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Sample records for carlo method mcnp4c

  1. a New Method for Neutron Capture Therapy (nct) and Related Simulation by MCNP4C Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Mousavi; Alireza, Seyed; Ali, Taheri

    2010-01-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is enumerated as one of the most important methods for treatment of some strong maladies among cancers in medical science thus is unavoidable controlling and protecting instances in use of this science. Among of treatment instances of this maladies with use of nuclear medical science is use of neutron therapy that is one of the most important and effective methods in treatment of cancers. But whereas fast neutrons have too destroyer effects and also sake of protection against additional absorbed energy (absorbed dose) by tissue during neutron therapy and also naught damaging to rest of healthy tissues, should be measured absorbed energy by tissue accurately, because destroyer effects of fast neutrons is almost quintuple more than gamma photons. In this article for neutron therapy act of male's liver has been simulated a system by the Monte Carlo method (MCNP4C code) and also with use of analytical method, thus absorbed dose by this tissue has been obtained for sources with different energies accurately and has been compared results of this two methods together.

  2. Standard Neutron, Photon, and Electron Data Libraries for MCNP4C.

    2004-02-16

    Version 03 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. DLC-200/MCNPDATA is for use with Versions 4C and and 4C2 of the MCNP transport code. This data library provides a comprehensive set of cross sections for a wide range of radiation transport applications using the Monte Carlo code package CCC-700/MCNP4C. See Appendix G of the MCNP report LA-13709-M for information on the libraries and how to select specific nuclides for use in MCNP. Newer MCNP cross sections from LANLmore » are included in CCC-710/MCNP5.« less

  3. Calculation of the store house worker dose in a lost wax foundry using MCNP-4C.

    PubMed

    Alegría, Natalia; Legarda, Fernando; Herranz, Margarita; Idoeta, Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Lost wax casting is an industrial process which permits the transmutation into metal of models made in wax. The wax model is covered with a silicaceous shell of the required thickness and once this shell is built the set is heated and wax melted. Liquid metal is then cast into the shell replacing the wax. When the metal is cool, the shell is broken away in order to recover the metallic piece. In this process zircon sands are used for the preparation of the silicaceous shell. These sands have varying concentrations of natural radionuclides: 238U, 232Th and 235U together with their progenics. The zircon sand is distributed in bags of 50 kg, and 30 bags are on a pallet, weighing 1,500 kg. The pallets with the bags have dimensions 80 cm x 120 cm x 80 cm, and constitute the radiation source in this case. The only pathway of exposure to workers in the store house is external radiation. In this case there is no dust because the bags are closed and covered by plastic, the store house has a good ventilation rate and so radon accumulation is not possible. The workers do not touch with their hands the bags and consequently skin contamination will not take place. In this study all situations of external irradiation to the workers have been considered; transportation of the pallets from vehicle to store house, lifting the pallets to the shelf, resting of the stock on the shelf, getting down the pallets, and carrying the pallets to production area. Using MCNP-4C exposure situations have been simulated, considering that the source has a homogeneous composition, the minimum stock in the store house is constituted by 7 pallets, and the several distances between pallets and workers when they are at work. The photons flux obtained by MCNP-4C is multiplied by the conversion factor of Flux to Kerma for air by conversion factor to Effective Dose by Kerma unit, and by the number of emitted photons. Those conversion factors are obtained of ICRP 74 table 1 and table 17 respectively. This

  4. Performance of the MTR core with MOX fuel using the MCNP4C2 code.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Ismail; Albarhoum, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    The MCNP4C2 code was used to simulate the MTR-22 MW research reactor and perform the neutronic analysis for a new fuel namely: a MOX (U3O8&PuO2) fuel dispersed in an Al matrix for One Neutronic Trap (ONT) and Three Neutronic Traps (TNTs) in its core. Its new characteristics were compared to its original characteristics based on the U3O8-Al fuel. Experimental data for the neutronic parameters including criticality relative to the MTR-22 MW reactor for the original U3O8-Al fuel at nominal power were used to validate the calculated values and were found acceptable. The achieved results seem to confirm that the use of MOX fuel in the MTR-22 MW will not degrade the safe operational conditions of the reactor. In addition, the use of MOX fuel in the MTR-22 MW core leads to reduce the uranium fuel enrichment with (235)U and the amount of loaded (235)U in the core by about 34.84% and 15.21% for the ONT and TNTs cases, respectively. PMID:27213809

  5. Performance of the MTR core with MOX fuel using the MCNP4C2 code.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Ismail; Albarhoum, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    The MCNP4C2 code was used to simulate the MTR-22 MW research reactor and perform the neutronic analysis for a new fuel namely: a MOX (U3O8&PuO2) fuel dispersed in an Al matrix for One Neutronic Trap (ONT) and Three Neutronic Traps (TNTs) in its core. Its new characteristics were compared to its original characteristics based on the U3O8-Al fuel. Experimental data for the neutronic parameters including criticality relative to the MTR-22 MW reactor for the original U3O8-Al fuel at nominal power were used to validate the calculated values and were found acceptable. The achieved results seem to confirm that the use of MOX fuel in the MTR-22 MW will not degrade the safe operational conditions of the reactor. In addition, the use of MOX fuel in the MTR-22 MW core leads to reduce the uranium fuel enrichment with (235)U and the amount of loaded (235)U in the core by about 34.84% and 15.21% for the ONT and TNTs cases, respectively.

  6. Calculations of the thermal and fast neutron fluxes in the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor using the MCNP-4C code.

    PubMed

    Khattab, K; Sulieman, I

    2009-04-01

    The MCNP-4C code, based on the probabilistic approach, was used to model the 3D configuration of the core of the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR). The continuous energy neutron cross sections from the ENDF/B-VI library were used to calculate the thermal and fast neutron fluxes in the inner and outer irradiation sites of MNSR. The thermal fluxes in the MNSR inner irradiation sites were also measured experimentally by the multiple foil activation method ((197)Au (n, gamma) (198)Au and (59)Co (n, gamma) (60)Co). The foils were irradiated simultaneously in each of the five MNSR inner irradiation sites to measure the thermal neutron flux and the epithermal index in each site. The calculated and measured results agree well.

  7. Monte Carlo method for calculating the radiation skyshine produced by electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Chaocheng; Li, Quanfeng; Chen, Huaibi; Du, Taibin; Cheng, Cheng; Tang, Chuanxiang; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Hui; Pei, Zhigang; Ming, Shenjin

    2005-06-01

    Using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code, the X-ray skyshine produced by 9 MeV, 15 MeV and 21 MeV electron linear accelerators were calculated respectively with a new two-step method combined with the split and roulette variance reduction technique. Results of the Monte Carlo simulation, the empirical formulas used for skyshine calculation and the dose measurements were analyzed and compared. In conclusion, the skyshine dose measurements agreed reasonably with the results computed by the Monte Carlo method, but deviated from computational results given by empirical formulas. The effect on skyshine dose caused by different structures of accelerator head is also discussed in this paper.

  8. Calculation of Absorbed Dose in Target Tissue and Equivalent Dose in Sensitive Tissues of Patients Treated by BNCT Using MCNP4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Pooya, S. M. Hosseini

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is used for treatment of many diseases, including brain tumors, in many medical centers. In this method, a target area (e.g., head of patient) is irradiated by some optimized and suitable neutron fields such as research nuclear reactors. Aiming at protection of healthy tissues which are located in the vicinity of irradiated tissue, and based on the ALARA principle, it is required to prevent unnecessary exposure of these vital organs. In this study, by using numerical simulation method (MCNP4C Code), the absorbed dose in target tissue and the equiavalent dose in different sensitive tissues of a patiant treated by BNCT, are calculated. For this purpose, we have used the parameters of MIRD Standard Phantom. Equiavelent dose in 11 sensitive organs, located in the vicinity of target, and total equivalent dose in whole body, have been calculated. The results show that the absorbed dose in tumor and normal tissue of brain equal to 30.35 Gy and 0.19 Gy, respectively. Also, total equivalent dose in 11 sensitive organs, other than tumor and normal tissue of brain, is equal to 14 mGy. The maximum equivalent doses in organs, other than brain and tumor, appear to the tissues of lungs and thyroid and are equal to 7.35 mSv and 3.00 mSv, respectively.

  9. A comparative study of the neutron flux spectra in the MNSR irradiation sites for the HEU and LEU cores using the MCNP4C code.

    PubMed

    Dawahra, S; Khattab, K; Saba, G

    2015-10-01

    A comparative study for fuel conversion from the HEU to LEU in the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) has been performed in this paper using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy and lethargy flux spectra in the first inner and outer irradiation sites of the MNSR reactor for the existing HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched) and the potential LEU fuels (U3Si2-Al, U3Si-Al, U9Mo-Al, 19.75% enriched and UO2, 12.6% enriched) were investigated using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy flux spectra for each group was calculated by dividing the neutron flux by the width of each energy group. The neutron flux spectra per unit lethargy was calculated by multiplying the neutron energy flux spectra for each energy group by the average energy of each group. The thermal neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.0 to 0.625 eV, the fast neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV for the existing HEU and potential LEU fuels. Good agreements have been noticed between the flux spectra for the potential LEU fuels and the existing HEU fuels with maximum relative differences less than 10% and 8% in the inner and outer irradiation sites.

  10. Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenet, Rémi

    2013-07-01

    Bayesian inference often requires integrating some function with respect to a posterior distribution. Monte Carlo methods are sampling algorithms that allow to compute these integrals numerically when they are not analytically tractable. We review here the basic principles and the most common Monte Carlo algorithms, among which rejection sampling, importance sampling and Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) methods. We give intuition on the theoretical justification of the algorithms as well as practical advice, trying to relate both. We discuss the application of Monte Carlo in experimental physics, and point to landmarks in the literature for the curious reader.

  11. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Koonin, S.E.; Dean, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, thermal behavior of {gamma}-soft nuclei, and calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. 87 refs.

  12. Modeling the effect in of criticality from changes in key parameters for small High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (U-BatteryTM) using MCNP4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    The neutron transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) which was wellkown as the gold standard in predicting nuclear reaction was used to model the small nuclear reactor core called "U-batteryTM", which was develop by the University of Manchester and Delft Institute of Technology. The paper introduces on the concept of modeling the small reactor core, a high temperature reactor (HTR) type with small coated TRISO fuel particle in graphite matrix using the MCNPv4C software. The criticality of the core were calculated using the software and analysed by changing key parameters such coolant type, fuel type and enrichment levels, cladding materials, and control rod type. The criticality results from the simulation were validated using the SCALE 5.1 software by [1] M Ding and J L Kloosterman, 2010. The data produced from these analyses would be used as part of the process of proposing initial core layout and a provisional list of materials for newly design reactor core. In the future, the criticality study would be continued with different core configurations and geometries.

  13. Monte Carlo methods in ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.B.

    1997-06-24

    Monte Carlo methods appropriate to simulate the transport of x-rays, neutrons, ion and electrons in Inertial Confinement Fusion targets are described and analyzed. The Implicit Monte Carlo method of x-ray transport handles symmetry within indirect drive ICF hohlraums well, but can be improved 50X in efficiency by angular biasing the x-rays towards the fuel capsule. Accurate simulation of thermonuclear burns nd burn diagnostics involves detailed particle source spectra, charged particle ranges, inflight reaction kinematics, corrections for bulk and thermal Doppler effects and variance reduction to obtain adequate statistics for rare events. It is found that the effects of angular Coulomb scattering must be included in models of charged particle transport through heterogeneous materials.

  14. Monte Carlo N Particle code - Dose distribution of clinical electron beams in inhomogeneous phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Nedaie, H. A.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Allahverdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Electron dose distributions calculated using the currently available analytical methods can be associated with large uncertainties. The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for dose calculation in electron beams. Most of the clinical electron beam simulation studies have been performed using non- MCNP [Monte Carlo N Particle] codes. Given the differences between Monte Carlo codes, this work aims to evaluate the accuracy of MCNP4C-simulated electron dose distributions in a homogenous phantom and around inhomogeneities. Different types of phantoms ranging in complexity were used; namely, a homogeneous water phantom and phantoms made of polymethyl methacrylate slabs containing different-sized, low- and high-density inserts of heterogeneous materials. Electron beams with 8 and 15 MeV nominal energy generated by an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator were investigated. Measurements were performed for a 10 cm × 10 cm applicator at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. Individual parts of the beam-defining system were introduced into the simulation one at a time in order to show their effect on depth doses. In contrast to the first scattering foil, the secondary scattering foil, X and Y jaws and applicator provide up to 5% of the dose. A 2%/2 mm agreement between MCNP and measurements was found in the homogenous phantom, and in the presence of heterogeneities in the range of 1-3%, being generally within 2% of the measurements for both energies in a "complex" phantom. A full-component simulation is necessary in order to obtain a realistic model of the beam. The MCNP4C results agree well with the measured electron dose distributions. PMID:23533162

  15. Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Gupta, R.; Wilson, K. G.; Umrigar, C.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive program to analyze critical systems using an Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method (IMCRG) being undertaken at LANL and Cornell is described. Here we first briefly review the method and then list some of the topics being investigated.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation for Neptun 10 PC medical linear accelerator and calculations of output factor for electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Momennezhad, Mehdi; Hashemi, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Aim Exact knowledge of dosimetric parameters is an essential pre-requisite of an effective treatment in radiotherapy. In order to fulfill this consideration, different techniques have been used, one of which is Monte Carlo simulation. Materials and methods This study used the MCNP-4Cb to simulate electron beams from Neptun 10 PC medical linear accelerator. Output factors for 6, 8 and 10 MeV electrons applied to eleven different conventional fields were both measured and calculated. Results The measurements were carried out by a Wellhofler-Scanditronix dose scanning system. Our findings revealed that output factors acquired by MCNP-4C simulation and the corresponding values obtained by direct measurements are in a very good agreement. Conclusion In general, very good consistency of simulated and measured results is a good proof that the goal of this work has been accomplished. PMID:24377010

  17. An enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Li, Peiwu; Mao, Jin; Ma, Fei; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qi

    2015-09-30

    Outlier detection is crucial in building a highly predictive model. In this study, we proposed an enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method by establishing cross-prediction models based on determinate normal samples and analyzing the distribution of prediction errors individually for dubious samples. One simulated and three real datasets were used to illustrate and validate the performance of our method, and the results indicated that this method outperformed Monte Carlo outlier detection in outlier diagnosis. After these outliers were removed, the value of validation by Kovats retention indices and the root mean square error of prediction decreased from 3.195 to 1.655, and the average cross-validation prediction error decreased from 2.0341 to 1.2780. This method helps establish a good model by eliminating outliers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Monte-Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code System.

    2007-08-31

    Version 00 MCB is a Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code for a general-purpose use to calculate a nuclide density time evolution with burnup or decay. It includes eigenvalue calculations of critical and subcritical systems as well as neutron transport calculations in fixed source mode or k-code mode to obtain reaction rates and energy deposition that are necessary for burnup calculations. The MCB-1C patch file and data packages as distributed by the NEADB are verymore » well organized and are being made available through RSICC as received. The RSICC package includes the MCB-1C patch and MCB data libraries. Installation of MCB requires MCNP4C source code and utility programs, which are not included in this MCB distribution. They were provided with the now obsolete CCC-700/MCNP-4C package.« less

  19. Monte Carlo Methods in the Physical Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Kalos, M H

    2007-06-06

    I will review the role that Monte Carlo methods play in the physical sciences. They are very widely used for a number of reasons: they permit the rapid and faithful transformation of a natural or model stochastic process into a computer code. They are powerful numerical methods for treating the many-dimensional problems that derive from important physical systems. Finally, many of the methods naturally permit the use of modern parallel computers in efficient ways. In the presentation, I will emphasize four aspects of the computations: whether or not the computation derives from a natural or model stochastic process; whether the system under study is highly idealized or realistic; whether the Monte Carlo methodology is straightforward or mathematically sophisticated; and finally, the scientific role of the computation.

  20. Path Integral Monte Carlo Methods for Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethan, Ethan; Dubois, Jonathan; Ceperley, David

    2014-03-01

    In general, Quantum Monte Carlo methods suffer from a sign problem when simulating fermionic systems. This causes the efficiency of a simulation to decrease exponentially with the number of particles and inverse temperature. To circumvent this issue, a nodal constraint is often implemented, restricting the Monte Carlo procedure from sampling paths that cause the many-body density matrix to change sign. Unfortunately, this high-dimensional nodal surface is not a priori known unless the system is exactly solvable, resulting in uncontrolled errors. We will discuss two possible routes to extend the applicability of finite-temperatue path integral Monte Carlo. First we extend the regime where signful simulations are possible through a novel permutation sampling scheme. Afterwards, we discuss a method to variationally improve the nodal surface by minimizing a free energy during simulation. Applications of these methods will include both free and interacting electron gases, concluding with discussion concerning extension to inhomogeneous systems. Support from DOE DE-FG52-09NA29456, DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL LDRD 10- ERD-058, and the Lawrence Scholar program.

  1. Monte Carlo methods to calculate impact probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, H.; Wiśniowski, T.; Wajer, P.; Gabryszewski, R.; Valsecchi, G. B.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Unraveling the events that took place in the solar system during the period known as the late heavy bombardment requires the interpretation of the cratered surfaces of the Moon and terrestrial planets. This, in turn, requires good estimates of the statistical impact probabilities for different source populations of projectiles, a subject that has received relatively little attention, since the works of Öpik (1951, Proc. R. Irish Acad. Sect. A, 54, 165) and Wetherill (1967, J. Geophys. Res., 72, 2429). Aims: We aim to work around the limitations of the Öpik and Wetherill formulae, which are caused by singularities due to zero denominators under special circumstances. Using modern computers, it is possible to make good estimates of impact probabilities by means of Monte Carlo simulations, and in this work, we explore the available options. Methods: We describe three basic methods to derive the average impact probability for a projectile with a given semi-major axis, eccentricity, and inclination with respect to a target planet on an elliptic orbit. One is a numerical averaging of the Wetherill formula; the next is a Monte Carlo super-sizing method using the target's Hill sphere. The third uses extensive minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID) calculations for a Monte Carlo sampling of potentially impacting orbits, along with calculations of the relevant interval for the timing of the encounter allowing collision. Numerical experiments are carried out for an intercomparison of the methods and to scrutinize their behavior near the singularities (zero relative inclination and equal perihelion distances). Results: We find an excellent agreement between all methods in the general case, while there appear large differences in the immediate vicinity of the singularities. With respect to the MOID method, which is the only one that does not involve simplifying assumptions and approximations, the Wetherill averaging impact probability departs by diverging toward

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, J.; Gandolfi, S.; Pederiva, F.; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, R.; Schmidt, K. E.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2015-09-09

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments, and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. The nuclear interactions and currents are reviewed along with a description of the continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit,more » and three-body interactions. A variety of results are presented, including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. Low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars are also described. Furthermore, a coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.« less

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Joseph A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Schmidt, K. E,; Wiringa, Robert B.

    2014-10-19

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-bodymore » interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.« less

  4. Discrete range clustering using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, G. B.; Sridhar, B.

    1993-01-01

    For automatic obstacle avoidance guidance during rotorcraft low altitude flight, a reliable model of the nearby environment is needed. Such a model may be constructed by applying surface fitting techniques to the dense range map obtained by active sensing using radars. However, for covertness, passive sensing techniques using electro-optic sensors are desirable. As opposed to the dense range map obtained via active sensing, passive sensing algorithms produce reliable range at sparse locations, and therefore, surface fitting techniques to fill the gaps in the range measurement are not directly applicable. Both for automatic guidance and as a display for aiding the pilot, these discrete ranges need to be grouped into sets which correspond to objects in the nearby environment. The focus of this paper is on using Monte Carlo methods for clustering range points into meaningful groups. One of the aims of the paper is to explore whether simulated annealing methods offer significant advantage over the basic Monte Carlo method for this class of problems. We compare three different approaches and present application results of these algorithms to a laboratory image sequence and a helicopter flight sequence.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.; Gandolfi, S.; Pederiva, F.; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, R.; Schmidt, K. E.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2015-09-09

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments, and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. The nuclear interactions and currents are reviewed along with a description of the continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. A variety of results are presented, including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. Low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars are also described. Furthermore, a coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  6. Monte Carlo methods in lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    The mass of the O/sup +/ glueball for SU(2) gauge theory in 4 dimensions is calculated. This computation was done on a prototype parallel processor and the implementation of gauge theories on this system is described in detail. Using an action of the purely Wilson form (tract of plaquette in the fundamental representation), results with high statistics are obtained. These results are not consistent with scaling according to the continuum renormalization group. Using actions containing higher representations of the group, a search is made for one which is closer to the continuum limit. The choice is based upon the phase structure of these extended theories and also upon the Migdal-Kadanoff approximation to the renormalizaiton group on the lattice. The mass of the O/sup +/ glueball for this improved action is obtained and the mass divided by the square root of the string tension is a constant as the lattice spacing is varied. The other topic studied is the inclusion of dynamical fermions into Monte Carlo calculations via the pseudo fermion technique. Monte Carlo results obtained with this method are compared with those from an exact algorithm based on Gauss-Seidel inversion. First applied were the methods to the Schwinger model and SU(3) theory.

  7. Recent Developments in Quantum Monte Carlo: Methods and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Austin, Brian; Domin, Dominik; Galek, Peter T. A.; Handy, Nicholas; Prasad, Rajendra; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Umezawa, Naoto; Lester, William A.

    2007-12-01

    The quantum Monte Carlo method in the diffusion Monte Carlo form has become recognized for its capability of describing the electronic structure of atomic, molecular and condensed matter systems to high accuracy. This talk will briefly outline the method with emphasis on recent developments connected with trial function construction, linear scaling, and applications to selected systems.

  8. Neutron transport calculations using Quasi-Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    1997-07-01

    This paper examines the use of quasirandom sequences of points in place of pseudorandom points in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. For two simple demonstration problems, the root mean square error, computed over a set of repeated runs, is found to be significantly less when quasirandom sequences are used ({open_quotes}Quasi-Monte Carlo Method{close_quotes}) than when a standard Monte Carlo calculation is performed using only pseudorandom points.

  9. Iterative acceleration methods for Monte Carlo and deterministic criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, T.J.

    1995-11-01

    If you have ever given up on a nuclear criticality calculation and terminated it because it took so long to converge, you might find this thesis of interest. The author develops three methods for improving the fission source convergence in nuclear criticality calculations for physical systems with high dominance ratios for which convergence is slow. The Fission Matrix Acceleration Method and the Fission Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (FDSA) Method are acceleration methods that speed fission source convergence for both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods. The third method is a hybrid Monte Carlo method that also converges for difficult problems where the unaccelerated Monte Carlo method fails. The author tested the feasibility of all three methods in a test bed consisting of idealized problems. He has successfully accelerated fission source convergence in both deterministic and Monte Carlo criticality calculations. By filtering statistical noise, he has incorporated deterministic attributes into the Monte Carlo calculations in order to speed their source convergence. He has used both the fission matrix and a diffusion approximation to perform unbiased accelerations. The Fission Matrix Acceleration method has been implemented in the production code MCNP and successfully applied to a real problem. When the unaccelerated calculations are unable to converge to the correct solution, they cannot be accelerated in an unbiased fashion. A Hybrid Monte Carlo method weds Monte Carlo and a modified diffusion calculation to overcome these deficiencies. The Hybrid method additionally possesses reduced statistical errors.

  10. Dosimetry at the Portuguese research reactor using thermoluminescence measurements and Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves, I C; Santos, J; Cardoso, J; Santos, L; Ferro Carvalho, A; Marques, J G; Kling, A; Ramalho, A J G; Osvay, M

    2006-01-01

    This work presents an extensive study on Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation and thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry for characterising mixed radiation fields (neutrons and photons) occurring in nuclear reactors. The feasibility of these methods is investigated for radiation fields at various locations of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI). The performance of the approaches developed in this work is compared with dosimetric techniques already existing at RPI. The Monte Carlo MCNP-4C code was used for a detailed modelling of the reactor core, the fast neutron beam and the thermal column of RPI. Simulations using these models allow to reproduce the energy and spatial distributions of the neutron field very well (agreement better than 80%). In the case of the photon field, the agreement improves with decreasing intensity of the component related to fission and activation products. (7)LiF:Mg,Ti, (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y TL detectors (TLDs) with low neutron sensitivity are able to determine photon dose and dose profiles with high spatial resolution. On the other hand, (nat)LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs with increased neutron sensitivity show a remarkable loss of sensitivity and a high supralinearity in high-intensity fields hampering their application at nuclear reactors.

  11. Vectorized Monte Carlo methods for reactor lattice analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, F. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the new computational methods and equivalent mathematical representations of physics models used in the MCV code, a vectorized continuous-enery Monte Carlo code for use on the CYBER-205 computer are discussed. While the principal application of MCV is the neutronics analysis of repeating reactor lattices, the new methods used in MCV should be generally useful for vectorizing Monte Carlo for other applications. For background, a brief overview of the vector processing features of the CYBER-205 is included, followed by a discussion of the fundamentals of Monte Carlo vectorization. The physics models used in the MCV vectorized Monte Carlo code are then summarized. The new methods used in scattering analysis are presented along with details of several key, highly specialized computational routines. Finally, speedups relative to CDC-7600 scalar Monte Carlo are discussed.

  12. An assessment of the MCNP4C weight window

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher N. Culbertson; John S. Hendricks

    1999-12-01

    A new, enhanced weight window generator suite has been developed for MCNP version 4C. The new generator correctly estimates importances in either a user-specified, geometry-independent, orthogonal grid or in MCNP geometric cells. The geometry-independent option alleviates the need to subdivide the MCNP cell geometry for variance reduction purposes. In addition, the new suite corrects several pathologies in the existing MCNP weight window generator. The new generator is applied in a set of five variance reduction problems. The improved generator is compared with the weight window generator applied in MCNP4B. The benefits of the new methodology are highlighted, along with a description of its limitations. The authors also provide recommendations for utilization of the weight window generator.

  13. COMPARISON OF MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR NONLINEAR RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. MARTIN; F. B. BROWN

    2001-03-01

    Five Monte Carlo methods for solving the nonlinear thermal radiation transport equations are compared. The methods include the well-known Implicit Monte Carlo method (IMC) developed by Fleck and Cummings, an alternative to IMC developed by Carter and Forest, an ''exact'' method recently developed by Ahrens and Larsen, and two methods recently proposed by Martin and Brown. The five Monte Carlo methods are developed and applied to the radiation transport equation in a medium assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Conservation of energy is derived and used to define appropriate material energy update equations for each of the methods. Details of the Monte Carlo implementation are presented, both for the random walk simulation and the material energy update. Simulation results for all five methods are obtained for two infinite medium test problems and a 1-D test problem, all of which have analytical solutions. Conclusions regarding the relative merits of the various schemes are presented.

  14. A Particle Population Control Method for Dynamic Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweezy, Jeremy; Nolen, Steve; Adams, Terry; Zukaitis, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    A general particle population control method has been derived from splitting and Russian Roulette for dynamic Monte Carlo particle transport. A well-known particle population control method, known as the particle population comb, has been shown to be a special case of this general method. This general method has been incorporated in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Monte Carlo Application Toolkit (MCATK) and examples of it's use are shown for both super-critical and sub-critical systems.

  15. Monte Carlo methods and applications in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods for studying few- and many-body quantum systems are introduced, with special emphasis given to their applications in nuclear physics. Variational and Green's function Monte Carlo methods are presented in some detail. The status of calculations of light nuclei is reviewed, including discussions of the three-nucleon-interaction, charge and magnetic form factors, the coulomb sum rule, and studies of low-energy radiative transitions. 58 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Perturbation Monte Carlo methods for tissue structure alterations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an extension of the perturbation Monte Carlo method to model light transport when the phase function is arbitrarily perturbed. Current perturbation Monte Carlo methods allow perturbation of both the scattering and absorption coefficients, however, the phase function can not be varied. The more complex method we develop and test here is not limited in this way. We derive a rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo extension that can be applied to a large family of important biomedical light transport problems and demonstrate its greater computational efficiency compared with using conventional Monte Carlo simulations to produce forward transport problem solutions. The gains of the perturbation method occur because only a single baseline Monte Carlo simulation is needed to obtain forward solutions to other closely related problems whose input is described by perturbing one or more parameters from the input of the baseline problem. The new perturbation Monte Carlo methods are tested using tissue light scattering parameters relevant to epithelia where many tumors originate. The tissue model has parameters for the number density and average size of three classes of scatterers; whole nuclei, organelles such as lysosomes and mitochondria, and small particles such as ribosomes or large protein complexes. When these parameters or the wavelength is varied the scattering coefficient and the phase function vary. Perturbation calculations give accurate results over variations of ∼15-25% of the scattering parameters.

  17. Application of biasing techniques to the contributon Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Dubi, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, a new Monte Carlo Method called the Contribution Monte Carlo Method was developed. The method is based on the theory of contributions, and uses a new receipe for estimating target responses by a volume integral over the contribution current. The analog features of the new method were discussed in previous publications. The application of some biasing methods to the new contribution scheme is examined here. A theoretical model is developed that enables an analytic prediction of the benefit to be expected when these biasing schemes are applied to both the contribution method and regular Monte Carlo. This model is verified by a variety of numerical experiments and is shown to yield satisfying results, especially for deep-penetration problems. Other considerations regarding the efficient use of the new method are also discussed, and remarks are made as to the application of other biasing methods. 14 figures, 1 tables.

  18. Observations on variational and projector Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Umrigar, C J

    2015-10-28

    Variational Monte Carlo and various projector Monte Carlo (PMC) methods are presented in a unified manner. Similarities and differences between the methods and choices made in designing the methods are discussed. Both methods where the Monte Carlo walk is performed in a discrete space and methods where it is performed in a continuous space are considered. It is pointed out that the usual prescription for importance sampling may not be advantageous depending on the particular quantum Monte Carlo method used and the observables of interest, so alternate prescriptions are presented. The nature of the sign problem is discussed for various versions of PMC methods. A prescription for an exact PMC method in real space, i.e., a method that does not make a fixed-node or similar approximation and does not have a finite basis error, is presented. This method is likely to be practical for systems with a small number of electrons. Approximate PMC methods that are applicable to larger systems and go beyond the fixed-node approximation are also discussed. PMID:26520496

  19. Observations on variational and projector Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umrigar, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Variational Monte Carlo and various projector Monte Carlo (PMC) methods are presented in a unified manner. Similarities and differences between the methods and choices made in designing the methods are discussed. Both methods where the Monte Carlo walk is performed in a discrete space and methods where it is performed in a continuous space are considered. It is pointed out that the usual prescription for importance sampling may not be advantageous depending on the particular quantum Monte Carlo method used and the observables of interest, so alternate prescriptions are presented. The nature of the sign problem is discussed for various versions of PMC methods. A prescription for an exact PMC method in real space, i.e., a method that does not make a fixed-node or similar approximation and does not have a finite basis error, is presented. This method is likely to be practical for systems with a small number of electrons. Approximate PMC methods that are applicable to larger systems and go beyond the fixed-node approximation are also discussed.

  20. Observations on variational and projector Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Umrigar, C. J.

    2015-10-28

    Variational Monte Carlo and various projector Monte Carlo (PMC) methods are presented in a unified manner. Similarities and differences between the methods and choices made in designing the methods are discussed. Both methods where the Monte Carlo walk is performed in a discrete space and methods where it is performed in a continuous space are considered. It is pointed out that the usual prescription for importance sampling may not be advantageous depending on the particular quantum Monte Carlo method used and the observables of interest, so alternate prescriptions are presented. The nature of the sign problem is discussed for various versions of PMC methods. A prescription for an exact PMC method in real space, i.e., a method that does not make a fixed-node or similar approximation and does not have a finite basis error, is presented. This method is likely to be practical for systems with a small number of electrons. Approximate PMC methods that are applicable to larger systems and go beyond the fixed-node approximation are also discussed.

  1. Frequency domain optical tomography using a Monte Carlo perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki

    2016-04-01

    A frequency domain Monte Carlo method is applied to near-infrared optical tomography, where an intensity-modulated light source with a given modulation frequency is used to reconstruct optical properties. The frequency domain reconstruction technique allows for better separation between the scattering and absorption properties of inclusions, even for ill-posed inverse problems, due to cross-talk between the scattering and absorption reconstructions. The frequency domain Monte Carlo calculation for light transport in an absorbing and scattering medium has thus far been analyzed mostly for the reconstruction of optical properties in simple layered tissues. This study applies a Monte Carlo calculation algorithm, which can handle complex-valued particle weights for solving a frequency domain transport equation, to optical tomography in two-dimensional heterogeneous tissues. The Jacobian matrix that is needed to reconstruct the optical properties is obtained by a first-order "differential operator" technique, which involves less variance than the conventional "correlated sampling" technique. The numerical examples in this paper indicate that the newly proposed Monte Carlo method provides reconstructed results for the scattering and absorption coefficients that compare favorably with the results obtained from conventional deterministic or Monte Carlo methods.

  2. Monte Carlo Form-Finding Method for Tensegrity Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cao, Yan-Ping

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a Monte Carlo-based approach to solve tensegrity form-finding problems. It uses a stochastic procedure to find the deterministic equilibrium configuration of a tensegrity structure. The suggested Monte Carlo form-finding (MCFF) method is highly efficient because it does not involve complicated matrix operations and symmetry analysis and it works for arbitrary initial configurations. Both regular and non-regular tensegrity problems of large scale can be solved. Some representative examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of this versatile method.

  3. Domain decomposition methods for a parallel Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Alme, H J; Rodrigue, G H; Zimmerman, G B

    1999-01-27

    Achieving parallelism in simulations that use Monte Carlo transport methods presents interesting challenges. For problems that require domain decomposition, load balance can be harder to achieve. The Monte Carlo transport package may have to operate with other packages that have different optimal domain decompositions for a given problem. To examine some of these issues, we have developed a code that simulates the interaction of a laser with biological tissue; it uses a Monte Carlo method to simulate the laser and a finite element model to simulate the conduction of the temperature field in the tissue. We will present speedup and load balance results obtained for a suite of problems decomposed using a few domain decomposition algorithms we have developed.

  4. Multiple-time-stepping generalized hybrid Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, Bruno; Akhmatskaya, Elena; Reich, Sebastian; Azpiroz, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    Performance of the generalized shadow hybrid Monte Carlo (GSHMC) method [1], which proved to be superior in sampling efficiency over its predecessors [2–4], molecular dynamics and hybrid Monte Carlo, can be further improved by combining it with multi-time-stepping (MTS) and mollification of slow forces. We demonstrate that the comparatively simple modifications of the method not only lead to better performance of GSHMC itself but also allow for beating the best performed methods, which use the similar force splitting schemes. In addition we show that the same ideas can be successfully applied to the conventional generalized hybrid Monte Carlo method (GHMC). The resulting methods, MTS-GHMC and MTS-GSHMC, provide accurate reproduction of thermodynamic and dynamical properties, exact temperature control during simulation and computational robustness and efficiency. MTS-GHMC uses a generalized momentum update to achieve weak stochastic stabilization to the molecular dynamics (MD) integrator. MTS-GSHMC adds the use of a shadow (modified) Hamiltonian to filter the MD trajectories in the HMC scheme. We introduce a new shadow Hamiltonian formulation adapted to force-splitting methods. The use of such Hamiltonians improves the acceptance rate of trajectories and has a strong impact on the sampling efficiency of the method. Both methods were implemented in the open-source MD package ProtoMol and were tested on a water and a protein systems. Results were compared to those obtained using a Langevin Molly (LM) method [5] on the same systems. The test results demonstrate the superiority of the new methods over LM in terms of stability, accuracy and sampling efficiency. This suggests that putting the MTS approach in the framework of hybrid Monte Carlo and using the natural stochasticity offered by the generalized hybrid Monte Carlo lead to improving stability of MTS and allow for achieving larger step sizes in the simulation of complex systems.

  5. Quantifying the effect of anode surface roughness on diagnostic x-ray spectra using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mehranian, A.; Ay, M. R.; Alam, N. Riyahi; Zaidi, H.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The accurate prediction of x-ray spectra under typical conditions encountered in clinical x-ray examination procedures and the assessment of factors influencing them has been a long-standing goal of the diagnostic radiology and medical physics communities. In this work, the influence of anode surface roughness on diagnostic x-ray spectra is evaluated using MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: An image-based modeling method was used to create realistic models from surface-cracked anodes. An in-house computer program was written to model the geometric pattern of cracks and irregularities from digital images of focal track surface in order to define the modeled anodes into MCNP input file. To consider average roughness and mean crack depth into the models, the surface of anodes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. It was found that the average roughness (R{sub a}) in the most aged tube studied is about 50 {mu}m. The correctness of MCNP4C in simulating diagnostic x-ray spectra was thoroughly verified by calling its Gaussian energy broadening card and comparing the simulated spectra with experimentally measured ones. The assessment of anode roughness involved the comparison of simulated spectra in deteriorated anodes with those simulated in perfectly plain anodes considered as reference. From these comparisons, the variations in output intensity, half value layer (HVL), heel effect, and patient dose were studied. Results: An intensity loss of 4.5% and 16.8% was predicted for anodes aged by 5 and 50 {mu}m deep cracks (50 kVp, 6 deg. target angle, and 2.5 mm Al total filtration). The variations in HVL were not significant as the spectra were not hardened by more than 2.5%; however, the trend for this variation was to increase with roughness. By deploying several point detector tallies along the anode-cathode direction and averaging exposure over them, it was found that for a 6 deg. anode, roughened by 50 {mu}m deep

  6. Bayesian Monte Carlo Method for Nuclear Data Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, A.J.

    2015-01-15

    A Bayesian Monte Carlo method is outlined which allows a systematic evaluation of nuclear reactions using TALYS. The result will be either an EXFOR-weighted covariance matrix or a collection of random files, each accompanied by an experiment based weight.

  7. Shifted-Contour Monte Carlo Method for Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitcheva, G.S.; Dean, D.J.

    2004-09-13

    We propose a new approach for alleviating the 'sign' problem in the nuclear shell model Monte Carlo method. The approach relies on modifying the integration contour of the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to pass through an imaginary stationary point in the auxiliary-field associated with the Hartree-Fock density.

  8. Monte Carlo method for magnetic impurities in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, J. E.; Fye, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a Monte Carlo algorithm to study properties of dilute magnetic alloys; the method can treat a small number of magnetic impurities interacting wiith the conduction electrons in a metal. Results for the susceptibility of a single Anderson impurity in the symmetric case show the expected universal behavior at low temperatures. Some results for two Anderson impurities are also discussed.

  9. Bayesian methods, maximum entropy, and quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Gubernatis, J.E.; Silver, R.N. ); Jarrell, M. )

    1991-01-01

    We heuristically discuss the application of the method of maximum entropy to the extraction of dynamical information from imaginary-time, quantum Monte Carlo data. The discussion emphasizes the utility of a Bayesian approach to statistical inference and the importance of statistically well-characterized data. 14 refs.

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R. B.; Physics

    2008-01-01

    A major goal in nuclear physics is to understand how nuclear binding, structure, and reactions can be described from the underlying interactions between individual nucleons. We want to compute the properties of an A-nucleon system as an A-body problem with free-space nuclear interactions that describe nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering and the two-nucleon bound-state. Properties of interest for a given nucleus include the ground-state binding energy, excitation spectrum, one- and two-nucleon density and momentum distributions, electromagnetic moments and transitions. They also wish to describe the interactions of nuclei with electrons, neutrinos, pions, nucleons, and other nuclei. Such calculations can provide a standard of comparison to test whether sub-nucleonic effects, such as explicit quark degrees of freedom, must be invoked to explain an observed phenomenon. they can also be used to evaluate nuclear matrix elements needed for some test of the standard model, and to predict reaction rates that are difficult or impossible to measure in the laboratory. For example, all the astrophysical reactions that contribute to the Big Bang or to solar energy production should be amenable to such ab initio calculations. To achieve this goal, they must both determine reasonable Hamiltonians to be used and devise reliable many-body methods to evaluate them. Significant progress has been made in the past decade on both fronts, with the development of a number of potential models that accurately reproduce NN elastic scattering data, and a variety of advanced many-body methods. In practice, to reproduce experimental energies and transitions, it appears necessary to add many-nucleon forces to the Hamiltonian and electroweak charge and current operators beyond the basic single-nucleon terms. While testing their interactions and currents against experiment, it is also important to test the many-body methods against each other to ensure that any approximations made are not biasing the

  11. Monte Carlo methods for multidimensional integration for European option pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, V.; Dimov, I. T.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we illustrate examples of highly accurate Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo methods for multiple integrals related to the evaluation of European style options. The idea is that the value of the option is formulated in terms of the expectation of some random variable; then the average of independent samples of this random variable is used to estimate the value of the option. First we obtain an integral representation for the value of the option using the risk neutral valuation formula. Then with an appropriations change of the constants we obtain a multidimensional integral over the unit hypercube of the corresponding dimensionality. Then we compare a specific type of lattice rules over one of the best low discrepancy sequence of Sobol for numerical integration. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods are compared with Adaptive and Crude Monte Carlo techniques for solving the problem. The four approaches are completely different thus it is a question of interest to know which one of them outperforms the other for evaluation multidimensional integrals in finance. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of the developed algorithms are discussed.

  12. Bayesian Monte Carlo method for nuclear data evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koning, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    A Bayesian Monte Carlo method is outlined which allows a systematic evaluation of nuclear reactions using the nuclear model code TALYS and the experimental nuclear reaction database EXFOR. The method is applied to all nuclides at the same time. First, the global predictive power of TALYS is numerically assessed, which enables to set the prior space of nuclear model solutions. Next, the method gradually zooms in on particular experimental data per nuclide, until for each specific target nuclide its existing experimental data can be used for weighted Monte Carlo sampling. To connect to the various different schools of uncertainty propagation in applied nuclear science, the result will be either an EXFOR-weighted covariance matrix or a collection of random files, each accompanied by the EXFOR-based weight.

  13. A surrogate accelerated multicanonical Monte Carlo method for uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Keyi; Li, Jinglai

    2016-09-01

    In this work we consider a class of uncertainty quantification problems where the system performance or reliability is characterized by a scalar parameter y. The performance parameter y is random due to the presence of various sources of uncertainty in the system, and our goal is to estimate the probability density function (PDF) of y. We propose to use the multicanonical Monte Carlo (MMC) method, a special type of adaptive importance sampling algorithms, to compute the PDF of interest. Moreover, we develop an adaptive algorithm to construct local Gaussian process surrogates to further accelerate the MMC iterations. With numerical examples we demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve several orders of magnitudes of speedup over the standard Monte Carlo methods.

  14. Monte Carlo Methods in ICF (LIRPP Vol. 13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, George B.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo methods appropriate to simulate the transport of x-rays, neutrons, ions and electrons in Inertial Confinement Fusion targets are described and analyzed. The Implicit Monte Carlo method of x-ray transport handles symmetry within indirect drive ICF hohlraums well, but can be improved SOX in efficiency by angular biasing the x-rays towards the fuel capsule. Accurate simulation of thermonuclear burn and burn diagnostics involves detailed particle source spectra, charged particle ranges, inflight reaction kinematics, corrections for bulk and thermal Doppler effects and variance reduction to obtain adequate statistics for rare events. It is found that the effects of angular Coulomb scattering must be included in models of charged particle transport through heterogeneous materials.

  15. EchoSeed Model 6733 Iodine-125 brachytherapy source: Improved dosimetric characterization using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Hadad, K.; Faghihi, R.; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, M.; Naghshnezhad, Z.; Meigooni, A. S.

    2012-08-15

    This study primarily aimed to obtain the dosimetric characteristics of the Model 6733 {sup 125}I seed (EchoSeed) with improved precision and accuracy using a more up-to-date Monte-Carlo code and data (MCNP5) compared to previously published results, including an uncertainty analysis. Its secondary aim was to compare the results obtained using the MCNP5, MCNP4c2, and PTRAN codes for simulation of this low-energy photon-emitting source. The EchoSeed geometry and chemical compositions together with a published {sup 125}I spectrum were used to perform dosimetric characterization of this source as per the updated AAPM TG-43 protocol. These simulations were performed in liquid water material in order to obtain the clinically applicable dosimetric parameters for this source model. Dose rate constants in liquid water, derived from MCNP4c2 and MCNP5 simulations, were found to be 0.993 cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} ({+-}1.73%) and 0.965 cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} ({+-}1.68%), respectively. Overall, the MCNP5 derived radial dose and 2D anisotropy functions results were generally closer to the measured data (within {+-}4%) than MCNP4c and the published data for PTRAN code (Version 7.43), while the opposite was seen for dose rate constant. The generally improved MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation may be attributed to a more recent and accurate cross-section library. However, some of the data points in the results obtained from the above-mentioned Monte Carlo codes showed no statistically significant differences. Derived dosimetric characteristics in liquid water are provided for clinical applications of this source model.

  16. A new lattice Monte Carlo method for simulating dielectric inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaozheng; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Nakamura, Issei

    We present a new lattice Monte Carlo method for simulating systems involving dielectric contrast between different species by modifying an algorithm originally proposed by Maggs et al. The original algorithm is known to generate attractive interactions between particles that have different dielectric constant than the solvent. Here we show that such attractive force is spurious, arising from incorrectly biased statistical weight caused by the particle motion during the Monte Carlo moves. We propose a new, simple algorithm to resolve this erroneous sampling. We demonstrate the application of our algorithm by simulating an uncharged polymer in a solvent with different dielectric constant. Further, we show that the electrostatic fields in ionic crystals obtained from our simulations with a relatively small simulation box correspond well with results from the analytical solution. Thus, our Monte Carlo method avoids the need for the Ewald summation in conventional simulation methods for charged systems. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474112 and 21404103). We are grateful to Computing Center of Jilin Province for essential support.

  17. Extension of the fully coupled Monte Carlo/S sub N response matrix method to problems including upscatter and fission

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.S.; Filippone, W.F. . Dept. of Nuclear and Energy Engineering); Alcouffe, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The neutron transport equation is solved by a hybrid method that iteratively couples regions where deterministic (S{sub N}) and stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods are applied. Unlike previous hybrid methods, the Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are fully coupled in the sense that no assumption is made about geometrical separation of decoupling. The fully coupled Monte Carlo/S{sub N} technique consists of defining spatial and/or energy regions of a problem in which either a Monte Carlo calculation or an S{sub N} calculation is to be performed. The Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are then connected through the common angular boundary fluxes, which are determined iteratively using the response matrix technique, and group sources. The hybrid method provides a new method of solving problems involving both optically thick and optically thin regions that neither Monte Carlo nor S{sub N} is well suited for by itself. The fully coupled Monte Carlo/S{sub N} method has been implemented in the S{sub N} code TWODANT by adding special-purpose Monte Carlo subroutines to calculate the response matrices and group sources, and linkage subroutines to carry out the interface flux iterations. The common angular boundary fluxes are included in the S{sub N} code as interior boundary sources, leaving the logic for the solution of the transport flux unchanged, while, with minor modifications, the diffusion synthetic accelerator remains effective in accelerating the S{sub N} calculations. The Monte Carlo routines have been successfully vectorized, with approximately a factor of five increases in speed over the nonvectorized version. The hybrid method is capable of solving forward, inhomogeneous source problems in X-Y and R-Z geometries. This capability now includes mulitigroup problems involving upscatter and fission in non-highly multiplying systems. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Monte Carlo determination of the conversion coefficients Hp(3)/Ka in a right cylinder phantom with 'PENELOPE' code. Comparison with 'MCNP' simulations.

    PubMed

    Daures, J; Gouriou, J; Bordy, J M

    2011-03-01

    This work has been performed within the frame of the European Union ORAMED project (Optimisation of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff). The main goal of the project is to improve standards of protection for medical staff for procedures resulting in potentially high exposures and to develop methodologies for better assessing and for reducing, exposures to medical staff. The Work Package WP2 is involved in the development of practical eye-lens dosimetry in interventional radiology. This study is complementary of the part of the ENEA report concerning the calculations with the MCNP-4C code of the conversion factors related to the operational quantity H(p)(3). In this study, a set of energy- and angular-dependent conversion coefficients (H(p)(3)/K(a)), in the newly proposed square cylindrical phantom made of ICRU tissue, have been calculated with the Monte-Carlo code PENELOPE and MCNP5. The H(p)(3) values have been determined in terms of absorbed dose, according to the definition of this quantity, and also with the kerma approximation as formerly reported in ICRU reports. At a low-photon energy (up to 1 MeV), the two results obtained with the two methods are consistent. Nevertheless, large differences are showed at a higher energy. This is mainly due to the lack of electronic equilibrium, especially for small angle incidences. The values of the conversion coefficients obtained with the MCNP-4C code published by ENEA quite agree with the kerma approximation calculations obtained with PENELOPE. We also performed the same calculations with the code MCNP5 with two types of tallies: F6 for kerma approximation and *F8 for estimating the absorbed dose that is, as known, due to secondary electrons. PENELOPE and MCNP5 results agree for the kerma approximation and for the absorbed dose calculation of H(p)(3) and prove that, for photon energies larger than 1 MeV, the transport of the secondary electrons has to be taken into account.

  19. MONTE CARLO RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMICS WITH IMPLICIT METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Nathaniel; Kasen, Daniel

    2015-03-15

    We explore the application of Monte Carlo transport methods to solving coupled radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD) problems. We use a time-dependent, frequency-dependent, three-dimensional radiation transport code that is special relativistic and includes some detailed microphysical interactions such as resonant line scattering. We couple the transport code to two different one-dimensional (non-relativistic) hydrodynamics solvers: a spherical Lagrangian scheme and a Eulerian Godunov solver. The gas–radiation energy coupling is treated implicitly, allowing us to take hydrodynamical time-steps that are much longer than the radiative cooling time. We validate the code and assess its performance using a suite of radiation hydrodynamical test problems, including ones in the radiation energy dominated regime. We also develop techniques that reduce the noise of the Monte Carlo estimated radiation force by using the spatial divergence of the radiation pressure tensor. The results suggest that Monte Carlo techniques hold promise for simulating the multi-dimensional RHD of astrophysical systems.

  20. Fast and accurate Monte Carlo modeling of a kilovoltage X-ray therapy unit using a photon-source approximation for treatment planning in complex media

    PubMed Central

    Zeinali-Rafsanjani, B.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Faghihi, R.; Karbasi, S.; Mosalaei, A.

    2015-01-01

    To accurately recompute dose distributions in chest-wall radiotherapy with 120 kVp kilovoltage X-rays, an MCNP4C Monte Carlo model is presented using a fast method that obviates the need to fully model the tube components. To validate the model, half-value layer (HVL), percentage depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles were measured. Dose measurements were performed for a more complex situation using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) placed within a Rando phantom. The measured and computed first and second HVLs were 3.8, 10.3 mm Al and 3.8, 10.6 mm Al, respectively. The differences between measured and calculated PDDs and beam profiles in water were within 2 mm/2% for all data points. In the Rando phantom, differences for majority of data points were within 2%. The proposed model offered an approximately 9500-fold reduced run time compared to the conventional full simulation. The acceptable agreement, based on international criteria, between the simulations and the measurements validates the accuracy of the model for its use in treatment planning and radiobiological modeling studies of superficial therapies including chest-wall irradiation using kilovoltage beam. PMID:26170553

  1. Improved criticality convergence via a modified Monte Carlo iteration method

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Thomas E; Gubernatis, James E

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear criticality calculations with Monte Carlo codes are normally done using a power iteration method to obtain the dominant eigenfunction and eigenvalue. In the last few years it has been shown that the power iteration method can be modified to obtain the first two eigenfunctions. This modified power iteration method directly subtracts out the second eigenfunction and thus only powers out the third and higher eigenfunctions. The result is a convergence rate to the dominant eigenfunction being |k{sub 3}|/k{sub 1} instead of |k{sub 2}|/k{sub 1}. One difficulty is that the second eigenfunction contains particles of both positive and negative weights that must sum somehow to maintain the second eigenfunction. Summing negative and positive weights can be done using point detector mechanics, but this sometimes can be quite slow. We show that an approximate cancellation scheme is sufficient to accelerate the convergence to the dominant eigenfunction. A second difficulty is that for some problems the Monte Carlo implementation of the modified power method has some stability problems. We also show that a simple method deals with this in an effective, but ad hoc manner.

  2. Condensed history Monte Carlo methods for photon transport problems

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Katherine; Spanier, Jerome

    2007-01-01

    We study methods for accelerating Monte Carlo simulations that retain most of the accuracy of conventional Monte Carlo algorithms. These methods – called Condensed History (CH) methods – have been very successfully used to model the transport of ionizing radiation in turbid systems. Our primary objective is to determine whether or not such methods might apply equally well to the transport of photons in biological tissue. In an attempt to unify the derivations, we invoke results obtained first by Lewis, Goudsmit and Saunderson and later improved by Larsen and Tolar. We outline how two of the most promising of the CH models – one based on satisfying certain similarity relations and the second making use of a scattering phase function that permits only discrete directional changes – can be developed using these approaches. The main idea is to exploit the connection between the space-angle moments of the radiance and the angular moments of the scattering phase function. We compare the results obtained when the two CH models studied are used to simulate an idealized tissue transport problem. The numerical results support our findings based on the theoretical derivations and suggest that CH models should play a useful role in modeling light-tissue interactions. PMID:18548128

  3. Direct simulation Monte Carlo method with a focal mechanism algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachman, Asep Nur; Chung, Tae Woong; Yoshimoto, Kazuo; Yun, Sukyoung

    2015-01-01

    To simulate the observation of the radiation pattern of an earthquake, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is modified by implanting a focal mechanism algorithm. We compare the results of the modified DSMC method (DSMC-2) with those of the original DSMC method (DSMC-1). DSMC-2 shows more or similarly reliable results compared to those of DSMC-1, for events with 12 or more recorded stations, by weighting twice for hypocentral distance of less than 80 km. Not only the number of stations, but also other factors such as rough topography, magnitude of event, and the analysis method influence the reliability of DSMC-2. The most reliable result by DSMC-2 is obtained by the best azimuthal coverage by the largest number of stations. The DSMC-2 method requires shorter time steps and a larger number of particles than those of DSMC-1 to capture a sufficient number of arrived particles in the small-sized receiver.

  4. Analysis of real-time networks with monte carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauclair, C.; Durrieu, G.

    2013-12-01

    Communication networks in embedded systems are ever more large and complex. A better understanding of the dynamics of these networks is necessary to use them at best and lower costs. Todays tools are able to compute upper bounds of end-to-end delays that a packet being sent through the network could suffer. However, in the case of asynchronous networks, those worst end-to-end delay (WEED) cases are rarely observed in practice or through simulations due to the scarce situations that lead to worst case scenarios. A novel approach based on Monte Carlo methods is suggested to study the effects of the asynchrony on the performances.

  5. Application of Monte Carlo methods in tomotherapy and radiation biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Ya-Yun

    Helical tomotherapy is an attractive treatment for cancer therapy because highly conformal dose distributions can be achieved while the on-board megavoltage CT provides simultaneous images for accurate patient positioning. The convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation methods typically used for Tomotherapy treatment planning may overestimate skin (superficial) doses by 3-13%. Although more accurate than C/S methods, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are too slow for routine clinical treatment planning. However, the computational requirements of MC can be reduced by developing a source model for the parts of the accelerator that do not change from patient to patient. This source model then becomes the starting point for additional simulations of the penetration of radiation through patient. In the first section of this dissertation, a source model for a helical tomotherapy is constructed by condensing information from MC simulations into series of analytical formulas. The MC calculated percentage depth dose and beam profiles computed using the source model agree within 2% of measurements for a wide range of field sizes, which suggests that the proposed source model provides an adequate representation of the tomotherapy head for dose calculations. Monte Carlo methods are a versatile technique for simulating many physical, chemical and biological processes. In the second major of this thesis, a new methodology is developed to simulate of the induction of DNA damage by low-energy photons. First, the PENELOPE Monte Carlo radiation transport code is used to estimate the spectrum of initial electrons produced by photons. The initial spectrum of electrons are then combined with DNA damage yields for monoenergetic electrons from the fast Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) developed earlier by Semenenko and Stewart (Purdue University). Single- and double-strand break yields predicted by the proposed methodology are in good agreement (1%) with the results of published

  6. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Svatos, M M

    1998-09-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to prove the feasibility of basing electron depth dose calculations in a phantom on first-principles single scatter physics, in an amount of time that is equal to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The Macro Response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that are on the order of conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history, with the potential to be much faster. This is possible because MRMC is a Local-to-Global method, meaning the problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, in this case, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or "kugel" A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25 MeV - 8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 cm to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, where steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the library are taken through the global geometry. For each step, the appropriate PDFs from the MRMC library are sampled to determine the electron's new energy, position and trajectory. The electron is immediately advanced to the end of the step and then chooses another kugel to sample, which continues until transport is completed. The MRMC global stepping code was benchmarked as a series of subroutines inside of the Peregrine Monte Carlo code. It was compared to Peregrine's class II condensed history electron transport package, EGS4, and MCNP for depth dose in simple phantoms having density inhomogeneities. Since the kugels completed in the library were of relatively small size, the zoning of the phantoms was scaled down from a clinical size, so that the energy deposition algorithms for spreading dose across 5-10 zones per kugel could be tested. Most

  7. Diagrammatic Monte Carlo Method for Many-Polaron Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Andrey S.; Nagaosa, Naoto; Prokof'ev, Nikolay

    2014-10-01

    We introduce the first bold diagrammatic Monte Carlo approach to deal with polaron problems at a finite electron density nonperturbatively, i.e., by including vertex corrections to high orders. Using the Holstein model on a square lattice as a prototypical example, we demonstrate that our method is capable of providing accurate results in the thermodynamic limit in all regimes from a renormalized Fermi liquid to a single polaron, across the nonadiabatic region where Fermi and Debye energies are of the same order of magnitude. By accounting for vertex corrections, the accuracy of the theoretical description is increased by orders of magnitude relative to the lowest-order self-consistent Born approximation employed in most studies. We also find that for the electron-phonon coupling typical for real materials, the quasiparticle effective mass increases and the quasiparticle residue decreases with increasing the electron density at constant electron-phonon coupling strength.

  8. Study on lidar received backscattering signals using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Yang, Kecheng; Ma, Yong; Lin, Jinzhang

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, an improved semi-analytic Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the lidar received backscattering signals. The H-G function is used to approximate the scattering phase function of seawater, from which we can derive the scattering angle directly, and a modified H-G function is used to calculate the probability of the photons received by the receiver at each scattering point, which greatly improves the accuracy of the simulation. The simulation result shows that the different parameters of air-sea system of lidar, such as lidar"s field of view, attenuation coefficient and single scattering albedo of seawater, greatly influence the lidar received backscattering signal waveform. Multiple scattering is studied to explain these phenomena.

