Science.gov

Sample records for carpal tunnel decompression

  1. Is carpal tunnel decompression warranted for HNPP?

    PubMed

    Earle, Nicholas; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2013-12-01

    The role of carpal tunnel decompression surgery for patients that have hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is currently unknown. Since recovery from carpal tunnel compression is often associated with remyelination or nodal reconstruction rather than axonal regeneration, it is uncertain whether the PMP22 deletion associated with HNPP interrupts myelin or nodal reconstitution. We describe two patients with genetically confirmed HNPP and symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome that had clinical and electrophysiological improvement after surgical decompression. The findings indicate a capacity for conduction repair in HNPP. They also suggest a need for further investigation and discussion around whether to offer carpal tunnel decompression to symptomatic HNPP patients.

  2. Reducing the pain associated with local anaesthetic infiltration for open carpal tunnel decompression.

    PubMed

    Vossinakis, I C; Stavroulaki, P; Paleochorlidis, I; Badras, L S

    2004-08-01

    This prospective, randomized study assessed the effectiveness of buffering lidocaine with sodium bicarbonate for reducing the pain associated with local anaesthetic infiltration for open carpal tunnel decompression. Twenty-one patients undergoing bilateral open carpal tunnel decompression received, in a randomized manner, lidocaine 1% with adrenaline (1:200,000) in one hand and the same local anaesthetic buffered with 8.4% NaHCO3 at a 5:1 ratio in the other hand. Pain, especially its burning element, was evaluated on a visual analogue scale and was significantly reduced with the buffered solution. The buffering was effective for all patients and no adverse effects were noted. This is a safe, easy and quick method for making open carpal tunnel surgery less uncomfortable to patients.

  3. The responsiveness of sensibility and strength tests in patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several clinical measures of sensory and motor function are used alongside patient-rated questionnaires to assess outcomes of carpal tunnel decompression. However there is a lack of evidence regarding which clinical tests are most responsive to clinically important change over time. Methods In a prospective cohort study 63 patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression were assessed using standardised clinician-derived and patient reported outcomes before surgery, at 4 and 8 months follow up. Clinical sensory assessments included: touch threshold with monofilaments (WEST), shape-texture identification (STI™ test), static two-point discrimination (Mackinnon-Dellon Disk-Criminator) and the locognosia test. Motor assessments included: grip and tripod pinch strength using a digital grip analyser (MIE), manual muscle testing of abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis using the Rotterdam Intrinsic Handheld Myometer (RIHM). The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) was used as a patient rated outcome measure. Results Relative responsiveness at 4 months was highest for the BCTQ symptom severity scale with moderate to large effects sizes (ES = -1.43) followed by the BCTQ function scale (ES = -0.71). The WEST and STI™ were the most responsive sensory tests at 4 months showing moderate effect sizes (WEST ES = 0.55, STI ES = 0.52). Grip and pinch strength had a relatively higher responsiveness compared to thenar muscle strength but effect sizes for all motor tests were very small (ES ≤0.10) or negative indicating a decline compared to baseline in some patients. Conclusions For clinical assessment of sensibility touch threshold assessed by monofilaments (WEST) and tactile gnosis measured with the STI™ test are the most responsive tests and are recommended for future studies. The use of handheld myometry (RIHM) for manual muscle testing, despite more specifically targeting thenar muscles, was less responsive than grip or tripod pinch testing using

  4. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones ... from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms ...

  5. Does sensory relearning improve tactile function after carpal tunnel decompression? A pragmatic, assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, C.; Houghton, J.; Miller, L.; Shepstone, L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome being effective in 80%–90% of cases, chronic numbness and hand disability can occur. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sensory relearning improves tactile discrimination and hand function after decompression. In a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial, 104 patients were randomized to a sensory relearning (n = 52) or control (n = 52) group. A total of 93 patients completed a 12-week follow-up. Primary outcome was the shape-texture identification test at 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes were touch threshold, touch localization, dexterity and self-reported hand function. No significant group differences were seen for the primary outcome (Shape-Texture Identification) at 6 weeks or 12 weeks. Similarly, no significant group differences were observed on secondary outcomes, with the exception of self-reported hand function. A secondary complier-averaged-causal-effects analysis showed no statistically significant treatment effect on the primary outcome. Sensory relearning for tactile sensory and functional deficits after carpal tunnel decompression is not effective. Level of Evidence: II PMID:27402282

  6. Carpal tunnel repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100078.htm Carpal tunnel repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... in the wrist and the wrist bones (carpal tunnel). Review Date 5/9/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  7. The carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-12-01

    The carpal bones are deeply convex anteriorly. This bony gutter is converted by the flexor retinaculum into a tube - the carpal tunnel, which conveys the median nerve, together with the long flexor tendons of the fingers and thumb, into the hand. It is of special interest to the surgeon because it is the site of a common nerve entrapment, the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  8. Carpal tunnel release

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are taking. This includes medicines, supplements, or herbs you bought without a prescription. You may be ... gov/pubmed/23026458 . Zhao M, Burke DT. Median neuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome). In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, ...

  9. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... an X-ray Carpal Tunnel Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Print A A A What's ...

  10. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy resulting from compression of the median nerve as it passes through a narrow tunnel in the wrist on its way to the hand. The lack of precise objective and clinical tests, along with symptoms that are synonymous with other syndromes in the upper extremity, cause carpal tunnel syndrome to appear to be a rare entity in athletics. However, it should not be ruled out as a possible etiology of upper extremity paralysis in the athlete. More typically, carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy encountered in industry. Treatment may include rest and/or splinting of the involved wrist, ice application, galvanic stimulation, or iontophoresis to reduce inflammation, and then transition to heat modalities and therapeutic exercises for developing flexibility, strength, and endurance. In addition, an ergonomic assessment should be conducted, resulting in modifications to accommodate the carpal tunnel syndrome patient. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558255

  11. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a collection of clinical symptoms and signs caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve compression. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgical treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, local corticosteroids injection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints.

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve damage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, surgical treatments, and postoperative treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, internal neurolysis, local and systemic corticosteroids, massage therapy, nerve and tendon gliding exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), pyridoxine, therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints. PMID:21718565

  13. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aroori, Somaiah; Spence, Roy AJ

    2008-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common peripheral neuropathies. It affects mainly middle aged women. In the majority of patients the exact cause and pathogenesis of CTS is unclear. Although several occupations have been linked to increased incidence and prevalence of CTS the evidence is not clear. Occupational CTS is uncommon and it is essential to exclude all other causes particularly the intrinsic factors such as obesity before attributing it to occupation. The risk of CTS is high in occupations involving exposure to high pressure, high force, repetitive work, and vibrating tools. The classic symptoms of CTS include nocturnal pain associated with tingling and numbness in the distribution of median nerve in the hand. There are several physical examination tests that will help in the diagnosis of CTS but none of these tests are diagnostic on their own. The gold standard test is nerve conduction studies. However, they are also associated with false positive and false negative results. The diagnosis of CTS should be based on history, physical examination and results of electrophysiological studies. The patient with mild symptoms of CTS can be managed with conservative treatment, particularly local injection of steroids. However, in moderate to severe cases, surgery is the only treatment that provides cure. The basic principle of surgery is to increase the volume of the carpal tunnel by dividing transverse carpal ligament to release the pressure on the median nerve. Apart from early recovery and return to work there is no significant difference in terms of early and late complications and long-term pain relief between endoscopic and open carpal tunnel surgery. PMID:18269111

  14. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 minutes of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve’s circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). Statement of clinical significance This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26662276

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chammas, M

    2014-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest entrapment neuropathy and is due to combined compression and traction on the median nerve at the wrist. It is often idiopathic. Although spontaneous resolution is possible, the usual natural evolution is slow progression. Diagnosis is mainly clinical depending on symptoms and provocative tests. An electromyogram is recommended preoperatively and in cases of work-related disease. Medical treatment is indicated early on or in cases with no deficit and consists of steroid injection in the canal or a night splint in neutral wrist position. Surgical treatment is by section of the flexor retinaculum and is indicated in resistance to medical treatment, in deficit or acute cases. Mini-invasive techniques such as endoscopic and mini-open approaches to carpal tunnel release with higher learning curves are justified by the shorter functional recovery time compared to classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon's preference, patient information, stage of severity, etiology and availability of material. Results are satisfactory in 90% of cases. Nerve recovery depends on the stage of severity as well as general patient factors. Recovery of force takes about 2-3 months after the disappearance of 'pillar pain'. This operation has a benign reputation with a 0.2-0.5% reported neurovascular complication rate.

  16. Carpal Tunnel Exercises: Can They Relieve Symptoms?

    MedlinePlus

    ... other carpal tunnel treatments, such as surgery, behavior modification or wrist splints. Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused ... when combined with other treatments, such as activity modification, wrist splinting or corticosteroid injections. After surgery to ...

  17. A One-Stop Carpal Tunnel Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Reid, MJ; David, LA; Nicholl, JE

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION By December 2008, 90% of referrals requiring hospital admission will need to be seen and treated within the 18-week patient pathway. Previously, patients within our trust with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome had to wait 3 months to see a specialist in clinic and, once assessed, would have to wait up to a further 6 months for an open carpal tunnel decompression under local anaesthetic (OCTD/LA). We set up a one-stop clinic, where patients would have their out-patient consultation and surgery on the same day. We evaluated the clinic in order to assess whether it led to reduced waiting times whilst maintaining good clinical outcome and patient satisfaction. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients were selected on the basis of the standard referral letter alone. Those selected were then assessed by a single surgeon in the clinic. The patients deemed appropriate underwent an OCTD/LA and were discharged the same day. Patients were followed up with a patient satisfaction and Boston questionnaire. RESULTS Forty-six patients underwent 63 OCTD/LA, waiting an average of 2.2 months (9 weeks) from referral. There was high patient satisfaction and improvement in symptoms following treatment in the clinic. CONCLUSIONS We believe a one-stop carpal tunnel clinic can be an efficient and cost-effective way of treating this common condition. PMID:19220947

  18. Pressure-morphology relationship of a released carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hee; Marquardt, Tamara L; Gabra, Joseph N; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-04-01

    We investigated morphological changes of a released carpal tunnel in response to variations of carpal tunnel pressure. Pressure within the carpal tunnel is known to be elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and dependent on wrist posture. Previously, increased carpal tunnel pressure was shown to affect the morphology of the carpal tunnel with an intact transverse carpal ligament (TCL). However, the pressure-morphology relationship of the carpal tunnel after release of the TCL has not been investigated. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) was performed endoscopically on cadaveric hands and the carpal tunnel pressure was dynamically increased from 10 to 120 mmHg. Simultaneously, carpal tunnel cross-sectional images were captured by an ultrasound system, and pressure measurements were recorded by a pressure transducer. Carpal tunnel pressure significantly affected carpal arch area (p < 0.001), with an increase of >62 mm(2) at 120 mmHg. Carpal arch height, length, and width also significantly changed with carpal tunnel pressure (p < 0.05). As carpal tunnel pressure increased, carpal arch height and length increased, but the carpal arch width decreased. Analyses of the pressure-morphology relationship for a released carpal tunnel revealed a nine times greater compliance than that previously reported for a carpal tunnel with an intact TCL. This change of structural properties as a result of transecting the TCL helps explain the reduction of carpal tunnel pressure and relief of symptoms for patients after CTR surgery.

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to an osteophyte of the trapezium.

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Halpern, Casey H; Dolinskas, Carol A; Zager, Eric L; Welch, William C

    2011-11-01

    We report a 42-year-old man with a rare carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) secondary to an osteophyte of the trapezium. The patient presented with a 3-year history of CTS, consisting of progressive pain and paresthesias in his right hand, positive Tinel and Phalen signs, and an electrodiagnostic study demonstrating median nerve compression at the wrist. The procedure was an open carpal tunnel release. Intraoperatively, a bony protuberance was found beneath the transverse carpal ligament (TCL), resulting in compression of the median nerve. The median nerve was decompressed and the patient's symptoms resolved postoperatively. Surgical pathology revealed bony fragments, and a postoperative CT scan was supportive of an osteophytic remnant protruding from the trapezium. Carpal bone osteophytes are rarely reported causes of CTS.

  20. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Michael Warren; Masear, Victoria; Chung, Kevin; Maupin, Kent; Andary, Michael; Amadio, Peter C.; Barth, Richard W.; Watters, William C.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline was created to improve patient care by outlining the appropriate information-gathering and decision-making processes involved in managing the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The methods used to develop this clinical practice guideline were designed to combat bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility. The guideline’s recommendations are as follows: The physician should obtain an accurate patient history. The physician should perform a physical examination of the patient that may include personal characteristics as well as performing a sensory examination, manual muscle testing of the upper extremity, and provocative and/or discriminatory tests for alternative diagnoses. The physician may obtain electrodiagnostic tests to differentiate among diagnoses. This may be done in the presence of thenar atrophy and/or persistent numbness. The physician should obtain electrodiagnostic tests when clinical and/or provocative tests are positive and surgical management is being considered. If the physician orders electrodiagnostic tests, the testing protocol should follow the American Academy of Neurology/American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine/American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation guidelines for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, the physician should not routinely evaluate patients suspected of having carpal tunnel syndrome with new technology, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and pressure-specified sensorimotor devices in the wrist and hand. This decision was based on an additional nonsystematic literature review following the face-to-face meeting of the work group. PMID:19474448

  1. Medical history of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Heidi; Posner, Martin A

    2002-05-01

    The anatomical configuration of the carpal tunnel is that of an inelastic channel. Consequently, any increase in its volume or alteration in shape will usually result in a significant increase in interstitial pressure. At a pressure threshold of 20 mm Hg to 30 mm Hg, epineurial blood flow is compromised. When that pressure is sustained, the symptoms and physical findings associated with CTS appear. Typically, patients present with intermittent pain and paresthesias in all or part of the median nerve distribution of their hand(s). As weeks and months pass, symptoms progressively increase in frequency and severity. Eventually, thenar muscle weakness develops that initially manifests itself as "fatigue," or "tiredness." The progressive increase in symptoms and physical findings, usually accompanied by a progressive deterioration in electrodiagnostic studies, facilitates the classification of the condition into early, intermediate, and advanced stages. The increase in interstitial pressure in the carpal tunnel is in the vast majority of cases idiopathic (spontaneous). It can also be caused by a myriad of other conditions that can be classified into three other categories: intrinsic factors that increase the volume of the tunnel (outside and inside the nerve), extrinsic factors that alter the contour of the tunnel, and repetitive/overuse conditions. In addition, there is another category of neuropathic factors that affect the nerve without increasing interstitial pressure. In rare situations CTS can present as an acute problem. Far less common than the chronic form of the condition, it can follow acute wrist trauma, rheumatologic disorders, hemorrhagic problems, vascular disorders affecting a patent median artery, and high pressure injection injuries. Prompt recognition is important, followed in most cases by urgent surgical decompression of the median nerve.

  2. CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME IN CYCLISTS

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Daniel; Sassul, Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: About a group of cyclists, professionals / amateurs, Mountain bike, road and triathlon; achieve a good diagnosis of the disease, with a good clinical examination and sectorized according EGM injury evoked potentials. Methods: Clinical examination and accurate test with different signs of pathology. EGM with evocative potential and conduction velocity. Results: After 25 track cyclists, 18 professionals, 22 male and 3 female; for 24 months. Through good clinical examination and EMG. We got that 70% had direct compression injuries Carpal tunnel for poor support on the handlebars. The rest were cervical praxis, by poor body position on the bike, taking cervico very steep angles / dorsal, during competitions or training for more than 2 hrs. Conclusion: A good prevention work with our teacher / cyclist in the position of deposrtista in ciclo simulador. Work in the gym, on tone and elongation of the upper limb. A good EGM, made with a specialist physiatrist. It leads to the correct diagnosis, leads to a good final treatment; which agreed that:* Cervical praxis, had good results with treatment Conservative / FST / vit.B12.* The Carpal tunnel own injuries, treatment was quirúrg. (Open surgery) with subsequent FST / vit..B12 with satisfactory return in time to sporting activity.

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome - anatomical and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Iskra, Tomasz; Mizia, Ewa; Musial, Agata; Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common and widely known of the entrapment neuropathies in which the body's peripheral nerves are compressed. Common symptoms of CTS involve the hand and result from compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. In general, CTS develops when the tissues around the median nerve irritate or compress on the nerve along its course through the carpal tunnel, however often it is very difficult to determine cause of CTS. Proper treatment (conservative or surgical) usually can relieve the symptoms and restore normal use of the wrist and hand.

  4. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Physical Therapy or Surgery?

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome causes pain, numbness, and weakness in the wrist and hand. Nearly 50% of all work-related injuries are linked to carpal tunnel syndrome, and people with this injury are more likely to miss work because of it. Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome can be treated with physical therapy or surgery. Although surgery may be considered when the symptoms are severe, more than a third of patients do not return to work within 8 weeks after an operation. Based on the potential side effects and risks of surgery, patients often ask if they might try physical therapy first. An article in the March 2017 issue of JOSPT assesses the effectiveness of therapy and surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):162. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0503.

  5. Limited incision carpal tunnel release

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sunil; Bhogesha, Sandeep; Singh, Onkar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy. Limited incision techniques for carpal tunnel release are gaining popularity. The main advantages of these techniques are less scar load, less pillar pain, shorter recovery, and return-to-work time. However, the completeness of release, and risk of neurovascular injury are always a concern. We devised a method of limited incision release with two mini-incisions and use of nasal speculum and a probe. We aimed to evaluate the clinical and neurological outcome of this technique. Materials and Methods: Twenty seven cases (9 male and 18 female, age 28–56 years) of isolated CTS cases were enrolled in the study. A total of 33 hands (six bilateral) underwent limited incision carpal tunnel release. In this study, two mini-incisions were used and release was done with the help of nasal speculum. Evaluation preoperatively and in 6 months and at 1-year postoperatively was done, namely, (a) clinical status examination, (b) motor testing using grip and pinch dynamometer, and (c) neurological outcome measure using nerve conduction study. Results: All the patients had good clinical and neurological outcome with no recurrence during followup. The first symptom to get relieved was night pains, with a mean of 4.5 days (range 2–14 days). Compared to pain, improvement of sensory symptoms was delayed; the mean duration was 42.8 days (range 30–90 days). Scar tenderness was present only for a mean duration of 9 days (range 7–21 days). The mean duration for patients to resume their daily activities was12 days (range 7–28 days) and to work was 32 days (range 21–90 days). The hand grip showed mean values of 45.12 ± 16.16 g/mm2 preoperatively, 62.45 ± 18.86 g/mm2 at 6 months postoperatively, and 74.87 ± 20.35 g/mm2 at 1-year postoperatively. The key pinch showed mean values of 11.27 ± 3.51 g/mm2 preoperatively, 20.181 ± 3.94 g/mm2 at 6 months postoperatively, and 27.96 ± 94.42 g/mm2

  6. Practical anatomy of the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Rotman, Mitchell B; Donovan, James P

    2002-05-01

    The carpal tunnel is most narrow at the level of the hook of the hamate. The median nerve is the most superficial structure. It has specific relationships to surrounding structures within the carpal tunnel to the ulnar bursa, flexor tendons, and endoscopic devices placed inside the canal. The importance of the ring finger axis is stressed. Knowledge of topographical landmarks that mark the borders of the carpal tunnel, the hook of the hamate, superficial arch, and thenar branch of the median nerve ensure appropriate incision placement for endoscopic as well as open carpal tunnel release surgery. Anatomy of the transverse carpal ligament, its layers and relationships to adjacent structures including the fad pad, Guyon's canal, palmar fascia, and thenar muscles has been discussed. Fibers derived primarily from thenar muscle fascia with connections to the hypothenar muscle fascia and dorsal fascia of the palmaris brevis form a separate fascial layer directly palmar to the TCL and can be retained. This helps to preserve postoperative pinch strength. The fat pad in line with the ring finger axis overlaps the deep surface of the distal edge of the TCL and must be retracted in order to visualize the distal end of the ligament. Whereas the ulnar artery within Guyon's canal is frequently located radial to the hook of the hamate, injury to this structure has not been a problem during ECTR surgery. Variations of the median nerve and its branches, as well as the palmar cutaneous nerve distribution, have been reviewed. A rare ulnar-sided thenar branch from the median nerve, interconnecting branches between the ulnar and median nerves located just distal to the end of the TCL, and transverse ulnar-based cutaneous nerves can be injured during open or ECTR surgery. Anomalous muscles, tendons or interconnections, and the lumbricals during finger flexion may be seen within the carpal tunnel. These structures can be the cause of compression of the median nerve. The anatomy of the

  7. Physical Therapy as Good as Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164278.html Physical Therapy as Good as Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Study Conservative approach ... FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery is a common approach to treat carpal tunnel syndrome. But, ...

  8. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in motorcyclists.

    PubMed

    Manes, Harvey R

    2012-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is prevalent in patients who have a repetitive motion, vibration, or pressure exerted on the wrist joint for an extended period of time. The prevalence of this condition in the general population is approximately 5%. Motorcyclists subject themselves to high levels of vibration from the road and use their wrists to control the motorcycle's brakes, gas intake, and gears via the handlebars. Under these conditions, the author hypothesized that an increased prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome would be observed in this population.

  9. Employees' Knowledge of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandy-Goldston, Terrie M.

    A study examined employees' knowledge of the causes of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), its prevention, and their legal rights after being diagnosed with CTS. A 24-item questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 30 Chicago-area employees who had been afflicted with CTS. Of those surveyed, 99% considered their CTS injury related to their…

  10. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in ARL Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Joyce K.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 72 member libraries in the Association of Research Libraries revealed the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and the measures taken to cope with it. Recommends implementing proactive ergonomics programs; soliciting staff input for solutions; providing report guidelines; using external help; stressing preventive measures and…

  11. Carpal Tunnel Cross-Sectional Area Affected by Soft Tissues Abutting the Carpal Bones.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-02-01

    The carpal tunnel accommodates free movement of its contents, and the tunnel's cross-sectional area is a useful morphological parameter for the evaluation of the space available for the carpal tunnel contents and of potential nerve compression in the tunnel. The osseous boundary of the carpal bones as the dorsal border of the carpal tunnel is commonly used to determine the tunnel area, but this boundary contains soft tissues such as numerous intercarpal ligaments and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. The aims of this study were to quantify the thickness of the soft tissues abutting the carpal bones and to investigate how this soft tissue influences the calculation of the carpal tunnel area. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed for eight cadaveric specimens. A medical balloon with a physiological pressure was inserted into an evacuated tunnel to identify the carpal tunnel boundary. The balloon-based (i.e. true carpal tunnel) and osseous-based carpal tunnel boundaries were extracted and divided into regions corresponding to the hamate, capitate, trapezoid, trapezium, and transverse carpal ligament (TCL). From the two boundaries, the overall and regional soft tissue thicknesses and areas were calculated. The soft tissue thickness was significantly greater for the trapezoid (3.1±1.2mm) and trapezium (3.4±1.0mm) regions than for the hamate (0.7±0.3mm) and capitate (1.2±0.5mm) regions. The carpal tunnel area using the osseous boundary (243.0±40.4mm(2)) was significantly larger than the balloon-based area (183.9±29.7mm(2)) with a ratio of 1.32. In other words, the carpal tunnel area can be estimated as 76% (= 1/1.32) of the osseous-based area. The abundance of soft tissue in the trapezoid and trapezium regions can be attributed mainly to the capitate-trapezium ligament and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Inclusion of such soft tissue leads to overestimations of the carpal tunnel area. Correct quantification of the carpal tunnel area aids in examining carpal

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome in occupational medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Bugajska, Joanna; Jedryka-Góral, Anna; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz

    2007-01-01

    Work-related overload syndromes are chiefly associated with the upper limbs, where carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) plays a leading role. This article analyses methods of diagnosing CTS, with special emphasis on those that can be used by physicians in early diagnosis of CTS in workers doing monotonous work. It also discusses occupational (e.g., assembly work, typing, playing instruments, packaging and work associated with the use of a hammer or pruning scissors) and extra-occupational factors (e.g., post-traumatic deformation of bone elements of the carpal tunnel, degenerative and inflammatory changes in tendon sheaths, connective tissue hypertrophy or formation of crystal deposits) leading to CTS; diagnostic methods (subjective symptoms, physical examination and manual provocative tests, vibration perception threshold, electrophysiological examination and imaging methods); and therapeutic and preventive management tools accessible in occupational medicine practice.

  13. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tunnel syndrome may have trouble typing on the computer or playing a video game. In fact, repetitive ... times as many women as men have CTS. Computer operators, assembly-line workers, and hair stylists are ...

  14. Current options for nonsurgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans; Colbert, Agatha; Frydl, Jennifer; Arnall, Elizabeth; Elliot, Molly; Carlson, Nels

    2010-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common of the entrapment neuropathies. Surgical decompression is commonly performed and has traditionally been considered the defnitive treatment for CTS. Conservative treatment options include physical therapy, bracing, steroid injections and alternative medicine. While CTS is often progressive, patients may get better without formal treatment. The resolution of symptoms is not necessarily related to the severity of the clinical findings and self-limited activity is common. The current literature suggests that bracing and corticosteroid injections may be useful in the nonsurgical treatment of CTS, although the benefits may be short term. There is limited evidence regarding the efficacy of other treatments, such as therapy, exercise, yoga, acupuncture, lasers and magnets, and further studies are needed. Surgery is recommended for progressive functional deficits and significant pain. PMID:20490348

  15. Effect of wrist posture on carpal tunnel pressure while typing.

    PubMed

    Rempel, David M; Keir, Peter J; Bach, Joel M

    2008-09-01

    Long weekly hours of keyboard use may lead to or aggravate carpal tunnel syndrome. The effects of typing on fluid pressure in the carpal tunnel, a possible mediator of carpal tunnel syndrome, are unknown. Twenty healthy subjects participated in a laboratory study to investigate the effects of typing at different wrist postures on carpal tunnel pressure of the right hand. Changes in wrist flexion/extension angle (p = 0.01) and radial/ulnar deviation angle (p = 0.03) independently altered carpal tunnel pressure; wrist deviations in extension or radial deviation were associated with an increase in pressure. The activity of typing independently elevated carpal tunnel pressure (p = 0.001) relative to the static hand held in the same posture. This information can guide the design and use of keyboards and workstations in order to minimize carpal tunnel pressure while typing. The findings may also be useful to clinicians and ergonomists in the management of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who use a keyboard.

  16. Effects of static fingertip loading on carpal tunnel pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rempel, D.; Keir, P. J.; Smutz, W. P.; Hargens, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and fingertip force during a simple pressing task. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in 15 healthy volunteers by means of a saline-filled catheter inserted percutaneously into the carpal tunnel of the nondominant hand. The subjects pressed on a load cell with the tip of the index finger and with 0, 6, 9, and 12 N of force. The task was repeated in 10 wrist postures: neutral; 10 and 20 degrees of ulnar deviation; 10 degrees of radial deviation; and 15, 30, and 45 degrees of both flexion and extension. Fingertip loading significantly increased carpal tunnel pressure for all wrist angles (p = 0.0001). Post hoc analyses identified significant increase (p < 0.05) in carpal tunnel pressure between unloaded (0 N) and all loaded conditions, as well as between the 6 and 12 N load conditions. This study demonstrates that the process whereby fingertip loading elevates carpal tunnel pressure is independent of wrist posture and that relatively small fingertip loads have a large effect on carpal tunnel pressure. It also reveals the response characteristics of carpal tunnel pressure to fingertip loading, which is one step in understanding the relationship between sustained grip and pinch activities and the aggravation or development of median neuropathy at the wrist.

  17. Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Evaluation of the Depth of the Carpal Tunnel by Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Elsaman, Ahmed Mohammed Mahrous Yousif; Thabit, Mohamed Nasreldin; Radwan, Ahmed Roshdy Al-Agamy; Ohrndorf, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the work described here was to evaluate the depth of the carpal tunnel (DCT) in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy volunteers by ultrasonography (US), through measurement of the distance from the flexor retinaculum to the surface of the capitate bone at the carpal tunnel outlet, and compare it with other ultrasonographic and electrophysiologic parameters in CTS. The study was conducted in 60 non-diabetic patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (unilateral n = 37, bilateral n = 23) evidenced by electrophysiologic diagnosis according to the criteria of the American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AAEM). Furthermore, 40 hands from 20 healthy volunteers were examined. Median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA); flattening ratio (FR), the ratio of the length to the width of the median nerve; and DCT at the canal outlet were measured for all participants. The mean age was 35.6 ± 9.48 y. The female-to-male ratio was 47:13 in the CTS patients. The sensitivity and specificity were 82% and 95% for CSA, 75% and 60% for FR and 75% and 87.5% for DCT, respectively. Differences between patients and healthy controls were significant for all three parameters, greatest for DCT, followed by CSA and then FR. We conclude that DCT increased in CTS and this new parameter is comparable in sensitivity and specificity to CSA and FR. DCT increased independently of the cause of the CTS (decrease in size of canal or increase in contents).

  18. Suggested variations on standard carpal tunnel syndrome assessment tests.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Whitney

    2008-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a highly prevalent peripheral neuropathy and manual therapy practitioners are likely to have clients presenting with this condition. There are no definitive diagnostic procedures that have shown a high degree of accuracy in identifying carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, manual therapy practitioners do not have access to high-tech diagnostic procedures and therefore rely on physical examination methods to identify peripheral neuropathies like carpal tunnel syndrome. Several special orthopedic testing procedures have shown value in predicting the presence of carpal tunnel syndrome. Combining these standard testing procedures with neurodynamic principles allows for modifications to these tests making them more sensitive in identifying median nerve compression neuropathy in the carpal tunnel.

  19. Osteopathic manipulative medicine for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siu, Gilbert; Jaffe, J Douglas; Rafique, Maryum; Weinik, Michael M

    2012-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is 1 of the most common peripheral nerve entrapment disorders. Osteopathic manipulative medicine can be invaluable in diagnosing and managing CTS. Combined with a patient's history and a standard physical examination, an osteopathic structural examination can facilitate localizing the nerve entrapment, diagnosing CTS, and monitoring the disease process. Osteopathic manipulative treatment is noninvasive and can be used to supplement traditional CTS treatment methods. The authors also review the relevant anatomy involving CTS and the clinical efficacy of osteopathic manipulative medicine in the management of this disorder.

  20. Carpal tunnel: Normal anatomy, anatomical variants and ultrasound technique.

    PubMed

    Presazzi, A; Bortolotto, C; Zacchino, M; Madonia, L; Draghi, F

    2011-03-01

    The carpal tunnel is an osteofibrous canal situated in the volar wrist. The boundaries are the carpal bones and the flexor retinaculum. In addition to the medial nerve, the carpal tunnel contains nine tendons: the flexor pollicis longus, the four flexor digitorum superficialis and the four flexor digitorum profundus. Ultrasound (US) study of the carpal tunnel generally involves short-axis imaging of the tendons, and in the presence of disease, long-axis imaging and dynamic maneuvers are added. There are numerous reports of anatomical variants of the wrist involving vessels, nerves, tendons and muscles, and they can all be studied by US. Some are particularly relevant from a clinical point of view and will therefore be accurately described. The anatomy is complex, and the US operator should therefore be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy as well as the anatomical variants that may have a role in the pathogenesis of carpal tunnel syndrome or influence treatment.

  1. [Carpal tunnel syndrome. The contribution of ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Pardal-Fernandez, J M

    2014-11-16

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent mononeuropathy. Its incidence is huge and the ensuing community health problems are therefore the cause of much concern. Such a situation has made it necessary to develop a key point in the management of the illness, that is, to find flexible, sensitive, specific and cost-effective diagnostic procedures. Today tools of proven worth are now available, especially electrophysiology, and quite recently we also have ultrasonography. Both of these techniques allow us to confirm and characterise neuropathies due to entrapment and indeed a large number of papers dealing with ultrasound imaging have been published in the literature over the last few years. It therefore comes as no surprise that many renowned authors have acknowledged the usefulness of this technique. Here, we review the pathophysiological and diagnostic aspects of carpal tunnel syndrome, with greater emphasis on how ultrasonography has contributed to the morphological evaluation of the entrapped nerve. This method has proved itself to have significant advantages not only due to its being readily available, inexpensive, fast and painless, but also, and above all, because of its high capacity to detect neural and perineural alterations. A critical review of the literature supports this thesis and shows its incorporation into routine daily evaluation to be highly recommendable.

  2. Description, reliability and validity of a novel method to measure carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coppieters, Michel W; Schmid, Annina B; Kubler, Paul A; Hodges, Paul W

    2012-12-01

    Elevated carpal tunnel pressure is an important pathomechanism in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Several invasive methods have been described for direct measurement of carpal tunnel pressure, but all have two important limitations. The pressure gauge requires sterilisation between uses, which makes time-efficient data collection logistically cumbersome, and more importantly, the reliability of carpal tunnel pressure measurements has not been evaluated for any of the methods in use. This technical note describes a new method to measure carpal tunnel pressure using inexpensive, disposable pressure sensors and reports the within and between session reliability of the pressure recordings in five different wrist positions and during typing and computer mouse operation. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC[3,1]) were calculated for recordings within one session for healthy participants (n = 7) and patients with CTS (n = 5), and for recordings between two sessions for patients with CTS (n = 5). Overall, the reliability was high. With the exception of two coefficients, the reliability of the recordings at different wrist angles varied from 0.63 to 0.99. Reliability for typing and mouse operation ranged from 0.86 to 0.99. The new method described in this report is inexpensive and reliable, and data collection can be applied more efficiently as off-site sterilisation of equipment is not required. These advances are likely to promote future research into carpal tunnel pressure, such as investigation of the therapeutic mechanisms of various conservative treatment modalities that are believed to reduce elevated carpal tunnel pressure.

  3. Area and shape changes of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Ming; Masters, Tamara L; Mondello, Tracy A

    2011-12-01

    Carpal tunnel mechanics is relevant to our understanding of median nerve compression in the tunnel. The compliant characteristics of the tunnel strongly influence its mechanical environment. We investigated the distensibility of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure. A custom balloon device was designed to apply controlled pressure. Tunnel cross sections were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging to derive the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and morphological parameters at the hook of hamate. The results showed that the cross-sectional area (CSA) at the level of the hook of hamate increased, on average, by 9.2% and 14.8% at 100 and 200 mmHg, respectively. The increased CSA was attained by a shape change of the cross section, displaying increased circularity. The increase in CSA was mainly attributable to the increase of area in the carpal arch region formed by the transverse carpal ligament. The narrowing of the carpal arch width was associated with an increase in the carpal arch. We concluded that the carpal tunnel is compliant to accommodate physiological variations of the carpal tunnel pressure, and that the increase in tunnel CSA is achieved by increasing the circularity of the cross section.

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Takaaki; Nakamura, Ryogo; Nakao, Etsuhiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We retrospectively reviewed 12 patients (3 men and 9 women, with a mean age of 72 years) who were surgically treated for carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease. All patients except 1 were incidentally diagnosed with Kienböck disease and had little or no wrist pain. Radiographic tests revealed advanced Kienböck disease in all patients. Intraoperative findings indicated that the site of maximum compression on the median nerve was located at the level of the carpal tunnel inlet in 11 patients, and the volar dislocated fragment of the lunate was located proximally adjacent to the floor of the carpal tunnel inlet. This disorder is most prevalent in elderly women, and even advanced Kienböck disease can present without wrist pain. Our findings suggest that palmar protrusion of the lunate may be the primary cause of carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease. PMID:27578910

  5. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: The Risk to Educational Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedt, Joe D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and its ramifications for sign language users, in particular, educational interpreters. Discussed are the syndrome's incidence, causes, diagnostic procedures, medical and surgical interventions, and prevention guidelines. (JDD)

  6. PROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN PROXIMAL TRANSVERSE INCISION AND THE CONVENTIONAL LONGITUDINAL INCISIONS FOR CARPAL TUNNEL RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira Alves, Marcelo de Pinho

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a pathological condition frequently seen in orthopedic consultation offices. It is most common compressive neuropathy and also the one most often treated surgically. CTS is usually diagnosed clinically, through the clinical history, physical examination (Tinel, Phalen and Durkan tests) and complementary examinations, and more specifically, nerve conduction studies. Ultrasound scans and magnetic resonance imaging may also be used. Conservative treatment is reserved for patients presenting with mild symptoms, with little incapacitation, who show good response to non-steroidal or steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy and lifestyle changes. Surgical treatment is more frequent, and a variety of techniques are used. The goal of the surgery is to decompress the carpal tunnel and, by sectioning the transverse carpal ligament, release the median nerve. The aim of this paper was to compare surgical treatment of CTS by means of a transverse mini-incision made proximally to the carpal canal, with the classic longitudinal incision over the carpal canal. The mini-incision technique was shown to be less invasive and equally effective for treating CTS, with less morbidity than with the classic longitudinal incision. PMID:27022592

  7. [Principal causes for recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Alonso, M F; Abdala-Dergal, C

    2016-01-01

    The frequent causes of relapsing carpal tunnel syndrome were analyzed. Nine patients were followed-up from January 1st to December 31st, 2011. They underwent a physical exam and imaging tests. Pain was measured in all of them with the VAS, and the Brigham and Womens Hospital questionnaire was used to assess disability. Patients included seven females and two males; mean age was 52 years. Major causes for relapse included postoperative fibrosis with incomplete release in seven patients and incomplete release in two patients in whom minimally invasive approaches were used. Three of the nine patients had retractile scars. The main cause of relapse was postoperative fibrosis associated with the minima-lly invasive approach.

  8. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  9. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to gouty tenosynovitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pledger, S R; Hirsch, B; Freiberg, R A

    1976-01-01

    A 30-year-old patient developed bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to gouty tenosynovitis. Relief of symptoms followed removal of the tophaceous masses from the carpal tunnel. Surgical treatment is recommended whenever there is symptomatic median nerve compression.

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome among grocery store workers.

    PubMed

    Osorio, A M; Ames, R G; Jones, J; Castorina, J; Rempel, D; Estrin, W; Thompson, D

    1994-02-01

    The California Department of Health Services evaluated carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a median nerve entrapment condition associated with forceful and repetitive wrist motion, among grocery store workers at a large California supermarket where a CTS cluster had been reported. Forceful and repetitive wrist motion was measured, in three exposure levels, through a job classification scheme based upon type of work tasks and average time per week spent performing these tasks. A medical questionnaire and measurements of median sensory nerve conduction were used to measure CTS. CTS prevalence was 23% based upon a sample of 56 participants drawn from a workforce of 69 employees. A relative risk of 8.3 (95% confidence interval 2.6-26.4) for a history of CTS-like symptoms between the high and low exposure level groups held up after adjustment for the potential confounders of age, sex, alcohol consumption, and high-risk medical history. It was concluded that the basic principles of good ergonomic design should be used to prevent or diminish the risk of musculoskeletal injury in the workplace.

  11. Anatomic Anomalies Encountered in 467 Open Carpal Tunnel Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Ahmadreza; Nasiri, Behnam; Mousavi, Seyed Ahmad; Hesarikia, Hamid; Navaeifar, Nasrin; Taleb, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy and carpal tunnel surgery is the most frequently performed hand surgery. Anatomic anomalies may predispose the median nerve to compression. The aim of the current study was to search for anatomic anomalies in open carpal tunnel surgeries through a cross-sectional study. During a cross-sectional study in a one-year period, 436 consecutive patients (307 females and 129 males) with the average age of 50.3 ± 2.4 years underwent 467 classic open carpal tunnel surgeries. Thirty-one patients had bilateral surgeries. A thorough inspection of the incisions was conducted to search for vascular, neural, tendon and muscular anomalies. Forty-two (8.9%) hands (14 males and 28 females) had anomalies. The average age of the patients with discovered anomalies was 48.6 ± 7.6 years. Ten anomalies were seen on the left hands and 32 anomalies were seen on the right hands. Among the 42 anomalies, there were 16 persistent median arteries, 14 anomalies of the median nerve, 7 intratunnel intrusion of the flexor and lumbrical muscle bellies and 5 anomalies of the origin of the thenar muscles. There was no correlation between the discovered anomalies and the age, gender or hand sides. Anatomical anomalies are not uncommon in carpal tunnel surgeries. However, the frequencies of the reported anomalies vary among different studies. Familiarity with these anomalies increases the safety of the operation.

  12. Atypical Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in a Holt Oram Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mace, James; Reddy, Srikanth; Mohil, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    We present a case report of a patient diagnosed with Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) presenting with clinical and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome. Pre-operative Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an abnormal course of the median nerve; as such an atypical incision and approach were carried out to decompress the nerve to excellent post operative clinical effect. To our knowledge this is the first description of abnormal nervous course in a patient with HOS leading to peripheral entrapment. A literature surrounding the important aspects of HOS to the orthopaedic surgeon is presented concomitantly. PMID:25621081

  13. The reliability of physical examination for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marx, R G; Hudak, P L; Bombardier, C; Graham, B; Goldsmith, C; Wright, J G

    1998-08-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliability of static and moving two-point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing, Tinel's test, manual motor testing of abductor pollicis brevis, vibration and Phalen's test in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Twelve patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome were examined in an outpatient setting. The interobserver reliability was satisfactory for all tests except for Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing. Intraobserver reliability was also satisfactory for all tests. Static two point discrimination had higher reliability than moving two-point discrimination. Seven tests for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome were reliable in the hands of skilled health care professionals. Hand surgeons and hand therapists examined patients more reliably than occupational health workers.

  14. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Caused by Space Occupying Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Jung; Yoon, Hong Ki; Hahn, Soo Bong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to space occupying lesions (SOL). Materials and Methods Eleven patients and 12 cases that underwent surgery for CTS due to SOL were studied retrospectively. We excluded SOL caused by bony lesions, such as malunion of distal radius fracture, volar lunate dislocation, etc. The average age was 51 years. There were 3 men and 8 women. Follow-up period was 12 to 40 months with an average of 18 months. The diagnosis of CTS was made clinically and electrophysiologically. In patients with swelling or tenderness on the area of wrist flexion creases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomogram (CT) were additionally taken as well as the carpal tunnel view. We performed conventional open transverse carpal ligament release and removal of SOL. Results The types of lesion confirmed by pathologic examination were; tuberculosis tenosynovitis in 3 cases, nonspecific tenosynovitis in 2 cases, and gout in one case. Other SOLs were tumorous condition in five cases, and abnormal palmaris longus hypertrophy in 1 case. Tumorous conditions were due to calcifying mass in 4 cases and ganglion in 1 case. Following surgery, all cases showed alleviation of symptom without recurrence or complications. Conclusion In cases with swelling or tenderness on the area of wrist flexion creases, it is important to obtain a carpal tunnel view, and MRI and/or CT should be supplemented in order to rule out SOLs around the carpal tunnel, if necessary. PMID:19430560

  15. Risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in a general population.

    PubMed Central

    Nordstrom, D L; Vierkant, R A; DeStefano, F; Layde, P M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the individual, physical, and psychosocial risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in a general population. METHODS: Population based case-control study in Marshfield epidemiological study area in Wisconsin, USA. Cases were men and women aged 18-69 with newly diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 206 (83.1%) of 248 eligible). Controls were a random sample of residents of the study area who had no history of diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 211 (81.5%) of 259 eligible). Cases and controls were matched by age. Telephone interviews and reviews of medical records obtained height and weight, medical history, average daily hours of exposure to selected physical and organisational work factors, and self ratings on psychosocial work scales. RESULTS: In the final logistic regression model, five work and three non-work variables were associated with risk of carpal tunnel syndrome, after adjusting for age. For each one unit of increase in body mass index (kg/m2), risk increased 8% (odds ratio (OR) 1.08; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03 to 1.14). Having a previous musculoskeletal condition was positively associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.03 to 6.23). People reporting the least influence at work had 2.86 times the risk (95% CI, 1.10 to 7.14) than those with the most influence at work. CONCLUSIONS: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a work related disease, although some important measures of occupational exposure, including keyboard use, were not risk factors in this general population study. The mechanism whereby a weight gain of about six pounds increases the risk of disease 8% requires explanation. PMID:9404321

  16. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  17. A vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Kubler, Paul A; Johnston, Venerina; Coppieters, Michel W

    2015-03-01

    Non-neutral wrist positions and external pressure leading to increased carpal tunnel pressure during computer use have been associated with a heightened risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study investigated whether commonly used ergonomic devices reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with CTS. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in twenty-one patients with CTS before, during and after a computer mouse task using a standard mouse, a vertical mouse, a gel mouse pad and a gliding palm support. Carpal tunnel pressure increased while operating a computer mouse. Although the vertical mouse significantly reduced ulnar deviation and the gel mouse pad and gliding palm support decreased wrist extension, none of the ergonomic devices reduced carpal tunnel pressure. The findings of this study do therefore not endorse a strong recommendation for or against any of the ergonomic devices commonly recommended for patients with CTS. Selection of ergonomic devices remains dependent on personal preference.

  18. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasonography in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and to evaluate the correlation between quantitative muscle US findings and electrodiagnostic study results in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The clinical significance of quantitative muscle US in CTS was also assessed. Methods Twenty patients with CTS and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. All control and CTS subjects underwent a bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction study (NCS) and quantitative muscle US. Transverse US images of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) were obtained to measure muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), thickness, and echo intensity (EI). EI was determined using computer-assisted, grayscale analysis. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for quantitative muscle US in control subjects, and differences in muscle thickness, CSA, and EI between the CTS patient and control groups were analyzed. Relationships between quantitative US parameters and electrodiagnostic study results were evaluated. Results Quantitative muscle US had high inter-rater and intra-rater reliability in the control group. Muscle thickness and CSA were significantly decreased, and EI was significantly increased in the APB of the CTS group (all p<0.05). EI demonstrated a significant positive correlation with latency of the median motor and sensory NCS in CTS patients (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings suggest that quantitative muscle US parameters may be useful for detecting muscle changes in CTS. Further study involving patients with other neuromuscular diseases is needed to evaluate peripheral muscle change using quantitative muscle US. PMID:28119835

  19. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to tophaceous compression of the median nerves.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C Y; Yu, C L; Tsai, S T

    1996-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with long-term gouty arthritis developed bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. At surgery a chalky substance, which showed negative birefringence on polarized microscopy, was found infiltrating around the intensely inflamed transverse carpal ligaments. In differential diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, tophaceous compression over the median nerve should be taken into consideration.

  20. Prevalence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome among Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Jens Erik Just; Peter, Peter Johannsen; Nielsen, Viggo Kamp; Mai, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with Down syndrome were examined clinically and electrophysiologically for occurrence of carpal tunnel syndrome. Twenty-seven patients had normal findings, 13 had prolonged distal motor latency and reduced distal nerve conduction velocity, and 8 patients had one of these signs. Results show that prevalence of…

  1. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Post-Operative Outcome of Patients Undergoing Carpal Tunnel Release?

    PubMed Central

    Roshanzamir, Sharareh; Mortazavi, Sahameddin; Dabbaghmanesh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Risk factors associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome include repetitive use of hand and wrist, advanced age, obesity, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Decompression of the median nerve is the last treatment of choice usually indicated when negative results to conservative treatments remain for three months. In this study, we aimed to find out whether hypothyroid patients would respond to CTS surgical decompression differently in comparison to healthy individuals. Methods This case control study was conducted on patients with CTS in need of surgical release who were refered to Shahid Faghihi hospital, International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from January 2013 to January 2015. Twenty-five hypothyroid and 22 euthyroid patients were recruited. Hypothyroidism was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and serum TSH level. All patients were followed for three weeks after surgery and a Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) was completed for them pre and post operation. An electrophysiological study was performed during the same follow up period. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16. Results The CTS grade reported by electrophysiological study, decreased significantly 3 weeks after operation in comparison with preoperative grades (p<0.001). A significant decrease was observed in the immediate postoperative BCTQ scores compared to preoperative (p<0.001). Also a decrease was detected in the three weeks of postoperative follow up compared to immediate postoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001) and preoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001). Postoperative BCTQ scores of euthyroid patients decreased more in comparison to hypothyroid patients (p<0.001). Conclusion It seems that, hypothyroidism has an effect on postoperative outcome of carpal tunnel release. PMID:27790353

  2. Transverse carpal ligament: its effect on flexor tendon excursion, morphologic changes of the carpal canal, and on pinch and grip strengths after open carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Netscher, D; Mosharrafa, A; Lee, M; Polsen, C; Choi, H; Steadman, A K; Thornby, J

    1997-09-01

    A three-part study is described that examines postoperative weakness after open carpal tunnel release and investigates the role of the transverse carpal ligament in the digital flexor pulley system. The effect of this ligament on flexor tendon excursion is evaluated in a cadaver study. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis is used to determine whether division of the transverse carpal ligament promotes volar migration of the median nerve and flexor tendons. Finally, the effects of ligament division and various methods of transverse carpal ligament reconstruction on the return of grip and pinch strengths after open carpal tunnel release are evaluated. The authors were able to determine that transverse carpal ligament reconstruction, particularly the transposition flap repair technique, after open carpal tunnel release confers a mechanical advantage and that the transverse carpal ligament is an important pulley for flexor tendon excursion. Based on the magnetic resonance imaging studies, volar displacement of carpal contents is reduced in patients undergoing transverse carpal ligament reconstruction by means of a transposition flap compared with those undergoing no ligament reconstruction and those undergoing reconstruction using the palmar aponeurosis. Postoperative grip and pinch strength values for the transposition flap repair group surpassed those of the other two groups at 12 weeks.

  3. Bilateral carpal tunnel surgery in one operation: Retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Herisson, O; Dury, M; Rapp, E; Marin-Braun, F

    2016-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment syndrome. The incidence of a bilateral condition varies between 22% and 87%. The aim of our study was to assess the level of satisfaction and the clinical outcomes in a group of patients operated on through a bilateral neurolysis on the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, in one operating session. This is a retrospective study involving patients with an electromyographic and clinical diagnosis of bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. Patients were treated on an outpatient basis and the bilateral neurolysis was performed by endoscopy. The postoperative data was collected during consultation by a senior surgeon or during telephone interviews. Patients were asked to respond to a satisfaction questionnaire and the functional outcome was assessed through the Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick-DASH) questionnaire. Twenty-nine patients with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome were operated on in single operating sessions between January 2009 and January 2014. The average follow-up was 46 months. The average age at the time of the intervention was 45 years. Two patients were lost to follow-up, and 27 were able to be assessed. In relation to the clinical and functional outcomes, the average Quick-DASH score was 6.78 (ranges: 0-43.2). Twenty-five patients (92.5%) were satisfied with this simultaneous treatment and 26 patients (96%) would choose the same technique again. One-stage surgery in cases of bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome appears to constitute a benefit for the patient, the surgeon and the anaesthetist, but it is reserved for patients who request it and who are motivated by this type of intervention.

  4. [Carpal tunnel syndrome, amyloid tenosynovitis and periodic hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Clanet, M; Mansat, M; Durroux, R; Testut, M F; Guiraud, B; Rascol, A; Conte, J

    1981-01-01

    Since 1975, various entrapment neuropathies have been reported in patients undergoing periodic haemodialysis, the most frequent being the carpal tunnel syndrome. Ten patients on chronic haemodialysis developing 15 carpal tunnel syndromes (5 unilateral and 5 bilateral) are reported. Various causes for the renal failure were present and clinical signs of the carpal tunnel syndrome developed at a late stage. The arteriovenous fistula required for extrarenal epuration was antebrachial and of the laterolateral type, except in one case when it was lateroterminal. The carpal tunnel syndrome was always on the same side as the fistula, developing at a later stage on th contralateral side in the 5 cases of bilateral disorders. Lesions were severe, in 11 of the 15 cases. Some patients noted fluctuations in pain symptoms during haemodialysis, either improving or becoming worse. Gross pathological findings during operation (13 cases) were tenosynovitis with epineural hypervascularisation on the opposite side. In 9 cases, however, atypical hypertrophic tenosynovitis was observed. Histological examination in 12 cases demonstrated typical tenosynovitis in 3 patients, but granulomatous tenosynovitis with amyloid deposits was reported in 9 patients. Lesions were bilateral in 2 cases thus present, on the side opposite to the fistula. Ultrastructural study confirmed the amyloid nature of the deposits in 3 cases, the microfibrillary appearance (80 to 100 A) being characteristic of amyloid substance. This rare complication does not represent a common carpal tunnel syndrome, and three mechanisms may be involved in its induction : peripheral uraemic neuropathy, haemodynamic modifications resulting from the antebrachial arteriovenous shunt, and amyloid formation in the flexor synovial sheaths. In the latter case, the type of amyloid disease may be a primary systemic amyloidosis not previously detected, or an elective amyloid process localised to the tenosynovial and periarticular tissues.

  5. Sonographic diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: a study in 200 hospital workers*

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Adham do Amaral e; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Nassif, Paulo Afonso Nunes; Sakuma, Alexandre Kaue; Barros, Wagner Haese

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in a sample of 200 healthy hospital workers, establishing the respective epidemiological associations. Materials and Methods Two hundred individuals were submitted to wrist ultrasonography to measure the median nerve area. They were questioned and examined for epidemiological data, body mass index, carpal tunnel syndrome signs and symptoms, and submitted to the Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) to evaluate the carpal tunnel syndrome severity. A median nerve area ≥ 9 mm2 was considered to be diagnostic of carpal tunnel syndrome. Results Carpal tunnel syndrome was diagnosed by ultrasonography in 34% of the sample. It was observed the association of carpal tunnel syndrome with age (p < 0.0001), paresthesia (p < 0.0001), Tinel’s test (p < 0.0001), Phalen’s test (p < 0.0001), BCTQ score (p < 0.0001), and years of formal education (p < 0.0001). Years of formal education was the only variable identified as an independent risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.24). Conclusion The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in a population of hospital workers was of 34%. The number of years of formal education was the only independent risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26543279

  6. Digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome due to tophaceus infiltration of wrist flexor tendon: first manifestation of gout.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Cortés, P; Caba, M; Gómez-Sánchez, R; Gómez-Morales, M

    2011-11-09

    The authors report an unusual case of flexor tenosynovitis, severe carpal tunnel syndrome, and triggering at the carpal tunnel as the first manifestation of gout. A 69-year-old man presented with digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome of his right hand and was treated surgically. A flexor tenosynovectomy and a median nerve neurolysis were performed through an extended carpal tunnel approach. The sublimis and the profundus tendons were involved. Partial ruptures and multiple whitish lesions suggestive of tophacceous infiltration of the flexor tendons were seen. Macroscopically, the removed synovial tissue was involved by multiple whitish nodules that were milimetric in size and was suggestive of monosodium urate crystals deposits. By light microscopy examination, numerous nonnecrotizing granulomas of different sizes were observed that were compounded by large aggregations of acellular nonpolarized material, surrounded by epithelioid histiocytes, mononuclear cells, and foreign body multinucleated giant cells. Postoperatively, the patient recovered with resolution of the median nerve symptoms and a near-to-full range of motion of the affected digits.To the authors' knowledge, this patient is the first case report with flexor tendons tophacceous infiltration as the first clinical sign of gout. Gouty flexor tenosynovitis can occur in the absence of a long history of gout. A high index of suspicion is paramount to the initiation of proper management. Operative treatment of gouty flexor tenosynovitis is mandatory to debulk tophaceous deposits, improve tendon gliding, and decompress nerves. Routine uric acid determination could be helpful in the preoperative evaluation of patients with flexor tenosynovitis.

  7. Carpal tunnel and transverse carpal ligament stiffness with changes in wrist posture and indenter size.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Michael W R; Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P; Keir, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of loading and posture on mechanical properties of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL). Ten fresh-frozen cadaver arms were dissected to expose the TCL and positioned in the load frame of a servo-hydraulic testing machine, equipped with a load cell and custom made indenters. Four cylindrical indenters (5, 10, 20, and 35 mm) loaded the TCL in three wrist postures (30° extension, neutral and 30° flexion). Three loading cycles with a peak force of 50 N were applied at 5 N/s for each condition. The flexed wrist posture had significantly greater TCL stiffness (40.0 ± 3.3 N/mm) than the neutral (35.9 ± 3.5 N/mm, p = 0.045) and extended postures (34.9 ± 2.8 N/mm, p = 0.025). TCL stiffness using the 10 and 20 mm indenters was larger than the 5 mm indenter. Stiffness was greatest with the 20 mm indenter, which had the greatest indenter contact area on the TCL. The 35 mm indenter covered the carpal bones, compressed the carpal tunnel and produced the lowest stiffness. The complexity of the TCL makes it an important part of the carpal tunnel and the mechanical properties found are essential to understanding mechanisms of carpal tunnel syndrome. 

  8. Value of anatomic landmarks in carpal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, O Y; Uras, I; Tasbas, B; Kaya, M; Ozay, R; Komurcu, M

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated which anatomic landmarks were most useful for correct and safe incision placement in carpal tunnel surgery. Kirschner wires were attached to the hands to mark previously defined landmarks. The bony attachments of the transverse carpal ligament, which were identified previously, were drawn on an anteroposterior digital x-ray of the hand, with the thumb in full abduction. The relationship between anatomic landmarks and these bony attachments were examined. In all hands, either the line along the third web space or the crease between the thenar and the hypothenar regions, or both, were on the ulnar half of the transverse carpal ligament. During incision placement, we recommend selecting the most ulnar choice between the line drawn along the third web space and the crease between the thenar and hypothenar regions in order to be at safe distance from the recurrent motor branch of the median nerve.

  9. Long-term complications of open carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Boya, Hakan; Ozcan, Ozal; Oztekin, Haluk H

    2008-11-01

    Fifty patients who underwent open carpal tunnel release (OCTR) surgery at least 12 months earlier for carpal tunnel syndrome were reviewed, focusing on scar tenderness, pillar pain, and symptoms of neuroma. A total of 55 hands were studied. At an average of 20.2 months of follow-up, 5.5% had Tinel's sign, 7.3% had scar tenderness, 12.7% had pillar pain, and 18% had burning discomfort. Pillar pain was elicited in a much higher fraction of patients by using the "table test" (provocation of pillar pain by having the patient lean with his/her weight on the hands placed on the edge of a table), even when traditional tests were negative. Symptoms and signs are present in a substantial number of patients after OCTR, even after almost 2 years of follow-up. Patients should be informed of the incidence of long-term symptoms and signs after OCTR surgery.