  9. Grand-canonical Monte Carlo method for Donnan equilibria.

    PubMed

    Barr, S A; Panagiotopoulos, A Z

    2012-07-01

    We present a method that enables the direct simulation of Donnan equilibria. The method is based on a grand-canonical Monte Carlo scheme that properly accounts for the unequal partitioning of small ions on the two sides of a semipermeable membrane, and can be used to determine the Donnan electrochemical potential, osmotic pressure, and other system properties. Positive and negative ions are considered separately in the grand-canonical moves. This violates instantaneous charge neutrality, which is usually considered a prerequisite for simulations using the Ewald sum to compute the long-range charge-charge interactions. In this work, we show that if the system is neutral only in an average sense, it is still possible to get reliable results in grand-canonical simulations of electrolytes performed with Ewald summation of electrostatic interactions. We compare our Donnan method with a theory that accounts for differential partitioning of the salt, and find excellent agreement for the electrochemical potential, the osmotic pressure, and the salt concentrations on the two sides. We also compare our method with experimental results for a system of charged colloids confined by a semipermeable membrane and to a constant-NVT simulation method, which does not account for salt partitioning. Our results for the Donnan potential are much closer to the experimental results than the constant-NVT method, highlighting the important effect of salt partitioning on the Donnan potential. PMID:23005559

  10. Monte Carlo N-particle simulation of neutron-based sterilisation of anthrax contamination

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Xu, J; Liu, T; Ouyang, X

    2012-01-01

    Objective To simulate the neutron-based sterilisation of anthrax contamination by Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) 4C code. Methods Neutrons are elementary particles that have no charge. They are 20 times more effective than electrons or γ-rays in killing anthrax spores on surfaces and inside closed containers. Neutrons emitted from a 252Cf neutron source are in the 100 keV to 2 MeV energy range. A 2.5 MeV D–D neutron generator can create neutrons at up to 1013 n s−1 with current technology. All these enable an effective and low-cost method of killing anthrax spores. Results There is no effect on neutron energy deposition on the anthrax sample when using a reflector that is thicker than its saturation thickness. Among all three reflecting materials tested in the MCNP simulation, paraffin is the best because it has the thinnest saturation thickness and is easy to machine. The MCNP radiation dose and fluence simulation calculation also showed that the MCNP-simulated neutron fluence that is needed to kill the anthrax spores agrees with previous analytical estimations very well. Conclusion The MCNP simulation indicates that a 10 min neutron irradiation from a 0.5 g 252Cf neutron source or a 1 min neutron irradiation from a 2.5 MeV D–D neutron generator may kill all anthrax spores in a sample. This is a promising result because a 2.5 MeV D–D neutron generator output >1013 n s−1 should be attainable in the near future. This indicates that we could use a D–D neutron generator to sterilise anthrax contamination within several seconds. PMID:22573293

  11. Underwater Optical Wireless Channel Modeling Using Monte-Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, P. Sri; Prince, Shanthi

    2011-10-01

    At present, there is a lot of interest in the functioning of the marine environment. Unmanned or Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (UUVs or AUVs) are used in the exploration of the underwater resources, pollution monitoring, disaster prevention etc. Underwater, where radio waves do not propagate, acoustic communication is being used. But, underwater communication is moving towards Optical Communication which has higher bandwidth when compared to Acoustic Communication but has shorter range comparatively. Underwater Optical Wireless Communication (OWC) is mainly affected by the absorption and scattering of the optical signal. In coastal waters, both inherent and apparent optical properties (IOPs and AOPs) are influenced by a wide array of physical, biological and chemical processes leading to optical variability. The scattering effect has two effects: the attenuation of the signal and the Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI) of the signal. However, the Inter-Symbol Interference is ignored in the present paper. Therefore, in order to have an efficient underwater OWC link it is necessary to model the channel efficiently. In this paper, the underwater optical channel is modeled using Monte-Carlo method. The Monte Carlo approach provides the most general and most flexible technique for numerically solving the equations of Radiative transfer. The attenuation co-efficient of the light signal is studied as a function of the absorption (a) and scattering (b) coefficients. It has been observed that for pure sea water and for less chlorophyll conditions blue wavelength is less absorbed whereas for chlorophyll rich environment red wavelength signal is absorbed less comparative to blue and green wavelength.

  12. A modified Monte Carlo 'local importance function transform' method

    SciTech Connect

    Keady, K. P.; Larsen, E. W.

    2013-07-01

    The Local Importance Function Transform (LIFT) method uses an approximation of the contribution transport problem to bias a forward Monte-Carlo (MC) source-detector simulation [1-3]. Local (cell-based) biasing parameters are calculated from an inexpensive deterministic adjoint solution and used to modify the physics of the forward transport simulation. In this research, we have developed a new expression for the LIFT biasing parameter, which depends on a cell-average adjoint current to scalar flux (J{sup *}/{phi}{sup *}) ratio. This biasing parameter differs significantly from the original expression, which uses adjoint cell-edge scalar fluxes to construct a finite difference estimate of the flux derivative; the resulting biasing parameters exhibit spikes in magnitude at material discontinuities, causing the original LIFT method to lose efficiency in problems with high spatial heterogeneity. The new J{sup *}/{phi}{sup *} expression, while more expensive to obtain, generates biasing parameters that vary smoothly across the spatial domain. The result is an improvement in simulation efficiency. A representative test problem has been developed and analyzed to demonstrate the advantage of the updated biasing parameter expression with regards to solution figure of merit (FOM). For reference, the two variants of the LIFT method are compared to a similar variance reduction method developed by Depinay [4, 5], as well as MC with deterministic adjoint weight windows (WW). (authors)

  13. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods: an introductory example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauenberg, Katy; Elster, Clemens

    2016-02-01

    When the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and methods from its supplements are not applicable, the Bayesian approach may be a valid and welcome alternative. Evaluating the posterior distribution, estimates or uncertainties involved in Bayesian inferences often requires numerical methods to avoid high-dimensional integrations. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling is such a method—powerful, flexible and widely applied. Here, a concise introduction is given, illustrated by a simple, typical example from metrology. The Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is the most basic and yet flexible MCMC method. Its underlying concepts are explained and the algorithm is given step by step. The few lines of software code required for its implementation invite interested readers to get started. Diagnostics to evaluate the performance and common algorithmic choices are illustrated to calibrate the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for efficiency. Routine application of MCMC algorithms may be hindered currently by the difficulty to assess the convergence of MCMC output and thus to assure the validity of results. An example points to the importance of convergence and initiates discussion about advantages as well as areas of research. Available software tools are mentioned throughout.

  14. MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO POSTERIOR SAMPLING WITH THE HAMILTONIAN METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    K. HANSON

    2001-02-01

    The Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique provides a means for drawing random samples from a target probability density function (pdf). MCMC allows one to assess the uncertainties in a Bayesian analysis described by a numerically calculated posterior distribution. This paper describes the Hamiltonian MCMC technique in which a momentum variable is introduced for each parameter of the target pdf. In analogy to a physical system, a Hamiltonian H is defined as a kinetic energy involving the momenta plus a potential energy {var_phi}, where {var_phi} is minus the logarithm of the target pdf. Hamiltonian dynamics allows one to move along trajectories of constant H, taking large jumps in the parameter space with relatively few evaluations of {var_phi} and its gradient. The Hamiltonian algorithm alternates between picking a new momentum vector and following such trajectories. The efficiency of the Hamiltonian method for multidimensional isotropic Gaussian pdfs is shown to remain constant at around 7% for up to several hundred dimensions. The Hamiltonian method handles correlations among the variables much better than the standard Metropolis algorithm. A new test, based on the gradient of {var_phi}, is proposed to measure the convergence of the MCMC sequence.

  15. An automated variance reduction method for global Monte Carlo neutral particle transport problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marc Andrew

    A method to automatically reduce the variance in global neutral particle Monte Carlo problems by using a weight window derived from a deterministic forward solution is presented. This method reduces a global measure of the variance of desired tallies and increases its associated figure of merit. Global deep penetration neutron transport problems present difficulties for analog Monte Carlo. When the scalar flux decreases by many orders of magnitude, so does the number of Monte Carlo particles. This can result in large statistical errors. In conjunction with survival biasing, a weight window is employed which uses splitting and Russian roulette to restrict the symbolic weights of Monte Carlo particles. By establishing a connection between the scalar flux and the weight window, two important concepts are demonstrated. First, such a weight window can be constructed from a deterministic solution of a forward transport problem. Also, the weight window will distribute Monte Carlo particles in such a way to minimize a measure of the global variance. For Implicit Monte Carlo solutions of radiative transfer problems, an inefficient distribution of Monte Carlo particles can result in large statistical errors in front of the Marshak wave and at its leading edge. Again, the global Monte Carlo method is used, which employs a time-dependent weight window derived from a forward deterministic solution. Here, the algorithm is modified to enhance the number of Monte Carlo particles in the wavefront. Simulations show that use of this time-dependent weight window significantly improves the Monte Carlo calculation.

  16. Treatment planning aspects and Monte Carlo methods in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Michael K.; Manser, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Over the last years, the interest in proton radiotherapy is rapidly increasing. Protons provide superior physical properties compared with conventional radiotherapy using photons. These properties result in depth dose curves with a large dose peak at the end of the proton track and the finite proton range allows sparing the distally located healthy tissue. These properties offer an increased flexibility in proton radiotherapy, but also increase the demand in accurate dose estimations. To carry out accurate dose calculations, first an accurate and detailed characterization of the physical proton beam exiting the treatment head is necessary for both currently available delivery techniques: scattered and scanned proton beams. Since Monte Carlo (MC) methods follow the particle track simulating the interactions from first principles, this technique is perfectly suited to accurately model the treatment head. Nevertheless, careful validation of these MC models is necessary. While for the dose estimation pencil beam algorithms provide the advantage of fast computations, they are limited in accuracy. In contrast, MC dose calculation algorithms overcome these limitations and due to recent improvements in efficiency, these algorithms are expected to improve the accuracy of the calculated dose distributions and to be introduced in clinical routine in the near future.

  17. Cluster growth processes by direct simulation monte carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuseki, H.; Jin, Y.; Kawazoe, Y.; Wille, L. T.

    Thin films obtained by cluster deposition have attracted strong attention both as a new manufacturing technique to realize high-density magnetic recording media and to create systems with unique magnetic properties. Because the film's features are influenced by the cluster properties during the flight path, the relevant physical scale to be studied is as large as centimeters. In this paper, a new model of cluster growth processes based on a combination of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method and the cluster growth model is introduced to examine the effects of experimental conditions on cluster growth by an adiabatic expansion process. From the macroscopic viewpoint, we simulate the behavior of clusters and inert gas in the flight path under different experimental conditions. The internal energy of the cluster, which consists of rotational and vibrational energies, is limited by the binding energy which depends on the cluster size. These internal and binding energies are used as criteria of the cluster growth. The binding energy is estimated by surface and volume terms. Several types of size distribution of generated clusters under various conditions are obtained by the present model. The results of the present numerical simulations reveal that the size distribution is strongly related to the experimental conditions and can be controlled.

  18. Medical Imaging Image Quality Assessment with Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C. M.; Karpetas, G. E.; Fountos, G. P.; Kalyvas, N. I.; Martini, Niki; Koukou, Vaia; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess image quality of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction, with cluster computing. The PET scanner simulated in this study was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution (1MBq). Image quality was assessed in terms of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). MTF curves were estimated from transverse reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL algorithm. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using various subsets (3 to 21) and iterations (1 to 20), as well as by using various beta (hyper) parameter values. MTF values were found to increase up to the 12th iteration whereas remain almost constant thereafter. MTF improves by using lower beta values. The simulated PET evaluation method based on the TLC plane source can be also useful in research for the further development of PET and SPECT scanners though GATE simulations.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) [0.1981], 0.1895(9) [0.1874(4)], 0.1530(34) [0.1599(73)], 0.1664(37) [0.1724(110)], 0.1613(43) [0.1675(110)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) [0.0203(12)], 0.0188(10) [0.0220(21)], 0.0247(8) [0.0310(12)], 0.0253(8) [0.0351(8)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  1. Latent uncertainties of the precalculated track Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, Marc-André; Seuntjens, Jan; Roberge, David

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: While significant progress has been made in speeding up Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation methods, they remain too time-consuming for the purpose of inverse planning. To achieve clinically usable calculation speeds, a precalculated Monte Carlo (PMC) algorithm for proton and electron transport was developed to run on graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm utilizes pregenerated particle track data from conventional MC codes for different materials such as water, bone, and lung to produce dose distributions in voxelized phantoms. While PMC methods have been described in the past, an explicit quantification of the latent uncertainty arising from the limited number of unique tracks in the pregenerated track bank is missing from the paper. With a proper uncertainty analysis, an optimal number of tracks in the pregenerated track bank can be selected for a desired dose calculation uncertainty. Methods: Particle tracks were pregenerated for electrons and protons using EGSnrc and GEANT4 and saved in a database. The PMC algorithm for track selection, rotation, and transport was implemented on the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) 4.0 programming framework. PMC dose distributions were calculated in a variety of media and compared to benchmark dose distributions simulated from the corresponding general-purpose MC codes in the same conditions. A latent uncertainty metric was defined and analysis was performed by varying the pregenerated track bank size and the number of simulated primary particle histories and comparing dose values to a “ground truth” benchmark dose distribution calculated to 0.04% average uncertainty in voxels with dose greater than 20% of D{sub max}. Efficiency metrics were calculated against benchmark MC codes on a single CPU core with no variance reduction. Results: Dose distributions generated using PMC and benchmark MC codes were compared and found to be within 2% of each other in voxels with dose values greater than 20% of

  2. Analytic And Monte Carlo Study Of The Perturbation Factor kp For A Standard Of Dw Through An Ka Standard Ionization Chamber BEV-CC01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Verdesoto, M. X.; Álvarez Romero, J. T.

    2003-09-01

    To characterize an ionization chamber BEV-CC01 as a standard of absorbed dose to water Dw at SSDL-Mexico, the approach developed by the BIPM for 60Co gamma radiation, [1] has been chosen. This requires the estimation of a factor kp, which stems from the perturbation introduced by the presence of the ionization chamber in the water phantom, and due to finite size of the cavity. This factor is the product of four terms: ψw,c, (μen/ρ)w,c, (1 + μ'.ȳ)w,c and kcav. Two independent determinations are accomplished using a combination of the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C in ITS mode [2,3] and analytic methods: one kp∥=1.1626 ± uc=: 0.90% for the chamber axis parallel to the beam axis; and another kp =1.1079± uc=0.89% for the chamber axis perpendicular to the beam axis. The variance reduction techniques: splitting-Russian roulette, source biasing and forced photon collisions are employed in the simulations to improve the calculation efficiency. The energy fluence for the 60Co housing-source Picker C/9 is obtained by realistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, it is verified by comparison of MC calculated and measured beam output air kerma factors, and percent depth dose curves in water, PDD. This spectrum is considered as input energy for a point source (74% is from primary photons and the rest 26% is from scattered radiation) in the determination of the kp factors. Details of the calculations are given together with the theoretical basis of the ionometric standard employed.

  3. Markov chain Monte Carlo posterior sampling with the Hamiltonian method.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Kenneth M.

    2001-01-01

    A major advantage of Bayesian data analysis is that provides a characterization of the uncertainty in the model parameters estimated from a given set of measurements in the form of a posterior probability distribution. When the analysis involves a complicated physical phenomenon, the posterior may not be available in analytic form, but only calculable by means of a simulation code. In such cases, the uncertainty in inferred model parameters requires characterization of a calculated functional. An appealing way to explore the posterior, and hence characterize the uncertainty, is to employ the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. The goal of MCMC is to generate a sequence random of parameter x samples from a target pdf (probability density function), {pi}(x). In Bayesian analysis, this sequence corresponds to a set of model realizations that follow the posterior distribution. There are two basic MCMC techniques. In Gibbs sampling, typically one parameter is drawn from the conditional pdf at a time, holding all others fixed. In the Metropolis algorithm, all the parameters can be varied at once. The parameter vector is perturbed from the current sequence point by adding a trial step drawn randomly from a symmetric pdf. The trial position is either accepted or rejected on the basis of the probability at the trial position relative to the current one. The Metropolis algorithm is often employed because of its simplicity. The aim of this work is to develop MCMC methods that are useful for large numbers of parameters, n, say hundreds or more. In this regime the Metropolis algorithm can be unsuitable, because its efficiency drops as 0.3/n. The efficiency is defined as the reciprocal of the number of steps in the sequence needed to effectively provide a statistically independent sample from {pi}.

  4. A multiple step random walk Monte Carlo method for heat conduction involving distributed heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraghi, M. H. N.; Chung, B. T. F.

    1982-06-01

    A multiple step fixed random walk Monte Carlo method for solving heat conduction in solids with distributed internal heat sources is developed. In this method, the probability that a walker reaches a point a few steps away is calculated analytically and is stored in the computer. Instead of moving to the immediate neighboring point the walker is allowed to jump several steps further. The present multiple step random walk technique can be applied to both conventional Monte Carlo and the Exodus methods. Numerical results indicate that the present method compares well with finite difference solutions while the computation speed is much faster than that of single step Exodus and conventional Monte Carlo methods.

  5. MODELING LEACHING OF VIRUSES BY THE MONTE CARLO METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A predictive screening model was developed for fate and transport
    of viruses in the unsaturated zone. A database of input parameters
    allowed Monte Carlo analysis with the model. The resulting kernel
    densities of predicted attenuation during percolation indicated very ...

  6. Evaluation of path-history-based fluorescence Monte Carlo method for photon migration in heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu; Deng, Yong; Luo, Zhaoyang; Wang, Kan; Lian, Lichao; Yang, Xiaoquan; Meglinski, Igor; Luo, Qingming

    2014-12-29

    The path-history-based fluorescence Monte Carlo method used for fluorescence tomography imaging reconstruction has attracted increasing attention. In this paper, we first validate the standard fluorescence Monte Carlo (sfMC) method by experimenting with a cylindrical phantom. Then, we describe a path-history-based decoupled fluorescence Monte Carlo (dfMC) method, analyze different perturbation fluorescence Monte Carlo (pfMC) methods, and compare the calculation accuracy and computational efficiency of the dfMC and pfMC methods using the sfMC method as a reference. The results show that the dfMC method is more accurate and efficient than the pfMC method in heterogeneous medium.

  7. CONTINUOUS-ENERGY MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR CALCULATING GENERALIZED RESPONSE SENSITIVITIES USING TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces a new approach for calculating sensitivity coefficients for generalized neutronic responses to nuclear data uncertainties using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. The approach presented in this paper, known as the GEAR-MC method, allows for the calculation of generalized sensitivity coefficients for multiple responses in a single Monte Carlo calculation with no nuclear data perturbations or knowledge of nuclear covariance data. The theory behind the GEAR-MC method is presented here, and proof of principle is demonstrated by using the GEAR-MC method to calculate sensitivity coefficients for responses in several 3D, continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications.

  8. A Residual Monte Carlo Method for Spatially Discrete, Angularly Continuous Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2012-06-19

    Residual Monte Carlo provides exponential convergence of statistical error with respect to the number of particle histories. In the past, residual Monte Carlo has been applied to a variety of angularly discrete radiation-transport problems. Here, we apply residual Monte Carlo to spatially discrete, angularly continuous transport. By maintaining angular continuity, our method avoids the deficiencies of angular discretizations, such as ray effects. For planar geometry and step differencing, we use the corresponding integral transport equation to calculate an angularly independent residual from the scalar flux in each stage of residual Monte Carlo. We then demonstrate that the resulting residual Monte Carlo method does indeed converge exponentially to within machine precision of the exact step differenced solution.

  9. Efficient, Automated Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rong; Ambrose, Martin; Spanier, Jerome

    2008-11-20

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an indispensible model for solving radiative transport problems, but their slow convergence inhibits their use as an everyday computational tool. In this paper, we present two new ideas for accelerating the convergence of Monte Carlo algorithms based upon an efficient algorithm that couples simulations of forward and adjoint transport equations. Forward random walks are first processed in stages, each using a fixed sample size, and information from stage k is used to alter the sampling and weighting procedure in stage k + 1. This produces rapid geometric convergence and accounts for dramatic gains in the efficiency of the forward computation. In case still greater accuracy is required in the forward solution, information from an adjoint simulation can be added to extend the geometric learning of the forward solution. The resulting new approach should find widespread use when fast, accurate simulations of the transport equation are needed. PMID:23226872

  10. Mathematical simulations of photon interactions using Monte Carlo analysis to evaluate the uncertainty associated with in vivo K X-ray fluorescence measurements of stable lead in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodwick, Camille J.

    This research utilized Monte Carlo N-Particle version 4C (MCNP4C) to simulate K X-ray fluorescent (K XRF) measurements of stable lead in bone. Simulations were performed to investigate the effects that overlying tissue thickness, bone-calcium content, and shape of the calibration standard have on detector response in XRF measurements at the human tibia. Additional simulations of a knee phantom considered uncertainty associated with rotation about the patella during XRF measurements. Simulations tallied the distribution of energy deposited in a high-purity germanium detector originating from collimated 88 keV 109Cd photons in backscatter geometry. Benchmark measurements were performed on simple and anthropometric XRF calibration phantoms of the human leg and knee developed at the University of Cincinnati with materials proven to exhibit radiological characteristics equivalent to human tissue and bone. Initial benchmark comparisons revealed that MCNP4C limits coherent scatter of photons to six inverse angstroms of momentum transfer and a Modified MCNP4C was developed to circumvent the limitation. Subsequent benchmark measurements demonstrated that Modified MCNP4C adequately models photon interactions associated with in vivo K XRF of lead in bone. Further simulations of a simple leg geometry possessing tissue thicknesses from 0 to 10 mm revealed increasing overlying tissue thickness from 5 to 10 mm reduced predicted lead concentrations an average 1.15% per 1 mm increase in tissue thickness (p < 0.0001). An anthropometric leg phantom was mathematically defined in MCNP to more accurately reflect the human form. A simulated one percent increase in calcium content (by mass) of the anthropometric leg phantom's cortical bone demonstrated to significantly reduce the K XRF normalized ratio by 4.5% (p < 0.0001). Comparison of the simple and anthropometric calibration phantoms also suggested that cylindrical calibration standards can underestimate lead content of a human leg up

  11. Modification of codes NUALGAM and BREMRAD. Volume 3: Statistical considerations of the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, H.

    1971-01-01

    The statistics are considered of the Monte Carlo method relative to the interpretation of the NUGAM2 and NUGAM3 computer code results. A numerical experiment using the NUGAM2 code is presented and the results are statistically interpreted.

  12. Growing lattice animals and Monte-Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, G. R.; Leath, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    We consider the search problems which arise in Monte-Carlo studies involving growing lattice animals. A new periodic hashing scheme (based on a periodic cell) especially suited to these problems is presented which takes advantage both of the connected geometric structure of the animals and the traversal-oriented nature of the search. The scheme is motivated by a physical analogy and tested numerically on compact and on ramified animals. In both cases the performance is found to be more efficient than random hashing, and to a degree depending on the compactness of the animals

  13. Krylov-Projected Quantum Monte Carlo Method.

    PubMed

    Blunt, N S; Alavi, Ali; Booth, George H

    2015-07-31

    We present an approach to the calculation of arbitrary spectral, thermal, and excited state properties within the full configuration interaction quzantum Monte Carlo framework. This is achieved via an unbiased projection of the Hamiltonian eigenvalue problem into a space of stochastically sampled Krylov vectors, thus, enabling the calculation of real-frequency spectral and thermal properties and avoiding explicit analytic continuation. We use this approach to calculate temperature-dependent properties and one- and two-body spectral functions for various Hubbard models, as well as isolated excited states in ab initio systems. PMID:26274406

  14. Methods for coupling radiation, ion, and electron energies in grey Implicit Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. M.; Densmore, J. D.

    2007-08-01

    We present three methods for extending the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method to treat the time-evolution of coupled radiation, electron, and ion energies. The first method splits the ion and electron coupling and conduction from the standard IMC radiation-transport process. The second method recasts the IMC equations such that part of the coupling is treated during the Monte Carlo calculation. The third method treats all of the coupling and conduction in the Monte Carlo simulation. We apply modified equation analysis (MEA) to simplified forms of each method that neglects the errors in the conduction terms. Through MEA we show that the third method is theoretically the most accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of each method on a series of 0-dimensional, nonlinear benchmark problems where the accuracy of the third method is shown to be up to ten times greater than the other coupling methods for selected calculations.

  15. Dynamical Monte Carlo methods for plasma-surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; Marinov, Daniil

    2016-08-01

    Different dynamical Monte Carlo algorithms to investigate molecule formation on surfaces are developed, evaluated and compared with the deterministic approach based on reaction-rate equations. These include a null event algorithm, the n-fold way/BKL algorithm and an ‘hybrid’ variant of the latter. NO2 formation by NO oxidation on Pyrex and O recombination on silica with the formation of O2 are taken as case studies. The influence of the grid size on the CPU calculation time and the accuracy of the results is analysed. The role of Langmuir–Hinsehlwood recombination involving two physisorbed atoms and the effect of back diffusion and its inclusion in a deterministic formulation are investigated and discussed. It is shown that dynamical Monte Carlo schemes are flexible, simple to implement, describe easily elementary processes that are not straightforward to include in deterministic simulations, can run very efficiently if appropriately chosen and give highly reliable results. Moreover, the present approach provides a relatively simple procedure to describe fully coupled surface and gas phase chemistries.

  16. Dynamical Monte Carlo methods for plasma-surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; Marinov, Daniil

    2016-08-01

    Different dynamical Monte Carlo algorithms to investigate molecule formation on surfaces are developed, evaluated and compared with the deterministic approach based on reaction-rate equations. These include a null event algorithm, the n-fold way/BKL algorithm and an ‘hybrid’ variant of the latter. NO2 formation by NO oxidation on Pyrex and O recombination on silica with the formation of O2 are taken as case studies. The influence of the grid size on the CPU calculation time and the accuracy of the results is analysed. The role of Langmuir-Hinsehlwood recombination involving two physisorbed atoms and the effect of back diffusion and its inclusion in a deterministic formulation are investigated and discussed. It is shown that dynamical Monte Carlo schemes are flexible, simple to implement, describe easily elementary processes that are not straightforward to include in deterministic simulations, can run very efficiently if appropriately chosen and give highly reliable results. Moreover, the present approach provides a relatively simple procedure to describe fully coupled surface and gas phase chemistries.

  17. Application of Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C; Descalle, M-A; DeNardo, G L; Nigg, D W

    2002-02-19

    Targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the role of radiation beyond the treatment of localized tumors. This novel form of therapy targets metastatic cancers by combining radioactive isotopes with tumor-seeking molecules such as monoclonal antibodies and custom-designed synthetic agents. Ultimately, like conventional radiotherapy, the effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy is limited by the maximum dose that can be given to a critical, normal tissue, such as bone marrow, kidneys, and lungs. Because radionuclide therapy relies on biological delivery of radiation, its optimization and characterization are necessarily different than for conventional radiation therapy. We have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA treatment planning system. This system calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using a set of computed tomography scans to describe the 3D patient anatomy, combined with 2D (planar image) and 3D (SPECT, or single photon emission computed tomography) to describe the time-dependent radiation source. The accuracy of such a dose calculation is limited primarily by the accuracy of the initial radiation source distribution, overlaid on the patient's anatomy. This presentation provides an overview of MINERVA functionality for molecular targeted radiation therapy, and describes early validation and implementation results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. APR1400 LBLOCA uncertainty quantification by Monte Carlo method and comparison with Wilks' formula

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, M.; Bae, S.; Chung, B. D.

    2012-07-01

    An analysis of the uncertainty quantification for the PWR LBLOCA by the Monte Carlo calculation has been performed and compared with the tolerance level determined by Wilks' formula. The uncertainty range and distribution of each input parameter associated with the LBLOCA accident were determined by the PIRT results from the BEMUSE project. The Monte-Carlo method shows that the 95. percentile PCT value can be obtained reliably with a 95% confidence level using the Wilks' formula. The extra margin by the Wilks' formula over the true 95. percentile PCT by the Monte-Carlo method was rather large. Even using the 3 rd order formula, the calculated value using the Wilks' formula is nearly 100 K over the true value. It is shown that, with the ever increasing computational capability, the Monte-Carlo method is accessible for the nuclear power plant safety analysis within a realistic time frame. (authors)

  19. Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment for irregularly shaped food product volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Siswantoro, Joko; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Abdullah, Azizi; Idrus, Bahari

    2014-01-01

    Volume measurement plays an important role in the production and processing of food products. Various methods have been proposed to measure the volume of food products with irregular shapes based on 3D reconstruction. However, 3D reconstruction comes with a high-priced computational cost. Furthermore, some of the volume measurement methods based on 3D reconstruction have a low accuracy. Another method for measuring volume of objects uses Monte Carlo method. Monte Carlo method performs volume measurements using random points. Monte Carlo method only requires information regarding whether random points fall inside or outside an object and does not require a 3D reconstruction. This paper proposes volume measurement using a computer vision system for irregularly shaped food products without 3D reconstruction based on Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment. Five images of food product were captured using five cameras and processed to produce binary images. Monte Carlo integration with heuristic adjustment was performed to measure the volume based on the information extracted from binary images. The experimental results show that the proposed method provided high accuracy and precision compared to the water displacement method. In addition, the proposed method is more accurate and faster than the space carving method.

  20. Enhanced physics design with hexagonal repeated structure tools using Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L L; Lan, J S; Schwarz, R A

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses proposed new missions for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor which involve the use of target assemblies containing local hydrogenous moderation within this otherwise fast reactor. Parametric physics design studies with Monte Carlo methods are routinely utilized to analyze the rapidly changing neutron spectrum. An extensive utilization of the hexagonal lattice within lattice capabilities of the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) continuous energy Monte Carlo computer code is applied here to solving such problems. Simpler examples that use the lattice capability to describe fuel pins within a brute force'' description of the hexagonal assemblies are also given.

  1. Optimization of the beam shaping assembly in the D-D neutron generators-based BNCT using the response matrix method.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Y; Khalafi, H; Rahmani, F

    2013-12-01

    Optimization of the Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) has been performed using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code to shape the 2.45 MeV neutrons that are produced in the D-D neutron generator. Optimal design of the BSA has been chosen by considering in-air figures of merit (FOM) which consists of 70 cm Fluental as a moderator, 30 cm Pb as a reflector, 2mm (6)Li as a thermal neutron filter and 2mm Pb as a gamma filter. The neutron beam can be evaluated by in-phantom parameters, from which therapeutic gain can be derived. Direct evaluation of both set of FOMs (in-air and in-phantom) is very time consuming. In this paper a Response Matrix (RM) method has been suggested to reduce the computing time. This method is based on considering the neutron spectrum at the beam exit and calculating contribution of various dose components in phantom to calculate the Response Matrix. Results show good agreement between direct calculation and the RM method.

  2. Bold Diagrammatic Monte Carlo Method Applied to Fermionized Frustrated Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagin, S. A.; Prokof'ev, N.; Starykh, O. A.; Svistunov, B.; Varney, C. N.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate, by considering the triangular lattice spin-1/2 Heisenberg model, that Monte Carlo sampling of skeleton Feynman diagrams within the fermionization framework offers a universal first-principles tool for strongly correlated lattice quantum systems. We observe the fermionic sign blessing—cancellation of higher order diagrams leading to a finite convergence radius of the series. We calculate the magnetic susceptibility of the triangular-lattice quantum antiferromagnet in the correlated paramagnet regime and reveal a surprisingly accurate microscopic correspondence with its classical counterpart at all accessible temperatures. The extrapolation of the observed relation to zero temperature suggests the absence of the magnetic order in the ground state. We critically examine the implications of this unusual scenario.

  3. Fermion-dimer scattering using an impurity lattice Monte Carlo approach and the adiabatic projection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean

    2014-12-01

    We present lattice Monte Carlo calculations of fermion-dimer scattering in the limit of zero-range interactions using the adiabatic projection method. The adiabatic projection method uses a set of initial cluster states and Euclidean time projection to give a systematically improvable description of the low-lying scattering cluster states in a finite volume. We use Lüscher's finite-volume relations to determine the s -wave, p -wave, and d -wave phase shifts. For comparison, we also compute exact lattice results using Lanczos iteration and continuum results using the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian equation. For our Monte Carlo calculations we use a new lattice algorithm called impurity lattice Monte Carlo. This algorithm can be viewed as a hybrid technique which incorporates elements of both worldline and auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. A NEW MONTE CARLO METHOD FOR TIME-DEPENDENT NEUTRINO RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; O'Connor, Evan; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.; Loeffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik

    2012-08-20

    Monte Carlo approaches to radiation transport have several attractive properties such as simplicity of implementation, high accuracy, and good parallel scaling. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods can handle complicated geometries and are relatively easy to extend to multiple spatial dimensions, which makes them potentially interesting in modeling complex multi-dimensional astrophysical phenomena such as core-collapse supernovae. The aim of this paper is to explore Monte Carlo methods for modeling neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae. We generalize the Implicit Monte Carlo photon transport scheme of Fleck and Cummings and gray discrete-diffusion scheme of Densmore et al. to energy-, time-, and velocity-dependent neutrino transport. Using our 1D spherically-symmetric implementation, we show that, similar to the photon transport case, the implicit scheme enables significantly larger timesteps compared with explicit time discretization, without sacrificing accuracy, while the discrete-diffusion method leads to significant speed-ups at high optical depth. Our results suggest that a combination of spectral, velocity-dependent, Implicit Monte Carlo and discrete-diffusion Monte Carlo methods represents a robust approach for use in neutrino transport calculations in core-collapse supernovae. Our velocity-dependent scheme can easily be adapted to photon transport.

  5. Advanced computational methods for nodal diffusion, Monte Carlo, and S(sub N) problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    This document describes progress on five efforts for improving effectiveness of computational methods for particle diffusion and transport problems in nuclear engineering: (1) Multigrid methods for obtaining rapidly converging solutions of nodal diffusion problems. An alternative line relaxation scheme is being implemented into a nodal diffusion code. Simplified P2 has been implemented into this code. (2) Local Exponential Transform method for variance reduction in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. This work yielded predictions for both 1-D and 2-D x-y geometry better than conventional Monte Carlo with splitting and Russian Roulette. (3) Asymptotic Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN problems. New transport differencing schemes have been obtained that allow solution by the conjugate gradient method, and the convergence of this approach is rapid. (4) Quasidiffusion (QD) methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN Problems on irregular spatial grids. A symmetrized QD method has been developed in a form that results in a system of two self-adjoint equations that are readily discretized and efficiently solved. (5) Response history method for speeding up the Monte Carlo calculation of electron transport problems. This method was implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. In addition, we have developed and implemented a parallel time-dependent Monte Carlo code on two massively parallel processors.

  6. Advanced computational methods for nodal diffusion, Monte Carlo, and S[sub N] problems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    This document describes progress on five efforts for improving effectiveness of computational methods for particle diffusion and transport problems in nuclear engineering: (1) Multigrid methods for obtaining rapidly converging solutions of nodal diffusion problems. A alternative line relaxation scheme is being implemented into a nodal diffusion code. Simplified P2 has been implemented into this code. (2) Local Exponential Transform method for variance reduction in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. This work yielded predictions for both 1-D and 2-D x-y geometry better than conventional Monte Carlo with splitting and Russian Roulette. (3) Asymptotic Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN problems. New transport differencing schemes have been obtained that allow solution by the conjugate gradient method, and the convergence of this approach is rapid. (4) Quasidiffusion (QD) methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN Problems on irregular spatial grids. A symmetrized QD method has been developed in a form that results in a system of two self-adjoint equations that are readily discretized and efficiently solved. (5) Response history method for speeding up the Monte Carlo calculation of electron transport problems. This method was implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. In addition, we have developed and implemented a parallel time-dependent Monte Carlo code on two massively parallel processors.

  7. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    We perform a stability analysis of a Monte Carlo method for simulating the Compton scattering of photons by free electron in high energy density applications and develop time-step limits that avoid unstable and oscillatory solutions. Implementing this Monte Carlo technique in multi physics problems typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value, which can lead to this undesirable behavior. With a set of numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficacy of our time-step limits.

  8. TH-E-18A-01: Developments in Monte Carlo Methods for Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Badal, A; Zbijewski, W; Bolch, W; Sechopoulos, I

    2014-06-15

    Monte Carlo simulation methods are widely used in medical physics research and are starting to be implemented in clinical applications such as radiation therapy planning systems. Monte Carlo simulations offer the capability to accurately estimate quantities of interest that are challenging to measure experimentally while taking into account the realistic anatomy of an individual patient. Traditionally, practical application of Monte Carlo simulation codes in diagnostic imaging was limited by the need for large computational resources or long execution times. However, recent advancements in high-performance computing hardware, combined with a new generation of Monte Carlo simulation algorithms and novel postprocessing methods, are allowing for the computation of relevant imaging parameters of interest such as patient organ doses and scatter-to-primaryratios in radiographic projections in just a few seconds using affordable computational resources. Programmable Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), for example, provide a convenient, affordable platform for parallelized Monte Carlo executions that yield simulation times on the order of 10{sup 7} xray/ s. Even with GPU acceleration, however, Monte Carlo simulation times can be prohibitive for routine clinical practice. To reduce simulation times further, variance reduction techniques can be used to alter the probabilistic models underlying the x-ray tracking process, resulting in lower variance in the results without biasing the estimates. Other complementary strategies for further reductions in computation time are denoising of the Monte Carlo estimates and estimating (scoring) the quantity of interest at a sparse set of sampling locations (e.g. at a small number of detector pixels in a scatter simulation) followed by interpolation. Beyond reduction of the computational resources required for performing Monte Carlo simulations in medical imaging, the use of accurate representations of patient anatomy is crucial to the

  9. Macro-step Monte Carlo Methods and their Applications in Proton Radiotherapy and Optical Photon Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacqmin, Dustin J.

    Monte Carlo modeling of radiation transport is considered the gold standard for radiotherapy dose calculations. However, highly accurate Monte Carlo calculations are very time consuming and the use of Monte Carlo dose calculation methods is often not practical in clinical settings. With this in mind, a variation on the Monte Carlo method called macro Monte Carlo (MMC) was developed in the 1990's for electron beam radiotherapy dose calculations. To accelerate the simulation process, the electron MMC method used larger steps-sizes in regions of the simulation geometry where the size of the region was large relative to the size of a typical Monte Carlo step. These large steps were pre-computed using conventional Monte Carlo simulations and stored in a database featuring many step-sizes and materials. The database was loaded into memory by a custom electron MMC code and used to transport electrons quickly through a heterogeneous absorbing geometry. The purpose of this thesis work was to apply the same techniques to proton radiotherapy dose calculation and light propagation Monte Carlo simulations. First, the MMC method was implemented for proton radiotherapy dose calculations. A database composed of pre-computed steps was created using MCNPX for many materials and beam energies. The database was used by a custom proton MMC code called PMMC to transport protons through a heterogeneous absorbing geometry. The PMMC code was tested against MCNPX for a number of different proton beam energies and geometries and proved to be accurate and much more efficient. The MMC method was also implemented for light propagation Monte Carlo simulations. The widely accepted Monte Carlo for multilayered media (MCML) was modified to incorporate the MMC method. The original MCML uses basic scattering and absorption physics to transport optical photons through multilayered geometries. The MMC version of MCML was tested against the original MCML code using a number of different geometries and

  10. Markov chain Monte Carlo method for tracking myocardial borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiczek, Robert; Ray, N.; Acton, Scott T.; Roy, R. J.; French, Brent A.; Epstein, F. H.

    2005-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance studies have led to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease. Manual segmentation of myocardial borders, a major task in the data analysis of these studies, is a tedious and time consuming process subject to observer bias. Automated segmentation reduces the time needed to process studies and removes observer bias. We propose an automated segmentation algorithm that uses an active contour to capture the endo- and epicardial borders of the left ventricle in a mouse heart. The contour is initialized by computing the ellipse corresponding to the maximal gradient inverse of variation (GICOV) value. The GICOV is the mean divided by the normalized standard deviation of the image intensity gradient in the outward normal direction along the contour. The GICOV is maximal when the contour lies along strong, relatively constant gradients. The contour is then evolved until it maximizes the GICOV value subject to shape constraints. The problem is formulated in a Bayesian framework and is implemented using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique.

  11. Prediction of Protein-DNA binding by Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuefan; Eisenberg, Moises; Korobka, Alex

    1997-08-01

    We present an analysis and prediction of protein-DNA binding specificity based on the hydrogen bonding between DNA, protein, and auxillary clusters of water molecules. Zif268, glucocorticoid receptor, λ-repressor mutant, HIN-recombinase, and tramtrack protein-DNA complexes are studied. Hydrogen bonds are approximated by the Lennard-Jones potential with a cutoff distance between the hydrogen and the acceptor atoms set to 3.2 Åand an angular component based on a dipole-dipole interaction. We use a three-stage docking algorithm: geometric hashing that matches pairs of hydrogen bonding sites; (2) least-squares minimization of pairwise distances to filter out insignificant matches; and (3) Monte Carlo stochastic search to minimize the energy of the system. More information can be obtained from our first paper on this subject [Y.Deng et all, J.Computational Chemistry (1995)]. Results show that the biologically correct base pair is selected preferentially when there are two or more strong hydrogen bonds (with LJ potential lower than -0.20) that bind it to the protein. Predicted sequences are less stable in the case of weaker bonding sites. In general the inclusion of water bridges does increase the number of base pairs for which correct specificity is predicted.

  12. A Monte Carlo Synthetic-Acceleration Method for Solving the Thermal Radiation Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M; Mosher, Scott W; Slattery, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diusion equation in three dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that not only can our Monte Carlo method be an eective solver for sparse matrix systems, but also that it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned Conjugate Gradient while producing numerically identical results. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  13. A New Method for the Calculation of Diffusion Coefficients with Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Eric

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new Monte Carlo-based method for the calculation of diffusion coefficients. One distinctive feature of this method is that it does not resort to the computation of transport cross sections directly, although their functional form is retained. Instead, a special type of tally derived from a deterministic estimate of Fick's Law is used for tallying the total cross section, which is then combined with a set of other standard Monte Carlo tallies. Some properties of this method are presented by means of numerical examples for a multi-group 1-D implementation. Calculated diffusion coefficients are in general good agreement with values obtained by other methods.

  14. A Monte Carlo synthetic-acceleration method for solving the thermal radiation diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Thomas M.; Mosher, Scott W.; Slattery, Stuart R.; Hamilton, Steven P.

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration-based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diffusion equation in three spatial dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that our Monte Carlo method is an effective solver for sparse matrix systems. For solutions converged to the same tolerance, it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned conjugate gradient and GMRES. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  15. Spin-orbit interactions in electronic structure quantum Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Cody A.; Zhu, Minyi; Guo, Shi; Ambrosetti, Alberto; Pederiva, Francesco; Mitas, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We develop generalization of the fixed-phase diffusion Monte Carlo method for Hamiltonians which explicitly depends on particle spins such as for spin-orbit interactions. The method is formulated in a zero-variance manner and is similar to the treatment of nonlocal operators in commonly used static-spin calculations. Tests on atomic and molecular systems show that it is very accurate, on par with the fixed-node method. This opens electronic structure quantum Monte Carlo methods to a vast research area of quantum phenomena in which spin-related interactions play an important role.

  16. Monte Carlo method for the evaluation of symptom association.

    PubMed

    Barriga-Rivera, A; Elena, M; Moya, M J; Lopez-Alonso, M

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal monitoring is limited to 96 hours by the current technology. This work presents a computational model to investigate symptom association in gastroesophageal reflux disease with larger data samples proving important deficiencies of the current methodology that must be taking into account in clinical evaluation. A computational model based on Monte Carlo analysis was implemented to simulate patients with known statistical characteristics Thus, sets of 2000 10-day-long recordings were simulated and analyzed using the symptom index (SI), the symptom sensitivity index (SSI), and the symptom association probability (SAP). Afterwards, linear regression was applied to define the dependency of these indexes with the number of reflux, the number of symptoms, the duration of the monitoring, and the probability of association. All the indexes were biased estimators of symptom association and therefore they do not consider the effect of chance: when symptom and reflux were completely uncorrelated, the values of the indexes under study were greater than zero. On the other hand, longer recording reduced variability in the estimation of the SI and the SSI while increasing the value of the SAP. Furthermore, if the number of symptoms remains below one-tenth of the number of reflux episodes, it is not possible to achieve a positive value of the SSI. A limitation of this computational model is that it does not consider feeding and sleeping periods, differences between reflux episodes or causation. However, the conclusions are not affected by these limitations. These facts represent important limitations in symptom association analysis, and therefore, invasive treatments must not be considered based on the value of these indexes only until a new methodology provides a more reliable assessment. PMID:23082973

  17. Sampling uncertainty evaluation for data acquisition board based on Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Leyi; Wang, Zhongyu

    2008-10-01

    Evaluating the data acquisition board sampling uncertainty is a difficult problem in the field of signal sampling. This paper analyzes the sources of dada acquisition board sampling uncertainty in the first, then introduces a simulation theory of dada acquisition board sampling uncertainty evaluation based on Monte Carlo method and puts forward a relation model of sampling uncertainty results, sampling numbers and simulation times. In the case of different sample numbers and different signal scopes, the author establishes a random sampling uncertainty evaluation program of a PCI-6024E data acquisition board to execute the simulation. The results of the proposed Monte Carlo simulation method are in a good agreement with the GUM ones, and the validities of Monte Carlo method are represented.

  18. A Monte Carlo Study of Eight Confidence Interval Methods for Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Jeanine L.; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Hibbard, Susan T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine eight of the different methods for computing confidence intervals around alpha that have been proposed to determine which of these, if any, is the most accurate and precise. Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate samples under known and controlled population conditions. In general, the differences in…

  19. [Temperature distribution based on Monte Carlo method of optical transmission in tissues of laser ablation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yafen; Bai, Jingfeng

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo method was used for calculation of finite-diameter laser distribution in tissues through convolution operation. Photo-thermal ablation model was set up on the basis of Pennes bioheat equation, and tissue temperature distribution was simulated by using finite element method by ANSYS through the model. The simulation result is helpful for clinical application of laser.

  20. Comparison of the Monte Carlo adjoint-weighted and differential operator perturbation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, Brian C; Brown, Forrest B

    2010-01-01

    Two perturbation theory methodologies are implemented for k-eigenvalue calculations in the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MCNP6. A comparison of the accuracy of these techniques, the differential operator and adjoint-weighted methods, is performed numerically and analytically. Typically, the adjoint-weighted method shows better performance over a larger range; however, there are exceptions.

  1. Renyi entanglement entropy of interacting fermions calculated using the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-09-12

    We present a new algorithm for calculating the Renyi entanglement entropy of interacting fermions using the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. The algorithm only samples the interaction correction of the entanglement entropy, which by design ensures the efficient calculation of weakly interacting systems. Combined with Monte Carlo reweighting, the algorithm also performs well for systems with strong interactions. We demonstrate the potential of this method by studying the quantum entanglement signatures of the charge-density-wave transition of interacting fermions on a square lattice.

  2. Comparison of uncertainty in fatigue tests obtained by the Monte Carlo method in two softwares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, Lisiane; Kapper Fabricio, Daniel Antonio; Reguly, Afonso

    2016-07-01

    The Supplement 1 to the “Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement” indicates the Monte Carlo method for calculating the expanded measurement uncertainty. The objective of this work is to compare the measurement uncertainty values obtained via Monte Carlo method through two commercial softwares (Matlab® and Crystal Ball®) for the parameter ‘adjusted strain’, obtained from fatigue tests. Simulations were carried out using different number of iterations and different levels of confidence. The results showed that there are short differences between the measurement uncertainty values generated by different software.

  3. Advantages of Analytical Transformations in Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Brooks III, E D; Daffin, F

    2004-12-13

    Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport typically attempt to solve an integral by directly sampling analog or weighted particles, which are treated as physical entities. Improvements to the methods involve better sampling, probability games or physical intuition about the problem. We show that significant improvements can be achieved by recasting the equations with an analytical transform to solve for new, non-physical entities or fields. This paper looks at one such transform, the difference formulation for thermal photon transport, showing a significant advantage for Monte Carlo solution of the equations for time dependent transport. Other related areas are discussed that may also realize significant benefits from similar analytical transformations.

  4. Development of Continuous-Energy Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculation Methods in the Shift Monte Carlo Code

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Martin, William R; Rearden, Bradley T; Williams, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Three methods for calculating continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients were developed and implemented into the SHIFT Monte Carlo code within the Scale code package. The methods were used for several simple test problems and were evaluated in terms of speed, accuracy, efficiency, and memory requirements. A promising new method for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was developed and produced accurate sensitivity coefficients with figures of merit that were several orders of magnitude larger than those from existing methods.

  5. Domain decomposition methods for parallel laser-tissue models with Monte Carlo transport

    SciTech Connect

    Alme, H.J.; Rodrique, G.; Zimmerman, G.

    1998-10-19

    Achieving parallelism in simulations that use Monte Carlo transport methods presents interesting challenges. For problems that require domain decomposition, load balance can be harder to achieve. The Monte Carlo transport package may have to operate with other packages that have different optimal domain decompositions for a given problem. To examine some of these issues, we have developed a code that simulates the interaction of a laser with biological tissue; it uses a Monte Carlo method to simulate the laser and a finite element model to simulate the conduction of the temperature field in the tissue. We will present speedup and load balance results obtained for a suite of problems decomposed using a few domain decomposition algorithms we have developed.

  6. A multi-group Monte Carlo core analysis method and its application in SCWR design

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Wang, K.; Yu, G.

    2012-07-01

    Complex geometry and spectrum have been the characteristics of many newly developed nuclear energy systems, so the suitability and precision of the traditional deterministic codes are doubtable while being applied to simulate these systems. On the contrary, the Monte Carlo method has the inherent advantages of dealing with complex geometry and spectrum. The main disadvantage of Monte Carlo method is that it takes long time to get reliable results, so the efficiency is too low for the ordinary core designs. A new Monte Carlo core analysis scheme is developed, aimed to increase the calculation efficiency. It is finished in two steps: Firstly, the assembly level simulation is performed by continuous energy Monte Carlo method, which is suitable for any geometry and spectrum configuration, and the assembly multi-group constants are tallied at the same time; Secondly, the core level calculation is performed by multi-group Monte Carlo method, using the assembly group constants generated in the first step. Compared with the heterogeneous Monte Carlo calculations of the whole core, this two-step scheme is more efficient, and the precision is acceptable for the preliminary analysis of novel nuclear systems. Using this core analysis scheme, a SCWR core was designed based on a new SCWR assembly design. The core output is about 1,100 MWe, and a cycle length of about 550 EFPDs can be achieved with 3-batch refueling pattern. The average and maximum discharge burn-up are about 53.5 and 60.9 MWD/kgU respectively. (authors)

  7. Coupling Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Methods for the Simulation of Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Miller, Erin A.; Shaver, Mark W.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Ellis, J. E.; Kaye, William R.; McConn, Ronald J.; Meriwether, George H.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Valsan, Andrei B.; Wareing, Todd A.

    2008-10-31

    Radiation transport modeling methods used in the radiation detection community fall into one of two broad categories: stochastic (Monte Carlo) and deterministic. Monte Carlo methods are typically the tool of choice for simulating gamma-ray spectrometers operating in homeland and national security settings (e.g. portal monitoring of vehicles or isotope identification using handheld devices), but deterministic codes that discretize the linear Boltzmann transport equation in space, angle, and energy offer potential advantages in computational efficiency for many complex radiation detection problems. This paper describes the development of a scenario simulation framework based on deterministic algorithms. Key challenges include: formulating methods to automatically define an energy group structure that can support modeling of gamma-ray spectrometers ranging from low to high resolution; combining deterministic transport algorithms (e.g. ray-tracing and discrete ordinates) to mitigate ray effects for a wide range of problem types; and developing efficient and accurate methods to calculate gamma-ray spectrometer response functions from the deterministic angular flux solutions. The software framework aimed at addressing these challenges is described and results from test problems that compare coupled deterministic-Monte Carlo methods and purely Monte Carlo approaches are provided.

  8. Power Analysis for Complex Mediational Designs Using Monte Carlo Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoemmes, Felix; MacKinnon, David P.; Reiser, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Applied researchers often include mediation effects in applications of advanced methods such as latent variable models and linear growth curve models. Guidance on how to estimate statistical power to detect mediation for these models has not yet been addressed in the literature. We describe a general framework for power analyses for complex…

  9. Neutron streaming through shield ducts using a discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Baker, R.S.

    1993-08-18

    A common problem in shield design is determining the neutron flux that streams through ducts in shields and also that penetrates the shield after having traveled partway down the duct. Obviously the determination of the neutrons that stream down the duct can be computed in a straightforward manner using Monte Carlo techniques. On the other hand those neutrons that must penetrate a significant portion of the shield are more easily handled using discrete ordinates methods. A hybrid discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo cods, TWODANT/MC, which is an extension of the existing discrete ordinates code TWODANT, has been developed at Los Alamos to allow the efficient, accurate treatment of both streaming and deep penetration problems in a single calculation. In this paper we provide examples of the application of TWODANT/MC to typical geometries that are encountered in shield design and compare the results with those obtained using the Los Alamos Monte Carlo code MCNP{sup 3}.

  10. Calibration coefficient of reference brachytherapy ionization chamber using analytical and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D

    2010-06-01

    A cylindrical graphite ionization chamber of sensitive volume 1002.4 cm(3) was designed and fabricated at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for use as a reference dosimeter to measure the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The air kerma calibration coefficient (N(K)) of this ionization chamber was estimated analytically using Burlin general cavity theory and by the Monte Carlo method. In the analytical method, calibration coefficients were calculated for each spectral line of an HDR (192)Ir source and the weighted mean was taken as N(K). In the Monte Carlo method, the geometry of the measurement setup and physics related input data of the HDR (192)Ir source and the surrounding material were simulated using the Monte Carlo N-particle code. The total photon energy fluence was used to arrive at the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) using mass energy absorption coefficients. The energy deposition rates were used to simulate the value of charge rate in the ionization chamber and N(K) was determined. The Monte Carlo calculated N(K) agreed within 1.77 % of that obtained using the analytical method. The experimentally determined RAKR of HDR (192)Ir sources, using this reference ionization chamber by applying the analytically estimated N(K), was found to be in agreement with the vendor quoted RAKR within 1.43%.

  11. An NCME Instructional Module on Estimating Item Response Theory Models Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee-Seon; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an introduction to Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation for item response models. A brief description of Bayesian inference is followed by an overview of the various facets of MCMC algorithms, including discussion of prior specification, sampling procedures, and methods for evaluating chain…

  12. On the utility of graphics cards to perform massively parallel simulation of advanced Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony; Yau, Christopher; Giles, Michael B; Doucet, Arnaud; Holmes, Christopher C

    2010-12-01

    We present a case-study on the utility of graphics cards to perform massively parallel simulation of advanced Monte Carlo methods. Graphics cards, containing multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), are self-contained parallel computational devices that can be housed in conventional desktop and laptop computers and can be thought of as prototypes of the next generation of many-core processors. For certain classes of population-based Monte Carlo algorithms they offer massively parallel simulation, with the added advantage over conventional distributed multi-core processors that they are cheap, easily accessible, easy to maintain, easy to code, dedicated local devices with low power consumption. On a canonical set of stochastic simulation examples including population-based Markov chain Monte Carlo methods and Sequential Monte Carlo methods, we nd speedups from 35 to 500 fold over conventional single-threaded computer code. Our findings suggest that GPUs have the potential to facilitate the growth of statistical modelling into complex data rich domains through the availability of cheap and accessible many-core computation. We believe the speedup we observe should motivate wider use of parallelizable simulation methods and greater methodological attention to their design. PMID:22003276

  13. Novel approach to modeling spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraszewski, Maciej; Trojanowski, Michal; Strakowski, Marcin; Pluciński, Jerzy; Kosmowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-05-01

    Numerical modeling Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems is needed for optical setup optimization, development of new signal processing methods and assessment of impact of different physical phenomena inside the sample on OCT signal. The Monte Carlo method has been often used for modeling Optical Coherence Tomography, as it is a well established tool for simulating light propagation in scattering media. However, in this method light is modeled as a set of energy packets traveling along straight lines. This reduces accuracy of Monte Carlo calculations in case of simulating propagation of dopeds. Since such beams are commonly used in OCT systems, classical Monte Carlo algorithm need to be modified. In presented research, we have developed model of SD-OCT systems using combination of Monte Carlo and analytical methods. Our model includes properties of optical setup of OCT system, which is often omitted in other research. We present applied algorithms and comparison of simulation results with SD-OCT scans of optical phantoms. We have found that our model can be used for determination of level of OCT signal coming from scattering particles inside turbid media placed in different positions relatively to focal point of incident light beam. It may improve accuracy of simulating OCT systems.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo Methods for First Principles Simulation of Liquid Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergely, John Robert

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an accurate microscopic description of water structure and dynamics is of great interest to molecular biology researchers and in the physics and quantum chemistry simulation communities. This dissertation describes efforts to apply quantum Monte Carlo methods to this problem with the goal of making progress toward a fully "ab initio"…

  15. Monte-Carlo methods make Dempster-Shafer formalism feasible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreinovich, Vladik YA.; Bernat, Andrew; Borrett, Walter; Mariscal, Yvonne; Villa, Elsa

    1991-01-01

    One of the main obstacles to the applications of Dempster-Shafer formalism is its computational complexity. If we combine m different pieces of knowledge, then in general case we have to perform up to 2(sup m) computational steps, which for large m is infeasible. For several important cases algorithms with smaller running time were proposed. We prove, however, that if we want to compute the belief bel(Q) in any given query Q, then exponential time is inevitable. It is still inevitable, if we want to compute bel(Q) with given precision epsilon. This restriction corresponds to the natural idea that since initial masses are known only approximately, there is no sense in trying to compute bel(Q) precisely. A further idea is that there is always some doubt in the whole knowledge, so there is always a probability p(sub o) that the expert's knowledge is wrong. In view of that it is sufficient to have an algorithm that gives a correct answer a probability greater than 1-p(sub o). If we use the original Dempster's combination rule, this possibility diminishes the running time, but still leaves the problem infeasible in the general case. We show that for the alternative combination rules proposed by Smets and Yager feasible methods exist. We also show how these methods can be parallelized, and what parallelization model fits this problem best.

  16. Molecular modeling of porous carbons using the hybrid reverse Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Jain, Surendra K; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Pikunic, Jorge P; Gubbins, Keith E

    2006-11-21

    We apply a simulation protocol based on the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method, which incorporates an energy constraint, to model porous carbons. This method is called hybrid reverse Monte Carlo (HRMC), since it combines the features of the Monte Carlo and reverse Monte Carlo methods. The use of the energy constraint term helps alleviate the problem of the presence of unrealistic features (such as three- and four-membered carbon rings), reported in previous RMC studies of carbons, and also correctly describes the local environment of carbon atoms. The HRMC protocol is used to develop molecular models of saccharose-based porous carbons in which hydrogen atoms are taken into account explicitly in addition to the carbon atoms. We find that the model reproduces the experimental pair correlation function with good accuracy. The local structure differs from that obtained with a previous model (Pikunic, J.; Clinard, C.; Cohaut, N.; Gubbins, K. E.; Guet, J. M.; Pellenq, R. J.-M.; Rannou, I.; Rouzaud, J. N. Langmuir 2003, 19 (20), 8565). We study the local structure by calculating the nearest neighbor distribution, bond angle distribution, and ring statistics. PMID:17106983

  17. Evaluation of the Monte Carlo method (KTMAN-2) in fluoroscopic dosimetry and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Hyosim; Park, Hongmin; Lee, Wonho; Park, Sungho

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the Monte Carlo method for determining the dose calculation in fluoroscopy by using a realistic human phantom. The dose was calculated by using Monte Carlo N-particle extended (MCNPX) in simulations and was measured by using Korean Typical Man-2 (KTMAN-2) phantom in the experiments. MCNPX is a widely-used simulation tool based on the Monte-Carlo method and uses random sampling. KTMAN-2 is a virtual phantom written in MCNPX language and is based on the typical Korean man. This study was divided into two parts: simulations and experiments. In the former, the spectrum generation program (SRS-78) was used to obtain the output energy spectrum for fluoroscopy; then, each dose to the target organ was calculated using KTMAN-2 with MCNPX. In the latter part, the output of the fluoroscope was calibrated first and TLDs (Thermoluminescent dosimeter) were inserted in the ART (Alderson Radiation Therapy) phantom at the same places as in the simulation. Thus, the phantom was exposed to radiation, and the simulated and the experimental doses were compared. In order to change the simulation unit to the dose unit, we set the normalization factor (NF) for unit conversion. Comparing the simulated with the experimental results, we found most of the values to be similar, which proved the effectiveness of the Monte Carlo method in fluoroscopic dose evaluation. The equipment used in this study included a TLD, a TLD reader, an ART phantom, an ionization chamber and a fluoroscope.

  18. A Hybrid Method for Evaluating of Lightning Performance of Overhead Lines based on Monte Carlo Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatinasab, Reza; Tadayon, Pooya; Ametani, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid method for calculating lightning performance of overhead lines caused by direct strokes by combining Lattice diagram together with the Monte Carlo method. In order to go through this, firstly, the proper analytical relations for overvoltages calculation are established based on Lattice diagram. Then, the Monte Carlo procedure is applied to the obtained analytical relations. The aim of the presented method that will be called `ML method' is simply estimation of the lightning performance of the overhead lines and performing the risk analysis of power apparatus with retaining the acceptable accuracy. To confirm the accuracy, the calculated results of the presented ML method are compared with those calculated by the EMTP/ATP simulation.

  19. A synergistic combination of the deterministic and Monte Carlo methods for double-heterogeneous problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Shim, H. J.; Noh, T.

    2006-07-01

    To resolve the double-heterogeneity (DH) problem resulting from the TRISO fuel of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), a synergistic combination of a deterministic method and the Monte Carlo method has been proposed. As the deterministic approach, the RPT (Reactivity-equivalent Physical Transformation) method is adopted. In the combined methodology, a reference k-infinite value is obtained by the Monte Carlo method for an initial state of a problem and it is used by the RPT method to transform the original DH problem into a conventional single-heterogeneous one, and the transformed problem is analyzed by the conventional deterministic methods. The combined methodology has been applied to the depletion analysis of typical HTGR fuels including both prismatic block and pebble. The reference solution is obtained using a Monte Carlo code MCCARD and the accuracy of the deterministic-only and the combined methods is evaluated. For the deterministic solution, the DRAGON and HELIOS codes were used. It has been shown that the combined method provides an accurate solution although the deterministic-only solution shows noticeable errors. For the pebble, the two deterministic codes cannot handle the DH problem. Nevertheless, we have shown that the solution of the DRAGON-MCCARD combined approach agrees well with the reference. (authors)

  20. A high-order photon Monte Carlo method for radiative transfer in direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Modest, M.F.; Haworth, D.C. . E-mail: dch12@psu.edu

    2007-05-01

    A high-order photon Monte Carlo method is developed to solve the radiative transfer equation. The statistical and discretization errors of the computed radiative heat flux and radiation source term are isolated and quantified. Up to sixth-order spatial accuracy is demonstrated for the radiative heat flux, and up to fourth-order accuracy for the radiation source term. This demonstrates the compatibility of the method with high-fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) for chemically reacting flows. The method is applied to address radiative heat transfer in a one-dimensional laminar premixed flame and a statistically one-dimensional turbulent premixed flame. Modifications of the flame structure with radiation are noted in both cases, and the effects of turbulence/radiation interactions on the local reaction zone structure are revealed for the turbulent flame. Computational issues in using a photon Monte Carlo method for DNS of turbulent reacting flows are discussed.

  1. In silico prediction of the β-cyclodextrin complexation based on Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Veselinović, Jovana B; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Nikolić, Goran M

    2015-11-10

    In this study QSPR models were developed to predict the complexation of structurally diverse compounds with β-cyclodextrin based on SMILES notation optimal descriptors using Monte Carlo method. The predictive potential of the applied approach was tested with three random splits into the sub-training, calibration, test and validation sets and with different statistical methods. Obtained results demonstrate that Monte Carlo method based modeling is a very promising computational method in the QSPR studies for predicting the complexation of structurally diverse compounds with β-cyclodextrin. The SMILES attributes (structural features both local and global), defined as molecular fragments, which are promoters of the increase/decrease of molecular binding constants were identified. These structural features were correlated to the complexation process and their identification helped to improve the understanding for the complexation mechanisms of the host molecules.

  2. Neutron-Gamma-ray-coupled albedo Monte Carlo method streaming analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Kawai, M.; Seki, Y.

    1986-11-01

    The neutron-gamma-ray-coupled albedo Monte Carlo (AMC) method has been developed and implemented in MORSE-I. The energy- and angle-dependent differential albedo data, which include secondary gamma rays, are calculated for a slab layer with one dimensional transport theory. Fundamental formulas for this method are described. The applicability to shielding design of fusion reactors is confirmed by analyzing the radiation streaming experiment conducted at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The AMC method has reproduced well the experimental data of radiation dose rates and spectra with an accuracy of approximately 10%. It is shown that the AMC method is several times more efficient than the ordinary Monte Carlo calculation in obtaining data necessary for the design with expected accuracy.

  3. A Monte Carlo method using octree structure in photon and electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, K.; Maeda, S.

    1995-12-01

    Most of the early Monte Carlo calculations in medical physics were used to calculate absorbed dose distributions, and detector responses and efficiencies. Recently, data acquisition in Single Photon Emission CT (SPECT) has been simulated by a Monte Carlo method to evaluate scatter photons generated in a human body and a collimator. Monte Carlo simulations in SPECT data acquisition are generally based on the transport of photons only because the photons being simulated are low energy, and therefore the bremsstrahlung productions by the electrons generated are negligible. Since the transport calculation of photons without electrons is much simpler than that with electrons, it is possible to accomplish the high-speed simulation in a simple object with one medium. Here, object description is important in performing the photon and/or electron transport using a Monte Carlo method efficiently. The authors propose a new description method using an octree representation of an object. Thus even if the boundaries of each medium are represented accurately, high-speed calculation of photon transport can be accomplished because the number of voxels is much fewer than that of the voxel-based approach which represents an object by a union of the voxels of the same size. This Monte Carlo code using the octree representation of an object first establishes the simulation geometry by reading octree string, which is produced by forming an octree structure from a set of serial sections for the object before the simulation; then it transports photons in the geometry. Using the code, if the user just prepares a set of serial sections for the object in which he or she wants to simulate photon trajectories, he or she can perform the simulation automatically using the suboptimal geometry simplified by the octree representation without forming the optimal geometry by handwriting.

  4. Searching therapeutic agents for treatment of Alzheimer disease using the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Mariya A; Toropov, Andrey A; Raška, Ivan; Rašková, Mária

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) for the pIC50 (binding affinity) of gamma-secretase inhibitors can be constructed with the Monte Carlo method using CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). The considerable influence of the presence of rings of various types with respect to the above endpoint has been detected. The mechanistic interpretation and the domain of applicability of the QSARs are discussed. Methods to select new potential gamma-secretase inhibitors are suggested. PMID:26164035

  5. Frequency-domain Monte Carlo method for linear oscillatory gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladiges, Daniel R.; Sader, John E.

    2015-03-01

    Gas flows generated by resonating nanoscale devices inherently occur in the non-continuum, low Mach number regime. Numerical simulations of such flows using the standard direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method are hindered by high statistical noise, which has motivated the development of several alternate Monte Carlo methods for low Mach number flows. Here, we present a frequency-domain low Mach number Monte Carlo method based on the Boltzmann-BGK equation, for the simulation of oscillatory gas flows. This circumvents the need for temporal simulations, as is currently required, and provides direct access to both amplitude and phase information using a pseudo-steady algorithm. The proposed method is validated for oscillatory Couette flow and the flow generated by an oscillating sphere. Good agreement is found with an existing time-domain method and accurate numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-BGK equation. Analysis of these simulations using a rigorous statistical approach shows that the frequency-domain method provides a significant improvement in computational speed.

  6. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    Compton scattering is an important aspect of radiative transfer in high energy density applications. In this process, the frequency and direction of a photon are altered by colliding with a free electron. The change in frequency of a scattered photon results in an energy exchange between the photon and target electron and energy coupling between radiation and matter. Canfield, Howard, and Liang have presented a Monte Carlo method for simulating Compton scattering that models the photon-electron collision kinematics exactly. However, implementing their technique in multiphysics problems that include the effects of radiation-matter energy coupling typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value. This explicit evaluation can lead to unstable and oscillatory solutions. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of this Monte Carlo method and present time-step limits that avoid instabilities and nonphysical oscillations by considering a spatially independent, purely scattering radiative-transfer problem. Examining a simplified problem is justified because it isolates the effects of Compton scattering, and existing Monte Carlo techniques can robustly model other physics (such as absorption, emission, sources, and photon streaming). Our analysis begins by simplifying the equations that are solved via Monte Carlo within each time step using the Fokker-Planck approximation. Next, we linearize these approximate equations about an equilibrium solution such that the resulting linearized equations describe perturbations about this equilibrium. We then solve these linearized equations over a time step and determine the corresponding eigenvalues, quantities that can predict the behavior of solutions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation as a function of time-step size and other physical parameters. With these results, we develop our time-step limits. This approach is similar to our recent investigation of time discretizations for the

  7. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  8. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Mourant, Judith R.; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  9. A Monte Carlo method for solving the one-dimensional telegraph equations with boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acebrón, Juan A.; Ribeiro, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    A Monte Carlo algorithm is derived to solve the one-dimensional telegraph equations in a bounded domain subject to resistive and non-resistive boundary conditions. The proposed numerical scheme is more efficient than the classical Kac's theory because it does not require the discretization of time. The algorithm has been validated by comparing the results obtained with theory and the Finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method for a typical two-wire transmission line terminated at both ends with general boundary conditions. We have also tested transmission line heterogeneities to account for wave propagation in multiple media. The algorithm is inherently parallel, since it is based on Monte Carlo simulations, and does not suffer from the numerical dispersion and dissipation issues that arise in finite difference-based numerical schemes on a lossy medium. This allowed us to develop an efficient numerical method, capable of outperforming the classical FDTD method for large scale problems and high frequency signals.

  10. Flat-histogram methods in quantum Monte Carlo simulations: Application to the t-J model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantis, Nikolaos G.; Manousakis, Efstratios

    2016-09-01

    We discuss that flat-histogram techniques can be appropriately applied in the sampling of quantum Monte Carlo simulation in order to improve the statistical quality of the results at long imaginary time or low excitation energy. Typical imaginary-time correlation functions calculated in quantum Monte Carlo are subject to exponentially growing errors as the range of imaginary time grows and this smears the information on the low energy excitations. We show that we can extract the low energy physics by modifying the Monte Carlo sampling technique to one in which configurations which contribute to making the histogram of certain quantities flat are promoted. We apply the diagrammatic Monte Carlo (diag-MC) method to the motion of a single hole in the t-J model and we show that the implementation of flat-histogram techniques allows us to calculate the Green's function in a wide range of imaginary-time. In addition, we show that applying the flat-histogram technique alleviates the “sign”-problem associated with the simulation of the single-hole Green's function at long imaginary time.

  11. Monte Carlo method of radiative transfer applied to a turbulent flame modeling with LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Gicquel, Olivier; Veynante, Denis; Taine, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Radiative transfer plays an important role in the numerical simulation of turbulent combustion. However, for the reason that combustion and radiation are characterized by different time scales and different spatial and chemical treatments, the radiation effect is often neglected or roughly modelled. The coupling of a large eddy simulation combustion solver and a radiation solver through a dedicated language, CORBA, is investigated. Two formulations of Monte Carlo method (Forward Method and Emission Reciprocity Method) employed to resolve RTE have been compared in a one-dimensional flame test case using three-dimensional calculation grids with absorbing and emitting media in order to validate the Monte Carlo radiative solver and to choose the most efficient model for coupling. Then the results obtained using two different RTE solvers (Reciprocity Monte Carlo method and Discrete Ordinate Method) applied on a three-dimensional flame holder set-up with a correlated-k distribution model describing the real gas medium spectral radiative properties are compared not only in terms of the physical behavior of the flame, but also in computational performance (storage requirement, CPU time and parallelization efficiency). To cite this article: J. Zhang et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  12. A comparison of generalized hybrid Monte Carlo methods with and without momentum flip

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmatskaya, Elena; Bou-Rabee, Nawaf; Reich, Sebastian

    2009-04-01

    The generalized hybrid Monte Carlo (GHMC) method combines Metropolis corrected constant energy simulations with a partial random refreshment step in the particle momenta. The standard detailed balance condition requires that momenta are negated upon rejection of a molecular dynamics proposal step. The implication is a trajectory reversal upon rejection, which is undesirable when interpreting GHMC as thermostated molecular dynamics. We show that a modified detailed balance condition can be used to implement GHMC without momentum flips. The same modification can be applied to the generalized shadow hybrid Monte Carlo (GSHMC) method. Numerical results indicate that GHMC/GSHMC implementations with momentum flip display a favorable behavior in terms of sampling efficiency, i.e., the traditional GHMC/GSHMC implementations with momentum flip got the advantage of a higher acceptance rate and faster decorrelation of Monte Carlo samples. The difference is more pronounced for GHMC. We also numerically investigate the behavior of the GHMC method as a Langevin-type thermostat. We find that the GHMC method without momentum flip interferes less with the underlying stochastic molecular dynamics in terms of autocorrelation functions and it to be preferred over the GHMC method with momentum flip. The same finding applies to GSHMC.

  13. Development of continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient calculation methods in the shift Monte Carlo Code

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, C.; Martin, W.; Rearden, B.; Williams, M.

    2012-07-01

    Three methods for calculating continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients were developed and implemented into the Shift Monte Carlo code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used for two small-scale test problems and were evaluated in terms of speed, accuracy, efficiency, and memory requirements. A promising new method for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was developed and produced accurate sensitivity coefficients with figures of merit that were several orders of magnitude larger than those from existing methods. (authors)

  14. Application de la methode des sous-groupes au calcul Monte-Carlo multigroupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas

    This thesis is dedicated to the development of a Monte Carlo neutron transport solver based on the subgroup (or multiband) method. In this formalism, cross sections for resonant isotopes are represented in the form of probability tables on the whole energy spectrum. This study is intended in order to test and validate this approach in lattice physics and criticality-safety applications. The probability table method seems promising since it introduces an alternative computational way between the legacy continuous-energy representation and the multigroup method. In the first case, the amount of data invoked in continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculations can be very important and tend to slow down the overall computational time. In addition, this model preserves the quality of the physical laws present in the ENDF format. Due to its cheap computational cost, the multigroup Monte Carlo way is usually at the basis of production codes in criticality-safety studies. However, the use of a multigroup representation of the cross sections implies a preliminary calculation to take into account self-shielding effects for resonant isotopes. This is generally performed by deterministic lattice codes relying on the collision probability method. Using cross-section probability tables on the whole energy range permits to directly take into account self-shielding effects and can be employed in both lattice physics and criticality-safety calculations. Several aspects have been thoroughly studied: (1) The consistent computation of probability tables with a energy grid comprising only 295 or 361 groups. The CALENDF moment approach conducted to probability tables suitable for a Monte Carlo code. (2) The combination of the probability table sampling for the energy variable with the delta-tracking rejection technique for the space variable, and its impact on the overall efficiency of the proposed Monte Carlo algorithm. (3) The derivation of a model for taking into account anisotropic

  15. Monte Carlo method for photon heating using temperature-dependent optical properties.

    PubMed

    Slade, Adam Broadbent; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The Monte Carlo method for photon transport is often used to predict the volumetric heating that an optical source will induce inside a tissue or material. This method relies on constant (with respect to temperature) optical properties, specifically the coefficients of scattering and absorption. In reality, optical coefficients are typically temperature-dependent, leading to error in simulation results. The purpose of this study is to develop a method that can incorporate variable properties and accurately simulate systems where the temperature will greatly vary, such as in the case of laser-thawing of frozen tissues. A numerical simulation was developed that utilizes the Monte Carlo method for photon transport to simulate the thermal response of a system that allows temperature-dependent optical and thermal properties. This was done by combining traditional Monte Carlo photon transport with a heat transfer simulation to provide a feedback loop that selects local properties based on current temperatures, for each moment in time. Additionally, photon steps are segmented to accurately obtain path lengths within a homogenous (but not isothermal) material. Validation of the simulation was done using comparisons to established Monte Carlo simulations using constant properties, and a comparison to the Beer-Lambert law for temperature-variable properties. The simulation is able to accurately predict the thermal response of a system whose properties can vary with temperature. The difference in results between variable-property and constant property methods for the representative system of laser-heated silicon can become larger than 100K. This simulation will return more accurate results of optical irradiation absorption in a material which undergoes a large change in temperature. This increased accuracy in simulated results leads to better thermal predictions in living tissues and can provide enhanced planning and improved experimental and procedural outcomes. PMID

  16. Monte Carlo method for photon heating using temperature-dependent optical properties.

    PubMed

    Slade, Adam Broadbent; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The Monte Carlo method for photon transport is often used to predict the volumetric heating that an optical source will induce inside a tissue or material. This method relies on constant (with respect to temperature) optical properties, specifically the coefficients of scattering and absorption. In reality, optical coefficients are typically temperature-dependent, leading to error in simulation results. The purpose of this study is to develop a method that can incorporate variable properties and accurately simulate systems where the temperature will greatly vary, such as in the case of laser-thawing of frozen tissues. A numerical simulation was developed that utilizes the Monte Carlo method for photon transport to simulate the thermal response of a system that allows temperature-dependent optical and thermal properties. This was done by combining traditional Monte Carlo photon transport with a heat transfer simulation to provide a feedback loop that selects local properties based on current temperatures, for each moment in time. Additionally, photon steps are segmented to accurately obtain path lengths within a homogenous (but not isothermal) material. Validation of the simulation was done using comparisons to established Monte Carlo simulations using constant properties, and a comparison to the Beer-Lambert law for temperature-variable properties. The simulation is able to accurately predict the thermal response of a system whose properties can vary with temperature. The difference in results between variable-property and constant property methods for the representative system of laser-heated silicon can become larger than 100K. This simulation will return more accurate results of optical irradiation absorption in a material which undergoes a large change in temperature. This increased accuracy in simulated results leads to better thermal predictions in living tissues and can provide enhanced planning and improved experimental and procedural outcomes.

  17. Multilevel Monte Carlo methods for computing failure probability of porous media flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagerlund, F.; Hellman, F.; Målqvist, A.; Niemi, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study improvements of the standard and multilevel Monte Carlo method for point evaluation of the cumulative distribution function (failure probability) applied to porous media two-phase flow simulations with uncertain permeability. To illustrate the methods, we study an injection scenario where we consider sweep efficiency of the injected phase as quantity of interest and seek the probability that this quantity of interest is smaller than a critical value. In the sampling procedure, we use computable error bounds on the sweep efficiency functional to identify small subsets of realizations to solve highest accuracy by means of what we call selective refinement. We quantify the performance gains possible by using selective refinement in combination with both the standard and multilevel Monte Carlo method. We also identify issues in the process of practical implementation of the methods. We conclude that significant savings in computational cost are possible for failure probability estimation in a realistic setting using the selective refinement technique, both in combination with standard and multilevel Monte Carlo.

  18. Molecular simulation of shocked materials using the reactive Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, John K.; Rice, Betsy M.

    2002-08-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of the reactive Monte Carlo (RxMC) simulation method [J. K. Johnson, A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, and K. E. Gubbins, Mol. Phys. 81, 717 (1994); W. R. Smith and B. Tříska, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 3019 (1994)] for calculating the shock Hugoniot properties of a material. The method does not require interaction potentials that simulate bond breaking or bond formation; it requires only the intermolecular potentials and the ideal-gas partition functions for the reactive species that are present. By performing Monte Carlo sampling of forward and reverse reaction steps, the RxMC method provides information on the chemical equilibria states of the shocked material, including the density of the reactive mixture and the mole fractions of the reactive species. We illustrate the methodology for two simple systems (shocked liquid NO and shocked liquid N2), where we find excellent agreement with experimental measurements. The results show that the RxMC methodology provides an important simulation tool capable of testing models used in current detonation theory predictions. Further applications and extensions of the reactive Monte Carlo method are discussed.

  19. GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo simulation of particle coagulation based on the inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J.; Kruis, F. E.

    2013-09-01

    Simulating particle coagulation using Monte Carlo methods is in general a challenging computational task due to its numerical complexity and the computing cost. Currently, the lowest computing costs are obtained when applying a graphic processing unit (GPU) originally developed for speeding up graphic processing in the consumer market. In this article we present an implementation of accelerating a Monte Carlo method based on the Inverse scheme for simulating particle coagulation on the GPU. The abundant data parallelism embedded within the Monte Carlo method is explained as it will allow an efficient parallelization of the MC code on the GPU. Furthermore, the computation accuracy of the MC on GPU was validated with a benchmark, a CPU-based discrete-sectional method. To evaluate the performance gains by using the GPU, the computing time on the GPU against its sequential counterpart on the CPU were compared. The measured speedups show that the GPU can accelerate the execution of the MC code by a factor 10-100, depending on the chosen particle number of simulation particles. The algorithm shows a linear dependence of computing time with the number of simulation particles, which is a remarkable result in view of the n2 dependence of the coagulation.

  20. Imaging in turbid media by modified filtered back projection method using data from Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Ashwani; Vasu, Ram M.

    2003-07-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis in medicine has shown considerable attention in recent years. Several methods are already available for imaging the biological tissue like X-ray computerized tomography, magentic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging et c. But each of these methods has its own disadvantages. Optical tomography which uses NIR light is one of the emerging methods in teh field of medical imaging because it is non-invasive in nature. The only problem that occurs in using light for imaging the tissue is that it is highly scattered inside tissue, so the propagation of light in tissue is not confined to straight lines as is the case with X-ray tomography. Therefore the need arises to understand the behaviour of propagation of light in tissue. There are several methods for light interaction with tissue. Monte Carlo method is one of these methods which is a simple technique for simulation of light through tissue. The only problem faced with Monte Carlo simulation is its high computational time. Once the data is obtained using Monte Carlo simulation, it need to be inverted to obtain the reconstruction of tissue image. There are standard methods of reconstruction like algebraic reconstruction method, filtered backprojection method etc. But these methods can not be used as such in the case when light is used as probing radiations because it is highly scattered inside the tissue. The standard filtered backprojection method has been modified so that the zigzag path of photons is taken into consideration while back projecting the data. This is achieved by dividing the tissue domain in a square grid and storing the average path traversed in each grid element. It has been observed that the reconstruction obtained using this modification is much better than the result in case of standard filtered backprojection method.

  1. A step beyond the Monte Carlo method in economics: Application of multivariate normal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabaivanov, S.; Malechkova, A.; Marchev, A.; Milev, M.; Markovska, V.; Nikolova, K.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we discuss the numerical algorithm of Milev-Tagliani [25] used for pricing of discrete double barrier options. The problem can be reduced to accurate valuation of an n-dimensional path integral with probability density function of a multivariate normal distribution. The efficient solution of this problem with the Milev-Tagliani algorithm is a step beyond the classical application of Monte Carlo for option pricing. We explore continuous and discrete monitoring of asset path pricing, compare the error of frequently applied quantitative methods such as the Monte Carlo method and finally analyze the accuracy of the Milev-Tagliani algorithm by presenting the profound research and important results of Honga, S. Leeb and T. Li [16].

  2. Effect of porosity on electrical conduction of simulated nanostructures by Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariani, R. S.; Abbas Hadi, N.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical conduction of deposited nanostructures is studied by oblique angle deposition. At first, a medium is simulated as nanocolumns by Monte Carlo method, then the effects of porosity on electron transport in 1D and 2D are investigated. The results show that more electrons transfer in media with low porosity, but with increasing porosity, the distance between nanocolumns expands and less electrons transfer. Therefore, the transport current reduces at the surface.

  3. A local'' exponential transform method for global variance reduction in Monte Carlo transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.S. ); Larsen, E.W. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Numerous variance reduction techniques, such as splitting/Russian roulette, weight windows, and the exponential transform exist for improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo transport calculations. Typically, however, these methods, while reducing the variance in the problem area of interest tend to increase the variance in other, presumably less important, regions. As such, these methods tend to be not as effective in Monte Carlo calculations which require the minimization of the variance everywhere. Recently, Local'' Exponential Transform (LET) methods have been developed as a means of approximating the zero-variance solution. A numerical solution to the adjoint diffusion equation is used, along with an exponential representation of the adjoint flux in each cell, to determine local'' biasing parameters. These parameters are then used to bias the forward Monte Carlo transport calculation in a manner similar to the conventional exponential transform, but such that the transform parameters are now local in space and energy, not global. Results have shown that the Local Exponential Transform often offers a significant improvement over conventional geometry splitting/Russian roulette with weight windows. Since the biasing parameters for the Local Exponential Transform were determined from a low-order solution to the adjoint transport problem, the LET has been applied in problems where it was desirable to minimize the variance in a detector region. The purpose of this paper is to show that by basing the LET method upon a low-order solution to the forward transport problem, one can instead obtain biasing parameters which will minimize the maximum variance in a Monte Carlo transport calculation.

  4. A ``local`` exponential transform method for global variance reduction in Monte Carlo transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.S.; Larsen, E.W.

    1992-08-01

    Numerous variance reduction techniques, such as splitting/Russian roulette, weight windows, and the exponential transform exist for improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo transport calculations. Typically, however, these methods, while reducing the variance in the problem area of interest tend to increase the variance in other, presumably less important, regions. As such, these methods tend to be not as effective in Monte Carlo calculations which require the minimization of the variance everywhere. Recently, ``Local`` Exponential Transform (LET) methods have been developed as a means of approximating the zero-variance solution. A numerical solution to the adjoint diffusion equation is used, along with an exponential representation of the adjoint flux in each cell, to determine ``local`` biasing parameters. These parameters are then used to bias the forward Monte Carlo transport calculation in a manner similar to the conventional exponential transform, but such that the transform parameters are now local in space and energy, not global. Results have shown that the Local Exponential Transform often offers a significant improvement over conventional geometry splitting/Russian roulette with weight windows. Since the biasing parameters for the Local Exponential Transform were determined from a low-order solution to the adjoint transport problem, the LET has been applied in problems where it was desirable to minimize the variance in a detector region. The purpose of this paper is to show that by basing the LET method upon a low-order solution to the forward transport problem, one can instead obtain biasing parameters which will minimize the maximum variance in a Monte Carlo transport calculation.

  5. The massive schwinger model on the lattice studied via a local hamiltonian Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, A.; Ranft, J.

    1983-10-01

    A local hamiltonian Monte Carlo method is used to study the massive Schwinger model. A non-vanishing quark condensate is found and the dependence of the condensate and the string tension on the background field is calculated. These results reproduce well the expected continuum results. We study also the first order phase transition which separates the weak and strong coupling regimes and find evidence for the behaviour conjectured by Coleman.

  6. Application of the vector Monte-Carlo method in polarisation optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Churmakov, D Yu; Kuz'min, V L; Meglinskii, I V

    2006-11-30

    The vector Monte-Carlo method is developed and applied to polarisation optical coherence tomography. The basic principles of simulation of the propagation of polarised electromagnetic radiation with a small coherence length are considered under conditions of multiple scattering. The results of numerical simulations for Rayleigh scattering well agree with the Milne solution generalised to the case of an electromagnetic field and with theoretical calculations in the diffusion approximation. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  7. Monte Carlo Methods in Materials Science Based on FLUKA and ROOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, Lawrence; Wilson, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Andersen, Victor

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of mitigation measures for space radiation protection necessarily involves the relevant fields of nuclear physics and particle transport modeling. One method of modeling the interaction of radiation traversing matter is Monte Carlo analysis, a subject that has been evolving since the very advent of nuclear reactors and particle accelerators in experimental physics. Countermeasures for radiation protection from neutrons near nuclear reactors, for example, were an early application and Monte Carlo methods were quickly adapted to this general field of investigation. The project discussed here is concerned with taking the latest tools and technology in Monte Carlo analysis and adapting them to space applications such as radiation shielding design for spacecraft, as well as investigating how next-generation Monte Carlos can complement the existing analytical methods currently used by NASA. We have chosen to employ the Monte Carlo program known as FLUKA (A legacy acronym based on the German for FLUctuating KAscade) used to simulate all of the particle transport, and the CERN developed graphical-interface object-oriented analysis software called ROOT. One aspect of space radiation analysis for which the Monte Carlo s are particularly suited is the study of secondary radiation produced as albedoes in the vicinity of the structural geometry involved. This broad goal of simulating space radiation transport through the relevant materials employing the FLUKA code necessarily requires the addition of the capability to simulate all heavy-ion interactions from 10 MeV/A up to the highest conceivable energies. For all energies above 3 GeV/A the Dual Parton Model (DPM) is currently used, although the possible improvement of the DPMJET event generator for energies 3-30 GeV/A is being considered. One of the major tasks still facing us is the provision for heavy ion interactions below 3 GeV/A. The ROOT interface is being developed in conjunction with the

  8. A Hybrid Monte Carlo-Deterministic Method for Global Binary Stochastic Medium Transport Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Keady, K P; Brantley, P

    2010-03-04

    Global deep-penetration transport problems are difficult to solve using traditional Monte Carlo techniques. In these problems, the scalar flux distribution is desired at all points in the spatial domain (global nature), and the scalar flux typically drops by several orders of magnitude across the problem (deep-penetration nature). As a result, few particle histories may reach certain regions of the domain, producing a relatively large variance in tallies in those regions. Implicit capture (also known as survival biasing or absorption suppression) can be used to increase the efficiency of the Monte Carlo transport algorithm to some degree. A hybrid Monte Carlo-deterministic technique has previously been developed by Cooper and Larsen to reduce variance in global problems by distributing particles more evenly throughout the spatial domain. This hybrid method uses an approximate deterministic estimate of the forward scalar flux distribution to automatically generate weight windows for the Monte Carlo transport simulation, avoiding the necessity for the code user to specify the weight window parameters. In a binary stochastic medium, the material properties at a given spatial location are known only statistically. The most common approach to solving particle transport problems involving binary stochastic media is to use the atomic mix (AM) approximation in which the transport problem is solved using ensemble-averaged material properties. The most ubiquitous deterministic model developed specifically for solving binary stochastic media transport problems is the Levermore-Pomraning (L-P) model. Zimmerman and Adams proposed a Monte Carlo algorithm (Algorithm A) that solves the Levermore-Pomraning equations and another Monte Carlo algorithm (Algorithm B) that is more accurate as a result of improved local material realization modeling. Recent benchmark studies have shown that Algorithm B is often significantly more accurate than Algorithm A (and therefore the L-P model

  9. Review of improved Monte Carlo methods in uncertainty-based design optimization for aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xingzhi; Chen, Xiaoqian; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Yao, Wen

    2016-10-01

    Ever-increasing demands of uncertainty-based design, analysis, and optimization in aerospace vehicles motivate the development of Monte Carlo methods with wide adaptability and high accuracy. This paper presents a comprehensive review of typical improved Monte Carlo methods and summarizes their characteristics to aid the uncertainty-based multidisciplinary design optimization (UMDO). Among them, Bayesian inference aims to tackle the problems with the availability of prior information like measurement data. Importance sampling (IS) settles the inconvenient sampling and difficult propagation through the incorporation of an intermediate importance distribution or sequential distributions. Optimized Latin hypercube sampling (OLHS) is a stratified sampling approach to achieving better space-filling and non-collapsing characteristics. Meta-modeling approximation based on Monte Carlo saves the computational cost by using cheap meta-models for the output response. All the reviewed methods are illustrated by corresponding aerospace applications, which are compared to show their techniques and usefulness in UMDO, thus providing a beneficial reference for future theoretical and applied research.

  10. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods for lattice systems: A first look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, K.; Leovey, H.; Ammon, A.; Griewank, A.; Müller-Preussker, M.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the applicability of quasi-Monte Carlo methods to Euclidean lattice systems for quantum mechanics in order to improve the asymptotic error behavior of observables for such theories. In most cases the error of an observable calculated by averaging over random observations generated from an ordinary Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation behaves like N, where N is the number of observations. By means of quasi-Monte Carlo methods it is possible to improve this behavior for certain problems to N-1, or even further if the problems are regular enough. We adapted and applied this approach to simple systems like the quantum harmonic and anharmonic oscillator and verified an improved error scaling. Catalogue identifier: AERJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 67759 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2165365 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C and C++. Computer: PC. Operating system: Tested on GNU/Linux, should be portable to other operating systems with minimal efforts. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: No RAM: The memory usage directly scales with the number of samples and dimensions: Bytes used = “number of samples” × “number of dimensions” × 8 Bytes (double precision). Classification: 4.13, 11.5, 23. External routines: FFTW 3 library (http://www.fftw.org) Nature of problem: Certain physical models formulated as a quantum field theory through the Feynman path integral, such as quantum chromodynamics, require a non-perturbative treatment of the path integral. The only known approach that achieves this is the lattice regularization. In this formulation the path integral is discretized to a finite, but very high dimensional integral. So far only Monte

  11. Monte Carlo and deterministic computational methods for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng; Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2013-07-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction β plays an important role in kinetics and static analysis of the reactor physics experiments. It is used as reactivity unit referred to as "dollar". Usually, it is obtained by computer simulation due to the difficulty in measuring it experimentally. In 1965, Keepin proposed a method, widely used in the literature, for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction β. This method requires calculation of the adjoint neutron flux as a weighting function of the phase space inner products and is easy to implement by deterministic codes. With Monte Carlo codes, the solution of the adjoint neutron transport equation is much more difficult because of the continuous-energy treatment of nuclear data. Consequently, alternative methods, which do not require the explicit calculation of the adjoint neutron flux, have been proposed. In 1997, Bretscher introduced the k-ratio method for calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction; this method is based on calculating the multiplication factor of a nuclear reactor core with and without the contribution of delayed neutrons. The multiplication factor set by the delayed neutrons (the delayed multiplication factor) is obtained as the difference between the total and the prompt multiplication factors. Using Monte Carlo calculation Bretscher evaluated the β as the ratio between the delayed and total multiplication factors (therefore the method is often referred to as the k-ratio method). In the present work, the k-ratio method is applied by Monte Carlo (MCNPX) and deterministic (PARTISN) codes. In the latter case, the ENDF/B nuclear data library of the fuel isotopes (235U and 238U) has been processed by the NJOY code with and without the delayed neutron data to prepare multi-group WIMSD neutron libraries for the lattice physics code DRAGON, which was used to generate the PARTISN macroscopic cross sections. In recent years Meulekamp and van der Marck in 2006 and Nauchi and Kameyama

  12. A combined approach to the estimation of statistical error of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, M. Yu.; Shkarupa, E. V.

    2015-11-01

    Presently, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is widely used for solving rarefied gas dynamics problems. As applied to steady-state problems, a feature of this method is the use of dependent sample values of random variables for the calculation of macroparameters of gas flows. A new combined approach to estimating the statistical error of the method is proposed that does not practically require additional computations, and it is applicable for any degree of probabilistic dependence of sample values. Features of the proposed approach are analyzed theoretically and numerically. The approach is tested using the classical Fourier problem and the problem of supersonic flow of rarefied gas through permeable obstacle.

  13. Path-integral Monte Carlo method for Rényi entanglement entropies.

    PubMed

    Herdman, C M; Inglis, Stephen; Roy, P-N; Melko, R G; Del Maestro, A

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to measure the Rényi entanglement entropies in systems of interacting bosons in the continuum. This approach is based on a path-integral ground state method that can be applied to interacting itinerant bosons in any spatial dimension with direct relevance to experimental systems of quantum fluids. We demonstrate how it may be used to compute spatial mode entanglement, particle partitioned entanglement, and the entanglement of particles, providing insights into quantum correlations generated by fluctuations, indistinguishability, and interactions. We present proof-of-principle calculations and benchmark against an exactly soluble model of interacting bosons in one spatial dimension. As this algorithm retains the fundamental polynomial scaling of quantum Monte Carlo when applied to sign-problem-free models, future applications should allow for the study of entanglement entropy in large-scale many-body systems of interacting bosons.

  14. Electron density of states of Fe-based superconductors: Quantum trajectory Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashurnikov, V. A.; Krasavin, A. V.; Zhumagulov, Ya. V.

    2016-03-01

    The spectral and total electron densities of states in two-dimensional FeAs clusters, which simulate iron-based superconductors, have been calculated using the generalized quantum Monte Carlo algorithm within the full two-orbital model. Spectra have been reconstructed by solving the integral equation relating the Matsubara Green's function and spectral density by the method combining the gradient descent and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations have been performed for clusters with dimensions up to 10 × 10 FeAs cells. The profiles of the Fermi surface for the entire Brillouin zone have been presented in the quasiparticle approximation. Data for the total density of states near the Fermi level have been obtained. The effect of the interaction parameter, size of the cluster, and temperature on the spectrum of excitations has been studied.

  15. Visual improvement for bad handwriting based on Monte-Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cao; Xiao, Jianguo; Xu, Canhui; Jia, Wenhua

    2014-03-01

    A visual improvement algorithm based on Monte Carlo simulation is proposed in this paper, in order to enhance visual effects for bad handwriting. The whole improvement process is to use well designed typeface so as to optimize bad handwriting image. In this process, a series of linear operators for image transformation are defined for transforming typeface image to approach handwriting image. And specific parameters of linear operators are estimated by Monte Carlo method. Visual improvement experiments illustrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively enhance visual effect for handwriting image as well as maintain the original handwriting features, such as tilt, stroke order and drawing direction etc. The proposed visual improvement algorithm, in this paper, has a huge potential to be applied in tablet computer and Mobile Internet, in order to improve user experience on handwriting.

  16. An Automated, Multi-Step Monte Carlo Burnup Code System.

    2003-07-14

    Version 02 MONTEBURNS Version 2 calculates coupled neutronic/isotopic results for nuclear systems and produces a large number of criticality and burnup results based on various material feed/removal specifications, power(s), and time intervals. MONTEBURNS is a fully automated tool that links the LANL MCNP Monte Carlo transport code with a radioactive decay and burnup code. Highlights on changes to Version 2 are listed in the transmittal letter. Along with other minor improvements in MONTEBURNS Version 2,more » the option was added to use CINDER90 instead of ORIGEN2 as the depletion/decay part of the system. CINDER90 is a multi-group depletion code developed at LANL and is not currently available from RSICC. This MONTEBURNS release was tested with various combinations of CCC-715/MCNPX 2.4.0, CCC-710/MCNP5, CCC-700/MCNP4C, CCC-371/ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN2.1 and CINDER90. Perl is required software and is not included in this distribution. MCNP, ORIGEN2, and CINDER90 are not included.« less

  17. An Automated, Multi-Step Monte Carlo Burnup Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    TRELLUE, HOLLY R.

    2003-07-14

    Version 02 MONTEBURNS Version 2 calculates coupled neutronic/isotopic results for nuclear systems and produces a large number of criticality and burnup results based on various material feed/removal specifications, power(s), and time intervals. MONTEBURNS is a fully automated tool that links the LANL MCNP Monte Carlo transport code with a radioactive decay and burnup code. Highlights on changes to Version 2 are listed in the transmittal letter. Along with other minor improvements in MONTEBURNS Version 2, the option was added to use CINDER90 instead of ORIGEN2 as the depletion/decay part of the system. CINDER90 is a multi-group depletion code developed at LANL and is not currently available from RSICC. This MONTEBURNS release was tested with various combinations of CCC-715/MCNPX 2.4.0, CCC-710/MCNP5, CCC-700/MCNP4C, CCC-371/ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN2.1 and CINDER90. Perl is required software and is not included in this distribution. MCNP, ORIGEN2, and CINDER90 are not included.

  18. Neural decoding using a parallel sequential Monte Carlo method on point processes with ensemble effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Wang, Yiwen; Wang, Fang; Liao, Yuxi; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Li, Hongbao; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Sequential Monte Carlo estimation on point processes has been successfully applied to predict the movement from neural activity. However, there exist some issues along with this method such as the simplified tuning model and the high computational complexity, which may degenerate the decoding performance of motor brain machine interfaces. In this paper, we adopt a general tuning model which takes recent ensemble activity into account. The goodness-of-fit analysis demonstrates that the proposed model can predict the neuronal response more accurately than the one only depending on kinematics. A new sequential Monte Carlo algorithm based on the proposed model is constructed. The algorithm can significantly reduce the root mean square error of decoding results, which decreases 23.6% in position estimation. In addition, we accelerate the decoding speed by implementing the proposed algorithm in a massive parallel manner on GPU. The results demonstrate that the spike trains can be decoded as point process in real time even with 8000 particles or 300 neurons, which is over 10 times faster than the serial implementation. The main contribution of our work is to enable the sequential Monte Carlo algorithm with point process observation to output the movement estimation much faster and more accurately.

  19. Neural Decoding Using a Parallel Sequential Monte Carlo Method on Point Processes with Ensemble Effect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Liao, Yuxi; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Sequential Monte Carlo estimation on point processes has been successfully applied to predict the movement from neural activity. However, there exist some issues along with this method such as the simplified tuning model and the high computational complexity, which may degenerate the decoding performance of motor brain machine interfaces. In this paper, we adopt a general tuning model which takes recent ensemble activity into account. The goodness-of-fit analysis demonstrates that the proposed model can predict the neuronal response more accurately than the one only depending on kinematics. A new sequential Monte Carlo algorithm based on the proposed model is constructed. The algorithm can significantly reduce the root mean square error of decoding results, which decreases 23.6% in position estimation. In addition, we accelerate the decoding speed by implementing the proposed algorithm in a massive parallel manner on GPU. The results demonstrate that the spike trains can be decoded as point process in real time even with 8000 particles or 300 neurons, which is over 10 times faster than the serial implementation. The main contribution of our work is to enable the sequential Monte Carlo algorithm with point process observation to output the movement estimation much faster and more accurately. PMID:24949462

  20. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for statistical analysis of RF photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Piels, Molly; Zibar, Darko

    2016-02-01

    The microwave reflection coefficient is commonly used to characterize the impedance of high-speed optoelectronic devices. Error and uncertainty in equivalent circuit parameters measured using this data are systematically evaluated. The commonly used nonlinear least-squares method for estimating uncertainty is shown to give unsatisfactory and incorrect results due to the nonlinear relationship between the circuit parameters and the measured data. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are shown to provide superior results, both for individual devices and for assessing within-die variation. PMID:26906783

  1. Extrapolation method in the Monte Carlo Shell Model and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2011-05-06

    We demonstrate how the energy-variance extrapolation method works using the sequence of the approximated wave functions obtained by the Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM), taking {sup 56}Ni with pf-shell as an example. The extrapolation method is shown to work well even in the case that the MCSM shows slow convergence, such as {sup 72}Ge with f5pg9-shell. The structure of {sup 72}Se is also studied including the discussion of the shape-coexistence phenomenon.

  2. Estimating Super Heavy Element Event Random Probabilities Using Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyer, Mark; Henderson, Roger; Kenneally, Jacqueline; Moody, Kenton; Nelson, Sarah; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Wilk, Philip

    2009-10-01

    Because superheavy element (SHE) experiments involve very low event rates and low statistics, estimating the probability that a given event sequence is due to random events is extremely important in judging the validity of the data. A Monte Carlo method developed at LLNL [1] is used on recent SHE experimental data to calculate random event probabilities. Current SHE experimental activities in collaboration with scientists at Dubna, Russia will be discussed. [4pt] [1] N.J. Stoyer, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 455 (2000) 433.

  3. Numerical simulation of the blast impact problem using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anupam; Long, Lyle N.

    2004-10-01

    A particle approach using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to solve the problem of blast impact with structures. A novel approach to model the solid boundary condition for particle methods is presented. The solver is validated against an analytical solution of the Riemann shocktube problem and against experiments on interaction of a planar shock with a square cavity. Blast impact simulations are performed for two model shapes, a box and an I-shaped beam, assuming that the solid body does not deform. The solver uses domain decomposition technique to run in parallel. The parallel performance of the solver on two Beowulf clusters is also presented.

  4. A study of potential energy curves from the model space quantum Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsuka, Yuhki; Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2015-12-07

    We report on the first application of the model space quantum Monte Carlo (MSQMC) to potential energy curves (PECs) for the excited states of C{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} to validate the applicability of the method. A parallel MSQMC code is implemented with the initiator approximation to enable efficient sampling. The PECs of MSQMC for various excited and ionized states are compared with those from the Rydberg-Klein-Rees and full configuration interaction methods. The results indicate the usefulness of MSQMC for precise PECs in a wide range obviating problems concerning quasi-degeneracy.

  5. A boundary-dispatch Monte Carlo (Exodus) method for analysis of conductive heat transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Naraghi, M.H.N.; Shunchang Tsai

    1993-12-01

    A boundary-dispatch Monte Carlo (Exodus) method, in which the particles are dispatched from the boundaries of a conductive medium or source of heat, is developed. A fixed number of particles are dispatched from a boundary node to the nearest internal node. These particles make random walks within the medium similar to that of the conventional Monte Carlo method. Once a particle visits an internal node, a number equal to the temperature of the boundary node from which particles are dispatched is added to a counter. Performing this procedure for all boundary nodes, the temperature of a node can be determined by dividing the flag, or the counter of this node by the total number of particle visits to this node. Two versions of the boundary-dispatch method (BDM) are presented, multispecies and bispecies BDM. The results of bispecies BDM based on the Exodus dispatching method compare well with the Gauss-Seidel method in both accuracy and computational time. Its computational time is much less than the shrinking-boundary Exodus method.

  6. Monte Carlo method for calculating oxygen abundances and their uncertainties from strong-line flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, F. B.; Modjaz, M.; Oh, S. M.; Fierroz, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Kewley, L.; Graur, O.

    2016-07-01

    We present the open-source Python code pyMCZ that determines oxygen abundance and its distribution from strong emission lines in the standard metallicity calibrators, based on the original IDL code of Kewley and Dopita (2002) with updates from Kewley and Ellison (2008), and expanded to include more recently developed calibrators. The standard strong-line diagnostics have been used to estimate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium through various emission line ratios (referred to as indicators) in many areas of astrophysics, including galaxy evolution and supernova host galaxy studies. We introduce a Python implementation of these methods that, through Monte Carlo sampling, better characterizes the statistical oxygen abundance confidence region including the effect due to the propagation of observational uncertainties. These uncertainties are likely to dominate the error budget in the case of distant galaxies, hosts of cosmic explosions. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, our code produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 15 metallicity calibrators simultaneously, as well as for E(B- V) , and estimates their median values and their 68% confidence regions. We provide the option of outputting the full Monte Carlo distributions, and their Kernel Density estimates. We test our code on emission line measurements from a sample of nearby supernova host galaxies (z < 0.15) and compare our metallicity results with those from previous methods. We show that our metallicity estimates are consistent with previous methods but yield smaller statistical uncertainties. It should be noted that systematic uncertainties are not taken into account. We also offer visualization tools to assess the spread of the oxygen abundance in the different calibrators, as well as the shape of the estimated oxygen abundance distribution in each calibrator, and develop robust metrics for determining the appropriate Monte Carlo sample size. The code

  7. Analysis and modeling of localized heat generation by tumor-targeted nanoparticles (Monte Carlo methods)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanattalab, Ehsan; SalmanOgli, Ahmad; Piskin, Erhan

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the tumor-targeted nanoparticles that influence heat generation. We suppose that all nanoparticles are fully functionalized and can find the target using active targeting methods. Unlike the commonly used methods, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the treatment procedure proposed in this study is purely noninvasive, which is considered to be a significant merit. It is found that the localized heat generation due to targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher than other areas. By engineering the optical properties of nanoparticles, including scattering, absorption coefficients, and asymmetry factor (cosine scattering angle), the heat generated in the tumor's area reaches to such critical state that can burn the targeted tumor. The amount of heat generated by inserting smart agents, due to the surface Plasmon resonance, will be remarkably high. The light-matter interactions and trajectory of incident photon upon targeted tissues are simulated by MIE theory and Monte Carlo method, respectively. Monte Carlo method is a statistical one by which we can accurately probe the photon trajectories into a simulation area.

  8. Monte Carlo Method for Determining Earthquake Recurrence Parameters from Short Paleoseismic Catalogs: Example Calculations for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Paleoearthquake observations often lack enough events at a given site to directly define a probability density function (PDF) for earthquake recurrence. Sites with fewer than 10-15 intervals do not provide enough information to reliably determine the shape of the PDF using standard maximum-likelihood techniques [e.g., Ellsworth et al., 1999]. In this paper I present a method that attempts to fit wide ranges of distribution parameters to short paleoseismic series. From repeated Monte Carlo draws, it becomes possible to quantitatively estimate most likely recurrence PDF parameters, and a ranked distribution of parameters is returned that can be used to assess uncertainties in hazard calculations. In tests on short synthetic earthquake series, the method gives results that cluster around the mean of the input distribution, whereas maximum likelihood methods return the sample means [e.g., NIST/SEMATECH, 2006]. For short series (fewer than 10 intervals), sample means tend to reflect the median of an asymmetric recurrence distribution, possibly leading to an overestimate of the hazard should they be used in probability calculations. Therefore a Monte Carlo approach may be useful for assessing recurrence from limited paleoearthquake records. Further, the degree of functional dependence among parameters like mean recurrence interval and coefficient of variation can be established. The method is described for use with time-independent and time-dependent PDF?s, and results from 19 paleoseismic sequences on strike-slip faults throughout the state of California are given.

  9. Monte Carlo method for determining earthquake recurrence parameters from short paleoseismic catalogs: Example calculations for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2008-01-01

    Paleoearthquake observations often lack enough events at a given site to directly define a probability density function (PDF) for earthquake recurrence. Sites with fewer than 10-15 intervals do not provide enough information to reliably determine the shape of the PDF using standard maximum-likelihood techniques (e.g., Ellsworth et al., 1999). In this paper I present a method that attempts to fit wide ranges of distribution parameters to short paleoseismic series. From repeated Monte Carlo draws, it becomes possible to quantitatively estimate most likely recurrence PDF parameters, and a ranked distribution of parameters is returned that can be used to assess uncertainties in hazard calculations. In tests on short synthetic earthquake series, the method gives results that cluster around the mean of the input distribution, whereas maximum likelihood methods return the sample means (e.g., NIST/SEMATECH, 2006). For short series (fewer than 10 intervals), sample means tend to reflect the median of an asymmetric recurrence distribution, possibly leading to an overestimate of the hazard should they be used in probability calculations. Therefore a Monte Carlo approach may be useful for assessing recurrence from limited paleoearthquake records. Further, the degree of functional dependence among parameters like mean recurrence interval and coefficient of variation can be established. The method is described for use with time-independent and time-dependent PDFs, and results from 19 paleoseismic sequences on strike-slip faults throughout the state of California are given.

  10. Suppressing nonphysical overheating with a modified implicit Monte Carlo method for time-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclarren, Ryan G; Urbatsch, Todd J

    2008-01-01

    In this note we develop a robust implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) algorithm based on more accurately updating the linearized equilibrium radiation energy density. The method does not introduce oscillations in the solution and has the same limit as {Delta}t{yields}{infinity} as the standard Fleck and Cummings IMC method. Moreover, the approach we introduce can be trivially added to current implementations of IMC by changing the definition of the Fleck factor. Using this new method we develop an adaptive scheme that uses either standard IMC or the modified method basing the adaptation on a zero-dimensional problem solved in each cell. Numerical results demonstrate that the new method alleviates both the nonphysical overheating that occurs in standard IMC when the time step is large and significantly diminishes the statistical noise in the solution.

  11. Three-dimensional hypersonic rarefied flow calculations using direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celenligil, M. Cevdet; Moss, James N.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of three-dimensional simulations on the hypersonic rarefied flows in an effort to understand the highly nonequilibrium flows about space vehicles entering the Earth's atmosphere for a realistic estimation of the aerothermal loads is presented. Calculations are performed using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method with a five-species reacting gas model, which accounts for rotational and vibrational internal energies. Results are obtained for the external flows about various bodies in the transitional flow regime. For the cases considered, convective heating, flowfield structure and overall aerodynamic coefficients are presented and comparisons are made with the available experimental data. The agreement between the calculated and measured results are very good.

  12. Bayesian and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for identifying nonlinear systems in the presence of uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Green, P. L.; Worden, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors outline the general principles behind an approach to Bayesian system identification and highlight the benefits of adopting a Bayesian framework when attempting to identify models of nonlinear dynamical systems in the presence of uncertainty. It is then described how, through a summary of some key algorithms, many of the potential difficulties associated with a Bayesian approach can be overcome through the use of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. The paper concludes with a case study, where an MCMC algorithm is used to facilitate the Bayesian system identification of a nonlinear dynamical system from experimentally observed acceleration time histories. PMID:26303916

  13. Refinement of overlapping local/global iteration method based on Monte Carlo/p-CMFD calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Y.; Yun, S.; Cho, N. Z.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the overlapping local/global (OLG) iteration method based on Monte Carlo/p-CMFD calculations is refined in two aspects. One is the consistent use of estimators to generate homogenized scattering cross sections. Another is that the incident or exiting angular interval is divided into multi-angular bins to modulate albedo boundary conditions for local problems. Numerical tests show that, compared to the one angle bin case in a previous study, the four angle bin case shows significantly improved results. (authors)

  14. Microlens assembly error analysis for light field camera based on Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sai; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Wei; Liu, Bin; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes numerical analysis of microlens assembly errors in light field cameras using the Monte Carlo method. Assuming that there were no manufacturing errors, home-built program was used to simulate images of coupling distance error, movement error and rotation error that could appear during microlens installation. By researching these images, sub-aperture images and refocus images, we found that the images present different degrees of fuzziness and deformation for different microlens assembly errors, while the subaperture image presents aliasing, obscured images and other distortions that result in unclear refocus images.

  15. Electronic structure of solid FeO at high pressures by quantum Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolorenč, Jindřich; Mitas, Lubos

    2010-02-01

    We determine equation of state of stoichiometric FeO by employing the diffusion Monte Carlo method. The fermionic nodes of the many-body wave function are fixed by a single Slater determinant of one-particle orbitals extracted from spin-unrestricted Kohn-Sham equations utilizing a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. The calculated ambient pressure properties agree very well with available experimental data. At approximately 65 GPa, the atomic lattice is found to change from the rocksalt B1 to the NiAs-type inverse B8 structure.

  16. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  17. Phase coexistence in heterogeneous porous media: a new extension to Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation method.

    PubMed

    Puibasset, Joël

    2005-04-01

    The effect of confinement on phase behavior of simple fluids is still an area of intensive research. In between experiment and theory, molecular simulation is a powerful tool to study the effect of confinement in realistic porous materials, containing some disorder. Previous simulation works aiming at establishing the phase diagram of a confined Lennard-Jones-type fluid, concentrated on simple pore geometries (slits or cylinders). The development of the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo technique by Panagiotopoulos [Mol. Phys. 61, 813 (1987)], greatly favored the study of such simple geometries for two reasons. First, the technique is very efficient to calculate the phase diagram, since each run (at a given temperature) converges directly to an equilibrium between a gaslike and a liquidlike phase. Second, due to volume exchange procedure between the two phases, at least one invariant direction of space is required for applicability of this method, which is the case for slits or cylinders. Generally, the introduction of some disorder in such simple pores breaks the initial invariance in one of the space directions and prevents to work in the Gibbs ensemble. The simulation techniques for such disordered systems are numerous (grand canonical Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics, histogram reweighting, N-P-T+test method, Gibbs-Duhem integration procedure, etc.). However, the Gibbs ensemble technique, which gives directly the coexistence between phases, was never generalized to such systems. In this work, we focus on two weakly disordered pores for which a modified Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo technique can be applied. One of the pores is geometrically undulated, whereas the second is cylindrical but presents a chemical variation which gives rise to a modulation of the wall potential. In the first case almost no change in the phase diagram is observed, whereas in the second strong modifications are reported. PMID:15847492

  18. The applicability of certain Monte Carlo methods to the analysis of interacting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Krapp, D.M. Jr.

    1998-05-01

    The authors consider polymers, modeled as self-avoiding walks with interactions on a hexagonal lattice, and examine the applicability of certain Monte Carlo methods for estimating their mean properties at equilibrium. Specifically, the authors use the pivoting algorithm of Madras and Sokal and Metroplis rejection to locate the phase transition, which is known to occur at {beta}{sub crit} {approx} 0.99, and to recalculate the known value of the critical exponent {nu} {approx} 0.58 of the system for {beta} = {beta}{sub crit}. Although the pivoting-Metropolis algorithm works well for short walks (N < 300), for larger N the Metropolis criterion combined with the self-avoidance constraint lead to an unacceptably small acceptance fraction. In addition, the algorithm becomes effectively non-ergodic, getting trapped in valleys whose centers are local energy minima in phase space, leading to convergence towards different values of {nu}. The authors use a variety of tools, e.g. entropy estimation and histograms, to improve the results for large N, but they are only of limited effectiveness. Their estimate of {beta}{sub crit} using smaller values of N is 1.01 {+-} 0.01, and the estimate for {nu} at this value of {beta} is 0.59 {+-} 0.005. They conclude that even a seemingly simple system and a Monte Carlo algorithm which satisfies, in principle, ergodicity and detailed balance conditions, can in practice fail to sample phase space accurately and thus not allow accurate estimations of thermal averages. This should serve as a warning to people who use Monte Carlo methods in complicated polymer folding calculations. The structure of the phase space combined with the algorithm itself can lead to surprising behavior, and simply increasing the number of samples in the calculation does not necessarily lead to more accurate results.

  19. Dynamic load balancing for petascale quantum Monte Carlo applications: The Alias method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, C. D.; Krishnan, S.; Srinivasan, A.; Kent, P. R. C.

    2013-02-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo is a highly accurate Quantum Monte Carlo method for electronic structure calculations of materials, but it requires frequent load balancing or population redistribution steps to maintain efficiency on parallel machines. This step can be a significant factor affecting performance, and will become more important as the number of processing elements increases. We propose a new dynamic load balancing algorithm, the Alias Method, and evaluate it theoretically and empirically. An important feature of the new algorithm is that the load can be perfectly balanced with each process receiving at most one message. It is also optimal in the maximum size of messages received by any process. We also optimize its implementation to reduce network contention, a process facilitated by the low messaging requirement of the algorithm: a simple renumbering of the MPI ranks based on proximity and a space filling curve significantly improves the MPI Allgather performance. Empirical results on the petaflop Cray XT Jaguar supercomputer at ORNL show up to 30% improvement in performance on 120,000 cores. The load balancing algorithm may be straightforwardly implemented in existing codes. The algorithm may also be employed by any method with many near identical computational tasks that require load balancing.

  20. An off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo method using local environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konwar, Dhrubajit; Bhute, Vijesh J.; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2011-11-01

    We present a method called local environment kinetic Monte Carlo (LE-KMC) method for efficiently performing off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of activated processes in material systems. Like other off-lattice KMC schemes, new atomic processes can be found on-the-fly in LE-KMC. However, a unique feature of LE-KMC is that as long as the assumption that all processes and rates depend only on the local environment is satisfied, LE-KMC provides a general algorithm for (i) unambiguously describing a process in terms of its local atomic environments, (ii) storing new processes and environments in a catalog for later use with standard KMC, and (iii) updating the system based on the local information once a process has been selected for a KMC move. Search, classification, storage and retrieval steps needed while employing local environments and processes in the LE-KMC method are discussed. The advantages and computational cost of LE-KMC are discussed. We assess the performance of the LE-KMC algorithm by considering test systems involving diffusion in a submonolayer Ag and Ag-Cu alloy films on Ag(001) surface.

  1. Dynamic load balancing for petascale quantum Monte Carlo applications: The Alias method

    SciTech Connect

    Sudheer, C. D.; Krishnan, S.; Srinivasan, A.; Kent, P. R. C.

    2013-02-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo is the most accurate widely used Quantum Monte Carlo method for the electronic structure of materials, but it requires frequent load balancing or population redistribution steps to maintain efficiency and avoid accumulation of systematic errors on parallel machines. The load balancing step can be a significant factor affecting performance, and will become more important as the number of processing elements increases. We propose a new dynamic load balancing algorithm, the Alias Method, and evaluate it theoretically and empirically. An important feature of the new algorithm is that the load can be perfectly balanced with each process receiving at most one message. It is also optimal in the maximum size of messages received by any process. We also optimize its implementation to reduce network contention, a process facilitated by the low messaging requirement of the algorithm. Empirical results on the petaflop Cray XT Jaguar supercomputer at ORNL showing up to 30% improvement in performance on 120,000 cores. The load balancing algorithm may be straightforwardly implemented in existing codes. The algorithm may also be employed by any method with many near identical computational tasks that requires load balancing.

  2. Differential Monte Carlo method for computing seismogram envelopes and their partial derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2016-05-01

    We present an efficient method that is applicable to waveform inversions of seismogram envelopes for structural parameters describing scattering properties in the Earth. We developed a differential Monte Carlo method that can simultaneously compute synthetic envelopes and their partial derivatives with respect to structural parameters, which greatly reduces the required CPU time. Our method has no theoretical limitations to apply to the problems with anisotropic scattering in a heterogeneous background medium. The effects of S wave polarity directions and phase differences between SH and SV components are taken into account. Several numerical examples are presented to show that the intrinsic and scattering attenuation at the depth range of the asthenosphere have different impacts on the observed seismogram envelopes, thus suggesting that our method can potentially be applied to inversions for scattering properties in the deep Earth.

  3. Nuclear reactor transient analysis via a quasi-static kinetics Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, YuGwon; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-12-31

    The predictor-corrector quasi-static (PCQS) method is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for reactor transient analysis. To solve the transient fixed-source problem of the PCQS method, fission source iteration is used and a linear approximation of fission source distributions during a macro-time step is introduced to provide delayed neutron source. The conventional particle-tracking procedure is modified to solve the transient fixed-source problem via MC calculation. The PCQS method with MC calculation is compared with the direct time-dependent method of characteristics (MOC) on a TWIGL two-group problem for verification of the computer code. Then, the results on a continuous-energy problem are presented.

  4. A method for reducing the largest relative errors in Monte Carlo iterated-fission-source calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J. L.; Sutton, T. M.