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome - Part I (anatomy, physiology, etiology and diagnosis).

    PubMed

    Chammas, Michel; Boretto, Jorge; Burmann, Lauren Marquardt; Ramos, Renato Matta; Dos Santos Neto, Francisco Carlos; Silva, Jefferson Braga

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is defined by compression of the median nerve in the wrist. It is the commonest of the compressive syndromes and its most frequent cause is idiopathic. Even though spontaneous regression is possible, the general rule is that the symptoms will worsen. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, from the symptoms and provocative tests. Electroneuromyographic examination may be recommended before the operation or in cases of occupational illnesses.

  11. Surgical options for recalcitrant carpal tunnel syndrome with perineural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Jacoby, Sidney M; Osterman, A Lee

    2012-03-01

    Surgical release of the transverse carpal ligament for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is, in general, a very successful procedure. Some patients, however, fail this standard release and have persistent or recurrent symptoms. Such recalcitrance may relate to incomplete release but more often relates to perineural or intraneural fibrosis of the median nerve. While there is no good treatment for intraneural fibrosis, numerous procedures have evolved in an attempt to treat perineural fibrosis which restricts nerve gliding. These include procedures to isolate the nerve from scar as well as procedures to bring neovascularization to the median nerve. This review describes the various surgical treatment options for recalcitrant CTS as well as their reported outcomes.

  12. Bilateral widespread mechanical pain sensitivity in carpal tunnel syndrome: evidence of central processing in unilateral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Cuadrado, María Luz; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether bilateral widespread pressure hypersensitivity exists in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. A total of 20 females with carpal tunnel syndrome (aged 22-60 years), and 20 healthy matched females (aged 21-60 years old) were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds were assessed bilaterally over median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, the carpal tunnel and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. The results showed that pressure pain threshold levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the median, ulnar, and radial nerve trunks, the carpal tunnel, the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, and the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome as compared to healthy controls (all, P < 0.001). Pressure pain threshold was negatively correlated to both hand pain intensity and duration of symptoms (all, P < 0.001). Our findings revealed bilateral widespread pressure hypersensitivity in subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome, which suggest that widespread central sensitization is involved in patients with unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The generalized decrease in pressure pain thresholds associated with pain intensity and duration of symptoms supports a role of the peripheral drive to initiate and maintain central sensitization. Nevertheless, both central and peripheral sensitization mechanisms are probably involved at the same time in carpal tunnel syndrome.

  13. Long-term result and patient reported outcome of wrist splint treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Povlsen, Bo; Bashir, Muhammad; Wong, Fabian

    2014-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the commonest peripheral neuropathy presenting to specialist hand and wrist clinics. This study investigated the long-term outcome of carpal tunnel syndrome treated with isolated night wrist splint and the factors determining the likelihood of success of this intervention. Seventy-five patients referred to a specialist hand clinic with CTS were given night wrist splint treatment for 3 months as per a previous study protocol. Fifty-two patients from this cohort did not wish to have surgery after wrist splint treatment and were followed for a further 33-month period. Baseline pain and numbness levels were recorded on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) using a questionnaire upon first presentation. A further questionnaire at 36 months reassessed pain and numbness levels, patients' satisfaction with the treatment, and whether they had subsequent surgical decompression. Of the patients who completed the follow-up questionnaire 33 months after their period of conservative management, 43% were successfully treated with splint treatment alone. There was no difference in the VAS for pain or numbness at the baseline and at 36 months between successful and failed treatment groups. Patients successfully treated with wrist splinting alone reported a higher level of satisfaction with their treatment compared to patients who failed wrist splint treatment or had surgical decompression. The results reinforce the previous recommendation on wrist splinting as a first-line treatment in the Primary Care setting. Referral to specialist hand and wrist clinics should be reserved for patients with symptoms refractory to this initial measure.

  14. Carpal tunnel syndrome: The role of occupational factors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T

    2011-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a fairly common condition in working-aged people, sometimes caused by physical occupational activities, such as repeated and forceful movements of the hand and wrist or use of hand-held powered vibratory tools. Symptoms may be prevented or alleviated by primary control measures at work and some cases of disease are compensable. Following a general description of the disorder, its epidemiology, and some of the difficulties surrounding diagnosis, this review focuses on the role of occupational factors in causation of CTS and factors that can mitigate risk. Areas of uncertainty, debate and research interest are emphasised where relevant. PMID:21663847

  15. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Review of the Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, I; Khan, W.S; Goddard, N; Smitham, P

    2012-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) remains a puzzling and disabling condition present in 3.8% of the general population. CTS is the most well-known and frequent form of median nerve entrapment, and accounts for 90% of all entrapment neuropathies. This review aims to provide an overview of this common condition, with an emphasis on the pathophysiology involved in CTS. The clinical presentation and risk factors associated with CTS are discussed in this paper. Also, the various methods of diagnosis are explored; including nerve conduction studies, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:22470412

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome: primary care and occupational factors.

    PubMed

    Saint-Lary, Olivier; Rébois, Arnaud; Mediouni, Zakia; Descatha, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) affects about 1% of working-aged people and is the commonest cause of hand pain in manual workers. CTS is a clinical diagnosis and does not warrant any further investigation in the presence of mild and suggestive CTS. Although the recommended non-surgical management is still a matter of debate, nocturnal splinting or steroid injection are recommended in most countries, with strong to moderate level of evidence for short-term efficacy. Patients with an uncertain diagnosis or severe symptoms, should undergo nerve conduction studies with referral to a hand specialist.

  17. Neurovascular Bundle Decompression without Excessive Dissection for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Kyongsong; ISU, Toyohiko; MORIMOTO, Daijiro; SASAMORI, Toru; SUGAWARA, Atsushi; CHIBA, Yasuhiro; ISOBE, Masahiro; KOBAYASHI, Shiro; MORITA, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve and its branches in the tarsal tunnel. We present our less invasive surgical treatment of TTS in 69 patients (116 feet) and their clinical outcomes. The mean follow-up period was 64.6 months. With the patient under local anesthesia we use a microscope to perform sharp dissection of the flexor retinaculum and remove the connective tissues surrounding the posterior tibial nerve and vessels. To prevent postoperative adhesion and delayed neuropathy, decompression is performed to achieve symptom improvement without excessive dissection. Decompression is considered complete when the patient reports intraoperative symptom abatement and arterial pulsation is sufficient. The sensation of numbness and/or pain and of foreign substance adhesion was reduced in 92% and 95% of our patients, respectively. In self-assessments, 47 patients (68%) reported the treatment outcome as satisfactory, 15 (22%) as acceptable, and 7 (10%) were dissatisfied. Of 116 feet, 4 (3%) required re-operation, initial decompression was insufficient in 2 feet and further decompression was performed; in the other 2 feet improvement was achieved by decompression of the distal tarsal tunnel. Our surgical method involves neurovascular bundle decompression to obtain sufficient arterial pulsation. As we use local anesthesia, we can confirm symptom improvement intraoperatively, thereby avoiding unnecessary excessive dissection. Our method is simple, safe, and without detailed nerve dissection and it prevents postoperative adhesion. PMID:25367582

  18. Neurovascular bundle decompression without excessive dissection for tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyongsong; Isu, Toyohiko; Morimoto, Daijiro; Sasamori, Toru; Sugawara, Atsushi; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Isobe, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve and its branches in the tarsal tunnel. We present our less invasive surgical treatment of TTS in 69 patients (116 feet) and their clinical outcomes. The mean follow-up period was 64.6 months. With the patient under local anesthesia we use a microscope to perform sharp dissection of the flexor retinaculum and remove the connective tissues surrounding the posterior tibial nerve and vessels. To prevent postoperative adhesion and delayed neuropathy, decompression is performed to achieve symptom improvement without excessive dissection. Decompression is considered complete when the patient reports intraoperative symptom abatement and arterial pulsation is sufficient. The sensation of numbness and/or pain and of foreign substance adhesion was reduced in 92% and 95% of our patients, respectively. In self-assessments, 47 patients (68%) reported the treatment outcome as satisfactory, 15 (22%) as acceptable, and 7 (10%) were dissatisfied. Of 116 feet, 4 (3%) required re-operation, initial decompression was insufficient in 2 feet and further decompression was performed; in the other 2 feet improvement was achieved by decompression of the distal tarsal tunnel. Our surgical method involves neurovascular bundle decompression to obtain sufficient arterial pulsation. As we use local anesthesia, we can confirm symptom improvement intraoperatively, thereby avoiding unnecessary excessive dissection. Our method is simple, safe, and without detailed nerve dissection and it prevents postoperative adhesion.

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome severity staging using sonographic and clinical measures

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Volz, Kevin R.; Fahy, Christine M.; Evans, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasonography may be valuable in staging carpal tunnel syndrome severity, especially by combining multiple measures. This study aimed to develop a preliminary severity staging model using multiple sonographic and clinical measures. Methods Measures were obtained in 104 participants. Multiple categorization structures for each variable were correlated to diagnostic severity based on nerve conduction. Goodness-of-fit was evaluated for models using iterative combinations of highly correlated variables. Using the best-fit model, a preliminary scoring system was developed, and frequency of misclassification was calculated. Results The severity staging model with best fit (Rho 0.90) included patient-reported symptoms, functional deficits, provocative testing, nerve cross-sectional area, and nerve longitudinal appearance. An 8-point scoring scale classified severity accurately for 79.8% of participants. Discussion This severity staging model is a novel approach to carpal tunnel syndrome evaluation. Including more sensitive measures of nerve vascularity, nerve excursion, or other emerging techniques may refine this preliminary model. PMID:25287477

  20. Pathokinematics of precision pinch movement associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) can adversely affect fine motor control of the hand. Precision pinch between the thumb and index finger requires coordinated movements of these digits for reliable task performance. We examined the impairment upon precision pinch function affected by CTS during digit movement and digit contact. Eleven CTS subjects and 11 able-bodied (ABL) controls donned markers for motion capture of the thumb and index finger during precision pinch movement (PPM). Subjects were instructed to repetitively execute the PPM task, and performance was assessed by range of movement, variability of the movement trajectory, and precision of digit contact. The CTS group demonstrated shorter path-length of digit endpoints and greater variability in inter-pad distance and most joint angles across the PPM movement. Subjects with CTS also showed lack of precision in contact points on the digit-pads and relative orientation of the digits at contact. Carpal tunnel syndrome impairs the ability to perform precision pinch across the movement and at digit-contact. The findings may serve to identify deficits in manual dexterity for functional evaluation of CTS.

  1. Effect of metabolic syndrome on the outcome of corticosteroid injection for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roh, Y H; Lee, B K; Baek, J R; Park, M H; Noh, J H; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse peripheral nerve impairment is common in metabolic syndrome: in patients with metabolic syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome this might affect the outcome of treatment by local corticosteroid injection. A total of 55 consecutive patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and metabolic syndrome treated with corticosteroid injection (10 mg triamcinolone acetonide) were age and sex matched with 55 control patients without metabolic syndrome. Grip strength, perception of touch with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaires were assessed at the baseline and at 6, 12 and 24 weeks follow-up. The two groups had similar pre-operative grip strength and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire scores. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire symptom and function scores of the metabolic syndrome group were significantly greater than the control group at 12 and 24 weeks follow-up. Except for significantly greater grip strength at the 12-week follow-up in the control group, there were no significant differences in grip strength between the groups. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament sensory index for the control group was significantly greater than that of the metabolic syndrome group throughout the 24-week follow-up. After 24 weeks, five patients (13%) in the control group and 13 patients (27%) in the metabolic syndrome group had had carpal tunnel surgery. Patients with metabolic syndrome are at risk for poor functional outcome and failure of treatment after corticosteroid injection for carpal tunnel syndrome.

  2. Ulnar nerve entrapment in Guyon's canal due to recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ozgur; Calisaneller, Tarkan; Gulsen, Salih; Caner, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Guyon's canal syndrome is a compression neuropathy of the ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist. Compression of the ulnar nerve at the wrist by a ganglion, lipomas, diseases of the ulnar artery, fractures of the hamate and trauma are common etiologcal factors. Unlike Guyon's canal syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment of the upper extremity. Although, open (OCTR) or endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) is highly effective in relieving pain, failure with carpal tunnel release is seldom seen. In this paper, we presented a patient with ulnar nerve entrapment associated with recurrent CTS and discussed the possible pathomechanism with a review of current literature.

  3. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Sarcoidosis: A Case Report of a Rare Neurologic Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Sonambekar, Ajinkya; Gupta, Nikhil; Swadi, Akanksha; Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic inflammatory disease with myriad clinical manifestations. Neurologic involvement in sarcoidosis is uncommon. Peripheral neuropathic presentations include mononeuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, and generalized sensory, motor, autonomic, and sensorimotor polyneuropathies. Case Presentation We report a case of carpal tunnel syndrome caused by sarcoidosis in a 30-year-old woman. Other causes of carpal tunnel syndrome were ruled out. The patient responded well to the standard line of corticosteroid treatment and wrist splinting. Discussion Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by sarcoidosis is a rare presentation. The mechanism of neurologic involvement in sarcoidosis is not clear. PMID:27643973

  4. Changes in Clinical Symptoms, Functions, and the Median Nerve Cross-Sectional Area at the Carpal Tunnel Inlet after Open Carpal Tunnel Release

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Young-Do; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Shin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between clinical symptoms and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet before and after open carpal tunnel release (CTR). Methods Thirty-two patients (53 hands) that underwent open CTR for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were prospectively enrolled. Median nerve CSA at the carpal tunnel inlet was measured preoperatively and at 2 and 12 weeks after CTR by high resolution ultrasonography. The Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) was also completed at these times. Results BCTQ symptom (BCTQ-S) score was significantly improved at 2 weeks postoperatively, but BCTQ function (BCTQ-F) score and CSA were significantly improved at 12 weeks postoperatively. Preoperative CSA was significantly correlated with preoperative BCTQ-S and BCTQ-F scores but was not significantly correlated with postoperative BCTQ scores or postoperative changes in BCTQ scores. Postoperative median nerve CSA was not significantly correlated with postoperative BCTQ-S or BCTQ-F scores, and postoperative changes in median nerve CSA were not significantly correlated with postoperative changes in BCTQ-S or BCTQ-F scores. Conclusions The study shows clinical symptoms resolve rapidly after open CTR, but median nerve swelling and clinical function take several months to recover. In addition, preoperative median nerve swelling might predict preoperative severities of clinical symptoms and functional disabilities. However, postoperative reductions in median nerve swelling were not found to reflect postoperative reductions in clinical symptoms or functional disabilities. PMID:27583113

  5. Assessing the variability of injectate distribution following carpal tunnel injection--a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, A; Zaliunaite, R; Soames, R; Wigderowitz, C A

    2013-01-01

    This anatomical study was designed to assess the distribution of a solution (injectate) made up using local anesthetic, steroid and dye into the carpal tunnel using a commonly used injection technique. Dissections were undertaken in 29 embalmed cadaveric wrists. The cadaveric specimens were dissected 24 hours after injection to observe the effect of time on diffusion patterns in both superficial and deep planes. Eighteen of the 29 specimens showed the presence of the injectate in the superficial plane and three preferential patterns of distribution were noted in the deep plane: free in the carpal tunnel, exclusively in the tendon sheath and mixed. This is the first study investigating the delayed diffusion pattern of injectate in the carpal tunnel and illustrates its variability. The findings of variable degree of superficial diffusion and different patterns of intracarpal spread help to offer some explanation regarding the variability of the response following carpal tunnel injection.

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome following an electrical injury in a child

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sambandam; Findlay, Alice Rima; Anand, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is very rare in children and has been reported very infrequently in the literature. We present an unusual case of CTS in a 14-year-old girl who developed this following an accidental electrical shock. As far as we are aware, this is the first case report of CTS in a child following electrical injury. This rare complication of electrical injury can easily be disregarded or misdiagnosed as neuropraxia, and this can delay appropriate treatment, as evidenced by this case. We propose that CTS should be considered when instigating initial medical care after an electrical injury, and that a referral to a hand surgeon should not be delayed, as these children need urgent surgical intervention to preserve hand function. PMID:25733087

  7. PROFILE OF PATIENTS ON SICK LEAVE WITH CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Judson Welber Veríssimo; de Oliveira, Alexandre Barbosa; Nascimento, Valdênia das Graças; de Paiva, Henver Ribeiro; Viecili, Leandro; Rocha, Murilo Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report clinical and epidemiological characteristics and risk factors of patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) on sick leave admitted in a University Hospital. Methods: This is a transversal study conducted with patients admitted sequentially over 18 years of age, without distinction of gender and race in the period between September and November 2014. Patients answered a questionnaire and underwent physical examination carried out by the authors. Results: Twenty-five patients were admitted within three months, all females, the mean age was 50.24 years old (standard deviation 10,39) . Among the professions they performed, general and cleaning services were the most prevalent. Most patients featured obesity, followed by depression and systemic arterial hypertension. Approximately half of them were on sick leave. Sleep disorders were also a frequent complaint. Conclusion: CTS is a frequent cause of sick leave and it is related to obesity, dyslipidemia and depression. Level of Evidence IV, Series of Cases. PMID:26981030

  8. Impact of carpal tunnel syndrome on the expectant woman's life

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is known to be a common complication during pregnancy especially during the third trimester. Aim This article focuses on its impact to the third trimester pregnant mothers with CTS. Methods Third trimester pregnant mothers with no other known risk factors for CTS, were interviewed and examined for a clinical diagnosis of CTS. The severity of CTS was assessed by means of symptoms severity and functionality using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Results Out of 333 third trimester pregnant mothers, 82 (24.6%) were clinically diagnosed with CTS. Malay race was found to have significant correlation with the diagnosis of CTS (p = 0.024) and are two times more likely to get CTS during pregnancy (OR = 2.26) compare to the non-Malays. Bilateral CTS was two times higher (n = 58, 63.4%) than unilateral cases (n = 30, 36.6%), however no significant correlation between the two was found with severity (p = 0.284) or functional (p = 0.906). The commonest complaint was numbness/tingling during day time (n = 63, 76.8%). Majority of the CTS cases were mild (n = 66, 80.5%) and approximately one third (n = 28, 34.1%) had affected hand functions. All symptoms related to pain was found to have significant correlation with severity (p = 0.00, OR = 12.23) and function (p = 0.005, OR = 5.01), whereas numbness and tingling does not (Severity, p = 0.843, function, p = 0.632). Conclusion This study shows that even though CTS in third trimester pregnancy is prevalent, generally it would be mild. However, function can still be affected especially if patients complain of pain. PMID:22283968

  9. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions: (1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; (2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; (3) 30 mmHg; (4) 60 mmHg; (5) 90 mmHg; (6) 120 mmHg. The gliding resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in gliding resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon gliding resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients.

  10. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve in patients with macrodactyly: diagnosis and treatment of a rare disease causing carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Dietmar; Ulrich, Franziska; Schroeder, Michael; Pallua, Norbert

    2009-09-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a very rare benign peripheral nerve tumour. It is mostly encountered in the proximal extremities of young adults, involving the median nerve in the majority of cases. We present two patients with macrodactyly and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve and discuss diagnosis and treatment of the disease. A 10-year-old girl with a congenital progressive macrodactyly of her right index finger presented with a slowly growing mass in her right palm and pain and numbness, along with motor and sensory deficits in the median nerve distribution. Treatment consisted of carpal tunnel release, epineurolysis and partial excision of the fibrofatty tissue. The second patient, a 25-year-old man presented with a swelling in his left palm and findings compatible with carpal tunnel syndrome. Intraoperatively, the lesion presented as sausage-shaped enlargement of the median nerve by fibrofatty tissue. After carpal tunnel release, a partial excision of the mass with epineurolysis was performed. In both patients, histology showed nerve bundles separated by abundant fibrofatty tissue. In the girl, a proliferation of dysplastic perineurial cells could be observed. The suspected diagnosis for patients with macrodactyly and clinical signs of carpal tunnel syndrome should be lipofibromatous hamartoma. A carefully taken history, physical examination, X-ray, and MRI are important for its correct diagnosis. The surgical management remains controversial. Treatment should include decompression of the median nerve at points of compression, partial excision of the fibrofatty tissue, and debulking of soft tissue. In some cases, an epineurolysis can be additionally performed.

  11. Effectiveness of low-level laser on carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Hua-Feng; Ma, Xin-Long; Tian, Peng; Huang, Yuting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been applied in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) for an extended period of time without definitive consensus on its effectiveness. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser in the treatment of mild to moderate CTS using a Cochrane systematic review. Methods: We conducted electronic searches of PubMed (1966–2015.10), Medline (1966–2015.10), Embase (1980–2015.10), and ScienceDirect (1985–2015.10), using the terms “carpal tunnel syndrome” and “laser” according to the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Relevant journals or conference proceedings were searched manually to identify studies that might have been missed in the database search. Only randomized clinical trials were included, and the quality assessments were performed according to the Cochrane systematic review method. The data extraction and analyses from the included studies were conducted independently by 2 reviewers. The results were expressed as the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the continuous outcomes. Results: Seven randomized clinical trials met the inclusion criteria; there were 270 wrists in the laser group and 261 wrists in the control group. High heterogeneity existed when the analysis was conducted. Hand grip (at 12 weeks) was stronger in the LLLT group than in the control group (MD = 2.04; 95% CI: 0.08–3.99; P = 0.04; I2 = 62%), and there was better improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) (at 12 weeks) in the LLLT group (MD = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.84–1.11; P < 0.01; I2 = 0%). The sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) (at 12 weeks) was better in the LLLT group (MD = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.44–1.73; P = 0.001; I2 = 0%). However, 1 included study was weighted at >95% in the calculation of these 3 parameters. There were no statistically significant differences in the other parameters between the 2 groups. Conclusion

  12. Characteristics of the electrophysiological activity of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Gen; Aoki, Takafumi; Ito, Hiromoto

    2011-01-01

    The main cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) remains unknown. Stiffness of the subcutaneous area of the volar aspect of the carpal tunnel is present in many patients and suggests that the stiffness of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is increased. We performed an electrophysiological study to investigate muscle activities and to clarify whether the stiffness of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is involved in the pathogenesis of CTS. The subjects of this study included 16 patients with early CTS showing no motor dysfunction. Both thenar muscles (opponens pollicis, abductor pollicis brevis, and flexor pollicis brevis) and hypothenar muscles (opponens digiti minimi, abductor digiti minimi, flexor digiti minimi brevis) were investigated. Surface electrodes were placed on each muscle, and maximum voluntary contractions with the thumb and little finger in opposition were maintained for 3 seconds in all patients and in 7 control subjects. Electromyographs were subjected to fast Fourier transform analysis, and the root mean square (RMS) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were determined for each muscle. The RMS of the opponens pollicis was significantly less in hands affected by CTS (292.8 µV) than in healthy hands (405.9 µV). The RMS did not differ between affected hands and healthy hands for the other 2 thenar muscles but did differ significantly for the hypothenar muscles. The MPF did not differ between affected hands and healthy hands for any muscle. The results show that electrophysiological differences are present among muscles innervated by the median nerve and that hypothenar muscles originally unrelated to median nerve dysfunction are also affected in early CTS. These results suggest that modulation of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is involved in the pathogenesis of CTS.

  13. Hypothyroidism and carpal tunnel syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Rahman

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the magnitude of the association between hypothyroidism and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Eighteen studies were included in a random-effects meta-analysis. A meta-analysis of the studies that did not control their estimates for any confounder showed an association between a thyroid disease (hypo- or hyperthyroidism) and CTS (N = 9,573, effect size [ES] = 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.68) and between hypothyroidism and CTS (N = 64,531, ES = 2.15 [95% CI, 1.64-2.83]). When a meta-analysis limited to the studies that controlled their estimates for some potential confounders, the association between a thyroid disease and CTS disappeared (N = 4,799, ES = 1.17 [95% CI, 0.71-1.92], I(2) = 0%), and the effect size for hypothyroidism largely attenuated (N = 71,133, ES = 1.44 [95% CI, 1.27-1.63], I(2) = 0%). Moreover, there was evidence of publication bias. This meta-analysis found only a modest association between hypothyroidism and CTS. Confounding and publication bias may still account for part of the remaining excess risk.

  14. Handheld Electrical Impedance Myography Probe for Assessing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Chen, Lingfen; Zhu, Yu; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Wenwen; Tian, Dong; Yu, Yude

    2017-03-30

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a novel, noninvasive, and painless technique for quantitatively assessing muscle health as well as disease status and progression. The preparatory work for commercial adhesive electrodes used in previous EIM measurements is tedious, as the electrodes need to be cut, repeatedly applied, and removed. Moreover, the electrode distances need to be measured many times. To overcome these problems, we developed a convenient and practical handheld EIM probe for assessing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in the small hand muscles. To reduce the electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI), the micropillared and microholed stainless steel electrodes (SSEs) contained in the probe were fabricated using a laser processing technique. When covered with saline, these electrodes showed lower ESCIs than a smooth SSE and Ag/AgCl electrode. The probe was shown to have excellent test-retest reproducibility in both healthy subjects and CTS patients, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.975. The reactance and phase values of the abductor pollicis brevis (affected muscle) for CTS patients were consistently lower than those for healthy subjects, with a 50-kHz difference of 37.1% (p < 0.001) and 31.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. Further, no significant differences were detected in the case of the abductor digiti minimi (unaffected muscle). These results indicate that EIM has considerable potential for CTS assessment and hence merits further investigation.

  15. Importance of Recognizing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome for Neurosurgeons: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Masatoshi; Kanda, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenta; Uneda, Atsuhito; Hirashita, Koji; Yoshino, Kimihiro

    2017-02-02

    Idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common complaint, reflecting entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity. CTS produces symptoms similar to those of other conditions, such as cervical spondylosis or ischemic or neoplastic intracranial disease. Because of these overlaps, patients with CTS are often referred to a neurosurgeon. Surgical treatment of CTS was started recently in our department. Through this experience, we realized that neurosurgeons should have an increased awareness of this condition so they can knowledgeably assess patients with a differential diagnosis that includes CTS and cervical spinal and cerebral disease. We conducted a literature review to gain the information needed to summarize current knowledge on the clinical, pathogenetic, and therapeutic aspects of CTS. Because the optimal diagnostic criteria for this disease are still undetermined, its diagnosis is based on the patient's history and physical examination, which should be confirmed by nerve conduction studies and imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography. Treatment methods include observation, medication, splinting, steroid injections, and surgical intervention. Understanding the clinical features and pathogenesis of CTS, as well as the therapeutic options available to treat it, is important for neurosurgeons if they are to provide the correct management of patients with this disease.

  16. Patient Comprehension of Carpal Tunnel Surgery: An Investigation of Health Literacy.

    PubMed

    Waryasz, Gregory R; Gil, Joseph A; Chiou, Daniel; Ramos, Paul; Schiller, Jonathan R; DaSilva, Manuel F

    2017-03-01

    Background: Health literacy is the ability of a patient to understand their medical condition. The purpose of this investigation is to determine whether patients are able to obtain an elementary understanding of the fundamental principles of carpal tunnel release and the postoperative instructions after going through the process of informed consent and being provided an additional standardized postoperative instruction document. Our hypothesis is that patients will lack an understanding of these principles and, therefore, will be at risk for being noncompliant in their postoperative care. Methods: Fifty patients with a diagnosis of carpal tunnel surgery who elected to undergo carpal tunnel release alone were enrolled. A standardized education process was performed. Patients completed the questionnaire at their postoperative visit. Results: The average percentage of correct answers was 75.8% (8.34 out of 11 correct). Fisher exact test analysis demonstrated that patients with a lower education level were less likely to know how long it takes for their preoperative symptoms to resolve (P = .0071), and they were less likely to correctly choose all of the important elements of postoperative care during the first week after surgery (P = .022). Conclusions: Although we made efforts to help patients achieve health literacy in carpal tunnel surgery, we found that patients continued to lack comprehension of pertinent components of carpal tunnel surgery, particularly understanding the involved anatomy.

  17. Finite element simulation of the mechanical impact of computer work on the carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mouzakis, Dionysios E; Rachiotis, George; Zaoutsos, Stefanos; Eleftheriou, Andreas; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2014-09-22

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a clinical disorder resulting from the compression of the median nerve. The available evidence regarding the association between computer use and CTS is controversial. There is some evidence that computer mouse or keyboard work, or both are associated with the development of CTS. Despite the availability of pressure measurements in the carpal tunnel during computer work (exposure to keyboard or mouse) there are no available data to support a direct effect of the increased intracarpal canal pressure on the median nerve. This study presents an attempt to simulate the direct effects of computer work on the whole carpal area section using finite element analysis. A finite element mesh was produced from computerized tomography scans of the carpal area, involving all tissues present in the carpal tunnel. Two loading scenarios were applied on these models based on biomechanical data measured during computer work. It was found that mouse work can produce large deformation fields on the median nerve region. Also, the high stressing effect of the carpal ligament was verified. Keyboard work produced considerable and heterogeneous elongations along the longitudinal axis of the median nerve. Our study provides evidence that increased intracarpal canal pressures caused by awkward wrist postures imposed during computer work were associated directly with deformation of the median nerve. Despite the limitations of the present study the findings could be considered as a contribution to the understanding of the development of CTS due to exposure to computer work.

  18. Changes in the carpal tunnel while wearing the Manu® soft hand brace: a sonographic study.

    PubMed

    Manente, G; Melchionda, D; Staniscia, T; D'Archivio, C; Mazzone, V; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effect of the Manu(®) soft hand brace, which has been designed to relieve median nerve entrapment in carpal tunnel syndrome. An observational, controlled study was conducted in 10 participants, five with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and five controls, using sonography to study changes in the dimensions of the carpal tunnel before and while wearing the brace. An increase in transverse diameter, thinning of the flexor retinaculum, and displacement of the proximal insertion of the lumbrical muscle to the middle finger from the edge of the carpal tunnel were observed in patients while wearing the brace. The changes in the morphology of the carpal tunnel while wearing the Manu(®) support its use as an alternative to a night wrist splint.

  19. [Carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger wrist" revealing a tendinous sheath fibroma].

    PubMed

    Benhima, M A; Ait Essi, F; Abkari, I; Najeb, Y; Fikry, T

    2014-02-01

    The tendinous sheath fibroma (TSF) is a rare benign tumor, exceptionally responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger" wrist: we found this association less than ten times in the English and French literature. We report the case of a 63-year-old right-handed carpenter who featured a triggering phenomenon of the right wrist during the flexion-extension movements and compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel, secondary to a TSF of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The diagnosis was suspected at the sonography and MRI, the tumor was excised and proven histologically to be a TSF. One year later, the patient remained free of symptoms.

  20. Co-existing carpal tunnel syndrome in complex regional pain syndrome after hand trauma.

    PubMed

    Koh, S M; Moate, F; Grinsell, D

    2010-03-01

    This study highlights the benefits of carpal tunnel release (CTR) in four patients presenting with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) after hand surgery who also had carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) diagnosed clinically and by nerve conduction studies. Three of the patients underwent pre- and postoperative volumetric, circumference, grip strength and range of motion measurements. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) functional outcome measure and pain scores were also used. There was almost complete resolution of CRPS symptoms in all four patients, with notable reductions in oedema and improvements in grip strength and range of motion. There were also improvements in DASH outcome scores and pain scores after CTR.

  1. Carpal tunnel syndrome impairs index finger responses to unpredictable perturbations.

    PubMed

    Grandy, Emily L; Xiu, Kaihua; Marquardt, Tamara L; Li, Chengliu; Evans, Peter J; Li, Zong-Ming

    2017-03-16

    The fine-tuning of digit forces to object properties can be disrupted by carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). CTS' effects on hand function have mainly been investigated using predictable manipulation tasks; however, unpredictable perturbations are commonly encountered during manual tasks, presenting situations which may be more challenging to CTS patients given their hand impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle and force responses of the index finger to unpredictable perturbations in patients with CTS. Nine CTS patients and nine asymptomatic controls were instructed to stop the movement of a sliding plate by increasing index finger force following an unexpected perturbation. The electrical activity of the first dorsal interosseous muscle and forces exerted by the index finger were recorded. CTS patients demonstrated 20.9% greater muscle response latency and 12.0% greater force response latency compared to controls (p<0.05). The duration of plate sliding was significantly different between groups (p<0.05); the CTS group's duration was 142.2±5.8ms compared to the control group's duration of 133.1±8.4ms. Although CTS patients had increased muscle and force response durations comparatively, these differences were not statistically significant. Findings from this study suggest CTS-induced sensorimotor deficits interfere with accurate detection, processing and response to unpredictable perturbations. These deficits could be accounted for at multiple levels of the peripheral and central nervous systems. Delayed and decreased responses may indicate inefficient object manipulation by CTS patients and may help to explain why CTS patients tend to drop objects.

  2. Decompression Sickness during Construction of the Dartford Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Golding, F. Campbell; Griffiths, P.; Hempleman, H. V.; Paton, W. D. M.; Walder, D. N.

    1960-01-01

    A clinical, radiological and statistical survey has been made of decompression sickness during the construction of the Dartford Tunnel. Over a period of two years, 1,200 men were employed on eight-hour shifts at pressures up to 28 pounds per square inch (p.s.i.). There were 689 cases of decompression sickness out of 122,000 compressions, an incidence of 0·56%. The majority of cases (94·9%) were simple “bends”. The remainder (5·1%) exhibited signs and symptoms other than pain and were more serious. All cases were successfully treated and no fatality or permanent disability occurred. In two serious cases, cysts in the lungs were discovered. It is suggested that these gave rise to air embolism when the subjects were decompressed, and pulmonary changes may contribute more than hitherto believed to the pathogenesis of bends. Some other clinical features are described, including “skin-mottling” and an association between bends and the site of an injury. The bends rate is higher for the back shift (3 p.m. to 11 p.m.) and the night shift (11 p.m. to 7 a.m.) than for the day shift. In the treatment of decompression sickness it appears to be more satisfactory to use the minimum pressure required for relief of symptoms followed by slow decompression with occasional “soaks”, than to attempt to drive the causative bubbles into solution with high pressures. During the contract the decompression tables recently prescribed by the Ministry of Labour were used. Evidence was obtained that they could be made safer, and that the two main assumptions on which they are based (that sickness will not occur at pressures below 18 p.s.i., and that a man saturates in four hours) may be incorrect. It is desirable to test tables based on 15 p.s.i. and eight-hour saturation. The existence of acclimatization to pressure was confirmed; it is such that the bends rate may fall in two to three weeks to 0·1% of the incidence on the first day of exposure. Acclimatization is lost again

  3. Critical analysis of outcome measures used in the assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, P.; Gul, Arif; Ilango, Balakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Clinicians and researchers are confounded by the various outcome measures used for the assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In this study, we critically analysed the conceptual framework, validity, reliability, responsiveness and appropriateness of some of the commonly used CTS outcome measures. Initially, we conducted an extensive literature search to identify all of the outcome measures used in the assessment of CTS patients, which revealed six different carpal tunnel outcome measures [Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ), Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire (MHQ), Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Patient Evaluation Measure (PEM), clinical rating scale (Historical-Objective (Hi-Ob) scale) and Upper Extremity Functional Scale (UEFS)]. We analysed the construction framework, development process, validation process, reliability, internal consistency (IC), responsiveness and limitations of each of these outcome measures. Our analysis reveals that BCTQ, MHQ and PEM have comprehensive frameworks, good validity, reliability and responsiveness both in the hands of the developers, as well as independent researchers. The UEFS and Hi-Ob scale need validation and reliability testing by independent researchers. Region-specific measures like DASH have good frameworks and, hence, a potential role in the assessment of CTS but they require more validation in exclusive carpal tunnel patients. PMID:17370071

  4. Critical analysis of outcome measures used in the assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Priyanka, P; Gul, Arif; Ilango, Balakrishnan

    2008-08-01

    Clinicians and researchers are confounded by the various outcome measures used for the assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In this study, we critically analysed the conceptual framework, validity, reliability, responsiveness and appropriateness of some of the commonly used CTS outcome measures. Initially, we conducted an extensive literature search to identify all of the outcome measures used in the assessment of CTS patients, which revealed six different carpal tunnel outcome measures [Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ), Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire (MHQ), Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Patient Evaluation Measure (PEM), clinical rating scale (Historical-Objective (Hi-Ob) scale) and Upper Extremity Functional Scale (UEFS)]. We analysed the construction framework, development process, validation process, reliability, internal consistency (IC), responsiveness and limitations of each of these outcome measures. Our analysis reveals that BCTQ, MHQ and PEM have comprehensive frameworks, good validity, reliability and responsiveness both in the hands of the developers, as well as independent researchers. The UEFS and Hi-Ob scale need validation and reliability testing by independent researchers. Region-specific measures like DASH have good frameworks and, hence, a potential role in the assessment of CTS but they require more validation in exclusive carpal tunnel patients.

  5. Yoga Asanas for the Relief and Prevention of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beleu, Steve

    This collection of yoga asanas (exercises) can help relieve the pain of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and help prevent CTS among people who work on computer terminals. For maximum benefit, the exercises should be practiced daily or on as regular a schedule as possible. They are not intended to replace surgery or a physician's prescribed care. They…

  6. Interpreter's Wrist: Repetitive Stress Injury and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Sign Language Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedt, Joe D.

    1992-01-01

    In a survey concerning repetitive stress injury (RSI) and carpal tunnel syndrome, 87 percent of the 40 sign language interpreters reported that they had at some time experienced at least 2 symptoms associated with RSI, and most interpreters knew others with RSI problems. Data indicate that RSI is a severe problem among sign language interpreters.…

  7. Management of true recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome: is it worthwhile to bring vascularized tissue?

    PubMed

    Duclos, L; Sokolow, C

    1998-01-01

    Since 1989, 13 consecutive cases of true recurrent carpal tunnel have been operated on. Average delay before reoperation was 20 months (3 to 60 months). Intraoperative findings were univocal: extensive fibrosis with nerve adhesion to the roof of the carpal tunnel and a lack of nerve gliding. Surgery performed was: extensive external neurolysis from distal forearm to distal to carpal tunnel to allow a complete freedom of the nerve. A vascularized flap was never performed. Mean follow-up was 27.5 months (range 4 to 74 months). Results were: complete relief of symptoms in 75%; improvement with complete disappearance of nocturnal symptoms but persistent dysesthesia in 17%; no improvement in one patient (Sudeck's dystrophy). Interests of this study are: homogeneous population (only true recurrence), no bias from work compensation, consecutive cases, one surgeon, standardized surgical procedure and one independent observer. Results suggest that main factor for true recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome is lack of normal gliding of the nerve and that an extensive neurolysis helps to restore this gliding.

  8. Bilateral carpal tunnel in childhood associated with Schwartz-Jampel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, A; Arpa, J; Pérez Conde, M C; Ferrer, M T

    1984-01-01

    The case of a 7-year-old girl, the only descendant of non-consanguineous parents, who presented typical features of the Schwartz-Jampel syndrome and electrophysiological evidence of bilateral carpal tunnel is reported. Conventional electromyogram (EMG) showed persistent and continuous electrical activity and high frequency discharges elicited spontaneously by movement of the needle or after voluntary activation. Electrical silence after phenytoin therapy was sometimes seen. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG) showed that high frequency discharges had a complex configuration and multiple components. Occasionally the discharges showed a progressive decrease in amplitude. Increased jitter was also found in some potential pairs that had been isolated under voluntary contraction after phenytoin therapy. Motor and sensory conduction velocities on the median nerve were slowed bilaterally across the carpal tunnel. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome is an unusual condition in children and its clinical picture differs from that in adults. Carpal tunnel syndrome was not clinically suspected in the patient reported in this article and the diagnosis was confirmed by the conduction velocity study.

  9. Persistent median artery in the carpal tunnel and anastomosis with superficial palmar arch

    PubMed Central

    Bijannejad, Dariush; Azandeh, Saeed; Javadnia, Fatemeh; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; zhaleh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Persistent median artery (PMA) in present cadaver originated from the brachial artery and anastomosed with the superficial palmar arch (SPA). As the PMA may be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome and SPA is the main source of arterial supply, knowledge of which are important for the hand surgical interventions. PMID:27583265

  10. An Association between Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Migraine Headaches—National Health Interview Survey, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Law, Huay-Zong; Amirlak, Bardia; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migraine headaches have not historically been considered a compression neuropathy. Recent studies suggest that some migraines are successfully treated by targeted peripheral nerve decompression. Other compression neuropathies have previously been associated with one another. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether an association exists between migraines and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), the most common compression neuropathy. Methods: Data from 25,880 respondents of the cross-sectional 2010 National Health Interview Survey were used to calculate nationally representative prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of CTS and migraine headaches. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CI for the degree of association between migraines and CTS after controlling for known demographic and health-related factors. Results: CTS was associated with older age, female gender, obesity, diabetes, and smoking. CTS was less common in Hispanics and Asians. Migraine was associated with younger age, female gender, obesity, diabetes, and current smoking. Migraine was less common in Asians. Migraine prevalence was 34% in those with CTS compared with 16% in those without CTS (aOR, 2.60; 95% CI, 2.16–3.13). CTS prevalence in patients with migraine headache was 8% compared with 3% in those without migraine headache (aOR, 2.67; 95% CI, 2.22–3.22). Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate an association between CTS and migraine headache. Longitudinal and genetic studies with physician verification of migraine headaches and CTS are needed to further define this association. PMID:25878944

  11. Functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome reflect reorganization of primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Holden, Jameson; Lee, Jeungchan; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Im, Jaehyun; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R; Park, Kyungmo; Audette, Joseph; Tommerdahl, Mark; Napadow, Vitaly

    2014-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, a median nerve entrapment neuropathy, is characterized by sensorimotor deficits. Recent reports have shown that this syndrome is also characterized by functional and structural neuroplasticity in the primary somatosensory cortex of the brain. However, the linkage between this neuroplasticity and the functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome is unknown. Sixty-three subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome aged 20-60 years and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were evaluated with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T while vibrotactile stimulation was delivered to median nerve innervated (second and third) and ulnar nerve innervated (fifth) digits. For each subject, the interdigit cortical separation distance for each digit's contralateral primary somatosensory cortex representation was assessed. We also evaluated fine motor skill performance using a previously validated psychomotor performance test (maximum voluntary contraction and visuomotor pinch/release testing) and tactile discrimination capacity using a four-finger forced choice response test. These biobehavioural and clinical metrics were evaluated and correlated with the second/third interdigit cortical separation distance. Compared with healthy control subjects, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced second/third interdigit cortical separation distance (P < 0.05) in contralateral primary somatosensory cortex, corroborating our previous preliminary multi-modal neuroimaging findings. For psychomotor performance testing, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced maximum voluntary contraction pinch strength (P < 0.01) and a reduced number of pinch/release cycles per second (P < 0.05). Additionally, for four-finger forced-choice testing, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated greater response time (P < 0.05), and reduced sensory discrimination accuracy (P < 0.001) for median nerve, but not ulnar nerve

  12. Functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome reflect reorganization of primary somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Norman; Holden, Jameson; Lee, Jeungchan; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Im, Jaehyun; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R.; Park, Kyungmo; Audette, Joseph; Tommerdahl, Mark; Napadow, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, a median nerve entrapment neuropathy, is characterized by sensorimotor deficits. Recent reports have shown that this syndrome is also characterized by functional and structural neuroplasticity in the primary somatosensory cortex of the brain. However, the linkage between this neuroplasticity and the functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome is unknown. Sixty-three subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome aged 20–60 years and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were evaluated with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T while vibrotactile stimulation was delivered to median nerve innervated (second and third) and ulnar nerve innervated (fifth) digits. For each subject, the interdigit cortical separation distance for each digit’s contralateral primary somatosensory cortex representation was assessed. We also evaluated fine motor skill performance using a previously validated psychomotor performance test (maximum voluntary contraction and visuomotor pinch/release testing) and tactile discrimination capacity using a four-finger forced choice response test. These biobehavioural and clinical metrics were evaluated and correlated with the second/third interdigit cortical separation distance. Compared with healthy control subjects, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced second/third interdigit cortical separation distance (P < 0.05) in contralateral primary somatosensory cortex, corroborating our previous preliminary multi-modal neuroimaging findings. For psychomotor performance testing, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced maximum voluntary contraction pinch strength (P < 0.01) and a reduced number of pinch/release cycles per second (P < 0.05). Additionally, for four-finger forced-choice testing, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated greater response time (P < 0.05), and reduced sensory discrimination accuracy (P < 0.001) for median nerve, but not ulnar nerve

  13. In-continuity neuroma of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Depaoli, R; Coscia, D R; Alessandrino, F

    2015-03-01

    Iatrogenic injuries of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome resulting in the formation of a neuroma are rare. We present here the case of two patients, one with a bifid median nerve, showing in-continuity neuroma after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients reported persistent post-operative pain and showing symptoms. In both cases, ultrasound showed an in-continuity neuroma with a hypoechoic and enlarged median nerve at the carpal tunnel. The case report shows that ultrasound may be helpful in confirming the clinical diagnosis of neuroma and it is useful for evaluation of the percentage of the area affected by the tear.

  14. Thrombosis of the persistent median artery as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome - case study.

    PubMed

    Rzepecka-Wejs, Ludomira; Multan, Aleksandra; Konarzewska, Aleksandra

    2012-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent neuropathy of the upper extremity, that mainly occurs in manual workers and individuals, whose wrist is overloaded by performing repetitive precise tasks. In the past it was common among of typists, seamstresses and mechanics, but nowadays it is often caused by long hours of computer keyboard use. The patient usually complains of pain, hypersensitivity and paresthesia of his hand and fingers in the median nerve distribution. The symptoms often increase at night. In further course of the disease atrophy of thenar muscles is observed. In the past the diagnosis was usually confirmed in nerve conduction studies. Nowadays a magnetic resonance scan or an ultrasound scan can be used to differentiate the cause of the symptoms. The carpal tunnel syndrome is usually caused by compression of the median nerve passing under the flexor retinaculum due to the presence of structures reducing carpal tunnel area, such as an effusion in the flexor tendons sheaths (due to overload or in the course of rheumatoid diseases), bony anomalies, muscle and tendon variants, ganglion cysts or tumors. In some cases diseases of upper extremity vessels including abnormalities of the persistent median artery may also result in carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case of symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome caused by thrombosis of the persistent median artery which was diagnosed in ultrasound examination. The ultrasound scan enabled for differential diagnosis and resulted in an immediate referral to clinician, who recommended instant commencement on anticoagulant treatment. The follow-up observation revealed nearly complete remission of clinical symptoms and partial recanalization of the persistent median artery.

  15. Bilateral hand/wrist heat and cold hyperalgesia, but not hypoesthesia, in unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Padua, Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate bilaterally warm/cold detection and heat/cold pain thresholds over the hand/wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A total of 25 women with strictly unilateral CTS (mean 42 +/- 10 years), and 20 healthy matched women (mean 41 +/- 8 years) were recruited. Warm/cold detection and heat/cold pain thresholds were assessed bilaterally over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence in a blinded design. Self-reported measures included both clinical pain history (intensity, location and area) and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. No significant differences between groups for both warm and cold detection thresholds in either carpal tunnel or thenar eminence (P > 0.5) were found. Further, significant differences between groups, but not between sides, for both heat and cold pain thresholds in both the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence were found (all P < 0.001). Heat pain thresholds (P < 0.01) were negatively correlated, whereas cold pain thresholds (P < 0.001) were positively correlated with hand pain intensity and duration of symptoms. Our findings revealed bilateral thermal hyperalgesia (lower heat pain and reduced cold pain thresholds) but not hypoesthesia (normal warm/cold detection thresholds) in patients with strictly unilateral CTS when compared to controls. We suggest that bilateral heat and cold hyperalgesia may reflect impairments in central nociceptive processing in patients with unilateral CTS. The bilateral thermal hyperalgesia associated with pain intensity and duration of pain history supports a role of generalized sensitization mechanisms in the initiation, maintenance and spread of pain in CTS.

  16. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Associated with Oral Bisphosphonates. A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Martín Arias, Luis H.; Sáinz, María; Escudero, Antonio; Fierro, Inmaculada; Sauzet, Odile; Cornelius, Victoria R.; Molokhia, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are widely used to prevent osteoporotic fractures. Some severe musculoskeletal reactions have been described with this medication; among them, some cases of carpal tunnel syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether bisphosphonates may be associated with this syndrome. Methods A cohort study was conducted to compare exposed to unexposed women; the exposed group was that composed of women having received at least one prescription of an oral bisphosphonate. For the purpose, we used information from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. The outcome of interest was defined as those women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. A survival analysis was performed; the Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and to adjust for identified confounding variables. Results Out of a sample of 59,475 women older than 51 years, 19,825 were treated with bisphosphonates during the period studied. No differences in age distribution or mean follow-up time were observed between the two groups in comparison. Overall, there were 572 women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome, 242 (1.2%) in the group exposed to bisphosphonates, and 330 (0.8%) in the unexposed. An adjusted hazard ratio of developing carpal tunnel syndrome of 1.38 (95%CI, 1.15–1.64) was found for women exposed to bisphosphonates; no significant changes in the hazard ratios were found when considering different levels of bisphosphonate exposure. Conclusions An increased risk of carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with the use of bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women. PMID:26765346

  17. A fluid-immersed multi-body contact finite element formulation for median nerve stress in the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ko, Cheolwoong; Brown, Thomas D

    2007-10-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is among the most important of the family of musculoskeletal disorders caused by chronic peripheral nerve compression. Despite the large body of research in many disciplinary areas aimed at reducing CTS incidence and/or severity, means for objective characterization of the biomechanical insult directly responsible for the disorder have received little attention. In this research, anatomical image-based human carpal tunnel finite element (FE) models were constructed to enable study of median nerve mechanical insult. The formulation included large-deformation multi-body contact between the nerve, the nine digital flexor tendons, and the carpal tunnel boundary. These contact engagements were addressed simultaneously with nerve and tendon fluid-structural interaction (FSI) with the synovial fluid within the carpal tunnel. The effects of pertinent physical parameters on median nerve stress were explored. The results suggest that median nerve stresses due to direct structural contact are typically far higher than those from fluid pressure.

  18. Outcomes and safety of endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gkotsoulias, Efthymios N; Simonson, Devin C; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-02-01

    Open surgical decompression of the tarsal tunnel is the standard surgical approach for compression of the tibial nerve within the tarsal tunnel. Complications associated with this approach can be significant and periods of non-weight bearing are required. An alternative approach allowing for minimal soft tissue trauma and reduced time to ambulation is therefore desirable. Endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression may provide such an alternative. The authors performed a systematic review of electronic databases and other relevant sources to identify material regarding the safety of endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression. Only articles that included clear information concerning the safety of endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression with a follow-up of at least 12 months were included. Three studies were identified involving 37 feet, with a weighted mean follow-up of 27 months. There were no permanent complications relating to iatrogenic nerve injury, deep infection, or prolonged wound healing problems documented despite initiating ambulation within one week of surgery. Two patients (5.6%) developed recurrence more than 2 years postoperative and one (2.7%) showed no improvement. Endoscopic tarsal tunnel decompression is a safe procedure with a low rate of recurrence or failure and allows for near-immediate ambulation. However, additional prospective investigations comparing open and endoscopic approaches to tarsal tunnel decompression are warranted.

  19. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Dabloun, Slim; Benzarti, Sofien; Khechimi, Myriam; Jenzeri, Abdesselem; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead to deep infections involving the skin, bones and joints. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is exceptional after cat bite. We report a case of a 56 Year old female presenting with an acute carpal tunnel syndrome associated with compartment syndrome of the right hand 6 days after a cat bite of her right thumb. The patient was treated by surgery to relieve the median nerve. Microbiology identified PasteurellaMultocida.

  20. Corticoid injection as a predictive factor of results of carpal tunnel release

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Giselly Veríssimo; Fernandes, Carlos Henrique; Raduan, Jorge; Meirelles, Lia Miyamoto; dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes; Faloppa, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the symptoms relief after local corticoid injection correlate with better results of surgical treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome. METHODS: Between February 2011 and June 2013, 100 wrists of 88 patients were included in the study. All patients were subjected to corticoid injections in the carpal tunnel and evaluated before and after infiltration and surgery. The following parameters were evaluated: visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Boston questionnaire, sensitivity and strength. RESULTS: Only 28 out of 100 wrists subjected to injection were symptom-free after six months follow up. Sixty out of the 72 patients who did not present relief or relapse symptoms were treated surgically. Surgical results were better regarding VAS, Boston questionnaire and sensitivity in a specific group of patients, which had a longer relief of symptoms after the corticoid injection, with statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Longer relief of symptoms after corticoid injection correlated with better results of surgical treatment. Level of Evidence II, Prognostic Study. PMID:26405432

  1. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Neurophysiological Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in 130 Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Alrawashdeh, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is frequently confirmed by performing nerve conduction studies. Previous studies demonstrated that abnormal nerve conduction study (NCS) is suggestive of CTS among asymptomatic individuals. However, previous studies included individuals with risk factors for the syndrome. A NCS was performed on the median and ulnar nerves in 130 healthy individuals. About 15% of individuals in this study demonstrated electrodiagnostic evidence of carpal tunnels syndrome. Four cases have shown signs of isolated median neuropathy with normal median sensory component. Results indicated that the most widely used method for confirming diagnosis of CTS may have up to 15% of false positives. However, most of those showed changes of minimal CTS. Isolated prolongation of the median motor latency should be investigated further as they are usually classified as moderate to severe CTS and may undergo unnecessary surgeries. PMID:27994828

  2. Minimal Clinically Important Difference of Carpal Tunnel Release in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Kagan; Malay, Sunitha; Toker, Serdar; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Establishing minimally clinically important difference (MCID) for patient-reported outcomes questionnaires is essential in outcomes research to evaluate patients’ perspective of treatment effectiveness. We aim to determine (MCID) after carpal tunnel release in diabetic and non-diabetic patients using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Methods We prospectively evaluated 114 patients (87 non-diabetic, 27 diabetic) undergoing carpal tunnel release. In addition to standard history and physical examination, we obtained preoperative electrodiagnostic studies to confirm Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). The BCTQ was administered before and after the surgery at 3 and 6 months. Patients were asked about their level of satisfaction at the final follow-up period. We applied the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve approach to determine the MCID of symptom and function severity scales of the questionnaire. We used patient satisfaction as the reference standard to compare against the standardized change in scores after surgery for the 2 groups. Results For both diabetic and non-diabetic patients, symptom and function severity scales showed large effect size of >0.8 at 3 and 6 months after the surgery. At 6 months after surgery to be satisfied, diabetic patients required an MCID of 1.55 and 2.05 points for symptom and function scales, whereas non-diabetic patients required 1.45 and 1.6 points, respectively. Conclusion Diabetic patients needed a greater improvement in BCTQ score to be satisfied on functional and symptom severity scales than non-diabetic patients. Overall diabetic patients had less improvement in BCTQ final scores compared to non-diabetics. PMID:23416439

  3. Gouty wrist arthritis causing carpal tunnel syndrome--a case report.

    PubMed

    Sikkandar, M F; Sapuan, J; Singh, R; Abdullah, S

    2012-06-01

    A 63 year old male with a history of gout and hypertension presented with carpal tunnel syndrome. He gave history of bilateral wrist pain associated with numbness over the median nerve distribution of the hand. Tinels sign and Phalens test were positive with no obvious thenar muscle wasting on examination. Tophaceous deposits in the flexor tendons and within the synovium of the wrist joint was seen during surgery and this established gout as the cause of median nerve entrapment in this patient.