    2013-07-01

    In Monte Carlo iterated-fission-source calculations relative uncertainties on local tallies tend to be larger in lower-power regions and smaller in higher-power regions. Reducing the largest uncertainties to an acceptable level simply by running a larger number of neutron histories is often prohibitively expensive. The uniform fission site method has been developed to yield a more spatially-uniform distribution of relative uncertainties. This is accomplished by biasing the density of fission neutron source sites while not biasing the solution. The method is integrated into the source iteration process, and does not require any auxiliary forward or adjoint calculations. For a given amount of computational effort, the use of the method results in a reduction of the largest uncertainties relative to the standard algorithm. Two variants of the method have been implemented and tested. Both have been shown to be effective. (authors)

  5. Nuclear reactor transient analysis via a quasi-static kinetics Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, YuGwon; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-12-01

    The predictor-corrector quasi-static (PCQS) method is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for reactor transient analysis. To solve the transient fixed-source problem of the PCQS method, fission source iteration is used and a linear approximation of fission source distributions during a macro-time step is introduced to provide delayed neutron source. The conventional particle-tracking procedure is modified to solve the transient fixed-source problem via MC calculation. The PCQS method with MC calculation is compared with the direct time-dependent method of characteristics (MOC) on a TWIGL two-group problem for verification of the computer code. Then, the results on a continuous-energy problem are presented.

  6. Kinetic Monte Carlo method for rule-based modeling of biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Monine, Michael I; Faeder, James R; Hlavacek, William S

    2008-09-01

    We present a kinetic Monte Carlo method for simulating chemical transformations specified by reaction rules, which can be viewed as generators of chemical reactions, or equivalently, definitions of reaction classes. A rule identifies the molecular components involved in a transformation, how these components change, conditions that affect whether a transformation occurs, and a rate law. The computational cost of the method, unlike conventional simulation approaches, is independent of the number of possible reactions, which need not be specified in advance or explicitly generated in a simulation. To demonstrate the method, we apply it to study the kinetics of multivalent ligand-receptor interactions. We expect the method will be useful for studying cellular signaling systems and other physical systems involving aggregation phenomena.

  7. Application of the Monte Carlo Method for the Estimation of Uncertainty in Radiofrequency Field Spot Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovidis, S.; Apostolidis, C.; Samaras, T.

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the present work is the application of the Monte Carlo method (GUMS1) for evaluating uncertainty in electromagnetic field measurements and the comparison of the results with the ones obtained using the 'standard' method (GUM). In particular, the two methods are applied in order to evaluate the field measurement uncertainty using a frequency selective radiation meter and the Total Exposure Quotient (TEQ) uncertainty. Comparative results are presented in order to highlight cases where GUMS1 results deviate significantly from the ones obtained using GUM, such as the presence of a non-linear mathematical model connecting the inputs with the output quantity (case of the TEQ model) or the presence of a dominant nonnormal distribution of an input quantity (case of U-shaped mismatch uncertainty). The deviation of the results obtained from the two methods can even lead to different decisions regarding the conformance with the exposure reference levels.

  8. Self-optimizing Monte Carlo method for nuclear well logging simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianyan

    1997-09-01

    In order to increase the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulation for nuclear well logging problems, a new method has been developed for variance reduction. With this method, an importance map is generated in the regular Monte Carlo calculation as a by-product, and the importance map is later used to conduct the splitting and Russian roulette for particle population control. By adopting a spatial mesh system, which is independent of physical geometrical configuration, the method allows superior user-friendliness. This new method is incorporated into the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP4A through a patch file. Two nuclear well logging problems, a neutron porosity tool and a gamma-ray lithology density tool are used to test the performance of this new method. The calculations are sped up over analog simulation by 120 and 2600 times, for the neutron porosity tool and for the gamma-ray lithology density log, respectively. The new method enjoys better performance by a factor of 4~6 times than that of MCNP's cell-based weight window, as per the converged figure-of-merits. An indirect comparison indicates that the new method also outperforms the AVATAR process for gamma-ray density tool problems. Even though it takes quite some time to generate a reasonable importance map from an analog run, a good initial map can create significant CPU time savings. This makes the method especially suitable for nuclear well logging problems, since one or several reference importance maps are usually available for a given tool. Study shows that the spatial mesh sizes should be chosen according to the mean-free-path. The overhead of the importance map generator is 6% and 14% for neutron and gamma-ray cases. The learning ability towards a correct importance map is also demonstrated. Although false-learning may happen, physical judgement can help diagnose with contributon maps. Calibration and analysis are performed for the neutron tool and the gamma-ray tool. Due to the fact that a very

  9. Stochastic modeling of polarized light scattering using a Monte Carlo based stencil method.

    PubMed

    Sormaz, Milos; Stamm, Tobias; Jenny, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    This paper deals with an efficient and accurate simulation algorithm to solve the vector Boltzmann equation for polarized light transport in scattering media. The approach is based on a stencil method, which was previously developed for unpolarized light scattering and proved to be much more efficient (speedup factors of up to 10 were reported) than the classical Monte Carlo while being equally accurate. To validate what we believe to be the new stencil method, a substrate composed of spherical non-absorbing particles embedded in a non-absorbing medium was considered. The corresponding single scattering Mueller matrix, which is required to model scattering of polarized light, was determined based on the Lorenz-Mie theory. From simulations of a reflected polarized laser beam, the Mueller matrix of the substrate was computed and compared with an established reference. The agreement is excellent, and it could be demonstrated that a significant speedup of the simulations is achieved due to the stencil approach compared with the classical Monte Carlo. PMID:20448777

  10. Exploration of compact protein conformations using the guided replication Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Solomon, J E; Liney, D

    1995-11-01

    We have studied the use of a new Monte Carlo (MC) chain generation algorithm, introduced by T. Garel and H. Orland [(1990) Journal of Physics A, Vol. 23, pp. L621-L626], for examining the thermodynamics of protein folding transitions and for generating candidate C(alpha) backbone structures as starting points for a de novo protein structure paradigm. This algorithm, termed the guided replication Monte Carlo method, allows a rational approach to the introduction of known "native" folded characteristics as constraints in the chain generation process . We have shown this algorithm to be computationally very efficient in generating large ensembles of candidate C(alpha) chains on the face centered cubic lattice, and illustrate its use by calculating a number of thermodynamic quantities related to protein folding characteristics. In particular, we have used this static MC algorithm to compare such temperature-dependent quantities as the ensemble mean energy, ensemble mean free energy, the heat capacity, and the mean-square radius of gyration. We also demonstrate the use of several simple "guide fields" for introducing protein-specific constraints into the ensemble generation process. Several extensions to our current model are suggested, and applications of the method to other folding related problems are discussed.

  11. Adapting phase-switch Monte Carlo method for flexible organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgwater, Sally; Quigley, David

    2014-03-01

    The role of cholesterol in lipid bilayers has been widely studied via molecular simulation, however, there has been relatively little work on crystalline cholesterol in biological environments. Recent work has linked the crystallisation of cholesterol in the body with heart attacks and strokes. Any attempt to model this process will require new models and advanced sampling methods to capture and quantify the subtle polymorphism of solid cholesterol, in which two crystalline phases are separated by a phase transition close to body temperature. To this end, we have adapted phase-switch Monte Carlo for use with flexible molecules, to calculate the free energy between crystal polymorphs to a high degree of accuracy. The method samples an order parameter , which divides a displacement space for the N molecules, into regions energetically favourable for each polymorph; which is traversed using biased Monte Carlo. Results for a simple model of butane will be presented, demonstrating that conformational flexibility can be correctly incorporated within a phase-switching scheme. Extension to a coarse grained model of cholesterol and the resulting free energies will be discussed.

  12. Investigation of a New Monte Carlo Method for the Transitional Gas Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X.; Day, Chr.

    2011-05-20

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is well developed for rarefied gas flow in transition flow regime when 0.0110, the gas flow is free molecular and can be simulated by the Test Particle Monte Carlo method (TPMC) without any problem even for a complex 3D vacuum system. In this paper we will investigate the approach to extend the TPMC to the transition flow regime by considering the collision between gas molecules as an interaction between a probe molecule and the gas background. Recently this collision mechanism has been implemented into ProVac3D, a new TPMC simulation program developed by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The preliminary simulation result shows a correct nonlinear increasing of the gas flow. However, there is still a quantitative discrepancy with the experimental data, which means further improvement is needed.

  13. A self-consistent method for the generation of configuration interaction coefficients using variational Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Kevin E.; Anderson, James B.

    We have developed a new method for calculating configuration interaction coefficients for trial wavefunctions used in quantum Monte Carlo calculations of molecular structure. These numerical calculations can be carried out with optimized Jastrow functions included in the wavefunction. These calculations produce coefficients different from those obtained through methods using analytical integration without the Jastrow functions and lead to more accurate trial wavefunctions. We tested the method on the beryllium atom and found that the VMC energy obtained with improved coefficients (-14.6615 hartrees) was 0.9 millihartrees lower than the energy obtained using coefficients from analytical calculations (-14.6606 hartrees). This energy difference corresponds to about 1% of the correlation energy.

  14. Torsional diffusion Monte Carlo: A method for quantum simulations of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, David C.

    2001-06-01

    The quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method is extended to the treatment of coupled torsional motions in proteins. A general algorithm and computer program has been developed by interfacing this torsional-DMC method with all-atom force-fields for proteins. The method gives the zero-point energy and atomic coordinates averaged over the coupled torsional motions in the quantum ground state of the protein. Application of the new algorithm is made to the proteins gelsolin (356 atoms and 142 torsions) and gp41-HIV (1101 atoms and 452 torsions). The results indicate that quantum-dynamical effects are important for the energies and geometries of typical proteins such as these.

  15. Monte Carlo based statistical power analysis for mediation models: methods and software.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    The existing literature on statistical power analysis for mediation models often assumes data normality and is based on a less powerful Sobel test instead of the more powerful bootstrap test. This study proposes to estimate statistical power to detect mediation effects on the basis of the bootstrap method through Monte Carlo simulation. Nonnormal data with excessive skewness and kurtosis are allowed in the proposed method. A free R package called bmem is developed to conduct the power analysis discussed in this study. Four examples, including a simple mediation model, a multiple-mediator model with a latent mediator, a multiple-group mediation model, and a longitudinal mediation model, are provided to illustrate the proposed method.

  16. Direct simulation Monte Carlo calculation of rarefied gas drag using an immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, W.; Kleijn, C. R.; van Ommen, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    For simulating rarefied gas flows around a moving body, an immersed boundary method is presented here in conjunction with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method in order to allow the movement of a three dimensional immersed body on top of a fixed background grid. The simulated DSMC particles are reflected exactly at the landing points on the surface of the moving immersed body, while the effective cell volumes are taken into account for calculating the collisions between molecules. The effective cell volumes are computed by utilizing the Lagrangian intersecting points between the immersed boundary and the fixed background grid with a simple polyhedra regeneration algorithm. This method has been implemented in OpenFOAM and validated by computing the drag forces exerted on steady and moving spheres and comparing the results to that from conventional body-fitted mesh DSMC simulations and to analytical approximations.

  17. Applications of a Monte Carlo whole-core microscopic depletion method

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, J.L.; Butement, A.W.; Watt, S.; Shadbolt, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    In the WIMS-6 (Ref. 1) reactor physics program scheme a three-dimensional microscopic depletion method has been developed using Monte Carlo fluxes. Together with microscopic cross sections, these give nuclide reaction rates, which are used to solve nuclide depletion equations for each region. An extension of the method, enabling rapid whole-core calculations, has been implemented in the long-established companion code MONK5W. Predictions at successive depletion time steps are based on a calculational route where both geometry and cross sections are accurately represented, providing a reliable and independent approach for benchmarking other methods. Newly developed tracking and storage procedures in MONK5W enable whole core burnup modeling on a desktop computer. Theory and applications are presented in this paper.

  18. Reconstruction of magnetic domain structure using the reverse Monte Carlo method with an extended Fourier image

    PubMed Central

    Tokii, Maki; Kita, Eiji; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Ono, Kanta; Yanagihara, Hideto

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of the magnetic domain structure is indispensable to the investigation of magnetization processes and the coercivity mechanism. It is necessary to develop a reconstruction method from the reciprocal-space image to the real-space image. For this purpose, it is necessary to solve the problem of missing phase information in the reciprocal-space image. We propose the method of extend Fourier image with mean-value padding to compensate for the phase information. We visualized the magnetic domain structure using the Reverse Monte Carlo method with simulated annealing to accelerate the calculation. With this technique, we demonstrated the restoration of the magnetic domain structure, obtained magnetization and magnetic domain width, and reproduced the characteristic form that constitutes a magnetic domain. PMID:25991875

  19. A Monte Carlo simulation based inverse propagation method for stochastic model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Nuo; Wang, Chunjie

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an efficient stochastic model updating method based on statistical theory. Significant parameters have been selected implementing the F-test evaluation and design of experiments, and then the incomplete fourth-order polynomial response surface model (RSM) has been developed. Exploiting of the RSM combined with Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), reduces the calculation amount and the rapid random sampling becomes possible. The inverse uncertainty propagation is given by the equally weighted sum of mean and covariance matrix objective functions. The mean and covariance of parameters are estimated synchronously by minimizing the weighted objective function through hybrid of particle-swarm and Nelder-Mead simplex optimization method, thus the better correlation between simulation and test is achieved. Numerical examples of a three degree-of-freedom mass-spring system under different conditions and GARTEUR assembly structure validated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. An asymptotic preserving Monte Carlo method for the multispecies Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hong; Jin, Shi

    2016-01-01

    An asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme is efficient in solving multiscale kinetic equations with a wide range of the Knudsen number. In this paper, we generalize the asymptotic preserving Monte Carlo method (AP-DSMC) developed in [25] to the multispecies Boltzmann equation. This method is based on the successive penalty method [26] originated from the BGK-penalization-based AP scheme developed in [7]. For the multispecies Boltzmann equation, the penalizing Maxwellian should use the unified Maxwellian as suggested in [12]. We give the details of AP-DSMC for multispecies Boltzmann equation, show its AP property, and verify through several numerical examples that the scheme can allow time step much larger than the mean free time, thus making it much more efficient for flows with possibly small Knudsen numbers than the classical DSMC.

  1. Simulating rotationally inelastic collisions using a direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schullian, O.; Loreau, J.; Vaeck, N.; van der Avoird, A.; Heazlewood, B. R.; Rennick, C. J.; Softley, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    A new approach to simulating rotational cooling using a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is described and applied to the rotational cooling of ammonia seeded into a helium supersonic jet. The method makes use of ab initio rotational state changing cross sections calculated as a function of collision energy. Each particle in the DSMC simulations is labelled with a vector of rotational populations that evolves with time. Transfer of energy into translation is calculated from the mean energy transfer for this population at the specified collision energy. The simulations are compared with a continuum model for the on-axis density, temperature and velocity; rotational temperature as a function of distance from the nozzle is in accord with expectations from experimental measurements. The method could be applied to other types of gas mixture dynamics under non-uniform conditions, such as buffer gas cooling of NH3 by He.

  2. Development of a generalized perturbation theory method for sensitivity analysis using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods

    DOE PAGES

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools of the ORNL SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system that have been developed over the last decade have proven indispensable for numerous application and design studies for nuclear criticality safety and reactor physics. SCALE contains tools for analyzing the uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, but cannot quantify uncertainty in important neutronic parameters such as multigroup cross sections, fuel fission rates, activation rates, and neutron fluence rates with realistic three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. A more complete understanding of the sources of uncertainty in these design-limiting parameters could lead to improvements in processmore » optimization, reactor safety, and help inform regulators when setting operational safety margins. A novel approach for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was recently explored as academic research and has been found to accurately and rapidly calculate sensitivity coefficients in criticality safety applications. The work presented here describes a new method, known as the GEAR-MC method, which extends the CLUTCH theory for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients to enable sensitivity coefficient calculations and uncertainty analysis for a generalized set of neutronic responses using high-fidelity continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculations. Here, several criticality safety systems were examined to demonstrate proof of principle for the GEAR-MC method, and GEAR-MC was seen to produce response sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with reference direct perturbation sensitivity coefficients.« less

  3. GUINEVERE experiment: Kinetic analysis of some reactivity measurement methods by deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, G.; Burgio, N.; Carta, M.; Peluso, V.; Fabrizio, V.; Ricci, L.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE experiment (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) is an experimental program in support of the ADS technology presently carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol (Belgium). In the experiment a modified lay-out of the original thermal VENUS critical facility is coupled to an accelerator, built by the French body CNRS in Grenoble, working in both continuous and pulsed mode and delivering 14 MeV neutrons by bombardment of deuterons on a tritium-target. The modified lay-out of the facility consists of a fast subcritical core made of 30% U-235 enriched metallic Uranium in a lead matrix. Several off-line and on-line reactivity measurement techniques will be investigated during the experimental campaign. This report is focused on the simulation by deterministic (ERANOS French code) and Monte Carlo (MCNPX US code) calculations of three reactivity measurement techniques, Slope ({alpha}-fitting), Area-ratio and Source-jerk, applied to a GUINEVERE subcritical configuration (namely SC1). The inferred reactivity, in dollar units, by the Area-ratio method shows an overall agreement between the two deterministic and Monte Carlo computational approaches, whereas the MCNPX Source-jerk results are affected by large uncertainties and allow only partial conclusions about the comparison. Finally, no particular spatial dependence of the results is observed in the case of the GUINEVERE SC1 subcritical configuration. (authors)

  4. Estimation of the four-wave mixing noise probability-density function by the multicanonical Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Neokosmidis, Ioannis; Kamalakis, Thomas; Chipouras, Aristides; Sphicopoulos, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The performance of high-powered wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) optical networks can be severely degraded by four-wave-mixing- (FWM-) induced distortion. The multicanonical Monte Carlo method (MCMC) is used to calculate the probability-density function (PDF) of the decision variable of a receiver, limited by FWM noise. Compared with the conventional Monte Carlo method previously used to estimate this PDF, the MCMC method is much faster and can accurately estimate smaller error probabilities. The method takes into account the correlation between the components of the FWM noise, unlike the Gaussian model, which is shown not to provide accurate results. PMID:15648621

  5. Efficient kinetic Monte Carlo method for reaction-diffusion problems with spatially varying annihilation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Karsten; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-03-01

    We present an efficient Monte Carlo method to simulate reaction-diffusion processes with spatially varying particle annihilation or transformation rates as it occurs for instance in the context of motor-driven intracellular transport. Like Green's function reaction dynamics and first-passage time methods, our algorithm avoids small diffusive hops by propagating sufficiently distant particles in large hops to the boundaries of protective domains. Since for spatially varying annihilation or transformation rates the single particle diffusion propagator is not known analytically, we present an algorithm that generates efficiently either particle displacements or annihilations with the correct statistics, as we prove rigorously. The numerical efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated with an illustrative example.

  6. Estimating the Probability of Asteroid Collision with the Earth by the Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernitsov, A. M.; Tamarov, V. A.; Barannikov, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The commonly accepted method of estimating the probability of asteroid collision with the Earth is investigated on an example of two fictitious asteroids one of which must obviously collide with the Earth and the second must pass by at a dangerous distance from the Earth. The simplest Kepler model of motion is used. Confidence regions of asteroid motion are estimated by the Monte Carlo method. Two variants of constructing the confidence region are considered: in the form of points distributed over the entire volume and in the form of points mapped onto the boundary surface. The special feature of the multidimensional point distribution in the first variant of constructing the confidence region that can lead to zero probability of collision for bodies that collide with the Earth is demonstrated. The probability estimates obtained for even considerably smaller number of points in the confidence region determined by its boundary surface are free from this disadvantage.

  7. Analysis of vibrational-translational energy transfer using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.

    1991-01-01

    A new model is proposed for energy transfer between the vibrational and translational modes for use in the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The model modifies the Landau-Teller theory for a harmonic oscillator and the rate transition is related to an experimental correlation for the vibrational relaxation time. Assessment of the model is made with respect to three different computations: relaxation in a heat bath, a one-dimensional shock wave, and hypersonic flow over a two-dimensional wedge. These studies verify that the model achieves detailed balance, and excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained in the shock wave calculation. The wedge flow computation reveals that the usual phenomenological method for simulating vibrational nonequilibrium in the DSMC technique predicts much higher vibrational temperatures in the wake region.

  8. Time Domain Estimation of Arterial Parameters using the Windkessel Model and the Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostuski, Vladimir; Pastore, Ignacio; Rodriguez Palacios, Gaspar; Vaca Diez, Gustavo; Moscoso-Vasquez, H. Marcela; Risk, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Numerous parameter estimation techniques exist for characterizing the arterial system using electrical circuit analogs. However, they are often limited by their requirements and usually high computational burdain. Therefore, a new method for estimating arterial parameters based on Monte Carlo simulation is proposed. A three element Windkessel model was used to represent the arterial system. The approach was to reduce the error between the calculated and physiological aortic pressure by randomly generating arterial parameter values, while keeping constant the arterial resistance. This last value was obtained for each subject using the arterial flow, and was a necessary consideration in order to obtain a unique set of values for the arterial compliance and peripheral resistance. The estimation technique was applied to in vivo data containing steady beats in mongrel dogs, and it reliably estimated Windkessel arterial parameters. Further, this method appears to be computationally efficient for on-line time-domain estimation of these parameters.

  9. The Linked Neighbour List (LNL) method for fast off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, M. D.; Ricci, M.; Zannoni, C.

    2010-03-01

    We present a new algorithm, called linked neighbour list (LNL), useful to substantially speed up off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of fluids by avoiding the computation of the molecular energy before every attempted move. We introduce a few variants of the LNL method targeted to minimise memory footprint or augment memory coherence and cache utilisation. Additionally, we present a few algorithms which drastically accelerate neighbour finding. We test our methods on the simulation of a dense off-lattice Gay-Berne fluid subjected to periodic boundary conditions observing a speedup factor of about 2.5 with respect to a well-coded implementation based on a conventional link-cell. We provide several implementation details of the different key data structures and algorithms used in this work.

  10. Estimation of pressure-particle velocity impedance measurement uncertainty using the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Eric; Flesch, Rodolfo C C; Lenzi, Arcanjo; Flesch, Carlos A

    2011-07-01

    The pressure-particle velocity (PU) impedance measurement technique is an experimental method used to measure the surface impedance and the absorption coefficient of acoustic samples in situ or under free-field conditions. In this paper, the measurement uncertainty of the the absorption coefficient determined using the PU technique is explored applying the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that because of the uncertainty, it is particularly difficult to measure samples with low absorption and that difficulties associated with the localization of the acoustic centers of the sound source and the PU sensor affect the quality of the measurement roughly to the same extent as the errors in the transfer function between pressure and particle velocity do.

  11. Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Methods for Accelerating Active Interrogation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Douglas E.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W; Wagner, John C

    2013-01-01

    The potential for smuggling special nuclear material (SNM) into the United States is a major concern to homeland security, so federal agencies are investigating a variety of preventive measures, including detection and interdiction of SNM during transport. One approach for SNM detection, called active interrogation, uses a radiation source, such as a beam of neutrons or photons, to scan cargo containers and detect the products of induced fissions. In realistic cargo transport scenarios, the process of inducing and detecting fissions in SNM is difficult due to the presence of various and potentially thick materials between the radiation source and the SNM, and the practical limitations on radiation source strength and detection capabilities. Therefore, computer simulations are being used, along with experimental measurements, in efforts to design effective active interrogation detection systems. The computer simulations mostly consist of simulating radiation transport from the source to the detector region(s). Although the Monte Carlo method is predominantly used for these simulations, difficulties persist related to calculating statistically meaningful detector responses in practical computing times, thereby limiting their usefulness for design and evaluation of practical active interrogation systems. In previous work, the benefits of hybrid methods that use the results of approximate deterministic transport calculations to accelerate high-fidelity Monte Carlo simulations have been demonstrated for source-detector type problems. In this work, the hybrid methods are applied and evaluated for three example active interrogation problems. Additionally, a new approach is presented that uses multiple goal-based importance functions depending on a particle s relevance to the ultimate goal of the simulation. Results from the examples demonstrate that the application of hybrid methods to active interrogation problems dramatically increases their calculational efficiency.

  12. Calculations of alloy phases with a direct Monte-Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Faulkner, J.S.; Wang, Yang; Horvath, E.A.; Stocks, G.M.

    1994-09-01

    A method for calculating the boundaries that describe solid-solid phase transformations in the phase diagrams of alloys is described. The method is first-principles in the sense that the only input is the atomic numbers of the constituents. It proceeds from the observation that the crux of the Monte-Carlo method for obtaining the equilibrium distribution of atoms in an alloy is a calculation of the energy required to replace an A atom on site i with a B atom when the configuration of the atoms on the neighboring sites, {kappa}, is specified, {delta}H{sub {kappa}}(A{yields}B) = E{sub B}{kappa} -E{sub A}{kappa}. Normally, this energy difference is obtained by introducing interatomic potentials, v{sub ij}, into an Ising Hamiltonian, but the authors calculate it using the embedded cluster method (ECM). In the ECM an A or B atom is placed at the center of a cluster of atoms with the specified configuration K, and the atoms on all the other sites in the alloy are simulated by the effective scattering matrix obtained from the coherent potential approximation. The interchange energy is calculated directly from the electronic structure of the cluster. The table of {delta}H{sub {kappa}}(A{yields}B)`s for all configurations K and several alloy concentrations is used in a Monte Carlo calculation that predicts the phase of the alloy at any temperature and concentration. The detailed shape of the miscibility gaps in the palladium-rhodium and copper-nickel alloy systems are shown.

  13. Coherent-wave Monte Carlo method for simulating light propagation in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraszewski, Maciej; Pluciński, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    Simulating propagation and scattering of coherent light in turbid media, such as biological tissues, is a complex problem. Numerical methods for solving Helmholtz or wave equation (e.g. finite-difference or finite-element methods) require large amount of computer memory and long computation time. This makes them impractical for simulating laser beam propagation into deep layers of tissue. Other group of methods, based on radiative transfer equation, allows to simulate only propagation of light averaged over the ensemble of turbid medium realizations. This makes them unuseful for simulating phenomena connected to coherence properties of light. We propose a new method for simulating propagation of coherent light (e.g. laser beam) in biological tissue, that we called Coherent-Wave Monte Carlo method. This method is based on direct computation of optical interaction between scatterers inside the random medium, what allows to reduce amount of memory and computation time required for simulation. We present the theoretical basis of the proposed method and its comparison with finite-difference methods for simulating light propagation in scattering media in Rayleigh approximation regime.

  14. Comparison of Monte Carlo collimator transport methods for photon treatment planning in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidhalter, D.; Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Fix, M. K.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was a Monte Carlo (MC) based investigation of the impact of different radiation transport methods in collimators of a linear accelerator on photon beam characteristics, dose distributions, and efficiency. Thereby it is investigated if it is possible to use different simplifications in the radiation transport for some clinical situations in order to save calculation time. Methods: Within the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan, a GUI-based framework for photon MC treatment planning, different MC methods are available for the radiation transport through the collimators [secondary jaws and multileaf collimator (MLC)]: EGSnrc (reference), VMC++, and Pin (an in-house developed MC code). Additional nonfull transport methods were implemented in order to provide different complexity levels for the MC simulation: Considering collimator attenuation only, considering Compton scatter only or just the firstCompton process, and considering the collimators as totally absorbing. Furthermore, either a simple or an exact geometry of the collimators can be selected for the absorbing or attenuation method. Phasespaces directly above and dose distributions in a water phantom are analyzed for academic and clinical treatment fields using 6 and 15 MV beams, including intensity modulated radiation therapy with dynamic MLC. Results: For all MC transport methods, differences in the radial mean energy and radial energy fluence are within 1% inside the geometric field. Below the collimators, the energy fluence is underestimated for nonfull MC transport methods ranging from 5% for Compton to 100% for Absorbing. Gamma analysis using EGSnrc calculated doses as reference shows that the percentage of voxels fulfilling a 1% /1 mm criterion is at least 98% when using VMC++, Compton, or firstCompton transport methods. When using the methods Pin, Transmission, Flat-Transmission, Flat-Absorbing or Absorbing, the mean value of points fulfilling this criterion over all tested cases is 97

  15. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.; Jordan, George C., IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Moses, Gregory A.

    2013-12-01

    We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking MC particles through optically thick materials. DDMC accelerates IMC in diffusive domains. Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally gray DDMC method. We rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. This formulation includes an analysis that yields an additional factor in the standard IMC-to-DDMC spatial interface condition. To our knowledge the new boundary condition is distinct from others presented in prior DDMC literature. The method is suitable for a variety of opacity distributions and may be applied to semi-relativistic radiation transport in simple fluids and geometries. Additionally, we test the code, called SuperNu, using an analytic solution having static material, as well as with a manufactured solution for moving material with structured opacities. Finally, we demonstrate with a simple source and 10 group logarithmic wavelength grid that IMC-DDMC performs better than pure IMC in terms of accuracy and speed when there are large disparities between the magnitudes of opacities in adjacent groups. We also present and test our implementation of the new boundary condition.

  16. Determination of phase equilibria in confined systems by open pore cell Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Minoru T; Tanaka, Hideki

    2013-02-28

    We present a modification of the molecular dynamics simulation method with a unit pore cell with imaginary gas phase [M. Miyahara, T. Yoshioka, and M. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8124 (1997)] designed for determination of phase equilibria in nanopores. This new method is based on a Monte Carlo technique and it combines the pore cell, opened to the imaginary gas phase (open pore cell), with a gas cell to measure the equilibrium chemical potential of the confined system. The most striking feature of our new method is that the confined system is steadily led to a thermodynamically stable state by forming concave menisci in the open pore cell. This feature of the open pore cell makes it possible to obtain the equilibrium chemical potential with only a single simulation run, unlike existing simulation methods, which need a number of additional runs. We apply the method to evaluate the equilibrium chemical potentials of confined nitrogen in carbon slit pores and silica cylindrical pores at 77 K, and show that the results are in good agreement with those obtained by two conventional thermodynamic integration methods. Moreover, we also show that the proposed method can be particularly useful for determining vapor-liquid and vapor-solid coexistence curves and the triple point of the confined system.

  17. Parallel domain decomposition methods in fluid models with Monte Carlo transport

    SciTech Connect

    Alme, H.J.; Rodrigues, G.H.; Zimmerman, G.B.

    1996-12-01

    To examine the domain decomposition code coupled Monte Carlo-finite element calculation, it is important to use a domain decomposition that is suitable for the individual models. We have developed a code that simulates a Monte Carlo calculation ( ) on a massively parallel processor. This code is used to examine the load balancing behavior of three domain decomposition ( ) for a Monte Carlo calculation. Results are presented.

  18. Monte Carlo Method Applied to the ABV Model of an Interconnect Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahoo, P. R.; Linares, J.; Chiruta, D.; Chong, C.; Pougnet, P.; Meis, C.; El Hami, A.

    2016-08-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of a 2D microscopic ABV (metal A, metal B and void V) Ising model of an interconnect alloy is performed by taking into account results of Finite Element methods (FEM) calculations on correlated void-thermal effects. The evolution of a homogeneous structure of a binary alloy containing a small percentage of voids is studied with temperature cycling. The diffusion of voids and segregation of A type or B type metals is a function of the relative interaction energy of the different pairs AA, BB, AB, AV and BV, the initial concentrations of A, B and V and local heating effect due to the presence of clusters of voids. Voids segregates in a matrix of A type, of B type or AB type and form large localized clusters or smaller delocalized ones of different shapes.

  19. A Monte Carlo method for variance estimation for estimators based on induced smoothing

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhezhen; Shao, Yongzhao; Ying, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    An important issue in statistical inference for semiparametric models is how to provide reliable and consistent variance estimation. Brown and Wang (2005. Standard errors and covariance matrices for smoothed rank estimators. Biometrika 92, 732–746) proposed a variance estimation procedure based on an induced smoothing for non-smooth estimating functions. Herein a Monte Carlo version is developed that does not require any explicit form for the estimating function itself, as long as numerical evaluation can be carried out. A general convergence theory is established, showing that any one-step iteration leads to a consistent variance estimator and continuation of the iterations converges at an exponential rate. The method is demonstrated through the Buckley–James estimator and the weighted log-rank estimators for censored linear regression, and rank estimation for multiple event times data. PMID:24812418

  20. Monte Carlo method for adaptively estimating the unknown parameters and the dynamic state of chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Inés P.; Míguez, Joaquín; Meucci, Riccardo

    2009-05-01

    We propose a Monte Carlo methodology for the joint estimation of unobserved dynamic variables and unknown static parameters in chaotic systems. The technique is sequential, i.e., it updates the variable and parameter estimates recursively as new observations become available, and, hence, suitable for online implementation. We demonstrate the validity of the method by way of two examples. In the first one, we tackle the estimation of all the dynamic variables and one unknown parameter of a five-dimensional nonlinear model using a time series of scalar observations experimentally collected from a chaotic CO2 laser. In the second example, we address the estimation of the two dynamic variables and the phase parameter of a numerical model commonly employed to represent the dynamics of optoelectronic feedback loops designed for chaotic communications over fiber-optic links.

  1. Accelerating mesh-based Monte Carlo method on modern CPU architectures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qianqian; Kaeli, David R

    2012-12-01

    In this report, we discuss the use of contemporary ray-tracing techniques to accelerate 3D mesh-based Monte Carlo photon transport simulations. Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) based computation and branch-less design are exploited to accelerate ray-tetrahedron intersection tests and yield a 2-fold speed-up for ray-tracing calculations on a multi-core CPU. As part of this work, we have also studied SIMD-accelerated random number generators and math functions. The combination of these techniques achieved an overall improvement of 22% in simulation speed as compared to using a non-SIMD implementation. We applied this new method to analyze a complex numerical phantom and both the phantom data and the improved code are available as open-source software at http://mcx.sourceforge.net/mmc/.

  2. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Evans, T. M.

    2013-07-01

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear operator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approximation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage fraction of stochastic histories from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem to test the models for symmetric operators. In general, the derived approximations show good agreement with measured computational results. (authors)

  3. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling Methods for 1D Seismic and EM Data Inversion

    2008-09-22

    This software provides several Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods for the Bayesian model developed for inverting 1D marine seismic and controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. The current software can be used for individual inversion of seismic AVO and CSEM data and for joint inversion of both seismic and EM data sets. The structure of the software is very general and flexible, and it allows users to incorporate their own forward simulation codes and rockmore » physics model codes easily into this software. Although the softwae was developed using C and C++ computer languages, the user-supplied codes can be written in C, C++, or various versions of Fortran languages. The software provides clear interfaces for users to plug in their own codes. The output of this software is in the format that the R free software CODA can directly read to build MCMC objects.« less

  4. A study of the dielectric and magnetic properties of multiferroic materials using the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, A.; Almodovar, N. S.; Portelles, J.; Heiras, J.; Siqueiros, J. M.

    2012-03-01

    A study of the dielectric and magnetic properties of multiferroic materials using the Monte Carlo (MC) method is presented. Two different systems are considered: the first, ferroelectric-antiferromagnetic (FE-AFM) recently studied by X. S. Gaoand J. M. Liu and the second antiferroelectric-ferromagnetic (AFE-FM). Based on the DIFFOUR-Ising hybrid microscopic model developed by Janssen, a Hamiltonian that takes into account the magnetoelectric coupling in both ferroic phases is proposed. The obtained results show that the existence of such coupling modifies the ferroelectric and magnetic ordering in both phases. Additionally, it is shown that the presence of a magnetic or an electric field influences the electric polarization and the magnetization, respectively, making evident the magnetoelectric effect.

  5. The Calculation of Thermal Conductivities by Three Dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-Peng; Li, Zeng-Yao; Liu, He; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    Three dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with the variable soft sphere (VSS) collision model is implemented to solve the Boltzmann equation and to acquire the heat flux between two parallel plates (Fourier Flow). The gaseous thermal conductivity of nitrogen is derived based on the Fourier's law under local equilibrium condition at temperature from 270 to 1800 K and pressure from 0.5 to 100,000 Pa and compared with the experimental data and Eucken relation from Chapman and Enskog (CE) theory. It is concluded that the present results are consistent with the experimental data but much higher than those by Eucken relation especially at high temperature. The contribution of internal energy of molecule to the gaseous thermal conductivity becomes significant as increasing the temperature. PMID:26353582

  6. An analysis of the convergence of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitzine, Cyril; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-05-01

    In this article, a rigorous framework for the analysis of the convergence of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is presented. It is applied to the simulation of two test cases: an axisymmetric jet at a Knudsen number of 0.01 and Mach number of 1 and a two-dimensional cylinder flow at a Knudsen of 0.05 and Mach 10. The rate of convergence of sampled quantities is found to be well predicted by an extended form of the Central Limit Theorem that takes into account the correlation of samples but requires the calculation of correlation spectra. A simplified analytical model that does not require correlation spectra is then constructed to model the effect of sample correlation. It is then used to obtain an a priori estimate of the convergence error.

  7. A Monte Carlo Method for Projecting Uncertainty in 2D Lagrangian Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robel, A.; Lozier, S.; Gary, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    In this study, a novel method is proposed for modeling the propagation of uncertainty due to subgrid-scale processes through a Lagrangian trajectory advected by ocean surface velocities. The primary motivation and application is differentiating between active and passive trajectories for sea turtles as observed through satellite telemetry. A spatiotemporal launch box is centered on the time and place of actual launch and populated with launch points. Synthetic drifters are launched at each of these locations, adding, at each time step along the trajectory, Monte Carlo perturbations in velocity scaled to the natural variability of the velocity field. The resulting trajectory cloud provides a dynamically evolving density field of synthetic drifter locations that represent the projection of subgrid-scale uncertainty out in time. Subsequently, by relaunching synthetic drifters at points along the trajectory, plots are generated in a daisy chain configuration of the “most likely passive pathways” for the drifter.

  8. Topics in structural dynamics: Nonlinear unsteady transonic flows and Monte Carlo methods in acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The results are reported of two unrelated studies. The first was an investigation of the formulation of the equations for non-uniform unsteady flows, by perturbation of an irrotational flow to obtain the linear Green's equation. The resulting integral equation was found to contain a kernel which could be expressed as the solution of the adjoint flow equation, a linear equation for small perturbations, but with non-constant coefficients determined by the steady flow conditions. It is believed that the non-uniform flow effects may prove important in transonic flutter, and that in such cases, the use of doublet type solutions of the wave equation would then prove to be erroneous. The second task covered an initial investigation into the use of the Monte Carlo method for solution of acoustical field problems. Computed results are given for a rectangular room problem, and for a problem involving a circular duct with a source located at the closed end.

  9. Nonequilibrium hypersonic flows simulations with asymptotic-preserving Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Liu, Hong; Jin, Shi

    2014-12-01

    In the rarefied gas dynamics, the DSMC method is one of the most popular numerical tools. It performs satisfactorily in simulating hypersonic flows surrounding re-entry vehicles and micro-/nano- flows. However, the computational cost is expensive, especially when Kn → 0. Even for flows in the near-continuum regime, pure DSMC simulations require a number of computational efforts for most cases. Albeit several DSMC/NS hybrid methods are proposed to deal with this, those methods still suffer from the boundary treatment, which may cause nonphysical solutions. Filbet and Jin [1] proposed a framework of new numerical methods of Boltzmann equation, called asymptotic preserving schemes, whose computational costs are affordable as Kn → 0. Recently, Ren et al. [2] realized the AP schemes with Monte Carlo methods (AP-DSMC), which have better performance than counterpart methods. In this paper, AP-DSMC is applied in simulating nonequilibrium hypersonic flows. Several numerical results are computed and analyzed to study the efficiency and capability of capturing complicated flow characteristics.

  10. Multi-Physics Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods for Subsurface Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigelo, J.; Ginting, V.; Rahunanthan, A.; Pereira, F.

    2014-12-01

    For CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers, contaminant transport in subsurface, and oil or gas recovery, we often need to forecast flow patterns. Subsurface characterization is a critical and challenging step in flow forecasting. To characterize subsurface properties we establish a statistical description of the subsurface properties that are conditioned to existing dynamic and static data. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is used in a Bayesian statistical description to reconstruct the spatial distribution of rock permeability and porosity. The MCMC algorithm requires repeatedly solving a set of nonlinear partial differential equations describing displacement of fluids in porous media for different values of permeability and porosity. The time needed for the generation of a reliable MCMC chain using the algorithm can be too long to be practical for flow forecasting. In this work we develop fast and effective computational methods for generating MCMC chains in the Bayesian framework for the subsurface characterization. Our strategy consists of constructing a family of computationally inexpensive preconditioners based on simpler physics as well as on surrogate models such that the number of fine-grid simulations is drastically reduced in the generated MCMC chains. In particular, we introduce a huff-puff technique as screening step in a three-stage multi-physics MCMC algorithm to reduce the number of expensive final stage simulations. The huff-puff technique in the algorithm enables a better characterization of subsurface near wells. We assess the quality of the proposed multi-physics MCMC methods by considering Monte Carlo simulations for forecasting oil production in an oil reservoir.

  11. Liquid crystal free energy relaxation by a theoretically informed Monte Carlo method using a finite element quadrature approach.

    PubMed

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-12-28

    A theoretically informed Monte Carlo method is proposed for Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals on the basis of theoretical representations in terms of coarse-grained free energy functionals. The free energy functional is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. A piecewise finite element discretization is used to approximate the alignment field, thereby providing an excellent geometrical representation of curved interfaces and accurate integration of the free energy. The method is suitable for situations where the free energy functional includes highly non-linear terms, including chirality or high-order deformation modes. The validity of the method is established by comparing the results of Monte Carlo simulations to traditional Ginzburg-Landau minimizations of the free energy using a finite difference scheme, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of simulations of chiral liquid crystal droplets with and without nanoparticle inclusions.

  12. Integration of Monte-Carlo ray tracing with a stochastic optimisation method: application to the design of solar receiver geometry.

    PubMed

    Asselineau, Charles-Alexis; Zapata, Jose; Pye, John

    2015-06-01

    A stochastic optimisation method adapted to illumination and radiative heat transfer problems involving Monte-Carlo ray-tracing is presented. A solar receiver shape optimisation case study illustrates the advantages of the method and its potential: efficient receivers are identified using a moderate computational cost.

  13. Solution of deterministic-stochastic epidemic models by dynamical Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aièllo, O. E.; Haas, V. J.; daSilva, M. A. A.; Caliri, A.

    2000-07-01

    This work is concerned with dynamical Monte Carlo (MC) method and its application to models originally formulated in a continuous-deterministic approach. Specifically, a susceptible-infected-removed-susceptible (SIRS) model is used in order to analyze aspects of the dynamical MC algorithm and achieve its applications in epidemic contexts. We first examine two known approaches to the dynamical interpretation of the MC method and follow with the application of one of them in the SIRS model. The working method chosen is based on the Poisson process where hierarchy of events, properly calculated waiting time between events, and independence of the events simulated, are the basic requirements. To verify the consistence of the method, some preliminary MC results are compared against exact steady-state solutions and other general numerical results (provided by Runge-Kutta method): good agreement is found. Finally, a space-dependent extension of the SIRS model is introduced and treated by MC. The results are interpreted under and in accordance with aspects of the herd-immunity concept.

  14. A deterministic alternative to the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Tubman, Norm M; Lee, Joonho; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Head-Gordon, Martin; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2016-07-28

    Development of exponentially scaling methods has seen great progress in tackling larger systems than previously thought possible. One such technique, full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo, is a useful algorithm that allows exact diagonalization through stochastically sampling determinants. The method derives its utility from the information in the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian, along with a stochastic projected wave function, to find the important parts of Hilbert space. However, the stochastic representation of the wave function is not required to search Hilbert space efficiently, and here we describe a highly efficient deterministic method that can achieve chemical accuracy for a wide range of systems, including the difficult Cr2 molecule. We demonstrate for systems like Cr2 that such calculations can be performed in just a few cpu hours which makes it one of the most efficient and accurate methods that can attain chemical accuracy for strongly correlated systems. In addition our method also allows efficient calculation of excited state energies, which we illustrate with benchmark results for the excited states of C2. PMID:27475353

  15. A deterministic alternative to the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubman, Norm M.; Lee, Joonho; Takeshita, Tyler Y.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2016-07-01

    Development of exponentially scaling methods has seen great progress in tackling larger systems than previously thought possible. One such technique, full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo, is a useful algorithm that allows exact diagonalization through stochastically sampling determinants. The method derives its utility from the information in the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian, along with a stochastic projected wave function, to find the important parts of Hilbert space. However, the stochastic representation of the wave function is not required to search Hilbert space efficiently, and here we describe a highly efficient deterministic method that can achieve chemical accuracy for a wide range of systems, including the difficult Cr2 molecule. We demonstrate for systems like Cr2 that such calculations can be performed in just a few cpu hours which makes it one of the most efficient and accurate methods that can attain chemical accuracy for strongly correlated systems. In addition our method also allows efficient calculation of excited state energies, which we illustrate with benchmark results for the excited states of C2.

  16. A First-Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo method for reaction–drift–diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, Ava J.; Sigurdsson, Jon Karl; Shrake, Justin; Atzberger, Paul J.; Isaacson, Samuel A.

    2014-02-15

    Stochastic reaction–diffusion models are now a popular tool for studying physical systems in which both the explicit diffusion of molecules and noise in the chemical reaction process play important roles. The Smoluchowski diffusion-limited reaction model (SDLR) is one of several that have been used to study biological systems. Exact realizations of the underlying stochastic processes described by the SDLR model can be generated by the recently proposed First-Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo (FPKMC) method. This exactness relies on sampling analytical solutions to one and two-body diffusion equations in simplified protective domains. In this work we extend the FPKMC to allow for drift arising from fixed, background potentials. As the corresponding Fokker–Planck equations that describe the motion of each molecule can no longer be solved analytically, we develop a hybrid method that discretizes the protective domains. The discretization is chosen so that the drift–diffusion of each molecule within its protective domain is approximated by a continuous-time random walk on a lattice. New lattices are defined dynamically as the protective domains are updated, hence we will refer to our method as Dynamic Lattice FPKMC or DL-FPKMC. We focus primarily on the one-dimensional case in this manuscript, and demonstrate the numerical convergence and accuracy of our method in this case for both smooth and discontinuous potentials. We also present applications of our method, which illustrate the impact of drift on reaction kinetics.

  17. Moment approach to the bootstrap current in nonaxisymmetric toroidal plasmas using {delta}f Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, A.; Isaev, M. Yu.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, N.; Hanatani, K.; Cooper, W. A.; Tran, T. M.

    2009-05-15

    To evaluate the bootstrap current in nonaxisymmetric toroidal plasmas quantitatively, a {delta}f Monte Carlo method is incorporated into the moment approach. From the drift-kinetic equation with the pitch-angle scattering collision operator, the bootstrap current and neoclassical conductivity coefficients are calculated. The neoclassical viscosity is evaluated from these two monoenergetic transport coefficients. Numerical results obtained by the {delta}f Monte Carlo method for a model heliotron are in reasonable agreement with asymptotic formulae and with the results obtained by the variational principle.

  18. ATR WG-MOX Fuel Pellet Burnup Measurement by Monte Carlo - Mass Spectrometric Method

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Gray Sen I

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents a new method for calculating the burnup of nuclear reactor fuel, the MCWO-MS method, and describes its application to an experiment currently in progress to assess the suitability for use in light-water reactors of Mixed-OXide (MOX) fuel that contains plutonium derived from excess nuclear weapons material. To demonstrate that the available experience base with Reactor-Grade Mixed uranium-plutonium OXide (RGMOX) can be applied to Weapons-Grade (WG)-MOX in light water reactors, and to support potential licensing of MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium for use in United States reactors, an experiment containing WG-MOX fuel is being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Fuel burnup is an important parameter needed for fuel performance evaluation. For the irradiated MOX fuel’s Post-Irradiation Examination, the 148Nd method is used to measure the burnup. The fission product 148Nd is an ideal burnup indicator, when appropriate correction factors are applied. In the ATR test environment, the spectrum-dependent and burnup-dependent correction factors (see Section 5 for detailed discussion) can be substantial in high fuel burnup. The validated Monte Carlo depletion tool (MCWO) used in this study can provide a burnup-dependent correction factor for the reactor parameters, such as capture-to-fission ratios, isotopic concentrations and compositions, fission power, and spectrum in a straightforward fashion. Furthermore, the correlation curve generated by MCWO can be coupled with the 239Pu/Pu ratio measured by a Mass Spectrometer (in the new MCWO-MS method) to obtain a best-estimate MOX fuel burnup. A Monte Carlo - MCWO method can eliminate the generation of few-group cross sections. The MCWO depletion tool can analyze the detailed spatial and spectral self-shielding effects in UO2, WG-MOX, and reactor-grade mixed oxide (RG-MOX) fuel pins. The MCWO-MS tool only

  19. Uniform-acceptance force-bias Monte Carlo method with time scale to study solid-state diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mees, Maarten J.; Pourtois, Geoffrey; Neyts, Erik C.; Thijsse, Barend J.; Stesmans, André

    2012-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods have a long-standing history as partners of molecular dynamics (MD) to simulate the evolution of materials at the atomic scale. Among these techniques, the uniform-acceptance force-bias Monte Carlo (UFMC) method [G. Dereli, Mol. Simul.10.1080/08927029208022490 8, 351 (1992)] has recently attracted attention [M. Timonova , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.144107 81, 144107 (2010)] thanks to its apparent capacity of being able to simulate physical processes in a reduced number of iterations compared to classical MD methods. The origin of this efficiency remains, however, unclear. In this work we derive a UFMC method starting from basic thermodynamic principles, which leads to an intuitive and unambiguous formalism. The approach includes a statistically relevant time step per Monte Carlo iteration, showing a significant speed-up compared to MD simulations. This time-stamped force-bias Monte Carlo (tfMC) formalism is tested on both simple one-dimensional and three-dimensional systems. Both test-cases give excellent results in agreement with analytical solutions and literature reports. The inclusion of a time scale, the simplicity of the method, and the enhancement of the time step compared to classical MD methods make this method very appealing for studying the dynamics of many-particle systems.

  20. The many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method for time-dependent ab-initio quantum simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, J.M. Dimov, I.

    2014-09-15

    The aim of ab-initio approaches is the simulation of many-body quantum systems from the first principles of quantum mechanics. These methods are traditionally based on the many-body Schrödinger equation which represents an incredible mathematical challenge. In this paper, we introduce the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method in the context of distinguishable particles and in the absence of spin-dependent effects. Despite these restrictions, the method has several advantages. First of all, the Wigner formalism is intuitive, as it is based on the concept of a quasi-distribution function. Secondly, the Monte Carlo numerical approach allows scalability on parallel machines that is practically unachievable by means of other techniques based on finite difference or finite element methods. Finally, this method allows time-dependent ab-initio simulations of strongly correlated quantum systems. In order to validate our many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method, as a case study we simulate a relatively simple system consisting of two particles in several different situations. We first start from two non-interacting free Gaussian wave packets. We, then, proceed with the inclusion of an external potential barrier, and we conclude by simulating two entangled (i.e. correlated) particles. The results show how, in the case of negligible spin-dependent effects, the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method provides an efficient and reliable tool to study the time-dependent evolution of quantum systems composed of distinguishable particles.

  1. Coarse-grained computation for particle coagulation and sintering processes by linking Quadrature Method of Moments with Monte-Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Yu; Kavousanakis, Michail E.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Fox, Rodney O.

    2010-07-20

    The study of particle coagulation and sintering processes is important in a variety of research studies ranging from cell fusion and dust motion to aerosol formation applications. These processes are traditionally simulated using either Monte-Carlo methods or integro-differential equations for particle number density functions. In this paper, we present a computational technique for cases where we believe that accurate closed evolution equations for a finite number of moments of the density function exist in principle, but are not explicitly available. The so-called equation-free computational framework is then employed to numerically obtain the solution of these unavailable closed moment equations by exploiting (through intelligent design of computational experiments) the corresponding fine-scale (here, Monte-Carlo) simulation. We illustrate the use of this method by accelerating the computation of evolving moments of uni- and bivariate particle coagulation and sintering through short simulation bursts of a constant-number Monte-Carlo scheme.

  2. Low-Density Nozzle Flow by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and Continuum Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chang-Hong; Kim, Sku C.; Stubbs, Robert M.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    Two different approaches, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method based on molecular gasdynamics, and a finite-volume approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations, which are based on continuum gasdynamics, are employed in the analysis of a low-density gas flow in a small converging-diverging nozzle. The fluid experiences various kinds of flow regimes including continuum, slip, transition, and free-molecular. Results from the two numerical methods are compared with Rothe's experimental data, in which density and rotational temperature variations along the centerline and at various locations inside a low-density nozzle were measured by the electron-beam fluorescence technique. The continuum approach showed good agreement with the experimental data as far as density is concerned. The results from the DSMC method showed good agreement with the experimental data, both in the density and the rotational temperature. It is also shown that the simulation parameters, such as the gas/surface interaction model, the energy exchange model between rotational and translational modes, and the viscosity-temperature exponent, have substantial effects on the results of the DSMC method.

  3. FW-CADIS Method for Global and Semi-Global Variance Reduction of Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C; Peplow, Douglas E.; Mosher, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) method for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo calculations of distributions, such as flux or dose rate distributions (e.g., mesh tallies), as well as responses at multiple localized detectors and spectra. This method, referred to as Forward-Weighted CADIS (FW-CADIS), is an extension of the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method, which has been used for more than a decade to very effectively improve the efficiency of Monte Carlo calculations of localized quantities, e.g., flux, dose, or reaction rate at a specific location. The basis of this method is the development of an importance function that represents the importance of particles to the objective of uniform Monte Carlo particle density in the desired tally regions. Implementation of this method utilizes the results from a forward deterministic calculation to develop a forward-weighted source for a deterministic adjoint calculation. The resulting adjoint function is then used to generate consistent space- and energy-dependent source biasing parameters and weight windows that are used in a forward Monte Carlo calculation to obtain more uniform statistical uncertainties in the desired tally regions. The FW-CADIS method has been implemented and demonstrated within the MAVRIC sequence of SCALE and the ADVANTG/MCNP framework. Application of the method to representative, real-world problems, including calculation of dose rate and energy dependent flux throughout the problem space, dose rates in specific areas, and energy spectra at multiple detectors, is presented and discussed. Results of the FW-CADIS method and other recently developed global variance reduction approaches are also compared, and the FW-CADIS method outperformed the other methods in all cases considered.

  4. A statistical method for verifying mesh convergence in Monte Carlo simulations with application to fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Joseph E.; Strack, O. E.

    2011-03-22

    A novel method is presented for assessing the convergence of a sequence of statistical distributions generated by direct Monte Carlo sampling. The primary application is to assess the mesh or grid convergence, and possibly divergence, of stochastic outputs from non-linear continuum systems. Example systems include those from fluid or solid mechanics, particularly those with instabilities and sensitive dependence on initial conditions or system parameters. The convergence assessment is based on demonstrating empirically that a sequence of cumulative distribution functions converges in the Linfty norm. The effect of finite sample sizes is quantified using confidence levels from the Kolmogorov–Smirnov statistic. The statistical method is independent of the underlying distributions. The statistical method is demonstrated using two examples: (1) the logistic map in the chaotic regime, and (2) a fragmenting ductile ring modeled with an explicit-dynamics finite element code. In the fragmenting ring example the convergence of the distribution describing neck spacing is investigated. The initial yield strength is treated as a random field. Two different random fields are considered, one with spatial correlation and the other without. Both cases converged, albeit to different distributions. The case with spatial correlation exhibited a significantly higher convergence rate compared with the one without spatial correlation.

  5. THE EURADOS-KIT TRAINING COURSE ON MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR THE CALIBRATION OF BODY COUNTERS.

    PubMed

    Breustedt, B; Broggio, D; Gomez-Ros, J M; Leone, D; Marzocchi, O; Poelz, S; Shutt, A; Lopez, M A

    2016-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are numerical simulation techniques that can be used to extend the scope of calibrations performed in in vivo monitoring laboratories. These methods allow calibrations to be carried out for a much wider range of body shapes and sizes than would be feasible using physical phantoms. Unfortunately, nowadays, this powerful technique is still used mainly in research institutions only. In 2013, EURADOS and the in vivo monitoring laboratory of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) organized a 3-d training course to disseminate knowledge on the application of MC methods for in vivo monitoring. It was intended as a hands-on course centered around an exercise which guided the participants step by step through the calibration process using a simplified version of KIT's equipment. Only introductory lectures on in vivo monitoring and voxel models were given. The course was based on MC codes of the MCNP family, widespread in the community. The strong involvement of the participants and the working atmosphere in the classroom as well as the formal evaluation of the course showed that the approach chosen was appropriate. Participants liked the hands-on approach and the extensive course materials on the exercise.

  6. Calculation of photon pulse height distribution using deterministic and Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Azadeh; Vosoughi, Naser

    2015-12-01

    Radiation transport techniques which are used in radiation detection systems comprise one of two categories namely probabilistic and deterministic. However, probabilistic methods are typically used in pulse height distribution simulation by recreating the behavior of each individual particle, the deterministic approach, which approximates the macroscopic behavior of particles by solution of Boltzmann transport equation, is being developed because of its potential advantages in computational efficiency for complex radiation detection problems. In current work linear transport equation is solved using two methods including collided components of the scalar flux algorithm which is applied by iterating on the scattering source and ANISN deterministic computer code. This approach is presented in one dimension with anisotropic scattering orders up to P8 and angular quadrature orders up to S16. Also, multi-group gamma cross-section library required for this numerical transport simulation is generated in a discrete appropriate form. Finally, photon pulse height distributions are indirectly calculated by deterministic methods that approvingly compare with those from Monte Carlo based codes namely MCNPX and FLUKA.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo Method for Heavy Atomic and Molecular Systems with Spin-Orbit Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Cody; Mitas, Lubos

    We present a new quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method that can treat spin-orbit and other types of spin-depentent interactions explicitly. It is based on generalization of the fixed-phase and projection of the nonlocal operators with spinor trial wave functions. For testing the method we calculate several atomic and molecular systems such as Bi, W, Pb, PbH and PbO, some of them with both large- and small-core pseudopotentials. We validate the quality of the results against other correlated methods such as configuration interaction in two-component formalism. We find excellent agreement with extrapolated values for the total energies and we are able to reliably reproduce experimental values of excitation energies, electron affinity and molecular binding. We show that in order to obtain the agreement with experimental values the explicit inclusion of the spin-orbit interactions is crucial. U.S. D.O.E. grant de-sc0012314 and NERSC Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Density-of-states based Monte Carlo methods for simulation of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, Nitin; Knotts, Thomas A.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2004-03-01

    We have developed density-of-states [1] based Monte Carlo techniques for simulation of biological molecules. Two such methods are discussed. The first, Configurational Temperature Density of States (CTDOS) [2], relies on computing the density of states of a peptide system from knowledge of its configurational temperature. The reciprocal of this intrinsic temperature, computed from instantaneous configurational information of the system, is integrated to arrive at the density of states. The method shows improved efficiency and accuracy over techniques that are based on histograms of random visits to distinct energy states. The second approach, Expanded Ensemble Density of States (EXEDOS), incorporates elements from both the random walk method and the expanded ensemble formalism. It is used in this work to study mechanical deformation of model peptides. Results are presented in the form of force-extension curves and the corresponding potentials of mean force. The application of this proposed technique is further generalized to other biological systems; results will be presented for ion transport through protein channels, base stacking in nucleic acids and hybridization of DNA strands. [1]. F. Wang and D. P. Landau, Phys. Rev. Lett., 86, 2050 (2001). [2]. N. Rathore, T. A. Knotts IV and J. J. de Pablo, Biophys. J., Dec. (2003).

  9. THE EURADOS-KIT TRAINING COURSE ON MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR THE CALIBRATION OF BODY COUNTERS.