  4. A handy review of carpal tunnel syndrome: From anatomy to diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-rad, Mohammad; Nosair, Emad; Vegh, Andrea; Mohammadi, Afshin; Akkad, Adam; Lesha, Emal; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Sayed, Doaa; Davarian, Ali; Maleki-Miyandoab, Tooraj; Hasan, Anwarul

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most commonly diagnosed disabling condition of the upper extremities. It is the most commonly known and prevalent type of peripheral entrapment neuropathy that accounts for about 90% of all entrapment neuropathies. This review aims to provide an outline of CTS by considering anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnostic modalities and management of this common condition, with an emphasis on the diagnostic imaging evaluation. PMID:24976931

  5. Carpal tunnel syndrome – Part I (anatomy, physiology, etiology and diagnosis)☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Chammas, Michel; Boretto, Jorge; Burmann, Lauren Marquardt; Ramos, Renato Matta; dos Santos Neto, Francisco Carlos; Silva, Jefferson Braga

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is defined by compression of the median nerve in the wrist. It is the commonest of the compressive syndromes and its most frequent cause is idiopathic. Even though spontaneous regression is possible, the general rule is that the symptoms will worsen. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, from the symptoms and provocative tests. Electroneuromyographic examination may be recommended before the operation or in cases of occupational illnesses. PMID:26229841

  6. Factors affecting symptoms and functionality of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Hulya

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the associations between clinical, physical, and neurophysiological outcomes and self-reported symptoms and functions of patients after surgical carpal tunnel release. [Subjects and Methods] Among 261 patients who had undergone open surgical carpal tunnel release within the last three years, 83 (mean age 50.27 ± 11.13 years) participated in this study. Their socio-demographics and comorbidities were recorded. The intensity of pain, paresthesia, and fatigue symptoms in the hand were assessed by means of a Visual Analogue Scale, the Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments test of light touch pressure sensation, and Jamar dynamometry for measurement of grip and pinch strengths. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire evaluated the severity of symptoms and hand functional status, and the variables were analyzed by multivariate linear regression. [Results] The severity of the symptoms and functional status of release surgery patients was associated with diabetes mellitus, migraine, night pain, paresthesia and fatigue symptoms, impaired light touch pressure, and lack of medical treatment. [Conclusion] Appropriate post-surgery treatment programs for these factors should be taken into consideration to help patients obtain optimal functionality and health in their daily lives. PMID:25995565

  7. A systematic review of the psychometric properties of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Jose C de Carvalho; Jerosch-Herold, Christina; Song, Fujian

    2006-01-01

    Background The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) is a disease-specific measure of self-reported symptom severity and functional status. It is frequently used in the reporting of outcomes from trials into interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome. We conducted a systematic review of published studies on the psychometric properties of the BCTQ to determine the level of evidence on the instrument's validity, reliability and responsiveness to date. Methods A search of the databases Medline, CINAHL, AMED and PsychInfo was conducted to retrieve studies which investigated one or more of the psychometric properties of the BCTQ. Data abstraction was undertaken by the first two authors. Results Ten studies were retrieved which met the inclusion criteria. One study evaluated face and content validity (43 patients) eight studies assessed construct validity (932 patients), four studies tested reliability (126 patients) and nine studies assessed responsiveness (986 patients). Interpretability was evaluated in one study and acceptability in eight studies (978 patients). Conclusion The BCTQ is a standardised, patient-based outcome measure of symptom severity and functional status in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The evidence base of the psychometric properties indicates that the BCTQ is a valid, reliable, responsive and acceptable instrument and should be included as a primary outcome measures in future CTS trials. PMID:17054773

  8. Carpal tunnel syndrome in Indian patients: use of modified questionnaires for assessment.

    PubMed

    Mody, G N; Anderson, G A; Thomas, B P; Pallapati, S C R; Santoshi, J A; Antonisamy, B

    2009-10-01

    This study was conducted to assess the use of a modified carpal tunnel syndrome questionnaire (the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire, BCTQ) in an Indian patient population. Seventy-six Indian patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) were recruited to this prospective study. On a scale of one to five, the average score for the severity of symptoms was 2.09 (0.89). The average score for functional disability was 1.94 (0.74), which was lower than the average function score reported for Western CTS patients (Levine et al., 1993). The symptom severity and function disability scores were higher in patients with positive Tinel's sign and Phalen's test. The function disability score was moderately correlated with other clinical tests for CTS. The average modified BCTQ scores for Indian CTS patients was established through this study. This modified questionnaire might assist physicians in developing countries to assess disability from CTS, although socioeconomic and cultural differences will have to be taken into account when comparing assessments across different populations.

  9. Validation of a one-stop carpal tunnel clinic including nerve conduction studies and hand therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ball, C; Pearse, M; Kennedy, D; Hall, A; Nanchahal, J

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common hand disorder. We describe a pathway that includes clinical assessment, neurophysiological testing, surgery and physical therapy all at the same visit. METHODS All referrals for carpal tunnel syndrome were screened for inclusion in a ‘one-stop’ surgeon-led clinic. Prospective clinical data collected included patient reported outcome measures and satisfaction scores, touch threshold, pinch and grip strength. Patients were assessed clinically, underwent nerve conduction studies and surgery as indicated, all on the same day. Baseline and one-year follow-up data were analysed for 57 patients (62 hands). RESULTS There was significant improvement in all domains of the Boston Carpal Tunnel and Michigan Hand Outcomes questionnaires, grip strength and touch threshold. There were no adverse events. The total mean operating time was 12.8 minutes (range: 5–15 minutes) and the mean tourniquet time was 2.5 minutes (range: 1–11 minutes). Using a dual theatre model produced a short mean turnaround time of 14.8 minutes (range: 2–37 minutes). Patient satisfaction as judged using a Picker questionnaire was very high. CONCLUSIONS A highly efficient clinical service involving both diagnostics and treatment can be delivered at a single hospital visit while maintaining optimal outcomes and high patient satisfaction. PMID:22041242

  10. Gliding characteristics between flexor tendons and surrounding tissues in the carpal tunnel: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Osamura, Naoki; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel with varied wrist positions and tendon motion styles, which may help us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and repetitive hand motion. Eight fresh human cadaveric wrists and hands were used. The peak (PGR) and mean (MGR) gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon were measured with the wrist in 0, 30, and 60 degrees of flexion and extension. While moving all three fingers together, the PGR at 60 degrees flexion was significantly higher than that at 0, 30, or 60 degrees extension. While moving the middle finger alone, the PGR at 60 and 30 degrees flexion was significantly higher than the PGR at 60 degrees extension. The PGR moving the middle finger FDS alone was significantly greater than that for all three digits moving together in 0, 30, and 60 degrees flexion. Differential finger motion with wrist flexion elevated the tendon gliding resistance in the carpal tunnel, which may be relevant in considering the possible role of wrist position and activity in the etiology of CTS.

  11. Survey of Preferences in Patients Scheduled for Carpal Tunnel Release Using Conjoint Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan Lim; Kim, Jin Sam; Lee, Jun Bum; Kim, Sun Hwa; Min, Dong-Uk

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the preferences of patients scheduled for carpal tunnel release using conjoint analysis and also introduce an example of how to apply a conjoint analysis to the medical field. The use of conjoint analysis in this study is new to the field of orthopedic surgery. Methods A total of 97 patients scheduled for carpal tunnel release completed the survey. The following four attributes were predefined: board certification status, distance from the patient's residency, medical costs, and waiting time for surgery. Two plausible levels for each attribute were assigned. Based on these attributes and levels, 16 scenarios were generated (2 × 2 × 2 × 2). We employed 8 scenarios using a fractional factorial design (orthogonal plan). Preferences for scenarios were then evaluated by ranking: patients were asked to list the 8 scenarios in their order of preference. Outcomes consisted of two results: the average importance of each attribute and the utility score. Results The most important attribute was the physician's board certificate, followed by distance from the patient's residency to the hospital, waiting time, and costs. Utility estimate findings revealed that patients had a greater preference for a hand specialist than a general orthopedic surgeon. Conclusions Patients considered the physician's expertise as the most important factor when choosing a hospital for carpal tunnel release. This suggests that patients are increasingly seeking safety without complications as interest in medical malpractice has increased. PMID:28261434

  12. Double-blind randomized controlled trial of low-level laser therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Jamie; Chong, Su L; Amirjani, Nasim; Chan, K Ming

    2004-08-01

    Several studies have suggested that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is effective in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In a double-blind randomized controlled trial of LLLT, 15 CTS patients, 34 to 67 years of age, were randomly assigned to either the control group (n = 8) or treatment group (n =7). Both groups were treated three times per week for 5 weeks. Those in the treatment group received 860 nm galium/aluminum/arsenide laser at a dosage of 6 J/cm2 over the carpal tunnel, whereas those in the control group were treated with sham laser. The primary outcome measure was the Levine Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire, and the secondary outcome measures were electrophysiological data and the Purdue pegboard test. All patients completed the study without adverse effects. There was a significant symptomatic improvement in both the control (P = 0.034) and treatment (P =0.043) groups. However, there was no significant difference in any of the outcome measures between the two groups. Thus, LLLT is no more effective in the reduction of symptoms of CTS than is sham treatment.

  13. Effects of Neuromobilization Maneuver on Clinical and Electrophysiological Measures of Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oskouei, Ali E.; Talebi, Ghadam Ali; Shakouri, Seyed Kazem; Ghabili, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of neuromobilization combined with routine physiotherapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome through subjective, physical, and electrophysiological studies. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (totally 32 hands) were assigned two groups: treatment and control groups. In both groups, patients received the routine physiotherapy. In addition to the routine physiotherapy, patients in the treatment group received neuromobilization. The symptoms severity scale, visual analogue scale, functional status scale, Phalen’s sign, median nerve tension test, and median nerve distal sensory and motor latency were assessed. [Results] There were significant improvements in the symptoms severity scale, visual analogue scale, median nerve tension test, and Phalen’s sign in both groups. However, the functional status scale and median nerve distal motor latency were significantly improved only in the treatment group. [Conclusion] Neuromobilization in combination with routine physiotherapy improves some clinical findings more effectively than routine physiotherapy. Therefore, this combination can be used as an alternative effective non-invasive treatment for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:25140086

  14. Evaluation of surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome using local anesthesia☆

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marco Felipe Francisco Honorato; da Rocha Luz Júnior, Aurimar; Roncaglio, Bruno; Queiróz Júnior, Célio Pinheiro; Tribst, Marcelo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the results and complications from surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome by means of an open route, using a local anesthesia technique comprising use of a solution of lidocaine, epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate. Material and methods This was a cohort study conducted through evaluating the medical files of 16 patients who underwent open surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome, with use of local anesthesia consisting of 20 mL of 1% lidocaine, adrenaline at 1:100,000 and 2 mL of sodium bicarbonate. The DASH scores before the operation and six months after the operation were evaluated. Comparisons were made regarding the intensity of pain at the time of applying the anesthetic and during the surgical procedure, and in relation to other types of procedure. Results The DASH score improved from 65.17 to 16.53 six months after the operation (p < 0.01). In relation to the anesthesia, 75% of the patients reported that this technique was better than or the same as venous puncture and 81% reported that it was better than a dental procedure. Intraoperative pain occurred in two cases. There were no occurrences of ischemia. Conclusion Use of local anesthesia for surgically treating carpal tunnel syndrome is effective for performing the procedure and for the final result. PMID:26962490

  15. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-Qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10-20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  16. Relationship Between Electrodiagnosis and Various Ultrasonographic Findings for Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between electrodiagnosis and various ultrasonographic findings of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and propose the ultrasonographic standard that has closest consistency with the electrodiagnosis. Methods Ultrasonography was performed on 50 female patients (65 cases) previously diagnosed with CTS and 20 normal female volunteers (40 cases). Ultrasonography parameters were as follows: cross-sectional area (CSA) and flattening ratio (FR) of the median nerve at the levels of hamate bone, pisiform bone, and lunate bone; anteroposterior diameter (AP diameter) of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel; wrist to forearm ratio (WFR) of median nerve area at the distal wrist crease and 12 cm proximal to distal wrist crease; and compression ratio (CR) of the median nerve. Independent t-test was performed to compare the ultrasonographic findings between patient and control groups. Significant ultrasonographic findings were compared with the electrodiagnosis results and a kappa coefficient was used to determine the correlation. Results CSA and FR of median nerve at the hamate bone level, CSA of median nerve at pisiform bone level, AP diameter of median nerve within the carpal tunnel, CSA of median nerve at the distal wrist crease and WFR showed significant differences between patient and control groups. WFR showed highest concordance with electrodiagnosis (κ=0.71, p<0.001). Conclusion These findings suggested the applicability of ultrasonography, especially WFR, as a useful adjunctive tool for diagnosis of CTS. PMID:28119834

  17. Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Korean Version of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire: Its Clinical Evaluation in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Following Local Corticosteroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Jin; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook; Nam, Tai-Seung; Kim, Myung-Sun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and validate the Korean version of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (K-BCTQ) in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). After translation and cultural adaptation of the BCTQ to a Korean version, the K-BCTQ was administered to 54 patients with CTS; it was administered again after 2 weeks to assess reliability. Additionally, we administered K-DASH and EQ-5D to assess construct-validity. In a prospective study of responsiveness to clinical change, 29 of 54 patients were treated by ultrasonography-guided local corticosteroid injection therapy. The internal consistency of the K-BCTQ was high (Cronbach's alpha: 0.915) and the intra-class correlation coefficients were 0.931 for the symptom severity scale (P<0.001) and 0.844 for the functional severity scale (P<0.001). The construct-validity between the symptom severity scale and the K-DASH, and between the functional severity scale and the K-DASH were significantly correlated (both P<0.001). Clinical improvement was noted in 29 patients with injection therapy. The effect size of symptom severity was 0.67, and that of functional severity was 0.58. In conclusion, the K-BCTQ shows good reliability, construct-validity, and acceptable responsiveness after local corticosteroid injection therapy (Clinical trial number, KCT0000050). PMID:23853496

  18. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Korean version of the Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire: its clinical evaluation in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome following local corticosteroid injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Jin; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook; Nam, Tai-Seung; Kim, Myung-Sun; Lee, Shin-Seok

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and validate the Korean version of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (K-BCTQ) in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). After translation and cultural adaptation of the BCTQ to a Korean version, the K-BCTQ was administered to 54 patients with CTS; it was administered again after 2 weeks to assess reliability. Additionally, we administered K-DASH and EQ-5D to assess construct-validity. In a prospective study of responsiveness to clinical change, 29 of 54 patients were treated by ultrasonography-guided local corticosteroid injection therapy. The internal consistency of the K-BCTQ was high (Cronbach's alpha: 0.915) and the intra-class correlation coefficients were 0.931 for the symptom severity scale (P<0.001) and 0.844 for the functional severity scale (P<0.001). The construct-validity between the symptom severity scale and the K-DASH, and between the functional severity scale and the K-DASH were significantly correlated (both P<0.001). Clinical improvement was noted in 29 patients with injection therapy. The effect size of symptom severity was 0.67, and that of functional severity was 0.58. In conclusion, the K-BCTQ shows good reliability, construct-validity, and acceptable responsiveness after local corticosteroid injection therapy (Clinical trial number, KCT0000050).

  19. Effectiveness of hand therapy interventions in primary management of carpal tunnel syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Muller, Monique; Tsui, Deborah; Schnurr, Ronda; Biddulph-Deisroth, Lori; Hard, Julie; MacDermid, Joy C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hand therapy interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) based on the best available evidence. A qualitative systematic review was conducted. A literature search using 40 key terms was conducted from the earliest available date to January 2003 using seven databases. Articles were randomly assigned to two of five reviewers and evaluated according to predetermined criteria for inclusion at each of the title, abstract, and article levels. Included studies were independently scored by two reviewers using a structured effectiveness quality evaluation scale and also graded according to Sackett's Levels of Evidence. There were 2027 articles identified from the literature search, of which 345 met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies were used to formulate 30 recommendations. Current evidence demonstrates a significant benefit (grade B recommendations) from splinting, ultrasound, nerve gliding exercises, carpal bone mobilization, magnetic therapy, and yoga for people with CTS.

  20. Cervical Radiculopathy and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Determination of the Reliability, Diagnostic Accuracy, and Predictive Validity fo Commonly Used Clinical

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Patients with cervical radiculopathy and carpal tunnel syndrome result in significant medical and occupational costs annually. There is a need to...of diagnostic accuracy. and predictive validity of items of the clinical examination used for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  1. [Diffuse tenosenovial giant cell tumor of the wrist revealed by carpal tunnel syndrome: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ait Essi, F; Younsi, A; Abkari, I; Benhima, M A; Najeb, Y; Latifi, M; Fakhri, A; Belaabidia, B

    2012-10-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. It is the second most common soft tissue tumor of the hand after ganglion cyst. The localised (nodular) form is the most common. However, the less-common diffuse-type giant cell tumour is usually located in the peri-articular soft tissue. The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 42-year-old woman. The patient presented a mild carpal tunnel syndrome and a mid-palmar swelling. We present an unusual localization of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, causing carpal tunnel syndrome.

  2. Single versus repetitive injection of lignocaine in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Akarsu, S; Karadaş, Ö; Tok, F; Levent Gül, H; Eroğlu, E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of single versus repetitive injection of lignocaine into the carpal tunnel for the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. The 42 patients included were randomly assigned to two Groups: group 1 was injected with 4 mL of 1% lignocaine once and Group 2 was injected with 4 mL of 1% lignocaine twice a week for 2 weeks. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluations were performed at the study onset, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the final injection. Initially, the groups were similar with respect to clinical and electrophysiological findings. All parameters in Group 2 improved 6 weeks post treatment (p < 0.05), and these improvements persisted at 12 weeks post treatment (p < 0.05). Repetitive local lignocaine injection was effective in reducing the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and improving electrophysiological findings.

  3. Is carpal tunnel syndrome present in acute stroke patients? An investigative study using clinical and imaging screening tools.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Loochtan, Aaron I; Dresser, Brian; Chang, Jianhong; Farjat, Alfredo E; Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobson-Webb, Lisa D

    2017-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is known to develop post-stroke. Median nerve ultrasound (US) is an inexpensive, effective means of screening. In this prospective feasibility study, we compared the ability of the physical exam, the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and median nerve US to screen for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) within 72hours of stroke onset. We enrolled 24 consecutive patients. Using US, 19 (79%, p=0.0386) of the 24 patients screened positive for CTS on the paretic side and 20 (83%, p=0.0042) on the nonparetic side. With clinical examination, only 11 out of 24 (46%) screened positive for CTS on the paretic side and 8 (33%) on the nonparetic side. The BCTQ did not predict CTS. US can be an effective screening tool post-stroke. Further research is needed to determine specificity and efficacy compared to electrodiagnostic testing in this population.

  4. Effectiveness of Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Injection Using In-Plane Ulnar Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Park, Yongbum; Park, Ki Deok; Lee, Ju Kang; Lim, Oh Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of symptom improvement and the change of electrophysiological and ultrasonographic findings after sonographically guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Seventy-five cases of 44 patients diagnosed with CTS were included and evaluated at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks after injection. All patients received injection with 40 mg of triamcinolone mixed with 1 mL of 1% lidocaine into the carpal tunnel using an in-plane Ultrasound (US)-guided ulnar approach, out-plane US-guided approach, and blind injection. For clinical evaluation, we used the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and electrophysiological tests. The ultrasonographic findings were also evaluated with regard to cross-sectional area and the flattening ratio of the median nerve. Subjective symptoms measured by BCTQ and median nerve conduction parameters showed significant improvement at 4 weeks in the in-plane ulnar approach group compared with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection. This improvement was still observed at 12 weeks. The flattening ratio and cross-sectional area of the median nerve showed a more significant decrease with the in-plane ulnar approach than with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection (P < 0.05). US-guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in the CTS may be more effective than out-plane or blind injection. PMID:25546691

  5. Clinical Findings of Asymptomatic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical differences between patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) who have asymptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and those who have symptomatic CTS. Methods Sixty-three patients with DM were assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ), nerve conduction studies (NCS), and ultrasonographic evaluation of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve. According to the BCTQ responses and NCS results, the patients were divided into the following three groups: group 1 (n=16), in which NCS results did not reveal CTS; group 2 (n=19), in which NCS results revealed CTS but the group scored 0 points on the BCTQ (asymptomatic); and group 3 (n=28), in which NCS results revealed CTS and the group scored >1 point on the BCTQ (symptomatic). The clinical findings, NCS results, and CSA of the median nerve were compared among the three groups. Results There were no significant differences in age, DM duration, glycated hemoglobin levels, and presence of diabetic polyneuropathy among the three groups. The peak latency of the median sensory nerve action potential was significantly shorter in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3 (p<0.001); however, no difference was observed between groups 2 and 3. CSA of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel in group 2 was significantly larger than that in group 1 and smaller than that in group 3 (p<0.05). Conclusion The results of our study suggest that the symptoms of CTS in patients with diabetes are related to CSA of the median nerve, which is consistent with swelling of the nerve. PMID:27446786

  6. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-05

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures.

  7. Use of a splint following open carpal tunnel release: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cebesoy, Oguz; Kose, Kamil Cagri; Kuru, Ilhami; Altinel, Levent; Gul, Rauf; Demirtas, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the clinical effectiveness and costs of postoperative splintage and late rehabilitation with a bulky bandage dressing versus early rehabilitation after carpal tunnel release. In this comparative study, 46 patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. In each group, 3 patients were excluded because of improper follow-up, leaving a total of 40 patients. Group 1 used a splint (exercises given 3 wk postoperatively) and group 2 was given a bulky bandage (exercises provided immediately) after open release. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at the first and third postoperative months with the Questionnaire of Levine for Clinical Assessment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. The 2 groups were similar in terms of preoperative functional status scores and in controls at the first and third months (P=.549, P=.326, P=.190). When both groups were compared, no statistical significance was found regarding symptom severity scale scores preoperatively and at the first postoperative month (P=.632 vs P=.353). At the third month, scores were lower in favor of group 2 (P=.023). Additionally, 16 of 20 patients (80%) in group 1 reported a heavy feeling and discomfort caused by the splint. This problem was not reported by the patients in group 2. The cheapest splint on the market was 9 times more expensive than a bulky dressing. The investigators concluded that postoperative immobilization with a splint has no detectable benefits. Use of bulky dressings and abandonment of the use of postoperative splints may prevent unnecessary expenditures without sacrificing patient comfort or compromising the course of healing in carpal tunnel surgery.

  8. Clinical surveillance of carpal tunnel syndrome in two areas of the United Kingdom, 1991–2001

    PubMed Central

    Bland, J; Rudolfer, S

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the demographic characteristics of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and changes in incidence over time. Methods: Prospective collection of neurophysiological and clinical data on all patients presenting to the subregional department of clinical neurophysiology in Canterbury, UK, from 1992 to 2001 and to the electromyography clinic in St Luke's Hospital, Huddersfield, UK, from 1991 to 1993. Results: 6245 new cases of neurophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome were identified in Canterbury and 590 in Huddersfield. The average annual incidences (per 100 000) were 139.4 for women and 67.2 for men in East Kent, and 83.2 for women and 48.0 for men in Huddersfield. Corrected to the WHO European standard population these rates were 120.5 for women and 60.0 for men in East Kent, and 61.5 for women and 35.0 for men in Huddersfield. Between 1992 and 2001 there was an increase in the number of confirmed cases in East Kent but a decrease in their average severity. The age distributions were bimodal with a peak in the 50–54 age group and a second peak between 75 and 84 years. Over half the cases were bilateral. The disorder was consistently worse in the elderly, and more severe in men than in women in all age groups. Conclusions: The age distributions of unselected cases of carpal tunnel syndrome in both clinics differ markedly from that usually portrayed in surgical series. There was a significant increase in cases diagnosed between 1992 and 2001 in Canterbury, probably the result of increased ascertainment of milder cases. Median nerve impairment is more severe in the elderly and in men at all ages. PMID:14638888

  9. The Prevalence of Pronator Teres among Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Asheghan, Mahsa; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi; Aghdam, Abbas Shahabi; Khatibiaghda, Amidoddin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of conducting this study was to determine the prevalence of PTS among patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The study was conducted from March 2014 to April 2015 in the EDX ward and clinic of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the university hospital; Baqiytallah, a large referral practice and research center in Tehran. We included patients with clinical symptoms and signs of CTS. Clinical assessments were aimed to the diagnosis of CTS and PTS. At the next stage, ultrasound study was performed for the participants with suspected CTS. Sample size calculations were based on the formula: N=4[pq/w2]z1-α/22. Results showed that 13 (8.8%) patients presented electrodiagnostic, and 27 (18.2%) had clinical manifestations of pronator teres syndrome of which, 17 showed ultrasonic signs of the syndrome. In addition, 2, 7, and 8 out of the 17 patients had mild, moderate, and sever carpal tunnel syndrome, respectively. Age was not significantly different between the patients with, and without pronator teres syndrome (p-value=0.179). Nine participants with pronator teres syndrome were male and there was a significant difference concerning sex (p-value=0.013). There was a good agreement between electrodiagnostic and ultrasound findings (Cohen’s kappa coefficient=0.71, p-value<0.0001). Taken together, pronator teres syndrome should be considered as a possibility among patients with carpal tunnel syndrome especially in sever forms. Both electrodiagnostic and sonographic studies are efficient for diagnosing pronator teres syndrome. Men are more prone to develop pronator teres syndrome. PMID:27829824

  10. Outcomes and Satisfaction with Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Releases and the Predictors - A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Cheng, Chun-Ying; Chan, Yi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient’s final satisfaction with endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) is still unpredictable. The study aims to find the predictive factors for satisfaction in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) treated by ECTR using the Boston CTS questionnaire. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 37 patients (55 hands) who received ECTR and completed Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire at preoperative visit, 1 month and 6 months after operation while a telephone interview was conducted at 2 years after operation. Independent risk variables, including mean symptom severity scale, functional status scale, each item in questionnaire at all the time points, ASA physical status scale, age, gender, dominant site lesion, bilateral lesions, duration of symptoms and anesthesia method were recorded. Final outcome was determined by the patient’s satisfaction at the interval of 2 years. Predictors to outcome were analyzed by stepwise multiple regression analysis and tested with Pearson correlation test. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The severity of hand or wrist numbness during the daytime (Q6, explained 6.5% variances), the severity of numbness or tingling at night (Q9, explained 16.2% variances), the functional status of writing (q1, explained 13.9% variances), carrying grocery bags (q7, explained 13.6% variances) had significant predictive value (p<0.001). Other factors were not significant in the analysis including ASA, gender, age, dominant site lesion, bilateral lesions, anesthesia method and duration of symptoms. Conclusions: Boston questionnaire is a simple and reliable tool with high predictive values to evaluate patient’s outcome and satisfaction in ECTR. PMID:28217200

  11. Canaletto implant in revision surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome: 21 case series.

    PubMed

    Bilasy, A; Facca, S; Gouzou, S; Liverneaux, P A

    2012-09-01

    Revision carpal tunnel surgery varies from 0.3% to 19%. It involves a delayed neurolysis and prevention of perineural fibrosis. Despite numerous available procedures, the results remain mediocre. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of the Canaletto implant in this indication. Our series includes 20 patients (1 bilateral affection) reoperated for carpal tunnel between October 2008 and December 2009. After the first operation, the symptom-free period was 112 weeks, on average. The average incision was 27 mm. After neurolysis, the Canaletto implant was placed in contact with the nerve. Immediate postoperative mobilization was commenced. Sensory (pain, DN4, and hypoesthesia), motor (Jamar, muscle wasting), and functional (disabilities of the arm, should, and hand; DASH) criteria were evaluated. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) of the median nerve was measured. Average follow up was 12.1 months. All measurements were improved after insertion of the Canaletto implant: pain (6.45-3.68), DN4 (4.29-3.48), Quick DASH (55.30-34.96), Jamar (66.11-84.76), NCV (29.79-39.06 m/s), hypoesthesia (76.2-23.8%), wasting (42.9-23.8%). Nevertheless, four patients did not improve, and pain was the same or worse in six cases. Our results show that in recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome, Canaletto implant insertion gives results at least as good as other techniques, with the added advantage of a smaller access incision, a rapid, less invasive technique, and the eliminated morbidity of raising a flap to cover the median nerve.

  12. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome and wrist osteoarthritis in long-term paraplegic patients compared with controls.

    PubMed

    Akbar, M; Penzkofer, S; Weber, M A; Bruckner, T; Winterstein, M; Jung, M

    2014-02-01

    We compared functional and structural changes in the hands, in particular the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome, in 56 paraplegic patients who had been wheelchair dependent for over 25 years with a group of able-bodied volunteers (with matching criteria for gender and age). The hands were assessed by clinical examination, electrophysiology, disabilities of the arm shoulder and hand score and magnetic resonance imaging. Hand function was worse and wrist pain was experienced more often in the paraplegic patients, and they also had a significantly higher prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome both clinically and electrophysiologically. The prevalence of wrist and trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis was significantly higher in the right hand.

  13. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for carpal tunnel syndrome in general practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by entrapment of the median nerve and results in pain, tingling and numbness in the wrist and hand. It is a common condition in general practice. Effectiveness of treatment by intracarpal corticosteroid injection has never been investigated in general practice. The objective of this study was to determine if corticosteroid injections for carpal tunnel syndrome provided by general practitioners are effective. Methods In this study 69 participants with a clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome were recruited from 20 general practices. Short-term outcomes were assessed in a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Long-term results were assessed in a prospective cohort-study of steroid responders. Participants were randomised to intracarpal injections of 1 ml triamcinolonacetonide 10 mg/ml (TCA) or 1 ml NaCl (placebo). Non-responders to NaCl were treated with additional TCA injections. Main outcomes were immediate treatment success, mean score of the Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) of the Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire, subjective improvement and proportion of participants with recurrences during follow-up. Duration of follow-up was twelve months. Results The TCA-group (36 participants) had better outcomes than the NaCl-group (33 participants) during short-term assessment for outcome measures treatment response, mean improvement of SSS-score (the mean difference in change score was 0.637 {95% CI: 0.320, 0.960; p < 0.001}) and FSS-score (the mean difference in change score was 0.588 {95% CI: 0.232, 0.944; p = 0.002}) and perceived improvement (p = 0.01). The number to treat to achieve satisfactory partial treatment response or complete resolution of symptoms and signs was 3 (95% CI:1.83, 9.72). 49% of TCA-responders (17/35) had recurrences during follow-up. In the group of TCA-responders without recurrences (51%, 18/35) outcomes for SSS-score and FSS-score deteriorated during the follow

  14. Hand pain other than carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS): the role of occupational factors.

    PubMed

    Andréu, José-Luis; Otón, Teresa; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Sanz, Jesús

    2011-02-01

    Some occupational factors have been implicated in the development of disorders manifested as hand pain. The associations seem to be well documented in processes such as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) or writer's cramp. There are contradictory data in the literature about the relationships of trigger finger, De Quervain's tenosynovitis (DQT) and tenosynovitis of the wrist with occupational factors. In this article, we review current knowledge about clinical manifestations, case definition, implicated occupational factors, diagnosis and treatment of the most relevant hand pain disorders that have been associated with occupational factors, excluding carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS).

  15. Outcomes of Open Carpal Tunnel Release at a Minimum of Ten Years

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Dexter L.; Earp, Brandon E.; Collins, Jamie E.; Losina, Elena; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Black, Eric M.; Simmons, Barry P.; Blazar, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is little research on the long-term outcomes of open carpal tunnel release. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the functional and symptomatic outcomes of patients at a minimum of ten years postoperatively. Methods: Two hundred and eleven patients underwent open carpal tunnel release from 1996 to 2000 performed by the same hand fellowship-trained surgeon. Follow-up with validated self-administered questionnaire instruments was conducted an average of thirteen years after surgery. The principal outcomes included the Levine-Katz symptom and function scores, ranging from 1 point (best) to 5 points (worst), and satisfaction with the results of surgery. The patients self-reported current comorbidities. Results: After a mean follow-up of thirteen years (range, eleven to seventeen years), 92% (194) of 211 patients were located. They included 140 who were still living and fifty-four who had died. Seventy-two percent (113) of the 157 located, surviving patients responded to the questionnaire. The mean Levine-Katz symptom score (and standard deviation) was 1.3 ± 0.5 points, and 13% of patients had a poor symptom score (≥2 points). The mean Levine-Katz function score was 1.6 ± 0.8 points, and 26% had a poor function score (≥2 points). The most common symptom-related complaint was weakness in the hand, followed by diurnal pain, numbness, and tingling. The least common symptoms were nocturnal pain and tenderness at the incision. Eighty-eight percent of the patients were either completely satisfied or very satisfied with the surgery. Seventy-four percent reported their symptoms to be completely resolved. Thirty-three percent of men were classified as having poor function compared with 23% of women. Two (1.8%) of 113 patients underwent repeat surgery. Conclusions: At an average of thirteen years after open carpal tunnel release, the majority of patients are satisfied and free of symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Level of Evidence

  16. High incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Loizon, Marine; Laurencin, Chloé; Vial, Christophe; Danaila, Teodor; Thobois, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    We observed several cases of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) revealed after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). 115 consecutive PD patients who underwent STN-DBS between 2010 and 2014 at the Neurological Hospital in Lyon were retrospectively included. CTS was accepted as the diagnosis only if clinical examination and ENMG both confirmed it. Nine patients (7.8 %) developed CTS in the 2 years following surgery, which is far beyond the 2.7/1000 incidence in the general population. The present study shows an overrepresentation of CTS occurrence after STN-DBS in PD.

  17. Rewiring the primary somatosensory cortex in carpal tunnel syndrome with acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yumi; Kim, Hyungjun; Kettner, Norman; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Ong-Sutherland, Rebecca; Mezzacappa, Pia; Libby, Alexandra; Mawla, Ishtiaq; Morse, Leslie R; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2017-03-02

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy, affecting the median nerve at the wrist. Acupuncture is a minimally-invasive and conservative therapeutic option, and while rooted in a complex practice ritual, acupuncture overlaps significantly with many conventional peripherally-focused neuromodulatory therapies. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms by which acupuncture impacts accepted subjective/psychological and objective/physiological outcomes are not well understood. Eligible patients (n = 80, 65 female, age: 49.3 ± 8.6 years) were enrolled and randomized into three intervention arms: (i) verum electro-acupuncture 'local' to the more affected hand; (ii) verum electro-acupuncture at 'distal' body sites, near the ankle contralesional to the more affected hand; and (iii) local sham electro-acupuncture using non-penetrating placebo needles. Acupuncture therapy was provided for 16 sessions over 8 weeks. Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire assessed pain and paraesthesia symptoms at baseline, following therapy and at 3-month follow-up. Nerve conduction studies assessing median nerve sensory latency and brain imaging data were acquired at baseline and following therapy. Functional magnetic resonance imaging assessed somatotopy in the primary somatosensory cortex using vibrotactile stimulation over three digits (2, 3 and 5). While all three acupuncture interventions reduced symptom severity, verum (local and distal) acupuncture was superior to sham in producing improvements in neurophysiological outcomes, both local to the wrist (i.e. median sensory nerve conduction latency) and in the brain (i.e. digit 2/3 cortical separation distance). Moreover, greater improvement in second/third interdigit cortical separation distance following verum acupuncture predicted sustained improvements in symptom severity at 3-month follow-up. We further explored potential differential mechanisms of local versus distal acupuncture using diffusion tensor

  18. Static Magnetic Field Therapy for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Agatha P.; Markov, Marko S.; Carlson, Nels; Gregory, William L.; Carlson, Hans; Elmer, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of conducting trials of static magnetic field (SMF) therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), to collect preliminary data on the effectiveness of two SMF dosages and to explore the influence of a SMF on median nerve conduction. Design Randomized, double blind, sham controlled trial with 6-week intervention and 12-week follow-up. Setting University hospital outpatient clinics Participants Women and men (N=60), ages 21–65, with electrophysiologically-confirmed CTS diagnosis, recruited from the general population. Interventions Participants wore nightly either neodymium magnets that delivered either 15 or 45mTesla (mT) to the contents of the carpal canal, or a non-magnetic disk. Main Outcome Measures Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Function Severity Scale (FSS) of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and 4 median nerve parameters: sensory distal latency, sensory nerve action potential amplitude, motor distal latency and compound motor action potential amplitude). Results 58 of 60 randomized participants completed the study. There were no significant between-group differences for change in the primary endpoint SSS or for FSS or median nerve conduction parameters. For the SSS and the FSS each group showed a reduction at 6-weeks indicating improvement in symptoms. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility and safety of testing SMF therapy for CTS. There were no between-group differences observed for the BCTQ or median nerve parameters following 6 weeks of SMF therapy. Significant within-group, symptomatic improvements of the same magnitude were experienced by participants in both active and sham magnet groups. Future studies are needed to optimize SMF dosimetry and resolve issues related to the use of sham controls in SMF trials. PMID:20599049

  19. A manual therapy intervention improves symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Signorini, Massimo; Bassetti, Massimo; Del Rosso, Angela; Orlandi, Martina; De Scisciolo, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), manual therapy interventions (MTI) reduce tissue adhesion and increase wrist mobility. We evaluated the efficacy of a MTI in relieving CTS signs and symptoms. Twenty-two CTS patients (pts) (41 hands) were treated with a MTI, consisting in 6 treatments (2/week for 3 weeks) of soft tissues of wrist and hands and of carpal bones. Pts were assessed for hand sensitivity, paresthesia, hand strength, hand and forearm pain, night awakening; Phalen test, thenar eminence hypotrophy and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS). Median nerve was studied by sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and distal motor latency (DML). CTS was scored as minimal, mild, medium, severe and extreme. We considered as control group the same pts assessed before treatment: at baseline (T0a) and after 12 weeks (T0b). Pts were evaluated at the end of treatment (T1) and after 24-week (T2) follow-up. At T0b, versus T0a, forearm pain and Phalen test positivity were increased and hand strength reduced (p < 0.05). BCTQ-SSS and BCTQ-FSS scores improved at T1 versus T0b (p < 0.05) with the amelioration maintained at T2. At T1, the number of pts with paresthesia, night awakening, hypoesthesia, Phalen test, hand strength reduction and hand sensitivity was reduced with the lacking of symptoms maintained at T2 (p < 0.05). No changes in SNCV, DML and CTS scoring were shown. MTI improved CTS signs and symptoms, with benefits maintained at follow-up. Thus, it may be valid as a conservative therapy.

  20. An innovative hand brace for carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Manente, G; Torrieri, F; Di Blasio, F; Staniscia, T; Romano, F; Uncini, A

    2001-08-01

    We developed a hand brace and studied its efficacy and tolerability in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We randomized 83 subjects into a treated group, which wore the hand brace at night for 4 weeks, and a control group, which received no treatment. The primary efficacy measure was change in the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) score. Secondary measures were Subjects' Global Impression of Change Questionnaire (SGICQ), median distal motor latency, sensory conduction velocity and amplitude, and neurophysiological class of severity. The treated group showed a reduction in BCTQ symptomatic score (from 2.75 to 1.54 at 4 weeks; P < 0.001) and functional score (from 1.89 to 1.48; P < 0.001). There were no significant changes in the control subjects. SGICQ documented improvement in all treated subjects (P = 0.006). No significant difference was found in electrophysiological measurements, but overall neurophysiological classification shifted to less severe classes in the treated group (P < 0.05). Thus, the study demonstrates that this hand brace is highly efficient in relieving symptoms and functional loss in CTS.

  1. Motor Unit Number Estimation and Motor Unit Action Potential Analysis in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min Kyun; Jee, Sung Ju; Kim, Young-Jae; Shin, Hyun-Dae

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of motor unit number estimation (MUNE) and quantitative analysis of motor unit action potential (MUAP) in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) according to electrophysiologic severity, ultrasonographic measurement and clinical symptoms. Method We evaluated 78 wrists of 45 patients, who had been diagnosed with CTS and 42 wrists of 21 healthy controls. Median nerve conduction studies, amplitude and duration of MUAP, and the MUNE of the abductor pollicis brevis were measured. The cross sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the pisiform and distal radioulnar joint level was determined by high resolution ultrasonography. Clinical symptom of CTS was assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Results The MUNE, the amplitude and the duration of MUAP of the CTS group were significantly different from those found in the control group. The area under the ROC curve was 0.944 for MUNE, 0.923 for MUAP amplitude and 0.953 for MUAP duration. MUNE had a negative correlation with electrophysiologic stage of CTS, amplitude and duration of MUAP, CSA at pisiform level, and the score of BCTQ. The amplitude and duration of MUAP had a positive correlation with the score of BCTQ. The electrophysiologic stage was correlated with amplitude but not with the duration of MUAP. Conclusion MUNE, amplitude and duration of MUAP are useful tests for diagnosis of CTS. In addition, the MUNE serves as a good indicator of CTS severity. PMID:22506210

  2. Postsurgical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Following Carpal Tunnel Release: A Rare Disease Following a Common Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Shaun D.; Neumeister, Michael W.; Berry, Nada N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Postsurgical pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare but potentially devastating condition for surgical patients. While pyoderma gangrenosum has 2 subtypes, typical and atypical, each can be further classified by its heralding features. These include ulcerative, pustular, bullous, and vegetative. The presentation can be a result of trauma or, as mentioned before, postsurgical. The plastic and reconstructive surgeon most likely will encounter postsurgical pyoderma gangrenosum in practice, as it has been reported in patient populations frequently seen in plastic surgery clinics. Methods: We present a unique case of idiopathic postsurgical pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient who presented after carpal tunnel release, the most common surgery of the hand and wrist performed in the United States annually. This is believed to be the first ever case reported in the literature of pyoderma gangrenosum following carpal tunnel release. Results: The patient's disease course was complicated by surgical debridement prior to diagnosis. Unfortunately, this condition necessitated mid-forearm amputation. The wound eventually healed with primary closure and appropriate medical therapy. Conclusion: Previous experience with this disease, a high index of suspicion, and general education regarding the disease process and its management could potentially have prevented this outcome. We hope to underscore that it is important to consider a patient's entire history and to have a high index of suspicion in unusual postsurgical wounds in order to adequately diagnose, treat, and manage patients who develop postsurgical pyoderma gangrenosum.

  3. An epidemiological profile of cashiers holders carpal tunnel syndrome in a grocery store chain.

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Barros, R; Campos, D; Lima, D; Barbosa, Geórgia

    2012-01-01

    Occupational diseases are those acquired in the work. Statistics show an increase number of cases, victims like typists, telephone's operators, cashiers and many others with varied levels of involvement. It is composed of disorders affecting the upper limbs being recognized by the Ministry of Social Welfare. Among these diseases stands out for its high occurrence Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). It has been considered a disease of the century, because its incidence has increased in 40.8% of repetitive stress disorders, with prevalence in females, and predominant age ranging from 25 to 40 years. It is characterized by pain and paresthesia in the first four fingers and wrists, and arm pain, weakness, numbness in the territory of the median nerve, preserving or not the palmar sensation and numbness in the median sensory distribution. This study aims to assess functional capacity and severity of symptoms presented by cashiers diagnosed with CTS. It is a descriptive and quantitative in nature. The population consists of 13 grocery store cashiers of both sexes, with a workload of 42 hours. We will be used as an instrument called the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. That purports to be an effective means of measuring the numbness and pain in hands and wrists. Exclusion criteria we consider the subjects who have other diseases associated with CTS. The collection is with the possibility of partial results to be entered in a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel for data analysis and subsequent discussion and correlation with the current literature.

  4. Conservative treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome: comparison between laser therapy and Fascial Manipulation(®).

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Elisa; Pintucci, Marco; Cultrera, Pina; Baldini, Enrico; Stecco, Antonio; Petrocelli, Antonio; Pasquetti, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is multifactorial and most cases are classified as idiopathic (Thurston 2013). A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effectiveness of Fascial Manipulation(®) (FM) and Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for CTS. This prospective trial included 42 patients (70 hands with symptoms) with clinical and electroneuromyographic diagnosis of CTS. The patients were randomly assigned to receive multiple sessions of FM or multiple session of LLLT. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) were performed at baseline, end of treatment and after three months. The group that received FM showed a significant reduction in subjective pain perception and an increased function assessed by BCTQ at the end of the treatment and follow-up. The group that received LLLT showed an improvement in the BCTQ at the end of the treatment but the improvement level was not sustained at the three month follow-up. FM is a valid alternative treatment for CTS.

  5. Efficacies of Acupuncture and Anti-inflammatory Treatment for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hadianfard, Mohammadjavad; Bazrafshan, Esmaeel; Momeninejad, Hadi; Jahani, Navid

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the efficacies of acupuncture and anti-inflammatory treatment in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Fifty patients with mild to moderate CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups received night wrist splints as the standard conservative treatment for 1 month. The acupuncture group also received eight sessions of acupuncture therapy (twice a week for 4 weeks). The control group received 400 mg of ibuprofen three times a day for 10 days. The visual analog scale (VAS) score, the score on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire for Functional Status and Symptom Severity (BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT), and the electrodiagnostic findings were evaluated at baseline and 1 month after treatment. At the final follow up, significant improvements were found in both groups (p < 0.05). Statistically significant improvements were observed in the VAS score, the score on the global BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT, and the electrodiagnostic findings, but not in the distal motor latency (DML), in the acupuncture group (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that acupuncture affected the score on the global BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT, the VAS score, and the electrodiagnostic findings, except the DML, more than ibuprofen did and that acupuncture might be an effective treatment for CTS.

  6. Assessment of Decisional Conflict about the Treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, Comparing Patients and Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Michiel GJS.; Bossen, Jeroen K.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Mudgal, Chaitanya S.; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: As part of the process of developing a decision aid for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework, we were interested in the level of ‘decisional conflict’ of hand surgeons and patients with CTS. This study addresses the null hypothesis that there is no difference between surgeon and patient decisional conflict with respect to test and treatment options for CTS. Secondary analyses assess the impact of patient and physician demographics and the strength of the patient-physician relationship on decisional conflict. Methods: One-hundred-twenty-three observers of the Science of Variation Group (SOVG) and 84 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome completed a survey regarding the Decisional Conflict Scale. Patients also filled out the Pain Self-efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) and the Patient Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Results: On average, patients had significantly greater decision conflict and scored higher on most subscales of the decisional conflict scale than hand surgeons. Factors associated with greater decision conflict were specific hand surgeon, less self-efficacy (confidence that one can achieve one’s goals in spite of pain), and higher PDRQ (relationship between patient and doctor). Surgeons from Europe have--on average--significantly more decision conflict than surgeons in the United States of America. Conclusions: Patients with CTS have more decision conflict than hand surgeons. Decision aids might help narrow this gap in decisional conflict. PMID:27200394

  7. Combined tarsal and carpal tunnel syndrome in mucolipidosis type III. A case study and review.

    PubMed

    Smuts, Izelle; Potgieter, Denise; van der Westhuizen, Francois Hendrikus

    2009-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type III (MLIII) (MIM# 252600) is an uncommon autosomal recessive disorder that results from uridine 5'-diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine: lysosomal hydrolase N-acetyl-1-phosphotransferase or UDP-GlcNAc 1-phosphotransferase deficiency. Clinical manifestations include developmental delay, short stature and other structural abnormalities. Less common clinical features, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, claw hand deformities, trigger fingers, and claw toes have previously been reported, but no specific association with tarsal tunnel syndrome has been reported in the literature. Tarsal tunnel syndrome is caused by entrapment of the posterior tibialis nerve in the tunnel formed by the medial malleolus of the ankle and the flexor retinaculum. It causes pain in the heel and sole of the foot as well as abnormal sensation in the distribution area of nervus tibialis posterior. In adults, the most common cause described is a ganglion. The phenomenon is rare in children and the published series are small. This case report portrays the presentation of a young girl with breath-holding spells secondary to painful bilateral tarsal tunnel syndrome and trigger fingers subsequently diagnosed with MLIII.

  8. Battling Carpal Tunnel Syndrome through Ergonomics: A Case Study of Texas A&M's Library Provides Insights and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Joyce K.

    1995-01-01

    Current library automation practices and new technologies have forced library managers to seek some means of reducing carpal tunnel syndrome, and a case study of Texas A&M's library provides insights. Highlights include identifying and assessing the injuries, adjusting work surfaces, testing and selecting new keyboards, and developing…

  9. Clinical Usefulness of Oral Supplementation with Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Curcumin Phytosome, and B-Group Vitamins in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Undergoing Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Bortot, Paola; Ponti, Veronica; Novelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n = 60) served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation). Patients in Group C (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05). Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen's tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P < 0.05). We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. PMID:24563654

  10. Electroacupuncture and splinting versus splinting alone to treat carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vincent C.H.; Ho, Robin S.T.; Liu, Siya; Chong, Marc K.C.; Leung, Albert W.N.; Yip, Benjamin H.K.; Griffiths, Sian M.; Zee, Benny C.Y.; Wu, Justin C.Y.; Sit, Regina W.S.; Lau, Alexander Y.L.; Wong, Samuel Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of acupuncture for managing carpal tunnel syndrome is uncertain, particularly in patients already receiving conventional treatments (e.g., splinting). We aimed to assess the effects of electroacupuncture combined with splinting. Methods: We conducted a randomized parallel-group assessor-blinded 2-arm trial on patients with clinically diagnosed primary carpal tunnel syndrome. The treatment group was offered 13 sessions of electroacupuncture over 17 weeks. The treatment and control groups both received continuous nocturnal wrist splinting. Results: Of 181 participants randomly assigned to electroacupuncture combined with splinting (n = 90) or splinting alone (n = 91), 174 (96.1%) completed all follow-up. The electroacupuncture group showed greater improvements at 17 weeks in symptoms (primary outcome of Symptom Severity Scale score mean difference [MD] −0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.36 to −0.03), disability (Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire score MD −6.72, 95% CI −10.9 to −2.57), function (Functional Status Scale score MD −0.22, 95% CI −0.38 to −0.05), dexterity (time to complete blinded pick-up test MD −6.13 seconds, 95% CI −10.6 to −1.63) and maximal tip pinch strength (MD 1.17 lb, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.86). Differences between groups were small and clinically unimportant for reduction in pain (numerical rating scale −0.70, 95% CI −1.34 to −0.06), and not significant for sensation (first finger monofilament test −0.08 mm, 95% CI −0.22 to 0.06). Interpretation: For patients with primary carpal tunnel syndrome, chronic mild to moderate symptoms and no indication for surgery, electroacupuncture produces small changes in symptoms, disability, function, dexterity and pinch strength when added to nocturnal splinting. Trial registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Register no. ChiCTR-TRC-11001655 (www.chictr.org.cn/showprojen.aspx?proj=7890); subsequently deposited in the World Health

  11. Pre- and post-operative comorbidities in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis of the thumb, and trigger digit.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Gong, H S; Lee, H J; Lee, Y H; Rhee, S H; Baek, G H

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 633 hands in 362 patients who had idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome and underwent carpal tunnel release between 1999 and 2009. Electrophysiological studies and simple radiographs of the wrist, cervical spine, and basal joint of the thumb were routinely checked, and patients were also assessed for the presence of trigger digit or de Quervain's disease before and after surgery. Among 362 patients, cervical arthritis was found in 253 patients (70%), and C5-C6 arthritis was the most common site. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb was observed in 216 (34%) of the 633 hands. Trigger digit or de Quervain's disease was observed in 85 of the 633 hands (13%) before surgery, and developed in 67 hands (11%) after surgery. Cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis, and trigger digit commonly coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient education about these disorders is very important when they coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

  12. Digital nerve action potentials in healthy subjects, and in carpal tunnel and diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Casey, E. B.; Quesne, Pamela M. Le

    1972-01-01

    A technique is described for stimulating and recording from nerves in the finger using surface electrodes. A decrease in amplitude and velocity was found with increasing age. In control subjects the digital potential was approximately one and a half times larger than the potential recorded at the wrist. In patients with carpal tunnel syndrome there was some reduction in amplitude and velocity of the digital potential, but the changes were more marked at the wrist. In diabetic patients more uniform changes were found in the two segments. The technique was particularly useful in enabling conduction velocity to be calculated in the digital nerves when no potential could be recorded at the wrist. PMID:5084132

  13. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression.

  14. Infrared thermography based on artificial intelligence as a screening method for carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jesensek Papez, B; Palfy, M; Mertik, M; Turk, Z

    2009-01-01

    This study further evaluated a computer-based infrared thermography (IRT) system, which employs artificial neural networks for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) using a large database of 502 thermal images of the dorsal and palmar side of 132 healthy and 119 pathological hands. It confirmed the hypothesis that the dorsal side of the hand is of greater importance than the palmar side when diagnosing CTS thermographically. Using this method it was possible correctly to classify 72.2% of all hands (healthy and pathological) based on dorsal images and > 80% of hands when only severely affected and healthy hands were considered. Compared with the gold standard electromyographic diagnosis of CTS, IRT cannot be recommended as an adequate diagnostic tool when exact severity level diagnosis is required, however we conclude that IRT could be used as a screening tool for severe cases in populations with high ergonomic risk factors of CTS.

  15. Two-point discrimination and kinesthetic sense disorders in productive age individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wolny, Tomasz; Saulicz, Edward; Linek, Paweł; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate two-point discrimination (2PD) sense and kinesthetic sense dysfunctions in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients compared with a healthy group. Methods: The 2PD sense, muscle force, and kinesthetic differentiation (KD) of strength; the range of motion in radiocarpal articulation; and KD of motion were assessed. Results: The 2PD sense assessment showed significantly higher values in all the examined fingers in the CTS group than in those in the healthy group (p<0.01). There was a significant difference in the percentage value of error in KD of pincer and cylindrical grip (p<0.01) as well as in KD of flexion and extension movement in the radiocarpal articulation (p<0.01) between the studied groups. Conclusions: There are significant differences in the 2PD sense and KD of strength and movement between CTS patients compared with healthy individuals. PMID:27108640

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome – Part II (treatment)☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Chammas, Michel; Boretto, Jorge; Burmann, Lauren Marquardt; Ramos, Renato Matta; Neto, Francisco Santos; Silva, Jefferson Braga

    2014-01-01

    The treatments for non-deficit forms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are corticoid infiltration and/or a nighttime immobilization brace. Surgical treatment, which includes sectioning the retinaculum of the flexors (retinaculotomy), is indicated in cases of resistance to conservative treatment in deficit forms or, more frequently, in acute forms. In minimally invasive techniques (endoscopy and mini-open), and even though the learning curve is longer, it seems that functional recovery occurs earlier than in the classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon, patient, severity, etiology and availability of material. The results are satisfactory in close to 90% of the cases. Recovery of strength requires four to six months after regression of the pain of pillar pain type. This surgery has the reputation of being benign and has a complication rate of 0.2–0.5%. PMID:26229842

  17. [Pain and numbness in the arms and hands and carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Valéria Ribeiro Nogueira; Dantas, Fábio Galvão; Cardoso, Maria Aparecida Alves; de Medeiros, Jovany Luis Alves

    2006-12-01

    We studied the frequency and localization of pain and numbness in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), in comparison with individuals of the general population, matched for sex and age, and we determined the sensitivity and the specificity of these symptoms for the CTS diagnosis. Pain was a common symptom in the two groups of patients. Numbness occurred more frequently in CTS group (p<0.05). In CTS patients, pain complaints were present in neck (42.8%), arms (36.8%) and hands (82.8%). Among controls, pain was more common in head (11.4%), trunk (37.1%), legs (22.8%). In our casuistics, in relation to the CTS diagnosis, the presence of pain and numbness have low sensitivity and high specificity when they occur in the arms, and high sensitivity and specificity when they occur in the hands.

  18. Changes in treatment plan for carpal tunnel syndrome based on electrodiagnostic test results.

    PubMed

    Becker, S J E; Makanji, H S; Ring, D

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated how often the treatment plan for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) changed based on electrodiagnostic test results. Secondly, we assessed factors associated with a change in the treatment plan for CTS. One-hundred-and-thirty English-speaking adult patients underwent electrodiagnostic testing in a prospective cohort study. Treatment plan was recorded before and after testing. Treatment plan changed in 25 patients (19%) based on electrodiagnostic test results. The plan for operative treatment before testing decreased significantly after testing (83% versus 72%). The best logistic regression model for no change in treatment plan included a prolonged or non-recordable median distal sensory latency (normal, prolonged, or non-recordable), and explained 24% of the variation. For surgeons that manage CTS on the basis of objective pathophysiology rather than symptoms, electrodiagnostic test results often lead to changes in recommended treatment.

  19. A repeated carpal tunnel syndrome due to tophaceous gout in flexor tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Chen, Qiang; Shen, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Gouty tophi is a rare cause of CTS. We first report a unique case of repeated CTS with gouty tophi in flexor tendon. In the previous literature, the symptoms cases of CTS were gradually increased. Patient concerns: We report a 44-year-old male porter presented with mass on his left distal forearm combined a repeated carpal tunnel syndrome for 5 years. He felt numbness in fingers and his left palmar. The CTS symptoms had been eased through rest and dugs medication. It recurred twice. Diagnoses: Monosodium urate crystal deposits were found in surgery. Histologic findings confirmed the diagnosis of gout. Interventions: We removed partial of gouty tophus and retained the integrity of the tendon. Outcomes: Two years after the surgery, the patient had not experienced any symptom recurrence. Lessons: Early diagnosis and control of gout are necessary to avoid irreversible complications. The surgery combined with decreasing trioxypurine treatment can improve the treatment outcome of gouty tophus. PMID:28248892

  20. Revision surgery for recurrent and persistent carpal tunnel syndrome: Clinical results and factors affecting outcomes.

    PubMed

    Djerbi, I; César, M; Lenoir, H; Coulet, B; Lazerges, C; Chammas, M

    2015-12-01

    Thirty-eight hands in 36 patients with recurrent or persistent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) were reviewed retrospectively after a mean of 51 months (range 12-86) to identify factors that may lead to poor outcomes after surgical management. Clinical assessment focused on pain and sensitivity recovery, measured with a VAS and Weber's two-point discrimination test, respectively. At the latest follow-up, we found 11 excellent, 15 good, nine fair and three poor results. The risk of fair or poor results was significantly higher in the presence of intraneural fibrosis, severe preoperative sensory deficit, neuroma of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, workers compensation claims and number of previous surgeries. This last factor also significantly increased the risk of intraneural fibrosis. Despite disappointing outcomes, identification of these factors may improve our prognostic ability for revision surgery in cases of recurrent CTS.

  1. The Efficacy of 100 and 300 mg Gabapentin in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a neuropathy due to the compression of the median nerve. It is shown that gabapentin in high doses is effective in treatment of CTS patients. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of low doses of gabapentin in treatment of CTS patients. Ninety patients with CTS were randomly assigned to groups A, B and C. Gabapentin was administered to group A with dose of 100 mg/day and to group B with dose of 300 mg/day for 2 months. Group C received no treatment. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated using Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and parasthesia, Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) including Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. The pinch and grip strength was also measured. There was significant improvement in VAS, grip strength, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ score in all three groups (p < 0.05), but the changes in CMAP and SNAP was not significant. Groups A and B in comparison to group C had significantly better improvement in VAS, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ total score (p < 0.05). There was significantly more improvement in pinch strength and SSS score in group B compared to group A (p < 0.05). Gabapentin in low doses is a useful drug in treatment of CTS symptoms with no side effects and intolerance. Gabapentin with dose of 300 mg/day is more effective than the dose of 100 mg/day.

  2. The Efficacy of 100 and 300 mg Gabapentin in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a neuropathy due to the compression of the median nerve. It is shown that gabapentin in high doses is effective in treatment of CTS patients. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of low doses of gabapentin in treatment of CTS patients. Ninety patients with CTS were randomly assigned to groups A, B and C. Gabapentin was administered to group A with dose of 100 mg/day and to group B with dose of 300 mg/day for 2 months. Group C received no treatment. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated using Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and parasthesia, Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) including Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. The pinch and grip strength was also measured. There was significant improvement in VAS, grip strength, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ score in all three groups (p < 0.05), but the changes in CMAP and SNAP was not significant. Groups A and B in comparison to group C had significantly better improvement in VAS, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ total score (p < 0.05). There was significantly more improvement in pinch strength and SSS score in group B compared to group A (p < 0.05). Gabapentin in low doses is a useful drug in treatment of CTS symptoms with no side effects and intolerance. Gabapentin with dose of 300 mg/day is more effective than the dose of 100 mg/day. PMID:26664397

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome: Analyzing efficacy and utility of clinical tests and various diagnostic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Sood, Isha; Bhargava, Amita N.; Bhushan, Bharat; Rana, Kirti; Jangid, Hemant; Shubhkaran, Khichar; Pujar, Guruprasad S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy, but not adequately studied in India. Objectives: To study clinical tests, nerve conduction studies (NCS), ultrasonography (USG), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing CTS. Materials and Methods: We diagnosed CTS in 54 patients (93 hands) out of 60 screened patients with symptoms compatible with CTS, including 19 control patients (23 hands). We conducted provocative tests and calculated Boston Carpal tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) symptom (S) and function (F) scores. NCS positive patients were classified into mild, mild-to-moderate, moderate, severe, and all-CTS groups. Median nerve anteroposterior, transverse, circumference (CIR), and cross-sectional area (CSA) at inlet (I), middle (M), and outlet (O) each was measured by USG in all patients. MRI was done in 26 patients (39 hands). Results: Phalen, hand elevation and pressure provocation tests had higher sensitivity, Tinel's test had higher specificity and tethered median nerve and tourniquet tests had low sensitivity and moderate specificity. USG had low sensitivity but high specificity, and MRI had moderate sensitivity. USG in patients compared to controls was significantly abnormal in CSA-I, CIR-I, and CSA-O. Significant correlation was found between BCTQ-S and NCS and BCTQ-S and CIR-O. CIR-M, CIR-O, CSA-M, and CSA-I had correlation with NCS. MRI was significant in moderate and in moderate + severe groups combined and associated pathologies were detected in 59% patients. Conclusion: NCS remain gold standard but USG and MRI help increase sensitivity and detect mass lesions amenable to surgery. PMID:26752893

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded study. Forty-four patients with CTS were randomized into intervention or control groups. Patients in the intervention group were treated with PRF and night splint, and the control group was prescribed night splint alone. Primary outcome was the onset time of significant pain relief assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), and secondary outcomes included evaluation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) results, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. All outcome measurements were performed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty-six patients completed the study. The onset time of pain relief in the intervention group was significantly shorter (median onset time of 2 days vs. 14 days; hazard ratio = 7.37; 95% CI, 3.04–17.87) compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Significant improvement in VAS and BCTQ scores (p < 0.05) was detected in the intervention group at all follow-up periods compared to the controls (except for the severity subscale of BCTQ at week 1). Ultrasound-guided PRF treatment resulted in a lower VAS score and stronger finger pinch compared to the control group over the entire study. Conclusions Our study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF serves as a better approach for pain relief in patients with CTS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02217293 PMID:26067628

  5. A Cross-Sectional Study of Musculoskeletal Health Literacy in Patients With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Andrew J; Dunkman, Andrew; Goldberg, Daniel; Uhl, Richard L; Mulligan, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Background: Approximately 33% of Americans have inadequate health literacy, which is associated with infrequent use of preventative services, increased hospitalization and use of emergency care, and worse control of chronic diseases. In this study, the Literacy in Musculoskeletal Problems (LiMP) questionnaire was used to evaluate the prevalence of limited musculoskeletal literacy in patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (CTR), as these individuals may be at increased risk of inferior outcomes. Methods: This cross-sectional study included individuals older than or equal to 18 years of age who were scheduled for elective CTR. Participants completed a demographic survey and the LiMP questionnaire during their preoperative office visit. The prevalence of limited health literacy was determined, with chi-square analysis used to determine the influence of demographic parameters. Results: The mean LiMP score was 6 ± 1.40. Limited musculoskeletal literacy was seen in 34% of participants (22/65). Analysis identified race (Caucasian), gender (female), higher education levels (≥college), current or prior employment in a health care field, and a prior physician visit for a non-carpal tunnel musculoskeletal complaint as being associated with higher literacy rates. Conclusions: Approximately one-third of patients scheduled for elective CTR have limited musculoskeletal literacy and may lack the necessary skills required for making informed decisions regarding their care. This is concerning, as CTR is performed in the United States on roughly 500 000 individuals annually, at an estimated cost of 2 billion dollars. The identification of those most at risk is thus crucial, and will facilitate the development of education campaigns and interventions geared toward those who are most vulnerable.

  6. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  7. The role of job strain on return to work after carpal tunnel surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, D; Amick, B; Habeck, R; Ossmann, J; Katz, J

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To examine the impact of job strain (that is, high psychological job demands and low job control) on return to work and work role functioning at two months, six months, or both, following carpal tunnel release surgery. Methods: A community based cohort of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients from physician practices was recruited between April 1997 and October 1998 throughout Maine (USA). 128 patients at two months and 122 at six months completed all relevant questions. A three level outcome variable indicated whether patients had: (1) returned to work functioning successfully, (2) returned to work functioning with limitations, or (3) not returned to work for health reasons. Two job strain measures were created: one, by combining psychological job demands and job control; and two, by dividing demands by control. Ordinal logistic regression was used to identify predictors of the three level work outcome variable. Results: After adjustment, workers with high demands and high control (active work) were less likely to successfully return to work (OR = 0.22; p = 0.014) at two months. Having a job with higher demands than job control (high strain) predicted not returning to work or returning to work but not successfully meeting job demands (OR = 0.14; p = 0.001), at six months. Conclusions: The findings underscore the role of psychosocial work conditions, as defined by the Karasek demand-control model, in explaining a worker's return to work. Clinicians, researchers, and employers should consider a multidimensional and integrative model of successful work role functioning upon return to work. Moreover, since the evidence of the effects of work process changes on the reduction of CTS is very scarce, these findings point to the opportunity for collaborative workplace interventions to facilitate successful return to work. PMID:16234404

  8. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  9. Electrophysiologic and Ultrasonographic Assessment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Wheelchair Basketball Athletes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the contributing factors of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), electrodiagnostic and ultrasonographic findings of median nerve, and median nerve change after exercise in wheelchair basketball (WCB) players. Methods Fifteen WCB players with manual wheelchairs were enrolled in the study. Medical history of the subjects was taken. Electrodiagnosis and ultrasonography of both median nerves were performed to assess CTS in WCB players. Ultrasonographic median nerves evaluation was conducted after wheelchair propulsion for 20 minutes. Results Average body mass index (BMI) and period of wheelchair use of CTS subjects were greater than those of normal subjects. Electrodiagnosis revealed CTS in 14 of 30 hands (47%). Cross-sectional area (CSA) of median nerve was greater in CTS subjects than in normal subjects at 0.5 cm and 1 cm proximal to distal wrist crease (DWC), DWC, 1 cm, 2 cm, 3 cm, and 3.5 cm distal to DWC. After exercising, median nerve CSAs at 0.5 cm and 1 cm proximal to DWC, DWC, and 3 cm and 3.5 cm distal to DWC were greater than baseline CSAs in CTS subjects; and median nerve CSAs at 1 cm proximal to DWC and DWC were greater than baseline CSAs in normal subjects. The changes in median nerve CSA after exercise in CTS subjects were greater than in normal subjects at 0.5 cm proximal to DWC and 3 cm and 3.5 cm distal to DWC. Conclusion BMI and total period of wheelchair use contributed to developing CTS in WCB players. The experimental exercise might be related to the median nerve swelling around the inlet and outlet of carpal tunnel in WCB athletes with CTS. PMID:28289636

  10. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)(n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)(n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0(p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2(p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 (p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  11. Predictors of normal electrodiagnostic testing in the evaluation of suspected carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jeffrey; Zhao, Meijuan; Ring, David

    2010-12-01

    Electrodiagnostic studies (electromyography and nerve conduction velocity; EMG/NCV) are used to confirm the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and to evaluate its severity. We investigated the hypothesis that normal electrodiagnostic median nerve testing is predicted by 1) Physician pre-test confidence in the diagnosis of CTS, and 2) Puzzling patient factors. One hundred and forty consecutive patients who underwent electrodiagnostic testing to evaluate for possible CTS were reviewed retrospectively. Both physician confidence in the diagnosis of CTS and puzzling patient factors (heightened illness concern, disproportionate complaints, and vague/nonanatomical/noncharacteristic symptoms) were recorded. Electrodiagnostic testing was used as the reference standard for diagnosis of CTS. Electrodiagnostic testing confirmed CTS in 115 patients and was within normal limits in 25 patients. Low physician confidence in the diagnosis of CTS was highly predictive of a normal electrodiagnostic test (p < 0.001), with high sensitivity (97%), moderate specificity (40%), and high overall accuracy (87%). Puzzling patient factors were moderately predictive of normal electrodiagnostic testing (p < 0.001), with low sensitivity (16%), high specificity (96%), and high overall accuracy (81%). The best multivariable model retained younger age, negative Phalen's test, and low physician confidence as the best predictors of normal electrodiagnostic testing and explained 35% of the variation in test results. A model with low confidence alone explained 19% of the variation in test results. Physician intuition as recorded in the medical record in terms of puzzlement and low confidence are very specific and accurate predictors of normal electrodiagnostic testing in the setting of suspected carpal tunnel syndrome.

  12. Effect of grip type, wrist motion, and resistance level on pressures within the carpal tunnel of normal wrists.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; Fallentin, Nils; Andersen, Johan H; Keir, Peter J; Hansen, Torben B; Pransky, Glenn; Lin, Jia-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Elevated carpal tunnel pressure (CTP) has been associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. This study systematically evaluated the effect of wrist motion resistance and grip type on CTP during wrist motion typical of occupational tasks. CTP during four wrist motion patterns, with and without resistance, and with and without gripping, was measured in vivo in 14 healthy individuals. CTP measured during compound motions fell between that measured in the cardinal planes of wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Generally, with no active gripping there was little pressure change due to wrist angular displacement or resistance level. However, concurrent active pinch or power grip increased CTP particularly in motions including extension. CTP typically did not increase during wrist flexion, and in fact often decreased. Extension motions against resistance when employing a pinch or power grip increase CTP more than motions with flexion. Results could help inform design or modification of wrist motion intensive occupational tasks. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Prevalence and Related Characteristics of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Orchardists in the Gyeongsangnam-do Region

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and related characteristics of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in orchardists and to investigate the association between electrodiagnostic severity and physical examinations. Methods Between July 2013 and September 2014, 377 subjects (174 men and 203 women) visited the Gyeongsang National University Hospital's Center for Farmer's Safety and Health. All the subjects underwent electrodiagnostic tests and physical examination, including Phalen's test, Tinel's sign, and Durkan's carpal compression test (CCT). The subjects were classified into 2 groups, the normal group and the CTS group, according to electrodiagnostic test results. To determine the related characteristics of CTS, potential variables, including age, sex, drinking, smoking, body mass index, waist circumference, and total work time, were compared between the 2 groups. The association between electrodiagnostic severity and physical examinations was analyzed. Results CTS was diagnosed in 194 subjects based only on electrodiagnostic test results, corresponding to a prevalence of 51.5%. Among the variables, mean age (p=0.001) and total work time (p=0.007) were significantly correlated with CTS. With respect to the physical examinations, low specificities were observed for Tinel's sign, Phalen's test, and Durkan's CCT (38.4%, 36.1%, and 40.9%, respectively) in the subjects aged ≥65 years. In addition, Phalen's test (p=0.003) and Tinel's sign (p=0.032) in men and Durkan's CCT (p=0.047) in women showed statistically significant differences with increasing CTS severity. The odds ratio was 2.066 for Durkan's CCT in women according to the multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusion CTS prevalence among orchardists was high, and Durkan's CCT result was significantly quantitatively correlated with the electrodiagnostic test results. Therefore, Durkan's CCT is another reliable examination method for CTS. PMID:27847721

  14. Prevalence and associated factors of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) among medical laboratory staff at King Saud University Hospitals, KSA

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed S, Shaffi; Anas M, Bardeesi; Aref A, Altwair; Abdulrahman A, AlMubarak

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a group of symptoms resulting from local compression of the median nerve at the wrist leading to its subsequent functional impairment and local ischemia of the nerve. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and commonly reported symptoms of CTS in the laboratory workers of King Saud University (KSU) hospitals and to identify the associated variables with CTS. Methods: This was a quantitative observational cross-sectional study which was conducted in KSU hospitals’ laboratories with a total of 225 participants by using a standardized questionnaire known as “ Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Data Analysis was carried out by IBM SPSS Statistics software version 21.0. Results: Out of the 225 participants, 57 were found to be severely symptomatic with a prevalence of 25.3%. Among the severely affected participants, females were more than males (58% > 42%) and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.045). Technicians affected (91.2%) were more than attendants (8.8%) and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.042). Conclusion: The prevalence of Carpal tunnel syndrome in KSU hospitals’ medical laboratory staff (25.3%) was close to what was found in literature (21.5%). So laboratory workers are at risk of developing CTS, especially females and technicians with the dominant hand most likely to be affected. PMID:26101485

  15. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in workers engaged in the assembly of manufactured products in various industries in the province of Brescia].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, P G

    1996-01-01

    Tests were carried out on five manual assembly departments in a variety of different factories, in order to assess the risks associated with the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and to describe the prevalence of this disorder among exposed workers. The application of the risk analysis method proposed by the EPM Research Unit in Milan (Italy) demonstrated the presence of numerous jobs featuring both a high frequency of actions per minute and a total lack of recovery times, in addition to a variety of incongrous upper limb postures. The clinical and instrumental investigation diagnosed 76 cases of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome among the 170 exposed workers. 62% of the cases was bilateral and 24% was associated with Guyon Channel Syndrome. In two of the five departments reviewed, the carpal tunnel disorders detected were endemic, and featured unusually high prevalence. The situation had been seriously underestimated by the company technical and medical staff, resulting in a failure to call for the urgent adoption of individual protection and collective prevention measures. The authors recommend that an extensive and adequate occupational risk assessment analysis be performed: the local occupational health services could play a critical role in identifying the highest risk industries and the diseases diagnosed in a hospital environment.

  16. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  17. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study.

    PubMed

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-02-16

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)(n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)(n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0(p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2(p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 (p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  18. Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Detlef; Ebinger, Thomas; Illich, Wolfgang; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    2003-10-01

    We developed a new surgical procedure to improve the recurrence rate using an Er:YAG laser as dissection tool for the carpal ligament with the objective to ablate a small amount of the carpal ligament and to denaturate its ends. The Er:YAG Laser was transmitted to the applicator via a GeO fiber. With this system we proceeded 10 carpal ligament dissections without any complications in the follow-up period. All patients were free of pain and recurrence.

  19. Effect of wrist angle on median nerve appearance at the proximal carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension.

  20. Infrared thermography based on artificial intelligence for carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jesensek Papez, B; Palfy, M; Turk, Z

    2008-01-01

    Thermography for the measurement of surface temperatures is well known in industry, although is not established in medicine despite its safety, lack of pain and invasiveness, easy reproducibility, and low running costs. Promising results have been achieved in nerve entrapment syndromes, although thermography has never represented a real alternative to electromyography. Here an attempt is described to improve the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome with thermography using a computer-based system employing artificial neural networks to analyse the images. Method reliability was tested on 112 images (depicting the dorsal and palmar sides of 26 healthy and 30 pathological hands), with the hand divided into 12 segments and compared relative to a reference. Palmar segments appeared to have no beneficial influence on classification outcome, whereas dorsal segments gave improved outcome with classification success rates near to or over 80%, and finger segments influenced by the median nerve appeared to be of greatest importance. These are preliminary results from a limited number of images and further research will be undertaken as our image database grows.

  1. Comparative study between physical examination, electroneuromyography and ultrasonography in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Filho, Arnaldo Gonçalves; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; Amorim, Marcelo de Carvalho; Naus, Ronald Alan Sauaia; Loures, Elmano de Araújo; Moratelli, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the sensitivity of electromyography and ultrasonography in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), in comparison with physical examination, which is considered to be the gold standard. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the medical files of 56 patients with 70 hands affected by CTS who were attended between March 2010 and June 2012 were reviewed. The study included patients with a clinical diagnosis of CTS. The sensitivity of the complementary examinations was analyzed and compared with physical examination. Results Nocturnal symptoms were found in 96.4%, thenar atrophy in 62.5% and abnormal sense of touch in 50%. The sensitivities found were: ultrasonography, 67.1% (95% CI: 55.7%–78.6%); an association of physical examination tests, 95.7% (95% CI: 90.0%–100%); and electromyography, 98.6% (95% CI: 95.7%–100%). The presence of atrophy, abnormalities of the sense of touch and longer-duration symptoms increased the sensitivity of ultrasonography and physical examination. Conclusion The sensitivity of ultrasonography for CTS was lower than that of electromyography and physical examination. PMID:26229843

  2. The efficacy of phonophoresis on electrophysiological studies of the patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soyupek, Feray; Kutluhan, Suleyman; Uslusoy, Gokcen; Ilgun, Erdem; Eris, Sevilay; Askin, Ayhan

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy of phonophoresis with nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (P-NSAID) and corticosteroids (P-CS) in the treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and to compare the efficacy of phonophoresis with local CS injection (LCSI) and splinting with a 3-month follow-up. 84 hands of 51 patients with CTS were treated by applying LCSI, P-CS, P-NSAID, and wrist splinting. Electrophysiological studies, grip strength, hand dexterity, and sensory recovery of the first three digits were assessed. Duruöz hand index (DHI) was used to assess the functional hand disability. For clinical evaluation, we used Phalen and Tinnel signs. Pain intensity was evaluated by visual analog scale. The LCIS group showed a significant improvement in pain relief and DHI, but this group had significant deterioration in the results of monofilament and pegboard tests. The P-CS group showed improvement in sensory nerve conduction velocity, distal latency, grip strength, and DHI parameters. There was a significant improvement in grip strength, pegboard test, and pain intensity in the P-NSAID group. There was improvement only in pain intensity in the splinting group. We identified marked improvement in the electrophysiological studies in the P-CS group. Splinting had no effect on hand functions, disability, and electrophysiological studies.

  3. Relaxin Modulates the Expression of MMPs and TIMPs in Fibroblasts of Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young-Mi; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kang, Ho

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-fibrotic effect of relaxin in subsynovial fibroblasts activated by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Materials and Methods To test the anti-fibrotic effect of an adenovirus-relaxin construct (Ad-RLN) on subsynovial fibroblasts in vitro, cells from subsynovial connective tissue of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were activated with TGF-β1 and exposed to Ad-RLN (as a therapeutic gene) or adenovirus-lacZ construct (as a marker gene) for four hours. Subsynovial fibroblast cultures without adenoviral exposure served as controls. Results We observed induction of gene expressions of collagen I, III and IV, as well as the abatement of alpha-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA) synthesis, Smad2 phosphorylation, and fibronectin at the protein level, in comparison to controls. In addition, protein expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) I was significantly induced, whereas the protein expressions of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) I and IV were reduced due to relaxin expression. Conclusion RLN prevents excessive synthesis of extracellular matrix by reducing the expressions of its components, such as fibronectin, a-SMA, and phosphorylated Smad2, by increasing the expression of MMPs; and by decreasing the expression of TIMPs. PMID:28120574

  4. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on adaptation of multi-digit forces to object texture

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Mostafa; Santello, Marco; Johnston, Jamie A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The ability to adapt digit forces to object properties requires both anticipatory and feedback-driven control mechanisms which can be disrupted in individuals with a compromised sensorimotor system. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a median nerve compression neuropathy affecting sensory and motor function in a subset of digits in the hand. Our objective was to examine how CTS patients coordinate anticipatory and feedback-driven control for multi-digit grip force adaptation. Methods We asked CTS patients and healthy controls to grasp, lift, and hold an object with different textures. Results CTS patients effectively adapted their digit forces to changes in object texture, but produced excessive grip forces. CTS patients also produced larger peak force rate profiles with fewer modulations of normal force prior to lift onset than did controls and continued to increase grip force throughout the lift whereas forces were set at lift onset for the controls. Conclusions These findings suggest that CTS patients use less online sensory feedback for fine-tuning their grip forces, relying more on anticipatory control than do healthy controls. Significance These characteristics in force adaptation in CTS patients indicate impaired sensorimotor control which leads to excessive grip forces with the potential to further exacerbate their median nerve compression. PMID:22627019

  5. General Population Job Exposure Matrix Applied to a Pooled Study of Prevalent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ann Marie; Zeringue, Angelique; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Rempel, David; Bao, Stephen; Thiese, Matthew S.; Merlino, Linda; Burt, Susan; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Gerr, Fred; Hegmann, Kurt T.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    A job exposure matrix may be useful for the study of biomechanical workplace risk factors when individual-level exposure data are unavailable. We used job title–based exposure data from a public data source to construct a job exposure matrix and test exposure-response relationships with prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Exposures of repetitive motion and force from the Occupational Information Network were assigned to 3,452 active workers from several industries, enrolled between 2001 and 2008 from 6 studies. Repetitive motion and force exposures were combined into high/high, high/low, and low/low exposure groupings in each of 4 multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for personal factors. Although force measures alone were not independent predictors of CTS in these data, strong associations between combined physical exposures of force and repetition and CTS were observed in all models. Consistent with previous literature, this report shows that workers with high force/high repetition jobs had the highest prevalence of CTS (odds ratio = 2.14–2.95) followed by intermediate values (odds ratio = 1.09–2.27) in mixed exposed jobs relative to the lowest exposed workers. This study supports the use of a general population job exposure matrix to estimate workplace physical exposures in epidemiologic studies of musculoskeletal disorders when measures of individual exposures are unavailable. PMID:25700886

  6. Prevalence, incidence and risk factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in a large footwear factory.

    PubMed

    Roquelaure, Y; Mariel, J; Dano, C; Fanello, S; Penneau-Fontbonne, D

    2001-01-01

    The study was conducted to assess the prevalence and incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large modern footwear factory and to identify factors predictive of CTS. To this end, 199 workers were examined in 1996, and 162 of them were re-examined in 1997. Ergonomic and psychosocial risk factors of CTS were assessed by workpost analysis and self-administered questionnaire. The prevalence of CTS at baseline in 1996 and in 1997 was 16.6% (95%CI: 11.4-21.7) and 11.7% (95%CI: 6.7-16.8), respectively. The incidence rate of CTS in 1997 was 11.7% (95%CI: 6.7-7.8). No specific type of job performance was associated with CTS. Obesity (OR = 4.4; 95%CI: 1.1-17.1) and psychological distress at baseline (OR = 4.3; 95%CI: 1.0-18.6) were strongly predictive of CTS. Rapid trigger movements of the fingers were also predictive of CTS (OR = 3.8; 95%CI: 1.0-17.2). A strict control of thework by superiors was negatively associatedwith CTS (OR = 0.5; 95%CI: 0.2-1.3). The prevalence and incidence of CTS in this workforce were largely higher than in the general population and numerous industries. The study highlights the role of psychological distress in workers exposed to a high level of physical exposure and psychological demand.

  7. Pre-surgery Disability Compensation Predicts Long-Term Disability among Workers with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Spector, June T.; Turner, Judith A.; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Franklin, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to identify early risk factors for work disability compensation prior to and after carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) surgery, and to determine whether pre-surgery disability compensation is associated with long-term disability. Methods Washington State workers’ compensation administrative data and data from interviews with workers 18 days (median) after submitting new workers’ compensation claims for CTS were examined. Baseline risk factors for pre-surgery disability compensation and for long-term disability (≥365 days of work disability compensation prior to two years after claim filing) were evaluated for workers who underwent CTS surgery and had at least one day of disability compensation (N=670). Results After adjustment for baseline long-term disability risk factors, workers with pre-surgery disability compensation had over five times the odds of long-term disability. Baseline factors in multiple domains, including job, psychosocial, clinical, and worker pain and function, were associated with both pre-surgery disability compensation and long-term disability. Conclusions Risk factors for work disability prior to and after CTS surgery are similar, and early work disability is a risk factor for long-term CTS-related disability. An integrated approach to CTS-related disability prevention could include identifying and addressing combined risk factors soon after claim filing, more efficient use of conservative treatments and appropriate work modifications to minimize early work loss, and, when indicated, timely surgical intervention. PMID:22392804

  8. Reappraisal of the F/M amplitude ratio in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ginanneschi, F; Mondelli, M; Aretini, A; Rossi, Alessandro

    The F-wave/M-wave amplitude (F/M-amp) ratio has been shown to be increased in peripheral neuropathies, provided the maximum M-wave is relatively preserved. Reduced M-wave amplitudes and central facilitation of antidromically-induced reactivation of the anterior horn cells' axon hillocks (F-wave) are believed to contribute to higher F/M-amp ratios. The present study was undertaken to re-evaluate mechanisms responsible for higher F/M-amp ratios in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We enrolled 232 cases affected by CTS and 108 controls. Fand M-wave amplitudes and F-wave chronodispersion were analyzed for the median and ulnar nerves. The F/M-amp ratio of the median nerve in CTS subjects with moderate-severe nerve damage was significantly higher than that of mild CTS subjects and controls. Chronodispersion of the median nerve F-wave increased with increasing CTS severity. We conclude that the relative preservation of the median nerve F-wave is due to damage to the large diameter muscle afferent fibers responsible for the monosynaptic response. Absence of the monosynaptic response makes the small motoneurons, usually inaccessible to the antidromic volley because of its collision with the orthodromic reflex volley, able to fire in the F-wave.

  9. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chao; Dong, Hongjuan; Chu, Hong; Lu, Zuneng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To prospectively assess the effectiveness of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) by using clinical scores and nerve conduction studies (NCS). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-one patients enrolled in the study were clinically evaluated by a symptom severity scale (SSS) and functional status scale (FSS), and were electrophysiologically evaluated by conventional NCS; distal motor latency (DML), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and difference in sensory latency between the median and ulnar nerves (ΔDSL) were measured. Subjects were treated with wrist splinting. Patients who showed no improvement in symptoms were treated with other conservative treatments, the remaining patients continued to wear splints. SSS, FSS, and NCS were evaluated after splinting as well. [Results] The follow-up was completed in 20 patients (31 wrists) with splinting. SSS and FSS decreased, the DML shortened and ΔDSL decreased significantly after splinting for 3.03 ± 1.16 months. There were significant correlations between SSS and DML, SCV of wrist digit 2, and SCV of wrist digit 4. No correlations were found between SSS and ΔDSL, and FSS and the parameters of NCS. [Conclusion] Neutral wrist nocturnal splinting is effective in at least short term for CTS patients. There is a weak correlation between clinical scores and NCS, which suggests that both approaches should be used to effectively assess the therapeutic effect of CTS treatment. PMID:27630413

  10. Multidimensional Ultrasound Imaging of the Wrist: Changes of Shape and Displacement of the Median Nerve and Tendons in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Filius, Anika; Scheltens, Marjan; Bosch, Hans G.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Stam, Henk J.; Hovius, Steven E.R.; Amadio, Peter C.; Selles, Ruud W.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel may alter in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to fibrotic changes and increased carpal tunnel pressure. Ultrasound can visualize these potential changes, making ultrasound potentially an accurate diagnostic tool. To study this, we imaged the carpal tunnel of 113 patients and 42 controls. CTS severity was classified according to validated clinical and nerve conduction study (NCS) classifications. Transversal and longitudinal displacement and shape (changes) were calculated for the median nerve, tendons and surrounding tissue. To predict diagnostic value binary logistic regression modeling was applied. Reduced longitudinal nerve displacement (p≤0.019), increased nerve cross-sectional area (p≤0.006) and perimeter (p≤0.007), and a trend of relatively changed tendon displacements were seen in patients. Changes were more convincing when CTS was classified as more severe. Binary logistic modeling to diagnose CTS using ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 70-71% and specificity of 80-84%. In conclusion, CTS patients have altered dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel. PMID:25865180

  11. Multidimensional ultrasound imaging of the wrist: Changes of shape and displacement of the median nerve and tendons in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Scheltens, Marjan; Bosch, Hans G; van Doorn, Pieter A; Stam, Henk J; Hovius, Steven E R; Amadio, Peter C; Selles, Ruud W

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel may alter in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to fibrotic changes and increased carpal tunnel pressure. Ultrasound can visualize these potential changes, making ultrasound potentially an accurate diagnostic tool. To study this, we imaged the carpal tunnel of 113 patients and 42 controls. CTS severity was classified according to validated clinical and nerve conduction study (NCS) classifications. Transversal and longitudinal displacement and shape (changes) were calculated for the median nerve, tendons and surrounding tissue. To predict diagnostic value binary logistic regression modeling was applied. Reduced longitudinal nerve displacement (p≤ 0.019), increased nerve cross-sectional area (p≤ 0.006) and perimeter (p≤ 0.007), and a trend of relatively changed tendon displacements were seen in patients. Changes were more convincing when CTS was classified as more severe. Binary logistic modeling to diagnose CTS using ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 70-71% and specificity of 80-84%. In conclusion, CTS patients have altered dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel.

  12. What does the transverse carpal ligament contribute to carpal stability?

    PubMed

    Vanhees, Matthias; Verstreken, Frederik; van Riet, Roger

    2015-02-01

    Background The transverse carpal ligament is well known for its involvement in carpal tunnel syndrome, and sectioning of this ligament remains the definite treatment for this pathology. Some authors believe that the transverse carpal ligament is an important stabilizer of the carpal arch, whereas others do not consider it to be significant. Several studies have been performed, both in vivo and in in vitro. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament does not seem to have any effect on the width of the carpal arch in the unloaded condition. However, patients will load the arch during their activities of daily living. Materials and Methods A cadaveric study was done with distraction of the carpal bones before and after sectioning the transverse carpal ligament. Results With the transverse carpal ligament intact, the carpal arch is mobile, with distraction leading up to 50% widening of the arch. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament resulted in a significant widening of the carpal arch by a further 30%. Conclusions Loading of the carpal arch after sectioning of the transeverse carapal ligament leads to a significant increase in intracarpal mobility. This will inevitably influence carpal kinematics in the patient and might be responsible for some complications after simple carpal tunnel releases, such as pillar pain, palmar tenderness, and loss of grip strength.

  13. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conservative rehabilitation techniques may positively affect symptoms and overall hand function in compressive neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in addition to orthoses therapy and home orientations in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods/Design Patients older than 18 years old will be included, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, excluding comorbidies. A physiotherapist will conduct intervention, with a blinding evaluator. Randomization will be applied to allocate the patients in each group: with association or not to low-level laser therapy. All of them will be submitted to orthoses therapy and home orientations. Outcome will be assessed through: pain visual analogic scale, Semmes Weinstein monofilaments™ threshold sensibility test, Pinch Gauge™, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and two point discrimination test. Discussion This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, which aim to assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment added to low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Trial registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec) - 75ddtf / Universal Trial Number: U1111-1121-5184 PMID:23237204

  14. Surgical Approach and Anesthetic Modality for Carpal Tunnel Release: A Nationwide Database Study With Health Care Cost Implications.

    PubMed

    Foster, Brock D; Sivasundaram, Lakshmanan; Heckmann, Nathanael; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Pannell, William C; Wang, Jeffrey C; Ghiassi, Alidad

    2017-03-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel release (CTR) is commonly performed for carpal tunnel syndrome once conservative treatment has failed. Operative technique and anesthetic modality vary by surgeon preference and patient factors. However, CTR practices and anesthetic trends have, to date, not been described on a nationwide scale in the United States. Methods: The PearlDiver Patient Records Database was used to search Current Procedural Terminology codes for elective CTR from 2007 to 2011. Anesthetic modality (eg, general and regional anesthesia vs local anesthesia) and surgical approach (eg, endoscopic vs open) were recorded for this patient population. Cost analysis, patient demographics, regional variation, and annual changes in CTR surgery were evaluated. Results: We identified 86 687 patients who underwent carpal tunnel surgery during this 5-year time period. In this patient sample, 80.5% of CTR procedures were performed using general or regional anesthesia, compared with 19.5% of procedures performed using local anesthesia; 83.9% of all CTR were performed in an open fashion, and 16.1% were performed using an endoscopic technique. Endoscopic surgery was on average $794 more expensive than open surgery, and general or regional anesthesia was $654 more costly than local anesthesia. Conclusions: In the United States, open CTR under local anesthesia is the most cost-effective way to perform a CTR. However, only a small fraction of elective CTR procedures are performed with this technique, representing a potential area for significant health care cost savings. In addition, regional and age variations exist in procedure and anesthetic type utilized.

  15. The effect of excess body mass on the risk of carpal tunnel syndrome: a meta-analysis of 58 studies.

    PubMed

    Shiri, R; Pourmemari, M H; Falah-Hassani, K; Viikari-Juntura, E

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to estimate the effects of overweight and obesity on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and to assess whether sex modifies the associations. Literature searches were conducted in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and ResearchGate databases from 1953 to February 2015. Fifty-eight studies consisting of 1,379,372 individuals qualified for a meta-analysis. We used a random-effects meta-analysis, assessed heterogeneity and publication bias, and performed sensitivity analyses. Overweight increased the risk of CTS or carpal tunnel release 1.5-fold (pooled confounder-adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.47, 95% CI 1.37-1.57, N = 1,279,546) and obesity twofold (adjusted OR = 2.02, 95% CI 1.92-2.13, N = 1,362,207). Each one-unit increase in body mass index increased the risk of CTS by 7.4% (adjusted OR = 1.074, 95% CI 1.071-1.077, N = 1,258,578). Overweight and obesity had stronger effects on carpal tunnel release than CTS. The associations did not differ between men and women, and they were independent of study design. Moreover, the associations were not due to bias or confounding. Excess body mass markedly increases the risk of CTS. As the prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing globally, overweight-related CTS is expected to increase. Future studies should investigate whether a square-shaped wrist and exposure to physical workload factors potentiate the adverse effect of obesity on the median nerve.

  16. Assessing the complications and effectiveness of open carpal tunnel release in a tertiary care centre in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Khaleeq ur; Rahman, Shafiq; Khan, Adnan; Khan, Nauman Aman; Khan, Farman Ullah; khan, Rehman Ali; Farooq, Shama; Khan, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Open surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome is not devoid of complications and its quantitative assessment with the Boston questionnaire in a developing country had not been conducted, where, lack of facilities and surgical technique can influence the outcome. PRESENTATION OF CASE This was a prospective study in which all cases of carpal tunnel syndrome undergoing open release between June 2007 and June 2012 and who returned for follow up were included. Each patient was requested to fill out the Boston questionnaire twice both pre and post op at 3 months. All complications were recorded as well as bio-data of patients and co morbidities. Follow up was at 2 weeks and at 3 months. Those reporting complications at 3 months were further followed up until 6 months. 373 patients were included in the study. Twenty four patients developed complications. Of these, 12 experienced pain resulting from reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Three patients developed wound dehiscence, 2 cases acquired infections, 4 patients developed immediate post-operative haemorrhage and in 3 patients there was late recurrence of median nerve compression. The symptom severity score pre-operatively was 3.30 (±0.60) and it improved to 1.65 (±0.75) post-operatively indicating a significant change (p < 0.0001). The preoperative functional status score was 2.58 (±0.75) and post-op it became 1.60 (±0.80) again implying a good improvement with an effect size of 1.3. DISCUSSION All of the complications produced were well managed. The complication incidence was low. The open release procedure produced good improvement in hand function and in decreasing the symptom severity. CONCLUSION Conducting open release for carpal tunnel syndrome in a tertiary referral centre in a developing country offers a good outcome. PMID:24667074

  17. Sonographic assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis: prevalence and correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Omer; Kalyoncu, Umut; Akdogan, Ali; Karadag, Yesim Sucullu; Bilgen, Sule Apras; Ozbakır, Senay; Filippucci, Emilio; Kiraz, Sedat; Ertenli, Ihsan; Grassi, Walter; Calgüneri, Meral

    2012-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the most frequent extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). High frequency ultrasonography (US) is a sensitive and specific method in diagnosis of CTS. This study is aimed to: firstly assess diameter frequency of CTS in RA with US and compare with a control group; secondly, investigate relationship of CTS with disease activity. One hundred consecutive RA patients (women/men: 78/22) fulfilling ACR 1987 RA criteria and 45 healthy controls (women/control: 34/11) were enrolled into study. Disease activity parameters, RA and CTS patient global assessment and health assessment questionnaire (HAQ-DI) were recorded. Both patient and control group were questioned about secondary causes of CTS, and Katz hand diagram, Boston CTS questionnaire and Phalen ve Tinel tests were applied once for each hand. Wrist joint and carpal tunnel were assessed with US grey scale and power Doppler US, then cross-sectional area of median nerve (CSA) was calculated. Patients with median nerve CSA between 10.0 and 13.0 mm(2) were evaluated with electromyography (EMG). CTS was diagnosed if CSA of median nerve >13.0 mm(2) or CTS was shown with NCS. Although there was no difference between RA patients and controls in age, sex, history of DM (+) and goitre, CTS was more frequent in RA group (respectively, 17.0% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.038). In RA group with CTS, age, history of DM, disease duration, HAQ-DI score, CTS patient global score, Boston symptom severity and functional status scores were elevated compared to without CTS [respectively, 57 (36-73) vs. 50 (24-76), P = 0.041; 35.3% vs. 6.0%, P < 0.001; 108 (12-396) months vs. 72 (6-360) months, P = 0.036; 1.93 (0.75-2.87) vs. 1.125 (0-2.75), P = 0.013; 52 (1-97) vs. 25 (0-91), P = 0.001; 2.81 (1.18-4.17) vs. 2.0 (1.0-4.01), P = 0.01; 3.37 (1.37-5.0) vs. 2.25 (1.0-5.0), P = 0.008]. No difference was found between CTS (+) and (-) RA patients in acute phase reactants, disease activity and US findings

  18. The development of risk assessment models for carpal tunnel syndrome: a case-referent study.

    PubMed

    You, Heecheon; Simmons, Zachary; Freivalds, Andris; Kothari, Milind; Naidu, Sanjiv; Young, Ronda

    2004-05-15

    The present study developed risk assessment models for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) which can provide information of the likelihood of developing CTS for an individual having certain personal characteristics and occupational risks. A case-referent study was conducted consisting of two case groups and one referent group: (1) 22 work-related CTS patients (W-CTS), (2) 25 non-work related CTS patients (NW-CTS), and (3) 50 healthy workers (HEALTHY) having had no CTS history. The classification of CTS patients into one of the case groups was determined according to the type of insurance covering their medical costs. Personal characteristics, psychosocial stresses at work, and physical work conditions were surveyed by using a questionnaire tailor-designed to CTS (reliability of each scale > or = 0.7). By contrasting the risk information of each case group to that of the referent group, three logistic regression models were developed: W-CTS/HEALTHY, NW-CTS/HEALTHY, and C-CTS/HEALTHY (C-CTS, the combined group of W-CTS and NW-CTS). ROC analysis indicated that the models have satisfactory discriminability (d' = 1.91 to 2.51) and high classification accuracy (overall accuracy = 83-89%). Both W-CTS/HEALTHY and C-CTS/HEALTHY include personal and physical factors, while NW-CTS/HEALTHY involves only personal factors. This suggests that the injury causation of NW-CTS patients should be attributable mainly to their 'high' personal susceptibility to the disorder rather than exposure to adverse work conditions, while that of W-CTS patients be attributable to improper work conditions and CTS-prone personal characteristics in combination.

  19. Work increases the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome in the general population.

    PubMed

    Roquelaure, Yves; Ha, Catherine; Pelier-Cady, Marie-Christine; Nicolas, Guillaume; Descatha, Alexis; Leclerc, Annette; Raimbeau, Guy; Goldberg, Marcel; Imbernon, Ellen

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a general population according to employment status and to assess the proportion of cases attributable to work. CTS occurring in patients aged 20-59 years living in the French Maine and Loire region were included prospectively from 2002 to 2004. Medical and occupation history was gathered by mailed questionnaire. Incidence rates of CTS and relative risks (RRs) of CTS were computed in relation to employment status. The attributable fractions of risk of CTS to work among the exposed persons (AFEs) were calculated. A total of 1168 patients (819 women, 349 men) were included during the 3-year period. The mean incidence rate of CTS per 1000 person-years was higher in employed than unemployed persons (1.7 vs. 0.8 in women and 0.6 vs. 0.3 in men). The excess risk of CTS was statistically significant for male (RR 4.2) and female (RR 3.0) blue-collar workers and female lower-grade white-collar workers (RR 2.5). The AFE to work in general was 47% (95% confidence interval: 39-54) in women. AFEs reached higher values in female blue-collar workers [67% (65-68)] and lower-grade services, sales, and clerical white-collar workers [61% (57-64)]. The AFE in male blue-collar workers was 76% (72-80). These data show a higher incidence of CTS in the working than the non-working population and suggest that a substantial proportion of CTS cases diagnosed in lower-grade white-collar and blue-collar workers are attributable to work.

  20. The relationship of trigger finger and flexor tendon volar migration after carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Bae, K W; Choy, W S

    2014-09-01

    It has been suggested that the increased frequency of trigger finger (TF) after carpal tunnel release (CTR) may be caused by the volar migration of the flexor tendons at the wrist altering the tendon biomechanics at the A1 pulley. This hypothesis has not been validated. We performed pre- and post-operative ultrasonography (USG) on the affected wrists of 92 patients who underwent CTR. Pre-operative USG was performed in neutral with no tendon loading; post-operative USG was performed in neutral unloaded and in various positions of wrist flexion whilst loading the flexor tendons with gripping. The mean volar migration of the flexor tendons after CTR was 2.2 (SD 0.4) mm in the unloaded neutral position. It was 1.8 (SD 0.4) mm in patients who did not develop TF and 2.5 (SD 0.5) mm in those who did (p = 0.0067). In loaded wrist flexion, the mean volar migration of flexor tendons after CTR in patients who did not develop TF and those who did was 2.1 and 3.0 mm in 0° flexion; 3.2 and 3.9 mm in 15° flexion; 4.3 and 5.1 mm in 30° flexion; and 4.9 and 5.8 mm in 45° flexion, respectively. There were significant differences between patients with and without TF at each flexion angle. Our data indicate that patients with greater volar migration of the flexor tendons after CTR are more likely to develop TF. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that the occurrence of TF after CTR may be caused by the bowstringing effects of the flexor tendons.

  1. Prevalence and incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome in a meat packing plant

    PubMed Central

    Gorsche, R. G.; Wiley, J. P.; Renger, R. F.; Brant, R. F.; Gemer, T. Y.; Sasyniuk, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence and incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a modern meat packing plant. The secondary objective was to explore the relation between ethnicity and CTS. METHODS: Six hundred and sixty five workers were interviewed and examined to find the prevalence of CTS. Subsequently, 421 workers without CTS were followed up and examined at a median interval of 253 days; of those, 333 remained without CTS and were again examined at a median interval of 148 days. RESULTS: The prevalence and incidence of CTS was 21% and 11/100 person-years, respectively. The incidence for Asian mixed, white, and other ethnicities was 12.0, 12.2, and 7.2 cases/100 person- years, respectively. The observed incidence for men and women was 9.7 and 18.4 cases/100 person-years, respectively. This difference was not quite significant (p = 0.068) with an estimated relative risk (women v men) of 1.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.9 to 3.8). The interaction between sex and use of tools was significant (p = 0.04), however, although the relative risk for CTS in women who used tools was 4.2 the numbers were small and not significant. The relative risk for men who used tools was 0.64 and not significant. The percentage of incident cases with comorbid disease was only 6.3% (3/47). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence and incidence of CTS in this workforce were higher than in the general population. However, the prevalence of CTS in this modern, mechanised plant was not significantly different from that reported in older plants. No relation was found between ethnicity, age, body mass index, and CTS for either prevalence or incidence. Comorbid disease among the cases of CTS is significantly less than that found in other industry.   PMID:10474539

  2. The association of Raynaud's syndrome with carpal tunnel syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Peter; Mohokum, Melvin; Schlattmann, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has traditionally been included among the diseases associated with Raynaud's syndrome (RS). The prevalence of RS in patients suffering from CTS is not well defined. The objective of this paper was to assess the prevalence of RS in patients with CTS-a meta-analysis of published data was performed. The PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine and ISI Web of Knowledge was used for studies dealing with RS and CTS. The studies provided sufficient data to estimate the prevalence of RS in patients of CTS. A forest plot was determined by the revealed prevalence. Statistical analysis was based on methods for a random effects meta-analysis and a finite mixture model for proportions. Publication bias was investigated with the linear regression test (Egger's method). A meta-regression was conducted by the year of publication. Eight eligible studies, contributing data on 675 subjects, were included in this meta-analysis. For CTS, a pooled prevalence of 15.5% and 95% CI (95% CI 0.043, 0.318) were obtained. Statistically publication bias was present (P value 0.143). A mixture model analysis found five latent classes. The meta-regression indicated that the estimated prevalence increased when the year of commencement increased, too. Within the decade (1957-1967), the odds ratio increased from 1 (95% CI 1.065, 1.112) to 2.340 (95% CI 1.886, 2.903). Despite some heterogeneity, there is a possible indication of an association between RS and patients with CTS.

  3. Relationship of age, body mass index, wrist and waist circumferences to carpal tunnel syndrome severity.

    PubMed

    Komurcu, Hatice Ferhan; Kilic, Selim; Anlar, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has a multifactorial etiology involving systemic, anatomical, idiopathic, and ergonomic characteristics. In this study, an investigation of the relationship between the CTS degree established by electrophysiological measurements in patients with clinical CTS prediagnosis, and age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hand wrist circumference, and waist circumference measurements has been done. On 547 patients included in the study, motor and sensory conduction examinations of the median and ulnar nerve were done on one or two upper extremities thought to have CTS. In terms of CTS severity, the patients were divided into four groups (normal, mild, medium, and severe CTS). A total of 843 electrophysiological examinations were done consisting of 424 on the right hand wrist and 419 on the left hand wrist. When the age group of 18-35 years is taken as the reference group, the CTS development risk independent of BMI has been found to have increased by a factor of 1.86 for ages 36-64 years, and by 4.17 for ages 65 years and higher after adjustment for BMI. With respect to normal degree CTS group, the BMI were significantly different in groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS. The waist circumferences of groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS severity were found to be significantly higher in comparison to the normal reference group. When this value was corrected with BMI and re-examined the statistically significant differences persisted. The study identified a significant relationship between the CTS severity and age, BMI, waist circumference.

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome: what is attributable to work? The Montreal study.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, M; Stock, S; Patry, L; Armstrong, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the fraction of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is attributable to work in the total adult population of the island of Montreal. METHODS: The population consisted of 1.1 million people 20-64 years of age, with 73.2% of men and 60.6% of women employed. The rates of first surgery for CTS were compared between occupational groups and the total adult population with the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) method. Rates of surgery for the island of Montreal were obtained from the provincial data base of payments. The occupational history was obtained from telephone interviews of a sample of surgical cases. The attributable fractions in exposed people were calculated with odds ratios (ORs) obtained from logistic regressions with non-manual workers as the control group. RESULTS: The surgical incidence of CTS was 0.9/1000 adults. SIRs for all manual workers were 1.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.4-2.5) in men and 1.8 (95% CI 1.4-2.2) in women, and the fractions attributable to work were 76% (95% CI 47-88) and 55% (95% CI 33-69), respectively. Seven occupational groups were identified as having excess risk of surgical CTS, with fractions attributable to occupation ranging from 75% to 99%. CONCLUSION: Among manual workers on the island of Montreal, 55% of surgical CTS in women and 76% in men was attributable to work. Increased risk of surgical CTS was found in seven occupational groups. PMID:9282130

  5. Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on dexterous manipulation are grip type-dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Johnston, Jamie A; Ross, Mark A; Sanniec, Kyle; Gleason, Elizabeth A; Dueck, Amylou C; Santello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) impairs sensation of a subset of digits. Although the effects of CTS on manipulation performed with CTS-affected digits have been studied using precision grip tasks, the extent to which CTS affects multi-digit force coordination has only recently been studied. Whole-hand manipulation studies have shown that CTS patients retain the ability to modulate multi-digit forces to object mass, mass distribution, and texture. However, CTS results in sensorimotor deficits relative to healthy controls, including significantly larger grip force and lower ability to balance the torques generated by the digits. Here we investigated the effects of CTS on multi-digit force modulation to object weight when manipulating an object with a variable number of fingers. We hypothesized that CTS patients would be able to modulate digit forces to object weight. However, as different grip types involve the exclusive use of CTS-affected digits ('uniform' grips) or a combination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits ('mixed' grips), we addressed the question of whether 'mixed' grips would reduce or worsen CTS-induced force coordination deficits. The former scenario would be due to adding digits with intact tactile feedback, whereas the latter scenario might occur due to a potentially greater challenge for the central nervous system of integrating 'noisy' and intact tactile feedback. CTS patients learned multi-digit force modulation to object weight regardless of grip type. Although controls exerted the same total grip force across all grip types, patients exerted significantly larger grip force than controls but only for manipulations with four and five digits. Importantly, this effect was due to CTS patients' inability to change the finger force distribution when adding the ring and little fingers. These findings suggest that CTS primarily challenges sensorimotor integration processes for dexterous manipulation underlying the coordination of CTS-affected and non

  6. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on Dexterous Manipulation Are Grip Type-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Johnston, Jamie A.; Ross, Mark A.; Sanniec, Kyle; Gleason, Elizabeth A.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Santello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) impairs sensation of a subset of digits. Although the effects of CTS on manipulation performed with CTS-affected digits have been studied using precision grip tasks, the extent to which CTS affects multi-digit force coordination has only recently been studied. Whole-hand manipulation studies have shown that CTS patients retain the ability to modulate multi-digit forces to object mass, mass distribution, and texture. However, CTS results in sensorimotor deficits relative to healthy controls, including significantly larger grip force and lower ability to balance the torques generated by the digits. Here we investigated the effects of CTS on multi-digit force modulation to object weight when manipulating an object with a variable number of fingers. We hypothesized that CTS patients would be able to modulate digit forces to object weight. However, as different grip types involve the exclusive use of CTS-affected digits (‘uniform’ grips) or a combination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits (‘mixed’ grips), we addressed the question of whether ‘mixed’ grips would reduce or worsen CTS-induced force coordination deficits. The former scenario would be due to adding digits with intact tactile feedback, whereas the latter scenario might occur due to a potentially greater challenge for the central nervous system of integrating ‘noisy’ and intact tactile feedback. CTS patients learned multi-digit force modulation to object weight regardless of grip type. Although controls exerted the same total grip force across all grip types, patients exerted significantly larger grip force than controls but only for manipulations with four and five digits. Importantly, this effect was due to CTS patients’ inability to change the finger force distribution when adding the ring and little fingers. These findings suggest that CTS primarily challenges sensorimotor integration processes for dexterous manipulation underlying the coordination of CTS

  7. Effect of hand volume and other anthropometric measurements on carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Yıldız; Bülbül, İsmail; Öcek, Levent; Şener, Ufuk; Zorlu, Yaşar

    2017-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), majority of cases are considered to be idiopathic, is the most commonly encountered peripheral neuropathy causing disability. We asserted that thick and big hands may more prone to idiopathic CTS (ICTS) than others. The study included 165 subjects admitted to our electrophysiology lab with pre-diagnosis of CTS between May 2014 and April 2015. Eighty-five of the subjects were diagnosed as ICTS. The parameters analyzed were: age, gender, occupation, BMI, hand dominance, grade of ICTS, wrist circumference, proximal/distal width of palm, hand/palm length, hand volume and palm length/proximal palm width. Female gender was significantly higher in both groups. The mean age of study group was 44.02 ± 9.11 years, and control group was 41.25 ± 9.94 years. BMI, wrist circumference and hand volume were significantly higher in the study group (p < 0.05). However, palm length/prox.palm width ratio was higher in the control group (p = 0.00). There were also significant differences among CTS groups in terms of age (p = 0.001). Mean age was higher in severe CTS group. Female gender, older age and high BMI are risk factors for ICTS. Higher hand volume, wrist circumference and lower palm length/prox. palm width ratio can also be anthropometric risk factors. Large hand volumes, big and coarse hands are more prone to ICTS.

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase genes on chromosome 11q22 and risk of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burger, Marilize C; De Wet, Hanli; Collins, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Involvement of tendons and/or connective tissue structures in the aetiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has been proposed. DNA sequence variants within genes encoding structural components of the collagen fibril, the basic structural unit of connective tissue, have been shown to associate with modulating CTS risk. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in connective tissue remodelling. Variants within the MMP10, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP12 gene cluster on chromosome 11q22 have been associated with connective tissue injuries. The aim of this study was to investigate whether variants within these MMP genes are associated with CTS. Ninety-seven, self-reported Coloured participants with a history of CTS release surgery and 131 appropriately matched controls were genotyped for MMP10 rs486055 (C/T), MMP1 rs1799750 (G/GG), MMP3 rs679620 (A/G) or MMP12 rs2276109 (A/G) variants. A Pearson's Chi-squared test or a Fisher's exact test was used to determine any significant differences between the genotype distributions or any other categorical data of the groups. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to detect any significant differences between CTS and control groups for continuous data. There were no independent associations between any of the investigated MMP variants and CTS. There were also no significant differences in the relative distributions of the constructed MMP inferred haplotypes between CTS and CON groups. The MMP variants previously associated with other connective tissue injuries were not associated with CTS in this population. These findings do not exclude the possibility that other variants within this locus or other MMP genes are associated with CTS.

  9. Severity of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Diagnostic Accuracy of Hand and Body Anthropometric Measures

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, Mauro; Farioli, Andrea; Mattioli, Stefano; Aretini, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Federica; Greco, Giuseppe; Curti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the diagnostic properties of hand/wrist and body measures according to validated clinical and electrophysiological carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) severity scales. Methods We performed a prospective case-control study. For each case, two controls were enrolled. Two five-stage clinical and electrophysiological scales were used to evaluate CTS severity. Anthropometric measurements were collected and obesity indicators and hand/wrist ratios were calculated. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were calculated separately by gender. Results We consecutively enrolled 370 cases and 747 controls. The wrist-palm ratio, waist-hip-height ratio and waist-stature ratio showed the highest proportion of cases with abnormal values in the severe stages of CTS for clinical and electrophysiological severity scales in both genders. Accuracy tended to increase with CTS severity for females and males. In severe stage, most of the indexes presented moderate accuracy in both genders. Among subjects with severe CTS, the wrist-palm ratio presented the highest AUC for hand measures in the clinical and electrophysiological severity scales both in females (AUC 0.83 and 0.76, respectively) and males (AUC 0.91 and 0.82, respectively). Among subjects with severe CTS, the waist-stature ratio showed the highest AUC for body measures in the clinical and electrophysiological severity scales both in females (AUC 0.78 and 0.77, respectively) and males (AUC 0.84 and 0.76, respectively). The results of waist-hip-height ratio AUC were similar. Conclusions Wrist-palm ratio, waist-hip-height ratio and waist-stature ratio could contribute to support the diagnostic hypothesis of severe CTS that however has to be confirmed by nerve conduction study. PMID:27768728

  10. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kiyani, Abolghasem; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new and noninvasive treatment including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of CTS. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 60 patients with moderate CTS in selected health centers of Isfahan Medical University from November 2014 to April 2015. Patients with CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Conservative treatment including wrist splint at night for 3 months, consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 2 weeks, and oral consumption of Vitamin B1 for a month was recommended for both groups. The first group was treated with ESWT, one session per week for 4 weeks. Focus probe with 0.05, 0.07, 0.1, and 0.15 energy and shock numbers 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 were used from the first session to the fourth, respectively. The evaluated parameters were assessed before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19, Student’s t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: All parameters were significantly decreased in the ESWT group after 3 months. These results remained almost constant after 6 months compared with 3 months after treatment. However, only two parameters considerably improved after 3 months of treatment in the control group. The entire indexes in the control group implicated the regression of results in long-term period. Conclusion: It is recommended to use ESWT as a conservative treatment in patients with CTS. PMID:27563630

  11. Subjective symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome correlate more with psychological factors than electrophysiological severity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Firosh; Shehna, Abdulkhader; Ramesh, Sivaramakrishnan; Sandhya, Kakkassery Sankaran; Paul, Reji

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is one of the most common requests for electrodiagnosis. We aimed to note the relationship of subjective symptom severity of CTS, with objective electrophysiological severity and psychological status of patients. Patients and Methods: One hundred and forty-four consecutive patients of CTS referred to neurophysiology laboratory of a tertiary care hospital over 1 year were prospectively studied. Boston CTS Assessment Questionnaire (BCTSAQ) and visual analog scale (VAS) were used to assess subjective symptom severity. Psychological status was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Electrophysiological severity of CTS was estimated by median motor distal latency and median to ulnar peak sensory latency difference across the wrist. Each parameter in both hands was scored from 0 to 3 depending on the severity grade, and a composite electrophysiological severity score (CEPSS) was calculated for each patient by summing up the scores in both hands. Statistical analysis was done by Spearman's rank correlation test. Results: There was significant correlation of BCTSAQ with VAS (P = 0.001), HADS anxiety score (P < 0.001), and HADS depression score (P = 0.01). CEPSS had no significant correlation with VAS (P = 0.103), HADS anxiety score (P = 0.211), or HADS depression score (P = 0.55). CEPSS had a borderline correlation with BCTSAQ (P = 0.048). Conclusions: While the subjective symptoms of CTS are well correlated with psychological factors, their correlation with objective electrophysiological severity is weak. Hence, prompt treatment of psychological comorbidity is important in symptomatic management of CTS; decision about surgical intervention should be based on electrophysiological severity rather than symptom severity. PMID:28298847

  12. A comparison between ultrasonographic, surgical and histological assessment of tenosynovits in a cohort of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, David F; Glaser, Nick; Luime, Jolanda J; Lam, King H; Jacobs, Johannes W G; Selles, Ruud; Hazes, Johanna M W; Bertleff, Marietta

    2016-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may be caused by subclinical tenosynovitis which may be detected by ultrasonography (US). The objective of this study is to investigate whether ultrasonography has a place in the workup of idiopathic CTS patients. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of tenosynovitis and its association with the clinical outcome of surgery. A cohort of 31 consecutive idiopathic CTS patients (33 wrists) who were a candidate for carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery was assessed using greyscale ultrasonography (GSUS) and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). Peroperatively, tenosynovitis was evaluated macroscopically by the surgeon. Tissue samples from areas macroscopically suspected for tenosynovitis were taken for histological evaluation. The clinical outcome of the operation was assessed after 6 months and if applicable alternative diagnoses for the CTS were proposed. US tenosynovitis (OMERACT) was detected preoperatively in 58 % of the wrists. Peroperatively, macroscopic tenosynovitis was detected visually in 88 % of the wrists. Histological evaluation demonstrated a limited influx of lymphocytes indicative of a mild chronic inflammatory response in 19 %. Non-specific reactive changes were observed in 78 % of the cases. Ultrasonographically defined tenosynovitis was associated with an OR of 2.81 (95 % CI 0.61-13) for responding well to surgery. Most cases of ultrasonographic and peroperatively defined tenosynovitis were classified by histology as reactive changes. The presence of ultrasonographic tenosynovitis might be associated with a better clinical outcome of surgery.