    PubMed

    Breustedt, B; Broggio, D; Gomez-Ros, J M; Leone, D; Marzocchi, O; Poelz, S; Shutt, A; Lopez, M A

    2016-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are numerical simulation techniques that can be used to extend the scope of calibrations performed in in vivo monitoring laboratories. These methods allow calibrations to be carried out for a much wider range of body shapes and sizes than would be feasible using physical phantoms. Unfortunately, nowadays, this powerful technique is still used mainly in research institutions only. In 2013, EURADOS and the in vivo monitoring laboratory of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) organized a 3-d training course to disseminate knowledge on the application of MC methods for in vivo monitoring. It was intended as a hands-on course centered around an exercise which guided the participants step by step through the calibration process using a simplified version of KIT's equipment. Only introductory lectures on in vivo monitoring and voxel models were given. The course was based on MC codes of the MCNP family, widespread in the community. The strong involvement of the participants and the working atmosphere in the classroom as well as the formal evaluation of the course showed that the approach chosen was appropriate. Participants liked the hands-on approach and the extensive course materials on the exercise. PMID:27103642

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of proton therapy installations: a global experimental method to validate secondary neutron dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Farah, J; Martinetti, F; Sayah, R; Lacoste, V; Donadille, L; Trompier, F; Nauraye, C; De Marzi, L; Vabre, I; Delacroix, S; Hérault, J; Clairand, I

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations are increasingly used to assess stray radiation dose to healthy organs of proton therapy patients and estimate the risk of secondary cancer. Among the secondary particles, neutrons are of primary concern due to their high relative biological effectiveness. The validation of Monte Carlo simulations for out-of-field neutron doses remains however a major challenge to the community. Therefore this work focused on developing a global experimental approach to test the reliability of the MCNPX models of two proton therapy installations operating at 75 and 178 MeV for ocular and intracranial tumor treatments, respectively. The method consists of comparing Monte Carlo calculations against experimental measurements of: (a) neutron spectrometry inside the treatment room, (b) neutron ambient dose equivalent at several points within the treatment room, (c) secondary organ-specific neutron doses inside the Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Results have proven that Monte Carlo models correctly reproduce secondary neutrons within the two proton therapy treatment rooms. Sensitive differences between experimental measurements and simulations were nonetheless observed especially with the highest beam energy. The study demonstrated the need for improved measurement tools, especially at the high neutron energy range, and more accurate physical models and cross sections within the Monte Carlo code to correctly assess secondary neutron doses in proton therapy applications.

  11. Multi-level Monte Carlo Methods for Efficient Simulation of Coulomb Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the use of multi-level Monte Carlo (MLMC) schemes--originally introduced by Giles for financial applications--for the efficient simulation of Coulomb collisions in the Fokker-Planck limit. The scheme is based on a Langevin treatment of collisions, and reduces the computational cost of achieving a RMS error scaling as ɛ from O (ɛ-3) --for standard Langevin methods and binary collision algorithms--to the theoretically optimal scaling O (ɛ-2) for the Milstein discretization, and to O (ɛ-2 (logɛ)2) with the simpler Euler-Maruyama discretization. In practice, this speeds up simulation by factors up to 100. We summarize standard MLMC schemes, describe some tricks for achieving the optimal scaling, present results from a test problem, and discuss the method's range of applicability. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the University of California, Los Angeles, under grant DE-FG02-05ER25710, and by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Adjoint-based deviational Monte Carlo methods for phonon transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe M.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2015-06-01

    In the field of linear transport, adjoint formulations exploit linearity to derive powerful reciprocity relations between a variety of quantities of interest. In this paper, we develop an adjoint formulation of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonon transport. We use this formulation for accelerating deviational Monte Carlo simulations of complex, multiscale problems. Benefits include significant computational savings via direct variance reduction, or by enabling formulations which allow more efficient use of computational resources, such as formulations which provide high resolution in a particular phase-space dimension (e.g., spectral). We show that the proposed adjoint-based methods are particularly well suited to problems involving a wide range of length scales (e.g., nanometers to hundreds of microns) and lead to computational methods that can calculate quantities of interest with a cost that is independent of the system characteristic length scale, thus removing the traditional stiffness of kinetic descriptions. Applications to problems of current interest, such as simulation of transient thermoreflectance experiments or spectrally resolved calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials, are presented and discussed in detail.

  13. Systematic hierarchical coarse-graining with the inverse Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Naômé, Aymeric; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-12-28

    We outline our coarse-graining strategy for linking micro- and mesoscales of soft matter and biological systems. The method is based on effective pairwise interaction potentials obtained in detailed ab initio or classical atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, which can be used in simulations at less accurate level after scaling up the size. The effective potentials are obtained by applying the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method [A. P. Lyubartsev and A. Laaksonen, Phys. Rev. E 52(4), 3730–3737 (1995)] on a chosen subset of degrees of freedom described in terms of radial distribution functions. An in-house software package MagiC is developed to obtain the effective potentials for arbitrary molecular systems. In this work we compute effective potentials to model DNA-protein interactions (bacterial LiaR regulator bound to a 26 base pairs DNA fragment) at physiological salt concentration at a coarse-grained (CG) level. Normally the IMC CG pair-potentials are used directly as look-up tables but here we have fitted them to five Gaussians and a repulsive wall. Results show stable association between DNA and the model protein as well as similar position fluctuation profile.

  14. Systematic hierarchical coarse-graining with the inverse Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Naômé, Aymeric; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-12-01

    We outline our coarse-graining strategy for linking micro- and mesoscales of soft matter and biological systems. The method is based on effective pairwise interaction potentials obtained in detailed ab initio or classical atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, which can be used in simulations at less accurate level after scaling up the size. The effective potentials are obtained by applying the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method [A. P. Lyubartsev and A. Laaksonen, Phys. Rev. E 52(4), 3730-3737 (1995)] on a chosen subset of degrees of freedom described in terms of radial distribution functions. An in-house software package MagiC is developed to obtain the effective potentials for arbitrary molecular systems. In this work we compute effective potentials to model DNA-protein interactions (bacterial LiaR regulator bound to a 26 base pairs DNA fragment) at physiological salt concentration at a coarse-grained (CG) level. Normally the IMC CG pair-potentials are used directly as look-up tables but here we have fitted them to five Gaussians and a repulsive wall. Results show stable association between DNA and the model protein as well as similar position fluctuation profile.

  15. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method using unstructured adaptive mesh and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.-S.; Tseng, K.-C.; Kuo, C.-H.

    2002-02-01

    The implementation of an adaptive mesh-embedding (h-refinement) scheme using unstructured grid in two-dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is reported. In this technique, local isotropic refinement is used to introduce new mesh where the local cell Knudsen number is less than some preset value. This simple scheme, however, has several severe consequences affecting the performance of the DSMC method. Thus, we have applied a technique to remove the hanging node, by introducing the an-isotropic refinement in the interfacial cells between refined and non-refined cells. Not only does this remedy increase a negligible amount of work, but it also removes all the difficulties presented in the originals scheme. We have tested the proposed scheme for argon gas in a high-speed driven cavity flow. The results show an improved flow resolution as compared with that of un-adaptive mesh. Finally, we have used triangular adaptive mesh to compute a near-continuum gas flow, a hypersonic flow over a cylinder. The results show fairly good agreement with previous studies. In summary, the proposed simple mesh adaptation is very useful in computing rarefied gas flows, which involve both complicated geometry and highly non-uniform density variations throughout the flow field. Copyright

  16. Simulation of Watts Bar Unit 1 Initial Startup Tests with Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Andrew T; Gehin, Jess C; Bekar, Kursat B; Celik, Cihangir

    2014-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors* is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications. One component of the testing and validation plan for VERA is comparison of neutronics results to a set of continuous energy Monte Carlo solutions for a range of pressurized water reactor geometries using the SCALE component KENO-VI developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Recent improvements in data, methods, and parallelism have enabled KENO, previously utilized predominately as a criticality safety code, to demonstrate excellent capability and performance for reactor physics applications. The highly detailed and rigorous KENO solutions provide a reliable nu-meric reference for VERAneutronics and also demonstrate the most accurate predictions achievable by modeling and simulations tools for comparison to operating plant data. This paper demonstrates the performance of KENO-VI for the Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle 1 zero power physics tests, including reactor criticality, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients.

  17. Building proteins from C alpha coordinates using the dihedral probability grid Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed Central

    Mathiowetz, A. M.; Goddard, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    Dihedral probability grid Monte Carlo (DPG-MC) is a general-purpose method of conformational sampling that can be applied to many problems in peptide and protein modeling. Here we present the DPG-MC method and apply it to predicting complete protein structures from C alpha coordinates. This is useful in such endeavors as homology modeling, protein structure prediction from lattice simulations, or fitting protein structures to X-ray crystallographic data. It also serves as an example of how DPG-MC can be applied to systems with geometric constraints. The conformational propensities for individual residues are used to guide conformational searches as the protein is built from the amino-terminus to the carboxyl-terminus. Results for a number of proteins show that both the backbone and side chain can be accurately modeled using DPG-MC. Backbone atoms are generally predicted with RMS errors of about 0.5 A (compared to X-ray crystal structure coordinates) and all atoms are predicted to an RMS error of 1.7 A or better. PMID:7549885

  18. Development of a method for calibrating in vivo measurement systems using magnetic resonance imaging and Monte Carlo computations

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, M.W.; Poston, J.W.; Hickman, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    Research efforts towards developing a new method for calibrating in vivo measurement systems using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Monte Carlo computations are discussed. The method employs the enhanced three-point Dixon technique for producing pure fat and pure water MR images of the human body. The MR images are used to define the geometry and composition of the scattering media for transport calculations using the general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP, Version 4. A sample case for developing the new method utilizing an adipose/muscle matrix is compared with laboratory measurements. Verification of the integrated MRI-MCNP method has been done for a specially designed phantom composed of fat, water, air, and a bone-substitute material. Implementation of the MRI-MCNP method is demonstrated for a low-energy, lung counting in vivo measurement system. Limitations and solutions regarding the presented method are discussed. 15 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. On-the-fly nuclear data processing methods for Monte Carlo simulations of fast spectrum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jon

    2015-08-31

    The presentation summarizes work performed over summer 2015 related to Monte Carlo simulations. A flexible probability table interpolation scheme has been implemented and tested with results comparing favorably to the continuous phase-space on-the-fly approach.

  20. Exponential Monte Carlo Convergence on a Homogeneous Right Parallelepiped Using the Reduced Source Method with Legendre Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, J.A.

    1999-09-01

    In previous work, exponential convergence of Monte Carlo solutions using the reduced source method with Legendre expansion has been achieved only in one-dimensional rod and slab geometries. In this paper, the method is applied to three-dimensional (right parallelepiped) problems, with resulting evidence suggesting success. As implemented in this paper, the method approximates an angular integral of the flux with a discrete-ordinates numerical quadrature. It is possible that this approximation introduces an inconsistency that must be addressed.

  1. Constant-pH Hybrid Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulation Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Roux, Benoît

    2015-08-11

    A computational method is developed to carry out explicit solvent simulations of complex molecular systems under conditions of constant pH. In constant-pH simulations, preidentified ionizable sites are allowed to spontaneously protonate and deprotonate as a function of time in response to the environment and the imposed pH. The method, based on a hybrid scheme originally proposed by H. A. Stern (J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 164112), consists of carrying out short nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (neMD) switching trajectories to generate physically plausible configurations with changed protonation states that are subsequently accepted or rejected according to a Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) criterion. To ensure microscopic detailed balance arising from such nonequilibrium switches, the atomic momenta are altered according to the symmetric two-ends momentum reversal prescription. To achieve higher efficiency, the original neMD-MC scheme is separated into two steps, reducing the need for generating a large number of unproductive and costly nonequilibrium trajectories. In the first step, the protonation state of a site is randomly attributed via a Metropolis MC process on the basis of an intrinsic pKa; an attempted nonequilibrium switch is generated only if this change in protonation state is accepted. This hybrid two-step inherent pKa neMD-MC simulation method is tested with single amino acids in solution (Asp, Glu, and His) and then applied to turkey ovomucoid third domain and hen egg-white lysozyme. Because of the simple linear increase in the computational cost relative to the number of titratable sites, the present method is naturally able to treat extremely large systems. PMID:26300709

  2. Constant-pH Hybrid Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics–Monte Carlo Simulation Method

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A computational method is developed to carry out explicit solvent simulations of complex molecular systems under conditions of constant pH. In constant-pH simulations, preidentified ionizable sites are allowed to spontaneously protonate and deprotonate as a function of time in response to the environment and the imposed pH. The method, based on a hybrid scheme originally proposed by H. A. Stern (J. Chem. Phys.2007, 126, 164112), consists of carrying out short nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (neMD) switching trajectories to generate physically plausible configurations with changed protonation states that are subsequently accepted or rejected according to a Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) criterion. To ensure microscopic detailed balance arising from such nonequilibrium switches, the atomic momenta are altered according to the symmetric two-ends momentum reversal prescription. To achieve higher efficiency, the original neMD–MC scheme is separated into two steps, reducing the need for generating a large number of unproductive and costly nonequilibrium trajectories. In the first step, the protonation state of a site is randomly attributed via a Metropolis MC process on the basis of an intrinsic pKa; an attempted nonequilibrium switch is generated only if this change in protonation state is accepted. This hybrid two-step inherent pKa neMD–MC simulation method is tested with single amino acids in solution (Asp, Glu, and His) and then applied to turkey ovomucoid third domain and hen egg-white lysozyme. Because of the simple linear increase in the computational cost relative to the number of titratable sites, the present method is naturally able to treat extremely large systems. PMID:26300709

  3. Quantifying uncertainties in pollutant mapping studies using the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yi; Robinson, Allen L.; Presto, Albert A.

    2014-12-01

    Routine air monitoring provides accurate measurements of annual average concentrations of air pollutants, but the low density of monitoring sites limits its capability in capturing intra-urban variation. Pollutant mapping studies measure air pollutants at a large number of sites during short periods. However, their short duration can cause substantial uncertainty in reproducing annual mean concentrations. In order to quantify this uncertainty for existing sampling strategies and investigate methods to improve future studies, we conducted Monte Carlo experiments with nationwide monitoring data from the EPA Air Quality System. Typical fixed sampling designs have much larger uncertainties than previously assumed, and produce accurate estimates of annual average pollution concentrations approximately 80% of the time. Mobile sampling has difficulties in estimating long-term exposures for individual sites, but performs better for site groups. The accuracy and the precision of a given design decrease when data variation increases, indicating challenges in sites intermittently impact by local sources such as traffic. Correcting measurements with reference sites does not completely remove the uncertainty associated with short duration sampling. Using reference sites with the addition method can better account for temporal variations than the multiplication method. We propose feasible methods for future mapping studies to reduce uncertainties in estimating annual mean concentrations. Future fixed sampling studies should conduct two separate 1-week long sampling periods in all 4 seasons. Mobile sampling studies should estimate annual mean concentrations for exposure groups with five or more sites. Fixed and mobile sampling designs have comparable probabilities in ordering two sites, so they may have similar capabilities in predicting pollutant spatial variations. Simulated sampling designs have large uncertainties in reproducing seasonal and diurnal variations at individual

  4. A reverse Monte Carlo method for deriving optical constants of solids from reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Da, B.; Sun, Y.; Ding, Z. J.; Mao, S. F.; Zhang, Z. M.; Jin, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Tanuma, S.

    2013-06-07

    A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method is developed to obtain the energy loss function (ELF) and optical constants from a measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectrum by an iterative Monte Carlo (MC) simulation procedure. The method combines the simulated annealing method, i.e., a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters, surface and bulk excitation weighting factors, and band gap energy, with a conventional MC simulation of electron interaction with solids, which acts as a single step of MCMC sampling in this RMC method. To examine the reliability of this method, we have verified that the output data of the dielectric function are essentially independent of the initial values of the trial parameters, which is a basic property of a MCMC method. The optical constants derived for SiO{sub 2} in the energy loss range of 8-90 eV are in good agreement with other available data, and relevant bulk ELFs are checked by oscillator strength-sum and perfect-screening-sum rules. Our results show that the dielectric function can be obtained by the RMC method even with a wide range of initial trial parameters. The RMC method is thus a general and effective method for determining the optical properties of solids from REELS measurements.

  5. Monte Carlo studies of nuclear reactions and calculating hadron masses using different methods with consistent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncaglia, Renato

    Scattering reactions are ordinarily solved by performing a partial-wave decomposition of the scattering amplitude, and solving coupled-channel equations for each partial wave. As the energy increases, the number of partial waves and the number of equations for partial waves also increases, making the method unpractical. We study nuclear reactions without performing a partial wave expansion of the potential, by solving a Lippmann- Schwinger equation in momentum space with Monte Carlo techniques. We study the problem of the convergence of the Born series with the use of Pade acceleration in the presence of Monte-Carlo-generated noise by solving for Tabakin's potential, whose analytic solution is known. We also investigate how Pade-acceleration can handle the case of a weak nuclear potential in a strong Coulomb interaction by solving for a potential of the type proposed by Kisslinger for low-energy /pi - 12C interactions. The spectra of mesons and baryons show striking regularities, which can be explained in terms of some general properties of the quark-quark interactions. Without assuming any specific form for the Hamiltonian, we show that it is possible to take advantage of these regularities to obtain constraints on the constituent quark mass differences, and to predict the masses of some hadrons not yet observed experimentally. In particular, we predict the value of the mass of the Bc* meson. With the help of semi-empirical mass formulas which estimate the effect of color-magnetic interactions, we obtain sum-rules relating the masses of hadrons. These mass formulas can be used to predict the masses of several baryons not yet observed. Information on color-triplet and color-singlet interactions gathered respectively from the baryon and meson spectra can be used in determining the masses of exotic tetraquarks composed of color-triplet diquarks. All of our predictions yield exotic masses far above threshold for strong decay, therefore making experimental observation

  6. Scalar and Parallel Optimized Implementation of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Stefan; Boyd, Iain D.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes a new concept for the implementation of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. It uses a localized data structure based on a computational cell to achieve high performance, especially on workstation processors, which can also be used in parallel. Since the data structure makes it possible to freely assign any cell to any processor, a domain decomposition can be found with equal calculation load on each processor while maintaining minimal communication among the nodes. Further, the new implementation strictly separates physical modeling, geometrical issues, and organizational tasks to achieve high maintainability and to simplify future enhancements. Three example flow configurations are calculated with the new implementation to demonstrate its generality and performance. They include a flow through a diverging channel using an adapted unstructured triangulated grid, a flow around a planetary probe, and an internal flow in a contactor used in plasma physics. The results are validated either by comparison with results obtained from other simulations or by comparison with experimental data. High performance on an IBM SP2 system is achieved if problem size and number of parallel processors are adapted accordingly. On 400 nodes, DSMC calculations with more than 100 million particles are possible.

  7. In vivo simulation environment for fluorescence molecular tomography using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yizhai; Xu, Qiong; Li, Jin; Tang, Shaojie; Zhang, Xin

    2008-12-01

    Optical sensing of specific molecular target using near-infrared light has been recognized to be the crucial technology, have changing human's future. The imaging of Fluorescence Molecular Tomography is the most novel technology in optical sensing. It uses near-infrared light(600-900nm) as instrument and utilize fluorochrome as probe to take noncontact three-dimensional imaging for live molecular targets and to exhibit molecular process in vivo. In order to solve the problem of forward simulation in FMT, this paper mainly introduces a new simulation modeling. The modeling utilizes Monte Carlo method and is implemented in C++ programming language. Ultimately its accuracy has been testified by comparing with analytic solutions and MOSE from University of Iowa and Chinese Academy of Science. The main characters of the modeling are that it can simulate both of bioluminescent imaging and FMT and take analytic calculation and support more than one source and CCD detector simultaneously. It can generate sufficient and proper data and pre-preparation for the study of fluorescence molecular tomography.

  8. Monte carlo method-based QSAR modeling of penicillins binding to human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Veselinović, Jovana B; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Nikolić, Goran M; Veselinović, Aleksandar M

    2015-01-01

    The binding of penicillins to human serum proteins was modeled with optimal descriptors based on the Simplified Molecular Input-Line Entry System (SMILES). The concentrations of protein-bound drug for 87 penicillins expressed as percentage of the total plasma concentration were used as experimental data. The Monte Carlo method was used as a computational tool to build up the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model for penicillins binding to plasma proteins. One random data split into training, test and validation set was examined. The calculated QSAR model had the following statistical parameters: r(2)  = 0.8760, q(2)  = 0.8665, s = 8.94 for the training set and r(2)  = 0.9812, q(2)  = 0.9753, s = 7.31 for the test set. For the validation set, the statistical parameters were r(2)  = 0.727 and s = 12.52, but after removing the three worst outliers, the statistical parameters improved to r(2)  = 0.921 and s = 7.18. SMILES-based molecular fragments (structural indicators) responsible for the increase and decrease of penicillins binding to plasma proteins were identified. The possibility of using these results for the computer-aided design of new penicillins with desired binding properties is presented.

  9. Development of Monte Carlo Methods for Investigating Migration of Radionuclides in Contaminated Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Avrorin, E. N.; Tsvetokhin, A. G.; Xenofontov, A. I.; Kourbatova, E. I.; Regens, J. L.

    2002-02-26

    This paper presents the results of an ongoing research and development project conducted by Russian institutions in Moscow and Snezhinsk, supported by the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), in collaboration with the University of Oklahoma. The joint study focuses on developing and applying analytical tools to effectively characterize contaminant transport and assess risks associated with migration of radionuclides and heavy metals in the water column and sediments of large reservoirs or lakes. The analysis focuses on the development and evaluation of theoretical-computational models that describe the distribution of radioactive wastewater within a reservoir and characterize the associated radiation field as well as estimate doses received from radiation exposure. The analysis focuses on the development and evaluation of Monte Carlo-based, theoretical-computational methods that are applied to increase the precision of results and to reduce computing time for estimating the characteristics the radiation field emitted from the contaminated wastewater layer. The calculated migration of radionuclides is used to estimate distributions of radiation doses that could be received by an exposed population based on exposure to radionuclides from specified volumes of discrete aqueous sources. The calculated dose distributions can be used to support near-term and long-term decisions about priorities for environmental remediation and stewardship.

  10. IR imaging simulation and analysis for aeroengine exhaust system based on reverse Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Lihai; Mo, Dongla; Shi, Jingcheng

    2014-11-01

    The IR radiation characteristics of aeroengine are the important basis for IR stealth design and anti-stealth detection of aircraft. With the development of IR imaging sensor technology, the importance of aircraft IR stealth increases. An effort is presented to explore target IR radiation imaging simulation based on Reverse Monte Carlo Method (RMCM), which combined with the commercial CFD software. Flow and IR radiation characteristics of an aeroengine exhaust system are investigated, which developing a full size geometry model based on the actual parameters, using a flow-IR integration structured mesh, obtaining the engine performance parameters as the inlet boundary conditions of mixer section, and constructing a numerical simulation model of engine exhaust system of IR radiation characteristics based on RMCM. With the above models, IR radiation characteristics of aeroengine exhaust system is given, and focuses on the typical detecting band of IR spectral radiance imaging at azimuth 20°. The result shows that: (1) in small azimuth angle, the IR radiation is mainly from the center cone of all hot parts; near the azimuth 15°, mixer has the biggest radiation contribution, while center cone, turbine and flame stabilizer equivalent; (2) the main radiation components and space distribution in different spectrum is different, CO2 at 4.18, 4.33 and 4.45 micron absorption and emission obviously, H2O at 3.0 and 5.0 micron absorption and emission obviously.

  11. Extended canonical Monte Carlo methods: Improving accuracy of microcanonical calculations using a reweighting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, L.; Castro-Palacio, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    Velazquez and Curilef [J. Stat. Mech. (2010) P02002, 10.1088/1742-5468/2010/02/P02002; J. Stat. Mech. (2010) P04026, 10.1088/1742-5468/2010/04/P04026] have proposed a methodology to extend Monte Carlo algorithms that are based on canonical ensemble. According to our previous study, their proposal allows us to overcome slow sampling problems in systems that undergo any type of temperature-driven phase transition. After a comprehensive review about ideas and connections of this framework, we discuss the application of a reweighting technique to improve the accuracy of microcanonical calculations, specifically, the well-known multihistograms method of Ferrenberg and Swendsen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1195 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.63.1195]. As an example of application, we reconsider the study of the four-state Potts model on the square lattice L ×L with periodic boundary conditions. This analysis allows us to detect the existence of a very small latent heat per site qL during the occurrence of temperature-driven phase transition of this model, whose size dependence seems to follow a power law qL(L ) ∝(1/L ) z with exponent z ≃0 .26 ±0 .02. Discussed is the compatibility of these results with the continuous character of temperature-driven phase transition when L →+∞ .

  12. Development of a software package for solid-angle calculations using the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Xiulian; Zhang, Changsheng; Li, Gang; Xu, Jiayun; Sun, Guangai

    2014-02-01

    Solid-angle calculations play an important role in the absolute calibration of radioactivity measurement systems and in the determination of the activity of radioactive sources, which are often complicated. In the present paper, a software package is developed to provide a convenient tool for solid-angle calculations in nuclear physics. The proposed software calculates solid angles using the Monte Carlo method, in which a new type of variance reduction technique was integrated. The package, developed under the environment of Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC) in Microsoft Visual C++, has a graphical user interface, in which, the visualization function is integrated in conjunction with OpenGL. One advantage of the proposed software package is that it can calculate the solid angle subtended by a detector with different geometric shapes (e.g., cylinder, square prism, regular triangular prism or regular hexagonal prism) to a point, circular or cylindrical source without any difficulty. The results obtained from the proposed software package were compared with those obtained from previous studies and calculated using Geant4. It shows that the proposed software package can produce accurate solid-angle values with a greater computation speed than Geant4.

  13. Feasibility of a Monte Carlo-deterministic hybrid method for fast reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, W.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.; Yun, S.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo and deterministic hybrid method is investigated for the analysis of fast reactors in this paper. Effective multi-group cross sections data are generated using a collision estimator in the MCNP5. A high order Legendre scattering cross section data generation module was added into the MCNP5 code. Both cross section data generated from MCNP5 and TRANSX/TWODANT using the homogeneous core model were compared, and were applied to DIF3D code for fast reactor core analysis of a 300 MWe SFR TRU burner core. For this analysis, 9 groups macroscopic-wise data was used. In this paper, a hybrid calculation MCNP5/DIF3D was used to analyze the core model. The cross section data was generated using MCNP5. The k{sub eff} and core power distribution were calculated using the 54 triangle FDM code DIF3D. A whole core calculation of the heterogeneous core model using the MCNP5 was selected as a reference. In terms of the k{sub eff}, 9-group MCNP5/DIF3D has a discrepancy of -154 pcm from the reference solution, 9-group TRANSX/TWODANT/DIF3D analysis gives -1070 pcm discrepancy. (authors)

  14. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    DOE PAGES

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakagemore » frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.« less

  15. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.

  16. Monte Carlo analysis of thermochromatography as a fast separation method for nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Howard L

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear forensic science has become increasingly important for global nuclear security, and enhancing the timeliness of forensic analysis has been established as an important objective in the field. New, faster techniques must be developed to meet this objective. Current approaches for the analysis of minor actinides, fission products, and fuel-specific materials require time-consuming chemical separation coupled with measurement through either nuclear counting or mass spectrometry. These very sensitive measurement techniques can be hindered by impurities or incomplete separation in even the most painstaking chemical separations. High-temperature gas-phase separation or thermochromatography has been used in the past for the rapid separations in the study of newly created elements and as a basis for chemical classification of that element. This work examines the potential for rapid separation of gaseous species to be applied in nuclear forensic investigations. Monte Carlo modeling has been used to evaluate the potential utility of the thermochromatographic separation method, albeit this assessment is necessarily limited due to the lack of available experimental data for validation.

  17. Assessment of the Contrast to Noise Ratio in PET Scanners with Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C. M.; Karpetas, G. E.; Fountos, G. P.; Valais, I. G.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction. The PET scanner simulated was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution. Image quality was assessed in terms of the CNR. CNR was estimated from coronal reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using various subsets (3, 15 and 21) and various iterations (2 to 20). CNR values were found to decrease when both iterations and subsets increase. Two (2) iterations were found to be optimal. The simulated PET evaluation method, based on the TLC plane source, can be useful in image quality assessment of PET scanners.

  18. Dynamic measurements and uncertainty estimation of clinical thermometers using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorevc, Jaka; Bojkovski, Jovan; Pušnik, Igor; Drnovšek, Janko

    2016-09-01

    Clinical thermometers in intensive care units are used for the continuous measurement of body temperature. This study describes a procedure for dynamic measurement uncertainty evaluation in order to examine the requirements for clinical thermometer dynamic properties in standards and recommendations. In this study thermistors were used as temperature sensors, transient temperature measurements were performed in water and air and the measurement data were processed for the investigation of thermometer dynamic properties. The thermometers were mathematically modelled. A Monte Carlo method was implemented for dynamic measurement uncertainty evaluation. The measurement uncertainty was analysed for static and dynamic conditions. Results showed that dynamic uncertainty is much larger than steady-state uncertainty. The results of dynamic uncertainty analysis were applied on an example of clinical measurements and were compared to current requirements in ISO standard for clinical thermometers. It can be concluded that there was no need for dynamic evaluation of clinical thermometers for continuous measurement, while dynamic measurement uncertainty was within the demands of target uncertainty. Whereas in the case of intermittent predictive thermometers, the thermometer dynamic properties had a significant impact on the measurement result. Estimation of dynamic uncertainty is crucial for the assurance of traceable and comparable measurements.

  19. Extended canonical Monte Carlo methods: Improving accuracy of microcanonical calculations using a reweighting technique.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, L; Castro-Palacio, J C

    2015-03-01

    Velazquez and Curilef [J. Stat. Mech. (2010); J. Stat. Mech. (2010)] have proposed a methodology to extend Monte Carlo algorithms that are based on canonical ensemble. According to our previous study, their proposal allows us to overcome slow sampling problems in systems that undergo any type of temperature-driven phase transition. After a comprehensive review about ideas and connections of this framework, we discuss the application of a reweighting technique to improve the accuracy of microcanonical calculations, specifically, the well-known multihistograms method of Ferrenberg and Swendsen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1195 (1989)]. As an example of application, we reconsider the study of the four-state Potts model on the square lattice L×L with periodic boundary conditions. This analysis allows us to detect the existence of a very small latent heat per site qL during the occurrence of temperature-driven phase transition of this model, whose size dependence seems to follow a power law qL(L)∝(1/L)z with exponent z≃0.26±0.02. Discussed is the compatibility of these results with the continuous character of temperature-driven phase transition when L→+∞. PMID:25871247

  20. Analysis of probabilistic short run marginal cost using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Alcaraz, G.; Navarrete, N.; Tovar-Hernandez, J.H.; Fuerte-Esquivel, C.R.; Mota-Palomino, R.

    1999-11-01

    The structure of the Electricity Supply Industry is undergoing dramatic changes to provide new services options. The main aim of this restructuring is allowing generating units the freedom of selling electricity to anybody they wish at a price determined by market forces. Several methodologies have been proposed in order to quantify different costs associated with those new services offered by electrical utilities operating under a deregulated market. The new wave of pricing is heavily influenced by economic principles designed to price products to elastic market segments on the basis of marginal costs. Hence, spot pricing provides the economic structure for many of new services. At the same time, the pricing is influenced by uncertainties associated to the electric system state variables which defined its operating point. In this paper, nodal probabilistic short run marginal costs are calculated, considering as random variables the load, the production cost and availability of generators. The effect of the electrical network is evaluated taking into account linearized models. A thermal economic dispatch is used to simulate each operational condition generated by Monte Carlo method on small fictitious power system in order to assess the effect of the random variables on the energy trading. First, this is carry out by introducing each random variable one by one, and finally considering the random interaction of all of them.

  1. Monte Carlo evaluation of accuracy and noise properties of two scatter correction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, Y. |; Eberl, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1996-12-31

    Two independent scatter correction techniques, transmission dependent convolution subtraction (TDCS) and triple-energy window (TEW) method, were evaluated in terms of quantitative accuracy and noise properties using Monte Carlo simulation (EGS4). Emission projections (primary, scatter and scatter plus primary) were simulated for {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl for numerical chest phantoms. Data were reconstructed with ordered-subset ML-EM algorithm including attenuation correction using the transmission data. In the chest phantom simulation, TDCS provided better S/N than TEW, and better accuracy, i.e., 1.0% vs -7.2% in myocardium, and -3.7% vs -30.1% in the ventricular chamber for {sup 99m}Tc with TDCS and TEW, respectively. For {sup 201}Tl, TDCS provided good visual and quantitative agreement with simulated true primary image without noticeably increasing the noise after scatter correction. Overall TDCS proved to be more accurate and less noisy than TEW, facilitating quantitative assessment of physiological functions with SPECT.

  2. Water adsorption isotherms on porous onionlike carbonaceous particles. Simulations with the grand canonical Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Hantal, György; Picaud, Sylvain; Hoang, Paul N M; Voloshin, Vladimir P; Medvedev, Nikolai N; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2010-10-14

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on different types of model soot particles. These soot models are constructed by first removing atoms from onion-fullerene structures in order to create randomly distributed pores inside the soot, and then performing molecular dynamics simulations, based on the reactive adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) description of the interaction between carbon atoms, to optimize the resulting structures. The obtained results clearly show that the main driving force of water adsorption on soot is the possibility of the formation of new water-water hydrogen bonds with the already adsorbed water molecules. The shape of the calculated water adsorption isotherms at 298 K strongly depends on the possible confinement of the water molecules in pores of the carbonaceous structure. We found that there are two important factors influencing the adsorption ability of soot. The first of these factors, dominating at low pressures, is the ability of the soot of accommodating the first adsorbed water molecules at strongly hydrophilic sites. The second factor concerns the size and shape of the pores, which should be such that the hydrogen bonding network of the water molecules filling them should be optimal. This second factor determines the adsorption properties at higher pressures. PMID:20950025

  3. Water adsorption isotherms on porous onionlike carbonaceous particles. Simulations with the grand canonical Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantal, György; Picaud, Sylvain; Hoang, Paul N. M.; Voloshin, Vladimir P.; Medvedev, Nikolai N.; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2010-10-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on different types of model soot particles. These soot models are constructed by first removing atoms from onion-fullerene structures in order to create randomly distributed pores inside the soot, and then performing molecular dynamics simulations, based on the reactive adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) description of the interaction between carbon atoms, to optimize the resulting structures. The obtained results clearly show that the main driving force of water adsorption on soot is the possibility of the formation of new water-water hydrogen bonds with the already adsorbed water molecules. The shape of the calculated water adsorption isotherms at 298 K strongly depends on the possible confinement of the water molecules in pores of the carbonaceous structure. We found that there are two important factors influencing the adsorption ability of soot. The first of these factors, dominating at low pressures, is the ability of the soot of accommodating the first adsorbed water molecules at strongly hydrophilic sites. The second factor concerns the size and shape of the pores, which should be such that the hydrogen bonding network of the water molecules filling them should be optimal. This second factor determines the adsorption properties at higher pressures.

  4. Summarizing the output of a Monte Carlo method for uncertainty evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, P. M.; Matthews, C. E.; Cox, M. G.; Forbes, A. B.

    2014-06-01

    The ‘Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement’ (GUM) requires that the way a measurement uncertainty is expressed should be transferable. It should be possible to use directly the uncertainty evaluated for one measurement as a component in evaluating the uncertainty for another measurement that depends on the first. Although the method for uncertainty evaluation described in the GUM meets this requirement of transferability, it is less clear how this requirement is to be achieved when GUM Supplement 1 is applied. That Supplement uses a Monte Carlo method to provide a sample composed of many values drawn randomly from the probability distribution for the measurand. Such a sample does not constitute a convenient way of communicating knowledge about the measurand. In this paper consideration is given to obtaining a more compact summary of such a sample that preserves information about the measurand contained in the sample and can be used in a subsequent uncertainty evaluation. In particular, a coverage interval for the measurand that corresponds to a given coverage probability is often required. If the measurand is characterized by a probability distribution that is not close to being Gaussian, sufficient information has to be conveyed to enable such a coverage interval to be computed reliably. A quantile function in the form of an extended lambda distribution can provide adequate approximations in a number of cases. This distribution is defined by a fixed number of adjustable parameters determined, for example, by matching the moments of the distribution to those calculated in terms of the sample of values. In this paper, alternative flexible models for the quantile function and methods for determining a quantile function from a sample of values are proposed for meeting the above needs.

  5. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for the groundwater inverse problem.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Higdon, D. M.; Zhang, D.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we develop a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method (MCMC) to estimate the hydraulic conductivity field conditioned on the direct measurements of hydraulic conductivity and indirect measurements of dependent variables such as hydraulic head for saturated flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The log hydraulic conductivity field is represented (parameterized) by the combination of some basis kernels centered at fixed spatial locations. The prior distribution for the vector of coefficients {theta} are taken from a posterior distribution {pi}({theta}/d) that is proportional to the product of the likelihood function of measurements d given parameter vector {theta} and the prior distribution of {theta}. Starting from any initial setting, a partial realization of a Markov chain is generated by updating only one component of {theta} at a time according to Metropolis rules. This ensures that output from this chain has {pi}({theta}/d) as its stationary distribution. The posterior mean of the parameter {theta} (and thus the mean log hydraulic conductivity conditional to measurements on hydraulic conductivity, and hydraulic head) can be estimated from the Markov chain realizations (ignoring some early realizations). The uncertainty associated with the mean filed can also be assessed from these realizations. In addition, the MCMC approach provides an alternative for estimating conditional predictions of hydraulic head and concentration and their associated uncertainties. Numerical examples for flow in a hypothetic random porous medium show that estimated log hydraulic conductivity field from the MCMC approach is closer to the original hypothetical random field than those obtained using kriging or cokriging methods.

  6. Towards prediction of correlated material properties using quantum Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lucas

    Correlated electron systems offer a richness of physics far beyond noninteracting systems. If we would like to pursue the dream of designer correlated materials, or, even to set a more modest goal, to explain in detail the properties and effective physics of known materials, then accurate simulation methods are required. Using modern computational resources, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques offer a way to directly simulate electron correlations. I will show some recent results on a few extremely challenging materials including the metal-insulator transition of VO2, the ground state of the doped cuprates, and the pressure dependence of magnetic properties in FeSe. By using a relatively simple implementation of QMC, at least some properties of these materials can be described truly from first principles, without any adjustable parameters. Using the QMC platform, we have developed a way of systematically deriving effective lattice models from the simulation. This procedure is particularly attractive for correlated electron systems because the QMC methods treat the one-body and many-body components of the wave function and Hamiltonian on completely equal footing. I will show some examples of using this downfolding technique and the high accuracy of QMC to connect our intuitive ideas about interacting electron systems with high fidelity simulations. The work in this presentation was supported in part by NSF DMR 1206242, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program under Award Number FG02-12ER46875, and the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, Department of Energy Frontier Research Center under Grant No. DEAC0298CH1088. Computing resources were provided by a Blue Waters Illinois grant and INCITE PhotSuper and SuperMatSim allocations.

  7. Range Verification Methods in Particle Therapy: Underlying Physics and Monte Carlo Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kraan, Aafke Christine

    2015-01-01

    Hadron therapy allows for highly conformal dose distributions and better sparing of organs-at-risk, thanks to the characteristic dose deposition as function of depth. However, the quality of hadron therapy treatments is closely connected with the ability to predict and achieve a given beam range in the patient. Currently, uncertainties in particle range lead to the employment of safety margins, at the expense of treatment quality. Much research in particle therapy is therefore aimed at developing methods to verify the particle range in patients. Non-invasive in vivo monitoring of the particle range can be performed by detecting secondary radiation, emitted from the patient as a result of nuclear interactions of charged hadrons with tissue, including β+ emitters, prompt photons, and charged fragments. The correctness of the dose delivery can be verified by comparing measured and pre-calculated distributions of the secondary particles. The reliability of Monte Carlo (MC) predictions is a key issue. Correctly modeling the production of secondaries is a non-trivial task, because it involves nuclear physics interactions at energies, where no rigorous theories exist to describe them. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various aspects in modeling the physics processes for range verification with secondary particles produced in proton, carbon, and heavier ion irradiation. We discuss electromagnetic and nuclear interactions of charged hadrons in matter, which is followed by a summary of some widely used MC codes in hadron therapy. Then, we describe selected examples of how these codes have been validated and used in three range verification techniques: PET, prompt gamma, and charged particle detection. We include research studies and clinically applied methods. For each of the techniques, we point out advantages and disadvantages, as well as clinical challenges still to be addressed, focusing on MC simulation aspects. PMID:26217586

  8. Range Verification Methods in Particle Therapy: Underlying Physics and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kraan, Aafke Christine

    2015-01-01

    Hadron therapy allows for highly conformal dose distributions and better sparing of organs-at-risk, thanks to the characteristic dose deposition as function of depth. However, the quality of hadron therapy treatments is closely connected with the ability to predict and achieve a given beam range in the patient. Currently, uncertainties in particle range lead to the employment of safety margins, at the expense of treatment quality. Much research in particle therapy is therefore aimed at developing methods to verify the particle range in patients. Non-invasive in vivo monitoring of the particle range can be performed by detecting secondary radiation, emitted from the patient as a result of nuclear interactions of charged hadrons with tissue, including β (+) emitters, prompt photons, and charged fragments. The correctness of the dose delivery can be verified by comparing measured and pre-calculated distributions of the secondary particles. The reliability of Monte Carlo (MC) predictions is a key issue. Correctly modeling the production of secondaries is a non-trivial task, because it involves nuclear physics interactions at energies, where no rigorous theories exist to describe them. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various aspects in modeling the physics processes for range verification with secondary particles produced in proton, carbon, and heavier ion irradiation. We discuss electromagnetic and nuclear interactions of charged hadrons in matter, which is followed by a summary of some widely used MC codes in hadron therapy. Then, we describe selected examples of how these codes have been validated and used in three range verification techniques: PET, prompt gamma, and charged particle detection. We include research studies and clinically applied methods. For each of the techniques, we point out advantages and disadvantages, as well as clinical challenges still to be addressed, focusing on MC simulation aspects.

  9. Comprehensive modeling of special nuclear materials detection using three-dimensional deterministic and Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Gabriel M.

    Our study aim to design a useful neutron signature characterization device based on 3He detectors, a standard neutron detection methodology used in homeland security applications. Research work involved simulation of the generation, transport, and detection of the leakage radiation from Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). To accomplish research goals, we use a new methodology to fully characterize a standard "1-Ci" Plutonium-Beryllium (Pu-Be) neutron source based on 3-D computational radiation transport methods, employing both deterministic SN and Monte Carlo methodologies. Computational model findings were subsequently validated through experimental measurements. Achieved results allowed us to design, build, and laboratory-test a Nickel composite alloy shield that enables the neutron leakage spectrum from a standard Pu-Be source to be transformed, through neutron scattering interactions in the shield, into a very close approximation of the neutron spectrum leaking from a large, subcritical mass of Weapons Grade Plutonium (WGPu) metal. This source will make possible testing with a nearly exact reproduction of the neutron spectrum from a 6.67 kg WGPu mass equivalent, but without the expense or risk of testing detector components with real materials. Moreover, over thirty moderator materials were studied in order to characterize their neutron energy filtering potential. Specific focus was made to establish the limits of He-3 spectroscopy using ideal filter materials. To demonstrate our methodology, we present the optimally detected spectral differences between SNM materials (Plutonium and Uranium), metal and oxide, using ideal filter materials. Finally, using knowledge gained from previous studies, the design of a He-3 spectroscopy system neutron detector, simulated entirely via computational methods, is proposed to resolve the spectra from SNM neutron sources of high interest. This was accomplished by replacing ideal filters with real materials, and comparing reaction

  10. Range Verification Methods in Particle Therapy: Underlying Physics and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kraan, Aafke Christine

    2015-01-01

    Hadron therapy allows for highly conformal dose distributions and better sparing of organs-at-risk, thanks to the characteristic dose deposition as function of depth. However, the quality of hadron therapy treatments is closely connected with the ability to predict and achieve a given beam range in the patient. Currently, uncertainties in particle range lead to the employment of safety margins, at the expense of treatment quality. Much research in particle therapy is therefore aimed at developing methods to verify the particle range in patients. Non-invasive in vivo monitoring of the particle range can be performed by detecting secondary radiation, emitted from the patient as a result of nuclear interactions of charged hadrons with tissue, including β (+) emitters, prompt photons, and charged fragments. The correctness of the dose delivery can be verified by comparing measured and pre-calculated distributions of the secondary particles. The reliability of Monte Carlo (MC) predictions is a key issue. Correctly modeling the production of secondaries is a non-trivial task, because it involves nuclear physics interactions at energies, where no rigorous theories exist to describe them. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various aspects in modeling the physics processes for range verification with secondary particles produced in proton, carbon, and heavier ion irradiation. We discuss electromagnetic and nuclear interactions of charged hadrons in matter, which is followed by a summary of some widely used MC codes in hadron therapy. Then, we describe selected examples of how these codes have been validated and used in three range verification techniques: PET, prompt gamma, and charged particle detection. We include research studies and clinically applied methods. For each of the techniques, we point out advantages and disadvantages, as well as clinical challenges still to be addressed, focusing on MC simulation aspects. PMID:26217586

  11. [Study of Determination of Oil Mixture Components Content Based on Quasi-Monte Carlo Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-tian; Xu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-fei; Chen, Meng-han; Wang, Shi-tao

    2015-05-01

    Gasoline, kerosene, diesel is processed by crude oil with different distillation range. The boiling range of gasoline is 35 ~205 °C. The boiling range of kerosene is 140~250 °C. And the boiling range of diesel is 180~370 °C. At the same time, the carbon chain length of differentmineral oil is different. The carbon chain-length of gasoline is within the scope of C7 to C11. The carbon chain length of kerosene is within the scope of C12 to C15. And the carbon chain length of diesel is within the scope of C15 to C18. The recognition and quantitative measurement of three kinds of mineral oil is based on different fluorescence spectrum formed in their different carbon number distribution characteristics. Mineral oil pollution occurs frequently, so monitoring mineral oil content in the ocean is very important. A new method of components content determination of spectra overlapping mineral oil mixture is proposed, with calculation of characteristic peak power integrationof three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum by using Quasi-Monte Carlo Method, combined with optimal algorithm solving optimum number of characteristic peak and range of integral region, solving nonlinear equations by using BFGS(a rank to two update method named after its inventor surname first letter, Boyden, Fletcher, Goldfarb and Shanno) method. Peak power accumulation of determined points in selected area is sensitive to small changes of fluorescence spectral line, so the measurement of small changes of component content is sensitive. At the same time, compared with the single point measurement, measurement sensitivity is improved by the decrease influence of random error due to the selection of points. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and fluorescence contour spectra of single mineral oil and the mixture are measured by taking kerosene, diesel and gasoline as research objects, with a single mineral oil regarded whole, not considered each mineral oil components. Six characteristic peaks are

  12. [Study of Determination of Oil Mixture Components Content Based on Quasi-Monte Carlo Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-tian; Xu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-fei; Chen, Meng-han; Wang, Shi-tao

    2015-05-01

    Gasoline, kerosene, diesel is processed by crude oil with different distillation range. The boiling range of gasoline is 35 ~205 °C. The boiling range of kerosene is 140~250 °C. And the boiling range of diesel is 180~370 °C. At the same time, the carbon chain length of differentmineral oil is different. The carbon chain-length of gasoline is within the scope of C7 to C11. The carbon chain length of kerosene is within the scope of C12 to C15. And the carbon chain length of diesel is within the scope of C15 to C18. The recognition and quantitative measurement of three kinds of mineral oil is based on different fluorescence spectrum formed in their different carbon number distribution characteristics. Mineral oil pollution occurs frequently, so monitoring mineral oil content in the ocean is very important. A new method of components content determination of spectra overlapping mineral oil mixture is proposed, with calculation of characteristic peak power integrationof three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum by using Quasi-Monte Carlo Method, combined with optimal algorithm solving optimum number of characteristic peak and range of integral region, solving nonlinear equations by using BFGS(a rank to two update method named after its inventor surname first letter, Boyden, Fletcher, Goldfarb and Shanno) method. Peak power accumulation of determined points in selected area is sensitive to small changes of fluorescence spectral line, so the measurement of small changes of component content is sensitive. At the same time, compared with the single point measurement, measurement sensitivity is improved by the decrease influence of random error due to the selection of points. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and fluorescence contour spectra of single mineral oil and the mixture are measured by taking kerosene, diesel and gasoline as research objects, with a single mineral oil regarded whole, not considered each mineral oil components. Six characteristic peaks are

  13. Multistep Lattice-Voxel method utilizing lattice function for Monte-Carlo treatment planning with pixel based voxel model.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Saito, K; Nakamura, T; Sakae, T; Sakurai, H; Matsumura, A; Ono, K

    2011-12-01

    Treatment planning for boron neutron capture therapy generally utilizes Monte-Carlo methods for calculation of the dose distribution. The new treatment planning system JCDS-FX employs the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo code PHITS to calculate the dose distribution. JCDS-FX allows to build a precise voxel model consisting of pixel based voxel cells in the scale of 0.4×0.4×2.0 mm(3) voxel in order to perform high-accuracy dose estimation, e.g. for the purpose of calculating the dose distribution in a human body. However, the miniaturization of the voxel size increases calculation time considerably. The aim of this study is to investigate sophisticated modeling methods which can perform Monte-Carlo calculations for human geometry efficiently. Thus, we devised a new voxel modeling method "Multistep Lattice-Voxel method," which can configure a voxel model that combines different voxel sizes by utilizing the lattice function over and over. To verify the performance of the calculation with the modeling method, several calculations for human geometry were carried out. The results demonstrated that the Multistep Lattice-Voxel method enabled the precise voxel model to reduce calculation time substantially while keeping the high-accuracy of dose estimation.

  14. Self Consistent Monte Carlo Method to Study CSR Effects in Bunch Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, R.L.; Bassi, G.; Ellison, J.A.; Heinemann, K.A.; /New Mexico U.

    2008-01-08

    In this paper we report on the results of a self-consistent calculation of CSR effects on a particle bunch moving through the benchmark Zeuthen bunch compressors. The theoretical framework is based on a 4D Vlasov-Maxwell approach including shielding from the vacuum chamber. We calculate the fields in the lab frame, where time is the independent variable, and evolve the phase space density/points in the beam frame, where arc length, s, along a reference orbit, is the independent variable. Some details are given in [2], where we also discuss three approaches, the unperturbed source model (UPS), the self consistent Monte Carlo (SCMC) method and the method of local characteristics. Results for the UPS have been presented for 5 GeV before [3], here we compare them with our new results from the SCMC and study the 500MeV case. Our work using the method of characteristics is in progress. The SCMC algorithm begins by randomly generating an initial ensemble of beam frame phase space points according to a given initial phase space density. The algorithm then reduces to laying out one arc length step. Assume that at arc length s we know the location of the phase space points and the history of the source prior to s. We then (1) create a smooth representation of the lab frame charge and current densities, {rho}{sub L} and J{sub L}, (2) calculate the fields at s from the history of {rho}{sub L} and J{sub L}, and (3) move the beam frame phase space points according to the beam frame equations of motion. This is then iterated. The UPS calculation is similar except the fields are calculated from a function of s computed a priori from the beam frame equations of motion without the self-fields. The phase space points are then evolved according to the equations of motion with these ''unperturbed'' fields. In the UPS we use a Gaussian initial density which evolves under the linear beam frame equations as a Gaussian. This gives us an analytic formula for the source, which significantly

  15. Geometrically-compatible 3-D Monte Carlo and discrete-ordinates methods

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.E.; Wareing, T.A.; McGhee, J.M.; Evans, T.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was two-fold. The first purpose was to develop a deterministic discrete-ordinates neutral-particle transport scheme for unstructured tetrahedral spatial meshes, and implement it in a computer code. The second purpose was to modify the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code to use adjoint solutions from the tetrahedral-mesh discrete-ordinates code to reduce the statistical variance of Monte Carlo solutions via a weight-window approach. The first task has resulted in a deterministic transport code that is much more efficient for modeling complex 3-D geometries than any previously existing deterministic code. The second task has resulted in a powerful new capability for dramatically reducing the cost of difficult 3-D Monte Carlo calculations.

  16. Advanced Monte Carlo methods for analysis of very high temperature reactors: On-the-fly Doppler broadening and deterministic/Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilyurt, Gokhan

    Two of the primary challenges associated with the neutronic analysis of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are accounting for resonance self-shielding in the particle fuel (contributing to the double heterogeneity) and accounting for temperature feedback due to Doppler broadening. The double heterogeneity challenge is addressed by defining a "double heterogeneity factor" (DHF) that allows conventional light water reactor (LWR) lattice physics codes to analyze VHTR configurations. The challenge of treating Doppler broadening is addressed by a new "on-the-fly" methodology that is applied during the random walk process with negligible impact on computational efficiency. Although this methodology was motivated by the need to treat temperature feedback in a VHTR, it is applicable to any reactor design. The on-the-fly Doppler methodology is based on a combination of Taylor and asymptotic series expansions. The type of series representation was determined by investigating the temperature dependence of U238 resonance cross sections in three regions: near the resonance peaks, mid-resonance, and the resonance wings. The coefficients for these series expansions were determined by regressions over the energy and temperature range of interest. The comparison of the broadened cross sections using this methodology with the NJOY cross sections was excellent. A Monte Carlo code was implemented to apply the combined regression model and used to estimate the additional computing cost which was found to be less than 1%. The DHF accounts for the effect of the particle heterogeneity on resonance absorption in particle fuel. The first level heterogeneity posed by the VHTR fuel particles is a unique characteristic that cannot be accounted for by conventional LWR lattice physics codes. On the other hand, Monte Carlo codes can take into account the detailed geometry of the VHTR including resolution of individual fuel particles without performing any type of resonance approximation

  17. An Investigation of the Performance of the Unified Monte Carlo Method of Neutron Cross Section Data Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, Roberto Smith, Donald L.

    2008-12-15

    The Unified Monte Carlo method (UMC) has been suggested to avoid certain limitations and approximations inherent to the well-known Generalized Least Squares (GLS) method of nuclear data evaluation. This contribution reports on an investigation of the performance of the UMC method in comparison with the GLS method. This is accomplished by applying both methods to simple examples with few input values that were selected to explore various features of the evaluation process that impact upon the quality of an evaluation. Among the issues explored are: i) convergence of UMC results with the number of Monte Carlo histories and the ranges of sampled values; ii) a comparison of Monte Carlo sampling using the Metropolis scheme and a brute force approach; iii) the effects of large data discrepancies; iv) the effects of large data uncertainties; v) the effects of strong or weak model or experimental data correlations; and vi) the impact of ratio data and integral data. Comparisons are also made of the evaluated results for these examples when the input values are first transformed to comparable logarithmic values prior to performing the evaluation. Some general conclusions that are applicable to more realistic evaluation exercises are offered.

  18. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    approximately 1 % was achieved with an efficiency about three times faster than the NEQAIR code. To perform accurate and efficient analyses of chemically reacting flowfield - radiation interactions, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and the photon Monte Carlo (PMC) radiative transport methods are used to simulate flowfield - radiation coupling from transitional to peak heating freestream conditions. The non-catalytic and fully catalytic surface conditions were modeled and good agreement of the stagnation-point convective heating between DSMC and continuum fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation under the assumption of fully catalytic surface was achieved. Stagnation-point radiative heating, however, was found to be very different. To simulate three-dimensional radiative transport, the finite-volume based PMC (FV-PMC) method was employed. DSMC - FV-PMC simulations with the goal of understanding the effect of radiation on the flow structure for different degrees of hypersonic non-equilibrium are presented. It is found that except for the highest altitudes, the coupling of radiation influences the flowfield, leading to a decrease in both heavy particle translational and internal temperatures and a decrease in the convective heat flux to the vehicle body. The DSMC - FV-PMC coupled simulations are compared with the previous coupled simulations and correlations obtained using continuum flow modeling and one-dimensional radiative transport. The modeling of radiative transport is further complicated by radiative transitions occurring during the excitation process of the same radiating gas species. This interaction affects the distribution of electronic state populations and, in turn, the radiative transport. The radiative transition rate in the excitation/de-excitation processes and the radiative transport equation (RTE) must be coupled simultaneously to account for non-local effects. The QSS model is presented to predict the electronic state populations of radiating gas species taking

  19. Use of Monte Carlo methods in environmental risk assessments at the INEL: Applications and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, G.; Van Horn, R.

    1996-06-01

    The EPA is increasingly considering the use of probabilistic risk assessment techniques as an alternative or refinement of the current point estimate of risk. This report provides an overview of the probabilistic technique called Monte Carlo Analysis. Advantages and disadvantages of implementing a Monte Carlo analysis over a point estimate analysis for environmental risk assessment are discussed. The general methodology is provided along with an example of its implementation. A phased approach to risk analysis that allows iterative refinement of the risk estimates is recommended for use at the INEL.

  20. Numerical simulations of blast-impact problems using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anupam

    There is an increasing need to design protective structures that can withstand or mitigate the impulsive loading due to the impact of a blast or a shock wave. A preliminary step in designing such structures is the prediction of the pressure loading on the structure. This is called the "load definition." This thesis is focused on a numerical approach to predict the load definition on arbitrary geometries for a given strength of the incident blast/shock wave. A particle approach, namely the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, is used as the numerical model. A three-dimensional, time-accurate DSMC flow solver is developed as a part of this study. Embedded surfaces, modeled as triangulations, are used to represent arbitrary-shaped structures. Several techniques to improve the computational efficiency of the algorithm of particle-structure interaction are presented. The code is designed using the Object Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm. Domain decomposition with message passing is used to solve large problems in parallel. The solver is extensively validated against analytical results and against experiments. Two kinds of geometries, a box and an I-shaped beam are investigated for blast impact. These simulations are performed in both two- and three-dimensions. A major portion of the thesis is dedicated to studying the uncoupled fluid dynamics problem where the structure is assumed to remain stationary and intact during the simulation. A coupled, fluid-structure dynamics problem is solved in one spatial dimension using a simple, spring-mass-damper system to model the dynamics of the structure. A parametric study, by varying the mass, spring constant, and the damping coefficient, to study their effect on the loading and the displacement of the structure is also performed. Finally, the parallel performance of the solver is reported for three sample-size problems on two Beowulf clusters.

  1. Nanothermodynamics of large iron clusters by means of a flat histogram Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basire, M.; Soudan, J.-M.; Angelié, C.

    2014-09-01

    The thermodynamics of iron clusters of various sizes, from 76 to 2452 atoms, typical of the catalyst particles used for carbon nanotubes growth, has been explored by a flat histogram Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (called the σ-mapping), developed by Soudan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 144109 (2011), Paper I]. This method provides the classical density of states, gp(Ep) in the configurational space, in terms of the potential energy of the system, with good and well controlled convergence properties, particularly in the melting phase transition zone which is of interest in this work. To describe the system, an iron potential has been implemented, called "corrected EAM" (cEAM), which approximates the MEAM potential of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 64, 184102 (2001)] with an accuracy better than 3 meV/at, and a five times larger computational speed. The main simplification concerns the angular dependence of the potential, with a small impact on accuracy, while the screening coefficients Sij are exactly computed with a fast algorithm. With this potential, ergodic explorations of the clusters can be performed efficiently in a reasonable computing time, at least in the upper half of the solid zone and above. Problems of ergodicity exist in the lower half of the solid zone but routes to overcome them are discussed. The solid-liquid (melting) phase transition temperature Tm is plotted in terms of the cluster atom number Nat. The standard N_{at}^{-1/3} linear dependence (Pawlow law) is observed for Nat >300, allowing an extrapolation up to the bulk metal at 1940 ±50 K. For Nat <150, a strong divergence is observed compared to the Pawlow law. The melting transition, which begins at the surface, is stated by a Lindemann-Berry index and an atomic density analysis. Several new features are obtained for the thermodynamics of cEAM clusters, compared to the Rydberg pair potential clusters studied in Paper I.

  2. A Monte Carlo Method for Making the SDSS u-Band Magnitude More Accurate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiayin; Du, Cuihua; Zuo, Wenbo; Jing, Yingjie; Wu, Zhenyu; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Xu

    2016-10-01

    We develop a new Monte Carlo-based method to convert the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u-band magnitude to the south Galactic Cap of the u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS) u-band magnitude. Due to the increased accuracy of SCUSS u-band measurements, the converted u-band magnitude becomes more accurate compared with the original SDSS u-band magnitude, in particular at the faint end. The average u-magnitude error (for both SDSS and SCUSS) of numerous main-sequence stars with 0.2\\lt g-r\\lt 0.8 increases as the g-band magnitude becomes fainter. When g = 19.5, the average magnitude error of the SDSS u is 0.11. When g = 20.5, the average SDSS u error rises to 0.22. However, at this magnitude, the average magnitude error of the SCUSS u is just half as much as that of the SDSS u. The SDSS u-band magnitudes of main-sequence stars with 0.2\\lt g-r\\lt 0.8 and 18.5\\lt g\\lt 20.5 are converted, therefore the maximum average error of the converted u-band magnitudes is 0.11. The potential application of this conversion is to derive a more accurate photometric metallicity calibration from SDSS observations, especially for the more distant stars. Thus, we can explore stellar metallicity distributions either in the Galactic halo or some stream stars.