  13. Value of F-wave studies on the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alemdar, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Background F waves are late electrophysiological responses to antidromic activation of motor neurons and are used to evaluate the conduction along the whole length of peripheral nerves. We aimed to determine the diagnostic efficacies of minimum median nerve F-wave latency (FWL) and median-to-ulnar nerve F-wave latency difference (FWLD) on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and methods The electrophysiological studies consisted of sensory and motor nerve conduction and F-wave studies of the median and ulnar nerves. The best cut-off points of minimum median nerve FWL and FWLD for the diagnosis of CTS were detected for the whole study group and for different height subgroups (Group 1: 150–159 cm, Group 2: 160–169 cm, and Group 3: over 170 cm). The diagnostic efficacies of minimum median nerve FWL and FWLD were calculated for the whole CTS group and for the mild CTS group, separately. Results The best cut-off point of minimum median nerve FWL on the diagnosis of CTS was determined as 24.60 ms for the whole group. It was 23.90 ms for Group 1, 24.80 ms for Group 2, and 28.40 ms for Group 3. The usage of these stratified cut-off points yielded a higher total diagnostic efficacy rate than single cut-off point usage (79.9% vs 69%, respectively; P=0.02). The best cut-off point of FWLD on the diagnosis of CTS was 0.80 ms for the whole group. It was 0.55 ms for Group 1, 0.30 ms for Group 2, and 0.85 ms for Group 3. Both the single cutoff point usage and the stratified chart usage for FWLD had equal diagnostic efficacy (85.1%). In the mild CTS group, diagnostic efficacy was 55.5% for minimum median nerve FWL and 78.8% for FWLD (P=0.0001). Conclusion Median-to-ulnar nerve FWLD yields a higher diagnostic efficacy than minimum median nerve FWL on the diagnosis of CTS. However, the sensitivities of both parameters are not satisfactory for the extremities with mild CTS, which compose the main group having diagnostic challenge. PMID:26357476

  14. Efficacy, safety, and cost of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yi-Ming; Wang, Xi-Shan; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Fan, Bao-You; Lin, Wei; Zhou, Xian-Hu; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral nerve entrapment disease. Either surgical or conservative intervention for CTS patients is needed to choose. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the clinical efficacy, safety, and cost of surgical versus nonsurgical intervention. Methods: The eligible studies were acquired from PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Google, and Cochrane Library. The data were extracted by 2 of the coauthors independently and were analyzed by RevMan5.3. Standardized mean differences (SMDs), odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool and Newcastle–Ottawa Scale were used to assess risk of bias. Results: Thirteen studies including 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 4 observational studies were assessed. The methodological quality of the trials ranged from moderate to high. The difference of clinical efficacy was statistically significant between surgical and nonsurgical intervention, and nonsurgical treatment was more effective (OR = 2.35, 95%CI = 1.18–4.67, P = 0.01). Meanwhile, different results were discovered by subgroup analysis. The pooled results of function improvement, symptom improvement, neurophysiological parameters improvement, and cost of care at different follow-up times showed that the differences were not statistically significant between the 2 interventions. The difference of complications and side-effects was statistically significant and conservative treatment achieved better result than surgery (OR = 2.03, 95%CI = 1.28–3.22, P = 0.003). Sensitivity analysis proved the stability of the pooled results. Conclusion: Both surgical and conservative interventions had benefits in CTS. Nonsurgical treatment was more effective and safety than surgical treatment, but there were no significant differences in function improvement, symptom improvement, neurophysiological

  15. How to make electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome with normal distal conductions?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ju; Liao, Yi-Chu; Wei, Shiew-Jue; Tsai, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ming-Hong

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate which electrodiagnostic techniques are better in clinically diagnosed patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and patients with CTS with normal distal conduction study. A total of 230 clinically diagnosed patients with CTS and 100 normal control subjects were enrolled. All subjects were evaluated by eight electrodiagnostic techniques, including conventional conduction studies: median distal sensory latency and distal motor latency; short distance conduction studies across wrist, including wrist-palm sensory conduction time and wrist-palm motor conduction velocity; comparison of median sensory conduction across the wrist with radial or ulnar nerves in the same limb (median-radial sensory latency difference [M-R] or median-ulnar sensory latency difference [M-U]); and comparison of median wrist-palm and palm-index conduction, including distoproximal conduction time difference and distoproximal conduction time ratio. Normal limits were derived by calculating the mean ± 2 standard deviations from the data of the controls. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve with 95% confidence interval of each test were calculated. In clinically diagnosed patients with CTS, M-R is the best diagnostic technique with significant difference in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.912) compared with other tests except that of M-U. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of M-R were 84.3%, 98%, 99%, and 73.1%, respectively. Further evaluation of patients with CTS with normal distal latencies also revealed the best diagnostic value of M-R and M-U with significance to other tests in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. In clinical practice, after conventional median distal sensory latency and distal motor latency studies, the authors suggest performing

  16. Transverse ultrasound assessment of median nerve deformation and displacement in the human carpal tunnel during wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Passe, Sandra M; Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, are aggravated by wrist motion, but the effect of these motions on median nerve motion are unknown. To better understand the biomechanics of the abnormal nerve, it is first necessary to understand normal nerve movement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel level on transverse ultrasound images during different wrist movements, to have a baseline for comparison with abnormal movements. Dynamic ultrasound images of both wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were obtained during wrist maximal flexion, extension and ulnar deviation. To simplify the analysis, the initial and final shape and position of the median nerve were measured and analyzed. The circularity of the median nerve was significantly increased and the aspect ratio and perimeter were significantly decreased in the final image compared with the first image during wrist flexion with finger extension, wrist flexion with finger flexion and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (p < 0.01). There were significant differences in median nerve displacement vector between finger flexion, wrist flexion with finger extension and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (all p's < 0.001). The mean amplitudes of median nerve motion in wrist flexion with finger extension (2.36 ± 0.79 normalized units [NU]), wrist flexion with finger flexion (2.46 ± 0.84 NU) and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (2.86 ± 0.51 NU) were higher than those in finger flexion (0.82 ± 0.33 NU), wrist extension with finger extension (0.77 ± 0.46 NU) and wrist extension with finger flexion (0.81 ± 0.58 NU) (p < 0.0001). In the normal carpal tunnel, wrist flexion and ulnar deviation could induce significant transverse displacement and deformation of the median nerve.

  17. [Translation and validation of an instrument for evaluation of severity of symptoms and the functional status in carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Campos, Carmelinda Correia; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola; de Andrade, Lucilia Bannwart; Castelo Filho, Adauto; Nóbrega, João Antonio Maciel

    2003-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to translate, to do cultural equivalence and validation of the Levine et al. (1993) or Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) to Portuguese. The BCTQ application to patients, selected by the question "What was the reason that brought you to look for a physician and that led him to ask this examination?" showed very good reproducibility. The validity was measured through the comparison of the severity symptoms scores (SSS) and the functional status scores (FSS) with the results of grip forces, Minnesota, two point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein filaments perception and sensory conduction at the median nerve. The internal consistency was evaluated through Chronbach's alpha coefficient comparing the SSS and the FSS. The measuring properties were evaluated through paired t-test between pre and pos-surgical scores. Reproducibility, internal consistency, validation and measuring properties of the translated BCTQ were similar to those found by Levine et al. with the original version.

  18. An ultrasonographic and anatomical study of carpal tunnel, with special emphasis on the safe zones in percutaneous release.

    PubMed

    Chern, T-C; Jou, I-M; Chen, W-C; Wu, K-C; Shao, C-J; Shen, P-C

    2009-02-01

    We examined 40 wrists of 12 embalmed and eight fresh cadavers and defined the relative position of the flexor retinaculum to the neurovascular structure, ultrasonographic markers and safe zones by ultrasonography and anatomical dissection. Both longitudinal and transverse ultrasonographic sections clearly depicted the flexor retinaculum, neurovascular bundles, median nerve, flexor tendons and bony boundaries of the underlying joints. Topographic measurement showed [i] good correlation between the actual extent of the flexor retinaculum and the ultrasonographically determined distance between bony landmarks in all hands, and [ii] the widths and lengths of well-defined safe zones. A comparison study confirmed the accuracy of ultrasonography. We conclude that these ultrasonographic landmarks can locate the flexor retinaculum and facilitate safe and complete carpal tunnel release with open or minimally invasive techniques.

  19. Effect of radial shock wave therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: A prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Ke, Ming-Jen; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chih-Ya; Lin, Ching-Yueh; Li, Tsung-Ying; Shih, Feng-Mei; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Three recent studies demonstrated the positive effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for treating carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, none have entirely proved the effects of ESWT on CTS because all studies had a small sample size and lacked a placebo-controlled design. Moreover, radial ESWT (rESWT) has not been used to treat CTS. We conducted a prospective randomized, controlled, double-blinded study to assess the effect of rESWT for treating CTS. Thirty-four enrolled patients (40 wrists) were randomized into intervention and control groups (20 wrists in each). Participants in the intervention group underwent three sessions of rESWT with nightly splinting, whereas those in the control group underwent sham rESWT with nightly splinting. The primary outcome was visual analog scale (VAS), whereas the secondary outcomes included the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ), cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. Evaluations were performed before treatment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the third rESWT session. A significantly greater improvement in the VAS, BCTQ scores, and CSA of the median nerve was noted in the intervention group throughout the study as compared to the control group (except for BCTQ severity at week 12 and CSA at weeks 1 and 4) (p < 0.05). This is the first study to assess rESWT in a randomized placebo-controlled trial and demonstrate that rESWT is a safe and effective method for relieving pain and disability in patients with CTS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:977-984, 2016.

  20. The effect of local corticosteroid injection on F-wave conduction velocity and sympathetic skin response in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Orhan; Aygül, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; Ozdemir, Gökhan; Odabaş, Faruk Omer; Kaya, M Dursun; Ulvi, Hızır

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of steroid injection for the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), with F-wave parameters and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Seventeen hands of 10 women patients were treated with local steroid injection with 2-month follow-up. All patients underwent single injection into the carpal tunnel. Response to injection was measured nerve conduction studies (NCSs), median nerve F waves, and SSR before and after treatment. To determine the normal values, 42 hands of 21 healthy women were also studied. There was a significant improvement of sensory and motor nerve conduction values when compared to baseline values (P < 0.01). At the end of follow-up period, the median sensory distal latency and the sensory latency differences between the median and the ulnar nerve were improved 35 and 65%, respectively. The maximum, mean F-wave amplitudes and chronodispersion showed a slight improvement with respect to baseline values and controls, but statistical significance was not achieved after treatment. Although no statistically significant improvements were observed in SSR parameters, slightly decreased amplitudes and increased habituation of SSR were noted at the end of the treatment. The present study shows that the local steroid injection results in improvement in NCSs values, but the F-wave parameters were not effectual in short-term outcome of CTS treatment. These findings suggest that the sensory latency differences between the median and the ulnar wrist-to-digit 4 are better parameters in the median nerve recovery after treatment than the median sensory distal latency. Furthermore, the SSR does not seem to be a sensitive method in follow-up of CTS treatment.

  1. Effect of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is known as the most common entrapment neuropathy. Conservative treatments cannot reduce the symptomatic severity satisfactorily; therefore, effectiveness of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on carpal tunnel syndrome, as a complementary treatment, was evaluated in the current study. Linseed oil is a well-known preparation in Iranian traditional medicine and its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects have been shown in previous studies. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. One hundred patients (155 hands) with idiopathic mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome aged between 18 and 65 years old were randomized in two parallel groups. These two groups were treated during 4 weeks with topical placebo and linseed oil. In addition, a night wrist splint was prescribed for both groups. Symptomatic severity and functional status were measured using Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. In addition, median sensory nerve conduction velocity, motor distal latency, sensory distal latency and compound latency as electrodiagnostic parameters were measured at baseline and after the intervention period. Results After the intervention, significant improvement was observed regarding Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire symptomatic severity and functional status mean differences (p <0.001) in the linseed oil group compared with those in the placebo group. Also, regarding the mean differences of both groups, significant improvement of nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve was seen in the linseed oil group by a value of 2.38 m/sec (p < 0.05). However, motor distal latency and sensory distal latency of the median nerve showed no between-group significant changes (p = 0.14 for both items). Finally, compound latency was improved slightly in the case group, comparing mean differences between the groups (p <0.05). No significant adverse events were reported from using linseed

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome in association with hand-arm vibration syndrome: a review of claimants seeking compensation in the Mining Industry.

    PubMed

    Burke, F D; Lawson, I J; McGeoch, K L; Miles, J N V; Proud, G

    2005-05-01

    Twenty six thousand eight hundred and forty-two miners seeking compensation were clinically assessed for vascular and neurosensory impairment arising from exposure to occupational hand-arm vibration (Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome). They were also assessed clinically for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome which, if present, would result in additional compensation. Fifteen per cent were assessed as having both HAVS and CTS. Thirty-eight per cent of claimants had nocturnal wakening, 1.3% wasting of abductor pollicis brevis, 15% had a positive Tinel's test and 20% had a positive Phalen's test. The 15% prevalence reported is lower than the rates cited previously in several small population studies of workers exposed to vibration. This paper reports the results of the assessment process and discusses the difficulty of discriminating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome from diffuse neurosensory impairment arising from HAVS.

  3. Surgical Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome through a Minimal Incision on the Distal Wrist Crease: An Anatomical and Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hye Mi; Lee, Kyoung Suk; Kim, Jun Sik

    2015-01-01

    Background An anatomical analysis of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and the surrounding structures might help in identifying effective measures to minimize complications. Here, we present a surgical technique based on an anatomical study that was successfully applied in clinical settings. Methods Using 13 hands from 8 formalin-fixed cadavers, we measured the TCL length and thickness, correlation between the distal wrist crease and the proximal end of the TCL, and distance between the distal end of the TCL and the palmar arch; the TCL cross sections and the thickest parts were also examined. Clinically, fasciotomy was performed on the relevant parts of 15 hands from 13 patients by making a minimally invasive incision on the distal wrist crease. Postoperatively, a two-point discrimination check was conducted in which the sensations of the first, second, and third fingertips and the palmar cutaneous branch injuries were monitored (average duration, 7 months). Results In the 13 cadaveric hands, the distal wrist crease and the proximal end of the TCL were placed in the same location. The average length of the TCL and the distance from the distal TCL to the superficial palmar arch were 35.30±2.59 mm and 9.50±2.13 mm, respectively. The thickest part of the TCL was a region 25 mm distal to the distal wrist crease (average thickness, 4.00±0.57 mm). The 13 surgeries performed in the clinical settings yielded satisfactory results. Conclusions This peri-TCL anatomical study confirmed the safety of fasciotomy with a minimally invasive incision of the distal wrist crease. The clinical application of the technique indicated that the minimally invasive incision of the distal wrist crease was efficacious in the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26015889

  4. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel injection using in-plane ulnar approach: a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Park, Yongbum; Park, Ki Deok; Lee, Ju Kang; Lim, Oh Kyung

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of symptom improvement and the change of electrophysiological and ultrasonographic findings after sonographically guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Seventy-five cases of 44 patients diagnosed with CTS were included and evaluated at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks after injection. All patients received injection with 40 mg of triamcinolone mixed with 1 mL of 1% lidocaine into the carpal tunnel using an in-plane Ultrasound (US)-guided ulnar approach, out-plane US-guided approach, and blind injection. For clinical evaluation, we used the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and electrophysiological tests. The ultrasonographic findings were also evaluated with regard to cross-sectional area and the flattening ratio of the median nerve. Subjective symptoms measured by BCTQ and median nerve conduction parameters showed significant improvement at 4 weeks in the in-plane ulnar approach group compared with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection. This improvement was still observed at 12 weeks. The flattening ratio and cross-sectional area of the median nerve showed a more significant decrease with the in-plane ulnar approach than with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection (P < 0.05). US-guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in the CTS may be more effective than out-plane or blind injection.

  5. Association between the catechol-o-methyltransferase val158met polymorphism with susceptibility and severity of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eroğlu, P; Görükmez, O; Özemri Sağ, Ş; Yakut, T

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity. In this study, we aimed to clarify the relationships between the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene Val158Met (rs4680) polymorphism and development, functional and clinical status of CTS. Ninety-five women with electro diagnostically confirmed CTS and 95 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The functional and clinical status of the patients was measured by the Turkish version of the Boston Questionnaire and intensity of pain related to the past 2 weeks was evaluated on a visual analog scale (VAS). The Val158Met polymorphism was determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), method. We divided patients according to the genotypes of the Val158Met polymorphism as Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met. There were not any significant differences in terms of Val158Met polymorphisms between patients and healthy controls (p >0.05). We also did not find any relationships between the Val158Met polymorphism and CTS (p >0.05). In conclusion, although we did not find any relationships between CTS and the Val158Met polymorphism, we could not generalize this result to the general population. Future studies are warranted to conclude precise associations. PMID:27785396

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome and work organisation in repetitive work: a cross sectional study in France. Study Group on Repetitive Work

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, A.; Franchi, P.; Cristofari, M. F.; Delemotte, B.; Mereau, P.; Teyssier-Cotte, C.; Touranchet, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the determinants of signs of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in repetitive industrial work, with special attention to occupational constraints at group level and management practices of the companies. METHOD: A cross sectional study was conducted in three sectors: assembly line; clothing and shoe industry; food industry. A total of 1210 workers in repetitive work, from 53 different companies, was compared with a control group of 337 workers. Constraints at the workplace were partly self declared, and partly assessed by the occupational physicians in charge of the employees of the company. The definition of CTS was based on a standardised clinical examination. RESULTS: CTS was associated with repetitive work, especially packaging. It was more frequent among subjects who declared psychological and psychosomatic problems and those with a body mass index > or = 27. Dissatisfaction with work, lack of job control, short cycle time, and having to press repeatedly with the hand were associated with the syndrome. An odds ratio (OR) of 2.24 was found for "just in time" production. CONCLUSION: The results emphasise the complexity of the determinants of CTS, the role of psychosocial factors at work and the potentially negative effects of some practices of the companies aimed at enhancing their competitiveness.   PMID:9624269

  7. Association between the catechol-o-methyltransferase val158met polymorphism with susceptibility and severity of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Erkol İnal, E; Eroğlu, P; Görükmez, O; Özemri Sağ, Ş; Yakut, T

    2015-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity. In this study, we aimed to clarify the relationships between the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene Val158Met (rs4680) polymorphism and development, functional and clinical status of CTS. Ninety-five women with electro diagnostically confirmed CTS and 95 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The functional and clinical status of the patients was measured by the Turkish version of the Boston Questionnaire and intensity of pain related to the past 2 weeks was evaluated on a visual analog scale (VAS). The Val158Met polymorphism was determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), method. We divided patients according to the genotypes of the Val158Met polymorphism as Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met. There were not any significant differences in terms of Val158Met polymorphisms between patients and healthy controls (p >0.05). We also did not find any relationships between the Val158Met polymorphism and CTS (p >0.05). In conclusion, although we did not find any relationships between CTS and the Val158Met polymorphism, we could not generalize this result to the general population. Future studies are warranted to conclude precise associations.

  8. Development of a "Neuro-orthosis" for the control of wrist movements in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, U; Ozkan, M; Ozdogan, A H

    2007-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common, painful condition. Treatment is indicated when the symptoms of the disease interferes with the usual daily activities. The use of orthoses is advocated in the treatment of mild and moderate CTS. The rationale for using neutral wrist orthoses lies on the relation of the disease with the increased intracarpal pressure. It was demonstrated that the intracarpal pressure is minimum when the wrist is in neutral position. In spite of their proven therapeutic effects, long-term or improper use of static orthoses may lead to unwanted side effects such as muscle atrophy and discomfort during forceful activities. To overcome the problems caused by a static neutral wrist orthosis, a prototype control system was developed to control the wrist movements via electrical stimulation. At this control system, wrist movements in two planes are controlled by means of electrical stimulation of the antagonistic muscles. The effect of the new control system on hand function and dexterity was compared with those obtained with rigid orthosis and no orthosis.

  9. One-year Incidence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Latino Poultry Processing Workers and Other Latino Manual Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Michael S.; Walker, Francis O.; Newman, Jill C.; Schulz, Mark R.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Mora, Dana; Chen, Haiying; Eaton, Bethany; Quandt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) over one year in Latino poultry processing workers. Methods Symptoms and nerve conduction studies were used to identify Latino poultry processing workers (106 wrists) and Latinos in other manual labor occupations (257 wrists) that did not have CTS at baseline, and these individuals were then evaluated in the same manner one year later. Results Based on wrists, the one-year incidence of CTS was higher in poultry processing workers than non-poultry manual workers (19.8% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.022). Poultry workers had a higher odds (1.89; p = 0.089) of developing CTS over one year compared to non-poultry manual workers. Discussion Latino poultry processing workers have an incidence of CTS that is possibly higher than Latinos in other manual labor positions. Latino poultry workers’ high absolute and relative risk of CTS likely results from the repetitive and strenuous nature of poultry processing work. PMID:23996875

  10. Variability in the surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome: implications for the effective use of healthcare resources.

    PubMed

    ElMaraghy, Amr; Devereaux, Moira W

    2009-01-01

    Medicine has been said to be as much art as science, where physicians invoke their individual skills and judgment to address the unique aspects of each presenting patient. Yet to what extent should physicians exercise their own discretion in determining the use rates of hospital resources? This article examines the results of a study on surgeon use of surgical setting and anesthetic technique for carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery - a simple, low-risk surgical procedure that can be performed in either a formal operating room or a minor surgical setting, using local, regional or general anesthetic. The selected combination of surgical setting and anesthetic technique employed by a surgeon has not been standardized and can significantly impact both patient outcomes and administrative healthcare costs for hospital resources, equipment and pharmaceuticals. While a certain amount of variability in surgical management is necessary to allow clinicians to practise their "art," policy makers have an opportunity to standardize some surgeon practices to control costs, particularly when those practices are found to be as strongly influenced by the subjective attitudes of individual surgeons as by evidence-based science and economics.

  11. A longitudinal study of industrial and clerical workers: incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome and assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gell, Nancy; Werner, Robert A; Franzblau, Alfred; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2005-03-01

    This study followed workers over an extended period of time to identify factors which may influence the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). The purpose was to evaluate incidence of CTS and to create a predictive model of factors that play a role in the development of CTS. This prospective study followed 432 industrial and clerical workers over 5.4 years. Incident cases were defined as workers who had no prior history of CTS at baseline testing and were diagnosed with CTS during the follow-up period or at the follow-up screening. On the basis of logistic regression, significant predictors for CTS include baseline median-ulnar peak latency difference, a history of wrist/hand/finger tendonitis, a history of numbness, tingling, burning, and/or pain in the hand, and work above the action level of the peak force and hand activity level threshold limit value. This longitudinal study supports findings from previous cross-sectional studies identifying both work related ergonomic stressors and physical factors as independent risk factors for CTS.

  12. Palmitoylethanolamide, a neutraceutical, in nerve compression syndromes: efficacy and safety in sciatic pain and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous lipid modulator in animals and humans, and has been evaluated since the 1970s as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug in more than 30 clinical trials, in a total of ~6,000 patients. PEA is currently available worldwide as a nutraceutical in different formulations, with and without excipients. Here we describe the results of all clinical trials evaluating PEA's efficacy and safety in nerve compression syndromes: sciatic pain and pain due to carpal tunnel syndrome, and review preclinical evidence in nerve impingement models. Both the pharmacological studies as well as the clinical trials supported PEA's action as an analgesic compound. In total, eight clinical trials have been published in such entrapment syndromes, and 1,366 patients have been included in these trials. PEA proved to be effective and safe in nerve compression syndromes. In one pivotal, double blind, placebo controlled trial in 636 sciatic pain patients, the number needed to treat to reach 50% pain reduction compared to baseline was 1.5 after 3 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, no drug interactions or troublesome side effects have been described so far. Physicians are not always aware of PEA as a relevant and safe alternative to opioids and co-analgesics in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Especially since the often prescribed co-analgesic pregabaline has been proven to be ineffective in sciatic pain in a double blind enrichment trial, PEA should be considered as a new and safe treatment option for nerve compression syndromes.

  13. Analysis of factors affecting development of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with Hurler syndrome after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khanna, G; Van Heest, A E; Agel, J; Bjoraker, K; Grewal, S; Abel, S; Krivit, W; Peters, C; Orchard, P J

    2007-03-01

    Children with Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (MPSIH)) have skeletal, joint and soft tissue abnormalities that may persist or progress after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report our single center experience with development of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in 43 children with MPSIH after HSCT. Twenty-three children (59%) developed CTS following HSCT; 19 of the 39 children with enzyme activity in the normal or heterozygous range developed CTS (49%), whereas all four children with low heterozygous or absent enzyme activity developed CTS after HSCT. Fourteen of 19 related donor marrow recipients, eight of 19 of those receiving an unrelated donor graft and one of five unrelated cord blood recipients developed CTS. The mean age at surgical release was 4.8 years. With each year increase in age at HSCT, there was a 55% increased risk. Age and enzyme activity after HSCT were significant factors in the development of CTS. Transplantation by 2 years of age reduced the risk of developing CTS by 46%; higher enzyme activity led to a 78% reduction in the risk of developing CTS. However, children transplanted for MPSIH remain at risk for the development of CTS, and should be monitored on an ongoing basis by nerve conduction velocity testing.

  14. An ergonomics study on the evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome among Chikan embroidery workers of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Banerjee, Sunetra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chikan embroidery is a popular handicraft in India that involves hand-intensive stitching while seated in a static posture with the upper back curved and the head bent over the fabric. Women perform most Chikan embroidery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the repetitive nature of this work among female Chikan embroiderers by measuring the prevalence of upper extremity discomfort and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to analyze the extent of upper extremity pain symptomology. The repetitive nature of Chikan embroidery work was evaluated using the Assessment of Repetitive Tasks of the upper limbs tool (ART). Motor nerve conduction studies of median and ulnar nerves were performed with embroidery workers and a control group to determine the risk of CTS. Results: Among embroidery workers, the prevalence of wrist pain was 68% and forearm pain was 60%. The embroiderers also commonly reported Tingling and numbness in the hands and fingertips. The ART analysis found that Chikan embroidery is a highly repetitive task and nerve conduction studies showed that the embroidery workers were more likely to experience CTS than women in the control group. Conclusions: Chikan embroidery is a hand-intensive occupation involving repetitive use of hands and wrists and this study population is at risk of experiencing CTS. Future research should explore the potential benefits of ergonomics measures including incorporating breaks, stretching exercises, and the use of wrist splints to reduce repetitive strain and the probability of developing CTS. PMID:25658674

  15. National Trends in Carpal Tunnel Release and Hand Fracture Procedures Performed During Orthopaedic Residency: An Analysis of ACGME Case Logs

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Richard M.; Gottschalk, Michael B.; Capo, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Mastery in performing carpal tunnel release (CTR) and hand fracture procedures is an essential component of orthopaedic residency training. Objective  To assess orthopaedic resident case log data for temporal trends in CTR and hand fracture cases and to determine the degree of variability in case volume among residents. Methods  Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education orthopaedic surgery resident case logs were reviewed for graduation years 2007 through 2014. Annual data regarding the mean number of CTR and hand fracture/dislocation procedures were recorded, as well as the median number of procedures reported by the top and bottom 10% of residents (by case volume). Temporal trends were assessed using linear regression modeling. Results  There was no change in the mean number of CTRs performed per resident. Over the 8-year period, the top 10% of residents performed a significantly greater number of CTRs than the bottom 10% (62.1 versus 9.3, P < .001). Similarly, no change was noted in the mean number of total hand fracture/dislocation cases performed, with the top 10% of residents performing significantly more hand fracture cases than the bottom 10% (47.1 versus 9.3, P < .001). Conclusions  Our results indicate no change in CTR and hand fracture caseload for orthopaedic residents. However, as resident experience performing both procedures varies significantly, this variability likely has important educational implications. PMID:26913105

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and exposure to vibration, repetitive wrist movements, and heavy manual work: a case-referent study.

    PubMed Central

    Wieslander, G; Norbäck, D; Göthe, C J; Juhlin, L

    1989-01-01

    Possible connections between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and exposure to vibrating handheld tools, repetitive wrist movements, and heavy manual work were examined in a case-referent study. The cases were 38 men operated on for CTS between 1974 and 1980. For each case, two referents were drawn from among other surgical cases (hospital referents) and two further referents from the population register and telephone directory, respectively (population referents). Thirty four of 38 cases (89%) and 143 of 152 referents (94%) were interviewed by telephone. An increased prevalence of obesity, rheumatoid disease, diabetes, or thyroid disease was observed among the cases but most did not suffer from any of these disorders. CTS was significantly correlated with exposure to vibration from handheld tools and to repetitive wrist movements but showed a weaker correlation with work producing a heavy load on the wrist. A cause-effect relation between CTS and exposures to handheld vibrating tools and to work causing repetitive movements of the wrist seems probable. Some differences between hospital and population referents indicate that a case-referent study of this type could be biased by inappropriate selection of referents. PMID:2920142

  17. "…you earn money by suffering pain:" Beliefs About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Latino Poultry Processing Workers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-06-01

    The nature of poultry processing puts workers at risk for developing neurological injuries, particularly carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Many poultry processing workers are Latino immigrants. This qualitative analysis uses an explanatory models of illness (EMs) framework to describe immigrant Latino poultry processing workers' (Guatemalan and Mexican) beliefs of CTS. Understanding these workers' CTS EMs provides a foundation for recommendations to reduce the risk factors for this occupational injury. In-depth interviews were completed with 15 poultry processing workers diagnosed with CTS. Systematic qualitative analysis was used to delineate beliefs about causes, symptoms, physiology, treatments, quality-of-life and health implications of CTS. Participants' EMs largely reflect current biomedical understanding of CTS. These EMs are similar for Guatemalan and Mexican workers. Beliefs about causes include factors in the work environment (e.g., repetition, cold) and individual physical weakness. Treatments include over-the-counter medicine, as well as traditional remedies. Most know the future impact of CTS will include chronic pain. These workers know what causes CTS and that curing it would require quitting their jobs, but feel that they must endure CTS to support their families. Latino poultry processing workers, whether Guatemalan or Mexican, have a fairly complete understanding of what causes CTS, how to treat it, and what they must do to cure it. However, situational factors force them to endure CTS. Policy changes are needed to change the structure of work in poultry processing, particularly line speed and break frequency, if the prevalence of CTS is to be reduced.

  18. Extra-median spread of sensory symptoms in carpal tunnel syndrome suggests the presence of pain-related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Giampietro; Marani, Silvia; Tamburin, Stefano

    2006-06-01

    Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may complain of sensory symptoms outside the typical median nerve distribution. The study is aimed to understand which clinical features are associated with the extra-median distribution of symptoms in CTS. We recruited 241 consecutive CTS patients. After selection, 103 patients (165 hands) were included. The symptoms distribution was evaluated with a self-administered hand symptoms diagram. Patients underwent objective evaluation, neurographic study and a self-administered questionnaire on subjective complaints. No clinical or electrodiagnostic signs of ulnar nerve involvement were found in the 165 hands. Median distribution of symptoms was found in 60.6% of hands, glove distribution in 35.2% and ulnar distribution in 4.2%. Objective measures of median nerve lesion (tactile hypaesthesia and thenar muscles hypasthenia) and neurographic involvement were significantly more severe in median hands than in the other groups. Subjective complaints (nocturnal pain, numbness and tingling sensations) were significantly more severe in glove hands. Neurophysiological and objective measures were not correlated with subjective complaints. The severity of the objective examination and neurographic involvement and the intensity of sensory complaints appear to be independent factors that influence the symptoms distribution. Extra-median spread of sensory symptoms was associated with higher levels of pain and paresthesia. We suggest that central nervous system mechanisms of plasticity may underlie the spread of symptoms in CTS.

  19. Pooling job physical exposure data from multiple independent studies in a consortium study of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kapellusch, Jay M.; Garg, Arun; Bao, Stephen S.; Silverstein, Barbara A.; Burt, Susan E.; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Gerr, Frederic E.; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Hegmann, Kurt T.; Merlino, Linda A.; Rempel, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Pooling data from different epidemiological studies of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is necessary to improve statistical power and to more precisely quantify exposure–response relationships for MSDs. The pooling process is difficult and time-consuming, and small methodological differences could lead to different exposure–response relationships. A subcommittee of a six-study research consortium studying carpal tunnel syndrome: (i) visited each study site, (ii) documented methods used to collect physical exposure data and (iii) determined compatibility of exposure variables across studies. Certain measures of force, frequency of exertion and duty cycle were collected by all studies and were largely compatible. A portion of studies had detailed data to investigate simultaneous combinations of force, frequency and duration of exertions. Limited compatibility was found for hand/wrist posture. Only two studies could calculate compatible Strain Index scores, but Threshold Limit Value for Hand Activity Level could be determined for all studies. Challenges of pooling data, resources required and recommendations for future researchers are discussed. PMID:23697792

  20. Risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome related to the work organization: a prospective surveillance study in a large working population.

    PubMed

    Petit, Audrey; Ha, Catherine; Bodin, Julie; Rigouin, Pascal; Descatha, Alexis; Brunet, René; Goldberg, Marcel; Roquelaure, Yves

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed to determine the risk factors for incident carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large working population, with a special focus on factors related to work organization. In 2002-2005, 3710 workers were assessed and, in 2007-2010, 1611 were re-examined. At baseline all completed a self-administered questionnaire about personal/medical factors and work exposure. CTS symptoms and physical examination signs were assessed by a standardized medical examination at baseline and follow-up. The risk of "symptomatic CTS" was higher for women (OR = 2.9 [1.7-5.2]) and increased linearly with age (OR = 1.04 [1.00-1.07] for 1-year increment). Two work organizational factors remained in the multivariate risk model after adjustment for the personal/medical and biomechanical factors: payment on a piecework basis (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.5) and work pace dependent on automatic rate (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-4.1). Several factors related to work organization were associated with incident CTS after adjustment for potential confounders.

  1. Carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis in pain management, marijuana for pain.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Scott M

    2007-01-01

    This feature presents information for patients in a question and answer format. It is written to simulate actual questions that many pain patients ask and to provide answers in a context and language that most pain patients will comprehend. Issues addressed in this issue are carpel tunnel syndrome, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis, marijuana.

  2. Central sensitization does not identify patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who are likely to achieve short-term success with physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de-la-Llave-Rincon, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Pareja, Juan A

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify whether hyperexcitability of the central nervous system is a prognostic factor for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) likely to experience rapid and clinical self-reported improvement following a physical therapy program including soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic interventions. Women presenting with clinical and electrophysiological findings of CTS were involved in a prospective single-arm trial. Participants underwent a standardized examination and then a physical therapy session. The physical therapy sessions included both soft tissue mobilization directed at the anatomical sites of potential median nerve entrapment and a passive nerve slider neurodynamic technique targeted to the median nerve. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the median, radial and ulnar nerves, C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, carpal tunnel and tibialis anterior muscle were assessed bilaterally. Additionally, thermal detection and pain thresholds were measured over the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence bilaterally to evaluate central nervous system excitability. Subjects were classified as responders (having achieved a successful outcome) or non-responders based on self-perceived recovery. Variables were entered into a stepwise logistic regression model to determine the most accurate variables for determining prognosis. Data from 72 women were included in the analysis, of which 35 experienced a successful outcome (48.6%). Three variables including PPT over the C5-C6 joint affected side <137 kPa, HPT carpal tunnel affected side <39.6º and general health >66 points were identified. If 2 out of 3 variables were present (LR + 14.8), the likelihood of success increased from 48.6 to 93.3%. We identified 3 factors that may be associated with a rapid clinical response to both soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic techniques targeted to the median nerve in women presenting with CTS. Our results support that

  3. Relationship between electrodiagnostic severity and neuropathic pain assessed by the LANSS pain scale in carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gürsoy, Azize Esra; Kolukısa, Mehmet; Yıldız, Gülsen Babacan; Kocaman, Gülşen; Çelebi, Arif; Koçer, Abdülkadir

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of neuropathic pain assessed by the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) scale and electrophysiological findings in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We studied 124 hands with idiopathic CTS with pain complaints involving hand and wrist. All hands were assessed by the LANSS with which a score of 12 or more is defined as pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms. These hands were assigned to minimal, mild, moderate, severe, or extreme severe groups according to the results of the median nerve conduction studies. Results A LANSS score ≥ 12, suggestive of pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms, was defined in 59 (47.6%) CTS hands. Pain intensity was significantly higher in CTS hands with a LANSS score ≥ 12 (P < 0.001). Among electrophysiological findings, compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly lower in hands with a LANSS score ≥ 12 compared with hands with a LANSS score < 12 (P = 0.020). Severity of CTS was not significantly different between LANSS ≥ 12 and LANSS < 12 groups. Electrophysiological severity was significantly higher in CTS hands with evoked pain (P = 0.005) and allodynia (P < 0.001) in LANSS subscore analysis. Conclusion We suggest that the presence of pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms in CTS is not related to electrophysiological CTS severity. Neuropathic pain should be assessed carefully in patients with CTS, and an appropriate treatment plan should be chosen, taking into account the clinical and electrophysiological findings together with the true pain classification. PMID:23326196

  4. Effectiveness of splinting and splinting plus local steroid injection in severe carpal tunnel syndrome: A Randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khosrawi, Saeid; Emadi, Masoud; Mahmoodian, Amir Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Study aimed to compare the effectiveness of two commonly used conservative treatments, splinting and local steroid injection in improving clinical and nerve conduction findings of the patients with severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and Methods: In this randomized control clinical trial, the patients with severe CTS selected and randomized in two interventional groups. Group A was prescribed to use full time neutral wrist splint and group B was injected with 40 mg Depo-Medrol and prescribed to use the full time neutral wrist splint for 12 weeks. Clinical and nerve conduction findings of the patients was evaluated at baseline, 4 and 12 weeks after interventions. Results: Twenty-two and 21 patients were allocated in group A and B, respectively. Mean of clinical symptoms and functional status scores, nerve conduction variables and patients’ satisfaction score were not significant between group at baseline and 4 and 12 weeks after intervention. Within the group comparison, there was significant improvement in the patients’ satisfaction, clinical and nerve conduction items between the baseline level and 4 weeks after intervention and between the baseline and 12 weeks after intervention (P < 0.01). The difference was significant for functional status score between 4 and 12 weeks after intervention in group B (P = 0.02). Conclusion: considering some findings regarding the superior effect of splinting plus local steroid injection on functional status scale and median nerve distal motor latency, it seems that using combination therapy could be more effective for long-term period specially in the field of functional improvement of CTS. PMID:26962518

  5. Palmitoylethanolamide, a neutraceutical, in nerve compression syndromes: efficacy and safety in sciatic pain and carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous lipid modulator in animals and humans, and has been evaluated since the 1970s as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug in more than 30 clinical trials, in a total of ~6,000 patients. PEA is currently available worldwide as a nutraceutical in different formulations, with and without excipients. Here we describe the results of all clinical trials evaluating PEA’s efficacy and safety in nerve compression syndromes: sciatic pain and pain due to carpal tunnel syndrome, and review preclinical evidence in nerve impingement models. Both the pharmacological studies as well as the clinical trials supported PEA’s action as an analgesic compound. In total, eight clinical trials have been published in such entrapment syndromes, and 1,366 patients have been included in these trials. PEA proved to be effective and safe in nerve compression syndromes. In one pivotal, double blind, placebo controlled trial in 636 sciatic pain patients, the number needed to treat to reach 50% pain reduction compared to baseline was 1.5 after 3 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, no drug interactions or troublesome side effects have been described so far. Physicians are not always aware of PEA as a relevant and safe alternative to opioids and co-analgesics in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Especially since the often prescribed co-analgesic pregabaline has been proven to be ineffective in sciatic pain in a double blind enrichment trial, PEA should be considered as a new and safe treatment option for nerve compression syndromes. PMID:26604814

  6. Incidence rates of in-hospital carpal tunnel syndrome in the general population and possible associations with marital status

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Stefano; Baldasseroni, Alberto; Curti, Stefania; Cooke, Robin MT; Bena, Antonella; de Giacomi, Giovanna; dell'Omo, Marco; Fateh-Moghadam, Pirous; Melani, Carla; Biocca, Marco; Buiatti, Eva; Campo, Giuseppe; Zanardi, Francesca; Violante, Francesco S

    2008-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a socially relevant condition associated with biomechanical risk factors. We evaluated age-sex-specific incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS in central/northern Italy and explored relations with marital status. Methods Seven regions were considered (overall population, 14.9 million) over 3–6-year periods between 1997 and 2002 (when out-of-hospital CTS surgery was extremely rare). Incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS were estimated based on 1) codified demographic, diagnostic and intervention data in obligatory discharge records from all Italian public/private hospitals, archived (according to residence) on regional databases; 2) demographic general population data for each region. We compared (using the χscore test) age-sex-specific rates between married, unmarried, divorced and widowed subsets of the general population. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for married/unmarried men and women. Results Age-standardized incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years) of in-hospital cases of CTS were 166 in women and 44 in men (106 overall). Married subjects of both sexes showed higher age-specific rates with respect to unmarried men/women. SIRs were calculated comparing married vs unmarried rates of both sexes: 1.59 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.57–1.60) in women, and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.40–1.45) in men. As compared with married women/men, widows/widowers both showed 2–3-fold higher incidence peaks during the fourth decade of life (beyond 50 years of age, widowed subjects showed similar trends to unmarried counterparts). Conclusion This large population-based study illustrates distinct age-related trends in men and women, and also raises the question whether marital status could be associated with CTS in the general population. PMID:18957090

  7. Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on adaptation of multi-digit forces to object weight for whole-hand manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Johnston, Jamie A; Ross, Mark A; Smith, Anthony A; Coakley, Brandon J; Gleason, Elizabeth A; Dueck, Amylou C; Santello, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The delicate tuning of digit forces to object properties can be disrupted by a number of neurological and musculoskeletal diseases. One such condition is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS), a compression neuropathy of the median nerve that causes sensory and motor deficits in a subset of digits in the hand. Whereas the effects of CTS on median nerve physiology are well understood, the extent to which it affects whole-hand manipulation remains to be addressed. CTS affects only the lateral three and a half digits, which raises the question of how the central nervous system integrates sensory feedback from affected and unaffected digits to plan and execute whole-hand object manipulation. We addressed this question by asking CTS patients and healthy controls to grasp, lift, and hold a grip device (445, 545, or 745 g) for several consecutive trials. We found that CTS patients were able to successfully adapt grip force to object weight. However, multi-digit force coordination in patients was characterized by lower discrimination of force modulation to lighter object weights, higher across-trial digit force variability, the consistent use of excessively large digit forces across consecutive trials, and a lower ability to minimize net moments on the object. Importantly, the mechanical requirement of attaining equilibrium of forces and torques caused CTS patients to exert excessive forces at both CTS-affected digits and digits with intact sensorimotor capabilities. These findings suggest that CTS-induced deficits in tactile sensitivity interfere with the formation of accurate sensorimotor memories of previous manipulations. Consequently, CTS patients use compensatory strategies to maximize grasp stability at the expense of exerting consistently larger multi-digit forces than controls. These behavioral deficits might be particularly detrimental for tasks that require fine regulation of fingertip forces for manipulating light or fragile objects.

  8. Primary somatosensory/motor cortical thickness distinguishes paresthesia-dominant from pain-dominant carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Hyungjun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Mawla, Ishtiaq; Morse, Leslie R; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2016-05-01

    Paresthesia-dominant and pain-dominant subgroups have been noted in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a peripheral neuropathic disorder characterized by altered primary somatosensory/motor (S1/M1) physiology. We aimed to investigate whether brain morphometry dissociates these subgroups. Subjects with CTS were evaluated with nerve conduction studies, whereas symptom severity ratings were used to allocate subjects into paresthesia-dominant (CTS-paresthesia), pain-dominant (CTS-pain), and pain/paresthesia nondominant (not included in further analysis) subgroups. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired at 3T using a multiecho MPRAGE T1-weighted pulse sequence, and gray matter cortical thickness was calculated across the entire brain using validated, automated methods. CTS-paresthesia subjects demonstrated reduced median sensory nerve conduction velocity (P = 0.05) compared with CTS-pain subjects. In addition, cortical thickness in precentral and postcentral gyri (S1/M1 hand area) contralateral to the more affected hand was significantly reduced in CTS-paresthesia subgroup compared with CTS-pain subgroup. Moreover, in CTS-paresthesia subjects, precentral cortical thickness was negatively correlated with paresthesia severity (r(34) = -0.40, P = 0.016) and positively correlated with median nerve sensory velocity (r(36) = 0.51, P = 0.001), but not with pain severity. Conversely, in CTS-pain subjects, contralesional S1 (r(9) = 0.62, P = 0.042) and M1 (r(9) = 0.61, P = 0.046) cortical thickness were correlated with pain severity, but not median nerve velocity or paresthesia severity. This double dissociation in somatotopically specific S1/M1 areas suggests a neuroanatomical substrate for symptom-based CTS subgroups. Such fine-grained subgrouping of CTS may lead to improved personalized therapeutic approaches, based on superior characterization of the linkage between peripheral and central neuroplasticity.

  9. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on Adaptation of Multi-Digit Forces to Object Weight for Whole-Hand Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Johnston, Jamie A.; Ross, Mark A.; Smith, Anthony A.; Coakley, Brandon J.; Gleason, Elizabeth A.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Santello, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The delicate tuning of digit forces to object properties can be disrupted by a number of neurological and musculoskeletal diseases. One such condition is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS), a compression neuropathy of the median nerve that causes sensory and motor deficits in a subset of digits in the hand. Whereas the effects of CTS on median nerve physiology are well understood, the extent to which it affects whole-hand manipulation remains to be addressed. CTS affects only the lateral three and a half digits, which raises the question of how the central nervous system integrates sensory feedback from affected and unaffected digits to plan and execute whole-hand object manipulation. We addressed this question by asking CTS patients and healthy controls to grasp, lift, and hold a grip device (445, 545, or 745 g) for several consecutive trials. We found that CTS patients were able to successfully adapt grip force to object weight. However, multi-digit force coordination in patients was characterized by lower discrimination of force modulation to lighter object weights, higher across-trial digit force variability, the consistent use of excessively large digit forces across consecutive trials, and a lower ability to minimize net moments on the object. Importantly, the mechanical requirement of attaining equilibrium of forces and torques caused CTS patients to exert excessive forces at both CTS-affected digits and digits with intact sensorimotor capabilities. These findings suggest that CTS-induced deficits in tactile sensitivity interfere with the formation of accurate sensorimotor memories of previous manipulations. Consequently, CTS patients use compensatory strategies to maximize grasp stability at the expense of exerting consistently larger multi-digit forces than controls. These behavioral deficits might be particularly detrimental for tasks that require fine regulation of fingertip forces for manipulating light or fragile objects. PMID:22110738

  10. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb - excluding carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-traumatic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assessment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology - both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon's canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg's disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonography 2012; 12 (49): 120-163 - Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the example of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles). The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established - echogenicity and echostructure, thickness (edema and related increase

  11. Effect of pioglitazone on nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel in type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sudip; Sanyal, Debmalya; Das Choudhury, Sourav; Bandyopadhyay, Mili; Chakraborty, Suraj; Mukherjee, Arabinda

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of pioglitazone pharmacotherapy in median nerve electrophysiology in the carpal tunnel among type 2 diabetes patients. METHODS The study was executed in patients with type 2 diabetes, treated with oral drugs, categorized under pioglitazone or non-pioglitazone group (14 in each group), and who received electrophysiological evaluation by nerve conduction velocity at baseline and 3 mo. RESULTS At 3 mo, pioglitazone-category had inferior amplitude in sensory median nerve [8.5 interquartile range (IQR) = 6.5 to 11.5) vs non-pioglitazone 14.5 (IQR 10.5 to 18.75)] (P = 0.002). Non-pioglitazone category displayed amelioration in amplitude in the sensory median nerve [baseline 13 (IQR = 9 to 16.25) vs 3 mo 8.5 (IQR = 6.5 to 11.5)] (P = 0.01) and amplitude in motor median nerve [baseline 9 (IQR = 4.75 to 11) vs 3 mo 6.75 (IQR = 4.75 to 10.25)] (P = 0.049); and deterioration of terminal latency of in motor ulnar nerve [baseline 2.07 (IQR = 1.92 to 2.25) vs 3 mo 2.16 (IQR = 1.97 to 2.325)] (P = 0.043). There was amelioration of terminal latency in sensory ulnar nerve [baseline 2.45 (IQR = 2.315 to 2.88) vs 3 mo 2.37 (IQR = 2.275 to 2.445) for pioglitazone group (P = 0.038). CONCLUSION Treatment with pioglitazone accentuates probability of compressive neuropathy. In spite of comparable glycemic control over 3 mo, patients treated with pioglitazone showed superior electrophysiological parameters for the ulnar nerve. Pioglitazone has favourable outcome in nerve electrophysiology which was repealed when the nerve was subjected to compressive neuropathy. PMID:27895823

  12. The dose-dependent efficiency of radial shock wave therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ming-Jen; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chou, Yu-Ching; Li, Tsung-Ying; Chu, Heng-Yi; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Wu, Yung-Tsan

    2016-12-02

    Recently, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been shown to be a novel therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, previous studies did not examine the diverse effects of different-session ESWT for different-grades CTS. Thus, we conducted a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study. Sixty-nine patients (90 wrists) with mild to moderate CTS were randomized into 3 groups. Group A and C patients received one session of radial ESWT (rESWT) and sham eESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks, respectively; Group B patients received a single session of rESWT. The night splint was also used in all patients. The primary outcome was Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) points, whereas secondary outcomes included the sensory nerve conduction velocity and cross-sectional area of the median nerve. Evaluations were performed at 4, 10, and 14 weeks after the first session of rESWT. Compared to the control group, the three-session rESWT group demonstrated significant BCTQ point reductions at least 14 weeks, and the effect was much longer lasting in patients with moderate CTS than mild CTS. In contrast, the effect of single-session rESWT showed insignificant comparison. rESWT is a valuable strategy for treating CTS and multiple-session rESWT has a clinically cumulative effect.

  13. The dose-dependent efficiency of radial shock wave therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ming-Jen; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chou, Yu-Ching; Li, Tsung-Ying; Chu, Heng-Yi; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Wu, Yung-Tsan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been shown to be a novel therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, previous studies did not examine the diverse effects of different-session ESWT for different-grades CTS. Thus, we conducted a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study. Sixty-nine patients (90 wrists) with mild to moderate CTS were randomized into 3 groups. Group A and C patients received one session of radial ESWT (rESWT) and sham eESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks, respectively; Group B patients received a single session of rESWT. The night splint was also used in all patients. The primary outcome was Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) points, whereas secondary outcomes included the sensory nerve conduction velocity and cross-sectional area of the median nerve. Evaluations were performed at 4, 10, and 14 weeks after the first session of rESWT. Compared to the control group, the three-session rESWT group demonstrated significant BCTQ point reductions at least 14 weeks, and the effect was much longer lasting in patients with moderate CTS than mild CTS. In contrast, the effect of single-session rESWT showed insignificant comparison. rESWT is a valuable strategy for treating CTS and multiple-session rESWT has a clinically cumulative effect. PMID:27910920

  14. Six-month efficacy of platelet-rich plasma for carpal tunnel syndrome: A prospective randomized, single-blind controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Ho, Tsung-Yen; Chou, Yu-Ching; Ke, Ming-Jen; Li, Tsung-Ying; Huang, Guo-Shu; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2017-12-01

    Recently, a few small reports with short follow-up period have shown clinical benefits of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for peripheral neuropathy including one pilot study and one small, non-randomized trial in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Therefore, we conducted a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial to assess the 6-month effect of PRP in patients with CTS. Sixty patients with unilateral mild-to-moderate CTS were randomized into two groups of 30, namely the PRP and control groups. In the PRP group, patients were injected with one dose of 3 mL of PRP using ultrasound guidance and the control group received a night splint through the study period. The primary outcome measure was the visual analog scale (VAS) and secondary outcome measures included the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) score, the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve (MN), electrophysiological findings of the MN, and finger pinch strength. The evaluation was performed before treatment and at 1, 3, and 6 months post-injection. The PRP group exhibited a significant reduction in the VAS score, BCTQ score, and CSA of MN compared to the those of control group 6 months post-treatment (p < 0.05). Our study demonstrates that PRP is a safe modality that effectively relieves pain and improves disability in the patients with CTS.

  15. Association of a high normalized protein catabolic rate and low serum albumin level with carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Lee, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common mononeuropathy in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The association between chronic inflammation and CTS in hemodialysis (HD) patients has rarely been investigated. HD patients with a high normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) and low serum albumin level likely have adequate nutrition and inflammation. In this study, we assume that a low serum albumin level and high nPCR is associated with CTS in HD patients. We recruited 866 maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients and divided them into 4 groups according to their nPCR and serum albumin levels: (1) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (2) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (3) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL; and (4) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL. After adjustment for related variables, HD duration and nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL were positively correlated with CTS. By calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, we calculated that the nPCR and HD duration cut-off points for obtaining the most favorable Youden index were 1.29 g/kg/d and 7.5 years, respectively. Advance multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that in MHD patients, nPCR ≥1.29 g/kg/d and serum albumin <4 g/dL, and also HD duration >7.5 years were associated with CTS. A high nPCR and low serum albumin level, which likely reflect adequate nutrition and inflammation, were associated with CTS in MHD patients. PMID:27368039

  16. A Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial of a Neurodynamic Technique in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bialosky, Joel E.; Bishop, Mark D.; Price, Don D.; Robinson, Michael E.; Vincent, Kevin R.; George, Steven Z.