  3. SU-E-T-569: Neutron Shielding Calculation Using Analytical and Multi-Monte Carlo Method for Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S; Shin, E H; Kim, J; Ahn, S H; Chung, K; Kim, D-H; Han, Y; Choi, D H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the shielding wall design to protect patients, staff and member of the general public for secondary neutron using a simply analytic solution, multi-Monte Carlo code MCNPX, ANISN and FLUKA. Methods: An analytical and multi-Monte Carlo method were calculated for proton facility (Sumitomo Heavy Industry Ltd.) at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The NCRP-144 analytical evaluation methods, which produced conservative estimates on the dose equivalent values for the shielding, were used for analytical evaluations. Then, the radiation transport was simulated with the multi-Monte Carlo code. The neutron dose at evaluation point is got by the value using the production of the simulation value and the neutron dose coefficient introduced in ICRP-74. Results: The evaluation points of accelerator control room and control room entrance are mainly influenced by the point of the proton beam loss. So the neutron dose equivalent of accelerator control room for evaluation point is 0.651, 1.530, 0.912, 0.943 mSv/yr and the entrance of cyclotron room is 0.465, 0.790, 0.522, 0.453 mSv/yr with calculation by the method of NCRP-144 formalism, ANISN, FLUKA and MCNP, respectively. The most of Result of MCNPX and FLUKA using the complicated geometry showed smaller values than Result of ANISN. Conclusion: The neutron shielding for a proton therapy facility has been evaluated by the analytic model and multi-Monte Carlo methods. We confirmed that the setting of shielding was located in well accessible area to people when the proton facility is operated.

  4. Implementation of hybrid variance reduction methods in a multi group Monte Carlo code for deep shielding problems

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, E.; Palmer, T. S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the work that has been done to implement variance reduction techniques in a three dimensional, multi group Monte Carlo code - Tortilla, that works within the frame work of the commercial deterministic code - Attila, is presented. This project is aimed to develop an integrated Hybrid code that seamlessly takes advantage of the deterministic and Monte Carlo methods for deep shielding radiation detection problems. Tortilla takes advantage of Attila's features for generating the geometric mesh, cross section library and source definitions. Tortilla can also read importance functions (like adjoint scalar flux) generated from deterministic calculations performed in Attila and use them to employ variance reduction schemes in the Monte Carlo simulation. The variance reduction techniques that are implemented in Tortilla are based on the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) method and the LIFT (Local Importance Function Transform) method. These methods make use of the results from an adjoint deterministic calculation to bias the particle transport using techniques like source biasing, survival biasing, transport biasing and weight windows. The results obtained so far and the challenges faced in implementing the variance reduction techniques are reported here. (authors)

  5. Spray cooling simulation implementing time scale analysis and the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzer, Paul Joseph

    Spray cooling research is advancing the field of heat transfer and heat rejection in high power electronics. Smaller and more capable electronics packages are producing higher amounts of waste heat, along with smaller external surface areas, and the use of active cooling is becoming a necessity. Spray cooling has shown extremely high levels of heat rejection, of up to 1000 W/cm 2 using water. Simulations of spray cooling are becoming more realistic, but this comes at a price. A previous researcher has used CFD to successfully model a single 3D droplet impact into a liquid film using the level set method. However, the complicated multiphysics occurring during spray impingement and surface interactions increases computation time to more than 30 days. Parallel processing on a 32 processor system has reduced this time tremendously, but still requires more than a day. The present work uses experimental and computational results in addition to numerical correlations representing the physics occurring on a heated impingement surface. The current model represents the spray behavior of a Spraying Systems FullJet 1/8-g spray nozzle. Typical spray characteristics are indicated as follows: flow rate of 1.05x10-5 m3/s, normal droplet velocity of 12 m/s, droplet Sauter mean diameter of 48 microm, and heat flux values ranging from approximately 50--100 W/cm2 . This produces non-dimensional numbers of: We 300--1350, Re 750--3500, Oh 0.01--0.025. Numerical and experimental correlations have been identified representing crater formation, splashing, film thickness, droplet size, and spatial flux distributions. A combination of these methods has resulted in a Monte Carlo spray impingement simulation model capable of simulating hundreds of thousands of droplet impingements or approximately one millisecond. A random sequence of droplet impingement locations and diameters is generated, with the proper radial spatial distribution and diameter distribution. Hence the impingement, lifetime

  6. A study of the XY model by the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suranyi, Peter; Harten, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The massively parallel processor is used to perform Monte Carlo simulations for the two dimensional XY model on lattices of sizes up to 128 x 128. A parallel random number generator was constructed, finite size effects were studied, and run times were compared with those on a CRAY X-MP supercomputer.

  7. Using the Monte Carlo method for assessing the tissue and organ doses of patients in dental radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, K. O.; Minenko, V. F.; Verenich, K. A.; Kuten, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    This work is dedicated to modeling dental radiographic examinations to assess the absorbed doses of patients and effective doses. For simulating X-ray spectra, the TASMIP empirical model is used. Doses are assessed on the basis of the Monte Carlo method by using MCNP code for voxel phantoms of ICRP. The results of the assessment of doses to individual organs and effective doses for different types of dental examinations and features of X-ray tube are presented.

  8. Markov chain formalism for polarized light transfer in plane-parallel atmospheres, with numerical comparison to the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Davis, Anthony B; West, Robert A; Esposito, Larry W

    2011-01-17

    Building on the Markov chain formalism for scalar (intensity only) radiative transfer, this paper formulates the solution to polarized diffuse reflection from and transmission through a vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere. For verification, numerical results are compared to those obtained by the Monte Carlo method, showing deviations less than 1% when 90 streams are used to compute the radiation from two types of atmospheres, pure Rayleigh and Rayleigh plus aerosol, when they are divided into sublayers of optical thicknesses of less than 0.03.

  9. A Monte Carlo method to calculate the QCD evolution of structure functions with the inclusion of heavy quark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odorico, R.

    1981-06-01

    A Monte Carlo method is presented for the calculation of the QCD evolution of structure functions. Its application is discussed in detail in the framework of the LLA, but it can also be used with modified parton decay probability functions including higher-order effects. For heavy quark production, threshold constraints can be correctly taken into account, and one obtains results which at low Q2 are consistent with those of the photon-gluon fusion model.

  10. Performance of higher order Monte Carlo wave packet methods for surface science problems: A test for photoinduced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, I.; Saalfrank, P.

    2003-01-01

    Aiming to treat multidimensional quantum dissipative dynamics of adsorbates at surfaces, we consider application of several variants of the Monte Carlo wave packet method to an exemplary problem, the desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) of NO from a Pt(1 1 1) surface with a two-state two-dimensional model. We investigate the convergence of stochastic unravelling schemes of different order for 'rare' observables characteristic for this test system.

  11. Determination of surface dose rate of indigenous (32)P patch brachytherapy source by experimental and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Bakshi, A K; Dash, Ashutosh; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2015-09-01

    Isotope production and Application Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Center developed (32)P patch sources for treatment of superficial tumors. Surface dose rate of a newly developed (32)P patch source of nominal diameter 25 mm was measured experimentally using standard extrapolation ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT film. Monte Carlo model of the (32)P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed to estimate the surface dose rates from these sources. The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films are 82.03±4.18 (k=2) and 79.13±2.53 (k=2) respectively. The two values of the surface dose rates measured using the two independent experimental methods are in good agreement to each other within a variation of 3.5%. The surface dose rate to tissue (cGy/min) estimated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code works out to be 77.78±1.16 (k=2). The maximum deviation between the surface dose rates to tissue obtained by Monte Carlo and the extrapolation chamber method is 5.2% whereas the difference between the surface dose rates obtained by radiochromic film measurement and the Monte Carlo simulation is 1.7%. The three values of the surface dose rates of the (32)P patch source obtained by three independent methods are in good agreement to one another within the uncertainties associated with their measurements and calculation. This work has demonstrated that MCNP based electron transport simulations are accurate enough for determining the dosimetry parameters of the indigenously developed (32)P patch sources for contact brachytherapy applications.

  12. Monte Carlo method for computing density of states and quench probability of potential energy and enthalpy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Mauro, John C; Loucks, Roger J; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Raghavan, Srikanth

    2007-05-21

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of a many-body system can be described in terms of a potential energy landscape in multidimensional configuration space. The partition function of such a landscape can be written in terms of a density of states, which can be computed using a variety of Monte Carlo techniques. In this paper, a new self-consistent Monte Carlo method for computing density of states is described that uses importance sampling and a multiplicative update factor to achieve rapid convergence. The technique is then applied to compute the equilibrium quench probability of the various inherent structures (minima) in the landscape. The quench probability depends on both the potential energy of the inherent structure and the volume of its corresponding basin in configuration space. Finally, the methodology is extended to the isothermal-isobaric ensemble in order to compute inherent structure quench probabilities in an enthalpy landscape.

  13. Current impulse response of thin InP p+-i-n+ diodes using full band structure Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, A. H.; Cheang, P. L.

    2007-02-01

    A random response time model to compute the statistics of the avalanche buildup time of double-carrier multiplication in avalanche photodiodes (APDs) using full band structure Monte Carlo (FBMC) method is discussed. The effect of feedback impact ionization process and the dead-space effect on random response time are included in order to simulate the speed of APD. The time response of InP p+-i-n+ diodes with the multiplication region of 0.2μm is presented. Finally, the FBMC model is used to calculate the current impulse response of the thin InP p+-i-n+ diodes with multiplication lengths of 0.05 and 0.2μm using Ramo's theorem [Proc. IRE 27, 584 (1939)]. The simulated current impulse response of the FBMC model is compared to the results simulated from a simple Monte Carlo model.

  14. Nanothermodynamics of large iron clusters by means of a flat histogram Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Basire, M; Soudan, J-M; Angelié, C

    2014-09-14

    The thermodynamics of iron clusters of various sizes, from 76 to 2452 atoms, typical of the catalyst particles used for carbon nanotubes growth, has been explored by a flat histogram Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (called the σ-mapping), developed by Soudan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 144109 (2011), Paper I]. This method provides the classical density of states, gp(Ep) in the configurational space, in terms of the potential energy of the system, with good and well controlled convergence properties, particularly in the melting phase transition zone which is of interest in this work. To describe the system, an iron potential has been implemented, called "corrected EAM" (cEAM), which approximates the MEAM potential of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 64, 184102 (2001)] with an accuracy better than 3 meV/at, and a five times larger computational speed. The main simplification concerns the angular dependence of the potential, with a small impact on accuracy, while the screening coefficients S(ij) are exactly computed with a fast algorithm. With this potential, ergodic explorations of the clusters can be performed efficiently in a reasonable computing time, at least in the upper half of the solid zone and above. Problems of ergodicity exist in the lower half of the solid zone but routes to overcome them are discussed. The solid-liquid (melting) phase transition temperature T(m) is plotted in terms of the cluster atom number N(at). The standard N(at)(-1/3) linear dependence (Pawlow law) is observed for N(at) >300, allowing an extrapolation up to the bulk metal at 1940 ±50 K. For N(at) <150, a strong divergence is observed compared to the Pawlow law. The melting transition, which begins at the surface, is stated by a Lindemann-Berry index and an atomic density analysis. Several new features are obtained for the thermodynamics of cEAM clusters, compared to the Rydberg pair potential clusters studied in Paper I.

  15. Nanothermodynamics of large iron clusters by means of a flat histogram Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Basire, M.; Soudan, J.-M.; Angelié, C.

    2014-09-14

    The thermodynamics of iron clusters of various sizes, from 76 to 2452 atoms, typical of the catalyst particles used for carbon nanotubes growth, has been explored by a flat histogram Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (called the σ-mapping), developed by Soudan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 144109 (2011), Paper I]. This method provides the classical density of states, g{sub p}(E{sub p}) in the configurational space, in terms of the potential energy of the system, with good and well controlled convergence properties, particularly in the melting phase transition zone which is of interest in this work. To describe the system, an iron potential has been implemented, called “corrected EAM” (cEAM), which approximates the MEAM potential of Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. B 64, 184102 (2001)] with an accuracy better than 3 meV/at, and a five times larger computational speed. The main simplification concerns the angular dependence of the potential, with a small impact on accuracy, while the screening coefficients S{sub ij} are exactly computed with a fast algorithm. With this potential, ergodic explorations of the clusters can be performed efficiently in a reasonable computing time, at least in the upper half of the solid zone and above. Problems of ergodicity exist in the lower half of the solid zone but routes to overcome them are discussed. The solid-liquid (melting) phase transition temperature T{sub m} is plotted in terms of the cluster atom number N{sub at}. The standard N{sub at}{sup −1/3} linear dependence (Pawlow law) is observed for N{sub at} >300, allowing an extrapolation up to the bulk metal at 1940 ±50 K. For N{sub at} <150, a strong divergence is observed compared to the Pawlow law. The melting transition, which begins at the surface, is stated by a Lindemann-Berry index and an atomic density analysis. Several new features are obtained for the thermodynamics of cEAM clusters, compared to the Rydberg pair potential clusters studied in Paper I.

  16. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  17. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    approximately 1 % was achieved with an efficiency about three times faster than the NEQAIR code. To perform accurate and efficient analyses of chemically reacting flowfield - radiation interactions, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and the photon Monte Carlo (PMC) radiative transport methods are used to simulate flowfield - radiation coupling from transitional to peak heating freestream conditions. The non-catalytic and fully catalytic surface conditions were modeled and good agreement of the stagnation-point convective heating between DSMC and continuum fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation under the assumption of fully catalytic surface was achieved. Stagnation-point radiative heating, however, was found to be very different. To simulate three-dimensional radiative transport, the finite-volume based PMC (FV-PMC) method was employed. DSMC - FV-PMC simulations with the goal of understanding the effect of radiation on the flow structure for different degrees of hypersonic non-equilibrium are presented. It is found that except for the highest altitudes, the coupling of radiation influences the flowfield, leading to a decrease in both heavy particle translational and internal temperatures and a decrease in the convective heat flux to the vehicle body. The DSMC - FV-PMC coupled simulations are compared with the previous coupled simulations and correlations obtained using continuum flow modeling and one-dimensional radiative transport. The modeling of radiative transport is further complicated by radiative transitions occurring during the excitation process of the same radiating gas species. This interaction affects the distribution of electronic state populations and, in turn, the radiative transport. The radiative transition rate in the excitation/de-excitation processes and the radiative transport equation (RTE) must be coupled simultaneously to account for non-local effects. The QSS model is presented to predict the electronic state populations of radiating gas species taking

  18. Stochastic method for accommodation of equilibrating basins in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Siclen, Clinton D

    2007-02-01

    A computationally simple way to accommodate "basins" of trapping states in standard kinetic Monte Carlo simulations is presented. By assuming the system is effectively equilibrated in the basin, the residence time (time spent in the basin before escape) and the probabilities for transition to states outside the basin may be calculated. This is demonstrated for point defect diffusion over a periodic grid of sites containing a complex basin.

  19. Evaluation of the material assignment method used by a Monte Carlo treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Isambert, A; Brualla, L; Lefkopoulos, D

    2009-12-01

    An evaluation of the conversion process from Hounsfield units (HU) to material composition in computerised tomography (CT) images, employed by the Monte Carlo based treatment planning system ISOgray (DOSIsoft), is presented. A boundary in the HU for the material conversion between "air" and "lung" materials was determined based on a study using 22 patients. The dosimetric consequence of the new boundary was quantitatively evaluated for a lung patient plan.

  20. The Metropolis Monte Carlo method with CUDA enabled Graphic Processing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Clifford; Ji, Weixiao; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2014-02-01

    We present a CPU–GPU system for runtime acceleration of large molecular simulations using GPU computation and memory swaps. The memory architecture of the GPU can be used both as container for simulation data stored on the graphics card and as floating-point code target, providing an effective means for the manipulation of atomistic or molecular data on the GPU. To fully take advantage of this mechanism, efficient GPU realizations of algorithms used to perform atomistic and molecular simulations are essential. Our system implements a versatile molecular engine, including inter-molecule interactions and orientational variables for performing the Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) algorithm, which is one type of Markov chain Monte Carlo. By combining memory objects with floating-point code fragments we have implemented an MMC parallel engine that entirely avoids the communication time of molecular data at runtime. Our runtime acceleration system is a forerunner of a new class of CPU–GPU algorithms exploiting memory concepts combined with threading for avoiding bus bandwidth and communication. The testbed molecular system used here is a condensed phase system of oligopyrrole chains. A benchmark shows a size scaling speedup of 60 for systems with 210,000 pyrrole monomers. Our implementation can easily be combined with MPI to connect in parallel several CPU–GPU duets. -- Highlights: •We parallelize the Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) algorithm on one CPU—GPU duet. •The Adaptive Tempering Monte Carlo employs MMC and profits from this CPU—GPU implementation. •Our benchmark shows a size scaling-up speedup of 62 for systems with 225,000 particles. •The testbed involves a polymeric system of oligopyrroles in the condensed phase. •The CPU—GPU parallelization includes dipole—dipole and Mie—Jones classic potentials.

  1. Gaussian-Basis Monte Carlo Method for Numerical Study on Ground States of Itinerant and Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aimi, Takeshi; Imada, Masatoshi

    2007-08-01

    We examine Gaussian-basis Monte Carlo (GBMC) method introduced by Corney and Drummond. This method is based on an expansion of the density-matrix operator \\hatρ by means of the coherent Gaussian-type operator basis \\hatΛ and does not suffer from the minus sign problem. The original method, however, often fails in reproducing the true ground state and causes systematic errors of calculated physical quantities because the samples are often trapped in some metastable or symmetry broken states. To overcome this difficulty, we combine the quantum-number projection scheme proposed by Assaad, Werner, Corboz, Gull, and Troyer in conjunction with the importance sampling of the original GBMC method. This improvement allows us to carry out the importance sampling in the quantum-number-projected phase-space. Some comparisons with the previous quantum-number projection scheme indicate that, in our method, the convergence with the ground state is accelerated, which makes it possible to extend the applicability and widen the range of tractable parameters in the GBMC method. The present scheme offers an efficient practical way of computation for strongly correlated electron systems beyond the range of system sizes, interaction strengths and lattice structures tractable by other computational methods such as the quantum Monte Carlo method.

  2. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  3. A highly heterogeneous 3D PWR core benchmark: deterministic and Monte Carlo method comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaboulay, J.-C.; Damian, F.; Douce, S.; Lopez, F.; Guenaut, C.; Aggery, A.; Poinot-Salanon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Physical analyses of the LWR potential performances with regards to the fuel utilization require an important part of the work dedicated to the validation of the deterministic models used for theses analyses. Advances in both codes and computer technology give the opportunity to perform the validation of these models on complex 3D core configurations closed to the physical situations encountered (both steady-state and transient configurations). In this paper, we used the Monte Carlo Transport code TRIPOLI-4®; to describe a whole 3D large-scale and highly-heterogeneous LWR core. The aim of this study is to validate the deterministic CRONOS2 code to Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®; in a relevant PWR core configuration. As a consequence, a 3D pin by pin model with a consistent number of volumes (4.3 millions) and media (around 23,000) is established to precisely characterize the core at equilibrium cycle, namely using a refined burn-up and moderator density maps. The configuration selected for this analysis is a very heterogeneous PWR high conversion core with fissile (MOX fuel) and fertile zones (depleted uranium). Furthermore, a tight pitch lattice is selcted (to increase conversion of 238U in 239Pu) that leads to harder neutron spectrum compared to standard PWR assembly. In these conditions two main subjects will be discussed: the Monte Carlo variance calculation and the assessment of the diffusion operator with two energy groups for the core calculation.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in skin tissue phantoms using a parallel computing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di M.; Zhao, S. S.; Lu, Jun Q.; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2000-06-01

    In Monte Carlo simulations of light propagating in biological tissues, photons propagating in the media are described as classic particles being scattered and absorbed randomly in the media, and their path are tracked individually. To obtain any statistically significant results, however, a large number of photons is needed in the simulations and the calculations are time consuming and sometime impossible with existing computing resource, especially when considering the inhomogeneous boundary conditions. To overcome this difficulty, we have implemented a parallel computing technique into our Monte Carlo simulations. And this moment is well justified due to the nature of the Monte Carlo simulation. Utilizing the PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine, a parallel computing software package), parallel codes in both C and Fortran have been developed on the massive parallel computer of Cray T3E and a local PC-network running Unix/Sun Solaris. Our results show that parallel computing can significantly reduce the running time and make efficient usage of low cost personal computers. In this report, we present a numerical study of light propagation in a slab phantom of skin tissue using the parallel computing technique.

  5. Monte Carlo method based radiative transfer simulation of stochastic open forest generated by circle packing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shengye; Tamura, Masayuki

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method is a versatile application for simulating radiative transfer regime of the Solar - Atmosphere - Landscape system. Moreover, it can be used to compute the radiation distribution over a complex landscape configuration, as an example like a forest area. Due to its robustness to the complexity of the 3-D scene altering, MCRT method is also employed for simulating canopy radiative transfer regime as the validation source of other radiative transfer models. In MCRT modeling within vegetation, one basic step is the canopy scene set up. 3-D scanning application was used for representing canopy structure as accurately as possible, but it is time consuming. Botanical growth function can be used to model the single tree growth, but cannot be used to express the impaction among trees. L-System is also a functional controlled tree growth simulation model, but it costs large computing memory. Additionally, it only models the current tree patterns rather than tree growth during we simulate the radiative transfer regime. Therefore, it is much more constructive to use regular solid pattern like ellipsoidal, cone, cylinder etc. to indicate single canopy. Considering the allelopathy phenomenon in some open forest optical images, each tree in its own `domain' repels other trees. According to this assumption a stochastic circle packing algorithm is developed to generate the 3-D canopy scene in this study. The canopy coverage (%) and the tree amount (N) of the 3-D scene are declared at first, similar to the random open forest image. Accordingly, we randomly generate each canopy radius (rc). Then we set the circle central coordinate on XY-plane as well as to keep circles separate from each other by the circle packing algorithm. To model the individual tree, we employ the Ishikawa's tree growth regressive model to set the tree parameters including DBH (dt), tree height (H). However, the relationship between canopy height (Hc) and trunk height (Ht) is

  6. Geochemical Characterization Using Geophysical Data and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.; Murray, C.; Roden, E.; Majer, E.

    2002-12-01

    if they were available from direct measurements or as variables otherwise. To estimate the geochemical parameters, we first assigned a prior model for each variable and a likelihood model for each type of data, which together define posterior probability distributions for each variable on the domain. Since the posterior probability distribution may involve hundreds of variables, we used a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to explore each variable by generating and subsequently evaluating hundreds of realizations. Results from this case study showed that although geophysical attributes are not necessarily directly related to geochemical parameters, geophysical data could be very useful for providing accurate and high-resolution information about geochemical parameter distribution through their joint and indirect connections with hydrogeological properties such as lithofacies. This case study also demonstrated that MCMC methods were particularly useful for geochemical parameter estimation using geophysical data because they allow incorporation into the procedure of spatial correlation information, measurement errors, and cross correlations among different types of parameters.

  7. Monte Carlo assessment of soil moisture effect on high-energy thermal neutron capture gamma-ray by 14N.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Azizi, Maryam; Farhad Masoudi, S

    2006-01-01

    Among many conventional techniques, nuclear techniques have shown to be faster, more reliable, and more effective in detecting explosives. In the present work, neutrons from a 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source being in water tank are captured by elements of soil and landmine (TNT), namely (14)N, H, C, and O. The prompt capture gamma-ray spectrum taken by a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector indicates the characteristic photo peaks of the elements in soil and landmine. In the high-energy region of the gamma-ray spectrum, besides 10.829 MeV of (15)N, single escape (SE) and double escape (DE) peaks are unmistakable photo peaks, which make the detection of concealed explosive possible. The soil has the property of moderating neutrons as well as diffusing the thermal neutron flux. Among many elements in soil, silicon is more abundant and (29)Si emits 10.607 MeV prompt capture gamma-ray, which makes 10.829 MeV detection difficult. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to adjust source-target-detector distances and soil moisture content to yield the best result. Therefore, we applied MCNP4C for configuration very close to reality of a hidden landmine in soil.

  8. Application of dose kernel calculation using a simplified Monte Carlo method to treatment plan for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shohei; Takada, Yoshihisa; Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Tansho, Ryohei; Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Monte Carlo (FMC) calculation of dose distribution has been recognized to have superior accuracy, compared with the pencil beam algorithm (PBA). However, since the FMC methods require long calculation time, it is difficult to apply them to routine treatment planning at present. In order to improve the situation, a simplified Monte Carlo (SMC) method has been introduced to the dose kernel calculation applicable to dose optimization procedure for the proton pencil beam scanning. We have evaluated accuracy of the SMC calculation by comparing a result of the dose kernel calculation using the SMC method with that using the FMC method in an inhomogeneous phantom. The dose distribution obtained by the SMC method was in good agreement with that obtained by the FMC method. To assess the usefulness of SMC calculation in clinical situations, we have compared results of the dose calculation using the SMC with those using the PBA method for three clinical cases of tumor treatment. The dose distributions calculated with the PBA dose kernels appear to be homogeneous in the planning target volumes (PTVs). In practice, the dose distributions calculated with the SMC dose kernels with the spot weights optimized with the PBA method show largely inhomogeneous dose distributions in the PTVs, while those with the spot weights optimized with the SMC method have moderately homogeneous distributions in the PTVs. Calculation using the SMC method is faster than that using the GEANT4 by three orders of magnitude. In addition, the graphic processing unit (GPU) boosts the calculation speed by 13 times for the treatment planning using the SMC method. Thence, the SMC method will be applicable to routine clinical treatment planning for reproduction of the complex dose distribution more accurately than the PBA method in a reasonably short time by use of the GPU-based calculation engine. PMID:27074456

  9. PNS and statistical experiments simulation in subcritical systems using Monte-Carlo method on example of Yalina-Thermal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovich, Sergey; Talamo, A.; Burnos, V.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Fokov, Yu.

    2014-06-01

    In subcritical systems driven by an external neutron source, the experimental methods based on pulsed neutron source and statistical techniques play an important role for reactivity measurement. Simulation of these methods is very time-consumed procedure. For simulations in Monte-Carlo programs several improvements for neutronic calculations have been made. This paper introduces a new method for simulation PNS and statistical measurements. In this method all events occurred in the detector during simulation are stored in a file using PTRAC feature in the MCNP. After that with a special code (or post-processing) PNS and statistical methods can be simulated. Additionally different shapes of neutron pulses and its lengths as well as dead time of detectors can be included into simulation. The methods described above were tested on subcritical assembly Yalina-Thermal, located in Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research SOSNY, Minsk, Belarus. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results was shown.

  10. Weak second-order splitting schemes for Lagrangian Monte Carlo particle methods for the composition PDF/FDF transport equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haifeng Popov, Pavel P.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2010-03-01

    We study a class of methods for the numerical solution of the system of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) that arises in the modeling of turbulent combustion, specifically in the Monte Carlo particle method for the solution of the model equations for the composition probability density function (PDF) and the filtered density function (FDF). This system consists of an SDE for particle position and a random differential equation for particle composition. The numerical methods considered advance the solution in time with (weak) second-order accuracy with respect to the time step size. The four primary contributions of the paper are: (i) establishing that the coefficients in the particle equations can be frozen at the mid-time (while preserving second-order accuracy), (ii) examining the performance of three existing schemes for integrating the SDEs, (iii) developing and evaluating different splitting schemes (which treat particle motion, reaction and mixing on different sub-steps), and (iv) developing the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) to assess the convergence of Monte Carlo particle methods. Tests using MMS confirm the second-order accuracy of the schemes. In general, the use of frozen coefficients reduces the numerical errors. Otherwise no significant differences are observed in the performance of the different SDE schemes and splitting schemes.

  11. On a modified Monte-Carlo method and variable soft sphere model for rarefied binary gas mixture flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourazar, S. S.; Jahangiri, P.; Aboutalebi, A.; Ganjaei, A. A.; Nourazar, M.; Khadem, J.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of new terms in the improved algorithm, the modified direct simulation Monte-Carlo (MDSMC) method, is investigated by simulating a rarefied binary gas mixture flow inside a rotating cylinder. Dalton law for the partial pressures contributed by each species of the binary gas mixture is incorporated into our simulation using the MDSMC method and the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method. Moreover, the effect of the exponent of the cosine of deflection angle (α) in the inter-molecular collision models, the variable soft sphere (VSS) and the variable hard sphere (VHS), is investigated in our simulation. The improvement of the results of simulation is pronounced using the MDSMC method when compared with the results of the DSMC method. The results of simulation using the VSS model show some improvements on the result of simulation for the mixture temperature at radial distances close to the cylinder wall where the temperature reaches the maximum value when compared with the results using the VHS model.

  12. Bootstrapping & Separable Monte Carlo Simulation Methods Tailored for Efficient Assessment of Probability of Failure of Dynamic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehan, Musarrat

    The response of a dynamic system is random. There is randomness in both the applied loads and the strength of the system. Therefore, to account for the uncertainty, the safety of the system must be quantified using its probability of survival (reliability). Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) is a widely used method for probabilistic analysis because of its robustness. However, a challenge in reliability assessment using MCS is that the high computational cost limits the accuracy of MCS. Haftka et al. [2010] developed an improved sampling technique for reliability assessment called separable Monte Carlo (SMC) that can significantly increase the accuracy of estimation without increasing the cost of sampling. However, this method was applied to time-invariant problems involving two random variables only. This dissertation extends SMC to random vibration problems with multiple random variables. This research also develops a novel method for estimation of the standard deviation of the probability of failure of a structure under static or random vibration. The method is demonstrated on quarter car models and a wind turbine. The proposed method is validated using repeated standard MCS.

  13. Monte Carlo method for determining free-energy differences and transition state theory rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.

    1985-02-15

    We present a new Monte Carlo procedure for determining the Helmholtz free-energy difference between two systems that are separated in configuration space. Unlike most standard approaches, no integration over intermediate potentials is required. A Metropolis walk is performed for each system, and the average Metropolis acceptance probability for a hypothetical step along a probe vector into the other system is accumulated. Either classical or quantum free energies may be computed, and the procedure is also ideally suited for evaluating generalized transition state theory rate constants. As an application we determine the relative free energies of three configurations of a tungsten dimer on the W(110) surface.

  14. The Metropolis Monte Carlo method with CUDA enabled Graphic Processing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Clifford; Ji, Weixiao; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2014-02-01

    We present a CPU-GPU system for runtime acceleration of large molecular simulations using GPU computation and memory swaps. The memory architecture of the GPU can be used both as container for simulation data stored on the graphics card and as floating-point code target, providing an effective means for the manipulation of atomistic or molecular data on the GPU. To fully take advantage of this mechanism, efficient GPU realizations of algorithms used to perform atomistic and molecular simulations are essential. Our system implements a versatile molecular engine, including inter-molecule interactions and orientational variables for performing the Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) algorithm, which is one type of Markov chain Monte Carlo. By combining memory objects with floating-point code fragments we have implemented an MMC parallel engine that entirely avoids the communication time of molecular data at runtime. Our runtime acceleration system is a forerunner of a new class of CPU-GPU algorithms exploiting memory concepts combined with threading for avoiding bus bandwidth and communication. The testbed molecular system used here is a condensed phase system of oligopyrrole chains. A benchmark shows a size scaling speedup of 60 for systems with 210,000 pyrrole monomers. Our implementation can easily be combined with MPI to connect in parallel several CPU-GPU duets.

  15. Imitation Monte Carlo methods for problems of the Boltzmann equation with small Knudsen numbers, parallelizing algorithms with splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khisamutdinov, A. I.; Velker, N. N.

    2014-05-01

    The talk examines a system of pairwise interaction particles, which models a rarefied gas in accordance with the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, the master equations of Markov evolution of this system and corresponding numerical Monte Carlo methods. Selection of some optimal method for simulation of rarefied gas dynamics depends on the spatial size of the gas flow domain. For problems with the Knudsen number Kn of order unity "imitation", or "continuous time", Monte Carlo methods ([2]) are quite adequate and competitive. However if Kn <= 0.1 (the large sizes), excessive punctuality, namely, the need to see all the pairs of particles in the latter, leads to a significant increase in computational cost(complexity). We are interested in to construct the optimal methods for Boltzmann equation problems with large enough spatial sizes of the flow. Speaking of the optimal, we mean that we are talking about algorithms for parallel computation to be implemented on high-performance multi-processor computers. The characteristic property of large systems is the weak dependence of sub-parts of each other at a sufficiently small time intervals. This property is taken into account in the approximate methods using various splittings of operator of corresponding master equations. In the paper, we develop the approximate method based on the splitting of the operator of master equations system "over groups of particles" ([7]). The essence of the method is that the system of particles is divided into spatial subparts which are modeled independently for small intervals of time, using the precise"imitation" method. The type of splitting used is different from other well-known type "over collisions and displacements", which is an attribute of the known Direct simulation Monte Carlo methods. The second attribute of the last ones is the grid of the "interaction cells", which is completely absent in the imitation methods. The main of talk is parallelization of the imitation algorithms with

  16. Investigation of the spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function of sea foam layer by the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Ma, L X; Wang, F Q; Wang, C A; Wang, C C; Tan, J Y

    2015-11-20

    Spectral properties of sea foam greatly affect ocean color remote sensing and aerosol optical thickness retrieval from satellite observation. This paper presents a combined Mie theory and Monte Carlo method to investigate visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of sea foam layers. A three-layer model of the sea foam is developed in which each layer is composed of large air bubbles coated with pure water. A pseudo-continuous model and Mie theory for coated spheres is used to determine the effective radiative properties of sea foam. The one-dimensional Cox-Munk surface roughness model is used to calculate the slope density functions of the wind-blown ocean surface. A Monte Carlo method is used to solve the radiative transfer equation. Effects of foam layer thickness, bubble size, wind speed, solar zenith angle, and wavelength on the spectral reflectance and BRDF are investigated. Comparisons between previous theoretical results and experimental data demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed method. Sea foam can significantly increase the spectral reflectance and BRDF of the sea surface. The absorption coefficient of seawater near the surface is not the only parameter that influences the spectral reflectance. Meanwhile, the effects of bubble size, foam layer thickness, and solar zenith angle also cannot be obviously neglected. PMID:26836550

  17. A new method to calculate the response of the WENDI-II rem counter using the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägerhofer, Lukas; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Theis, Christian; Roesler, Stefan; Vincke, Helmut

    2012-11-01

    The FHT-762 WENDI-II is a commercially available wide range neutron rem counter which uses a 3He counter tube inside a polyethylene moderator. To increase the response above 10 MeV of kinetic neutron energy, a layer of tungsten powder is implemented into the moderator shell. For the purpose of the characterization of the response, a detailed model of the detector was developed and implemented for FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations. In common practice Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the neutron fluence inside the active volume of the detector. The resulting fluence is then folded offline with the reaction rate of the 3He(n,p)3H reaction to yield the proton-triton production rate. Consequently this approach does not consider geometrical effects like wall effects, where one or both reaction products leave the active volume of the detector without triggering a count. This work introduces a two-step simulation method which can be used to determine the detector's response, including geometrical effects, directly, using Monte Carlo simulations. A "first step" simulation identifies the 3He(n,p)3H reaction inside the active volume of the 3He counter tube and records its position. In the "second step" simulation the tritons and protons are started in accordance with the kinematics of the 3He(n,p)3H reaction from the previously recorded positions and a correction factor for geometrical effects is determined. The three dimensional Monte Carlo model of the detector as well as the two-step simulation method were evaluated and tested in the well-defined fields of an 241Am-Be(α,n) source as well as in the field of a 252Cf source. Results were compared with measurements performed by Gutermuth et al. [1] at GSI with an 241Am-Be(α,n) source as well as with measurements performed by the manufacturer in the field of a 252Cf source. Both simulation results show very good agreement with the respective measurements. After validating the method, the response values in terms of

  18. Multi-level Monte Carlo finite volume methods for uncertainty quantification of acoustic wave propagation in random heterogeneous layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Schwab, Ch.; Šukys, J.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the very challenging problem of efficient uncertainty quantification for acoustic wave propagation in a highly heterogeneous, possibly layered, random medium, characterized by possibly anisotropic, piecewise log-exponentially distributed Gaussian random fields. A multi-level Monte Carlo finite volume method is proposed, along with a novel, bias-free upscaling technique that allows to represent the input random fields, generated using spectral FFT methods, efficiently. Combined together with a recently developed dynamic load balancing algorithm that scales to massively parallel computing architectures, the proposed method is able to robustly compute uncertainty for highly realistic random subsurface formations that can contain a very high number (millions) of sources of uncertainty. Numerical experiments, in both two and three space dimensions, illustrating the efficiency of the method are presented.

  19. Study of CANDU thorium-based fuel cycles by deterministic and Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttin, A.; Guillemin, P.; Courau, T.; Marleau, G.; Meplan, O.; David, S.; Michel-Sendis, F.; Wilson, J. N.

    2006-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV forum, there is a renewal of interest in self-sustainable thorium fuel cycles applied to various concepts such as Molten Salt Reactors [1, 2] or High Temperature Reactors [3, 4]. Precise evaluations of the U-233 production potential relying on existing reactors such as PWRs [5] or CANDUs [6] are hence necessary. As a consequence of its design (online refueling and D{sub 2}O moderator in a thermal spectrum), the CANDU reactor has moreover an excellent neutron economy and consequently a high fissile conversion ratio [7]. For these reasons, we try here, with a shorter term view, to re-evaluate the economic competitiveness of once-through thorium-based fuel cycles in CANDU [8]. Two simulation tools are used: the deterministic Canadian cell code DRAGON [9] and MURE [10], a C++ tool for reactor evolution calculations based on the Monte Carlo code MCNP [11]. (authors)

  20. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo Based Method for Flaw Detection in Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, R E; Lee, C L; Nitao, J J; Hickling, T L; Hanley, W G

    2006-09-28

    A Bayesian inference methodology using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling procedure is presented for estimating the parameters of computational structural models. This methodology combines prior information, measured data, and forward models to produce a posterior distribution for the system parameters of structural models that is most consistent with all available data. The MCMC procedure is based upon a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm that is shown to function effectively with noisy data, incomplete data sets, and mismatched computational nodes/measurement points. A series of numerical test cases based upon a cantilever beam is presented. The results demonstrate that the algorithm is able to estimate model parameters utilizing experimental data for the nodal displacements resulting from specified forces.

  1. Diffusion Coefficient and Electric Field Studies for HSX using Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Talmadge, J. N.

    1999-11-01

    The HSX experiment has a magnetic field spectrum which closely approximates helical symmetry. Never the less, symmetry breaking terms are present which lead to asymmetric diffusion. Models for the asymmetric component of the monoenergetic diffusion coefficient are unable to account for all the terms in the HSX magnetic spectrum and the functional dependence on the radial electric field (Er). To model the diffusion coefficient as a function of Er and collisionality, Monte Carlo simulations have been made for different values of Er and background density. These results are fit to analytic models for the diffusion coefficient. Enforcing ambipolarity on these fluxes can lead to a calculation of the stellarator Er. To measure Er, we will use a spectroscopic system to measure impurity flow. A 1-meter spectrometer with a CCD detector has been purchased for this purpose; a LabVIEW control system has been implemented and collection optics designed. Details of the spectroscopic system will be presented.

  2. CORAL software: prediction of carcinogenicity of drugs by means of the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A

    2014-02-14

    Methodology of building up and validation of models for carcinogenic potentials of drugs by means of the CORAL software is described. The QSAR analysis by the CORAL software includes three phases: (i) definition of preferable parameters for the optimization procedure that gives maximal correlation coefficient between endpoint and an optimal descriptor that is calculated with so-called correlation weights of various molecular features; (ii) detection of molecular features with stable positive correlation weights or vice versa stable negative correlation weights (molecular features which are characterized by solely positive or solely negative correlation weights obtained for several starts of the Monte Carlo optimization are a basis for mechanistic interpretations of the model); and (iii) building up the model that is satisfactory from point of view of reliable probabilistic criteria and OECD principles. The methodology is demonstrated for the case of carcinogenicity of a large set (n = 1464) of organic compounds which are potential or actual pharmaceutical agents.

  3. Cosmic ray ionization and dose at Mars: Benchmarking deterministic and Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, R. B.; Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to evaluate the cosmic ray environment at Mars is of interest for future manned exploration. To support exploration, tools must be developed to accurately access the radiation environment in both free space and on planetary surfaces. The primary tool NASA uses to quantify radiation exposure behind shielding materials is the space radiation transport code, HZETRN. In order to build confidence in HZETRN, code benchmarking against Monte Carlo radiation transport codes is often used. This work compares the dose calculations at Mars by HZETRN and the GEANT4 application, Planetocosmics. The dose at ground and the energy deposited in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic ray protons and alpha particles has been calculated for the Curiosity landing conditions. In addition, this work has considered Solar Energetic Particle events, which allows for a better understanding of the spectral form in the comparison. The results for protons and alpha particles show very good agreement between HZETRN and Planetocosmics.

  4. Torsional path integral Monte Carlo method for the quantum simulation of large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas F.; Clary, David C.

    2002-05-01

    A molecular application is introduced for calculating quantum statistical mechanical expectation values of large molecules at nonzero temperatures. The Torsional Path Integral Monte Carlo (TPIMC) technique applies an uncoupled winding number formalism to the torsional degrees of freedom in molecular systems. The internal energy of the molecules ethane, n-butane, n-octane, and enkephalin are calculated at standard temperature using the TPIMC technique and compared to the expectation values obtained using the harmonic oscillator approximation and a variational technique. All studied molecules exhibited significant quantum mechanical contributions to their internal energy expectation values according to the TPIMC technique. The harmonic oscillator approximation approach to calculating the internal energy performs well for the molecules presented in this study but is limited by its neglect of both anharmonicity effects and the potential coupling of intramolecular torsions.

  5. Ground-state properties of LiH by reptation quantum Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Ospadov, Egor; Oblinsky, Daniel G; Rothstein, Stuart M

    2011-05-01

    We apply reptation quantum Monte Carlo to calculate one- and two-electron properties for ground-state LiH, including all tensor components for static polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities to fourth-order in the field. The importance sampling is performed with a large (QZ4P) STO basis set single determinant, directly obtained from commercial software, without incurring the overhead of optimizing many-parameter Jastrow-type functions of the inter-electronic and internuclear distances. We present formulas for the electrical response properties free from the finite-field approximation, which can be problematic for the purposes of stochastic estimation. The α, γ, A and C polarizability values are reasonably consistent with recent determinations reported in the literature, where they exist. A sum rule is obeyed for components of the B tensor, but B(zz,zz) as well as β(zzz) differ from what was reported in the literature. PMID:21445452

  6. Modeling of radiation-induced bystander effect using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Junchao; Liu, Liteng; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    Experiments showed that the radiation-induced bystander effect exists in cells, or tissues, or even biological organisms when irradiated with energetic ions or X-rays. In this paper, a Monte Carlo model is developed to study the mechanisms of bystander effect under the cells sparsely populated conditions. This model, based on our previous experiment which made the cells sparsely located in a round dish, focuses mainly on the spatial characteristics. The simulation results successfully reach the agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, other bystander effect experiment is also computed by this model and finally the model succeeds in predicting the results. The comparison of simulations with the experimental results indicates the feasibility of the model and the validity of some vital mechanisms assumed.

  7. Advanced computational methods for nodal diffusion, Monte Carlo, and S{sub N} problems. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    This document describes progress on five efforts for improving effectiveness of computational methods for particle diffusion and transport problems in nuclear engineering: (1) Multigrid methods for obtaining rapidly converging solutions of nodal diffusion problems. A alternative line relaxation scheme is being implemented into a nodal diffusion code. Simplified P2 has been implemented into this code. (2) Local Exponential Transform method for variance reduction in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. This work yielded predictions for both 1-D and 2-D x-y geometry better than conventional Monte Carlo with splitting and Russian Roulette. (3) Asymptotic Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN problems. New transport differencing schemes have been obtained that allow solution by the conjugate gradient method, and the convergence of this approach is rapid. (4) Quasidiffusion (QD) methods for obtaining accurate, rapidly converging solutions of multidimensional SN Problems on irregular spatial grids. A symmetrized QD method has been developed in a form that results in a system of two self-adjoint equations that are readily discretized and efficiently solved. (5) Response history method for speeding up the Monte Carlo calculation of electron transport problems. This method was implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. In addition, we have developed and implemented a parallel time-dependent Monte Carlo code on two massively parallel processors.

  8. Benchmark study of the two-dimensional Hubbard model with auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Mingpu; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-08-01

    Ground-state properties of the Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are studied by the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method. Accurate results for energy, double occupancy, effective hopping, magnetization, and momentum distribution are calculated for interaction strengths of U /t from 2 to 8, for a range of densities including half-filling and n =0.3 ,0.5 ,0.6 ,0.75 , and 0.875 . At half-filling, the results are numerically exact. Away from half-filling, the constrained path Monte Carlo method is employed to control the sign problem. Our results are obtained with several advances in the computational algorithm, which are described in detail. We discuss the advantages of generalized Hartree-Fock trial wave functions and its connection to pairing wave functions, as well as the interplay with different forms of Hubbard-Stratonovich decompositions. We study the use of different twist angle sets when applying the twist averaged boundary conditions. We propose the use of quasirandom sequences, which improves the convergence to the thermodynamic limit over pseudorandom and other sequences. With it and a careful finite size scaling analysis, we are able to obtain accurate values of ground-state properties in the thermodynamic limit. Detailed results for finite-sized systems up to 16 ×16 are also provided for benchmark purposes.

  9. Evaluation of Reaction Rate Theory and Monte Carlo Methods for Application to Radiation-Induced Microstructural Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Golubov, Stanislav I; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2007-08-01

    The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory, Monte Carlo, or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales, and timescales from those characteristic of diffusion to long-term microstructural evolution (~s to years). Although the rate theory and Monte Carlo models can be used simulate the same phenomena, some of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. Models employing the rate theory have been extensively used to describe radiation-induced phenomena such as void swelling and irradiation creep. The primary approximations in such models are time- and spatial averaging of the radiation damage source term, and spatial averaging of the microstructure into an effective medium. Kinetic Monte Carlo models can account for these spatial and temporal correlations; their primary limitation is the computational burden which is related to the size of the simulation cell. A direct comparison of RT and object kinetic MC simulations has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to the evolution (both nucleation and growth) of radiation-induced defect structures. The primary limitations of the OKMC model are related to computational issues. Even with modern computers, the maximum simulation cell size and the maximum dose (typically much less than 1 dpa) that can be simulated are limited. In contrast, even very detailed RT models can simulate microstructural evolution for doses up 100 dpa or greater in clock times that are relatively short. Within the context of the effective medium, essentially any defect density can be simulated. Overall, the agreement between the two methods is best for irradiation conditions which produce a high density of defects (lower temperature and higher displacement rate), and for

  10. Comparing Monte Carlo methods for finding ground states of Ising spin glasses: Population annealing, simulated annealing, and parallel tempering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlong; Machta, Jonathan; Katzgraber, Helmut G

    2015-07-01

    Population annealing is a Monte Carlo algorithm that marries features from simulated-annealing and parallel-tempering Monte Carlo. As such, it is ideal to overcome large energy barriers in the free-energy landscape while minimizing a Hamiltonian. Thus, population-annealing Monte Carlo can be used as a heuristic to solve combinatorial optimization problems. We illustrate the capabilities of population-annealing Monte Carlo by computing ground states of the three-dimensional Ising spin glass with Gaussian disorder, while comparing to simulated-annealing and parallel-tempering Monte Carlo. Our results suggest that population annealing Monte Carlo is significantly more efficient than simulated annealing but comparable to parallel-tempering Monte Carlo for finding spin-glass ground states.

  11. Final Technical Report - Large Deviation Methods for the Analysis and Design of Monte Carlo Schemes in Physics and Chemistry - DE-SC0002413

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, Paul

    2014-03-14

    This proposal is concerned with applications of Monte Carlo to problems in physics and chemistry where rare events degrade the performance of standard Monte Carlo. One class of problems is concerned with computation of various aspects of the equilibrium behavior of some Markov process via time averages. The problem to be overcome is that rare events interfere with the efficient sampling of all relevant parts of phase space. A second class concerns sampling transitions between two or more stable attractors. Here, rare events do not interfere with the sampling of all relevant parts of phase space, but make Monte Carlo inefficient because of the very large number of samples required to obtain variance comparable to the quantity estimated. The project uses large deviation methods for the mathematical analyses of various Monte Carlo techniques, and in particular for algorithmic analysis and design. This is done in the context of relevant application areas, mainly from chemistry and biology.

  12. Modeling the Thermal Conductivity of Nanocomposites Using Monte-Carlo Methods and Realistic Nanotube Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Khoa; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2012-02-01

    The effective thermal conductivity (Keff) of carbon nanotube (CNT) composites is affected by the thermal boundary resistance (TBR) and by the dispersion pattern and geometry of the CNTs. We have previously modeled CNTs as straight cylinders and found that the TBR between CNTs (TBRCNT-CNT) can suppress Keff at high volume fractions of CNTs [1]. Effective medium theory results assume that the CNTs are in a perfect dispersion state and exclude the TBRCNT-CNT [2]. In this work, we report on the development of an algorithm for generating CNTs with worm-like geometry in 3D, and with different persistence lengths. These worm-like CNTs are then randomly placed in a periodic box representing a realistic state, since the persistence length of a CNT can be obtained from microscopic images. The use of these CNT geometries in conjunction with off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations [1] in order to study the effective thermal properties of nanocomposites will be discussed, as well as the effects of the persistence length on Keff and comparisons to straight cylinder models. References [1] K. Bui, B.P. Grady, D.V. Papavassiliou, Chem. Phys. Let., 508(4-6), 248-251, 2011 [2] C.W. Nan, G. Liu, Y. Lin, M. Li, App. Phys. Let., 85(16), 3549-3551, 2006

  13. Specific absorbed fractions of electrons and photons for Rad-HUMAN phantom using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Cheng, Meng-Yun; Long, Peng-Cheng; Hu, Li-Qin

    2015-07-01

    The specific absorbed fractions (SAF) for self- and cross-irradiation are effective tools for the internal dose estimation of inhalation and ingestion intakes of radionuclides. A set of SAFs of photons and electrons were calculated using the Rad-HUMAN phantom, which is a computational voxel phantom of a Chinese adult female that was created using the color photographic image of the Chinese Visible Human (CVH) data set by the FDS Team. The model can represent most Chinese adult female anatomical characteristics and can be taken as an individual phantom to investigate the difference of internal dose with Caucasians. In this study, the emission of mono-energetic photons and electrons of 10 keV to 4 MeV energy were calculated using the Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code MCNP. Results were compared with the values from ICRP reference and ORNL models. The results showed that SAF from the Rad-HUMAN have similar trends but are larger than those from the other two models. The differences were due to the racial and anatomical differences in organ mass and inter-organ distance. The SAFs based on the Rad-HUMAN phantom provide an accurate and reliable data for internal radiation dose calculations for Chinese females. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03040000), National Natural Science Foundation of China (910266004, 11305205, 11305203) and National Special Program for ITER (2014GB112001)

  14. Analysis of Radiation Effects in Silicon using Kinetic Monte Carlo Methods

    DOE PAGES

    Hehr, Brian Douglas

    2014-11-25

    The transient degradation of semiconductor device performance under irradiation has long been an issue of concern. Neutron irradiation can instigate the formation of quasi-stable defect structures, thereby introducing new energy levels into the bandgap that alter carrier lifetimes and give rise to such phenomena as gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Normally, the initial defect formation phase is followed by a recovery phase in which defect-defect or defect-dopant interactions modify the characteristics of the damaged structure. A kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) code has been developed to model both thermal and carrier injection annealing of initial defect structures in semiconductor materials.more » The code is employed to investigate annealing in electron-irradiated, p-type silicon as well as the recovery of base current in silicon transistors bombarded with neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) “Blue Room” facility. Our results reveal that KMC calculations agree well with these experiments once adjustments are made, within the appropriate uncertainty bounds, to some of the sensitive defect parameters.« less

  15. Analysis of Radiation Effects in Silicon using Kinetic Monte Carlo Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Brian Douglas

    2014-11-25

    The transient degradation of semiconductor device performance under irradiation has long been an issue of concern. Neutron irradiation can instigate the formation of quasi-stable defect structures, thereby introducing new energy levels into the bandgap that alter carrier lifetimes and give rise to such phenomena as gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Normally, the initial defect formation phase is followed by a recovery phase in which defect-defect or defect-dopant interactions modify the characteristics of the damaged structure. A kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) code has been developed to model both thermal and carrier injection annealing of initial defect structures in semiconductor materials. The code is employed to investigate annealing in electron-irradiated, p-type silicon as well as the recovery of base current in silicon transistors bombarded with neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) “Blue Room” facility. Our results reveal that KMC calculations agree well with these experiments once adjustments are made, within the appropriate uncertainty bounds, to some of the sensitive defect parameters.

  16. Monte Carlo Planning Method Estimates Planning Horizons during Interactive Social Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hula, Andreas; Montague, P Read; Dayan, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Reciprocating interactions represent a central feature of all human exchanges. They have been the target of various recent experiments, with healthy participants and psychiatric populations engaging as dyads in multi-round exchanges such as a repeated trust task. Behaviour in such exchanges involves complexities related to each agent's preference for equity with their partner, beliefs about the partner's appetite for equity, beliefs about the partner's model of their partner, and so on. Agents may also plan different numbers of steps into the future. Providing a computationally precise account of the behaviour is an essential step towards understanding what underlies choices. A natural framework for this is that of an interactive partially observable Markov decision process (IPOMDP). However, the various complexities make IPOMDPs inordinately computationally challenging. Here, we show how to approximate the solution for the multi-round trust task using a variant of the Monte-Carlo tree search algorithm. We demonstrate that the algorithm is efficient and effective, and therefore can be used to invert observations of behavioural choices. We use generated behaviour to elucidate the richness and sophistication of interactive inference. PMID:26053429

  17. Monte Carlo Planning Method Estimates Planning Horizons during Interactive Social Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hula, Andreas; Montague, P Read; Dayan, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Reciprocating interactions represent a central feature of all human exchanges. They have been the target of various recent experiments, with healthy participants and psychiatric populations engaging as dyads in multi-round exchanges such as a repeated trust task. Behaviour in such exchanges involves complexities related to each agent's preference for equity with their partner, beliefs about the partner's appetite for equity, beliefs about the partner's model of their partner, and so on. Agents may also plan different numbers of steps into the future. Providing a computationally precise account of the behaviour is an essential step towards understanding what underlies choices. A natural framework for this is that of an interactive partially observable Markov decision process (IPOMDP). However, the various complexities make IPOMDPs inordinately computationally challenging. Here, we show how to approximate the solution for the multi-round trust task using a variant of the Monte-Carlo tree search algorithm. We demonstrate that the algorithm is efficient and effective, and therefore can be used to invert observations of behavioural choices. We use generated behaviour to elucidate the richness and sophistication of interactive inference.

  18. Atmospheric correction of Earth-observation remote sensing images by Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjit, Hanane; Oukebdane, Abdelaziz; Belbachir, Ahmad Hafid

    2013-10-01

    In earth observation, the atmospheric particles contaminate severely, through absorption and scattering, the reflected electromagnetic signal from the earth surface. It will be greatly beneficial for land surface characterization if we can remove these atmospheric effects from imagery and retrieve surface reflectance that characterizes the surface properties with the purpose of atmospheric correction. Giving the geometric parameters of the studied image and assessing the parameters describing the state of the atmosphere, it is possible to evaluate the atmospheric reflectance, and upward and downward transmittances which take part in the garbling data obtained from the image. To that end, an atmospheric correction algorithm for high spectral resolution data over land surfaces has been developed. It is designed to obtain the main atmospheric parameters needed in the image correction and the interpretation of optical observations. It also estimates the optical characteristics of the Earth-observation imagery (LANDSAT and SPOT). The physics underlying the problem of solar radiation propagations that takes into account multiple scattering and sphericity of the atmosphere has been treated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  19. Monte Carlo Planning Method Estimates Planning Horizons during Interactive Social Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hula, Andreas; Montague, P. Read; Dayan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocating interactions represent a central feature of all human exchanges. They have been the target of various recent experiments, with healthy participants and psychiatric populations engaging as dyads in multi-round exchanges such as a repeated trust task. Behaviour in such exchanges involves complexities related to each agent’s preference for equity with their partner, beliefs about the partner’s appetite for equity, beliefs about the partner’s model of their partner, and so on. Agents may also plan different numbers of steps into the future. Providing a computationally precise account of the behaviour is an essential step towards understanding what underlies choices. A natural framework for this is that of an interactive partially observable Markov decision process (IPOMDP). However, the various complexities make IPOMDPs inordinately computationally challenging. Here, we show how to approximate the solution for the multi-round trust task using a variant of the Monte-Carlo tree search algorithm. We demonstrate that the algorithm is efficient and effective, and therefore can be used to invert observations of behavioural choices. We use generated behaviour to elucidate the richness and sophistication of interactive inference. PMID:26053429

  20. The use of Monte Carlo methods in heavy charged particle radiation therapy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganetti, Harald

    2007-03-01

    This presentation will demonstrate the importance of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in proton therapy. MC applications will be shown which aim at 1. Modeling of the beam delivery system. MC can be used for quality assurance verification in order to understand the sensitivity of beam characteristics and how these influence the dose delivered. 2. Patient treatment dose verification. The capability of reading CT information has to be implemented into the MC code. Simulating the ionization chamber reading in the treatment head allows the dose to be specified for treatment plan verification. 3. 4D dose calculation. The patient geometry may be time dependent due to respiratory or cardiac motion. To consider this, patient specific 4D CT data can be used in combination with MC simulations. 4. Simulating positron emission. Positron emitters are produced via nuclear interactions along the beam path penetration and can be detected after treatment. Comparison between measured and MC simulated PET images can provide feedback on the intended dose in the patient. 5. Studies on radiation induced cancer risk. MC calculations based on computational anthropomorphic phantoms allow the estimation of organ dose and particle energy distributions everywhere in the patient.

  1. Time series analysis and Monte Carlo methods for eigenvalue separation in neutron multiplication problems

    SciTech Connect

    Nease, Brian R. Ueki, Taro

    2009-12-10

    A time series approach has been applied to the nuclear fission source distribution generated by Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport in order to calculate the non-fundamental mode eigenvalues of the system. The novel aspect is the combination of the general technical principle of projection pursuit for multivariate data with the neutron multiplication eigenvalue problem in the nuclear engineering discipline. Proof is thoroughly provided that the stationary MC process is linear to first order approximation and that it transforms into one-dimensional autoregressive processes of order one (AR(1)) via the automated choice of projection vectors. The autocorrelation coefficient of the resulting AR(1) process corresponds to the ratio of the desired mode eigenvalue to the fundamental mode eigenvalue. All modern MC codes for nuclear criticality calculate the fundamental mode eigenvalue, so the desired mode eigenvalue can be easily determined. This time series approach was tested for a variety of problems including multi-dimensional ones. Numerical results show that the time series approach has strong potential for three dimensional whole reactor core. The eigenvalue ratio can be updated in an on-the-fly manner without storing the nuclear fission source distributions at all previous iteration cycles for the mean subtraction. Lastly, the effects of degenerate eigenvalues are investigated and solutions are provided.

  2. A new variable parallel holes collimator for scintigraphic device with validation method based on Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinci, G.; Massari, R.; Scandellari, M.; Boccalini, S.; Costantini, S.; Di Sero, R.; Basso, A.; Sala, R.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this work is to show a new scintigraphic device able to change automatically the length of its collimator in order to adapt the spatial resolution value to gamma source distance. This patented technique replaces the need for collimator change that standard gamma cameras still feature. Monte Carlo simulations represent the best tool in searching new technological solutions for such an innovative collimation structure. They also provide a valid analysis on response of gamma cameras performances as well as on advantages and limits of this new solution. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulations are realized with GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) framework and the specific simulation object is a collimation method based on separate blocks that can be brought closer and farther, in order to reach and maintain specific spatial resolution values for all source-detector distances. To verify the accuracy and the faithfulness of these simulations, we have realized experimental measurements with identical setup and conditions. This confirms the power of the simulation as an extremely useful tool, especially where new technological solutions need to be studied, tested and analyzed before their practical realization. The final aim of this new collimation system is the improvement of the SPECT techniques, with the real control of the spatial resolution value during tomographic acquisitions. This principle did allow us to simulate a tomographic acquisition of two capillaries of radioactive solution, in order to verify the possibility to clearly distinguish them.

  3. Non-destructive method of characterisation of radioactive waste containers using gamma spectroscopy and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Ridikas, D; Feray, S; Cometto, M; Damoy, F

    2005-01-01

    During the decommissioning of the SATURNE accelerator at CEA Saclay (France), a number of concrete containers with radioactive materials of low or very low activity had to be characterised before their final storage. In this paper, a non-destructive approach combining gamma ray spectroscopy and Monte Carlo simulations is used in order to characterise massive concrete blocks containing some radioactive waste. The limits and uncertainties of the proposed method are quantified for the source term activity estimates using 137Cs as a tracer element. A series of activity measurements with a few representative waste containers were performed before and after destruction. It has been found that neither was the distribution of radioactive materials homogeneous nor was its density unique, and this became the major source of systematic errors in this study. Nevertheless, we conclude that by combining gamma ray spectroscopy and full scale Monte Carlo simulations one can estimate the source term activity for some tracer elements such as 134Cs, 137Cs, 60Co, etc. The uncertainty of this estimation should not be bigger than a factor of 2-3. PMID:16381694

  4. Analysis of QUADOS problem on TLD-ALBEDO personal dosemeter responses using discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kodeli, Ivo; Tanner, Rick

    2005-01-01

    In the scope of QUADOS, a Concerted Action of the European Commission, eight calculational problems were prepared in order to evaluate the use of computational codes for dosimetry in radiation protection and medical physics, and to disseminate "good practice" throughout the radiation dosimetry community. This paper focuses on the analysis of the P4 problem on the 'TLD-albedo dosemeter: neutron and/or photon response of a four-element TL-dosemeter mounted on a standard ISO slab phantom'. Altogether 17 solutions were received from the participants, 14 of those transported neutrons and 15 photons. Most participants (16 out of 17) used Monte Carlo methods. These calculations are time-consuming, requiring several days of CPU time to perform the whole set of calculations and achieve good statistical precision. The possibility of using deterministic discrete ordinates codes as an alternative to Monte Carlo was therefore investigated and is presented here. In particular the capacity of the adjoint mode calculations is shown. PMID:16381782

  5. A split-step method to include electron-electron collisions via Monte Carlo in multiple rate equation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthmacher, Klaus; Molberg, Andreas K.; Rethfeld, Bärbel; Gulley, Jeremy R.

    2016-10-01

    A split-step numerical method for calculating ultrafast free-electron dynamics in dielectrics is introduced. The two split steps, independently programmed in C++11 and FORTRAN 2003, are interfaced via the presented open source wrapper. The first step solves a deterministic extended multi-rate equation for the ionization, electron-phonon collisions, and single photon absorption by free-carriers. The second step is stochastic and models electron-electron collisions using Monte-Carlo techniques. This combination of deterministic and stochastic approaches is a unique and efficient method of calculating the nonlinear dynamics of 3D materials exposed to high intensity ultrashort pulses. Results from simulations solving the proposed model demonstrate how electron-electron scattering relaxes the non-equilibrium electron distribution on the femtosecond time scale.

  6. Effectiveness of the Monte Carlo method in stereotactic radiation therapy applied to quasi-homogenous brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Choi, Hoon Sik; Song, Jin Ho; Park, Byung-Do; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Monte Carlo (MC) method in stereotactic radiotherapy for brain tumor. The difference in doses predicted by the conventional Ray-tracing (Ray) and the advanced MC algorithms was comprehensively investigated through the simulations for phantom and patient data, actual measurement of dose distribution, and the retrospective analysis of 77 brain tumors patients. These investigations consistently showed that the MC algorithm overestimated the dose than the Ray algorithm and the MC overestimation was generally increased as decreasing the beams size and increasing the number of beams delivered. These results demonstrated that the advanced MC algorithm would be inaccurate than the conventional Raytracing algorithm when applied to a (quasi-) homogeneous brain tumors. Thus, caution may be needed to apply the MC method to brain radiosurgery or radiotherapy. PMID:26871473

  7. Effectiveness of the Monte Carlo method in stereotactic radiation therapy applied to quasi-homogenous brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Choi, Hoon Sik; Song, Jin Ho; Park, Byung-Do; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin

    2016-03-15

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Monte Carlo (MC) method in stereotactic radiotherapy for brain tumor. The difference in doses predicted by the conventional Ray-tracing (Ray) and the advanced MC algorithms was comprehensively investigated through the simulations for phantom and patient data, actual measurement of dose distribution, and the retrospective analysis of 77 brain tumors patients. These investigations consistently showed that the MC algorithm overestimated the dose than the Ray algorithm and the MC overestimation was generally increased as decreasing the beams size and increasing the number of beams delivered. These results demonstrated that the advanced MC algorithm would be inaccurate than the conventional Raytracing algorithm when applied to a (quasi-) homogeneous brain tumors. Thus, caution may be needed to apply the MC method to brain radiosurgery or radiotherapy. PMID:26871473

  8. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, J.D.; Park, H.; Wollaber, A.B.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; Knoll, D.A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm.

  9. A Monte Carlo Investigation of the Contrasting Groups Standard Setting Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizek, Gregory J.; Husband, Timothy H.

    The contrasting groups method is one of many possible methods for setting passing scores. The most commonly used method is probably that developed by W. H. Angoff (1971), but it has been suggested that the Angoff method may not be appropriate for many standard setting applications in education. The contrasting groups method is explored as an…

  10. Assessment of a fully 3D Monte Carlo reconstruction method for preclinical PET with iodine-124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, M.; Buvat, I.; Ammour, L.; Chouin, N.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.; Chérel, M.; Carlier, T.

    2015-03-01

    Iodine-124 is a radionuclide well suited to the labeling of intact monoclonal antibodies. Yet, accurate quantification in preclinical imaging with I-124 is challenging due to the large positron range and a complex decay scheme including high-energy gammas. The aim of this work was to assess the quantitative performance of a fully 3D Monte Carlo (MC) reconstruction for preclinical I-124 PET. The high-resolution small animal PET Inveon (Siemens) was simulated using GATE 6.1. Three system matrices (SM) of different complexity were calculated in addition to a Siddon-based ray tracing approach for comparison purpose. Each system matrix accounted for a more or less complete description of the physics processes both in the scanned object and in the PET scanner. One homogeneous water phantom and three heterogeneous phantoms including water, lungs and bones were simulated, where hot and cold regions were used to assess activity recovery as well as the trade-off between contrast recovery and noise in different regions. The benefit of accounting for scatter, attenuation, positron range and spurious coincidences occurring in the object when calculating the system matrix used to reconstruct I-124 PET images was highlighted. We found that the use of an MC SM including a thorough modelling of the detector response and physical effects in a uniform water-equivalent phantom was efficient to get reasonable quantitative accuracy in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Modelling the phantom heterogeneities in the SM did not necessarily yield the most accurate estimate of the activity distribution, due to the high variance affecting many SM elements in the most sophisticated SM.

  11. Monte Carlo methods for the simulation of positron emitters in SPECT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrzeniecki, A.B.; Selcow, E.C.; Yanch, J.C.; Belanger, M.J.; Lu, A.; Esser, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear medical systems are being widely used to better understand the characteristics of the acquired images. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an imaging modality that provides a physician with a nuclear medical image of function in an organ. In SPECT systems, the patient is injected with a radiopharmaceutical that is labeled with a photon-emitting radioisotope. A collimated gamma camera revolves around the patient, providing a series of planar images, which are then reconstructed to produce a three-dimensional image of the radiotracer distribution in the patient or phantom. The usage of positron emission computed tomography (PET) systems with {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is an important mechanism for quantitating tumor glucose metabolism. This may facilitate the detection of primary and metastatic malignancies and the distinction between tissue regions that are normal, fibrous, necrotic, or cancerous. However, PET facilities are implemented in significantly fewer hospitals in the United States than SPECT systems. To address this issue and provide similar functional information to a clinician, there is a growing interest in imaging the 511-keV photons associated with PET agents in SPECT imaging systems. Note that the clinical utility of FDG as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical cannot be replicated by known radiotracers emitting single photons. The authors are extending their simulations of SPECT systems to higher photon energies, where at present there is more disagreement between simulations and actual data. They discuss here possible reasons for this and steps being taken to address this discrepancy in the development of the modeling.

  12. Estimate of the melanin content in human hairs by the inverse Monte-Carlo method using a system for digital image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Genina, Elina A; Kochubei, V I; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2006-12-31

    Based on the digital image analysis and inverse Monte-Carlo method, the proximate analysis method is deve-loped and the optical properties of hairs of different types are estimated in three spectral ranges corresponding to three colour components. The scattering and absorption properties of hairs are separated for the first time by using the inverse Monte-Carlo method. The content of different types of melanin in hairs is estimated from the absorption coefficient. It is shown that the dominating type of melanin in dark hairs is eumelanin, whereas in light hairs pheomelanin dominates. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  13. The Monte Carlo method as a tool for statistical characterisation of differential and additive phase shifting algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, M.; Dorrío, B. V.; Blanco, J.; Diz-Bugarín, J.; Ribas, F.

    2011-01-01

    Several metrological applications base their measurement principle in the phase sum or difference between two patterns, one original s(r,phi) and another modified t(r,phi+Δphi). Additive or differential phase shifting algorithms directly recover the sum 2phi+Δphi or the difference Δphi of phases without requiring prior calculation of the individual phases. These algorithms can be constructed, for example, from a suitable combination of known phase shifting algorithms. Little has been written on the design, analysis and error compensation of these new two-stage algorithms. Previously we have used computer simulation to study, in a linear approach or with a filter process in reciprocal space, the response of several families of them to the main error sources. In this work we present an error analysis that uses Monte Carlo simulation to achieve results in good agreement with those obtained with spatial and temporal methods.

  14. Comparison of Ensemble Kalman Filter groundwater-data assimilation methods based on stochastic moment equations and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeri, M.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2014-04-01

    Traditional Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation requires computationally intensive Monte Carlo (MC) sampling, which suffers from filter inbreeding unless the number of simulations is large. Recently we proposed an alternative EnKF groundwater-data assimilation method that obviates the need for sampling and is free of inbreeding issues. In our new approach, theoretical ensemble moments are approximated directly by solving a system of corresponding stochastic groundwater flow equations. Like MC-based EnKF, our moment equations (ME) approach allows Bayesian updating of system states and parameters in real-time as new data become available. Here we compare the performances and accuracies of the two approaches on two-dimensional transient groundwater flow toward a well pumping water in a synthetic, randomly heterogeneous confined aquifer subject to prescribed head and flux boundary conditions.

  15. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, P; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A; Kent, Paul R C

    2014-12-01

    Highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based on point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. The results demonstrate that the lithium-carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches. PMID:26583215

  16. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh, P.; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-03

    In highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Moreover, the highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based on point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. Our results demonstrate that the lithium carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches.

  17. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    The spectrum of gamma energy absorption in the NaI crystal (scintillation detector) is the interaction result of gamma photon with NaI crystal, and it’s associated with the photon gamma energy incoming to the detector. Through a simulation approach, we can perform an early observation of gamma energy absorption spectrum in a scintillator crystal detector (NaI) before the experiment conducted. In this paper, we present a simulation model result of gamma energy absorption spectrum for energy 100-700 keV (i.e. 297 keV, 400 keV and 662 keV). This simulation developed based on the concept of photon beam point source distribution and photon cross section interaction with the Monte Carlo method. Our computational code has been successfully predicting the multiple energy peaks absorption spectrum, which derived from multiple photon energy sources.

  18. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, P; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A; Kent, Paul R C

    2014-12-01

    Highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based on point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. The results demonstrate that the lithium-carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches.

  19. Wang-Landau method for calculating Rényi entropies in finite-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Stephen; Melko, Roger G

    2013-01-01

    We implement a Wang-Landau sampling technique in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations for the purpose of calculating the Rényi entanglement entropies and associated mutual information. The algorithm converges an estimate for an analog to the density of states for stochastic series expansion QMC, allowing a direct calculation of Rényi entropies without explicit thermodynamic integration. We benchmark results for the mutual information on two-dimensional (2D) isotropic and anisotropic Heisenberg models, a 2D transverse field Ising model, and a three-dimensional Heisenberg model, confirming a critical scaling of the mutual information in cases with a finite-temperature transition. We discuss the benefits and limitations of broad sampling techniques compared to standard importance sampling methods.

  20. Calculating ellipse area by the Monte Carlo method and analysing dice poker with Excel at high school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacka, Jan

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports on lessons in which 18-19 years old high school students modelled random processes with Excel. In the first lesson, 26 students formulated a hypothesis on the area of ellipse by using the analogy between the areas of circle, square and rectangle. They verified the hypothesis by the Monte Carlo method with a spreadsheet model developed in the lesson. In the second lesson, 27 students analysed the dice poker game. First, they calculated the probability of the hands by combinatorial formulae. Then, they verified the result with a spreadsheet model developed in the lesson. The students were given a questionnaire to find out if they found the lesson interesting and contributing to their mathematical and technological knowledge.

  1. Uncertainty Determination for Aeroheating in Uranus and Saturn Probe Entries by the Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Prabhu, Dinesh; Cruden, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The 2013-2022 Decaedal survey for planetary exploration has identified probe missions to Uranus and Saturn as high priorities. This work endeavors to examine the uncertainty for determining aeroheating in such entry environments. Representative entry trajectories are constructed using the TRAJ software. Flowfields at selected points on the trajectories are then computed using the Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) Computational Fluid Dynamics Code. A Monte Carlo study is performed on the DPLR input parameters to determine the uncertainty in the predicted aeroheating, and correlation coefficients are examined to identify which input parameters show the most influence on the uncertainty. A review of the present best practices for input parameters (e.g. transport coefficient and vibrational relaxation time) is also conducted. It is found that the 2(sigma) - uncertainty for heating on Uranus entry is no more than 2.1%, assuming an equilibrium catalytic wall, with the uncertainty being determined primarily by diffusion and H(sub 2) recombination rate within the boundary layer. However, if the wall is assumed to be partially or non-catalytic, this uncertainty may increase to as large as 18%. The catalytic wall model can contribute over 3x change in heat flux and a 20% variation in film coefficient. Therefore, coupled material response/fluid dynamic models are recommended for this problem. It was also found that much of this variability is artificially suppressed when a constant Schmidt number approach is implemented. Because the boundary layer is reacting, it is necessary to employ self-consistent effective binary diffusion to obtain a correct thermal transport solution. For Saturn entries, the 2(sigma) - uncertainty for convective heating was less than 3.7%. The major uncertainty driver was dependent on shock temperature/velocity, changing from boundary layer thermal conductivity to diffusivity and then to shock layer ionization rate as velocity increases. While

  2. Analysis of neutron and photon response of a TLD-ALBEDO personal dosemeter on an ISO slab phantom using TRIPOLI-4.3 Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y K

    2005-01-01

    TRIPOLI-4.3 Monte Carlo transport code has been used to evaluate the QUADOS (Quality Assurance of Computational Tools for Dosimetry) problem P4, neutron and photon response of an albedo-type thermoluminescence personal dosemeter (TLD) located on an ISO slab phantom. Two enriched 6LiF and two 7LiF TLD chips were used and they were protected, in front or behind, with a boron-loaded dosemeter-holder. Neutron response of the four chips was determined by counting 6Li(n,t)4He events using ENDF/B-VI.4 library and photon response by estimating absorbed dose (MeV g(-1)). Ten neutron energies from thermal to 20 MeV and six photon energies from 33 keV to 1.25 MeV were used to study the energy dependence. The fraction of the neutron and photon response owing to phantom backscatter has also been investigated. Detailed TRIPOLI-4.3 solutions are presented and compared with MCNP-4C calculations. PMID:16381740

  3. Development of synthetic velocity - depth damage curves using a Weighted Monte Carlo method and Logistic Regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozinaki, Anthi Eirini K.; Karatzas, George P.; Sibetheros, Ioannis A.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2014-05-01

    Damage curves are the most significant component of the flood loss estimation models. Their development is quite complex. Two types of damage curves exist, historical and synthetic curves. Historical curves are developed from historical loss data from actual flood events. However, due to the scarcity of historical data, synthetic damage curves can be alternatively developed. Synthetic curves rely on the analysis of expected damage under certain hypothetical flooding conditions. A synthetic approach was developed and presented in this work for the development of damage curves, which are subsequently used as the basic input to a flood loss estimation model. A questionnaire-based survey took place among practicing and research agronomists, in order to generate rural loss data based on the responders' loss estimates, for several flood condition scenarios. In addition, a similar questionnaire-based survey took place among building experts, i.e. civil engineers and architects, in order to generate loss data for the urban sector. By answering the questionnaire, the experts were in essence expressing their opinion on how damage to various crop types or building types is related to a range of values of flood inundation parameters, such as floodwater depth and velocity. However, the loss data compiled from the completed questionnaires were not sufficient for the construction of workable damage curves; to overcome this problem, a Weighted Monte Carlo method was implemented, in order to generate extra synthetic datasets with statistical properties identical to those of the questionnaire-based data. The data generated by the Weighted Monte Carlo method were processed via Logistic Regression techniques in order to develop accurate logistic damage curves for the rural and the urban sectors. A Python-based code was developed, which combines the Weighted Monte Carlo method and the Logistic Regression analysis into a single code (WMCLR Python code). Each WMCLR code execution

  4. Radiative Transfer Modeling of a Large Pool Fire by Discrete Ordinates, Discrete Transfer, Ray Tracing, Monte Carlo and Moment Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, K. A.; Ripoll, J.-F.; Wray, A. A.; Joseph, D.; ElHafi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Five computational methods for solution of the radiative transfer equation in an absorbing-emitting and non-scattering gray medium were compared on a 2 m JP-8 pool fire. The temperature and absorption coefficient fields were taken from a synthetic fire due to the lack of a complete set of experimental data for fires of this size. These quantities were generated by a code that has been shown to agree well with the limited quantity of relevant data in the literature. Reference solutions to the governing equation were determined using the Monte Carlo method and a ray tracing scheme with high angular resolution. Solutions using the discrete transfer method, the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with both S(sub 4) and LC(sub 11) quadratures, and moment model using the M(sub 1) closure were compared to the reference solutions in both isotropic and anisotropic regions of the computational domain. DOM LC(sub 11) is shown to be the more accurate than the commonly used S(sub 4) quadrature technique, especially in anisotropic regions of the fire domain. This represents the first study where the M(sub 1) method was applied to a combustion problem occurring in a complex three-dimensional geometry. The M(sub 1) results agree well with other solution techniques, which is encouraging for future applications to similar problems since it is computationally the least expensive solution technique. Moreover, M(sub 1) results are comparable to DOM S(sub 4).

  5. Monte Carlo comparison of preliminary methods for ordering multiple genetic loci.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, J M; Boehnke, M

    1990-01-01

    We carried out a simulation study to compare the power of eight methods for preliminary ordering of multiple genetic loci. Using linkage groups of six loci and a simple pedigree structure, we considered the effects on method performance of locus informativity, interlocus spacing, total distance along the chromosome, and sample size. Method performance was assessed using the mean rank of the true order, the proportion of replicates in which the true order was the best order, and the number of orders that needed to be considered for subsequent multipoint linkage analysis in order to include the true order with high probability. A new method which maximizes the sum of adjacent two-point maximum lod scores divided by the equivalent number of informative meioses and the previously described method which minimizes the sum of adjacent recombination fraction estimates were found to be the best overall locus-ordering methods for the situations considered, although several other methods also performed well. PMID:2393021

  6. Characteristics of miniature electronic brachytherapy x-ray sources based on TG-43U1 formalism using Monte Carlo simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Safigholi, Habib; Faghihi, Reza; Jashni, Somaye Karimi; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2012-04-15

    distribution is less sensitive to the shape of the conical-hemisphere anode than the hemispherical anode. However, the optimized apex angle of conical-hemisphere anode was determined to be 60 deg. For the hemispherical targets, calculated radial dose function values at a distance of 5 cm were 0.137, 0.191, 0.247, and 0.331 for 40, 50, 60, and 80 keV electrons, respectively. These values for the conical-hemisphere targets are 0.165, 0.239, 0.305, and 0.412, respectively. Calculated 2D anisotropy functions values for the hemispherical target shape were F(1 cm, 0 deg.) = 1.438 and F(1 cm, 0 deg.) = 1.465 for 30 and 80 keV electrons, respectively. The corresponding values for conical-hemisphere targets are 1.091 and 1.241, respectively. Conclusions: A method for the characterizations of MEBXS using TG-43U1 dosimetric data using the MC MCNP4C has been presented. The effects of target geometry, thicknesses, and electron source geometry have been investigated. The final choices of MEBXS design are conical-hemisphere target shapes having an apex angle of 60 deg. Tungsten material having an optimized thickness versus electron energy and a 0.9 mm radius of uniform cylinder as a cathode produces optimal electron source characteristics.

  7. SAF values for internal photon emitters calculated for the RPI-P pregnant-female models using Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, C. Y.; Xu, X. George; Stabin, Michael G.

    2008-07-15

    Estimates of radiation absorbed doses from radionuclides internally deposited in a pregnant woman and her fetus are very important due to elevated fetal radiosensitivity. This paper reports a set of specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) for use with the dosimetry schema developed by the Society of Nuclear Medicine's Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee. The calculations were based on three newly constructed pregnant female anatomic models, called RPI-P3, RPI-P6, and RPI-P9, that represent adult females at 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational periods, respectively. Advanced Boundary REPresentation (BREP) surface-geometry modeling methods were used to create anatomically realistic geometries and organ volumes that were carefully adjusted to agree with the latest ICRP reference values. A Monte Carlo user code, EGS4-VLSI, was used to simulate internal photon emitters ranging from 10 keV to 4 MeV. SAF values were calculated and compared with previous data derived from stylized models of simplified geometries and with a model of a 7.5-month pregnant female developed previously from partial-body CT images. The results show considerable differences between these models for low energy photons, but generally good agreement at higher energies. These differences are caused mainly by different organ shapes and positions. Other factors, such as the organ mass, the source-to-target-organ centroid distance, and the Monte Carlo code used in each study, played lesser roles in the observed differences in these. Since the SAF values reported in this study are based on models that are anatomically more realistic than previous models, these data are recommended for future applications as standard reference values in internal dosimetry involving pregnant females.

  8. hybridMANTIS: a CPU-GPU Monte Carlo method for modeling indirect x-ray detectors with columnar scintillators.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Diksha; Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2012-04-21

    The computational modeling of medical imaging systems often requires obtaining a large number of simulated images with low statistical uncertainty which translates into prohibitive computing times. We describe a novel hybrid approach for Monte Carlo simulations that maximizes utilization of CPUs and GPUs in modern workstations. We apply the method to the modeling of indirect x-ray detectors using a new and improved version of the code MANTIS, an open source software tool used for the Monte Carlo simulations of indirect x-ray imagers. We first describe a GPU implementation of the physics and geometry models in fastDETECT2 (the optical transport model) and a serial CPU version of the same code. We discuss its new features like on-the-fly column geometry and columnar crosstalk in relation to the MANTIS code, and point out areas where our model provides more flexibility for the modeling of realistic columnar structures in large area detectors. Second, we modify PENELOPE (the open source software package that handles the x-ray and electron transport in MANTIS) to allow direct output of location and energy deposited during x-ray and electron interactions occurring within the scintillator. This information is then handled by optical transport routines in fastDETECT2. A load balancer dynamically allocates optical transport showers to the GPU and CPU computing cores. Our hybridMANTIS approach achieves a significant speed-up factor of 627 when compared to MANTIS and of 35 when compared to the same code running only in a CPU instead of a GPU. Using hybridMANTIS, we successfully hide hours of optical transport time by running it in parallel with the x-ray and electron transport, thus shifting the computational bottleneck from optical tox-ray transport. The new code requires much less memory than MANTIS and, asa result, allows us to efficiently simulate large area detectors.

  9. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System To Simulate Time-Analysis Quantities.

    2012-04-15

    Version: 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. The Monte Carlo simulation of correlation measurements that rely on the detection of fast neutrons and photons from fission requires that particle emissions and interactions following a fission event be described as close to reality as possible. The -PoliMi extension to MCNP and to MCNPX was developed to simulate correlated-particle and the subsequent interactions as close as possible to the physical behavior. Initially, MCNP-PoliMi, a modification of MCNP4C, wasmore » developed. The first version was developed in 2001-2002 and released in early 2004 to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). It was developed for research purposes, to simulate correlated counts in organic scintillation detectors, sensitive to fast neutrons and gamma rays. Originally, the field of application was nuclear safeguards; however subsequent improvements have enhanced the ability to model measurements in other research fields as well. During 2010-2011 the -PoliMi modification was ported into MCNPX-2.7.0, leading to the development of MCNPX-PoliMi. Now the -PoliMi v2.0 modifications are distributed as a patch to MCNPX-2.7.0 which currently is distributed in the RSICC PACKAGE BCC-004 MCNP6_BETA2/MCNP5/MCNPX. Also included in the package is MPPost, a versatile code that provides simulated detector response. By taking advantage of the modifications in MCNPX-PoliMi, MPPost can provide an accurate simulation of the detector response for a variety of detection scenarios.« less

  10. Multimodal nested sampling: an efficient and robust alternative to Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods for astronomical data analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feroz, F.; Hobson, M. P.

    2008-02-01

    In performing a Bayesian analysis of astronomical data, two difficult problems often emerge. First, in estimating the parameters of some model for the data, the resulting posterior distribution may be multimodal or exhibit pronounced (curving) degeneracies, which can cause problems for traditional Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. Secondly, in selecting between a set of competing models, calculation of the Bayesian evidence for each model is computationally expensive using existing methods such as thermodynamic integration. The nested sampling method introduced by Skilling, has greatly reduced the computational expense of calculating evidence and also produces posterior inferences as a by-product. This method has been applied successfully in cosmological applications by Mukherjee, Parkinson & Liddle, but their implementation was efficient only for unimodal distributions without pronounced degeneracies. Shaw, Bridges & Hobson recently introduced a clustered nested sampling method which is significantly more efficient in sampling from multimodal posteriors and also determines the expectation and variance of the final evidence from a single run of the algorithm, hence providing a further increase in efficiency. In this paper, we build on the work of Shaw et al. and present three new methods for sampling and evidence evaluation from distributions that may contain multiple modes and significant degeneracies in very high dimensions; we also present an even more efficient technique for estimating the uncertainty on the evaluated evidence. These methods lead to a further substantial improvement in sampling efficiency and robustness, and are applied to two toy problems to demonstrate the accuracy and economy of the evidence calculation and parameter estimation. Finally, we discuss the use of these methods in performing Bayesian object detection in astronomical data sets, and show that they significantly outperform existing MCMC techniques. An implementation

  11. Calculation of total counting efficiency of a NaI(Tl) detector by hybrid Monte-Carlo method for point and disk sources.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, S; Gurler, O; Kaynak, G; Gundogdu, O

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents results on the total gamma counting efficiency of a NaI(Tl) detector from point and disk sources. The directions of photons emitted from the source were determined by Monte-Carlo techniques and the photon path lengths in the detector were determined by analytic equations depending on photon directions. This is called the hybrid Monte-Carlo method where analytical expressions are incorporated into the Monte-Carlo simulations. A major advantage of this technique is the short computation time compared to other techniques on similar computational platforms. Another advantage is the flexibility for inputting detector-related parameters (such as source-detector distance, detector radius, source radius, detector linear attenuation coefficient) into the algorithm developed, thus making it an easy and flexible method to apply to other detector systems and configurations. The results of the total counting efficiency model put forward for point and disc sources were compared with the previous work reported in the literature.

  12. Post-DFT methods for Earth materials: Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of (Mg,Fe)O (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, K. P.; Militzer, B.; Cohen, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    (Mg,Fe)O is a major mineral phase in Earth's lower mantle that plays a key role in determining the structural and dynamical properties of deep Earth. A pressure-induced spin-pairing transition of Fe has been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies due to the consequential effects on lower mantle physics. The standard density functional theory (DFT) method does not treat strongly correlated electrons properly and results can have dependence on the choice of exchange-correlation functional. DFT+U, offers significant improvement over standard DFT for treating strongly correlated electrons. Indeed, DFT+U calculations and experiments have narrowed the ambient spin-transition between 40-60 GPa in (Mg,Fe)O. However, DFT+U, is not an ideal method due to dependence on Hubbard U parameter among other approximations. In order to further clarify details of the spin transition, it is necessary to use methods that explicitly treat effects of electron exchange and correlation, such as quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). Here, we will discuss methods of going beyond standard DFT and present QMC results on the (Mg,Fe)O elastic properties and spin-transition pressure in order to benchmark DFT+U results.

  13. Can You Repeat That Please?: Using Monte Carlo Simulation in Graduate Quantitative Research Methods Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carsey, Thomas M.; Harden, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Graduate students in political science come to the discipline interested in exploring important political questions, such as "What causes war?" or "What policies promote economic growth?" However, they typically do not arrive prepared to address those questions using quantitative methods. Graduate methods instructors must…

  14. An MLE method for finding LKB NTCP model parameters using Monte Carlo uncertainty estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolan, Martin; Oborn, Brad; Foo, Kerwyn; Haworth, Annette; Gulliford, Sarah; Ebert, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this work were to establish a program to fit NTCP models to clinical data with multiple toxicity endpoints, to test the method using a realistic test dataset, to compare three methods for estimating confidence intervals for the fitted parameters and to characterise the speed and performance of the program.

  15. New method to perform dosimetric quality control of treatment planning system using PENELOPE Monte Carlo and anatomical digital test objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhdech, Yassine; Beaumont, Stéphane; Guédon, Jean-Pierre; Torfeh, Tarraf

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we deepen the R&D program named DTO-DC (Digital Object Test and Dosimetric Console), which goal is to develop an efficient, accurate and full method to achieve dosimetric quality control (QC) of radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS). This method is mainly based on Digital Test Objects (DTOs) and on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using the PENELOPE code [1]. These benchmark simulations can advantageously replace experimental measures typically used as reference for comparison with TPS calculated dose. Indeed, the MC simulations rather than dosimetric measurements allow contemplating QC without tying treatment devices and offer in many situations (i.p. heterogeneous medium, lack of scattering volume...) better accuracy compared to dose measurements with classical dosimetry equipment of a radiation therapy department. Furthermore using MC simulations and DTOs, i.e. a totally numerical QC tools, will also simplify QC implementation, and enable process automation; this allows radiotherapy centers to have a more complete and thorough QC. The program DTO-DC was established primarily on ELEKTA accelerator (photons mode) using non-anatomical DTOs [2]. Today our aim is to complete and apply this program on VARIAN accelerator (photons and electrons mode) using anatomical DTOs. First, we developed, modeled and created three anatomical DTOs in DICOM format: 'Head and Neck', Thorax and Pelvis. We parallelized the PENELOPE code using MPI libraries to accelerate their calculation, we have modeled in PENELOPE geometry Clinac head of Varian Clinac 2100CD (photons mode). Then, to implement this method, we calculated the dose distributions in Pelvis DTO using PENELOPE and ECLIPSE TPS. Finally we compared simulated and calculated dose distributions employing the relative difference proposed by Venselaar [3]. The results of this work demonstrate the feasibility of this method that provides a more accurate and easily achievable QC. Nonetheless, this method, implemented

  16. Calculating dosimetry parameters in brachytherapy using the continuous beta spectrum of Sm-153 in the Monte Carlo simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Mohammad; Tavakoli-Anbaran, Hossien

    2015-02-01

    Calculation of dosimetry parameters by TG-60 approach for beta sources and TG-43 approach for gamma sources can help to design brachytherapy sources. In this work, TG-60 dosimetry parameters are calculated for the Sm-153 brachytherapy seed using the Monte Carlo simulation approach. The continuous beta spectrum of Sm-153 and probability density are applied to simulate the Sm-153 source. Sm-153 is produced by neutron capture during the 152Sm( n,)153Sm reaction in reactors. The Sm-153 radionuclide decays by beta rays followed by gamma-ray emissions with half-life of 1.928 days. Sm-153 source is simulated in a spherical water phantom to calculate the deposited energy and geometry function in the intended points. The Sm-153 seed consists of 20% samarium, 30% calcium and 50% silicon, in cylindrical shape with density 1.76gr/cm^3. The anisotropy function and radial dose function were calculated at 0-4mm radial distances relative to the seed center and polar angles of 0-90 degrees. The results of this research are compared with the results of Taghdiri et al. (Iran. J. Radiat. Res. 9, 103 (2011)). The final beta spectrum of Sm-153 is not considered in their work. Results show significant relative differences even up to 5 times for anisotropy functions at 0.6, 1 and 2mm distances and some angles. MCNP4C Monte Carlo code is applied in both in the present paper and in the above-mentioned one.

  17. Comparative Dosimetric Estimates of a 25 keV Electron Micro-beam with three Monte Carlo Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Mainardi, Enrico; Donahue, Richard J.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2002-09-11

    The calculations presented compare the different performances of the three Monte Carlo codes PENELOPE-1999, MCNP-4C and PITS, for the evaluation of Dose profiles from a 25 keV electron micro-beam traversing individual cells. The overall model of a cell is a water cylinder equivalent for the three codes but with a different internal scoring geometry: hollow cylinders for PENELOPE and MCNP, whereas spheres are used for the PITS code. A cylindrical cell geometry with scoring volumes with the shape of hollow cylinders was initially selected for PENELOPE and MCNP because of its superior simulation of the actual shape and dimensions of a cell and for its improved computer-time efficiency if compared to spherical internal volumes. Some of the transfer points and energy transfer that constitute a radiation track may actually fall in the space between spheres, that would be outside the spherical scoring volume. This internal geometry, along with the PENELOPE algorithm, drastically reduced the computer time when using this code if comparing with event-by-event Monte Carlo codes like PITS. This preliminary work has been important to address dosimetric estimates at low electron energies. It demonstrates that codes like PENELOPE can be used for Dose evaluation, even with such small geometries and energies involved, which are far below the normal use for which the code was created. Further work (initiated in Summer 2002) is still needed however, to create a user-code for PENELOPE that allows uniform comparison of exact cell geometries, integral volumes and also microdosimetric scoring quantities, a field where track-structure codes like PITS, written for this purpose, are believed to be superior.

  18. Monte Carlo Library Least Square (MCLLS) Method for Multiple Radioactive Particle Tracking in BPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijian; Lee, Kyoung; Gardner, Robin

    2010-03-01

    In This work, a new method of radioactive particles tracking is proposed. An accurate Detector Response Functions (DRF's) was developed from MCNP5 to generate library for NaI detectors with a significant speed-up factor of 200. This just make possible for the idea of MCLLS method which is used for locating and tracking the radioactive particle in a modular Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) by searching minimum Chi-square values. The method was tested to work pretty good in our lab condition with a six 2" X 2" NaI detectors array only. This method was introduced in both forward and inverse ways. A single radioactive particle tracking system with three collimated 2" X 2" NaI detectors is used for benchmark purpose.

  19. BOOTSTRAPPING AND MONTE CARLO METHODS OF POWER ANALYSIS USED TO ESTABLISH CONDITION CATEGORIES FOR BIOTIC INDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic indices have been used ot assess biological condition by dividing index scores into condition categories. Historically the number of categories has been based on professional judgement. Alternatively, statistical methods such as power analysis can be used to determine the ...

  20. Evolution of ensemble data assimilation for uncertainty quantification using the particle filter-Markov chain Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradkhani, Hamid; Dechant, Caleb M.; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2012-12-01

    Particle filters (PFs) have become popular for assimilation of a wide range of hydrologic variables in recent years. With this increased use, it has become necessary to increase the applicability of this technique for use in complex hydrologic/land surface models and to make these methods more viable for operational probabilistic prediction. To make the PF a more suitable option in these scenarios, it is necessary to improve the reliability of these techniques. Improved reliability in the PF is achieved in this work through an improved parameter search, with the use of variable variance multipliers and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. Application of these methods to the PF allows for greater search of the posterior distribution, leading to more complete characterization of the posterior distribution and reducing risk of sample impoverishment. This leads to a PF that is more efficient and provides more reliable predictions. This study introduces the theory behind the proposed algorithm, with application on a hydrologic model. Results from both real and synthetic studies suggest that the proposed filter significantly increases the effectiveness of the PF, with marginal increase in the computational demand for hydrologic prediction.

  1. Application of the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for snow water equivalent retrieval based on passive microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Durand, M. T.; Vanderjagt, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method is a retrieval algorithm based on Bayes' rule, which starts from an initial state of snow/soil parameters, and updates it to a series of new states by comparing the posterior probability of simulated snow microwave signals before and after each time of random walk. It is a realization of the Bayes' rule, which gives an approximation to the probability of the snow/soil parameters in condition of the measured microwave TB signals at different bands. Although this method could solve all snow parameters including depth, density, snow grain size and temperature at the same time, it still needs prior information of these parameters for posterior probability calculation. How the priors will influence the SWE retrieval is a big concern. Therefore, in this paper at first, a sensitivity test will be carried out to study how accurate the snow emission models and how explicit the snow priors need to be to maintain the SWE error within certain amount. The synthetic TB simulated from the measured snow properties plus a 2-K observation error will be used for this purpose. It aims to provide a guidance on the MCMC application under different circumstances. Later, the method will be used for the snowpits at different sites, including Sodankyla, Finland, Churchill, Canada and Colorado, USA, using the measured TB from ground-based radiometers at different bands. Based on the previous work, the error in these practical cases will be studied, and the error sources will be separated and quantified.

  2. Improved Monte Carlo method for ion transport in ion-molecule asymmetric systems at high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousfi, M.; Hennad, A.; Eichwald, O.

    1998-07-01

    An improved Monte Carlo method is developed for the simulation of the ion transport in classical drift tube in the case of ion-molecule asymmetric systems such as O-/O2 or N+/N2. The aim of this new method is to overcome the problem of incident ions which vanish at relative high electric field due to asymmetric charge transfer or electron detachment. These ion removal processes are compensated by a fictitious ion creation which improves the accuracy of the ion distribution function and swarm coefficient calculations. The classical ion-molecule collision processes occurring in weakly ionized gases at room temperature (elastic collisions including energy exchange and thermal motion of background gases and also inelastic collisions) are taken into account. This new method is then validated and the transport and reaction coefficients have been given for a large range of E/N (a part of them for the first time in the literature) in O-/O2 and N+/N2 systems.

  3. Monte Carlo-based fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction method accelerated by a cluster of graphic processing units.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guotao; Gong, Hui; Deng, Yong; Fu, Jianwei; Luo, Qingming

    2011-02-01

    High-speed fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) reconstruction for 3-D heterogeneous media is still one of the most challenging problems in diffusive optical fluorescence imaging. In this paper, we propose a fast FMT reconstruction method that is based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and accelerated by a cluster of graphics processing units (GPUs). Based on the Message Passing Interface standard, we modified the MC code for fast FMT reconstruction, and different Green's functions representing the flux distribution in media are calculated simultaneously by different GPUs in the cluster. A load-balancing method was also developed to increase the computational efficiency. By applying the Fréchet derivative, a Jacobian matrix is formed to reconstruct the distribution of the fluorochromes using the calculated Green's functions. Phantom experiments have shown that only 10 min are required to get reconstruction results with a cluster of 6 GPUs, rather than 6 h with a cluster of multiple dual opteron CPU nodes. Because of the advantages of high accuracy and suitability for 3-D heterogeneity media with refractive-index-unmatched boundaries from the MC simulation, the GPU cluster-accelerated method provides a reliable approach to high-speed reconstruction for FMT imaging.

  4. Combining Monte Carlo and mean-field-like methods for inference in hidden Markov random fields.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Florence; Fort, Gersende

    2007-03-01

    Issues involving missing data are typical settings where exact inference is not tractable as soon as nontrivial interactions occur between the missing variables. Approximations are required, and most of them are based either on simulation methods or on deterministic variational methods. While variational methods provide fast and reasonable approximate estimates in many scenarios, simulation methods offer more consideration of important theoretical issues such as accuracy of the approximation and convergence of the algorithms but at a much higher computational cost. In this work, we propose a new class of algorithms that combine the main features and advantages of both simulation and deterministic methods and consider applications to inference in hidden Markov random fields (HMRFs). These algorithms can be viewed as stochastic perturbations of variational expectation maximization (VEM) algorithms, which are not tractable for HMRF. We focus more specifically on one of these perturbations and we prove their (almost sure) convergence to the same limit set as the limit set of VEM. In addition, experiments on synthetic and real-world images show that the algorithm performance is very close and sometimes better than that of other existing simulation-based and variational EM-like algorithms.

  5. High-density dental implants and radiotherapy planning: evaluation of effects on dose distribution using pencil beam convolution algorithm and Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Çatli, Serap

    2015-09-08

    High atomic number and density of dental implants leads to major problems at providing an accurate dose distribution in radiotherapy and contouring tumors and organs caused by the artifact in head and neck tumors. The limits and deficiencies of the algorithms using in the treatment planning systems can lead to large errors in dose calculation, and this may adversely affect the patient's treatment. In the present study, four commercial dental implants were used: pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), amalgam, and crown. The effects of dental implants on dose distribution are determined with two methods: pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm and Monte Carlo code for 6 MV photon beam. The central axis depth doses were calculated on the phantom for a source-skin distance (SSD) of 100 cm and a 10 × 10 cm2 field using both of algorithms. The results of Monte Carlo method and Eclipse TPS were compared to each other and to those previously reported. In the present study, dose increases in tissue at a distance of 2 mm in front of the dental implants were seen due to the backscatter of electrons for dental implants at 6 MV using the Monte Carlo method. The Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) couldn't precisely account for the backscatter radiation caused by the dental prostheses. TPS underestimated the back scatter dose and overestimated the dose after the dental implants. The large errors found for TPS in this study are due to the limits and deficiencies of the algorithms. The accuracy of the PBC algorithm of Eclipse TPS was evaluated in comparison to Monte Carlo calculations in consideration of the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 65. From the comparisons of the TPS and Monte Carlo calculations, it is verified that the Monte Carlo simulation is a good approach to derive the dose distribution in heterogeneous media.

  6. A method to generate equivalent energy spectra and filtration models based on measurement for multidetector CT Monte Carlo dosimetry simulations.

    PubMed

    Turner, Adam C; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Chris H; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D; Stevens, Donna M; Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a method for generating x-ray source models for performing Monte Carlo (MC) radiation dosimetry simulations of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. These so-called "equivalent" source models consist of an energy spectrum and filtration description that are generated based wholly on the measured values and can be used in place of proprietary manufacturer's data for scanner-specific MDCT MC simulations. Required measurements include the half value layers (HVL1 and HVL2) and the bowtie profile (exposure values across the fan beam) for the MDCT scanner of interest. Using these measured values, a method was described (a) to numerically construct a spectrum with the calculated HVLs approximately equal to those measured (equivalent spectrum) and then (b) to determine a filtration scheme (equivalent filter) that attenuates the equivalent spectrum in a similar fashion as the actual filtration attenuates the actual x-ray beam, as measured by the bowtie profile measurements. Using this method, two types of equivalent source models were generated: One using a spectrum based on both HVL1 and HVL2 measurements and its corresponding filtration scheme and the second consisting of a spectrum based only on the measured HVL1 and its corresponding filtration scheme. Finally, a third type of source model was built based on the spectrum and filtration data provided by the scanner's manufacturer. MC simulations using each of these three source model types were evaluated by comparing the accuracy of multiple CT dose index (CTDI) simulations to measured CTDI values for 64-slice scanners from the four major MDCT manufacturers. Comprehensive evaluations were carried out for each scanner using each kVp and bowtie filter combination available. CTDI experiments were performed for both head (16 cm in diameter) and body (32 cm in diameter) CTDI phantoms using both central and peripheral measurement positions. Both equivalent source model types result in

  7. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrossan, Michael N.

    2016-08-01

    The 'Restricted Collision List' (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke-Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  8. A New Monte Carlo Filtering Method for the Diagnosis of Mission-Critical Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, Gregory; Menzies, Tim; Davies, Misty; Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Testing large-scale systems is expensive in terms of both time and money. Running simulations early in the process is a proven method of finding the design faults likely to lead to critical system failures, but determining the exact cause of those errors is still time-consuming and requires access to a limited number of domain experts. It is desirable to find an automated method that explores the large number of combinations and is able to isolate likely fault points. Treatment learning is a subset of minimal contrast-set learning that, rather than classifying data into distinct categories, focuses on finding the unique factors that lead to a particular classification. That is, they find the smallest change to the data that causes the largest change in the class distribution. These treatments, when imposed, are able to identify the settings most likely to cause a mission-critical failure. This research benchmarks two treatment learning methods against standard optimization techniques across three complex systems, including two projects from the Robust Software Engineering (RSE) group within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center. It is shown that these treatment learners are both faster than traditional methods and show demonstrably better results.

  9. Phase space modulation method for EPID-based Monte Carlo dosimetry of IMRT and RapidArc plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Avery; Townson, Reid; Bush, Karl; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2010-11-01

    Quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT require 3D evaluation of the dose distributions from the treatment planning system as compared to the distributions reconstructed from signals acquired during the plan delivery. This study presents the results of the dose reconstruction based on a novel method of Monte Carlo (MC) phase space modulation. Typically, in MC dose calculations the linear accelerator (linac) is modelled for each field in the plan and a phase space file (PSF) containing all relevant particle information is written for each field. Particles from the PSFs are then used in the dose calculation. This study investigates a method of omitting the modelling of the linac in cases where the treatment has been measured by an electronic portal imaging device. In this method each portal image is deconvolved using an empirically fit scatter kernel to obtain the primary photon fluence. The Phase Space Modulation (PSM) method consists of simulating the linac just once to create a large PSF for an open field and then modulating it using the delivered primary particle fluence. Reconstructed dose distributions in phantoms were produced using MC and the modulated PSFs. The kernel derived for this method accurately reproduced the dose distributions for 3×3, 10×10, and 15×15 cm2 field sizes (mean relative dose-difference along the beam central axis is under 1%). The method has been applied to IMRT pre-treatment verification of 10 patients (including one RapidArcTM case), mean dose in the structures of interest agreed with that calculated by MC directly within 1%, and 95% of the voxels passed 2%/2mm criteria.

  10. An automated Monte-Carlo based method for the calculation of cascade summing factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. J.; Britton, R.; Davies, A. V.; McLarty, J. L.; Goodwin, M.

    2016-10-01

    A versatile method has been developed to calculate cascade summing factors for use in quantitative gamma-spectrometry analysis procedures. The proposed method is based solely on Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) nuclear data, an X-ray energy library, and accurate efficiency characterisations for single detector counting geometries. The algorithm, which accounts for γ-γ, γ-X, γ-511 and γ-e- coincidences, can be applied to any design of gamma spectrometer and can be expanded to incorporate any number of nuclides. Efficiency characterisations can be derived from measured or mathematically modelled functions, and can accommodate both point and volumetric source types. The calculated results are shown to be consistent with an industry standard gamma-spectrometry software package. Additional benefits including calculation of cascade summing factors for all gamma and X-ray emissions, not just the major emission lines, are also highlighted.

  11. 3D Continuum Radiative Transfer. An adaptive grid construction algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccolini, G.; Alcolea, J.

    Solving the radiative transfer problem is a common problematic to may fields in astrophysics. With the increasing angular resolution of spatial or ground-based telescopes (VLTI, HST) but also with the next decade instruments (NGST, ALMA, ...), astrophysical objects reveal and will certainly reveal complex spatial structures. Consequently, it is necessary to develop numerical tools being able to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions in order to model and interpret these observations. I present a 3D radiative transfer program, using a new method for the construction of an adaptive spatial grid, based on the Monte Claro method. With the help of this tools, one can solve the continuum radiative transfer problem (e.g. a dusty medium), computes the temperature structure of the considered medium and obtain the flux of the object (SED and images).

  12. Monte Carlo-based diffusion tensor tractography with a geometrically corrected voxel-centre connecting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodammer, N. C.; Kaufmann, J.; Kanowski, M.; Tempelmann, C.

    2009-02-01

    Diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) allows one to explore axonal connectivity patterns in neuronal tissue by linking local predominant diffusion directions determined by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The majority of existing tractography approaches use continuous coordinates for calculating single trajectories through the diffusion tensor field. The tractography algorithm we propose is characterized by (1) a trajectory propagation rule that uses voxel centres as vertices and (2) orientation probabilities for the calculated steps in a trajectory that are obtained from the diffusion tensors of either two or three voxels. These voxels include the last voxel of each previous step and one or two candidate successor voxels. The precision and the accuracy of the suggested method are explored with synthetic data. Results clearly favour probabilities based on two consecutive successor voxels. Evidence is also provided that in any voxel-centre-based tractography approach, there is a need for a probability correction that takes into account the geometry of the acquisition grid. Finally, we provide examples in which the proposed fibre-tracking method is applied to the human optical radiation, the cortico-spinal tracts and to connections between Broca's and Wernicke's area to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method on measured data.

  13. Simple Monte Carlo methods to estimate the spectra evaluation error in differential-optical-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, M; Brandenburger, U; Brauers, T; Dorn, H P

    1999-01-20

    Differential-optical-absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) permits the sensitive measurement of concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere. DOAS is a technique of well-defined accuracy; however, the calculation of a statistically sound measurement precision is still an unsolved problem. Usually one evaluates DOAS spectra by performing least-squares fits of reference absorption spectra to the measured atmospheric absorption spectra. Inasmuch as the absorbance from atmospheric trace gases is usually very weak, with optical densities in the range from 10(-5) to 10(-3), interference caused by the occurrence of nonreproducible spectral artifacts often determines the detection limit and the measurement precision. These spectral artifacts bias the least-squares fitting result in two respects. First, spectral artifacts to some extent are falsely interpreted as real absorption, and second, spectral artifacts add nonstatistical noise to spectral residuals, which results in a significant misestimation of the least-squares fitting error. We introduce two new approaches to investigate the evaluation errors of DOAS spectra accurately. The first method, residual inspection by cyclic displacement, estimates the effect of false interpretation of the artifact structures. The second method applies a statistical bootstrap algorithm to estimate properly the error of fitting, even in cases when the condition of random and independent scatter of the residual signal is not fulfilled. Evaluation of simulated atmospheric measurement spectra shows that a combination of the results of both methods yields a good estimate of the spectra evaluation error to within an uncertainty of ~10%.

  14. Accurate determination of the Gibbs energy of Cu-Zr melts using the thermodynamic integration method in Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.-P.; Gheribi, A. E.; Chartrand, P.

    2011-08-01

    The design of multicomponent alloys used in different applications based on specific thermo-physical properties determined experimentally or predicted from theoretical calculations is of major importance in many engineering applications. A procedure based on Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) and the thermodynamic integration (TI) method to improve the quality of the predicted thermodynamic properties calculated from classical thermodynamic calculations is presented in this study. The Gibbs energy function of the liquid phase of the Cu-Zr system at 1800 K has been determined based on this approach. The internal structure of Cu-Zr melts and amorphous alloys at different temperatures, as well as other physical properties were also obtained from MCS in which the phase trajectory was modeled by the modified embedded atom model formalism. A rigorous comparison between available experimental data and simulated thermo-physical properties obtained from our MCS is presented in this work. The modified quasichemical model in the pair approximation was parameterized using the internal structure data obtained from our MCS and the precise Gibbs energy function calculated at 1800 K from the TI method. The predicted activity of copper in Cu-Zr melts at 1499 K obtained from our thermodynamic optimization was corroborated by experimental data found in the literature. The validity of the amplitude of the entropy of mixing obtained from the in silico procedure presented in this work was analyzed based on the thermodynamic description of hard sphere mixtures.

  15. Research on the microstructure and transmission characteristics of magnetic fluids film based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ri-qing; Zhao, Yong; Xu, Ning; Li, Hao

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic fluid is a new popular functional material, which is a new kind of stable colloid. The optical properties of the magnetic fluids have been studied widely by experiments. The theoretical research, however, on the microstructure and transmission characteristics of magnetic fluids is still ongoing. In this paper the Monte Carlo method was adopted to construct the model of the magnetic fluid and to simulate the microstructure and the transmission of the magnetic fluids film. The experimental setup to record the microstructure of the magnetic fluid was especially designed with a water-cooling system, which could ensure that the environmental temperature would not vary when the magnetic field was applied. Theoretical simulations and experiments of the magnetic fluid films with thicknesses of 8 μm and 10 μm under an external magnetic field of different strength were carried out. The experimental results indicated that the proposed method in this paper was feasible and could be well used in the study for optical properties of the magnetic fluids.

  16. Mesh-based Monte Carlo method for fibre-optic optogenetic neural stimulation with direct photon flux recording strategy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Younghoon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2016-03-21

    We propose a Monte Carlo (MC) method based on a direct photon flux recording strategy using inhomogeneous, meshed rodent brain atlas. This MC method was inspired by and dedicated to fibre-optics-based optogenetic neural stimulations, thus providing an accurate and direct solution for light intensity distributions in brain regions with different optical properties. Our model was used to estimate the 3D light intensity attenuation for close proximity between an implanted optical fibre source and neural target area for typical optogenetics applications. Interestingly, there are discrepancies with studies using a diffusion-based light intensity prediction model, perhaps due to use of improper light scattering models developed for far-field problems. Our solution was validated by comparison with the gold-standard MC model, and it enabled accurate calculations of internal intensity distributions in an inhomogeneous near light source domain. Thus our strategy can be applied to studying how illuminated light spreads through an inhomogeneous brain area, or for determining the amount of light required for optogenetic manipulation of a specific neural target area. PMID:26914289

  17. Combining Monte Carlo methods with coherent wave optics for the simulation of phase-sensitive X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Silvia; Modregger, Peter; Fix, Michael K.; Volken, Werner; Frei, Daniel; Manser, Peter; Stampanoni, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Phase-sensitive X-ray imaging shows a high sensitivity towards electron density variations, making it well suited for imaging of soft tissue matter. However, there are still open questions about the details of the image formation process. Here, a framework for numerical simulations of phase-sensitive X-ray imaging is presented, which takes both particle- and wave-like properties of X-rays into consideration. A split approach is presented where we combine a Monte Carlo method (MC) based sample part with a wave optics simulation based propagation part, leading to a framework that takes both particle- and wave-like properties into account. The framework can be adapted to different phase-sensitive imaging methods and has been validated through comparisons with experiments for grating interferometry and propagation-based imaging. The validation of the framework shows that the combination of wave optics and MC has been successfully implemented and yields good agreement between measurements and simulations. This demonstrates that the physical processes relevant for developing a deeper understanding of scattering in the context of phase-sensitive imaging are modelled in a sufficiently accurate manner. The framework can be used for the simulation of phase-sensitive X-ray imaging, for instance for the simulation of grating interferometry or propagation-based imaging. PMID:24763652

  18. Quantum critical point of Dirac fermions studied using efficient continuous-time projector quantum Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Iazzi, Mauro; Corboz, Philippe; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Quantum phase transition (QPT) of Dirac fermions is a fascinating topic both in condensed matter and in high energy physics. Besides its immediate connection to fundamental problems like mass generation and exotic phases of matter, it provides a common playground where state of the art numerical simulations can be crosschecked with various effective field theory predictions, thus deepen our understanding of both fields. The universality class of the QPT is fundamentally different from the usual bosonic field theory because of the coupling to the gapless fermionic mode at the critical point. We study lattice models with spinless and multi-flavor Dirac fermions using the newly developed efficient continuous-time projector quantum Monte Carlo method. Besides eliminating the Trotter error, the method also enables us to directly calculate derivative observables in a continuous range of interaction strengths, thus greatly enhancing the resolution of the quantum critical region. Compatible results are also obtained from infinite projected entangled-pair states calculations. We compare these numerical results with predictions of the Gross-Neveu theory and discuss their physical implications.

  19. Assessment of physician and patient (child and adult) equivalent doses during renal angiography by Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Karimian, A; Nikparvar, B; Jabbari, I

    2014-11-01

    Renal angiography is one of the medical imaging methods in which patient and physician receive high equivalent doses due to long duration of fluoroscopy. In this research, equivalent doses of some radiosensitive tissues of patient (adult and child) and physician during renal angiography have been calculated by using adult and child Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantoms and Monte Carlo method (MCNPX). The results showed, in angiography of right kidney in a child and adult patient, that gall bladder with the amounts of 2.32 and 0.35 mSv, respectively, has received the most equivalent dose. About the physician, left hand, left eye and thymus absorbed the most amounts of doses, means 0.020 mSv. In addition, equivalent doses of the physician's lens eye, thyroid and knees were 0.023, 0.007 and 7.9E-4 mSv, respectively. Although these values are less than the reported thresholds by ICRP 103, it should be noted that these amounts are related to one examination. PMID:25063788

  20. Employing a Monte Carlo algorithm in Newton-type methods for restricted maximum likelihood estimation of genetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Matilainen, Kaarina; Mäntysaari, Esa A; Lidauer, Martin H; Strandén, Ismo; Thompson, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of variance components by Monte Carlo (MC) expectation maximization (EM) restricted maximum likelihood (REML) is computationally efficient for large data sets and complex linear mixed effects models. However, efficiency may be lost due to the need for a large number of iterations of the EM algorithm. To decrease the computing time we explored the use of faster converging Newton-type algorithms within MC REML implementations. The implemented algorithms were: MC Newton-Raphson (NR), where the information matrix was generated via sampling; MC average information(AI), where the information was computed as an average of observed and expected information; and MC Broyden's method, where the zero of the gradient was searched using a quasi-Newton-type algorithm. Performance of these algorithms was evaluated using simulated data. The final estimates were in good agreement with corresponding analytical ones. MC NR REML and MC AI REML enhanced convergence compared to MC EM REML and gave standard errors for the estimates as a by-product. MC NR REML required a larger number of MC samples, while each MC AI REML iteration demanded extra solving of mixed model equations by the number of parameters to be estimated. MC Broyden's method required the largest number of MC samples with our small data and did not give standard errors for the parameters directly. We studied the performance of three different convergence criteria for the MC AI REML algorithm. Our results indicate the importance of defining a suitable convergence criterion and critical value in order to obtain an efficient Newton-type method utilizing a MC algorithm. Overall, use of a MC algorithm with Newton-type methods proved feasible and the results encourage testing of these methods with different kinds of large-scale problem settings.

  1. Application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method to Mantle Melting: An Example from REE Abundances in Abyssal Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, B.; Liang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation is a powerful statistical method in solving inverse problems that arise from a wide range of applications, such as nuclear physics, computational biology, financial engineering, among others. In Earth sciences applications of MCMC are primarily in the field of geophysics [1]. The purpose of this study is to introduce MCMC to geochemical inverse problems related to trace element fractionation during concurrent melting, melt transport and melt-rock reaction in the mantle. MCMC method has several advantages over linearized least squares methods in inverting trace element patterns in basalts and mantle rocks. First, MCMC can handle equations that have no explicit analytical solutions which are required by linearized least squares methods for gradient calculation. Second, MCMC converges to global minimum while linearized least squares methods may be stuck at a local minimum or converge slowly due to nonlinearity. Furthermore, MCMC can provide insight into uncertainties of model parameters with non-normal trade-off. We use MCMC to invert for extent of melting, amount of trapped melt, and extent of chemical disequilibrium between the melt and residual solid from REE data in abyssal peridotites from Central Indian Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In the first step, we conduct forward calculation of REE evolution with melting models in a reasonable model space. We then build up a chain of melting models according to Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to represent the probability of specific model. We show that chemical disequilibrium is likely to play an important role in fractionating LREE in residual peridotites. In the future, MCMC will be applied to more realistic but also more complicated melting models in which partition coefficients, diffusion coefficients, as well as melting and melt suction rates vary as functions of temperature, pressure and mineral compositions. [1]. Sambridge & Mosegarrd [2002] Rev. Geophys.

  2. Computing physical properties with quantum Monte Carlo methods with statistical fluctuations independent of system size.

    PubMed

    Assaraf, Roland

    2014-12-01

    We show that the recently proposed correlated sampling without reweighting procedure extends the locality (asymptotic independence of the system size) of a physical property to the statistical fluctuations of its estimator. This makes the approach potentially vastly more efficient for computing space-localized properties in large systems compared with standard correlated methods. A proof is given for a large collection of noninteracting fragments. Calculations on hydrogen chains suggest that this behavior holds not only for systems displaying short-range correlations, but also for systems with long-range correlations.