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Randomized, controlled trial. Objectives To assess the believability of a novel sham intervention for a neurodynamic technique (NDT) in participants with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Additionally, we wished to assess a potential mechanism of NDT (hypoalgesia) and to compare outcomes related to clinical pain and upper extremity disability between NDT and a sham intervention. Background Preliminary evidence suggests that NDT is effective in the treatment of CTS. A sham-controlled study is lacking from the literature and could provide insight to the efficacy of NDT, as well as the corresponding mechanisms. Methods Participants with signs and symptoms consistent with CTS provided baseline measures of expectation, clinical pain intensity, upper extremity disability, and experimental pain sensitivity. Participants were then randomly assigned to receive either a NDT known to anatomically stress the median nerve or a sham technique intended to minimize stress to the median nerve. Following brief exposure to the assigned technique, expectation was reassessed to observe for group-dependent changes. Participants received the assigned intervention over 3 weeks. Additionally, all participants received a prefabricated wrist splint for their involved hands, with instructions to sleep in the splint and to wear it during painful activities when awake. Following 3 weeks of the assigned intervention and splint wear, baseline measures were reassessed and participants were asked which intervention they believed they had received. Results Forty females agreed to participate. Expectations for pain relief and perceived group assignment were similar between the groups. Within-session decreases in clinical pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity were observed independent of group assignment. Reduction of temporal summation was observed only in participants receiving NDT. Significant improvements in clinical pain intensity and upper extremity

  17. Effectiveness of mechanical traction as a non-surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome compared to care as usual: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common condition (prevalence of 4%) where the median nerve is compressed within the carpal tunnel resulting in numbness, tingling, and pain in the hand. Current non-surgical treatment options (oral medication, corticosteroid injections, splinting, exercise, and mobilization) show limited effects, especially in the long-term. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery is effective in 70 to 75% of patients, but is relatively invasive and can be accompanied by complications. In an observational study, mechanical traction proved to be effective in up to 70% of patients directly after treatment and in 60% after two years follow-up. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) will examine the effectiveness of mechanical traction compared to care as usual in CTS. Methods/Design Patients diagnosed with CTS will be recruited from an outpatient neurology clinic and randomly assigned to the intervention group (mechanical traction) or the control group (care as usual). Participants in the intervention group will receive 12 treatments with mechanical traction during six consecutive weeks. Primary outcome is symptom severity and functional status, which are measured with the Boston Carpel Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Secondary outcomes are quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), health related resource utilization, and absenteeism from work. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, and at 3, 6, and 12 months after inclusion. Linear mixed effect models will be used to determine the change from baseline at 12 months on the BCTQ, WHOQOL-BREF, absenteeism from work and health related resource utilization. The baseline measurement, change from baseline at three and six months, as well as duration of symptoms until inclusion, age, gender, and co-morbidity will be included as covariates The Pearson’s correlation coefficient will be generated to assess the correlation between depression and anxiety and treatment outcome. Discussion Since current non

  18. The Value of Median Nerve Sonography as a Predictor for Short- and Long-Term Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Alexander; Ficjian, Anja; Husic, Rusmir; Zauner, Dorothea; Seel, Werner; Simmet, Nicole E.; Klammer, Alexander; Heizer, Petra; Brickmann, Kerstin; Gretler, Judith; Fürst-Moazedi, Florentine C.; Thonhofer, Rene; Hermann, Josef; Graninger, Winfried B.; Quasthoff, Stefan; Dejaco, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prognostic value of B-mode and Power Doppler (PD) ultrasound of the median nerve for the short- and long-term clinical outcomes of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Prospective study of 135 patients with suspected CTS seen 3 times: at baseline, then at short-term (3 months) and long-term (15–36 months) follow-up. At baseline, the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve was measured with ultrasound at 4 levels on the forearm and wrist. PD signals were graded semi-quantitatively (0–3). Clinical outcomes were evaluated at each visit with the Boston Questionnaire (BQ) and the DASH Questionnaire, as well as visual analogue scales for the patient’s assessment of pain (painVAS) and physician’s global assessment (physVAS). The predictive values of baseline CSA and PD for clinical outcomes were determined with multivariate logistic regression models. Results Short-term and long-term follow-up data were available for 111 (82.2%) and 105 (77.8%) patients, respectively. There was a final diagnosis of CTS in 84 patients (125 wrists). Regression analysis revealed that the CSA, measured at the carpal tunnel inlet, predicted short-term clinical improvement according to BQ in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel surgery (OR 1.8, p = 0.05), but not in patients treated conservatively. Neither CSA nor PD assessments predicted short-term improvement of painVAS, physVAS or DASH, nor was any of the ultrasound parameters useful for the prediction of long-term clinical outcomes. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet may predict short-term clinical improvement in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel release, but long-term outcomes are unrelated to ultrasound findings. PMID:27662617

  19. The Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Versus Surgery on Self-reported Function, Cervical Range of Motion, and Pinch Grip Force in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua; Palacios-Ceña, María; Fuensalida-Novo, Stella; Pareja, Juan A; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Study Design Randomized parallel-group trial. Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common pain condition that can be managed surgically or conservatively. Objective To compare the effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery for improving self-reported function, cervical range of motion, and pinch-tip grip force in women with CTS. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 100 women with CTS were randomly allocated to either a manual therapy (n = 50) or a surgery (n = 50) group. The primary outcome was self-rated hand function, assessed with the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included active cervical range of motion, pinch-tip grip force, and the symptom severity subscale of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Patients were assessed at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the last treatment by an assessor unaware of group assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat, with mixed analyses of covariance adjusted for baseline scores. Results At 12 months, 94 women completed the follow-up. Analyses showed statistically significant differences in favor of manual therapy at 1 month for self-reported function (mean change, -0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.1, -0.5) and pinch-tip grip force on the symptomatic side (thumb-index finger: mean change, 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.9 and thumb-little finger: mean change, 1.0; 95% CI: 0.5, 1.5). Improvements in self-reported function and pinch grip force were similar between the groups at 3, 6, and 12 months. Both groups reported improvements in symptom severity that were not significantly different at all follow-up periods. No significant changes were observed in pinch-tip grip force on the less symptomatic side and in cervical range of motion in either group. Conclusion Manual therapy and surgery had similar effectiveness for improving self-reported function, symptom severity, and pinch-tip grip force on the symptomatic hand in women with CTS. Neither manual therapy nor surgery resulted

  20. Correlation between Female Sex Hormones and Electrodiagnostic Parameters and Clinical Function in Post-menopausal Women with Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Azam; Naseri, Mahshid; Namazi, Hamid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role of sex-hormonal changes in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among post-menopausal women through measuring estrogen receptor (ER) expression in their transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and serum estrogen level, as well as determine the correlation between these factors and electrodiagnostic parameters and Boston score. Methods Biopsy samples of TCL were collected from 12 postmenopausal women who had undergone surgery for severe idiopathic CTS; control specimens were collected from 10 postmenopausal women without CTS who had undergone surgery for the other hand pathologies. To determine the distributions of ER in TCL, histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed. Serum estrogen level was also measured. Electrodiagnosis and Boston questionnaire were used for CTS severity and determination of the patients' function. Results ER expression in TCL and serum estrogen level were not significantly different in the case group compared to the control group (P = 0.79 and P = 0.88, respectively). Also, there was no correlation between ER expression or serum estrogen level and electrodiagnostic parameters or Boston score. Conclusions Sex hormones cannot still be considered as the etiology of idiopathic CTS in postmenopausal women. The role of other factors such as wrist ratio and narrower outlet in females compared to the males should be considered along with hormonal changes. PMID:27617242

  1. Difficulty of pinching behind the back: an atypical symptom of carpal tunnel syndrome related to a specific wrist position. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Tachibana, Shigekuni; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may be overlooked in the absence of typical sensory symptoms. Two patients with CTS lacked the attendant sensory symptoms but experienced difficulties performing a pinching action behind the back (manipulation of the buckle of a baby sling or the hook of a brassiere), a mode of pinching that required wrist flexion. The causative mechanism was probably exacerbation of a latent weakness of the intrinsic muscles of the thumb by wrist flexion, in which the strength of the extrinsic flexors of the thumb and index finger were decreased due to loosening of the tendons. Such symptoms, induced by a specific wrist position, may be help to diagnose a latent weakness in the intrinsic muscles of the thumb, present in patients with CTS.

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by typing on a computer, using a mouse, or repeating movements while working, playing a musical ... devices, such as keyboards, different types of computer mouse, cushioned mouse pads, and keyboard drawers Having someone ...

  3. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... might feel tingling during the day. Decreased grip strength may make it difficult to form a fist, ... base of the hand should be examined for strength and signs of atrophy. Routine laboratory tests and ...

  4. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the strain on your forearm. Keeping good posture and wrist position can lower your risk of getting CTS. Take breaks. Allowing your hand and wrist to rest and ... every hour is a good way to prevent CTS. Vary tasks. Avoid repetitive ...

  5. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient and Caregiver ... Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient and Caregiver ...

  6. Assessing the Value of High-Quality Care for Work-Associated Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in a Large Integrated Health Care System: Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Craig; Asch, Steven; Hanson, Mark; Avins, Andrew; Levitan, Barbara; Roth, Carol; Robbins, Michael; Dworsky, Michael; Seabury, Seth; Nuckols, Teryl

    2016-01-01

    Context Little is known about quality of care for occupational health disorders, although it may affect worker health and workers’ compensation costs. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common work-associated condition that causes substantial disability. Objective To describe the design of a study that is assessing quality of care for work-associated CTS and associations with clinical outcomes and costs. Design Prospective observational study of 477 individuals with new workers’ compensation claims for CTS without acute trauma who were treated at 30 occupational health clinics from 2011 to 2013 and followed for 18 months. Main Outcome Measures Timing of key clinical events, adherence to 45 quality measures, changes in scores on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and 12-item Short Form Health Survey Version 2 (SF-12v2), and costs associated with medical care and disability. Results Two hundred sixty-seven subjects (56%) received a diagnosis of CTS and had claims filed around the first visit to occupational health, 104 (22%) received a diagnosis before that visit and claim, and 98 (21%) received a diagnosis or had claims filed after that visit. One hundred seventy-eight (37%) subjects had time off work, which started around the time of surgery in 147 (83%) cases and lasted a median of 41 days (interquartile range = 42 days). Conclusions The timing of diagnosis varied, but time off work was generally short and related to surgery. If associations of quality of care with key medical, economic, and quality-of-life outcomes are identified for work-associated CTS, systematic efforts to evaluate and improve quality of medical care for this condition are warranted. PMID:27723446

  7. Decompression sickness and aseptic necrosis of bone: Investigations carried out during and after the construction of the Tyne Road Tunnel (1962-66)

    PubMed Central

    1971-01-01

    Report of Decompression Sickness Panel, Medical Research Council (1971). Brit. J. industr. Med., 28, 1-21. Decompression sickness and aseptic necrosis of bone: Investigations carried out during and after the construction of the Tyne Road Tunnel (1962-66). This paper describes investigations into the health of compressed air workers during and after the construction of a road tunnel under the River Tyne. Altogether 641 men were exposed to the compressed air environment over a period of approximately 31 months. The maximum working pressure was 42 psig (289·6 kN/m2), and the overall decompression sickness rate for work at pressures of 18 psig (124·1 kN/m2) and above was 2%. Radiological examination of the chest was carried out on 183 men to detect lung cysts but only one was found. Thus lung cysts were not shown to be a common factor in the causation of decompression sickness but the possibility of small sub-radiological collections of trapped air being involved was not excluded. Radiological examinations of the shoulders, hips and knee joints were carried out on 171 men. There was evidence of aseptic necrosis in one or more bones of 44 men (26%). Fifteen of the men with definite lesions of aseptic necrosis of bone and 7 of the men with suspected lesions had never worked in compressed air before this contract. The remaining 14 men with definite lesions and the 8 with suspected lesions had worked elsewhere in compressed air prior to this contract, but a definite lesion in one of these men and a suspected lesion in another can almost certainly be attributed to their work in compressed air on this contract. Images PMID:5543625

  8. Education, night splinting and exercise versus usual care on recovery and conversion to surgery for people awaiting carpal tunnel surgery: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Karina J; Ross, Leo; Coppieters, Michel W; Vicenzino, Bill; Schmid, Annina B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a prevalent upper limb condition that results in significant individual and socioeconomic costs. Large patient numbers, long outpatient waiting times and traditional referral pathways in public health systems create delays in accessing treatment for this condition. Alternative care pathways aimed at streamlining access to treatment and reducing the need for surgical intervention warrant further investigation. Methods A randomised, single-blind controlled clinical trial will be conducted. 128 participants aged 18–75 years with CTS will be recruited from the carpal tunnel surgery waitlists of participating public hospitals. Suitable participants will be stratified for severity and randomly allocated to either receive therapy (education, provision of splints and a home exercise programme) or standard care (continuing on the waitlist without hand therapy intervention for the duration of the study). Outcomes will be measured at baseline and after 6 weeks and 6 months. Primary outcomes are conversion to surgery ratio and perceived effect via the Global Rating of Change Scale. Secondary measures include patient satisfaction, and monitoring of symptoms and function using outcome measures including the Boston CTS Questionnaire, Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, patient completed diagram of symptoms and Self-reported Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale. Discussion This paper outlines the design and rationale for a randomised controlled trial that aims to assess the efficacy of an alternative care pathway for the management of patients with CTS while on the surgery waitlist. It is anticipated that the outcomes of this study will contribute to improved and expedited management of this common condition in a public hospital setting. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was granted by the Princess Alexandra Hospital Centres for Health Research

  9. Acute Effect of Topical Menthol on Chronic Pain in Slaughterhouse Workers with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Triple-Blind, Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D.; Jay, Kenneth; Colado, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Topical menthol gels are classified “topical analgesics” and are claimed to relieve minor aches and pains of the musculoskeletal system. In this study we investigate the acute effect of topical menthol on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We screened 645 slaughterhouse workers and recruited 10 participants with CTS and chronic pain of the arm/hand who were randomly distributed into two groups to receive topical menthol (Biofreeze) or placebo (gel with a menthol scent) during the working day and 48 hours later the other treatment (crossover design). Participants rated arm/hand pain intensity during the last hour of work (scale 0–10) immediately before 1, 2, and 3 hours after application. Furthermore, global rating of change (GROC) in arm/hand pain was assessed 3 hours after application. Compared with placebo, pain intensity and GROC improved more following application of topical menthol (P = 0.026 and P = 0.044, resp.). Pain intensity of the arm/hand decreased by −1.2 (CI 95%: −1.7 to −0.6) following topical menthol compared with placebo, corresponding to a moderate effect size of 0.63. In conclusion, topical menthol acutely reduces pain intensity during the working day in slaughterhouse workers with CTS and should be considered as an effective nonsystemic alternative to regular analgesics in the workplace management of chronic and neuropathic pain. PMID:25298894

  10. Acute effect of topical menthol on chronic pain in slaughterhouse workers with carpal tunnel syndrome: triple-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Colado, Juan Carlos; Wang, Yuling; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-01-01

    Topical menthol gels are classified "topical analgesics" and are claimed to relieve minor aches and pains of the musculoskeletal system. In this study we investigate the acute effect of topical menthol on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We screened 645 slaughterhouse workers and recruited 10 participants with CTS and chronic pain of the arm/hand who were randomly distributed into two groups to receive topical menthol (Biofreeze) or placebo (gel with a menthol scent) during the working day and 48 hours later the other treatment (crossover design). Participants rated arm/hand pain intensity during the last hour of work (scale 0-10) immediately before 1, 2, and 3 hours after application. Furthermore, global rating of change (GROC) in arm/hand pain was assessed 3 hours after application. Compared with placebo, pain intensity and GROC improved more following application of topical menthol (P = 0.026 and P = 0.044, resp.). Pain intensity of the arm/hand decreased by -1.2 (CI 95%: -1.7 to -0.6) following topical menthol compared with placebo, corresponding to a moderate effect size of 0.63. In conclusion, topical menthol acutely reduces pain intensity during the working day in slaughterhouse workers with CTS and should be considered as an effective nonsystemic alternative to regular analgesics in the workplace management of chronic and neuropathic pain.

  11. Heightened pain sensitivity in individuals with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and the relationship to clinical outcomes following a manual therapy intervention.

    PubMed

    Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Robinson, Michael E; Price, Donald D; George, Steven Z

    2011-12-01

    Neurophysiological responses related to lessening of pain sensitivity are a suggested mechanism of manual therapy. Prior studies have observed generalized lower pain thresholds associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in comparison to healthy controls. The present study sought to determine whether similar findings were present in suprathreshold measures and measures specific to central integration of pain (temporal summation and after sensations). Additionally, we wished to determine whether measures of pain sensitivity were related to clinical outcomes in participants with signs and symptoms of CTS receiving a manual therapy intervention. Individuals with signs and symptoms of CTS reported greater pain sensitivity to suprathreshold measures of mechanical pain, temporal summation, and after sensation in comparison to healthy controls. Immediate lessening of mechanical pain sensitivity and after sensations in response to a manual therapy intervention and 3-week attenuation of temporal summation following a 3-week course of manual therapy were associated with 3-week changes in clinical pain intensity in participants with signs and symptoms of CTS. These findings suggest heightened pain sensitivity across several parameters may be associated with CTS. Furthermore, changes in mechanical pain, after sensation, and temporal summation may be related to improvements in clinical outcomes.

  12. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression is increased in the subsynovial connective tissue in a rabbit model of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chikenji, Takako; Gingery, Anne; Zhao, Chunfeng; Vanhees, Matthias; Moriya, Tamami; Reisdorf, Ramona; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is an idiopathic disease that results from increased fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT). A recent study found overexpression of both transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the SSCT of CTS patients. This study investigated TGF-β and CTGF expression in a rabbit model of CTS, in which SSCT fibrosis is induced by a surgical injury. Levels of TGF-β1 and CTGF at 6, 12, 24 weeks after injury were determined by immunohistochemistry A significant increase in TGF-β1 and a concomitant significant increase in CTGF were found at 6 weeks, in addition to higher cell density compared to normal (all p<0.05), Interestingly, CTGF expression was reduced at 12 and 24 weeks, suggesting that an initial insult results in a time limited response. We conclude that this rabbit model mimics the fibrosis found in human CTS, and may be useful to study pathogenetic mechanisms of CTS in vivo.

  13. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression is increased in the subsynovial connective tissues of patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chikenji, Takako; Gingery, Anne; Zhao, Chunfeng; Passe, Sandra M; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Larson, Dirk; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a hallmark of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The etiology of this finding and its relationship to the development of CTS remain poorly understood. Recent studies have found that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a central role in fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of TGF-β and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a downstream mediator of TGF-β, in the pathogenesis of CTS. We compared SSCT specimens from 26 idiopathic CTS patients with specimens from 10 human cadaver controls with no previous diagnosis of CTS. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine levels TGF-β1, CTGF, collagen 1(Col1) and collagen 3 (Col3) expression. TGF-β1 (p < 0.01), CTGF (p < 0.01), and Col3 (p < 0.01) were increased in SSCT of CTS patients compared with control tissue. In addition, a strong positive correlation was found between TGF-β1 and CTGF, (R(2) = 0.80, p < 0.01) and a moderate positive correlation between Col3 and TGF-β1 (R(2) = 0.49, p < 0.01). These finding suggest that there is an increased expression of TGF-β and CTGF, a TGF-β regulated protein, and that this TGF-β activation may be responsible for SSCT fibrosis in CTS patients.

  14. Assessment of the effectiveness of interferential current therapy and TENS in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Koca, Irfan; Boyaci, Ahmet; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Ucar, Mehmet; Kocaturk, Ozcan

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of interferential current (IFC) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapies in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) compared with splint therapy, a standard treatment modality for CTS. This was a prospective, single-blinded, single-center, randomized, three-group parallel intervention study of 3 weeks duration. Efficacy was examined in the third week after the end of treatments. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of three groups: group I patients received splint therapy, group II patients received TENS applied on the palmar surface of the hand and the carpal tunnel, and group III patients underwent IFC therapy applied on the palmar surface of the hand and the volar surface of the forearm. TENS and ICF treatments were applied five times weekly for a total of 15 sessions. Group 1 patients were stabilized with volar wrist splints for 3 weeks. The efficacy of the therapies was assessed before initiation of therapy and at 3 weeks after completion of therapy using a visual analog scale (VAS), a symptom severity scale, the functional capacity scale of the BCTQ, and measurement of median nerve motor distal latency (mMDL) and median sensory nerve conduction velocity (mSNCV). Groups were compared pairwise using the Mann-Whitney U test to identify the source of differences between groups. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze changes in variables over time within a group. In the VAS, BCTQ, MDL, and mSNCV, no significant difference was observed between the groups (p > 0.05). In the VAS, BCTQ, and mSNCV, statistically significant improvements were detected in all groups (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between TENS and splint therapy with respect to improvement in clinical scores, whereas IFC therapy provided a significantly greater improvement in VAS, mMDL, and mSNCV values than splint therapy (VAS: 4.80 ± 1.18 and 6.37 ± 1.18; p = 0.001, mMDL: 3.89 ± 0.88 and 4.06 ± 0.61; p = 0

  15. Assessment from Functional Perspectives: Using Sensorimotor Control in the Hand as an Outcome Indicator in the Surgical Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Su, Fong-Chin; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Jou, I-Ming; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Kuo, Li-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether sensorimotor control of the hand could be an outcome indicator after carpal tunnel release (CTR), this work examined changes in the results of patients’ manual tactile test (MTT), pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA), two-point discrimination (2PD) and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) tests. Participants included 30 predominantly sensory neuropathy CTS patients, as confirmed by a nerve conduction study. The MTT, precision pinch performance in PHUA and traditional sensibility (2PD and SWM) tests were used to examine different aspects of sensory status at the time-points of two weeks before operation and one month post-operation, with a single-blind design. The results showed significant improvements in the sensory function as detected by the 2PD and SWM tests (p<0.001) and sensorimotor function as detected by the MTT (p<0.001) and PHUA test (p<0.05) for patients receiving CTR. The responsiveness of the SWM, MTT and PHUA tests (effect size>0.5, p<0.01) are better than that of two-point discrimination test (effect size<0.5, p<0.001). However, pinch strength saw a decline compared to baseline with a moderate effect sizes (effect size = 0.7, p<0.001). This cohort study found that the MTT and PHUA test can both meet all the statistical criteria with regard to assessing treatment outcomes for patients with CTS. In addition, the results of this work provide clinicians with the information that the sensorimotor functions of the hands, as assessed by MTT and PHUA, are responsive to clinical changes due to CTR. PMID:26053242

  16. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on adaptation of multi-digit forces to object mass distribution for whole-hand manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a compression neuropathy of the median nerve that results in sensorimotor deficits in the hand. Until recently, the effects of CTS on hand function have been studied using mostly two-digit grip tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of multi-digit forces as a function of object center of mass (CM) during whole-hand grasping. Methods Fourteen CTS patients and age- and gender-matched controls were instructed to grasp, lift, hold, and release a grip device with five digits for seven consecutive lifts while maintaining its vertical orientation. The object CM was changed by adding a mass at different locations at the base of the object. We measured forces and torques exerted by each digit and object kinematics and analyzed modulation of these variables to object CM at object lift onset and during object hold. Our task requires a modulation of digit forces at and after object lift onset to generate a compensatory moment to counteract the external moment caused by the added mass and to minimize object tilt. Results We found that CTS patients learned to generate a compensatory moment and minimized object roll to the same extent as controls. However, controls fully exploited the available degrees of freedom (DoF) in coordinating their multi-digit forces to generate a compensatory moment, i.e., digit normal forces, tangential forces, and the net center of pressure on the finger side of the device at object lift onset and during object hold. In contrast, patients modulated only one of these DoFs (the net center of pressure) to object CM by modulating individual normal forces at object lift onset. During object hold, however, CTS patients were able to modulate digit tangential force distribution to object CM. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, although CTS did not affect patients’ ability to perform our manipulation task, it interfered with the modulation of specific grasp control variables. This

  17. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  18. Surgical Decompression in the Treatment of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiji; Lineaweaver, William Charles; Chen, Zenggan; Hu, Junda; Mullins, Fred; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Background Over the last decade, surgical decompression procedures have been commonly used in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, the effectiveness of them remains to be proved. Methods A comprehensive literature search of databases including PubMed-Medline, Ovid-EMBASE, and Cochrane Library was performed to collect the related literatures. The Medical Subject Headings used were "diabetic neuropathy," "surgical decompression," and "outcomes." The methodological index for nonrandomized studies was adopted for assessing the studies included in this review. Analyses were performed with Review Manager (Version 5.3, Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, the Cochrane Collaboration, 2014). Results A total of 12 literatures (including 8 prospective and 4 retrospective) encompassing 1,825 patients with DPN were included in the final analysis. Only one literature was identified as a randomized controlled trial. The remaining 11 literatures were observational studies; 7 of them were classified as upper-extremity nerve decompression group and 4 of them were classified as lower-extremity nerve decompression group. Meta-analysis shows that Boston questionnaire symptom severity and functional status of upper extremities, and distal motor latency and sensory conduction velocity of median nerve of DPN patients are significantly improved after carpal tunnel release. Besides, visual analog scale and two-point discrimination are considered clinically and statistically significant in lower extremities after operation. Conclusions The findings from our review have shown the efficacy of surgical decompression procedures in relieving the neurologic symptoms and restoring the sensory deficits in DPN patients. As there are few high-quality randomized controlled trials or well-designed prospective studies, more data are needed to elucidate the role of surgical procedures for DPN treatment in the future.

  19. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  20. Movement of the distal carpal row during narrowing and widening of the carpal arch width.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Domalain, Mathieu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Change in carpal arch width (CAW) is associated with wrist movement, carpal tunnel release, or therapeutic tunnel manipulation. This study investigated the angular rotations of the distal carpal joints as the CAW was adjusted. The CAW was narrowed and widened by 2 and 4 mm in seven cadaveric specimens while the bone positions were tracked by a marker-based motion capture system. The joints mainly pronated during CAW narrowing and supinated during widening. Ranges of motion about the pronation axis for the hamate-capitate (H-C), capitate-trapezoid (C-Td), and trapezoid-trapezium (Td-Tm) joints were 8.1 ± 2.3 deg, 5.3 ± 1.3 deg, and 5.5 ± 3.5 deg, respectively. Differences between the angular rotations of the joints were found at ΔCAW = -4 mm about the pronation and ulnar-deviation axes. For the pronation axis, angular rotations of the H-C joint were larger than that of the C-Td and Td-Tm joints. Statistical interactions among the factors of joint, rotation axis, and ΔCAW indicated complex joint motion patterns. The complex three-dimensional motion of the bones can be attributed to several anatomical constraints such as bone arrangement, ligament attachments, and articular congruence. The results of this study provide insight into the mechanisms of carpal tunnel adaptations in response to biomechanical alterations of the structural components.

  1. Effects of dividing the transverse carpal ligament on the mechanical behavior of the carpal bones under axial compressive load: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zong-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Transecting the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) is a routine procedure to surgically treat carpal tunnel syndrome; yet, its mechanical consequences on carpal bones are unclear. In this study, our intent was to perform a computational analysis of carpal biomechanics resulting from TCL release. A three-dimensional finite element model of the wrist was constructed, which included all the carpal bones, the distal ulna and radius, the proximal metacarpals and the interosseous ligaments. Cartilage layers of each bone were modeled manually according to anatomic visualization software. The TCL was also modeled in three dimensions and added to the bone model. A 100-Newton axial load was applied to the upper section of the second and third metacarpals. The effects of dividing the TCL on the displacements of the carpal bones and the contact stress distribution in the midcarpal joints were studied using a finite element analysis method. When the TCL was divided, the axial compressive load resulted in the carpal bones deviating more radially. More specifically, the carpal bones on the radial side of the capitate and lunate (i.e. the trapezium, trapezoid, and scaphoid) moved further toward the radius, and the carpal bones on the ulnar side of the capitate and lunate (i.e. hamate, triquetrum, and pisiform) moved further toward the metacarpals. The contact stresses and contact locations in the midcarpal joints changed as a result of dividing the TCL. The changes in displacements of carpal bones and the contact stress distributions in the midcarpal joints due to TCL release may be implicated for some of the postoperative complications associated with carpal tunnel release.

  2. Decompression effect of partial capitate shortening for Kienbock's disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Moritomo, Hisao; Omokawa, Shohei; Iida, Akio; Wada, Takuro; Aoki, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Although capitate shortening for Kienbock's disease decompresses the radiolunate joint, the distal carpal row migrates proximally postoperatively and the carpal alignment subsequently collapses. We hypothesised that partial capitate shortening, in which only the lunate facet of the capitate is shortened and the scaphocapitate joint is preserved, could achieve adequate decompression without carpal collapse. Using 11 cadavers, we measured the intra-articular pressure with an axial load on the radioscaphoid, radiolunate and ulnocarpal joints before and after resection. We also investigated whether the decompression effect is related to the presence of the lunohamate articulation. After resection, the radioscaphoid joint mean pressure was significantly increased by an average of 39%, the radiolunate joint mean pressure was significantly decreased by an average of 53% and the ulnocarpal joint mean pressure was unchanged. The radiolunate joint mean pressure significantly decreased irrespective of the lunohamate articulation status.

  3. Decompression Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-25

    new experiments at 30 m ( 4 ATA) is appropriate for comparing N2 and He with respect to half times and surfacing ratios. Table 4 demonstrates the...THEORY C4 i t44 4 ’I9 41-*1 ai4 p80 7 10 009 UM"tUBNC*nm N4MDOf 29WS (DT) 6-25-80 The Seventeenth Undersea Medical Society Workshop DECOMPRESSION...Hamilton, Jr., Ph.D. Edward L Beckman, M.D. Hamilton Research Ltd. University of Hawaii 80 Grove Street School of Medicine Tarrytown, New York 10591

  4. A systematic review of outcomes assessed in randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a reference tool

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, Christina; Leite, José C de Carvalho; Song, Fujian

    2006-01-01

    Background A wide range of outcomes have been assessed in trials of interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), however there appears to be little consensus on what constitutes the most relevant outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the outcomes assessed in randomized clinical trials of surgical interventions for CTS and to compare these to the concepts contained in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods The bibliographic databases Medline, AMED and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials of surgical treatment for CTS. The outcomes assessed in these trials were identified, classified and linked to the different domains of the ICF. Results Twenty-eight studies were retrieved which met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently assessed outcomes were self-reported symptom resolution, grip or pinch strength and return to work. The majority of outcome measures employed assessed impairment of body function and body structure and a small number of studies used measures of activity and participation. Conclusion The ICF provides a useful framework for identifying the concepts contained in outcome measures employed to date in trials of surgical intervention for CTS and may help in the selection of the most appropriate domains to be assessed, especially where studies are designed to capture the impact of the intervention at individual and societal level. Comparison of results from different studies and meta-analysis would be facilitated through the use of a core set of standardised outcome measures which cross all domains of the ICF. Further work on developing consensus on such a core set is needed. PMID:17147807

  5. Three-dimensional stiffness of the carpal arch.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-04

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n=8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4±4.6N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1±0.9 and 2.6±0.5N/mm (p<0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist׳s three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function.

  6. Three-Dimensional Stiffness of the Carpal Arch

    PubMed Central

    Gabra, Joseph N.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n = 8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4 ± 4.6 N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.5 N/mm (p < 0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist's three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function. PMID:26617368

  7. Spontaneous Flexor Tendon Rupture Due to Atraumatic Chronic Carpal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, B. H.; Cerovac, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture is considered to be invariably associated with previous hand/wrist injury or systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. Case Description A 54-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of mild ulnar wrist pain and spontaneous left little finger flexion loss in the absence of distant/recent trauma and systemic arthropathy. Surgical exploration confirmed a zone IV left little finger flexor digitorum profundus (FDP5) attritional rupture (100%), ring finger flexor digitorum profundus (FDP4) attenuation (40%) and a disrupted lunotriquetral ligament and volar-ulnar wrist capsule. Volar subluxation of the narrowed carpal tunnel resulted in flexor tendon attrition against the hamate hook. A side-to-side tendon transfer was performed along with a lunotriquetral ligament repair and temporary Kirschner wire fixation. At 6 months the patient had full active, synchronous flexion of the ring and little fingers and reduced wrist pain. Literature Review Traumatic flexor tendon ruptures have been reported following distal radius/hamate hook fractures, from carpal bone osteophytes, accessory carpal bones and intraosseous ganglia. Attritional ruptures caused by chronic, degenerative carpal pathology are less common. Clinical Relevance This case highlights an unusual cause of flexor tendon rupture due to chronic carpal instability. PMID:25032080

  8. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  9. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  10. [Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miliam, Palle B; Basse, Peter N

    2009-03-30

    Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the extensor retinaculum of the ankle. It may be rare because it is underrecognized clinically.We present a case regarding a 29-year-old man, drummer, who for one and a half year experienced clinical symptoms of anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. A surgical decompression of the anterior tarsal tunnel was performed, and at the check three months later the symptoms where gone. One year after, there were still no symptoms.

  11. Adaptation of the Transverse Carpal Ligament Associated with Repetitive Hand Use in Pianists

    PubMed Central

    Mhanna, Christiane; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) plays a critical role in carpal tunnel biomechanics through interactions with its surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo adaptations of the TCL’s mechanical properties in response to repetitive hand use in pianists using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. It was hypothesized that pianists, in comparison to non-pianists, would have a stiffer TCL as indicated by an increased acoustic shear wave velocity (SWV). ARFI imagining was performed for 10 female pianists and 10 female non-pianists. The median SWV values of the TCL were determined for the entire TCL, as well as for its radial and ulnar portions, rTCL and uTCL, respectively. The TCL SWV was significantly increased in pianists relative to non-pianists (p < 0.05). Additionally, the increased SWV was location dependent for both pianist and non-pianist groups (p < 0.05), with the rTCL having a significantly greater SWV than the uTCL. Between groups, the rTCL SWV of pianists was 22.2% greater than that of the non-pianists (p < 0.001). This localized increase of TCL SWV, i.e. stiffening, may be primarily attributable to focal biomechanical interactions that occur at the radial TCL aspect where the thenar muscles are anchored. Progressive stiffening of the TCL may become constraining to the carpal tunnel, leading to median nerve compression in the tunnel. TCL maladaptation helps explain why populations who repeatedly use their hands are at an increased risk of developing musculoskeletal pathologies, e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26953892

  12. Avascular necrosis of carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Golimbu, C N; Firooznia, H; Rafii, M

    1995-05-01

    MR imaging is extremely well suited to detection of early phases of avascular necrosis, permitting diagnosis before collapse of the carpal bones has occurred. The sensitivity of this imaging modality allows differentiation of subtle changes in the bone marrow signal. This is used as criteria for a new stage classification of Kienböck's disease based on MR imaging appearance. The prognosis of scaphoid fractures and estimation of likelihood of avascular necrosis of the proximal fragment can be inferred by using gadolinium enhancement to evaluate the bone marrow vascularity.

  13. Ultrasound assessment of transverse carpal ligament thickness: a validity and reliability study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-06-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) forms the palmar boundary of the carpal tunnel and plays an important role in carpal tunnel mechanics. TCL hypertrophy has been observed for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and postulated as a potential etiologic factor. Ultrasound is particularly advantageous for TCL imaging because of its capability of detecting the interfaces between the TCL and other tissues. The purposes of this study were to develop an ultrasound based method to measure the TCL thickness and to test the validity and reliability of this method. Three operators conducted two sessions of ultrasound examination on eight cadaveric specimens and eight healthy volunteers. A custom script was used to calculate TCL thickness along the TCL length from the ultrasound images. The ultrasound based TCL thickness of the cadaveric specimens was compared with the dissection based TCL thickness for validation. The results showed Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.867-0.928, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values of 0.726-0.865, a standard error of measurement of 0.02-0.07 mm and a minimal detectable difference of 0.05-0.15 mm. The high correlation coefficients and small errors indicate that the ultrasound based method is valid for measuring TCL thickness. Furthermore, ultrasound measurements showed excellent intraoperator and interoperator reliability with ICC values as 0.826-0.933 and 0.840-0.882, respectively. The ultrasound based TCL thickness was in the range of 0.93-2.34 (1.54 ± 0.33) mm and agreed well with previous studies. The ultrasound method developed in this study is a valuable tool to examine morphologic properties of healthy and pathologic TCLs.

  14. THE AMELIORATIVE EFFECTS OF HEPARIN AND DEPOLYMERIZED HYALURONATE ON DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS IN RATS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS, DRUGS), (* MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES , DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), (*HEPARIN, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), (*ANTICOAGULANTS, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), RATS, COUMARINS, BLOOD COAGULATION, DOSAGE, LIPIDS, CANADA

  15. Decompression apparatus for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, M.

    1987-09-29

    In a decompression apparatus for an engine having a camshaft, a cam gear is described having a longitudinal bore along a central axis thereof, and a tappet engaging with an actuating cam on the camshaft. The improvement comprises: a releasing lever comprising a shaft and a weight secured to the shaft; the shaft forming a semicircular cam at one end; the camshaft having a first recess in a longitudinal direction; the cam gear having a second recess adjacent the bore; a bearing member for engaging with the first and second recesses and for rotatably supporting the shaft; a flat bottom notch for supporting the semicircular cam and being provided on the camshaft lose to the actuating cam; and the semicircular cam being arranged to project beyond a periphery of the actuating cam when engine operation is stopped.

  16. [Tarsal-carpal coalition syndrome: a familial case].

    PubMed

    Caino, S; Dello Ruso, B; Fano, V; Obregón, M G

    2012-06-01

    Tarsal-carpal coalition syndrome (TCC, OMIM #186570) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by fusion of the carpals, tarsals, and phalanges, with the short first metacarpals causing brachydactyly and humeroradial fusion. Mutations in the NOG gene have been reported in many families. We describe a family with carpal tarsal fusion seen at a Skeletal Dysplasia Clinic and look at the differential diagnoses.

  17. [Diagnostic validity of ultrasonography in carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Haddad-Garay, María; Tricas-Moreno, José M; Fanlo-Mazas, Pablo; Malo-Urries, Miguel; Estebanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Hidalgo-Garcia, César; Ruiz de Escudero-Zapico, Alazne

    2015-07-01

    Introduccion. La ecografia ha emergido como una herramienta diagnostica alternativa de las neuropatias perifericas, como el sindrome del tunel carpiano (STC). Sin embargo, faltan datos sobre la validez diagnostica de las diferentes mediciones ecograficas para la deteccion del STC en entornos clinicos. Objetivo. Hallar la validez diagnostica de las mediciones ecograficas del area de seccion transversal del nervio mediano en la muñeca (AST-M) y de la ratio del area del nervio mediano entre la muñeca y el antebrazo (R-MA) en el diagnostico del STC, utilizando como tecnica de referencia el electroneurograma (ENG). Pacientes y metodos. Se realizaron mediciones ecograficas en 59 sujetos (97 muñecas) referidos para someterse a un ENG por sospecha de STC. Los examinadores que realizaron la ecografia desconocian los resultados del ENG. Posteriormente, se calcularon los puntos de corte mediante curvas ROC para cada una de las mediciones (AST-M y R-MA) y se analizo su validez diagnostica. Resultados. Con un punto de corte de 9,15 mm2, la medicion AST-M obtuvo una sensibilidad del 75,81%, una especificidad del 74,29%, una ratio de probabilidad positiva de 2,95 y una ratio de probabilidad negativa de 0,33. Para la medicion R-MA y un punto de corte de 1,56, los valores de sensibilidad, especificidad y ratios de probabilidad positiva y negativa fueron 70,97%, 71,43%, 2,48 y 0,4, respectivamente. Conclusion. Tanto el AST-M como la R-MA parecen ser medidas utiles en el diagnostico del STC tomando como prueba de referencia el ENG.

  18. The Light at the End of the Carpal Tunnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusack, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of large public libraries on incidents of muscular-skeletal injuries associated with use of computer keyboards in libraries. Personnel policies and practices that can minimize injuries are outlined. Sidebars describe the importance of adjustable workstations, steps that employees can take to minimize injuries, and…

  19. A Start Toward Micronucleus-Based Decompression Models; Altitude Decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Liew, H. D.; Conkin, Johnny

    2007-01-01

    Do gaseous micronuclei trigger the formation of bubbles in decompression sickness (DCS)? Most previous instructions for DCS prevention have been oriented toward supersaturated gas in tissue. We are developing a mathematical model that is oriented toward the expected behavior of micronuclei. The issue is simplified in altitude decompressions because the aviator or astronaut is exposed only to decompression, whereas in diving there is a compression before the decompression. The model deals with four variables: duration of breathing of 100% oxygen before going to altitude (O2 prebreathing), altitude of the exposure, exposure duration, and rate of ascent. Assumptions: a) there is a population of micronuclei of various sizes having a range of characteristics, b) micronuclei are stable until they grow to a certain critical nucleation radius, c) it takes time for gas to diffuse in or out of micronuclei, and d) all other variables being equal, growth of micronuclei upon decompression is more rapid at high altitude because of the rarified gas in the micronuclei. To estimate parameters, we use a dataset of 4,756 men in altitude chambers exposed to various combinations of the model s variables. The model predicts occurrence of DCS symptoms quite well. It is notable that both the altitude chamber data and the model show little effect of O2 prebreathing until it lasts more than 60 minutes; this is in contrast to a conventional idea that the benefit of prebreathing is directly due to exponential washout of tissue nitrogen. The delay in response to O2 prebreathing can be interpreted as time required for outward diffusion of nitrogen; when the micronuclei become small enough, they are disabled, either by crushing or because they cannot expand to a critical nucleation size when the subject ascends to altitude.

  20. Morphometrical variations of the carpal bones in thoroughbreds and ponies.

    PubMed

    Abdunnabi, A H; Ahmed, Y A; Philip, C J; Davies, H M S

    2012-04-01

    There is scant morphological data for equine carpal bones despite the frequent pathology in Thoroughbreds (TB). This study aimed to identify morphological and morphometrical variations and similarities in carpal bones between and within TB and Ponies (Po). Carpal bones from nine TB and 13 Po were prepared by boiling and drying. Lateromedial width, dorsopalmar depth, proximodistal height, relative density and volume of each bone were measured. Normalized measurements of the radial (Cr) and third (C3) carpal bones were significantly different in all dimensions, and there were significant variations in relative sizes of articular facets of the ulnar (Cu), C3 and fourth (C4) carpal bones between the groups. Bilaterally, the proportionate volume of the intermediate carpal bone (Ci) was significantly greater in Po while that of Cu and C4 were significantly greater in TB. Relative density of most bones was greater in Po. The palmar tuberosity of the proximal surface of Ci and palmar tubercle on the palmar surface of Cu were more prominent and relatively larger in TB. In the second carpal bone (C2), the distal extent of the proximal articular surface on the palmar surface was greater in Po. The inconsistent first carpal bone (C1) was relatively larger in Po. Morphometrical similarities and differences in carpal bones between TB and Po indicate potential effects of selection for body size or fast exercise.

  1. Carpal arthrodesis in cats. Long-term functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Calvo, I; Farrell, M; Chase, D; Aisa, J; Rayward, R; Carmichael, S

    2009-01-01

    Pancarpal and partial carpal arthrodesis were performed in 22 carpi (20 cats) using various surgical methods. Short and long-term outcomes were assessed using a retrospective review of the case notes and via owner questionnaires. Carpal arthrodesis was associated with complications that did not affect the functional outcome, and in most cases, did not necessitate major revision surgery. Following arthrodesis, the cats did not jump as high, and showed a reduction in their willingness to jump and climb. Based on our results, carpal arthrodesis is a suitable salvage surgery to treat severe carpal injuries in the cat.

  2. Spaceflight Decompression Sickness Contingency Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervay, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the Decompression Sickness (DCS) Contingency Plan for manned spaceflight is shown. The topics include: 1) Approach; 2) DCS Contingency Plan Overview; 3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Cuff Classifications; 4) On-orbit Treatment Philosophy; 5) Long Form Malfunction Procedure (MAL); 6) Medical Checklist; 7) Flight Rules; 8) Crew Training; 9) Flight Surgeon / Biomedical Engineer (BME) Training; and 10) DCS Emergency Landing Site.

  3. Cardiopulmonary Changes with Moderate Decompression in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R.; Little, T.; Doursout, M.-F.; Butler, B. D.; Chelly, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were compressed to 616 kPa for 120 min then decompressed at 38 kPa/min to assess the cardiovascular and pulmonary responses to moderate decompression stress. In one series of experiments the rats were chronically instrumented with Doppler ultrasonic probes for simultaneous measurement of blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, left and right ventricular wall thickening fraction, and venous bubble detection. Data were collected at base-line, throughout the compression/decompression protocol, and for 120 min post decompression. In a second series of experiments the pulmonary responses to the decompression protocol were evaluated in non-instrumented rats. Analyses included blood gases, pleural and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and hemoglobin concentration, pulmonary edema, BAL and lung tissue phospholipids, lung compliance, and cell counts. Venous bubbles were directly observed in 90% of the rats where immediate post-decompression autopsy was performed and in 37% using implanted Doppler monitors. Cardiac output, stroke volume, and right ventricular wall thickening fractions were significantly decreased post decompression, whereas systemic vascular resistance was increased suggesting a decrease in venous return. BAL Hb and total protein levels were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression, pleural and plasma levels were unchanged. BAL white blood cells and neutrophil percentages were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression and pulmonary edema was detected. Venous bubbles produced with moderate decompression profiles give detectable cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in the rat.

  4. European EVA decompression sickness risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Lorenz; Wenzel, Jürgen; Skoog, A. I.; Luck, S.; Svensson, Bengt

    For the first manned flight of Hermes there will be a capability of performing EVA. The European EVA Space Suit will be an anthropomorphic system with an internal pressure of 500 hPa of pure oxygen. The pressure reduction from the Hermes cabin pressure of 1013 hPa will induce a risk for Decompression Sickness (DCS) for the EVA crewmember if no adequate protective procedures are implemented. Specific decompression procedures have to be developed. From a critical review of the literature and by using knowledge gained from research conducted in the past in the fields of diving and aerospace medicine safe protective procedures are proposed for the European EVA scenario. An R factor of 1.2 and a tissue half-time ( t1/2) of 360 minutes in a single-tissue model have been identified as appropriate operational values. On the basis of an acceptable risk level of approximately 1%, oxygen prebreathing times are proposed for (a) direct pressure reduction from 1013 hPa to a suit pressure of 500 hPa, and (b) staged decompression using a 700 hPa intermediate stage in the spacecraft cabin. In addition, factors which influence individual susceptibility to DCS are identified. Recommendations are also given in the areas of crew selection and medical monitoring requirements together with therapeutic measures that can be implemented in the Hermes scenario. A method for demonstration of the validity of proposed risks and procedures is proposed.

  5. Preoperative factors and outcome after lunate decompression for Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Condit, D P; Idler, R S; Fischer, T J; Hastings, H

    1993-07-01

    Preoperative factors and outcome were studied after lunate decompression for Kienböck's disease. Twenty-three patients treated with radial shortening or scaphoid-trapezium-trapezoid fusion were evaluated. The mean follow-up was 59 months. Neither good nor excellent outcomes were found with either lunate-preserving procedure when the preoperative radioscaphoid angle was greater than 60 degrees. Outcomes in the radial shortening osteotomy group were superior to those in the group treated with scaphoid-trapezium-trapezoid fusion. Lunate collapse was not prevented by either treatment method. Lunate index, carpal height, and staging did not correlate with outcome. Measurement of radioscaphoid angle provides predictive information regarding the outcome of stage III (Decoulx/Lichtman) Kienböck's disease treated with radial shortening or scaphoid-trapezium-trapezoid fusion.

  6. Subatmospheric Decompression Sickness in Man,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-04-01

    ashtray instead of an adjacent cup. spilling tea when pouring it owing to tremor and he lay down on his bed. He felt very thirsty. When he went to...duties to perform, he went back to the mess, ate his tea at about 4 p. m. and retired to bed, where he had severe nau- sea. frontal headache, pain...1907. Hall, A. L., 1955A. ’Some effects of explosive decompression on albino rats: preliminary studies’. U.S. Navy School Aviat. Med., Res. Proj. NM

  7. Thalmann Algorithm Decompression Table Generation Software Design Document

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Decompression Table Generation Software Design Document Navy Experimental Diving Unit Author...TITLE (Include Security Classification) (U) THALMANN ALGORITHM DECOMPRESSION TABLE GENERATION SOFTWARE DESIGN DOCUMENT 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...1 2. Decompression Table Generator (TBLP7R

  8. Graphics processing unit-assisted lossless decompression

    DOEpatents

    Loughry, Thomas A.

    2016-04-12

    Systems and methods for decompressing compressed data that has been compressed by way of a lossless compression algorithm are described herein. In a general embodiment, a graphics processing unit (GPU) is programmed to receive compressed data packets and decompress such packets in parallel. The compressed data packets are compressed representations of an image, and the lossless compression algorithm is a Rice compression algorithm.

  9. SEROTONIN AND OTHER VASOACTIVE AGENTS IN EXPERIMENTAL DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SEROTONIN, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), (*VASOACTIVE AGENTS, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), RATS, EXERCISE(PHYSIOLOGY), DOSAGE, CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS, BLOOD ANALYSIS, TOXICITY, BLOOD CIRCULATION, MORTALITY RATES , CANADA

  10. Pressureless Orbital Decompression for Myopic Proptosis.

    PubMed

    Rajak, Saul N; McGovern, Richard A; Selva, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Orbital decompression surgery increases the orbital volume. It has rarely been used for proptosis of the large highly myopic globe. However, external decompression surgery carries significant risks because of the large thin-walled globe. The authors report the first use of endoscopic medial wall orbital decompression surgery in this setting to obviate the risk of globe pressure.Endoscopic medial wall decompression brought about a 4 mm reduction of proptosis, correction of exotropia and elimination of retrobulbar ache providing good symmetry with the fellow eye.Endoscopic medial wall orbital decompression can be very effective for correcting the proptosis of high myopia and minimizes the risk of damage to the very large, thin-walled globe.

  11. Xenon Blocks Neuronal Injury Associated with Decompression.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; David, Hélène N; Vallée, Nicolas; Meckler, Cedric; Demaistre, Sebastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2015-10-15

    Despite state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, about 30% of patients suffering neurologic decompression sickness (DCS) exhibit incomplete recovery. Since the mechanisms of neurologic DCS involve ischemic processes which result in excitotoxicity, it is likely that HBO in combination with an anti-excitotoxic treatment would improve the outcome in patients being treated for DCS. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of the noble gas xenon in an ex vivo model of neurologic DCS. Xenon has been shown to provide neuroprotection in multiple models of acute ischemic insults. Fast decompression compared to slow decompression induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a well-known marker of sub-lethal cell injury. Post-decompression administration of xenon blocked the increase in LDH release induced by fast decompression. These data suggest that xenon could be an efficient additional treatment to HBO for the treatment of neurologic DCS.

  12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Symptomatic Carpal Bossing

    PubMed Central

    Radmer, Sebastian; Fresow, Robert; Tabibzada, Arash Mehdi; Kamusella, Peter; Scheer, Fabian; Andresen, Reimer

    2015-01-01

    Context Carpal bossing is an osseous formation at the dorsal portion of the quadrangular joint, which rarely becomes symptomatic. However, in some patients it causes pain, restricted mobility and can lead to complications like tendon rupture, inflammatory and degenerative joint disease. Aim In this article, we present our experiences with this rare disorder in order to improve diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings. Settings Design This is a multicenter and interdisciplinary observation made by orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists in the years 2010 to 2015. Retrospective observational study. The follow up period was 2 years. Materials and Methods In the observed time period, eight patients were diagnosed with symptomatic carpal bossing. Symptoms were pain at palmar flexion and limited mobility of the wrist in combination with a palpable protuberance over the quadrangular joint. All patients underwent X-ray, CT and MRI examinations. A conservative treatment strategy was initiated for 6 weeks in all patients, followed by a wedge resection when symptoms were persisting and disabling. Results After the conservative treatment schedule, five patients were asymptomatic. Three patients had persisting pain and were thus recommended for surgery. In the postoperative course, two patients were asymptomatic. One patient developed a type 1 complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the first postoperative year, which was successfully treated with pain-adapted physiotherapy, pharmacotherapy with analgesics and calcitonin, and a triple CT-guided thoracic sympathetic nerve blockade. Conclusion Carpal bossing is a mostly asymptomatic entity, which in our experience gets symptomatic due to direct trauma or repetitive stress, especially in competitive racket sports players. It can be diagnosed by thorough clinical examination and multimodal diagnostic imaging. Conservative treatment comprises an excellent prognosis, however surgery, either wedge resection or arthrodesis, must be

  13. The carpal stretch test at the rheumatoid wrist.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Matsusita, Kazuhiko; Arai, Takeshi; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic changes of the carpus for rheumatoid wrists in patients who underwent the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure by examining the clinical results and comparing pre- and postoperative radiographic measurements. We studied 43 wrists in 37 patients who showed vertical laxity in the radiocarpal and midcarpal joint on preoperative carpal stretch test. Pain was improved in all patients and the forearm rotation angles of the wrist were significantly improved after the operation. The carpal collapse ratio was significantly reduced after the operation. The carpal collapse reduction rate was significantly greater in the group with than that in the group without midcarpal joint vertical laxity on the carpal stretch test. Although the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure was not sufficiently effective in preventing carpal collapse, it did have a protective effect against ulnar carpal shift. The results of our study showed that vertical laxity of the midcarpal joint was the risk factor of the carpal collapse after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

  14. [Classification of altitude decompression sickness].

    PubMed

    Katuntsev, V P

    2000-01-01

    The article is devoted to the discussion of principles of and approaches to classification of altitude decompression sickness (DCS), one of the most methodically formidable aspects of the problem. Based on his own multiyear experience in altitude DCS investigations and critical review of literature, the author reasons his concept of clinical classification of altitude DCS. The author's concept places emphasis on obligatory consideration of three stages in DCS development: A--pre-disease (the premorbid syndrome), B--uncomplicated (light) and C--complicated (severe) forms. The objective sign of the premorbid state is "silent" gas bubbles in organism detectable by ultrasonic devices. Signs of uncomplicated altitude DCS are musculoarticular pains, local edema and skin itching. Complicated altitude DCS is diagnosed by systemic (respiratory, neurological and cardiovascular) disorders.

  15. libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

  16. In vivo tissue interaction between the transverse carpal ligament and finger flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Gordon, Joshua L; Marquardt, Tamara L; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-10-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) is a component of the flexor pulley system of the wrist, keeping the flexor tendons in place by resisting their volar displacement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo biomechanical interaction between the TCL and flexor tendons in response to tendon tensioning with the wrist at various postures. In eight healthy subjects, the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus tendons were tensioned by isometrically applying loads (5, 10, and 15N) to the index finger while the wrist posture was at 20° extension, neutral, 20° flexion, and 40° flexion. The TCL and flexor tendons were imaged at the distal carpal tunnel cross section using ultrasound. The volar-dorsal positions of the tendons, TCL arch height, and TCL-tendon distances were calculated. With increasing wrist flexion, the flexor tendons moved volarly, the TCL arch height increased, and the TCL-tendon distances decreased, indicating that the flexor tendons contacted the TCL and pushed it volarly. The TCL-tendon interaction was amplified by the combination of finger loading and wrist flexion. This study provides in vivo evidence of the biomechanical interaction between the TCL and flexor tendons. Repetitive TCL-tendon interactions may implicate the interacting tissues and the median nerve resulting in tissue maladaptation and nerve compression.

  17. The role of proprioception and neuromuscular stability in carpal instabilities.

    PubMed

    Hagert, E; Lluch, A; Rein, S

    2016-01-01

    Carpal stability has traditionally been defined as dependent on the articular congruity of joint surfaces, the static stability maintained by intact ligaments, and the dynamic stability caused by muscle contractions resulting in a compression of joint surfaces. In the past decade, a fourth factor in carpal stability has been proposed, involving the neuromuscular and proprioceptive control of joints. The proprioception of the wrist originates from afferent signals elicited by sensory end organs (mechanoreceptors) in ligaments and joint capsules that elicit spinal reflexes for immediate joint stability, as well as higher order neuromuscular influx to the cerebellum and sensorimotor cortices for planning and executing joint control. The aim of this review is to provide an understanding of the role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in carpal instabilities by delineating the sensory innervation and the neuromuscular control of the carpus, as well as descriptions of clinical applications of proprioception in carpal instabilities.

  18. Auto-decompression system for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, T.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes a valve control device for an engine having a combustion chamber, a valve controlling communication with the chamber, a camshaft rotatably mounted in the engine, a valve motion cam fixed to the camshaft for rotation therewith, and a valve actuation mechanism including a cam follower engageable with the valve motion cam, the valve control device comprising: a decompression cam carried by the camshaft axially adjacent the valve motion cam, the decompression cam including a base circle portion defining an outer peripheral surface smaller in radial extent than the outer peripheral surface of the valve motion cam and having an inner bore to loosely encircle the camshaft; means for adjusting the position of the decomposition cam with respect to the camshaft between two locations including a first location on which the outer peripheral surface of the decompression cam extends radially outwardly from the axis of the camshaft to an extent greater than that of the valve motion cam to engage the cam follower for decompression operation of the valve, and a second location at which the outer peripheral surface of the decompression cam extends radially outwardly from the axis of the camshaft to an extent less than that of the valve motion cam whereby the valve motion cam engages the cam follower for normal operation of the valve; and means responsive to the rotational speed of the camshaft for automatically moving the decompression cam between the first and second locations.

  19. Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Masternick, Eric B

    2006-07-01

    Compression of the deep peroneal nerve is commonly referred to as anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. Although rare, this syndrome remains poorly diagnosed. The syndrome is characterized by pain, weakness, and sensory changes of the foot and ankle. Non-operative measures should be attempted to reduce or remove the external compression along the anterior aspect of the foot and ankle. Other options include shoe modifications, cortisone injections,and physical therapy. If conservative management fails to relieve the symptoms, surgical decompression of the entrapped nerve can be performed. The deep peroneal nerve is released from compressive forces in the entrapment site. This can be performed at the more proximal level at the extensor retinaculum or more distally at the level of the tarsal metatarsal site.

  20. Acclimation to decompression sickness in rats.

    PubMed

    Montcalm-Smith, E A; McCarron, R M; Porter, W R; Lillo, R S; Thomas, J T; Auker, C R

    2010-03-01

    Protection against decompression sickness (DCS) by acclimation to hyperbaric decompression has been hypothesized but never proven. We exposed rats to acclimation dives followed by a stressful "test" dive to determine whether acclimation occurred. Experiments were divided into two phases. Phase 1 rats were exposed to daily acclimation dives of hyperbaric air for 30 min followed by rapid decompression on one of the following regimens: 70 ft of seawater (fsw) for 9 days (L70), 70 fsw for 4 days (S70), 40 fsw for 9 days (L40), 40 fsw for 4 days (S40), or unpressurized sham exposure for 9 days (Control). On the day following the last exposure, all were subjected to a "test" dive (175 fsw, 60 min, rapid decompression). Both L70 and S70 rats had significantly lower incidences of DCS than Control rats (36% and 41% vs. 62%, respectively). DCS incidences for the other regimens were lower than in Control rats but without statistical significance. Phase 2 used the most protective regimen from phase 1 (L70); rats were exposed to L70 or a similar regimen with a less stressful staged decompression. Another group was exposed to a single acclimation dive (70 fsw/30 min) on the day before the test dive. We observed a nonsignificant trend for the rapidly decompressed L70 dives to be more protective than staged decompression dives (44% vs. 51% DCS incidence). The single acclimation dive regimen did not provide protection. We conclude that protection against DCS can be attained with acclimating exposures that do not themselves cause DCS. The deeper acclimation dive regimens (70 fsw) provided the most protection.

  1. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  2. Simple transposition technique for microvascular decompression using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene "belt": technical note.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuichiro; Uchida, Masashi; Onodera, Hidetaka; Hiramoto, Jun; Yoshida, Yasuyuki

    2014-06-17

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a standard surgical procedure for treating vascular compression syndromes. There are two basic ways to perform MVD: interposition using a prosthesis and transposition. With the transposition technique, adhesions and granuloma around the decompression site are avoided, but the required operation is more complex than that for the interposition method. We describe a simple, quick MVD transposition procedure that uses a small "belt" cut from a sheet of 0.3-mm-thick expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane. The belt has a hole at the wide end and the other end tapered to a point. The belt is encircled around offending vessels by inserting the pointed end into the hole. The pointed end is then passed through a dural tunnel over the posterior wall of the petrous bone and is tied two or three times. This method avoids the risks involved in handling a surgical needle close to the cranial nerves and vessels.

  3. Vascularized bone grafts for the treatment of carpal bone pathology.

    PubMed

    Derby, Brian M; Murray, Peter M; Shin, Alexander Y; Bueno, Reuben A; Mathoulin, Christophe L; Ade, Tim; Neumeister, Michael W

    2013-03-01

    Primary bone healing fails to occur in 5-15 % of scaphoid bones that undergo fracture fixation. Untreated, occult fractures result in nonunion up to 12 % of the time. Conventional bone grafting is the accepted management in the treatment algorithm of scaphoid nonunion if the proximal pole is vascularized. Osteonecrosis of the proximal scaphoid pole intuitively suggests a need for transfer of the vascularized bone to the nonunion site. Scaphoid nonunion treatment aims to prevent biological and mechanical subsidence of the involved bone, destabilization of the carpus, and early degenerative changes associated with scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse. Pedicled distal radius and free vascularized bone grafts (VBGs) offer hand surgeons an alternative treatment option in the management of carpal bone nonunion. VBGs are also indicated in the treatment of avascular necrosis of the scaphoid (Preiser's disease), lunate (Kienböck's disease), and capitate. Relative contraindications to pedicled dorsal radius vascularized bone grafting include humpback deformity, carpal instability, or collapse. The free medial femoral condyle bone graft has offered a novel treatment option for the humpback deformity to restore geometry of the carpus, otherwise not provided by pedicled grafts. In general, VBGs are contraindicated in the setting of a carpal bone without an intact cartilaginous shell, in advanced carpal collapse with degenerative changes, and in attempts to salvage small or collapsed bone fragments. Wrist salvage procedures are generally accepted as the more definitive treatment option under such circumstances. This manuscript offers a current review of the techniques and outcomes of VBGs to the carpal bones.

  4. Evaluation of Associated Carpal Bone Fractures in Distal Radial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Youn Moo; Kim, Sang Bum; Yi, Jin Woong; Park, Cheol Yong; Yoon, Jeong Yong; Kim, Doo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and distribution of associated carpal bone fractures (CBFs) in distal radial fractures (DRFs). Methods Three hundred and thirteen patients who underwent surgical treatment for DRFs between March 2007 and January 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. In this study, 223 patients who had preoperative computed tomography (CT) were included. We investigated the frequency and distribution of associated CBFs on CT scans. The relationship between the frequency of associated CBFs and patient factors such as age, gender, body mass index, and the mechanism of injury was assessed. Results CBFs were complicated in 46 of 223 DRFs (20.9%). The distribution of CBFs was 23 cases in the triquetrum, 16 in the lunate, 12 in the scaphoid, five in the hamate, and four in the pisiform. Among the 46 cases, a fracture of one carpal bone occurred in 36 cases, two in seven cases, three in two cases, and four in one case. In 10 of the 46 cases, associated CBFs occurred in more than two carpal bones. No significant differences were observed for age, sex, body mass index, or the mechanism of injury between patients with DRFs and CBFs and those without CBFs. Conclusions Because CBFs that mainly occur in the proximal carpal row are complicated in DRFs at a relatively high frequency, assessment of carpal bones using CT scans is beneficial. PMID:23730472

  5. The U.S. Navy decompression computer.

    PubMed

    Butler, F K; Southerland, D

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Navy has recently approved the Cochran NAVY decompression computer (DC) for use in Naval Special Warfare diving. This action represents the first approval of a diver-worn DC for use in the U.S. Navy. This paper reviews the development and testing of both the decompression algorithm and the hardware chosen for the Navy's DC. The decompression software in the Cochran NAVY is the VVAL 18 algorithm developed at the Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) by Captain Ed Thalmann. A discussion of the relative conservatism of the VVAL18 algorithm in comparison to the U.S. Navy Standard Air Tables and the basis for the differences between the two is provided. The initial guidelines establishing DC diving practice for the Navy SEAL community are outlined as are plans for future research efforts in U.S. Navy DC diving.

  6. Decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, E.; Malbrain, M.; Nesbitt, I.; Cohen, J.; Kaloiani, V.; Ivatury, R.; Mone, M.; Debergh, D.; Björck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of decompressive laparotomy on outcomes in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome has been poorly investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to describe the effect of decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome on organ function and outcomes. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients who underwent decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome. The primary endpoints were 28‐day and 1‐year all‐cause mortality. Changes in intra‐abdominal pressure (IAP) and organ function, and laparotomy‐related morbidity were secondary endpoints. Results Thirty‐three patients were included in the study (20 men). Twenty‐seven patients were surgical admissions treated for abdominal conditions. The median (i.q.r.) Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 26 (20–32). Median IAP was 23 (21–27) mmHg before decompressive laparotomy, decreasing to 12 (9–15), 13 (8–17), 12 (9–15) and 12 (9–14) mmHg after 2, 6, 24 and 72 h. Decompressive laparotomy significantly improved oxygenation and urinary output. Survivors showed improvement in organ function scores, but non‐survivors did not. Fourteen complications related to the procedure developed in eight of the 33 patients. The abdomen could be closed primarily in 18 patients. The overall 28‐day mortality rate was 36 per cent (12 of 33), which increased to 55 per cent (18 patients) at 1 year. Non‐survivors were no different from survivors, except that they tended to be older and on mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Decompressive laparotomy reduced IAP and had an immediate effect on organ function. It should be considered in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome. PMID:26891380

  7. Hypobaric decompression prebreathe requirements and breathing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    To reduce incidence of decompression sickness (DCS), prebreathing 100 percent oxygen to denitrogenate is required prior to hypobaric decompressions from a sea level pressure breathing environment to pressures lower than 350 mm Hg (20,000 ft; 6.8 psia). The tissue ratio (TR) of such exposures equals or exceeds 1.7; TR being the tissue nitrogen pressure prior to decompression divided by the total pressure after decompression (((0.781)(14.697))/6.758). Designing pressure suits capable of greater pressure differentials, lower TR's, and procedures which limit the potential for DCS occurrence would enhance operational efficiency. The current 10.2 psia stage decompression prior to extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Shuttle in the 100 percent oxygen, 4.3 psia suit, results in a TR of 1.65 and has proven to be relatively free of DCS. Our recent study of zero-prebreathe decompressions to 6.8 psia breathing 100 percent oxygen (TR = 1.66) also resulted in no DCS (N = 10). The level of severe, Spencer Grades 3 or 4, venous gas emboli (VGE) increased from 0 percent at 9.5 psia to 40 percent at 6.8 psia yielding a Probit curve of VGE risk for the 51 male subjects who participated in these recent studies. Earlier, analogous decompressions using a 50 percent oxygen, 50 percent nitrogen breathing mixture resulted in one case of DCS and significantly higher levels of severe VGE, e.g., at 7.8 psia, the mixed gas breathing environment resulted in a 56 percent incidence of severe VGE versus 10 percent with use of 100 percent oxygen. The report of this study recommended use of 100 percent oxygen during zero-prebreathe exposure to 6.8 psia if such a suit could be developed. For future, long-term missions, we suggest study of the effects of decompression over several days to a breathing environment of 150 mmHg O2 and approximately 52 mmHg He as a means of eliminating DCS and VGE hazards during subsequent excursions. Once physiologically adapted to a 4 psia vehicle, base, or space

  8. Evidence Report: Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Norcross, Jason R.; Wessel, James H. III; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Klein, Jill S.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS) is identified by the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) as a recognized risk to human health and performance in space, as defined in the HRP Program Requirements Document (PRD). This Evidence Report provides a summary of the evidence that has been used to identify and characterize this risk. Given that tissue inert gas partial pressure is often greater than ambient pressure during phases of a mission, primarily during extravehicular activity (EVA), there is a possibility that decompression sickness may occur.

  9. Orbital decompression for severe dysthyroid eye disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fells, P

    1987-01-01

    Current methods of medical treatment of this difficult condition are briefly reviewed, with comments on the generally unsatisfactory response. Attention is therefore directed to surgical methods and a short history given of the various routes used for orbital decompression. The author's own results of transantral, and more recently ethmoidal, decompression are given, with a detailed description of the technique for the latter approach. An interesting frequent consequence of postoperative A pattern to the ocular movements is discussed in the light of Koornneef's concept of orbital fascial anatomy, and suggestions are made for its avoidance. Images PMID:3828262

  10. A Pottery Electric Kiln Using Decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Minoru; Minamide, Akiyuki; Takemata, Kazuya

    This paper presents a novel type electric kiln which fires the pottery using the decompression. The electric kiln is suitable for the environment and the energy saving as the pottery furnace. This paper described the baking principle and the baking characteristic of the novel type electric kiln.

  11. Decompression Sickness Risk Versus Time and Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    M, Wiegman J, Pilmanis exposure at 22,500 ft (Fig. 1-2) should raise AA. Prebreathe enhancement with concern since that level of decompression is...Andrew A. P11manis in a research phyniologist 2. Fischer MO, Wiegman JF, McLean SA, Olson Andrew A. ihi ish resiarch poycioo SRM. Evaluation of four

  12. Ethmoidectomy decompression for the treatment of Graves' optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, J J; Freeman, J L; Eplett, C J; Fliss, D M; Avram, D R

    1992-10-01

    When orbital decompression becomes necessary in Graves' optic neuropathy, medial wall decompression is a necessary component of the decompression procedure. The ethmoidectomy approach allows more direct visualization of the posterior ethmoids and sphenoids to effect maximum decompression. This is particularly important in cases in which computed tomography shows the medial rectus muscle to be enlarged posteriorly in the orbit. The procedure provides excellent visualization of the medial rectus. As with any medial wall decompression procedure, postoperative restriction of horizontal motility is a frequent complication, often necessitating more than one subsequent operation. The authors describe their experience with the procedure in 25 patients with Graves' optic neuropathy.

  13. Tarsal tunnel syndrome in a patient on long-term peritoneal dialysis: case report.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ozgür; Calişaneller, Tarkan; Sönmez, Erkin; Altinörs, Nur

    2007-10-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is defined as the entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel of the ankle. The etiologies of tarsal tunnel syndrome are mainly the presence of a ganglion, osseous prominence with tarsal bone coalition, trauma, varicose veins, neurinoma, hypertrophy of the flexor retinaculum, or systemic disease (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis). However, no specific cause can be identified in some cases. Patients with chronic renal failure tend to develop peripheral nerve entrapment and carpal tunnel syndrome is the best-known peripheral entrapment neuropathy among them. Contrary to carpal tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome is observed less frequently in chronic renal failure patients. The common presenting symptoms of TTS are paresthesias and/or pain in the plantar side of the foot. Motor symptoms are rarely detected. Diagnosis is made primarily by electroneuromyographic studies and physical examination. Surgery is the treatment of choice and the outcome is generally favourable. In this report, we present a patient with tarsal tunnel syndrome complicating peritoneal dialysis.

  14. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Altitude Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION - Exercise accelerates inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but may also promote bubble formation and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of exercise are likely critical to the net effect. The NASA Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise preceding a 4.3 psi exposure in non-ambulatory subjects (a microgravity analog) to produce two protocols now used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity (CEVIS and ISLE). Additional work is required to investigate whether exercise normal to 1 G environments increases the risk of DCS over microgravity simulation. METHODS - The CEVIS protocol was replicated with one exception. Our subjects completed controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining non-ambulatory throughout. Decompression stress was graded with aural Doppler (Spencer 0-IV scale). Two-dimensional echocardiographic imaging was used to look for left heart gas emboli (the presence of which prompted test termination). Venous blood was collected at three points to correlate Doppler measures of decompression stress with microparticle (cell fragment) accumulation. Fisher Exact Tests compared test and control groups. Trial suspension would occur when DCS risk >15% or grade IV venous gas emboli (VGE) risk >20% (at 70% confidence). RESULTS - Eleven person-trials were completed (9 male, 2 female) when DCS prompted suspension. DCS was greater than in CEVIS trials (3/11 [27%] vs. 0/45 [0%], respectively, p=0.03). Statistical significance was not reached for peak grade IV VGE (2/11 [18%] vs. 3/45 [7%], p=0.149) or cumulative grade IV VGE observations per subject-trial (8/128 [6%] vs. 26/630 [4%], p=0.151). Microparticle data were collected for 5/11 trials (3 with DCS outcomes), with widely varying patterns that could not be resolved statistically

  15. Treatment of hemimasticatory spasm with microvascular decompression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Nan; Dou, Ning-Ning; Zhou, Qiu-Meng; Jiao, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Zhong, Jun; Li, Shi-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a rare disorder characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. As the ideology and pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear, there has been no treatment that could give rise to a good outcome so far. Herein, we tried to use surgical management to cure the disease. Six patients with the disease were included in this study. These patients underwent microvascular decompression of the motor fibers of the trigeminal root. After the operation, all faces of the patients felt relaxed at varied degrees, except for 1 patient. Our study showed that microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve could lead to a better outcome. However, a control study with a large sample is needed before this technique is widely used.

  16. Carpal bone movements in gripping action of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Sasaki, M; Hayashi, Y; Koie, H; Yamaya, Y; Kimura, J

    2001-02-01

    The movement of the carpal bones in gripping was clarified in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by means of macroscopic anatomy, computed tomography (CT) and related 3-dimensional (3-D) volume rendering techniques. In the gripping action, 3-D CT images demonstrated that the radial and 4th carpal bones largely rotate or flex to the radial and ulnar sides respectively. This indicates that these carpal bones on both sides enable the panda to flex the palm from the forearm and to grasp objects by the manipulation mechanism that includes the radial sesamoid. In the macroscopic observations, we found that the smooth articulation surfaces are enlarged between the radial carpal and the radius on the radial side, and between the 4th and ulnar carpals on the ulnar side. The panda skilfully grasps using a double pincer-like apparatus with the huge radial sesamoid and accessory carpal.

  17. Reversal of dysthyroid optic neuropathy following orbital fat decompression

    PubMed Central

    Kazim, M.; Trokel, S.; Acaroglu, G.; Elliott, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To document the successful treatment of five patients with dysthyroid optic neuropathy by orbital fat decompression instead of orbital bone decompression after failed medical therapy.
METHODS—Eight orbits of five patients with dysthyroid optic neuropathy were selected for orbital fat decompression as an alternative to bone removal decompression. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids and/or orbital radiotherapy was either unsuccessful or contraindicated in each case. All patients satisfied clinical indications for orbital bone decompression to reverse the optic neuropathy. High resolution computerised tomographic (CT) scans were performed in all cases and in each case showed signs of enlargement of the orbital fat compartment. As an alternative to bone decompression, orbital fat decompression was performed on all eight orbits.
RESULTS—Orbital fat decompression was performed on five patients (eight orbits) with optic neuropathy. Optic neuropathy was reversed in all cases. There were no cases of postoperative diplopia, enophthalmos, globe ptosis, or anaesthesia. All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year.
CONCLUSIONS—In a subset of patients with an enlarged orbital fat compartment and in whom extraocular muscle enlargement is not the solitary cause of optic neuropathy, fat decompression is a surgical alternative to bony decompression.

 PMID:10837384

  18. Endothelial dysfunction correlates with decompression bubbles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongxin; Ning, Xiaowei; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that decompression led to endothelial dysfunction with controversial results. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between endothelial dysfunction, bubble formation and decompression rate. Rats were subjected to simulated air dives with one of four decompression rates: one slow and three rapid. Bubble formation was detected ultrasonically following decompression for two hours, before measurement of endothelial related indices. Bubbles were found in only rapid-decompressed rats and the amount correlated with decompression rate with significant variability. Serum levels of ET-1, 6-keto-PGF1α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MDA, lung Wet/Dry weight ratio and histological score increased, serum NO decreased following rapid decompression. Endothelial-dependent vasodilatation to Ach was reduced in pulmonary artery rings among rapid-decompressed rats. Near all the above changes correlated significantly with bubble amounts. The results suggest that bubbles may be the causative agent of decompression–induced endothelial damage and bubble amount is of clinical significance in assessing decompression stress. Furthermore, serum levels of ET-1 and MDA may serve as sensitive biomarkers with the capacity to indicate endothelial dysfunction and decompression stress following dives. PMID:27615160

  19. Recreational technical diving part 2: decompression from deep technical dives.

    PubMed

    Doolette, David J; Mitchell, Simon J

    2013-06-01

    Technical divers perform deep, mixed-gas 'bounce' dives, which are inherently inefficient because even a short duration at the target depth results in lengthy decompression. Technical divers use decompression schedules generated from modified versions of decompression algorithms originally developed for other types of diving. Many modifications ostensibly produce shorter and/or safer decompression, but have generally been driven by anecdote. Scientific evidence relevant to many of these modifications exists, but is often difficult to locate. This review assembles and examines scientific evidence relevant to technical diving decompression practice. There is a widespread belief that bubble algorithms, which redistribute decompression in favour of deeper decompression stops, are more efficient than traditional, shallow-stop, gas-content algorithms, but recent laboratory data support the opposite view. It seems unlikely that switches from helium- to nitrogen-based breathing gases during ascent will accelerate decompression from typical technical bounce dives. However, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of neurological decompression sickness (DCS) after dives conducted breathing only helium-oxygen than those with nitrogen-oxygen. There is also weak evidence suggesting less neurological DCS occurs if helium-oxygen breathing gas is switched to air during decompression than if no switch is made. On the other hand, helium-to-nitrogen breathing gas switches are implicated in the development of inner-ear DCS arising during decompression. Inner-ear DCS is difficult to predict, but strategies to minimize the risk include adequate initial decompression, delaying helium-to-nitrogen switches until relatively shallow, and the use of the maximum safe fraction of inspired oxygen during decompression.

  20. Complete dorsal dislocation of the carpal scaphoid with perilunate dorsal dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong Woo; Park, Jong Hoon; Suh, Dong Hun; Park, Jong Woong

    2016-01-01

    Complete dorsal dislocation of the carpal scaphoid combined with dorsal perilunate dislocation is an extremely rare carpal injury. We describe the case of a 23-year-old man who presented with a complete dorsal dislocation of the carpal scaphoid, combined with a perilunate dislocation. Surgical treatment was performed with open reduction and interosseus ligament repair. At 4 years follow up, the patient's wrist pain had completely resolved without limitations of wrist joint motion and without evidence of avascular necrosis of the carpal scaphoid. PMID:27512229

  1. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  2. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  3. The four medial ankle tunnels: a critical review of perceptions of tarsal tunnel syndrome and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A Lee

    2008-10-01

    The mechanisms of symptom production (other than a space-occupying lesion) and the diagnosis of tarsal tunnel syndrome remain controversial. To understand the diagnosis and treatment of tarsal tunnel syndrome in the presence of neuropathy, the known anatomy and pathophysiology related to the tarsal tunnel and the existing basic science and clinical evidence base related to these topics are reviewed. It is concluded that it is difficult to identify patients with tibial nerve compression at the ankle or foot region reliably with traditional electrodiagnostic techniques, even in the absence of neuropathy, and that the presence of a positive "Tinel" sign over the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel can identify this as a site of chronic nerve compression. For patients with tarsal tunnel syndrome and the comorbidity of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), it is concluded that a positive Tinel sign at the tarsal tunnel can predict a positive outcome for pain relief and restoration of sensation in 80% of the people who have decompression of the four medial ankle tunnels. With sensation improved, it is concluded that the natural history of DPN can be changed toward prevention of ulcers and amputation.

  4. Nonscaphoid carpal injuries – Incidence and associated injuries

    PubMed Central

    Raghupathi, Anantha Krishnan; Kumar, Prathap

    2014-01-01

    Aims Nonscaphoid fractures comprise approximately 40% of all carpal fractures. But the exact incidence of these rare injuries is still not clear. Missed or late diagnosis can lead to serious ligamentous disruption and permanent wrist dysfunction. Methods A retrospective analysis of wrist X-rays and CT scans were carried out for a period of 3 years. Incidence and associated injuries from this study was compared with literature. A total of 33 patients were included in our study. Both wrist X-rays and CT scans were reviewed individually by two authors. DASH scores were recorded for each patient. Results There were 26 male and 7 female patients. Out of 33 patients 13 (35%) were Triquetral fractures, 10 (27%) were Hamate fractures, 5 (14%) were Capitate fractures, 4 (11%) were Lunate fractures, 3 (8%) were Trapezium fractures and 2 (5%) were Pisiform fractures. There were no Trapezoid fractures in our study. Conclusion Incidence of nonscaphoid carpal fractures in our study is considerably higher when compared to literature. We propose that high index of suspicion should always be borne in mind when dealing with carpal fractures and detailed examination of wrist should be conducted even when X-rays does not show any obvious bony injuries. CT scans and other specialized images should be judiciously used in areas of suspicion for early diagnosis, to initiate immediate treatment, for early mobilisation and good functional recovery. PMID:25104893

  5. [Ethmoidectomy and orbital decompression in endocrine ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Richter, W C; Kley, W; Buschmann, W

    1984-07-01

    23 orbita decompression operations were performed in patients suffering from endocrine exophthalmos (Grave's disease) after normalization of thyroid metabolism and systemic corticoid therapy remained unsuccessful. We developed a modification of an external ethmoidectomy. The lamina of the middle nasal concha is carefully preserved, any opening to the nasal cavity is closed. Flap door incisions of the periorbita complete this procedure. Results are good and were followed up for a period of 30 months. The operation resulted in prompt restitution of normal eye position with fast normalization of visual acuity and field. Squint surgery was done in addition.

  6. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  1. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  2. Optic Nerve Decompression through a Supraorbital Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Luigi; Evins, Alexander I.; Berra, Luigi V.; Beer-Furlan, André; Stieg, Philip E.; Bernardo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective We propose a stepwise decompression of the optic nerve (ON) through a supraorbital minicraniotomy and describe the surgical anatomy of the ON as seen through this approach. We also discuss the clinical applications of this approach. Methods Supraorbital approaches were performed on 10 preserved cadaveric heads (20 sides). First, 3.5-cm skin incisions were made along the supraciliary arch from the medial third of the orbit and extended laterally. A 2 × 3-cm bone flap was fashioned and extradural dissections were completed. A 180-degree unroofing of the ON was achieved, and the length and width of the proximal and distal portions of the optic canal (OC) were measured. Results The supraorbital minicraniotomy allowed for identification of the anterior clinoid process and other surgical landmarks and adequate drilling of the roof of the OC with a comfortable working angle. A 25-degree contralateral head rotation facilitated visualization of the ON. Conclusion The supraorbital approach is a minimally invasive and cosmetically favorable alternative to more extended approaches with longer operative times used for the management of ON decompression in posttraumatic or compressive optic neuropathy from skull base pathologies extending into the OC. The relative ease of this approach provides a relatively short learning curve for developing neurosurgeons. PMID:26225308

  3. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths < 200 meters is estimated to have DCS risk < 6%. Saturation at raised DISSUB pressure markedly increases risk, with > 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models.

  4. Cardiovascular Pressures with Venous Gas Embolism and Decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Robinson, R.; Sutton, T.; Kemper, G. B.

    1995-01-01

    Venous gas embolism (VGE) is reported with decompression to a decreased ambient pressure. With severe decompression, or in cases where an intracardiac septal defect (patent foramen ovale) exists, the venous bubbles can become arterialized and cause neurological decompression illness. Incidence rates of patent foramen ovale in the general population range from 25-34% and yet aviators, astronauts, and deepsea divers who have decompression-induced venous bubbles do not demonstrate neurological symptoms at these high rates. This apparent disparity may be attributable to the normal pressure gradient across the atria of the heart that must be reversed for there to be flow potency. We evaluated the effects of: venous gas embolism (0.025, 0.05 and 0.15 ml/ kg min for 180 min.) hyperbaric decompression; and hypobaric decompression on the pressure gradient across the left and right atria in anesthetized dogs with intact atrial septa. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was used as a measure of left atrial pressure. In a total of 92 experimental evaluations in 22 dogs, there were no reported reversals in the mean pressure gradient across the atria; a total of 3 transient reversals occurred during the peak pressure gradient changes. The reasons that decompression-induced venous bubbles do not consistently cause serious symptoms of decompression illness may be that the amount of venous gas does not always cause sufficient pressure reversal across a patent foramen ovale to cause arterialization of the venous bubbles.

  5. Crystallization kinetics in magmas during decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Burton, Mike; Carroll, Michael R.

    2016-04-01

    Many variables play a role during magma crystallization at depth or in a volcanic conduit, and through experimentally derived constraints we can better understand pre- and syn-eruptive magma crystallization behavior. The thermodynamic properties of magmas have been extensively investigated as a function of T, P, fO2 and magma composition [1], and this allows estimation of the stability of equilibrium phases and physical parameters (e.g., density, viscosity). However, many natural igneous rocks contain geochemical, mineralogical and textural evidence of disequilibrium, suggesting that magmas frequently follow non-equilibrium, time-dependent pathways that are recorded in the geochemical and petrographic characteristics of the rocks. There are currently no suitable theoretical models capable of calculating nucleation and growth rates in disequilibrium conditions without experimental constraints. The aim of this contribution is provide quantitative data on growth and nucleation rates of feldspar crystals in silicate melts obtained through decompression experiments, in order to determine the magma evolution in pre- and sin-eruptive conditions. Decompression is one of the main processes that induce the crystallization of feldspar during the magma ascent in the volcanic conduit. Decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic and basaltic melts to investigate crystallization kinetics of feldspar as a function of the effect of the degassing, undercooling and time on nucleation and crystal growth process [2; 3]. Furthermore, feldspar is the main crystals phase present in magmas, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. Crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts show that long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations [2]. This is an important

  6. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Spacewalk Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal activity has the potential to both improve and compromise decompression safety. Exercise enhances inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but it may also promote bubble nuclei formation (nucleation), which can lead to gas phase separation and bubble growth and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of musculoskeletal activity and the level of tissue supersaturation may be critical to the net effect. Understanding the relationships is important to evaluate exercise prebreathe protocols and quantify decompression risk in gravity and microgravity environments. Data gathered during NASA's Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) studies combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise followed by low pressure (4.3 psi; altitude equivalent of 30,300 ft [9,235 m]) microgravity simulation to produce two protocols used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity. Both the Phase II/CEVIS (cycle ergometer vibration isolation system) and ISLE (in-suit light exercise) trials eliminated ambulation to more closely simulate the microgravity environment. The CEVIS results (35 male, 10 female) serve as control data for this NASA/Duke study to investigate the influence of ambulation exercise on bubble formation and the subsequent risk of DCS. METHODS Four experiments will replicate the CEVIS exercise-enhanced oxygen prebreathe protocol, each with a different exception. The first of these is currently underway. Experiment 1 - Subjects complete controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining nonambulatory throughout. Experiment 2 - Subjects remain non-ambulatory during the preflight period and ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 3 - Subjects ambulate during the preflight period and remain non-ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 4 - The order of heavy and light exercise employed in the CEVIS protocol is

  7. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  8. Automatic decompression device for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumiyama, Y.

    1986-10-07

    A decompression device is described for an internal combustion engine comprising: a holder secured to a camshaft supporting cams for controlling suction and exhaust valves of the engine, the cams having a contour and the holder having secured thereto a first cylindrical pin and a stopper pin; engine speed-responsive means including a first centrifugal weight supported by the holder for pivotal movement about the first pin and a second centrifugal weight supported on the first centrifugal weight for pivotal movement about a second pin having an axis parallel to the camshaft; cam means including a cylindrical pillar disposed on the second weight radially inwardly of the second pin and extending axially of the camshaft toward the cams for engagement with a valve operating member associated with one of the cams; and tension spring means mounted between the first centrifugal weight and the second centrifugal for moving the weights between a first position and a second position.

  9. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and the etiology of neurologic decompression sickness during altitude decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, W. T.; Powell, M. R.; Kumar, K. Vasantha; Waligora, J.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of gas bubbles in the arterial circulation can occur from iatrogenic mishaps, cardiopulmonary bypass devices, or following decompression, e.g., in deep-sea or SCUBA diving or in astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVA). We have examined the pathophysiology of neurological decompression sickness in human subjects who developed a large number of small gas bubbles in the right side of the heart as a result of hypobaric exposures. In one case, gas bubbles were detected in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the subject developed neurological symptoms; a 'resting' patent foramen ovalae (PFO) was found upon saline contrast echocardiography. A PFO was also detected in another individual who developed Spencer Grade 4 precordial Doppler ultrasound bubbles, but no evidence was seen of arterialization of bubbles upon insonation of either the MCA or common carotid artery. The reason for this difference in the behavior of intracardiac bubbles in these two individuals is not known. To date, we have not found evidence of right-to-left shunting of bubbles through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubbles present following decompression is examined and compared with the number arising from saline contrast injection. The estimates are comparable.

  10. Recurrent cubital tunnel syndrome. Etiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Filippi, R; Charalampaki, P; Reisch, R; Koch, D; Grunert, P

    2001-12-01

    Controversy surrounds the treatment of recurrent cubital tunnel syndrome after previous surgery. Irrespective of the surgical technique, namely pure decompression in the ulnar groove and the cubital tunnel distal of the medial epicondyle, and the different methods of volar transposition (subcutaneous, intramuscular, and submuscular), the results of surgical therapy of cubital tunnel syndrome are often not favorable, especially in cases of long-standing symptoms and severe deficits. Twenty-two patients who had previously undergone surgical treatment for ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow were evaluated because of persistent or recurrent pain, paresthesia, numbness, and motor weakness. Ten patients had undergone a nerve transposition, 5 patients underwent a simple decompression of the ulnar nerve, and 7 patients experienced two previous operations with different surgical techniques. Two patients underwent surgery at our hospital, whereas 20 patients underwent their primary surgery at other institutions. Various surgical techniques were used during the subsequent surgery, such as external neurolysis, subcutaneous anterior transposition, and subsequent transfer of the nerve back into the sulcus. The causes of continued or recurrent symptoms after initial surgery included dense perineural fibrosis of the nerve after subcutaneous transposition, adhesions of the nerve to the medial epicondyle and retention of the medial intermuscular septum. The average follow-up after the last procedure was 7 months (2 - 20 months). All 7 patients with subsequent transfer of the ulnar nerve back into the sulcus became pain-free, whereas only 11 of 15 patients who had external neurolysis or subcutaneous transposition became free of pain or experienced reduced pain. The recovery of motor function and return of sensibility were variable and unpredictable. In summary, reoperation after primary surgery of cubital tunnel syndrome gave satisfactory results in 18 of 22 cases. Subsequent

  11. Decompression sickness ('the bends') in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    García-Párraga, D; Crespo-Picazo, J L; de Quirós, Y Bernaldo; Cervera, V; Martí-Bonmati, L; Díaz-Delgado, J; Arbelo, M; Moore, M J; Jepson, P D; Fernández, Antonio

    2014-10-16

    Decompression sickness (DCS), as clinically diagnosed by reversal of symptoms with recompression, has never been reported in aquatic breath-hold diving vertebrates despite the occurrence of tissue gas tensions sufficient for bubble formation and injury in terrestrial animals. Similarly to diving mammals, sea turtles manage gas exchange and decompression through anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations. In the former group, DCS-like lesions have been observed on necropsies following behavioral disturbance such as high-powered acoustic sources (e.g. active sonar) and in bycaught animals. In sea turtles, in spite of abundant literature on diving physiology and bycatch interference, this is the first report of DCS-like symptoms and lesions. We diagnosed a clinico-pathological condition consistent with DCS in 29 gas-embolized loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta from a sample of 67. Fifty-nine were recovered alive and 8 had recently died following bycatch in trawls and gillnets of local fisheries from the east coast of Spain. Gas embolization and distribution in vital organs were evaluated through conventional radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasound. Additionally, positive response following repressurization was clinically observed in 2 live affected turtles. Gas embolism was also observed postmortem in carcasses and tissues as described in cetaceans and human divers. Compositional gas analysis of intravascular bubbles was consistent with DCS. Definitive diagnosis of DCS in sea turtles opens a new era for research in sea turtle diving physiology, conservation, and bycatch impact mitigation, as well as for comparative studies in other air-breathing marine vertebrates and human divers.

  12. Outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Kondreddi, Vamsi; Gopal, R Krishna; Yalamanchili, Ranjith K

    2012-01-01

    Background: Posterior heel pain due to retrocalcaneal bursitis, is a disabling condition that responds well to the conventional methods of treatment. Patients who do not respond to conservative treatment may require surgical intervention. This study evaluates the outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis, with resection of posterosuperior eminence of the calcaneum. Materials and Methods: This present study included 25 heels from 23 consecutive patients with posterior heel pain, who did not respond to conservative treatment and underwent endoscopic decompression of the retrocalcaneal bursae and excision of bony spurs. The functional outcome was evaluated by comparing the pre and postoperative American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores. The Maryland ankle and foot score was used postoperatively to assess the patient's satisfaction at the one-year followup. Results: The University of Maryland scores of 25 heels were categorized as the nonparametric categories, and it was observed that 16 patients had an excellent outcome, six good, three fair and there were no poor results. The AOFAS scores averaged 57.92 ± 6.224 points preoperatively and 89.08 ± 5.267 points postoperatively (P < 0.001), at an average followup of 16.4 months. The 12 heels having noninsertional tendinosis on ultrasound had low AOFAS scores compared to 13 heels having retrocalcaneal bursitis alone. At one year followup, correlation for preoperative ultrasound assessment of tendoachilles degeneration versus postoperative Maryland score (Spearman correlation) had shown a strong negative correlation. Conclusion: Endoscopic calcaneal resection is highly effective in patients with mild or no degeneration and yields cosmetically better results with fewer complications. Patients with degenerative changes in Achilles tendon had poorer outcomes in terms of subjective satisfaction. PMID:23325968

  13. Silastic arthroplasty for avascular necrosis of the carpal lunate.

    PubMed

    Pardini, A G

    1984-01-01

    The substitution of a diseased carpal lunate by a silastic implant (Swanson design) was performed in 70 patients. Twenty cases with a median follow-up of 48 months generally showed an increase in the range of motion of the wrist. There was disabling weakness of grip in one patient. Subluxation of the implant occurred in 2 cases, but this did not compromise the final result. Instability of the scaphoid was observed in 50% of the cases, before and after operation. There were no adverse reactions to the implant.

  14. Long-term review of fascial replacement after excision of the carpal lunate bone.

    PubMed

    Carroll, R E

    1997-09-01

    Excision of the carpal lunate bone in Kienbock's avascular necrosis gives relief of pain. To maintain grip strength, increase range of motion, and prevent carpal collapse or shifting, this space has been filled with various materials. Forty-three patients received fascial interposition replacement, and the experience and results of 10 patients observed for 10 years or more (range, 10-34) are presented. Pain was relieved. Range of motion was increased. Carpal collapse did not occur. All patients use their hand in an unrestricted, stressful activity. The result of an operation during an extended period is documented.

  15. Efficacy of high frequency ultrasound in postoperative evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome treatment.

    PubMed

    Kapuścińska, Katarzyna; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Zespół kanału nadgarstka (ZKN) to najczęstsza neuropatia uciskowa i częsta przyczyna zwolnień lekarskich z powodu przeciążenia ręki związanego z pracą. ZKN leczy się przede wszystkim operacyjnie.

  16. High-frequency ultrasound in carpal tunnel syndrome: assessment of patient eligibility for surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Kapuścińska, Katarzyna; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Zespół kanału nadgarstka (ZKN) jest najczęstszą neuropatią uciskową i częstą przyczyną zwolnień lekarskich z powodu przeciążenia ręki związanego z pracą. Optymalne postępowanie w tym zespole zależy od wczesnego rozpoznania i podjęcia odpowiedniego leczenia (zachowawczego lub operacyjnego).

  17. [Relationship between ultrasound measurements of the median nerve and electrophysiological severity in carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel; Fanlo-Mazas, Pablo; Malo-Urriés, Miguel; Haddad-Garay, María; Estébanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Hidalgo-García, César; Ruiz-de-Escudero Zapico, Alazne

    2015-11-16

    Introduccion. La ecografia es una herramienta que ha experimentado un gran desarrollo en el diagnostico de patologias compresivas neurales, como el sindrome del tunel carpiano (STC). Para planificar el tratamiento es importante establecer la gravedad de la patologia, por lo que seria relevante conocer la capacidad de la ecografia para discriminar el grado de afectacion del nervio mediano a este nivel. Objetivo. Investigar la correlacion de las mediciones ecograficas con la gravedad electrofisiologica en pacientes con STC. Pacientes y metodos. Se realizaron mediciones ecograficas en 59 sujetos (97 muñecas) remitidos para recibir un electroneurograma (ENG) por sospecha de STC. Segun el ENG, los sujetos se clasificaron como sanos, STC leve, moderado o grave. Posteriormente, se analizo la relacion entre las mediciones ecograficas y los resultados del ENG segun su gravedad. Tambien se calcularon las curvas ROC (receiver operaing characteristic) para los valores de corte optimos en cada grupo atendiendo a su gravedad. Resultados. Ambas mediciones ecograficas mostraron correlacion con la gravedad del STC determinada por el ENG. El area de seccion transversal del nervio mediano en la muñeca (AST-M) mostro la mayor correlacion (r = 0,613). Conclusiones. Existe relacion entre las mediciones ecograficas del nervio mediano, especialmente en el AST-M, y la gravedad del STC en un contexto clinico. Dichas mediciones podrian ser complementarias para diagnosticar el STC y determinar su gravedad.

  18. Circumferential decompression of the foramen magnum for the treatment of syringomyelia associated with basilar invagination.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Frederic P; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Krauss, William E

    2004-07-01

    Posterior fossa decompression utilizing suboccipital craniectomy and duraplasty remains the standard surgical treatment for Chiari-associated syringomyelia. In the presence of basilar invagination, anterior decompression, typically transoral odontoidectomy, or posterior decompression may be performed. We report two cases in which anterior and posterior (circumferential) decompression of the foramen magnum was used to treat cervical syringomyelia successfully. These cases demonstrate that circumferential decompression of the foramen magnum may be necessary in some cases of cervical syringomyelia associated with basilar invagination and Chiari malformation.

  19. The probability and severity of decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Hada, Ethan A.; Vann, Richard D.; Denoble, Petar J.

    2017-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS), which is caused by inert gas bubbles in tissues, is an injury of concern for scuba divers, compressed air workers, astronauts, and aviators. Case reports for 3322 air and N2-O2 dives, resulting in 190 DCS events, were retrospectively analyzed and the outcomes were scored as (1) serious neurological, (2) cardiopulmonary, (3) mild neurological, (4) pain, (5) lymphatic or skin, and (6) constitutional or nonspecific manifestations. Following standard U.S. Navy medical definitions, the data were grouped into mild—Type I (manifestations 4–6)–and serious–Type II (manifestations 1–3). Additionally, we considered an alternative grouping of mild–Type A (manifestations 3–6)–and serious–Type B (manifestations 1 and 2). The current U.S. Navy guidance allows for a 2% probability of mild DCS and a 0.1% probability of serious DCS. We developed a hierarchical trinomial (3-state) probabilistic DCS model that simultaneously predicts the probability of mild and serious DCS given a dive exposure. Both the Type I/II and Type A/B discriminations of mild and serious DCS resulted in a highly significant (p << 0.01) improvement in trinomial model fit over the binomial (2-state) model. With the Type I/II definition, we found that the predicted probability of ‘mild’ DCS resulted in a longer allowable bottom time for the same 2% limit. However, for the 0.1% serious DCS limit, we found a vastly decreased allowable bottom dive time for all dive depths. If the Type A/B scoring was assigned to outcome severity, the no decompression limits (NDL) for air dives were still controlled by the acceptable serious DCS risk limit rather than the acceptable mild DCS risk limit. However, in this case, longer NDL limits were allowed than with the Type I/II scoring. The trinomial model mild and serious probabilities agree reasonably well with the current air NDL only with the Type A/B scoring and when 0.2% risk of serious DCS is allowed. PMID:28296928

  20. The probability and severity of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E; Weber, Paul W; Hada, Ethan A; Vann, Richard D; Denoble, Petar J

    2017-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS), which is caused by inert gas bubbles in tissues, is an injury of concern for scuba divers, compressed air workers, astronauts, and aviators. Case reports for 3322 air and N2-O2 dives, resulting in 190 DCS events, were retrospectively analyzed and the outcomes were scored as (1) serious neurological, (2) cardiopulmonary, (3) mild neurological, (4) pain, (5) lymphatic or skin, and (6) constitutional or nonspecific manifestations. Following standard U.S. Navy medical definitions, the data were grouped into mild-Type I (manifestations 4-6)-and serious-Type II (manifestations 1-3). Additionally, we considered an alternative grouping of mild-Type A (manifestations 3-6)-and serious-Type B (manifestations 1 and 2). The current U.S. Navy guidance allows for a 2% probability of mild DCS and a 0.1% probability of serious DCS. We developed a hierarchical trinomial (3-state) probabilistic DCS model that simultaneously predicts the probability of mild and serious DCS given a dive exposure. Both the Type I/II and Type A/B discriminations of mild and serious DCS resulted in a highly significant (p < 0.01) improvement in trinomial model fit over the binomial (2-state) model. With the Type I/II definition, we found that the predicted probability of 'mild' DCS resulted in a longer allowable bottom time for the same 2% limit. However, for the 0.1% serious DCS limit, we found a vastly decreased allowable bottom dive time for all dive depths. If the Type A/B scoring was assigned to outcome severity, the no decompression limits (NDL) for air dives were still controlled by the acceptable serious DCS risk limit rather than the acceptable mild DCS risk limit. However, in this case, longer NDL limits were allowed than with the Type I/II scoring. The trinomial model mild and serious probabilities agree reasonably well with the current air NDL only with the Type A/B scoring and when 0.2% risk of serious DCS is allowed.

  1. Sub-diffraction Imaging via Surface Plasmon Decompression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-08

    of the local wavelength of a surface plasmon polariton supported by two adjoining curved metal surfaces. The views, opinions and/or findings...adiabatic decompression of the local wavelength of a surface plasmon polariton supported by two adjoining curved metal surfaces. Conference Name...diffraction imaging based on a process of adiabatic decompression of the local wavelength of a surface plasmon polariton supported by two adjoining curved

  2. Paradoxical Herniation following Decompressive Craniectomy in the Subacute Setting

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is reserved for extreme cases of intracranial hypertension. An uncommon complication known as paradoxical herniation has been documented within weeks to months following surgery. Here we present a unique case within days of surgery. Since standard medical treatment for intracranial hypertension will exacerbate paradoxical herniation, any abrupt neurological changes following decompressive craniectomy should be carefully investigated. Immediate treatment for paradoxical herniation is placement of the patient in the supine position with adequate hydration. Cranioplasty is the ultimate treatment option. PMID:27446619

  3. Cases from the aerospace medicine residents' teaching file. Decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G N

    2000-12-01

    Decompression sickness is an uncommon but serious risk associated with flying and SCUBA diving with potential for significant morbidity and mortality. It can occur in both novice and experienced individuals. This case illustrates an atypical presentation of decompression sickness in an experienced amateur SCUBA diver. Clinical suspicion must be high, since the presenting symptoms can be nonspecific as in this case. Early recognition and treatment are important for maximum recovery.

  4. Investigation of Hematologic and Pathologic Response to Decompression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-10

    advanced case of osteonecrosjs did not manifest itself radiographically. In addition to -extensive necrosis of the cortical bone with peniosteal new...weeks of the ini tial decompression (6 , 7) . His tologic study of these cases of osteonecrosis , as well as evid ence presented by other investi gators...thrombotic therapy remains to be determined. I 45. I. . References 1. Rivera , T.C. Decompression sickness among div e rs: An analysis of 935 cases . M

  5. Patterns and Variations in Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    TODA, Hiroki; GOTO, Masanori; IWASAKI, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a highly effective surgical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Although there is little prospective clinical evidence, accumulated observational studies have demonstrated the benefits of MVD for refractory TN. In the current surgical practice of MVD for TN, there have been recognized patterns and variations in surgical anatomy and various decompression techniques. Here we provide a stepwise description of surgical procedures and relevant anatomical characteristics, as well as procedural options. PMID:25925756

  6. Tunnel-to-tunnel correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Flow quality is discussed. Incremental comparisons of: (1) the angle of attack, (2) the axial force coefficient, and (3) the base cavity axial force coefficient against the normal force coefficient are presented. Relative blockage determination, relative buoyancy corrections, and boundary layer transition length are discussed. Blockage buoyancy caused by tunnel model wall dynamic interaction is discussed in terms of adaptive walls. The effect of 'transonic turbulence factor' is considered.

  7. Experimental respiratory decompression sickness in sheep.

    PubMed

    Atkins, C E; Lehner, C E; Beck, K A; Dubielzig, R R; Nordheim, E V; Lanphier, E H

    1988-09-01

    Respiratory decompression sickness (RDCS, "the chokes") is a potentially lethal consequence of ambient pressure reduction. Lack of a clearly suitable animal model has impeded understanding of this condition. RDCS, unaccompanied by central nervous system signs, occurred in 17 of 18 unanesthetized sheep exposed to compressed air at 230 kPa (2.27 ATA) for 22 h, returned to normal pressure for approximately 40 min, and taken to simulated altitude (0.75 ATA, 570 Torr). Respiratory signs, including tachypnea, sporadic apnea, and labored breathing, were accompanied by precordial Doppler ultrasound evidence of marked venous bubble loading. Pulmonary arterial pressures exceeded 30 Torr in five catheterized sheep that died or became moribund. Hypoxemia (arterial Po2 less than 40 Torr), neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed. Peribronchovascular edema was the most prominent necropsy finding. Chest radiography indicated interstitial edema in most affected sheep. High body weight and catheterization predisposed the sheep to severe RDCS. It appears that this protocol reliably provides a useful animal model for studies of RDCS and obstructive pulmonary hypertension, that the precipitating event is massive pulmonary embolization by bubbles, and that venous bubbles, detected by Doppler ultrasound, can signal impending RDCS.

  8. Use of ultrasound in altitude decompression modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Robert M.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    A model that predicts the probability of developing decompression sickness (DCS) with various denitrogenation schedules is being developed by the Armstrong Laboratory, using human data from previous exposures. It was noted that refinements are needed to improve the accuracy and scope of the model. A commercially developed ultrasonic echo imaging system is being used in this model development. Using this technique, bubbles images from a subject at altitude can be seen in the gall bladder, hepatic veins, vena cava, and chambers of the heart. As judged by their motion and appearance in the vena cava, venous bubbles near the heart range in size from 30 to 300 M. The larger bubbles skim along the top, whereas the smaller ones appear as faint images near the bottom of the vessel. Images from growing bubbles in a model altitude chamber indicate that they grow rapidly, going from 20 to 100 M in 3 sec near 30,000 ft altitude. Information such as this is valuable in verifying those aspects of the DCS model dealing with bubble size, their growth rate, and their site of origin.

  9. A systematic review of factitious decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Kenedi, Christopher; Sames, Christopher; Paice, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of factitious decompression sickness (DCS) involving a patient emergently treated at a hyperbaric medicine facility in New Zealand. Patients with factitious disorder feign illnesses such as DCS in order to receive care and attention despite the lack of an underlying illness. Other studies have suggested that 0.6% to as many as 9.3% of hospital admissions are factitious in nature. Therefore we believe that factitious DCS is occurring more often than hyperbaric clinicians suspect. DCS can be life-threatening, and hyperbaric medicine clinicians will almost always "err on the side of caution" when patients are referred with symptoms of DCS. Because DCS can be diagnosed based on subjective symptoms and self-reported history, there are opportunities for factitious patients to receive hyperbaric therapy. The costs associated with factitious DCS include transport, staff resources and preventing patients with treatable conditions from accessing the hyperbaric chamber. We performed a systematic review of the literature and found eight additional reported cases of confirmed or suspected factitious DCS. We report our findings and recommendations for hyperbaric medicine specialists regarding the recognition and management of factitious DCS.

  10. Endoscopic Versus Open Cubital Tunnel Release

    PubMed Central

    Aldekhayel, Salah; Govshievich, Alexander; Lee, James; Tahiri, Youssef; Luc, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several surgical techniques exist for treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release (ECTuR) has been recently reported as a promising minimally invasive technique. This study aims to compare outcomes and complications of open cubital tunnel release (OCTuR) and ECTuR in the treatment of idiopathic cubital tunnel syndrome. Methods: A systematic review of the literature (1980-2014) identified 118 citations. Studies including adults with idiopathic cubital tunnel treated exclusively by ECTuR or OCTuR were included. Outcomes of interest were postoperative grading, complications, number of reoperations, and the need for intraoperative conversion to another technique. Postoperative outcomes were combined into a uniform scale with 4 categories: “excellent,” “good,” “fair,” and “poor.” Results: Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria (17 observational and 3 comparative), representing 425 open and 556 endoscopic decompressions. In the open group, 79.8% experienced “good” or “excellent” results with 12% complication rate and 2.8% reoperation rate. In the endoscopic group, 81.8% experienced “good” or “excellent” results with 9% complication rate and 1.6% reoperation rate. Meta-analysis of 3 comparative studies demonstrated a significantly lower overall complication rate with ECTuR. Subgroup analysis of complications revealed a significantly higher incidence of scar tenderness and elbow pain with OCTuR. Conclusions: The current study demonstrates similar effectiveness between the endoscopic (ECTuR) and open (OCTuR) techniques for treatment of idiopathic cubital tunnel syndrome with similar outcomes, complication profiles, and reoperation rates. PMID:27418887

  11. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  12. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min‑1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ‑1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1‑e‑r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 ‑ Thr ‑ Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  13. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min−1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ−1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1−e−r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 − Thr − Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:28150725

  14. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-02

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9-15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9-156 ATA • min(-1)). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb - Ptiss) • τ(-1) dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1-e(-r), where r = ∫(PtissN2 - Thr - Pamb) • Pamb(-1) dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  15. Homologies and homeotic transformation of the theropod ‘semilunate' carpal

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xing; Han, Fenglu; Zhao, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The homology of the ‘semilunate' carpal, an important structure linking non-avian and avian dinosaurs, has been controversial. Here we describe the morphology of some theropod wrists, demonstrating that the ‘semilunate' carpal is not formed by the same carpal elements in all theropods possessing this feature and that the involvement of the lateralmost distal carpal in forming the ‘semilunate' carpal of birds is an inheritance from their non-avian theropod ancestors. Optimization of relevant morphological features indicates that these features evolved in an incremental way and the ‘semilunate' structure underwent a lateral shift in position during theropod evolution, possibly as a result of selection for foldable wings in birds and their close theropod relatives. We propose that homeotic transformation was involved in the evolution of the ‘semilunate' carpal. In combination with developmental data on avian wing digits, this suggests that homeosis played a significant role in theropod hand evolution in general. PMID:25116378

  16. Carpal Malalignment in Malunion of the Distal Radius and the Effect of Corrective Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Luc; Verhaegen, Filip; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malunions of the distal radius often induce carpal malalignment. Two different types can be distinguished: an adaptive midcarpal malalignment (so-called CIA wrist: carpal instability, adaptive) and a radiocarpal malalignment (dorsal translation of the whole carpus). The effect of distal radial osteotomy on the carpal alignment has hardly been studied. Material and Methods 31 wrists in 31 patients (mean age 44 years) with malunion of the distal radius after a Colles fracture were treated with a corrective osteotomy. The patients were divided on basis of effective radio-lunate flexion (ERLF) in the two patterns of carpal malalignment. The radiographic changes were evaluated. Results There were 20 patients with midcarpal malalignment (ERLF ≤ 25°) and 11 with radiocarpal malalignment (ERLF > 25°). There was a correction of radial tilt and ulnar variance in both groups. There was a significant improvement of the carpal alignment in the midcarpal malalignment group, up to normal parameters. Neither age nor delay between fracture and osteotomy correlated. In the radiocarpal malalignment group a significant effect on the ERLF was observed. In the patients with dorsal plating 70% of the hardware had to be removed. Conclusion Distal radial osteotomy is a reliable technique for correction of the deformity at the distal end of the radius and carpal malalignment. PMID:25097809

  17. [Resection of a carpal bone row in a Pustertaler Sprinze cow with chronic purulent arthritis of the carpal joint and osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Kofler, J; Peterbauer, C

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical and radiographic findings and the surgical treatment of a serofibrinous arthritis of the antebrachiocarpal joint and of a chronic purulent arthritis of the intercarpal and carpometacarpal joints with osteomyelitis of the distal carpal bones and subchondral osteomyelitis of the proximal metacarpal bones in a cow of the breed "Pustertaler Sprinze". The therapy comprised an arthrotomy of both joint spaces and the resection of the distal row of the carpal bones. The right forelimb had been immobilised for 70 days by a full limb cast. After this period, radiographs revealed an ob- vious ankylosis of the carpal joint, and the cow showed only a slight lameness. Six years postoperatively this cow was still in the herd and had produced six calves.

  18. Bilateral anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome variant secondary to extensor hallucis brevis muscle hypertrophy in a ballet dancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Joshua N; Rungprai, Chamnanni; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of bilateral anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome secondary EHB hypertrophy in a dancer, with successful treatment with bilateral EHB muscle excisions for decompression. The bilateral presentation of this case with the treatment of EHB muscle excision is the first of its type reported in the literature.

  19. Dynamic Heating and Decompression Experiments on Dacite and Rhyolite Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.; Waters, L.; Grocke, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral reaction rims, zoned crystals, and myriad growth or dissolution textures provide evidence for changes in magma pressure, temperature, or composition. Quantifying the magnitudes, timescales and length scales of those variations is a fundamental challenge of volcanology and igneous petrology; experiments provide quantitative insights into how magmas react to changes in pressure and temperature that can be used to address that challenge. We use single-step and dynamic experiments conducted in cold seal pressure vessels to study the responses of dacite and rhyolite magmas to heating and decompression events. During single-step decompression (or heating) experiments, conditions are changed nearly instantaneously from the initial to final state in one step, or several smaller steps, whereas "dynamic experiments" have continuous variation in pressure and/or temperature. These two types of experiments yield useful and complementary information describing crystal nucleation, growth, and reaction rates in response to changing (as opposed to steady state) conditions. Here we discuss isothermal decompression experiments that show substantial path-dependence for runs with equivalent time-averaged decompression rates as slow as 0.27 MPa/h for >500 h. Continuous decompression experiments often contain fewer but larger plagioclase crystals than are present in single-step runs, and those new crystals often show complex growth textures. Our results suggest that even slow changes in storage conditions can disrupt melt structure and greatly retard nucleation provided the changes are steady. We hypothesize that if the decompression path remains steady and continuous (absent a stall on and/or rapid decompression), the magma can remain in a growth-dominated regime even though it is far from equilibrium.

  20. Delayed Recompression for Decompression Sickness: Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hadanny, Amir; Fishlev, Gregori; Bechor, Yair; Bergan, Jacob; Friedman, Mony; Maliar, Amit; Efrati, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most cases of decompression sickness (DCS) occur soon after surfacing, with 98% within 24 hours. Recompression using hyperbaric chamber should be administrated as soon as feasible in order to decrease bubble size and avoid further tissue injury. Unfortunately, there may be a significant time delay from surfacing to recompression. The time beyond which hyperbaric treatment is non effective is unclear. The aims of the study were first to evaluate the effect of delayed hyperbaric treatment, initiated more than 48h after surfacing for DCS and second, to evaluate the different treatment protocols. Methods From January 2000 to February 2014, 76 divers had delayed hyperbaric treatment (≥48h) for DCS in the Sagol center for Hyperbaric medicine and Research, Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center, Israel. Data were collected from their medical records and compared to data of 128 patients treated earlier than 48h after surfacing at the same hyperbaric institute. Results There was no significant difference, as to any of the baseline characteristics, between the delayed and early treatment groups. With respect to treatment results, at the delayed treatment divers, complete recovery was achieved in 76% of the divers, partial recovery in 17.1% and no improvement in 6.6%. Similar results were achieved when treatment started early, where 78% of the divers had complete recovery, 15.6% partial recovery and 6.2% no recovery. Delayed hyperbaric treatment using US Navy Table 6 protocol trended toward a better clinical outcome yet not statistically significant (OR=2.786, CI95%[0.896-8.66], p=0.07) compared to standard hyperbaric oxygen therapy of 90 minutes at 2 ATA, irrespective of the symptoms severity at presentation. Conclusions Late recompression for DCS, 48 hours or more after surfacing, has clinical value and when applied can achieve complete recovery in 76% of the divers. It seems that the preferred hyperbaric treatment protocol should be based on US Navy Table 6. PMID

  1. Decompression sickness following breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Schipke, J D; Gams, E; Kallweit, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Despite convincing evidence of a relationship between breath-hold diving and decompression sickness (DCS), the causal connection is only slowly being accepted. Only the more recent textbooks have acknowledged the risks of repetitive breath-hold diving. We compare four groups of breath-hold divers: (1) Japanese and Korean amas and other divers from the Pacific area, (2) instructors at naval training facilities, (3) spear fishers, and (4) free-dive athletes. While the number of amas is likely decreasing, and Scandinavian Navy training facilities recorded only a few accidents, the number of spear fishers suffering accidents is on the rise, in particular during championships or using scooters. Finally, national and international associations (e.g., International Association of Free Drives [IAFD] or Association Internationale pour Le Developpment De L'Apnee [AIDA]) promote free-diving championships including deep diving categories such as constant weight, variable weight, and no limit. A number of free-diving athletes, training for or participating in competitions, are increasingly accident prone as the world record is presently set at a depth of 171 m. This review presents data found after searching Medline and ISI Web of Science and using appropriate Internet search engines (e.g., Google). We report some 90 cases in which DCS occurred after repetitive breath-hold dives. Even today, the risk of suffering from DCS after repetitive breath-hold diving is often not acknowledged. We strongly suggest that breath-hold divers and their advisors and physicians be made aware of the possibility of DCS and of the appropriate therapeutic measures to be taken when DCS is suspected. Because the risk of suffering from DCS increases depending on depth, bottom time, rate of ascent, and duration of surface intervals, some approaches to assess the risks are presented. Regrettably, none of these approaches is widely accepted. We propose therefore the development of easily manageable

  2. The risks of scuba diving: a focus on Decompression Illness.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or "off-gassed," resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport.