  3. Monte Carlo Simulation Methods for Computing Liquid-Vapor Saturation Properties of Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Rane, Kaustubh S; Murali, Sabharish; Errington, Jeffrey R

    2013-06-11

    We discuss molecular simulation methods for computing the phase coexistence properties of complex molecules. The strategies that we pursue are histogram-based approaches in which thermodynamic properties are related to relevant probability distributions. We first outline grand canonical and isothermal-isobaric methods for directly locating a saturation point at a given temperature. In the former case, we show how reservoir and growth expanded ensemble techniques can be used to facilitate the creation and insertion of complex molecules within a grand canonical simulation. We next focus on grand canonical and isothermal-isobaric temperature expanded ensemble techniques that provide a means to trace saturation lines over a wide range of temperatures. To demonstrate the utility of the strategies introduced here, we present phase coexistence data for a series of molecules, including n-octane, cyclohexane, water, 1-propanol, squalane, and pyrene. Overall, we find the direct grand canonical approach to be the most effective means to directly locate a coexistence point at a given temperature and the isothermal-isobaric temperature expanded ensemble scheme to provide the most effective means to follow a saturation curve to low temperature.

  4. Using the Monte Carlo Coupling Technique to Evaluate the Shielding Ability of a Modular Shielding House to Accommodate Spent-Fuel Transportable Storage Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Kohtaro; Kawakami, Kazuo; Shimizu, Daisuke

    2003-02-15

    The Monte Carlo coupling technique with the coordinate transformation is used to evaluate the shielding ability of a modular shielding house that accommodates four spent-fuel transportable storage casks for two units. The effective dose rate distributions can be obtained as far as 300 m from the center of the shielding house. The coupling technique is created with the Surface Source Write (SSW) card and the Surface Source Read/Coordinate Transformation (SSR/CRT) card in the MCNP 4C continuous energy Monte Carlo code as the 'SSW-SSR/CRT calculation system'. In the present Monte Carlo coupling calculation, the total effective dose rates 100, 200, and 300 m from the center of the shielding house are estimated to be 1.69, 0.285, and 0.0826 ({mu}Sv/yr per four casks), respectively. Accordingly, if the distance between the center of the shielding house and the site boundary of the storage facility is kept at >300 m, approximately 2400 casks are able to be accommodated in the modular shielding houses, under the Japanese severe criterion of 50 {mu}Sv/yr at the site boundary. The shielding house alone satisfies not only the technical conditions but also the economic requirements.It became evident that secondary gamma rays account for >60% of the effective total dose rate at all the calculated points around the shielding house, most of which are produced from the water in the steel-water-steel shielding system of the shielding house. The remainder of the dose rate comes mostly from neutrons; the fission product and {sup 60}Co activation gamma rays account for small percentages. Accordingly, reducing the secondary gamma rays is critical to improving not only the shielding ability but also the radiation safety of the shielding house.

  5. A hybrid multigroup/continuous-energy Monte Carlo method for solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.E.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Kensek, R.P.; Halbleib, J.A.; Sloan, D.P.

    1996-11-01

    A hybrid multigroup/continuous-energy Monte Carlo algorithm is developed for solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation. This algorithm differs significantly from previous charged-particle Monte Carlo algorithms. Most importantly, it can be used to perform both forward and adjoint transport calculations, using the same basic multigroup cross-section data. The new algorithm is fully described, computationally tested, and compared with a standard condensed history algorithm for coupled electron-photon transport calculations.

  6. Impulse response solution to the three-dimensional vector radiative transfer equation in atmosphere-ocean systems. I. Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng-Wang; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2008-03-10

    We have developed a powerful 3D Monte Carlo code, as part of the Radiance in a Dynamic Ocean (RaDyO) project, which can compute the complete effective Mueller matrix at any detector position in a completely inhomogeneous turbid medium, in particular, a coupled atmosphere-ocean system. The light source can be either passive or active. If the light source is a beam of light, the effective Mueller matrix can be viewed as the complete impulse response Green matrix for the turbid medium. The impulse response Green matrix gives us an insightful way to see how each region of a turbid medium affects every other region. The present code is validated with the multicomponent approach for a plane-parallel system and the spherical harmonic discrete ordinate method for the 3D scalar radiative transfer system. Furthermore, the impulse response relation for a box-type cloud model is studied. This 3D Monte Carlo code will be used to generate impulse response Green matrices for the atmosphere and ocean, which act as inputs to a hybrid matrix operator-Monte Carlo method. The hybrid matrix operator-Monte Carlo method will be presented in part II of this paper.

  7. A practical cone-beam CT scatter correction method with optimized Monte Carlo simulations for image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuan; Bai, Ti; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Pompos, Arnold; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-05-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has become the standard image guidance tool for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy. However, due to its large illumination field, scattered photons severely degrade its image quality. While kernel-based scatter correction methods have been used routinely in the clinic, it is still desirable to develop Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based methods due to their accuracy. However, the high computational burden of the MC method has prevented routine clinical application. This paper reports our recent development of a practical method of MC-based scatter estimation and removal for CBCT. In contrast with conventional MC approaches that estimate scatter signals using a scatter-contaminated CBCT image, our method used a planning CT image for MC simulation, which has the advantages of accurate image intensity and absence of image truncation. In our method, the planning CT was first rigidly registered with the CBCT. Scatter signals were then estimated via MC simulation. After scatter signals were removed from the raw CBCT projections, a corrected CBCT image was reconstructed. The entire workflow was implemented on a GPU platform for high computational efficiency. Strategies such as projection denoising, CT image downsampling, and interpolation along the angular direction were employed to further enhance the calculation speed. We studied the impact of key parameters in the workflow on the resulting accuracy and efficiency, based on which the optimal parameter values were determined. Our method was evaluated in numerical simulation, phantom, and real patient cases. In the simulation cases, our method reduced mean HU errors from 44 to 3 HU and from 78 to 9 HU in the full-fan and the half-fan cases, respectively. In both the phantom and the patient cases, image artifacts caused by scatter, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area, were reduced. With all the techniques employed, we achieved computation time of less than 30 s including the

  8. Study of Phase Equilibria of Petrochemical Fluids using Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Shyamal

    2001-03-01

    Knowledge of phase behavior of hydrocarbons and related compounds are highly of interest to chemical and petrochemical industries. For example, design of processes such as supercritical fluid extraction, petroleum refining, enhanced oil recovery, gas treatment, and fractionation of wax products. A precise knowledge of the phase equilibria of alkanes, alkenes and related compounds and their mixtures are required for efficient design of these processes. Experimental studies to understand the related phase equilibria often become unsuitable for various reasons. With the advancement of simulation technology, molecular simulations could provide a useful complement and alternative in the study and description of phase behavior of these systems. In this work we study vapor-liquid phase equilibria of pure hydrocarbons and their mixtures using Gibbs ensemble simulation. Insertion of long and articulated chain molecules are facilitated in our simulations by means of configurational bias and expanded ensemble methods. We use the newly developed NERD force field in our simulation. In this work NERD force field is extended to provide coverage for hydrocarbons with any arbitrary architecture. Our simulation results provide excellent quantitative agreement with available experimental phase equilibria data for both the pure components and mixtures.

  9. Percolation of the site random-cluster model by Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songsong; Zhang, Wanzhou; Ding, Chengxiang

    2015-08-01

    We propose a site random-cluster model by introducing an additional cluster weight in the partition function of the traditional site percolation. To simulate the model on a square lattice, we combine the color-assignation and the Swendsen-Wang methods to design a highly efficient cluster algorithm with a small critical slowing-down phenomenon. To verify whether or not it is consistent with the bond random-cluster model, we measure several quantities, such as the wrapping probability Re, the percolating cluster density P∞, and the magnetic susceptibility per site χp, as well as two exponents, such as the thermal exponent yt and the fractal dimension yh of the percolating cluster. We find that for different exponents of cluster weight q =1.5 , 2, 2.5 , 3, 3.5 , and 4, the numerical estimation of the exponents yt and yh are consistent with the theoretical values. The universalities of the site random-cluster model and the bond random-cluster model are completely identical. For larger values of q , we find obvious signatures of the first-order percolation transition by the histograms and the hysteresis loops of percolating cluster density and the energy per site. Our results are helpful for the understanding of the percolation of traditional statistical models.

  10. Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Kramer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrated purchasing patterns of plug-in vehicles may result in localized distribution transformer overload scenarios. Prolonged periods of transformer overloading causes service life decrements, and in worst-case scenarios, results in tripped thermal relays and residential service outages. This analysis will review distribution transformer load models developed in the IEC 60076 standard, and apply the model to a neighborhood with plug-in hybrids. Residential distribution transformers are sized such that night-time cooling provides thermal recovery from heavy load conditions during the daytime utility peak. It is expected that PHEVs will primarily be charged at night in a residential setting. If not managed properly, some distribution transformers could become overloaded, leading to a reduction in transformer life expectancy, thus increasing costs to utilities and consumers. A Monte-Carlo scheme simulated each day of the year, evaluating 100 load scenarios as it swept through the following variables: number of vehicle per transformer, transformer size, and charging rate. A general method for determining expected transformer aging rate will be developed, based on the energy needs of plug-in vehicles loading a residential transformer.

  11. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods

    DOE PAGES

    Ganesh, P.; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-03

    In highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Moreover, the highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based onmore » point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. Our results demonstrate that the lithium carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches.« less

  12. No-core Monte Carlo shell model calculations with unitary correlation operator method and similarity renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lang

    2015-05-01

    The unitary correlation operator method (UCOM) and the similarity renormalization group theory (SRG) are compared and discussed in the framework of the no-core Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM) calculations for 3H and 4He. The treatment of spurious center-of-mass motion by Lawson's prescription is performed in the MCSM calculations. These results with both transformed interactions show good suppression of spurious center-of-mass motion with proper Lawson's prescription parameter βc.m. values. The UCOM potentials obtain faster convergence of total energy for the ground state than that of SRG potentials in the MCSM calculations, which differs from the cases in the no-core shell model calculations (NCSM). These differences are discussed and analyzed in terms of the truncation scheme in the MCSM and NCSM, as well as the properties of the potentials of SRG and UCOM. Supported by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (JUSRP1035), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305077)

  13. Study on formation of step bunching on 6H-SiC (0001) surface by kinetic Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Chen, Xuejiang; Su, Juan

    2016-05-01

    The formation and evolution of step bunching during step-flow growth of 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces were studied by three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method and compared with the analytic model based on the theory of Burton-Cabera-Frank (BCF). In the KMC model the crystal lattice was represented by a structured mesh which fixed the position of atoms and interatomic bonding. The events considered in the model were adatoms adsorption and diffusion on the terrace, and adatoms attachment, detachment and interlayer transport at the step edges. In addition, effects of Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barriers at downward step edges and incorporation barriers at upwards step edges were also considered. In order to obtain more elaborate information for the behavior of atoms in the crystal surface, silicon and carbon atoms were treated as the minimal diffusing species. KMC simulation results showed that multiple-height steps were formed on the vicinal surface oriented toward [ 1 1 bar 00 ] or [ 11 2 bar 0 ] directions. And then the formation mechanism of the step bunching was analyzed. Finally, to further analyze the formation processes of step bunching, a one-dimensional BCF analytic model with ES and incorporation barriers was used, and then it was solved numerically. In the BCF model, the periodic boundary conditions (PBC) were applied, and the parameters were corresponded to those used in the KMC model. The evolution character of step bunching was consistent with the results obtained by KMC simulation.

  14. Visualisation of structural inhomogeneities in strongly scattering media using the method of spatially-resolved reflectometry: Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, A V; Priezzhev, A V; Myllylae, Risto A

    2011-06-30

    Two-dimensional spatial intensity distributions of diffuse scattering of near-infrared laser radiation from a strongly scattering medium, whose optical properties are close to those of skin, are obtained using Monte Carlo simulation. The medium contains a cylindrical inhomogeneity with the optical properties, close to those of blood. It is shown that stronger absorption and scattering of light by blood compared to the surrounding medium leads to the fact that the intensity of radiation diffusely reflected from the surface of the medium under study and registered at its surface has a local minimum directly above the cylindrical inhomogeneity. This specific feature makes the method of spatially-resolved reflectometry potentially applicable for imaging blood vessels and determining their sizes. It is also shown that blurring of the vessel image increases almost linearly with increasing vessel embedment depth. This relation may be used to determine the depth of embedment provided that the optical properties of the scattering media are known. The optimal position of the sources and detectors of radiation, providing the best imaging of the vessel under study, is determined. (biophotonics)

  15. MO-E-18C-02: Hands-On Monte Carlo Project Assignment as a Method to Teach Radiation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pater, P; Vallieres, M; Seuntjens, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a hands-on project on Monte Carlo methods (MC) recently added to the curriculum and to discuss the students' appreciation. Methods: Since 2012, a 1.5 hour lecture dedicated to MC fundamentals follows the detailed presentation of photon and electron interactions. Students also program all sampling steps (interaction length and type, scattering angle, energy deposit) of a MC photon transport code. A handout structured in a step-by-step fashion guides student in conducting consistency checks. For extra points, students can code a fully working MC simulation, that simulates a dose distribution for 50 keV photons. A kerma approximation to dose deposition is assumed. A survey was conducted to which 10 out of the 14 attending students responded. It compared MC knowledge prior to and after the project, questioned the usefulness of radiation physics teaching through MC and surveyed possible project improvements. Results: According to the survey, 76% of students had no or a basic knowledge of MC methods before the class and 65% estimate to have a good to very good understanding of MC methods after attending the class. 80% of students feel that the MC project helped them significantly to understand simulations of dose distributions. On average, students dedicated 12.5 hours to the project and appreciated the balance between hand-holding and questions/implications. Conclusion: A lecture on MC methods with a hands-on MC programming project requiring about 14 hours was added to the graduate study curriculum since 2012. MC methods produce “gold standard” dose distributions and slowly enter routine clinical work and a fundamental understanding of MC methods should be a requirement for future students. Overall, the lecture and project helped students relate crosssections to dose depositions and presented numerical sampling methods behind the simulation of these dose distributions. Research funding from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP acknowledges

  16. Modeling the propagation of light in realistic tissue structures with MMC-fpf: a meshed Monte Carlo method with free phase function.

    PubMed

    Watté, Rodrigo; Aernouts, Ben; Van Beers, Robbe; Herremans, Els; Ho, Quang Tri; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolaï, Bart; Saeys, Wouter

    2015-06-29

    Monte Carlo methods commonly used in tissue optics are limited to a layered tissue geometry and thus provide only a very rough approximation for many complex media such as biological structures. To overcome these limitations, a Meshed Monte Carlo method with flexible phase function choice (fpf-MC) has been developed to function in a mesh. This algorithm can model the light propagation in any complexly shaped structure, by attributing optical properties to the different mesh elements. Furthermore, this code allows the use of different discretized phase functions for each tissue type, which can be simulated from the microstructural properties of the tissue, in combination with a tool for simulating the bulk optical properties of polydisperse suspensions. As a result, the scattering properties of tissues can be estimated from information on the microstructural properties of the tissue. This is important for the estimation of the bulk optical properties that can be used for the light propagation model, since many types of tissue have never been characterized in literature. The combination of these contributions, made it possible to use the MMC-fpf for modeling the light porapagation in plant tissue. The developed Meshed Monte Carlo code with flexible phase function choice (MMC-fpf) was successfully validated in simulation through comparison with the Monte Carlo code in Multi-Layered tissues (R2 > 0.9999) and experimentally by comparing the measured and simulated reflectance (RMSE = 0.015%) and transmittance (RMSE = 0.0815%) values for tomato leaves.

  17. Vectorized Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the global algorithms and local kernels of conventional general-purpose Monte Carlo codes shows that multigroup Monte Carlo methods have sufficient structure to permit efficient vectorization. A structured multigroup Monte Carlo algorithm for vector computers is developed in which many particle events are treated at once on a cell-by-cell basis. Vectorization of kernels for tracking and variance reduction is described, and a new method for discrete sampling is developed to facilitate the vectorization of collision analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new method, a vectorized Monte Carlo code for multigroup radiation transport analysis was developed. This code incorporates many features of conventional general-purpose production codes, including general geometry, splitting and Russian roulette, survival biasing, variance estimation via batching, a number of cutoffs, and generalized tallies of collision, tracklength, and surface crossing estimators with response functions. Predictions of vectorized performance characteristics for the CYBER-205 were made using emulated coding and a dynamic model of vector instruction timing. Computation rates were examined for a variety of test problems to determine sensitivities to batch size and vector lengths. Significant speedups are predicted for even a few hundred particles per batch, and asymptotic speedups by about 40 over equivalent Amdahl 470V/8 scalar codes arepredicted for a few thousand particles per batch. The principal conclusion is that vectorization of a general-purpose multigroup Monte Carlo code is well worth the significant effort required for stylized coding and major algorithmic changes.

  18. Baseball Monte Carlo Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houser, Larry L.

    1981-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are used to simulate activities in baseball such as a team's "hot streak" and a hitter's "batting slump." Student participation in such simulations is viewed as a useful method of giving pupils a better understanding of the probability concepts involved. (MP)

  19. Bayesian Inversion of Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interactions for an Oak-Savanna Ecosystem Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Rubin, Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between soil, plant, and the atmosphere under water-stressed conditions is important for ecosystems where water availability is limited. In such ecosystems, the amount of water transferred from the soil to the atmosphere is controlled not only by weather conditions and vegetation type but also by soil water availability. Although researchers have proposed different approaches to model the impact of soil moisture on plant activities, the parameters involved are difficult to measure. However, using measurements of observed latent heat and carbon fluxes, as well as soil moisture data, Bayesian inversion methods can be employed to estimate the various model parameters. In our study, actual Evapotranspiration (ET) of an ecosystem is approximated by the Priestley-Taylor relationship, with the Priestley-Taylor coefficient modeled as a function of soil moisture content. Soil moisture limitation on root uptake is characterized in a similar manner as the Feddes' model. The inference of Bayesian inversion is processed within the framework of graphical theories. Due to the difficulty of obtaining exact inference, the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method is implemented using a free software package, BUGS (Bayesian inference Using Gibbs Sampling). The proposed methodology is applied to a Mediterranean Oak-Savanna FLUXNET site in California, where continuous measurements of actual ET are obtained from eddy-covariance technique and soil moisture contents are monitored by several time domain reflectometry probes located within the footprint of the flux tower. After the implementation of Bayesian inversion, the posterior distributions of all the parameters exhibit enhancement in information compared to the prior distributions. The generated samples based on data in year 2003 are used to predict the actual ET in year 2004 and the prediction uncertainties are assessed in terms of confidence intervals. Our tests also reveal the usefulness of various

  20. Assessment of parameter uncertainty in hydrological model using a Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo-based multilevel-factorial-analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junlong; Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe; Chen, Xi; Bao, Anming

    2016-07-01

    Without a realistic assessment of parameter uncertainty, decision makers may encounter difficulties in accurately describing hydrologic processes and assessing relationships between model parameters and watershed characteristics. In this study, a Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo-based multilevel-factorial-analysis (MCMC-MFA) method is developed, which can not only generate samples of parameters from a well constructed Markov chain and assess parameter uncertainties with straightforward Bayesian inference, but also investigate the individual and interactive effects of multiple parameters on model output through measuring the specific variations of hydrological responses. A case study is conducted for addressing parameter uncertainties in the Kaidu watershed of northwest China. Effects of multiple parameters and their interactions are quantitatively investigated using the MCMC-MFA with a three-level factorial experiment (totally 81 runs). A variance-based sensitivity analysis method is used to validate the results of parameters' effects. Results disclose that (i) soil conservation service runoff curve number for moisture condition II (CN2) and fraction of snow volume corresponding to 50% snow cover (SNO50COV) are the most significant factors to hydrological responses, implying that infiltration-excess overland flow and snow water equivalent represent important water input to the hydrological system of the Kaidu watershed; (ii) saturate hydraulic conductivity (SOL_K) and soil evaporation compensation factor (ESCO) have obvious effects on hydrological responses; this implies that the processes of percolation and evaporation would impact hydrological process in this watershed; (iii) the interactions of ESCO and SNO50COV as well as CN2 and SNO50COV have an obvious effect, implying that snow cover can impact the generation of runoff on land surface and the extraction of soil evaporative demand in lower soil layers. These findings can help enhance the hydrological model

  1. Monte Carlo Simulations Of The Dose Distributions From Carbon Microbeams Used In An Experimental Radiation Therapy Method

    SciTech Connect

    Dioszegi, I.; Rusek, A.; Chiang, I. H.; Dane, B. R.; Meek, A. G.; Dilmanian, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Recent upgrades of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code include transport of heavy ions. We employed the new code to simulate the energy and dose distributions produced by carbon beams in rabbit's head in and around a brain tumor. The work was within our experimental technique of interlaced carbon microbeams, which uses two 90 deg. arrays of parallel, thin planes of carbon beams (microbeams) interlacing to produce a solid beam at the target. A similar version of the method was earlier developed with synchrotron-generated x-ray microbeams. We first simulated the Bragg peak in high density polyethylene and other materials, where we could compare the calculated carbon energy deposition to the measured data produced at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The results showed that new MCNPX code gives a reasonable account of the carbon beam's dose up to {approx}200 MeV/nucleon beam energy. At higher energies, which were not relevant to our project, the model failed to reproduce the Bragg-peak's extent of increasing nuclear breakup tail. In our model calculations we determined the dose distribution along the beam path, including the angular straggling of the microbeams, and used the data for determining the optimal values of beam spacing in the array for producing adequate beam interlacing at the target. We also determined, for the purpose of Bragg-peak spreading at the target, the relative beam intensities of the consecutive exposures with stepwise lower beam energies, and simulated the resulting dose distribution in the spread out Bragg-peak. The details of the simulation methods used and the results obtained are presented.

  2. Quantitative Elemental Microanalysis Of Individual Particles With Use Of X-Ray Fluorescence Method And Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyzycki, Mateusz; Lankosz, Marek; Bielewski, Marek

    2010-04-01

    Recently a considerable interest has been triggered in the investigation of the composition of individual particles by X-ray fluorescence microanalysis. The sources of these micro-samples are mostly diversified. These samples come from space dust, air and ash, soil as well as environment and take the shape of a sphere or an oval. In analysis this kind of samples the geometrical effects caused by different sizes and shapes influence on accuracy of results. This fact arises from the matrix effect. For these samples it is not possible to find analytically a solution of equation taking into account an absorption of X-rays. Hence, a way out is to approximate the real sample shape with the other one or to use Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method. In current work authors utilized the iterative MC simulation to assess an elemental percentage of individual particles. The set of glass micro-spheres, made of NIST K3089 material of known chemical composition, with diameters in the range between 25 and 45 μm was investigated. The microspheres were scanned with X-ray tube primary radiation. Results of MC simulation were compared with these of some analytical approaches based on particle shape approximation. An investigation showed that the low-Z elements (Si, Ca, Ti) were the most sensitive on changes of particle shape and sizes. For high-Z elements (Fe—Pb) concentrations were nearly equal regardless of method used. However, for the all elements considered, results of MC simulation were more accurate then these of analytical relationships taken into comparison.

  3. A novel method combining Monte Carlo-FEM simulations and experiments for simultaneous evaluation of the ultrathin film mass density and Young's modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapoměl, J.; Stachiv, I.; Ferfecki, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel procedure of simultaneous measurement of the ultrathin film volumetric density and the Young's modulus utilizing the Monte Carlo probabilistic method combined with the finite-element method (FEM) and the experiments carried out on the suspended micro-/nanomechanical resonator with a deposited thin film under different but controllable axial prestresses is proposed and analyzed. Since the procedure requires detection of only two bending fundamental resonant frequencies of a beam under different axial prestress forces, the impacts of noise and damping on accuracy of the results are minimized and thus it essentially improves its reliability. Then the volumetric mass density and the Young's modulus of thin film are evaluated by means of the FEM based computational simulations and the accuracies of the determined values are estimated utilizing the Monte Carlo probabilistic method which has been incorporated into the computational procedure.

  4. Comparison of three methods of calculation, experimental and monte carlo simulation in investigation of organ doses (thyroid, sternum, cervical vertebra) in radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Ayat, Saba

    2012-07-01

    Radioiodine therapy is an effective method for treating thyroid cancer carcinoma, but it has some affects on normal tissues, hence dosimetry of vital organs is important to weigh the risks and benefits of this method. The aim of this study is to measure the absorbed doses of important organs by Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) simulation and comparing the results of different methods of dosimetry by performing a t-paired test. To calculate the absorbed dose of thyroid, sternum, and cervical vertebra using the MCNP code, *F8 tally was used. Organs were simulated by using a neck phantom and Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) method. Finally, the results of MCNP, MIRD, and Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements were compared by SPSS software. The absorbed dose obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for 100, 150, and 175 mCi administered (131)I was found to be 388.0, 427.9, and 444.8 cGy for thyroid, 208.7, 230.1, and 239.3 cGy for sternum and 272.1, 299.9, and 312.1 cGy for cervical vertebra. The results of paired t-test were 0.24 for comparing TLD dosimetry and MIRD calculation, 0.80 for MCNP simulation and MIRD, and 0.19 for TLD and MCNP. The results showed no significant differences among three methods of Monte Carlo simulations, MIRD calculation and direct experimental dosimetry using TLD.

  5. Phase-coexistence simulations of fluid mixtures by the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method using single-particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-09-01

    We present a single-particle Lennard-Jones (L-J) model for CO2 and N2. Simplified L-J models for other small polyatomic molecules can be obtained following the methodology described herein. The phase-coexistence diagrams of single-component systems computed using the proposed single-particle models for CO2 and N2 agree well with experimental data over a wide range of temperatures. These diagrams are computed using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method based on the Gibbs-NVT ensemble. This good agreement validates the proposed simplified models. That is, with properly selected parameters, the single-particle models have similar accuracy in predicting gas-phase properties as more complex, state-of-the-art molecular models. To further test these single-particle models, three binary mixtures of CH4, CO2 and N2 are studied using a Gibbs-NPT ensemble. These results are compared against experimental data over a wide range of pressures. The single-particle model has similar accuracy in the gas phase as traditional models although its deviation in the liquid phase is greater. Since the single-particle model reduces the particle number and avoids the time-consuming Ewald summation used to evaluate Coulomb interactions, the proposed model improves the computational efficiency significantly, particularly in the case of high liquid density where the acceptance rate of the particle-swap trial move increases. We compare, at constant temperature and pressure, the Gibbs-NPT and Gibbs-NVT ensembles to analyze their performance differences and results consistency. As theoretically predicted, the agreement between the simulations implies that Gibbs-NVT can be used to validate Gibbs-NPT predictions when experimental data is not available.

  6. Selection of voxel size and photon number in voxel-based Monte Carlo method: criteria and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Chen, Bin; Ran, Wei Yu; Wang, Guo Xiang; Wu, Wen Juan

    2015-09-01

    The voxel-based Monte Carlo method (VMC) is now a gold standard in the simulation of light propagation in turbid media. For complex tissue structures, however, the computational cost will be higher when small voxels are used to improve smoothness of tissue interface and a large number of photons are used to obtain accurate results. To reduce computational cost, criteria were proposed to determine the voxel size and photon number in 3-dimensional VMC simulations with acceptable accuracy and computation time. The selection of the voxel size can be expressed as a function of tissue geometry and optical properties. The photon number should be at least 5 times the total voxel number. These criteria are further applied in developing a photon ray splitting scheme of local grid refinement technique to reduce computational cost of a nonuniform tissue structure with significantly varying optical properties. In the proposed technique, a nonuniform refined grid system is used, where fine grids are used for the tissue with high absorption and complex geometry, and coarse grids are used for the other part. In this technique, the total photon number is selected based on the voxel size of the coarse grid. Furthermore, the photon-splitting scheme is developed to satisfy the statistical accuracy requirement for the dense grid area. Result shows that local grid refinement technique photon ray splitting scheme can accelerate the computation by 7.6 times (reduce time consumption from 17.5 to 2.3 h) in the simulation of laser light energy deposition in skin tissue that contains port wine stain lesions.

  7. GPU-Accelerated Monte Carlo Electron Transport Methods: Development and Application for Radiation Dose Calculations Using Six GPU cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George

    2014-06-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software testbed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. For photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla™ M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x106 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy.

  8. Selection of voxel size and photon number in voxel-based Monte Carlo method: criteria and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Chen, Bin; Ran, Wei Yu; Wang, Guo Xiang; Wu, Wen Juan

    2015-01-01

    The voxel-based Monte Carlo method (VMC) is now a gold standard in the simulation of light propagation in turbid media. For complex tissue structures, however, the computational cost will be higher when small voxels are used to improve smoothness of tissue interface and a large number of photons are used to obtain accurate results. To reduce computational cost, criteria were proposed to determine the voxel size and photon number in 3-dimensional VMC simulations with acceptable accuracy and computation time. The selection of the voxel size can be expressed as a function of tissue geometry and optical properties. The photon number should be at least 5 times the total voxel number. These criteria are further applied in developing a photon ray splitting scheme of local grid refinement technique to reduce computational cost of a nonuniform tissue structure with significantly varying optical properties. In the proposed technique, a nonuniform refined grid system is used, where fine grids are used for the tissue with high absorption and complex geometry, and coarse grids are used for the other part. In this technique, the total photon number is selected based on the voxel size of the coarse grid. Furthermore, the photon-splitting scheme is developed to satisfy the statistical accuracy requirement for the dense grid area. Result shows that local grid refinement technique photon ray splitting scheme can accelerate the computation by 7.6 times (reduce time consumption from 17.5 to 2.3 h) in the simulation of laser light energy deposition in skin tissue that contains port wine stain lesions. PMID:26417866

  9. Selection of voxel size and photon number in voxel-based Monte Carlo method: criteria and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Chen, Bin; Ran, Wei Yu; Wang, Guo Xiang; Wu, Wen Juan

    2015-01-01

    The voxel-based Monte Carlo method (VMC) is now a gold standard in the simulation of light propagation in turbid media. For complex tissue structures, however, the computational cost will be higher when small voxels are used to improve smoothness of tissue interface and a large number of photons are used to obtain accurate results. To reduce computational cost, criteria were proposed to determine the voxel size and photon number in 3-dimensional VMC simulations with acceptable accuracy and computation time. The selection of the voxel size can be expressed as a function of tissue geometry and optical properties. The photon number should be at least 5 times the total voxel number. These criteria are further applied in developing a photon ray splitting scheme of local grid refinement technique to reduce computational cost of a nonuniform tissue structure with significantly varying optical properties. In the proposed technique, a nonuniform refined grid system is used, where fine grids are used for the tissue with high absorption and complex geometry, and coarse grids are used for the other part. In this technique, the total photon number is selected based on the voxel size of the coarse grid. Furthermore, the photon-splitting scheme is developed to satisfy the statistical accuracy requirement for the dense grid area. Result shows that local grid refinement technique photon ray splitting scheme can accelerate the computation by 7.6 times (reduce time consumption from 17.5 to 2.3 h) in the simulation of laser light energy deposition in skin tissue that contains port wine stain lesions.

  10. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Monte Carlo study on the low momentum μ-π identification of the BESIII EM calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Lü, Jun-Guang; He, Kang-Lin; An, Zheng-Hua; Cai, Xiao; Dong, Ming-Yi; Fang, Jian; Hu, Tao; Liu, Wan-Jin; Lu, Qi-Wen; Ning, Fei-Peng; Sun, Li-Jun; Sun, Xi-Lei; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Xue, Zhen; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Zhou, Li

    2009-10-01

    The BESIII detector has a high-resolution electromagnetic calorimeter which can be used for low momentum μ-π identification. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, μ-π separation was studied. A multilayer perceptron neural network making use of the defined variables was used to do the identification and a good μ-π separation result was obtained.

  11. Substantiation of parameters of the geometric model of the research reactor core for the calculation using the Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Radaev, A. I. Schurovskaya, M. V.

    2015-12-15

    The choice of the spatial nodalization for the calculation of the power density and burnup distribution in a research reactor core with fuel assemblies of the IRT-3M and VVR-KN type using the program based on the Monte Carlo code is described. The influence of the spatial nodalization on the results of calculating basic neutronic characteristics and calculation time is investigated.

  12. On the limit theorem for life time distribution connected with some reliability systems and their validation by means of the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, Munteanu Bogdan; Alexei, Leahu; Sergiu, Cataranciuc

    2013-09-01

    We prove the limit theorem for life time distribution connected with reliability systems when their life time is a Pascal Convolution of independent and identically distributed random variables. We show that, in some conditions, such distributions may be approximated by means of Erlang distributions. As a consequnce, survival functions for such systems may be, respectively, approximated by Erlang survival functions. By using Monte Carlo method we experimantally confirm the theoretical results of our theorem.

  13. Monte Carlo neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrate that the effects of matter upon neutrino propagation may be recast as the scattering of the initial neutrino wave function. Exchanging the differential, Schrodinger equation for an integral equation for the scattering matrix S permits a Monte Carlo method for the computation of S that removes many of the numerical difficulties associated with direct integration techniques.

  14. SU-E-T-224: Is Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Method Necessary for Cyberknife Brain Treatment Planning?

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Fourkal, E; Hayes, S; Jin, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric difference resulted in using the pencil beam algorithm instead of Monte Carlo (MC) methods for tumors adjacent to the skull. Methods: We retrospectively calculated the dosimetric differences between RT and MC algorithms for brain tumors treated with CyberKnife located adjacent to the skull for 18 patients (total of 27 tumors). The median tumor sizes was 0.53-cc (range 0.018-cc to 26.2-cc). The absolute mean distance from the tumor to the skull was 2.11 mm (range - 17.0 mm to 9.2 mm). The dosimetric variables examined include the mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the target, the target coverage (TC) and conformality index. The MC calculation used the same MUs as the RT dose calculation without further normalization and 1% statistical uncertainty. The differences were analyzed by tumor size and distance from the skull. Results: The TC was generally reduced with the MC calculation (24 out of 27 cases). The average difference in TC between RT and MC was 3.3% (range 0.0% to 23.5%). When the TC was deemed unacceptable, the plans were re-normalized in order to increase the TC to 99%. This resulted in a 6.9% maximum change in the prescription isodose line. The maximum changes in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses were 5.4 %, 7.7%, and 8.4%, respectively, before re-normalization. When the TC was analyzed with regards to target size, it was found that the worst coverage occurred with the smaller targets (0.018-cc). When the TC was analyzed with regards to the distance to the skull, there was no correlation between proximity to the skull and TC between the RT and MC plans. Conclusions: For smaller targets (< 4.0-cc), MC should be used to re-evaluate the dose coverage after RT is used for the initial dose calculation in order to ensure target coverage.

  15. Behavioral Analysis of Visitors to a Medical Institution’s Website Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Consistent with the “attention, interest, desire, memory, action” (AIDMA) model of consumer behavior, patients collect information about available medical institutions using the Internet to select information for their particular needs. Studies of consumer behavior may be found in areas other than medical institution websites. Such research uses Web access logs for visitor search behavior. At this time, research applying the patient searching behavior model to medical institution website visitors is lacking. Objective We have developed a hospital website search behavior model using a Bayesian approach to clarify the behavior of medical institution website visitors and determine the probability of their visits, classified by search keyword. Methods We used the website data access log of a clinic of internal medicine and gastroenterology in the Sapporo suburbs, collecting data from January 1 through June 31, 2011. The contents of the 6 website pages included the following: home, news, content introduction for medical examinations, mammography screening, holiday person-on-duty information, and other. The search keywords we identified as best expressing website visitor needs were listed as the top 4 headings from the access log: clinic name, clinic name + regional name, clinic name + medical examination, and mammography screening. Using the search keywords as the explaining variable, we built a binomial probit model that allows inspection of the contents of each purpose variable. Using this model, we determined a beta value and generated a posterior distribution. We performed the simulation using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods with a noninformation prior distribution for this model and determined the visit probability classified by keyword for each category. Results In the case of the keyword “clinic name,” the visit probability to the website, repeated visit to the website, and contents page for medical examination was positive. In the case of the

  16. Comparison of ISO-GUM and Monte Carlo methods for the evaluation of measurement uncertainty: application to direct cadmium measurement in water by GFAAS.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Dimitrios; Meligotsidou, Loukia; Karavoltsos, Sotirios; Burnetas, Apostolos; Dassenakis, Manos; Scoullos, Michael

    2011-02-15

    The propagation stage of uncertainty evaluation, known as the propagation of distributions, is in most cases approached by the GUM (Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement) uncertainty framework which is based on the law of propagation of uncertainty assigned to various input quantities and the characterization of the measurand (output quantity) by a Gaussian or a t-distribution. Recently, a Supplement to the ISO-GUM was prepared by the JCGM (Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology). This Guide gives guidance on propagating probability distributions assigned to various input quantities through a numerical simulation (Monte Carlo Method) and determining a probability distribution for the measurand. In the present work the two approaches were used to estimate the uncertainty of the direct determination of cadmium in water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The expanded uncertainty results (at 95% confidence levels) obtained with the GUM Uncertainty Framework and the Monte Carlo Method at the concentration level of 3.01 μg/L were ±0.20 μg/L and ±0.18 μg/L, respectively. Thus, the GUM Uncertainty Framework slightly overestimates the overall uncertainty by 10%. Even after taking into account additional sources of uncertainty that the GUM Uncertainty Framework considers as negligible, the Monte Carlo gives again the same uncertainty result (±0.18 μg/L). The main source of this difference is the approximation used by the GUM Uncertainty Framework in estimating the standard uncertainty of the calibration curve produced by least squares regression. Although the GUM Uncertainty Framework proves to be adequate in this particular case, generally the Monte Carlo Method has features that avoid the assumptions and the limitations of the GUM Uncertainty Framework.

  17. The effect of carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature on low pressure organic vapor phase deposition simulation by direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Takao; Ueda, Noriaki

    2013-04-01

    The process of low pressure organic vapor phase deposition (LP-OVPD) controls the growth of amorphous organic thin films, where the source gases (Alq3 molecule, etc.) are introduced into a hot wall reactor via an injection barrel using an inert carrier gas (N2 molecule). It is possible to control well the following substrate properties such as dopant concentration, deposition rate, and thickness uniformity of the thin film. In this paper, we present LP-OVPD simulation results using direct simulation Monte Carlo-Neutrals (Particle-PLUS neutral module) which is commercial software adopting direct simulation Monte Carlo method. By estimating properly the evaporation rate with experimental vaporization enthalpies, the calculated deposition rates on the substrate agree well with the experimental results that depend on carrier gas flow rate and source cell temperature.

  18. Massively Parallel Combined Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics Methods to Study the Long-Time-Scale Evolution of Particulate Matter and Molecular Structures Under Reactive Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, A; Mundy, C J; Pitz, W J; Melius, C; Westbrook, C K; Caturla, M

    2003-12-19

    An important challenge in computational modeling is the development of new computational methods and capabilities for studying molecular-scale structures over very large time-scales. In particular, there is great interest in understanding the nucleation and growth of carbon soot particles as well as their fate in the atmosphere. We have recently developed and implemented a new computational tool to time-integrate the detailed structure of atomistically resolved surfaces and nanostructures driven by chemical and physical kinetic rule-based rate expressions. Fundamental chemical and physical processes such as chemical reactions, surface adsorption and surface diffusion are performed using a non-lattice real-space kinetic Monte Carlo scheme and driven by user-defined rule-based kinetic rate expressions, while atomic structure relaxation is approached using molecular dynamics. We demonstrate the sensitivity of particle evolution to chemical and physical kinetic mechanism using a parallel implementation of the combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics code.

  19. TU-F-BRE-06: Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Quality Correction Factor Determination Using Experimental and Monte Carlo Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M; Desai, V; Simiele, E; Taneja, S; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate beam quality correction factors for the flattening-filter-free (FFF) energies of the TrueBeam™ accelerator based on a dosimetry formalism for small and nonstandard fields. Methods: Three detectors - an Exradin W1 scintillator, Sun Nuclear EDGE diode, and LiF(Mg,Tl) TLD-100 chips - were investigated to determine their applicability as tools to measure quality correction factors for ionization chambers in the small and nonstandard fields of the TrueBeam™. Volume-averaging effects and energy dependence were observed in fields ranging from 1×1 to 40×40 cm{sup 2} for 6 MV and 10 MV beam energies using both FFF and flattened beam modes. Correction factors were determined for three ionization chambers: an Exradin A12 Farmer-type chamber, an Exradin A1SL scanning chamber, and an Exradin A26 reference-class microchamber. Beam quality corrections were also obtained using a benchmarked model of the TrueBeam™ created with the BEAMnrc user code of EGSnrc. Results: All three detectors demonstrated measureable energy dependence in the megavoltage range. The EDGE diode was deemed the most appropriate tool for beam quality correction factor measurements due to its low energy dependence and small size; however, alanine will be used in the future to reduce energy dependent effects even further. Measured k{sub Qmsr,Q} corrections of up to 4% were found for the 6MV FFF and 10 MV FFF beams, corresponding to a discrepancy of up to 3% compared to TG-51-determined dose. Up to a 10% k{sub Qclin,Qmsr} correction was measured for small fields referenced to a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field of the same energy. Much larger corrections were determined using the Monte Carlo model, and these discrepancies require further investigation. Conclusion: Progress has been made toward determining beam quality correction factors for the small and nonstandard fields of the TrueBeam™ accelerator. Further work must be done to ensure greater accuracy in patient treatments with this new

  20. Assessment of the neutron activation of a stainless steel sample in a Research Nuclear Reactor using the Monte Carlo method and CINDER'90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro, Ignacio; Ródenas, José; Marques, José G.; Gallardo, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Materials in a nuclear reactor are activated by neutron irradiation. When they are withdrawn from the reactor and placed in some storage, the potential dose received by workers in the surrounding area must be taken into account. In previous papers, activation of control rods in a NPP with BWR and dose rates around the storage pool have been estimated using the MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method. Models were validated comparing simulation results with experimental measurements. As the activation is mostly produced in stainless steel components of control rods the activation model can be also validated by means of experimental measurements on a stainless steel sample after being irradiated in a reactor. This has been done in the Portuguese Research Reactor at Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear. The neutron activation has been calculated by two different methods, Monte Carlo and CINDER'90, and results have been compared. After irradiation, dose rates at the water surface of the reactor pool were measured, with the irradiated stainless steel sample submerged at different positions under water. Experimental measurements have been compared with simulation results using Monte Carlo. The comparison shows a good agreement confirming the validation of models.

  1. Using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain method to estimate contact parameter temperature dependence: implications for Martian cloud modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttänen, Anni; Douspis, Marian

    2015-04-01

    In the last years several datasets on deposition mode ice nucleation in Martian conditions have showed that the effectiveness of mineral dust as a condensation nucleus decreases with temperature (Iraci et al., 2010; Phebus et al., 2011; Trainer et al., 2009). Previously, nucleation modelling in Martian conditions used only constant values of this so-called contact parameter, provided by the few studies previously published on the topic. The new studies paved the way for possibly more realistic way of predicting ice crystal formation in the Martian environment. However, the caveat of these studies (Iraci et al., 2010; Phebus et al., 2011) was the limited temperature range that inhibits using the provided (linear) equations for the contact parameter temperature dependence in all conditions of cloud formation on Mars. One wide temperature range deposition mode nucleation dataset exists (Trainer et al., 2009), but the used substrate was silicon, which cannot imitate realistically the most abundant ice nucleus on Mars, mineral dust. Nevertheless, this dataset revealed, thanks to measurements spanning from 150 to 240 K, that the behaviour of the contact parameter as a function of temperature was exponential rather than linear as suggested by previous work. We have tried to combine the previous findings to provide realistic and practical formulae for application in nucleation and atmospheric models. We have analysed the three cited datasets using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) method. The used method allows us to test and evaluate different functional forms for the temperature dependence of the contact parameter. We perform a data inversion by finding the best fit to the measured data simultaneously at all points for different functional forms of the temperature dependence of the contact angle m(T). The method uses a full nucleation model (Määttänen et al., 2005; Vehkamäki et al., 2007) to calculate the observables at each data point. We suggest one new and test

  2. Monte Carlo Simulation for Perusal and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.; Barcikowski, Robert S.; Robey, Randall R.

    The meaningful investigation of many problems in statistics can be solved through Monte Carlo methods. Monte Carlo studies can help solve problems that are mathematically intractable through the analysis of random samples from populations whose characteristics are known to the researcher. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the values of a statistic are…

  3. Neural-based pile-up correction and ballistic deficit correction of X-ray semiconductor detectors using the Monte Carlo simulation and the Ramo theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafaee, Mahdi; Moussavi Zarandi, Ali; Taheri, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Pile-up distortion is a common problem in many nuclear radiation detection systems, especially in high count rates. It can be solved by hardware-based pile-up rejections, but there is no complete pile-up elimination in this way. Additionally, the methods can lead to poor quantitative results. Generally, time characteristics of semiconductor detector pulses are different from Scintillator detector pulses due to ballistic deficit. Hence, pulse processing-based pile-up correction in the detectors should consider this specification. In this paper, the artificial neural network pile-up correction method is applied for silicon detector piled-up pulses. For this purpose, the interaction of photons with a silicon detector is simulated by the MCNP4c code and the pulse current is calculated by Ramo's theorem. In this approach, we use a sub-Nyquist frequency sampling. The results show that the proposed method is reliable for pile-up correction and ballistic deficit in semiconductor detectors. The technique is remarkable for commercial considerations and high-speed, real-time calculations.

  4. Development of the MCNPX depletion capability: A Monte Carlo linked depletion method that automates the coupling between MCNPX and CINDER90 for high fidelity burnup calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensin, Michael Lorne

    Monte Carlo-linked depletion methods have gained recent interest due to the ability to more accurately model complex 3-dimesional geometries and better track the evolution of temporal nuclide inventory by simulating the actual physical process utilizing continuous energy coefficients. The integration of CINDER90 into the MCNPX Monte Carlo radiation transport code provides a high-fidelity completely self-contained Monte-Carlo-linked depletion capability in a well established, widely accepted Monte Carlo radiation transport code that is compatible with most nuclear criticality (KCODE) particle tracking features in MCNPX. MCNPX depletion tracks all necessary reaction rates and follows as many isotopes as cross section data permits in order to achieve a highly accurate temporal nuclide inventory solution. This work chronicles relevant nuclear history, surveys current methodologies of depletion theory, details the methodology in applied MCNPX and provides benchmark results for three independent OECD/NEA benchmarks. Relevant nuclear history, from the Oklo reactor two billion years ago to the current major United States nuclear fuel cycle development programs, is addressed in order to supply the motivation for the development of this technology. A survey of current reaction rate and temporal nuclide inventory techniques is then provided to offer justification for the depletion strategy applied within MCNPX. The MCNPX depletion strategy is then dissected and each code feature is detailed chronicling the methodology development from the original linking of MONTEBURNS and MCNP to the most recent public release of the integrated capability (MCNPX 2.6.F). Calculation results of the OECD/NEA Phase IB benchmark, H. B. Robinson benchmark and OECD/NEA Phase IVB are then provided. The acceptable results of these calculations offer sufficient confidence in the predictive capability of the MCNPX depletion method. This capability sets up a significant foundation, in a well established

  5. Tests of constituent-quark generation methods which maintain both the nucleon center of mass and the desired radial distribution in Monte Carlo Glauber models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. T.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Stankus, P. W.

    2016-05-01

    Several methods of generating three constituent quarks in a nucleon are evaluated which explicitly maintain the nucleon's center of mass and desired radial distribution and can be used within Monte Carlo Glauber frameworks. The geometric models provided by each method are used to generate distributions over the number of constituent quark participants (Nqp) in p +p ,d +Au , and Au +Au collisions. The results are compared with each other and to a previous result of Nqp calculations, without this explicit constraint, used in measurements of √{sNN}=200 GeV p +p ,d +Au , and Au +Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  6. An Evaluation of the Plant Density Estimator the Point-Centred Quarter Method (PCQM) Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md Nabiul Islam; Hijbeek, Renske; Berger, Uta; Koedam, Nico; Grueters, Uwe; Islam, S. M. Zahirul; Hasan, Md Asadul; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Point-Centred Quarter Method (PCQM), the mean distance of the first nearest plants in each quadrant of a number of random sample points is converted to plant density. It is a quick method for plant density estimation. In recent publications the estimator equations of simple PCQM (PCQM1) and higher order ones (PCQM2 and PCQM3, which uses the distance of the second and third nearest plants, respectively) show discrepancy. This study attempts to review PCQM estimators in order to find the most accurate equation form. We tested the accuracy of different PCQM equations using Monte Carlo Simulations in simulated (having ‘random’, ‘aggregated’ and ‘regular’ spatial patterns) plant populations and empirical ones. Principal Findings PCQM requires at least 50 sample points to ensure a desired level of accuracy. PCQM with a corrected estimator is more accurate than with a previously published estimator. The published PCQM versions (PCQM1, PCQM2 and PCQM3) show significant differences in accuracy of density estimation, i.e. the higher order PCQM provides higher accuracy. However, the corrected PCQM versions show no significant differences among them as tested in various spatial patterns except in plant assemblages with a strong repulsion (plant competition). If N is number of sample points and R is distance, the corrected estimator of PCQM1 is 4(4N − 1)/(π ∑ R2) but not 12N/(π ∑ R2), of PCQM2 is 4(8N − 1)/(π ∑ R2) but not 28N/(π ∑ R2) and of PCQM3 is 4(12N − 1)/(π ∑ R2) but not 44N/(π ∑ R2) as published. Significance If the spatial pattern of a plant association is random, PCQM1 with a corrected equation estimator and over 50 sample points would be sufficient to provide accurate density estimation. PCQM using just the nearest tree in each quadrant is therefore sufficient, which facilitates sampling of trees, particularly in areas with just a few hundred trees per hectare. PCQM3 provides the best density estimations for all

  7. Quantum Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Fantoni, Riccardo; Moroni, Saverio

    2014-09-21

    We present a path integral Monte Carlo method which is the full quantum analogue of the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo method of Panagiotopoulos to study the gas-liquid coexistence line of a classical fluid. Unlike previous extensions of Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo to include quantum effects, our scheme is viable even for systems with strong quantum delocalization in the degenerate regime of temperature. This is demonstrated by an illustrative application to the gas-superfluid transition of {sup 4}He in two dimensions.

  8. Modeling the Reflectance of the Lunar Regolith by a New Method Combining Monte Carlo Ray Tracing and Hapke's Model with Application to Chang'E-1 IIM Data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yunzhao; Tang, Zesheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we model the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo ray tracing and Hapke's model. The existing modeling methods exploit either a radiative transfer model or a geometric optical model. However, the measured data from an Interference Imaging spectrometer (IIM) on an orbiter were affected not only by the composition of minerals but also by the environmental factors. These factors cannot be well addressed by a single model alone. Our method implemented Monte Carlo ray tracing for simulating the large-scale effects such as the reflection of topography of the lunar soil and Hapke's model for calculating the reflection intensity of the internal scattering effects of particles of the lunar soil. Therefore, both the large-scale and microscale effects are considered in our method, providing a more accurate modeling of the reflectance of the lunar regolith. Simulation results using the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) data and Chang'E-1 elevation map show that our method is effective and useful. We have also applied our method to Chang'E-1 IIM data for removing the influence of lunar topography to the reflectance of the lunar soil and to generate more realistic visualizations of the lunar surface. PMID:24526892

  9. Modeling the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo Ray tracing and Hapke's model with application to Chang'E-1 IIM data.

    PubMed

    Wong, Un-Hong; Wu, Yunzhao; Wong, Hon-Cheng; Liang, Yanyan; Tang, Zesheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we model the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo ray tracing and Hapke's model. The existing modeling methods exploit either a radiative transfer model or a geometric optical model. However, the measured data from an Interference Imaging spectrometer (IIM) on an orbiter were affected not only by the composition of minerals but also by the environmental factors. These factors cannot be well addressed by a single model alone. Our method implemented Monte Carlo ray tracing for simulating the large-scale effects such as the reflection of topography of the lunar soil and Hapke's model for calculating the reflection intensity of the internal scattering effects of particles of the lunar soil. Therefore, both the large-scale and microscale effects are considered in our method, providing a more accurate modeling of the reflectance of the lunar regolith. Simulation results using the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) data and Chang'E-1 elevation map show that our method is effective and useful. We have also applied our method to Chang'E-1 IIM data for removing the influence of lunar topography to the reflectance of the lunar soil and to generate more realistic visualizations of the lunar surface.

  10. AN ASSESSMENT OF MCNP WEIGHT WINDOWS

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. HENDRICKS; C. N. CULBERTSON

    2000-01-01

    The weight window variance reduction method in the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code MCNPTM has recently been rewritten. In particular, it is now possible to generate weight window importance functions on a superimposed mesh, eliminating the need to subdivide geometries for variance reduction purposes. Our assessment addresses the following questions: (1) Does the new MCNP4C treatment utilize weight windows as well as the former MCNP4B treatment? (2) Does the new MCNP4C weight window generator generate importance functions as well as MCNP4B? (3) How do superimposed mesh weight windows compare to cell-based weight windows? (4) What are the shortcomings of the new MCNP4C weight window generator? Our assessment was carried out with five neutron and photon shielding problems chosen for their demanding variance reduction requirements. The problems were an oil well logging problem, the Oak Ridge fusion shielding benchmark problem, a photon skyshine problem, an air-over-ground problem, and a sample problem for variance reduction.

  11. Calculating infinite-medium α-eigenvalue spectra with Monte Carlo using a transition rate matrix method

    DOE PAGES

    Betzler, Benjamin R.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent behavior of the energy spectrum in neutron transport was investigated with a formulation, based on continuous-time Markov processes, for computing α eigenvalues and eigenvectors in an infinite medium. In this study, a research Monte Carlo code called “TORTE” (To Obtain Real Time Eigenvalues) was created and used to estimate elements of a transition rate matrix. TORTE is capable of using both multigroup and continuous-energy nuclear data, and verification was performed. Eigenvalue spectra for infinite homogeneous mixtures were obtained, and an eigenfunction expansion was used to investigate transient behavior of the neutron energy spectrum.

  12. Magnetoabsorption of elliptically polarized electromagnetic radiation by graphene: The relaxation-time approximation and Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryuchkov, S. V.; Kukhar', E. I.; Zav'yalov, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that the linewidth of cyclotron absorption in band-gap graphene is nonzero even in the absence of electron scattering. The functional temperature dependence of the cyclotron absorption linewidth, which is applicable to band-gap graphene in the absence of collisions, has been analytically determined. The power of the elliptically polarized electromagnetic wave absorbed by graphene in the presence of a dc magnetic field has been numerically calculated. The Monte Carlo numerical experiment has confirmed the analytical calculations based on the Boltzmann equation.

  13. Application of the Monte Carlo methods and variational procedure for optimizing time-of-flight neutron diffractometer characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrushchinsky, A. A.; Kuten, S. A.; Viarenich, K. A.; Speransky, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Based on variational calculus, a procedure for the optimal approximation of detector surface of the time-of-flight neutron diffractometer has been suggested. The exact solution for a point sample and zero thickness detector has been obtained. Using the shape of the detector surface, an optimized Monte Carlo simulation has been performed for the parameters of the spectrometer depending on the sample size and detector thickness, its azimuthal and Bragg's angular dimensions, and taking into account the neutron absorption in the sample and detector.

  14. Uncertainty Propagation with Fast Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; van der Marck, S. C.; Koning, A. J.; Sjöstrand, H.; Zwermann, W.

    2014-04-01

    Two new and faster Monte Carlo methods for the propagation of nuclear data uncertainties in Monte Carlo nuclear simulations are presented (the "Fast TMC" and "Fast GRS" methods). They are addressing the main drawback of the original Total Monte Carlo method (TMC), namely the necessary large time multiplication factor compared to a single calculation. With these new methods, Monte Carlo simulations can now be accompanied with uncertainty propagation (other than statistical), with small additional calculation time. The new methods are presented and compared with the TMC methods for criticality benchmarks.

  15. Patient-specific organ dose estimation during transcatheter arterial embolization using Monte Carlo method and adaptive organ segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Lin, Yung-Chieh; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate organ doses for individual patients undergoing interventional transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation and adaptive organ segmentation. Five patients were enrolled in this study after institutional ethical approval and informed consent. Gafchromic XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface dose to reconstruct the nonuniform fluence distribution field as the input data in the Monte Carlo simulation. XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface doses due to their lower energy dependence compared with that of XR-RV2 films. To calculate organ doses, each patient's three-dimensional dose distribution was incorporated into CT DICOM images with image segmentation using thresholding and k-means clustering. Organ doses for all patients were estimated. Our dose evaluation system not only evaluated entrance surface doses based on measurements, but also evaluated the 3D dose distribution within patients using simulations. When film measurements were unavailable, the peak skin dose (between 0.68 and 0.82 of a fraction of the cumulative dose) can be calculated from the cumulative dose obtained from TAE dose reports. Successful implementation of this dose evaluation system will aid radiologists and technologists in determining the actual dose distributions within patients undergoing TAE.

  16. Implementation and testing of the on-the-fly thermal scattering Monte Carlo sampling method for graphite and light water in MCNP6

    DOE PAGES

    Pavlou, Andrew T.; Ji, Wei; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-01-23

    Here, a proper treatment of thermal neutron scattering requires accounting for chemical binding through a scattering law S(α,β,T). Monte Carlo codes sample the secondary neutron energy and angle after a thermal scattering event from probability tables generated from S(α,β,T) tables at discrete temperatures, requiring a large amount of data for multiscale and multiphysics problems with detailed temperature gradients. We have previously developed a method to handle this temperature dependence on-the-fly during the Monte Carlo random walk using polynomial expansions in 1/T to directly sample the secondary energy and angle. In this paper, the on-the-fly method is implemented into MCNP6 andmore » tested in both graphite-moderated and light water-moderated systems. The on-the-fly method is compared with the thermal ACE libraries that come standard with MCNP6, yielding good agreement with integral reactor quantities like k-eigenvalue and differential quantities like single-scatter secondary energy and angle distributions. The simulation runtimes are comparable between the two methods (on the order of 5–15% difference for the problems tested) and the on-the-fly fit coefficients only require 5–15 MB of total data storage.« less

  17. Ant colony method to control variance reduction techniques in the Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators of use in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pareja, S.; Vilches, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators requires large computation times to achieve the level of uncertainty required for radiotherapy. In this context, variance reduction techniques play a fundamental role in the reduction of this computational time. Here we describe the use of the ant colony method to control the application of two variance reduction techniques: Splitting and Russian roulette. The approach can be applied to any accelerator in a straightforward way and permits the increasing of the efficiency of the simulation by a factor larger than 50.

  18. Monte Carlo solution methods in a moment-based scale-bridging algorithm for thermal radiative transfer problems: Comparison with Fleck and Cummings

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Densmore, J. D.; Wollaber, A. B.; Knoll, D. A.; Rauenzahn, R. M.

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a moment-based scale-bridging algorithm for thermal radiative transfer problems. The algorithm takes the form of well-known nonlinear-diffusion acceleration which utilizes a low-order (LO) continuum problem to accelerate the solution of a high-order (HO) kinetic problem. The coupled nonlinear equations that form the LO problem are efficiently solved using a preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method. This work demonstrates the applicability of the scale-bridging algorithm with a Monte Carlo HO solver and reports the computational efficiency of the algorithm in comparison to the well-known Fleck-Cummings algorithm. (authors)

  19. Impulse response solution to the three-dimensional vector radiative transfer equation in atmosphere-ocean systems. II. The hybrid matrix operator--Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng-Wang; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2008-03-10

    A hybrid method is developed to solve the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) in a three-dimensional atmosphere-ocean system (AOS). The system is divided into three parts: the atmosphere, the dielectric interface, and the ocean. The Monte Carlo method is employed to calculate the impulse response functions (Green functions) for the atmosphere and ocean. The impulse response function of the dielectric interface is calculated by the Fresnel formulas. The matrix operator method is then used to couple these impulse response functions to obtain the vector radiation field for the AOS. The primary advantage of this hybrid method is that it solves the VRTE efficiently in an AOS with different dielectric interfaces while keeping the same atmospheric and oceanic conditions. For the first time, we present the downward radiance field in an ocean with a sinusoidal ocean wave.

  20. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for (99m)Tc-hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr(3)-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. (99m)Tc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of (99m)hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results.