  3. The Risks of Scuba Diving: A Focus on Decompression Illness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or “off-gassed,” resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport. PMID:25478296

  4. Decompression experiments identify kinetic controls on explosive silicic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Sisson, T.W.; Hankins, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Eruption intensity is largely controlled by decompression-induced release of water-rich gas dissolved in magma. It is not simply the amount of gas that dictates how forcefully magma is propelled upwards during an eruption, but also the rate of degassing, which is partly a function of the supersaturation pressure (??Pcritical) triggering gas bubble nucleation. High temperature and pressure decompression experiments using rhyolite and dacite melt reveal compositionally-dependent differences in the ??Pcritical of degassing that may explain why rhyolites have fueled some of the most explosive eruptions on record.

  5. Eruptive dynamics during magma decompression: a laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Cimarelli, C.; Scheu, B.; Wadsworth, F.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of eruptive styles characterizes the activity of a given volcano. Indeed, eruptive styles can range from effusive phenomena to explosive eruptions, with related implications for hazard management. Rapid changes in eruptive style can occur during an ongoing eruption. These changes are, amongst other, related to variations in the magma ascent rate, a key parameter affecting the eruptive style. Ascent rate is in turn dependent on several factors such as the pressure in the magma chamber, the physical properties of the magma and the rate at which these properties change. According to the high number of involved parameters, laboratory decompression experiments are the best way to achieve quantitative information on the interplay of each of those factors and the related impact on the eruption style, i.e. by analyzing the flow and deformation behavior of the transparent volatile-bearing analogue fluid. We carried out decompression experiments following different decompression paths and using silicone oil as an analogue for the melt, with which we can simulate a range of melt viscosity values. For a set of experiments we added rigid particles to simulate the presence of crystals in the magma. The pure liquid or suspension was mounted into a transparent autoclave and pressurized to different final pressures. Then the sample was saturated with argon for a fixed amount of time. The decompression path consists of a slow decompression from the initial pressure to the atmospheric condition. Alternatively, samples were decompressed almost instantaneously, after established steps of slow decompression. The decompression path was monitored with pressure transducers and a high-speed video camera. Image analysis of the videos gives quantitative information on the bubble distribution with respect to depth in the liquid, pressure and time of nucleation and on their characteristics and behavior during the ongoing magma ascent. Furthermore, we also monitored the evolution of

  6. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  7. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Air No-Decompression Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air No-Decompression Limits A Appendix A to Part 197... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Pt. 197, App. A Appendix A to Part 197—Air No-Decompression Limits The following table gives the depth versus bottom time limits for single, no-decompression, air dives...

  8. Cubital tunnel syndrome secondary to gouty tophi: A case report.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Hatice; Zateri, Coskun; Akbal, Ayla; Gokmen, Ferhat; Adam, Gurhan; Bilim, Serhad; Bozkurt, Emre

    2017-03-01

    Gout is a chronic rheumatic disease resulting from accumulation of monosodium urate crystals in tissues. The most important risk factor for the disease is hyperuricaemia. Precipitation of uric acid in the joint in the form of monosodium urate crystals is the main factor responsible for triggering attacks of arthritis. Tophi occur as a result of urate crystals that precipitate into joints and surrounding tissues. Tophi can erode the bone where they are located and cause compression in soft tissue due to a mass effect. The following case report describes a case of cubital tunnel syndrome developed in association with tophaceous compression and resolved with surgical decompression in a patient with chronic gouty arthritis.

  9. Decompressive Craniectomy and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is the largest cause of death in young patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Decompressive craniectomy is part of the second level measures for the management of increased intracranial pressure refractory to medical management as moderate hypothermia and barbiturate coma. The literature lack of concepts is their indications. We present a review on the state of the art. PMID:27162826

  10. Endoscopic decompression for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic decompression surgery for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine. Methods The records from seventeen consecutive patients treated with endoscopic posterior decompression without fusion for intaforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine (7 males and 10 females, mean age: 67.9 ± 10.7 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical procedures consisted of lateral or translaminal decompression with or without discectomy. The following items were investigated: 1) the preoperative clinical findings; 2) the radiologic findings including MRI and computed tomography-discography; and 3) the surgical outcome as evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale for lower back pain (JOA score). Results All patients had neurological findings compatible with a radiculopathy, such as muscle weakness and sensory disturbance. MRI demonstrated the obliteration of the normal increased signal intensity fat in the intervertebral foramen. Ten patients out of 14 who underwent computed tomography-discography exhibited disc protrusion or herniation. Selective nerve root block was effective in all patients. During surgery, 12 patients were found to have a protruded disc or herniation that compressed the nerve root. Sixteen patients reported pain relief immediately after surgery. Conclusions Intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression is a rare but distinct pathological condition causing severe radiculopathy. Endoscopic decompression surgery is considered to be an appropriate and less invasive surgical option. PMID:21439083

  11. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  12. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  13. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  14. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  15. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... minimum pressure capability of— (1) 6 ATA, when used for diving to 300 fsw; or (2) The maximum depth of the dive, when used for diving operations deeper than 300 fsw, unless a closed bell meeting the... minute to 60 fsw and at least 1 ATA per minute thereafter; (j) Have a decompression rate of 1 ATA...

  16. A Log Logistic Survival Model Applied to Hypobaric Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2001-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a complex, multivariable problem. A mathematical description or model of the likelihood of DCS requires a large amount of quality research data, ideas on how to define a decompression dose using physical and physiological variables, and an appropriate analytical approach. It also requires a high-performance computer with specialized software. I have used published DCS data to develop my decompression doses, which are variants of equilibrium expressions for evolved gas plus other explanatory variables. My analytical approach is survival analysis, where the time of DCS occurrence is modeled. My conclusions can be applied to simple hypobaric decompressions - ascents lasting from 5 to 30 minutes - and, after minutes to hours, to denitrogenation (prebreathing). They are also applicable to long or short exposures, and can be used whether the sufferer of DCS is at rest or exercising at altitude. Ultimately I would like my models to be applied to astronauts to reduce the risk of DCS during spacewalks, as well as to future spaceflight crews on the Moon and Mars.

  17. The Design and Development of the Topside Decompression Monitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    4 Subsea Cable CE-3T-6-100UC ................................................... 5 Diver-Worn Depth Sensor ...laptop computer, instrumentation case, diver instrumentation cable, and diver-worn depth sensor ; its software components include a decompression program...1 Sensor Instrumentation Case ................................................................. 1 Diver

  18. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. Role of Inflammatory Reponse in Experimental Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Little, T.

    1999-01-01

    Decompression to altitude can result in gas bubble formation both in tissues and in the systemic veins. The venous gas emboli (VGE) are often monitored during decompression exposures to assess risk for decompression sickness (DCS). Astronauts are at risk for DCS during extravehicular activities (EVA), where decompression occurs from the Space Shuttle or Space Station atmospheric pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch (PSI) to that of the space suit pressure of 4.3 PSI. DCS symptoms include diffuse pain, especially around joints, inflammation and edema. Pathophysiological effects include interstitial inflammatory responses and recurring injury to the vascular endothelium. Such responses can result in vasoconstriction and associated hemodynamic changes.The granulocyte cell activation and chemotaxin release results in the formation of vasoactive and microvascular permeability altering mediators, especially from the lungs which are the principal target organ for the venous bubbles, and from activated cells (neutrophils, platelets, macrophages). Such mediators include free arachidonic acid and the byproducts of its metabolism via the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways (see figure). The cyclooxygenase pathway results in formation of prostacyclin and other prostaglandins and thromboxanes that cause vasoconstriction, bronchoconstriction and platelet aggregation. Leukotrienes produced by the alternate pathway cause pulmonary and bronchial smooth muscle contraction and edema. Substances directly affecting vascular tone such as nitric oxide may also play a role in the respose to DCS. We are studying the role and consequent effects of the release inflammatory bioactive mediators as a result of DCS and VGE. More recent efforts are focused on identifying the effects of the body's circadian rhythm on these physiological consequences to decompression stress. al

  20. The stepped hybrid plate for carpal panarthrodesis - Part II: a multicentre study of 52 arthrodeses.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Bertrana, C; Darnaculleta, F; Durall, I; Franch, Jordi; Puchol, J L; Martinez, J J; Rubio, A

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-two carpal panarthrodeses (CP) were carried out in 44 dogs (eight bilateral), in a multicentre study using a single (n = 47) or double (n = 5) stepped hybrid CP plate. Of these 44 cases, 39 were between 20-55 kg in bodyweight , 26 were males , and the carpometacarpal was the most common joint involved. Falling and other impact trauma were the most common aetiology. Pain of unknown origin, carpal luxation, chronic accessory carpal bone fracture, distal comminuted intra-articular radial fracture, bone tumour, degenerative joint disease, canine erosive idiopathic polyarthritis, avascular necrosis of the radial carpal bone and fractures of several metacarpal bones were some of the pathologies reported. Fracture of the third metacarpal bone during screw insertion was the only intrasurgical complication. Malpositioning of the plate or screws and over-tightened screws were technical errors observed in seven of the procedures. The radial carpal bone was not fixed with a screw in two cases due to bone deformity. Concurrent plate breakage and bending in the same patient operated on bilaterally was observed during the follow-up period, which represented a major complication rate of 3.8% for all procedures. Minor complications were: low grade infection, lick granuloma, digit hyperextension, screw loosening or failure, incomplete fusion of some joints and a fracture of the third metacarpal bone at the distal screw hole of the plate; which represented a rate of 44.2% on all procedures. Complete carpal healing was observed radiographically in 94.2% of all procedures. Limb function was excellent to good, and all of the owners, except for one, were satisfied with the procedure.

  1. Rupture of the cell envelope by decompression of the deep-sea methanogen Methanococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Beum; Clark, Douglas S

    2002-03-01

    The effect of decompression on the structure of Methanococcus jannaschii, an extremely thermophilic deep-sea methanogen, was studied in a novel high-pressure, high-temperature bioreactor. The cell envelope of M. jannaschii appeared to rupture upon rapid decompression (ca. 1 s) from 260 atm of hyperbaric pressure. When decompression from 260 atm was performed over 5 min, the proportion of ruptured cells decreased significantly. In contrast to the effect produced by decompression from hyperbaric pressure, decompression from a hydrostatic pressure of 260 atm did not induce cell lysis.

  2. The cubital tunnel: a radiologic and histotopographic study

    PubMed Central

    Macchi, Veronica; Tiengo, Cesare; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Sarasin, Gloria; Tubbs, Shane; Maffulli, Nicola; De Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Entrapment of the ulnar nerve at the elbow is the second most common compression neuropathy in the upper limb. The present study evaluates the anatomy of the cubital tunnel. Eighteen upper limbs were analysed in unembalmed cadavers using ultrasound examination in all cases, dissection in nine cases, and microscopic study in nine cases. In all cases, thickening of the fascia at the level of the tunnel was found at dissection. From the microscopic point of view, the ulnar nerve is a multifascicular trunk (mean area of 6.0 ± 1.5 mm2). The roof of the cubital tunnel showed the presence of superimposed layers, corresponding to fascial, tendineous and muscular layers, giving rise to a tri-laminar structure (mean thickness 523 ± 235 μm). This multilayered tissue was hyperechoic (mean thickness 0.9 ± 0.3 mm) on ultrasound imaging. The roof of the cubital tunnel is elastic, formed by a myofascial trilaminar retinaculum. The pathological fusion of these three layers reduces gliding of the ulnar nerve during movements of the elbow joint. This may play a role in producing the symptoms typical of cubital tunnel syndrome. Independent from the surgical technique, decompression should span the ulnar nerve from the triceps brachii muscle to the flexor carpi ulnaris fascia. PMID:24917209

  3. Arthrography of the traumatized wrist: correlation with radiography and the carpal instability series

    SciTech Connect

    Levinsohn, E.M.; Palmer, A.K.

    1983-03-01

    Arthrography with fluoroscopic monitoring was used to assess the soft tissues of the wrist in 100 patients who had chronic traumatic pain but did not have rheumatoid arthritis. Findings were correlated with plain radiographs and the carpal instability series. Arthrograms were normal in 26% of cases and demonstrated perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage in 26%, radiocarpal-midcarpal communication in 30%, capsular lesions in 31%, lymphatic opacification in 12%, and tendon sheath filling in 10%. Communication between the radiocarpal and pisiform-troiquetral compartments, a normal finding, was seen in 69%. There was a significant association between perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage and both ulna-plus variance and carpal instability.

  4. Disabling hand injuries in boxing: boxer's knuckle and traumatic carpal boss.

    PubMed

    Melone, Charles P; Polatsch, Daniel B; Beldner, Steven

    2009-10-01

    This article describes the treatment of the two most debilitating hand-related boxing injuries: boxer's knuckle and traumatic carpal boss. Recognition of the normal anatomy as well as the predictable pathology facilitates an accurate diagnosis and precision surgery. For boxer's knuckle, direct repair of the disrupted extensor hood, without the need for tendon augmentation, has been consistently employed; for traumatic carpal boss, arthrodesis of the destabilized carpometacarpal joints has been the preferred method of treatment. Precisely executed operative treatment of both injuries has resulted in a favorable outcome, as in the vast majority of cases the boxers have experienced relief of pain, restoration of function, and an unrestricted return to competition.

  5. [Lesions of the radio-carpal joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and its surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Herasymenko, S I; Babko, A M

    2014-08-01

    Affection of radio-carpal joint is most frequently revealed in patients, suffering rheumatoid arthritis. While the disease progressing in almost 75% of patients the inflammatory changes in radio-carpal joint occur. An acute and chronic synovitis, damage of a cartilage constitute a cause of a typical erosion of bones inside a joint, weakening of a tendo-ligamentous apparatus and its further deformity. Operative treatment was aimed for the inflammatory focus elimination, reduction of the pain syndrome severity, the function loss, and the joint deformity correction. The mostly used operative interventions are tenoectomy, synovectomy, arthrodesis, total endoprosthesis.

  6. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  7. [A method for evaluating the safety of decompression regimens for divers].

    PubMed

    Volkov, L K; Voĭtsekhovich, I A; Liapin, V M; Miasnikov, A A

    1996-09-01

    The authors offer a way of estimation of safety modes of decompression, based on definition of intensity of venous gas embolism (VGE) at each decompression and account of probability of illness of divers in series of tests. Intensity of VGE was determined with the help of ultrasonic gas bubbles Doppler radar. Comparative safety of standard modes of decompression of divers of the Navy was estimated, and also the modes, designed in accordance with mathematical model of decompression, offered by I. A. Voĭtsekhovich (1990), were done. The results testify, that use of ultrasonic radar for estimation of intensity of VGE at decompression and account of average and maximum probability of decompression illness in series of tests of modes permit to receive the comparative characteristic of safety of modes at small number of decompressions.

  8. On diver thermal status and susceptibility to decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Wayne A

    2015-09-01

    In a recent Letter to the Editor, Clarke, et al, indicated that divers who deliberately chill themselves on a dive to reduce risk of decompression sickness (DCS) may be misinterpreting our 2007 Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) report. Indeed, we did not advocate that divers should risk hypothermia on bottom to reduce risk of DCS, nor do we dispute the authors' overall admonition to avoid diving cold unnecessarily. However, Clarke, et al, imply more generally that results of our study are not applicable to recreational or technical divers because the dives we tested were atypical of dives undertaken by such divers. We wish to clarify that our study does have implications for recreational and technical divers, implications that should not be ignored. The dives we tested were not intended to be typical of dives undertaken in any actual operational context. Instead, we chose to expose divers to temperatures at the extremes of their thermal tolerance in order to ensure that effects of diver thermal status on DCS susceptibility would be found if such effects existed. Our initial test dive profile provided appreciable time both on bottom and during decompression to allow any differential thermal effects during these two dive phases to manifest, while affording a baseline risk of DCS that could be altered by thermal effects without exposing subjects to inordinately high risks of DCS. Our results strongly indicate that the optimal diver thermal conditions for mitigation of DCS risk or minimization of decompression time entail remaining cool during gas uptake phases of a dive and warm during off-gassing phases. While the dose-response characteristics of our observed thermal effects are almost certainly non-linear in both exposure temperature and duration, it is only reasonable to presume that the effects vary monotonically with these factors. We have no reason to presume that such responses and effects under less extreme conditions would be in directions opposite to

  9. [The anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Milants, C; Wang, F C; Gomulinski, L; Ledon, F; Petrover, D; Bonnet, R; Crielaard, J M; Kaux, J F

    2015-01-01

    The anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the inferior extensor retinaculum of the ankle. It is frequently unrecognized and may lead to misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. We report the case of a 77 year old patient complaining of symptoms of an anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome with neuropathic pain located at the dorsal part of the foot, without any sensorimotor loss. The ENMG was in favour of a motor impairment of the deep peroneal nerve. MRI exploration of the ankle showed a millimetric bony overgrowth of the upper pole of the navicular bone, irritative to the deep peroneal nerve. Infiltration at overgrowth of the navicular provided a partial and temporary decrease in pain symptoms. Surgical nerve decompression was then considered.

  10. Investigating degassing dynamics into the shallow conduit through decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Laura; Scheu, Bettina; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    The history of bubbles' growth and interaction, as well as their spatial distribution in the shallow conduit, is deeply interconnected with the style of the eruptions. According to the fundamental role played by volatiles in the eruptive process, more effort is required in determining how the key factors of volcanic systems (i.e., magma properties, decompression rate) influence the dynamics of degassing. Therefore, our aim is to provide, through the analysis of decompression experiments on analogue materials, insights on such relations. We performed several decompression experiments with a shock-tube apparatus, and using silicon oil as laboratory-analogue for the magmatic melt. The sample was placed in a transparent autoclave, saturated with Argon for an established amount of time under a fixed pressure (up to a maximum of 10 MPa). Successively it was decompressed to atmospheric conditions, by releasing gas through a control valve. The dynamics of gas exsolution processes were recorded by using pressure sensors and a high speed camera. A range of viscosity values (1, 10, 100, 1000 Pa s) was investigated, for the same decompression path. Furthermore, some experiments were carried out with the addition of glass beads, as analogue to crystals, to the pure liquid. The height of the expanding column was monitored, in conjunction with images recorded during the experiments, and the growth rate of bubbles was measured at different times and depth. Finally, bubble size distribution has been evaluated at various stages for some experiments, in order to achieve a spatial map of the ongoing degassing phenomena. Results allowed us to define different regimes occurring during the decompression, whose features and characteristics are strongly affected by fluid viscosity. Indeed, several degassing phases were observed, from bubbly fluid to the eventual buildup of a more or less "foamy" phase, which ultimately experiences periodical oscillations around an average equilibrium level

  11. Risk of decompression sickness in the presence of circulating microbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. Vasantha; Powell, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we examined the association between microbubbles formed in the circulation from a free gas phase and symptoms of altitude decompression sickness (DCS). In a subgroup of 59 males of mean (S.D) age 31.2 (5.8) years who developed microbubbles during exposure to 26.59 kPa (4.3 psi) under simulated extravehicular activities (EVA), symptoms of DCS occurred in 24 (41 percent) individuals. Spencer grade 1 microbubbles occurred in 4 (7 percent), grade 2 in 9 (15 percent), grade 3 in 15 (25 percent), and grade 4 in 31 (53 percent) of subjects. Survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression showed that individuals with less than grade 3 CMB showed 2.46 times (95 percent confidence interval = 1.26 to 5.34) higher risk of symptoms. This information is crucial for defining the risk of DCS for inflight Doppler monitoring under space EVA. Altitude decompression sickness (DCS) occurs when there is acute reduction in ambient pressure. The symptoms of DCS are due to the formation of a free gas phase (in the form of gas microbubbles) in tissues during decompression. Musculo-skeletal pain of bends is the commonest form of DCS in altitude exposures. In the space flight environment, there is a risk of DCS when astronauts decompress from the normobaric shuttle pressure into the hypobaric space suit pressure (currently about 29.65 kPa (4.3 psi) for extra-vehicular activities (EVA). This risk is counterbalanced by a judicious combination of prior denitrogenation and staged decompression. Studies of DCS are limited by the duration of the test at reduced pressure. Since only a proportion of subjects tested develop symptoms, the information on DCS is generally incomplete or 'censored'. Many studies employ Doppler ultrasound monitoring of the precordial area for detecting circulating microbubbles (CMB). Although the association between CMB and bends pain is not causal, CMB are frequently monitored during decompression. In this paper, we examine the association

  12. Bayesian approach to decompression sickness model parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Howle, L E; Weber, P W; Nichols, J M

    2017-03-01

    We examine both maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches for estimating probabilistic decompression sickness model parameters. Maximum likelihood estimation treats parameters as fixed values and determines the best estimate through repeated trials, whereas the Bayesian approach treats parameters as random variables and determines the parameter probability distributions. We would ultimately like to know the probability that a parameter lies in a certain range rather than simply make statements about the repeatability of our estimator. Although both represent powerful methods of inference, for models with complex or multi-peaked likelihoods, maximum likelihood parameter estimates can prove more difficult to interpret than the estimates of the parameter distributions provided by the Bayesian approach. For models of decompression sickness, we show that while these two estimation methods are complementary, the credible intervals generated by the Bayesian approach are more naturally suited to quantifying uncertainty in the model parameters.

  13. Report on computation of repetitive hyperbaric-hypobaric decompression tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edel, P. O.

    1975-01-01

    The tables were constructed specifically for NASA's simulated weightlessness training program; they provide for 8 depth ranges covering depths from 7 to 47 FSW, with exposure times of 15 to 360 minutes. These tables were based up on an 8 compartment model using tissue half-time values of 5 to 360 minutes and Workmanline M-values for control of the decompression obligation resulting from hyperbaric exposures. Supersaturation ratios of 1.55:1 to 2:1 were used for control of ascents to altitude following such repetitive dives. Adequacy of the method and the resultant tables were determined in light of past experience with decompression involving hyperbaric-hypobaric interfaces in human exposures. Using these criteria, the method showed conformity with empirically determined values. In areas where a discrepancy existed, the tables would err in the direction of safety.

  14. Acute obstructive hydrocephalus complicating decompression surgery of the craniovertebral junction

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Ryuji; Saito, Nobuhito; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive hydrocephalus has been described as a rare complication following foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation. However, there are few reports of obstructive hydrocephalus after spinal surgery for other pathologies of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). The authors herein report a 52-year-old female with achondroplasia presenting with an 8-month history of myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at CVJ. She underwent resection of the C1 posterior arch and part of the edge of the occipital bone. A computed tomography (CT) scan obtained 1-week after the surgery revealed bilateral infratentorial fluid collection. The patient was first managed conservatively; however, on the 17th day, her consciousness level showed sudden deterioration. Emergency CT demonstrated marked hydrocephalus due to obstruction of the cerebral aqueduct. Acute obstructive hydrocephalus can occur late after decompression surgery at the CVJ, and thus should be included in the differential diagnosis of a deteriorating mental status. PMID:27366268

  15. Predictive modeling of altitude decompression sickness in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, D. J.; Hamilton, R. W., Jr.; Colley, I. A.; Schreiner, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The coding of data on 2,565 individual human altitude chamber tests is reported as part of a selection procedure designed to eliminate individuals who are highly susceptible to decompression sickness, individual aircrew members were exposed to the pressure equivalent of 37,000 feet and observed for one hour. Many entries refer to subjects who have been tested two or three times. This data contains a substantial body of statistical information important to the understanding of the mechanisms of altitude decompression sickness and for the computation of improved high altitude operating procedures. Appropriate computer formats and encoding procedures were developed and all 2,565 entries have been converted to these formats and stored on magnetic tape. A gas loading file was produced.

  16. [Isolated dislocation of the carpal scaphoid. A case report with review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Cherif, M R; Ben Ghozlen, R; Chehimi, A; Annabi, H; Trabelsi, M; Mbarek, M; Ben Hassine, H

    2002-10-01

    Isolated dislocation of the carpal scaphoid is an extremely rare injury, which is usually accompanied by significant ligamento-capsular lesions. A review of the literature found only 21 reported cases. The aim of this report is to present a single case of isolated radio-palmar dislocation of the scaphoid treated conservatively, which provided a good functional result at 10 years follow up.

  17. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  18. The Possible Relationship Between Patent Foramen Ovale and Decompression Sickness:.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    a potential conduit for blood clot (resulting in a stroke), or venous gas bubbles during decompression, (resulting in type II neurologic...Despite the high prevalence of PFO in the general population, and the relatively common occurrence of venous gas bubbles in diving and altitude exposures...being present in up to a third of the population. The potential for right- to-left shunting of venous gas emboli (VGE) which are known to occur in even

  19. Rapid decompression of congenital hydrocephalus associated with parenchymal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bass, T; White, L E; Wood, R D; Werner, A L; Schinco, F P

    1995-10-01

    A newborn boy with congenital hydrocephalus was diagnosed with aqueductal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging. Low-resistance ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement was followed by clinical deterioration. Repeat imaging studies revealed a collapsed cortical mantle with subdural hemorrhage. In addition to subdural blood, often associated with marked cerebral conformational changes, extensive intraparenchymal hemorrhage was seen. For extreme congenital hydrocephalus, ventriculoperitoneal shunts with greater resistance to flow than the currently used neonatal shunt devices may be indicated, to allow a more gradual ventricular decompression.

  20. Sidenafil Pre-Treatment Promotes Decompression Sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Brubakk, Alf O.; Gempp, Emmanuel; Castagna, Olivier; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Vallée, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Vascular bubble formation after decompression contributes to endothelial injuries which form the basis for the development of decompression sickness (DCS). Nitric oxide (NO) is a powerful vasodilator that contributes to vessel homeostasis. It has been shown that NO-releasing agent may reduce bubble formation and prevent serious decompression sickness. The use of sildenafil, a well-known, phosphodiesterase-5 blocker, which act by potentiating the vasodilatory effect on smooth muscle relaxation, has never been studied in DCS. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical effects of sildenafil pre-treatment on DCS in a rat model. 67 rats were subjected to a simulated dive at 90 msw for 45 min before staged decompression. The experimental group received 10 mg/kg of sildenafil one hour before exposure (n = 35) while controls were not treated (n = 32). Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and the level of circulating bubbles in the right cavities was quantified. There were significantly more manifestations of DCS in the sildenafil group than in the controls (34.3% vs 6.25%, respectively, p = 0.012). Platelet count was more reduced in treated rats than in controls (−21.7% vs −7%, respectively, p = 0.029), whereas bubble grades did not differ between groups. We concluded that pre-treatment with sildenafil promotes the onset and severity of neurological DCS. When considering the use of phosphodiesterase-5 blockers in the context of diving, careful discussion with physician should be recommended. PMID:23580342

  1. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart S of... - Decompression Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decompression Tables A Appendix A to Subpart S of Part 1926..., Caissons, Cofferdams and Compressed Air Pt. 1926, Subpt. S, App. A Appendix A to Subpart S of Part 1926... pressure p.s.i.g. Working period hours 1/2 1 11/2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Over 8 9 to 12 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 14 6...

  2. Decompressive hemicraniectomy in supra-tentorial malignant infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Furqan A.; Ramzan, Altaf U.; Wani, Abrar A.; Wani, Mushtaq A.; Malik, Nayil K.; Shah, Pervaiz A.; Asimi, Ravouf

    2012-01-01

    Background: Decompressive hemicraniectomy not only reduces the intracranial pressure but has been demonstrated to increase survival and decrease the morbidity in patients with supratentorial malignant brain infarcts (STMBI). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of surgical decompression to decrease the mortality and morbidity in patients with STMBI refractory to medical therapy and to compare the results with those of the medically managed patients. Methods: All the 24 consecutive patients with clinical and radiological diagnosis of STMBI, refractory to medical management in 2 years, were included. Option of surgical decompression after explaining the outcome, risk and benefits of the procedure was given to the attendants/relatives of all patients who were fulfilling the inclusion criteria. The patient group, whose attendants/relatives were not willing to undergo surgery, were subjected to the same medical therapy and they were taken as the “control group.” Results: Supratentorial malignant infarcts were more common in the age group of 41–60 years. Mean age of presentation was 42.16 ± 16.2 years and the mean GCS on admission was 7.83 ± 2.1. Mortality was 16.7% in the surgically and 25.0% in the medically managed group. Patients operated early (<48 h), age ≤60 years, midline shift <5 mm and size of infarct less than 2/3rd of the vascular territory involved showed good prognosis. The functional outcome revealed by modified Rankin Score (mRS) and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) was better in surgically managed patients. Results of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Score were better in surgically managed patients at 1 year. Barthal Index in the surgically managed group showed statistically significant results. Conclusions: Decompressive hemicraniectomy with duroplasty if performed early in STMBI not only decreases the mortality but also increases the functional outcome when compared with patients who were managed conservatively with medical therapy only

  3. Emergency decompressive craniectomy after removal of convexity meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Domenicucci, Maurizio; Paolini, Sergio; Mancarella, Cristina; Tola, Serena; D’Elia, Alessandro; Marotta, Nicola; Seferi, Arsen; Esposito, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Convexity meningiomas are benign brain tumors that are amenable to complete surgical resection and are associated with a low complication rate. The aim of this study was to identify factors that result in acute postoperative neurological worsening after the removal of convexity meningiomas. Methods: Clinical evaluation and neuroradiological analysis of patients who underwent removal of a supratentorial convexity meningioma were reviewed. Patients were selected when their postoperative course was complicated by acute neurological deterioration requiring decompressive craniectomy. Results: Six patients (mean age: 43.3 years) underwent surgical removal of a supratentorial convexity meningioma. Brain shift (mean: 9.9 mm) was evident on preoperative imaging due to lesions of varying size and perilesional edema. At various times postoperatively, patient consciousness worsened (up to decerebrate posture) with contralateral paresis and pupillary anisocoria. Computed tomography revealed no postoperative hematoma, however, did indicate increased brain edema and ventricular shift (mean: 12 mm). Emergency decompressive craniectomy and brief ventilator assistance were performed in all patients. Ischemia of the ipsilateral posterior cerebral artery occurred in 3 patients and hydrocephalus occurred in 2 patients. Outcome was good in 2, fair in 2, 1 patient had severe disability, and 1 patient died after 8 months. Conclusions: Brain shift on preoperative imaging is a substantial risk factor for postoperative neurological worsening in young adult patients after the removal of convexity meningiomas. Emergency decompressive craniectomy must be considered because it is effective in most cases. Other than consciousness impairment, there is no reliable clinical landmark to guide the decision to perform decompressive craniectomy; however, brain ischemia may have already occurred. PMID:27857859

  4. Hemimasticatory spasm treated with microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a very rare disorder of the trigeminal nerve characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. The mechanisms leading to hemimasticatory spasm are still unclear. Recently, injection of botulinum toxin has become the treatment of choice due to its excellent results. We report a case of a successful treatment of hemimasticatory spasm via microvascular decompression of the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve.

  5. A new tube for simultaneous gastric decompression and jejunal alimentation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R; Nyhus, L M

    1985-04-01

    A new tube has been devised for simultaneous gastric decompression and jejunal enteral alimentation. The tube is inserted by the nasogastric route intraoperatively. What differentiates this from earlier tubes is the addition of two inflatable balloons that facilitate passage of the tip of the tube through the retroperitoneal duodenum and into the proximal jejunum. Such a device is needed because the advantages of enteral alimentation in the postoperative patient include safety, low cost and significant metabolic benefits.

  6. Influence of repeated daily diving on decompression stress.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, J; Ljubkovic, M; Denoble, P J; Dujic, Z; Ranapurwala, S; Pollock, N W

    2014-06-01

    Acclimatization (an adaptive change in response to repeated environmental exposure) to diving could reduce decompression stress. A decrease in post-dive circulating venous gas emboli (VGE or bubbles) would represent positive acclimatization. The purpose of this study was to determine whether four days of daily diving alter post-dive bubble grades. 16 male divers performed identical no-decompression air dives on 4 consecutive days to 18 meters of sea water for 47 min bottom times. VGE monitoring was performed with transthoracic echocardiography every 20 min for 120 min post-dive. Completion of identical daily dives resulted in progressively decreasing odds (or logit risk) of having relatively higher grade bubbles on consecutive days. The odds on Day 4 were half that of Day 1 (OR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.73). The odds ratio for a >III bubble grade on Day 4 was 0.37 (95% CI: 0.20, 0.70) when compared to Day 1. The current study indicates that repetitive daily diving may reduce bubble formation, representing a positive (protective) acclimatization to diving. Further work is required to evaluate the impact of additional days of diving and multiple dive days and to determine if the effect is sufficient to alter the absolute risk of decompression sickness.

  7. Decryption-decompression of AES protected ZIP files on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tan Nhat; Pham, Phong Hong; Nguyen, Duc Huu; Nguyen, Thuy Thanh; Le, Hung Duc

    2011-10-01

    AES is a strong encryption system, so decryption-decompression of AES encrypted ZIP files requires very large computing power and techniques of reducing the password space. This makes implementations of techniques on common computing system not practical. In [1], we reduced the original very large password search space to a much smaller one which surely containing the correct password. Based on reduced set of passwords, in this paper, we parallel decryption, decompression and plain text recognition for encrypted ZIP files by using CUDA computing technology on graphics cards GeForce GTX295 of NVIDIA, to find out the correct password. The experimental results have shown that the speed of decrypting, decompressing, recognizing plain text and finding out the original password increases about from 45 to 180 times (depends on the number of GPUs) compared to sequential execution on the Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400 2.66 GHz. These results have demonstrated the potential applicability of GPUs in this cryptanalysis field.

  8. Protective Effects of Fluoxetine on Decompression Sickness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Barre, Sandrine; Pascual, Aurelie; Castagna, Olivier; Abraini, Jacques H.; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Vallee, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS) that can result in central nervous system disorders or even death. Bubbles alter the vascular endothelium and activate blood cells and inflammatory pathways, leading to a systemic pathophysiological process that promotes ischemic damage. Fluoxetine, a well-known antidepressant, is recognized as having anti-inflammatory properties at the systemic level, as well as in the setting of cerebral ischemia. We report a beneficial clinical effect associated with fluoxetine in experimental DCS. 91 mice were subjected to a simulated dive at 90 msw for 45 min before rapid decompression. The experimental group received 50 mg/kg of fluoxetine 18 hours before hyperbaric exposure (n = 46) while controls were not treated (n = 45). Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and cytokine IL-6 detection. There were significantly fewer manifestations of DCS in the fluoxetine group than in the controls (43.5% versus 75.5%, respectively; p = 0.004). Survivors showed a better and significant neurological recovery with fluoxetine. Platelets and red cells were significantly decreased after decompression in controls but not in the treated mice. Fluoxetine reduced circulating IL-6, a relevant marker of systemic inflammation in DCS. We concluded that fluoxetine decreased the incidence of DCS and improved motor recovery, by limiting inflammation processes. PMID:23145072

  9. Traumatic extradural haematoma revealed after contralateral decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Adarsh S; King, Andrew T

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic extradural haematoma following a severe head injury is well documented in neurosurgical literature. We report a case of traumatic extradural haematoma which initially was concealed by the high intracranial pressure (ICP) and revealed after the contralateral decompressive craniectomy. A 21-year-old roofer sustained severe head injury from a fall. The CT brain showed right sided fronto-temporal contusions with small acute subdural haematoma and left orbital roof fracture extending into the temporal bone. ICP was above 45 mmHg even after maximal medical therapy. Decompressive craniectomy was performed on the right side along with contusionectomy. Within an hour, ICP spiked and the CT brain showed left side extradural haematoma. The second surgery demonstrated a bleeding middle meningeal artery associated with the left temporal bone fracture. The clinical sequence of events, radiological and operative findings revealed this to be a traumatic extradural haematoma sustained at the initial trauma. This was revealed after the tamponade effect was released from the initial decompressive craniectomy on the contralateral side.

  10. Musculoskeletal-induced Nucleation in Altitude Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal activity has the potential to both improve and compromise decompression safety. Exercise enhances inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but it may also promote bubble nuclei formation (nucleation), which can lead to gas phase separation and bubble growth and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of musculoskeletal activity and the level of tissue supersaturation may be critical to the net effect. There are limited data available to evaluate cost-benefit relationships. Understanding the relationship is important to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of nucleation in exercise prebreathe protocols and to quantify risk in gravity and microgravity environments. Data gathered during NASA's Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) studies combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise followed by low pressure (4.3 psi; altitude equivalent of 30,300 ft [9,235 m]) microgravity simulation to produce two protocols used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity. Both the Phase II/CEVIS (cycle ergometer vibration isolation system) and ISLE (in-suit light exercise) trials eliminated ambulation to more closely simulate the microgravity environment. The CEVIS results (35 male, 10 female) serve as control data for this NASA/Duke study to investigate the influence of ambulation exercise on bubble formation and the subsequent risk of DCS.

  11. Case Control Study of Type II Decompression Sickness Associated with Patent Foramen Ovale in Experimental No-Decompression Dives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Navy Experimental Diving Unit 321 Bullfinch Rd. Panama City, FL 32407-7015 TA 07-08 NEDU TR 10-07 May 2010 CASE CONTROL STUDY OF TYPE II...08 NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) (U) Case Control Study of Type II Decompression Sickness Associated with Patent Foramen Ovale in...Unit, NEDU 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) This is a retrospective case control study comparing

  12. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  13. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  14. Intraoperative computed tomography for cervicomedullary decompression of foramen magnum stenosis in achondroplasia: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The authors report two cases of cervicomedullary decompression of foramen magnum (FM) stenosis in children with achondroplasia using intraoperative computed tomography (iCT). A 14-month-old girl with myelopathy and retarded motor development, and a 10-year-old girl who had already undergone incomplete FM decompression was presented with myelopathy. Both patients underwent decompressive sub-occipitalcraniectomy and C1 laminectomy without duraplasty using iCT. It clearly showed the extent of FM decompression during surgery, which finally enabled sufficient decompression. After the operation, their myelopathy improved. We think that iCT can provide useful information and guidance for sufficient decompression for FM stenosis in children with achondroplasia.

  15. Pipetron Tunnel Construction Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friant, James E.; Bauer, Robert A.; Gross, David L.; May, Michael; Lach, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    This report examines issues involved in the civil construction aspects of the tunneling that could be done in the region of Fermilab to support the Pipetron along, moderately deep, tunnel loop. Cost, technical and political aspects of tunneling are addressed in this preliminary guide for further study. At Snowmass 96, in a series of informal, but comprehensive discussions, several guidelines were developed to frame this report.

  16. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  17. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  18. Time Course of Endothelial Dysfunction Induced by Decompression Bubbles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Haowen; Liu, Yinuo; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Decompression stress can cause endothelial injury, leading to systematic inflammation and prothrombotic phenomena. Our previous work found that endothelial injury following decompression correlated positively with bubble formation. This study aimed to investigate the time course of endothelial injury and the relationship with bubble amounts. Rats were subjected to a simulated air dive to 7 ATA for 90 min with rapid decompression. Bubbles were detected ultrasonically at the root of pulmonary arteries following decompression. Surviving rats were randomly divided into six groups according to sampling time following decompression (2, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h). Three parameters, serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were identified from our previous study and measured. The level of MDA reached a peak level at 12 h post decompression, and then decreased gradually to control level before 72 h. For both ET-1 and ICAM-1, the greatest expression appeared at 24 h following surfacing, and the increases lasted for more than 72 h. These changes correlated positively with bubble counts at most detection time points. This study reveals the progress of endothelial dysfunction following decompression which provides guidance for timing the determination at least for the current model. The results further verify that bubbles are the causative agents of decompression induced endothelial damage and bubble amounts are an objective and suitable parameter to predict endothelial dysfunction. Most importantly, levels of endothelial biomarkers post dive may serve as sensitive parameters for assessing bubble load and decompression stress. PMID:28386238

  19. Intra-Operative Vertebroplasty Combined with Posterior Cord Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Luca; Mavilio, Nicola; Fiaschi, Pietro; Bragazzi, Roberto; Pacetti, Mattia; Castelletti, Lara; Saitta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous vertebroplasty (VP) is a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of vertebral pathology providing early vertebral stabilization and pain relief. In cases of vertebral pathology complicated by spinal cord compression with associated neurological deficits, VP alone cannot be performed free of risks. We describe a combined approach in which decompressive laminectomy and intra-operative vertebroplasty (IVP) are performed during a single session. Among the 252 VP performed in our centre in the past three years, 12 patients (12 vertebral levels) with different pathologies (six symptomatic haemangiomas, two metastatic fractures, four osteoporotic fractures) were treated with an open procedure combined with surgery. All cases were treated with decompressive laminectomy and IVP (mono/bipeduncular or median-posterior trans-somatic access). Five patients with symptomatic haemangiomas were treated with endovascular embolization prior to the combined approach. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was applied to assess pain intensity before and after surgery. The neurological deficits were evaluated with an ASIA impairment scale. In all cases benefit from pain and neurological deficits was observed. The mean VAS score decreased from 7.8 to 2.5 after surgery. The ASIA score improved in all cases (five cases from D to E and five cases from C to D). No clinical complications were observed. In one case a CT scan performed after the procedure showed a foraminal accumulation of PMMA, but the patient referred no symptoms. IVP can be successfully applied in different pathologies affecting the vertebrae. In our limited series this approach proved safe and efficient to provide decompression of spinal cord and dural sac and vertebral body stabilization in a single session. PMID:25363261

  20. Decompression without Fusion for Low-Grade Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Cheung, Prudence Wing Hang; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective series. Purpose Assess results of decompression-only surgery for low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis with consideration of instability. Overview of Literature There is no consensus on whether fusion or decompression-only surgery leads to better outcomes for patients with low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis. Current trends support fusion but many studies are flawed due to over-generalization without consideration of radiological instability and their variable presentations and natural history. Methods Patients with surgically treated degenerative spondylolisthesis from 1990–2013 were included. Clinical and radiological instability measures were included. Any residual or recurrence of symptoms, revision surgery performed and functional outcome scores including the numerical global rate of change scale, visual analogue scale, and modified Barthel index were measured. Follow-up periods for patients were divided into short-term (<5 years), mid-term (5–10 years) and long-term (>10 years). Results A total of 64 patients were recruited. Mechanical low back pain was noted in 48 patients and most (85.4%) had relief of back pain postoperatively. Radiological instability was noted in 4 subjects by flexion-extension radiographs and 12 subjects with prone traction radiographs by increased disc height and reduction of olisthesis and slip angle. From the results of the short-term, mid-term and long-term follow-up, reoperation only occurred within the first 5-year follow-up period. All functional scores improved from preoperative to postoperative 1-year follow-up. Conclusions Decompression-only for low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis has good long-term results despite instability. Further higher-level studies should be performed on this patient group with radiological instability to suggest the superior surgical option. PMID:26949462

  1. Diving decompression models and bubble metrics: modern computer syntheses.

    PubMed

    Wienke, B R

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative summary of computer models in diving applications is presented, underscoring dual phase dynamics and quantifying metrics in tissue and blood. Algorithms covered include the multitissue, diffusion, split phase gradient, linear-exponential, asymmetric tissue, thermodynamic, varying permeability, reduced gradient bubble, tissue bubble diffusion, and linear-exponential phase models. Defining relationships are listed, and diver staging regimens are underscored. Implementations, diving sectors, and correlations are indicated for models with a history of widespread acceptance, utilization, and safe application across recreational, scientific, military, research, and technical communities. Presently, all models are incomplete, but many (included above) are useful, having resulted in diving tables, underwater meters, and dive planning software. Those herein employ varying degrees of calibration and data tuning. We discuss bubble metrics in tissue and blood as a backdrop against computer models. The past 15 years, or so, have witnessed changes and additions to diving protocols and table procedures, such as shorter nonstop time limits, slower ascent rates, shallow safety stops, ascending repetitive profiles, deep decompression stops, helium based breathing mixtures, permissible reverse profiles, multilevel techniques, both faster and slower controlling repetitive tissue halftimes, smaller critical tensions, longer flying-after-diving surface intervals, and others. Stimulated by Doppler and imaging technology, table and decompression meter development, theory, statistics, chamber and animal testing, or safer diving consensus, these modifications affect a gamut of activity, spanning bounce to decompression, single to multiday, and air to mixed gas diving. As it turns out, there is growing support for many protocols on operational, experimental, and theoretical grounds, with bubble models addressing many concerns on plausible bases, but with further testing or

  2. Gender and Decompression Sickness: A Critical Review and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The author addressed the following questions: are women at greater risk of decompression sickness and venous gas emboli at certain times in their reproductive cycle, is risk modified by the use of birth control pills (BCP), and is there a difference in overall risk between men and women under the same decompression dose? The summary considers information from the few abstracts and reports that were available. Except for the observation of more Type II DCS in women, particularly in women who fly after diving, there was no compelling evidence of a difference in DCS risk between men and women SCUBA divers. Many women that presented with DCS symptoms seemed to be in or near menses, with statistically fewer cases reported as time increased from menses. There was no compelling evidence that the use of BCP in SCUBA divers increases the risk of DCS. There were insufficient data about VGE from SCUBA diving to make any conclusion about the incidence of VGE and gender. In contrast, there were ample data about VGE from research in altitude chambers. Women produced less VGE and less Grade IV VGE compared to men under the same decompression dose, certainly when resting oxygen prebreathe (PB) was performed prior to ascent to altitude. Dual-cycle ergometry exercise during PB tends to reduce the differences in VGE between men and women. There was no compelling evidence that the risk of altitude DCS was different between men and women. However, a large number of DCS cases were associated with menses, and the use of BCP did seem to put women at a slightly greater risk than those that did not use BCP. There were substantial observations that women comprised a larger number of difficult cases that required complicated medical management.

  3. Ischiofemoral Space Decompression Through Posterolateral Approach: Cutting Block Technique

    PubMed Central

    Howse, Elizabeth A.; Mannava, Sandeep; Tamam, Cüneyt; Martin, Hal D.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Stubbs, Allston J.

    2014-01-01

    Ischiofemoral space impingement has become an increasingly recognized extracapsular cause of atypical hip, deep gluteal, and groin pain that can be treated endoscopically. We present a minimally invasive posterolateral technique that preserves the attachment of the iliopsoas tendon and quadratus femoris insertion while decompressing the ischiofemoral space by resecting the lesser trochanter. Furthermore, we present tips to perform this technique in a manner that minimizes the potential for damage to the sciatic nerve. This technique also allows the surgeon to treat concurrent hip pathology arthroscopically. PMID:25685670

  4. Surgical decompression for notalgia paresthetica: a case report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric H; Rosson, Gedge D; Elsamanoudi, Ibrahim; Dellon, A Lee

    2010-01-01

    Notalgia paresthetica is a rare nerve compression. From the Greek word noton, meaning "back," and algia, meaning "pain," "notalgia paresthetica" implies that symptoms of burning pain, itching, and/or numbness in the localized region between the spinous processes of T2 through T6 and the medial border of the scapula constitute a nerve compression syndrome. The compressed nerve is the dorsal branch of the spinal nerve. It is compressed by the paraspinous muscles and fascia against the transverse process of these spinal segments. This is the first report of symptomatic relief by decompression of this nerve.

  5. Autonomic neurosurgery: from microvascular decompression to image guided stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, EAC; Green, AL

    2007-01-01

    The paper reviews mechanisms underlying autonomic disorders, with a focus on cardiovascular dysfunction. Neurosurgical approaches are described for medically refractory hypertension and orthostatic hypotension. After review of microvascular decompression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla, stereotactic CT and MRI guided deep brain stimulation of the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG) is evaluated. Results are presented from patient studies showing reductions in blood pressure with ventral PAG stimulation and increases in blood pressure with dorsal PAG stimulation. A rationale for the treatment of autonomic disorders by neurosurgical intervention is discussed. PMID:21614256

  6. Recomputation of U. S. Navy Standard Air Decompression Tables,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-31

    Contr-act #NOOQ(4-81-G-0216 with funds provided by the Naval Vedical Research and Development Comrmand. January 31, 1982 Appzavod fol Tru"-Ilc DL~trbuban...AO-AIII 991 SEA-SPACE RESEARCH . CO INC MARRERO LA F/6 6/19 RECOMPUTATZON F U. S. NAVY STANDARD AIR DECOMPRESSION TABLES, WI JAN 82 P 0 EDEL N0001-81...Peter 0. Edel SEA-SPACE RESEARCH COMPANY, INC. Marrero, Louisiana The research reported here has been supported under the Office of Naval Research

  7. Probable decompression sickness in a trainee with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, I

    1998-07-01

    Hypobaric chamber training has a potential risk of inducing decompression sickness (DCS). A case of a patient with an atopic dermatitis who complained of paresthesia and numbness in his left arm and shoulder during the altitude exposure is presented here. His symptoms were severe enough for the attending medical officer to diagnose Type II DCS, but it turned out to be a probable case of simple skin bends requiring no treatment. The author can find no better explanation for this discrepancy than the contribution of dermatitis. The possibility of atopic dermatitis confounding the correct diagnosis of the severity of DCS is proposed.

  8. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  9. Degassing of H2O in a phonolitic melt: A closer look at decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marxer, Holger; Bellucci, Philipp; Nowak, Marcus

    2015-05-01

    Melt degassing during magma ascent is controlled by the decompression rate and can be simulated in decompression experiments. H2O-bearing phonolitic melts were decompressed at a super-liquidus T of 1323 K in an internally heated argon pressure vessel, applying continuous decompression (CD) as well as to date commonly used step-wise decompression (SD) techniques to investigate the effect of decompression method on melt degassing. The hydrous melts were decompressed from 200 MPa at nominal decompression rates of 0.0028-1.7 MPa·s- 1. At final pressure (Pfinal), the samples were quenched rapidly at isobaric conditions with ~ 150 K·s- 1. The bubbles in the quenched samples are often deformed and dented. Flow textures in the glass indicate melt transport at high viscosity. We suggest that this observation is due to bubble shrinkage during quench. This general problem was mostly overlooked in the interpretation of experimentally degassed samples to date. Bubble shrinkage due to decreasing molar volume (Vm) of the exsolved H2O in the bubbles occurs during isobaric rapid quench until the melt is too viscous too relax. The decrease of Vm(H2O) during cooling at Pfinal of the experiments results in a decrease of the bubble volume by a shrinking factor Bs: At nominal decompression rates > 0.17 MPa·s- 1 and a Pfinal of 75 MPa, the decompression method has only minor influence on melt degassing. SD and CD result in high bubble number densities of 104-105 mm- 3. Fast P drop leads to immediate supersaturation with H2O in the melt. At such high nominal decompression rates, the diffusional transport of H2O is limited and therefore bubble nucleation is the predominant degassing process. The residual H2O contents in the melts decompressed to 75 MPa increase with nominal decompression rate. After homogeneous nucleation is triggered, CD rates ≤ 0.024 MPa·s- 1 facilitate continuous reduction of the supersaturation by H2O diffusion into previously nucleated bubbles. Bubble number

  10. The Stability Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Engineers operate the controls of the Stability Tunnel: Plans for a new tunnel to study stability problems began in the late thirties. The Stability Tunnel was authorized in 1939 and began operations in June 1941. The installation was completed in December that year with the completion of a new 10,000 Horsepower Diesel-electric generating plant. It was a single return, closed jet tunnel with a 6-foot square test section. The tunnel was disassembled and shipped to Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1958. The tunnel had two separate test sections: one for curved flow, the other for rolling flow. 'The facility...simulates the motion of the aircraft in curved or rolling flight. This is done by actually curving or rolling the airstream as it passes over the model and at the same time providing the proper velocity distribution.' (From AIAA-80-0309) >From Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing: 'The only tunnel directly designed for dynamic stability work is located at the Langley Field branch of the NACA. Its most vital feature is its ability to subject the models to curving air streams that simulate those actually encountered when an airplane rolls, pitches, or yaws. the rotating airstream for simulating roll is produced by a motor-driven paddle just ahead of the test section. Curved air of properly varying velocity for simulating pitch and yaw is produced by a combination of a curved test section and velocity screens. The proper use of this apparatus makes possible the determination of the stability derivatives.' Published in F.H. Lutze, 'Experimental Determination of Pure Rotary Stability Derivatives using a Curved and Rolling Flow Wind Tunnel,' AIAA-80-0309, AIAA 18th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Pasadena, CA, January 14-16, 1980; Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1947).

  11. [A single metastasis in the carpal bones as the first clinical manifestation of a hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Corrales Pinzón, R; Alonso Sánchez, J M; de la Mano González, S; El Karzazi Tarazona, K

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary tumor of the liver. Spreading outside the liver usually takes place in advanced stages of the disease, and bone is the third most common site of metastases. We present a case of hepatocellular carcinoma in which the first clinical manifestation was a single metastasis to the carpal bones. The interest of this case lies in the way this hepatocellular carcinoma manifested as well as in the unusual site of the metastasis.

  12. A very high speed lossless compression/decompression chip set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venbrux, Jack; Liu, Norley; Liu, Kathy; Vincent, Peter; Merrell, Randy

    1991-01-01

    A chip is described that will perform lossless compression and decompression using the Rice Algorithm. The chip set is designed to compress and decompress source data in real time for many applications. The encoder is designed to code at 20 M samples/second at MIL specifications. That corresponds to 280 Mbits/second at maximum quantization or approximately 500 Mbits/second under nominal conditions. The decoder is designed to decode at 10 M samples/second at industrial specifications. A wide range of quantization levels is allowed (4...14 bits) and both nearest neighbor prediction and external prediction are supported. When the pre and post processors are bypassed, the chip set performs high speed entropy coding and decoding. This frees the chip set from being tied to one modeling technique or specific application. Both the encoder and decoder are being fabricated in a 1.0 micron CMOS process that has been tested to survive 1 megarad of total radiation dosage. The CMOS chips are small, only 5 mm on a side, and both are estimated to consume less than 1/4 of a Watt of power while operating at maximum frequency.

  13. Decompressive Surgery in a Patient with Posttraumatic Syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Min Seok; Hwang, Yong Soon; Park, Sang Keun

    2010-01-01

    Posttraumatic syringomyelia may result from a variety of inherent conditions and traumatic events, or from some combination of these. Many hypotheses have arisen to explain this complex disorder, but no consensus has emerged. A 28-year-old man presented with progressive lower extremity weakness, spasticity, and decreased sensation below the T4 dermatome five years after an initial trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large, multi-septate syrinx cavity extending from C5 to L1, with a retropulsed bony fragment of L2. We performed an L2 corpectomy, L1-L3 interbody fusion using a mesh cage and screw fixation, and a wide decompression and release of the ventral portion of the spinal cord with an operating microscope. The patient showed complete resolution of his neurological symptoms, including the bilateral leg weakness and dysesthesia. Postoperative MRI confirmed the collapse of the syrinx and restoration of subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. These findings indicate a good correlation between syrinx collapse and symptomatic improvement. This case showed that syringomyelia may develop through obstruction of the subarachnoid CSF space by a bony fracture and kyphotic deformity. Ventral decompression of the obstructed subarachnoid space, with restoration of spinal alignment, effectively treated the spinal canal encroachment and post-traumatic syringomyelia. PMID:20379479

  14. Cortical blindness following posterior lumbar decompression and fusion.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    Perioperative vision loss following non-ocular surgery is a well-documented phenomenon. In particular, perioperative vision loss has been frequently cited following spinal surgery. Although the rate of vision compromise in spinal surgery is relatively low, the consequences can be quite severe and devastating for the patient. We report a 60-year-old woman who initially presented with back and left leg pain as well as paraparesis. Imaging studies of the lumbar spine showed bony erosion consistent with tumor infiltration of the L3 and L4 spinal segments. Laminectomy at the L2-L4 levels for decompression of the intraspinal tumor was performed. Pathology of the resected bone was consistent with metastatic adenocarincoma. Postoperatively, the patient suffered severe anemia and bilateral infarctions of the posterior cerebral arteries and occipital lobes resulting in vision compromise. Although a definitive pathogenesis remains unknown, preoperative cardiovascular issues and intraoperative hemodynamic instabilities have typically been implicated as high risk factors. High risk factors for this novel clinical presentation of visual compromise following posterior lumbar laminectomy with decompression for an intraspinal tumor are reported.

  15. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; ...

    2017-01-23

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. Themore » decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Finally, akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.« less

  16. Case Descriptions and Observations About Cutis Marmorata From Hypobaric Decompressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Pilmanis, Andrew A.; Webb, James T.

    2002-01-01

    There is disagreement about the pathophysiology, classification, and treatment of cutis marmorata (CM), so there is disagreement about the disposition and medical status of a person that had CM. CM is rare, associated with stressful decompressions, and may be associated with serious signs and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). CM presents as purple or bluish-red skin mottling, often in the pectoral region, shoulders, chest, or upper abdomen. It is unethical to induce CM in humans so all information comes from retrospective analysis of case reports, or from animal models. A literature search, seven recent case reports from the Johnson Space Center and Brooks Air Force Base Hypobaric DCS Databases, interviews with DCS treatment experts, and responses to surveys provided the factual information used to arrive at our conclusions and recommendations. The "weight of evidence" indicates that CM is a local, not centrally mediated or systemic response to bubbles. It is unclear whether obstruction of arterial or venous blood flow is the primary insult since the lesion is reported under either condition. Any neurological or cardiovascular involvements are coincidental, developing along the same time course. The skin could be the source of the bubbles due to its mass, the associated layer of fat, and the variable nature of skin blood flow. CM should not be categorized as Type II DCS, should be included with other skin manifestations in a category called cutaneous DCS, and hyperbaric treatment is only needed if ground level oxygen is ineffective in the case of altitude-induced CM.

  17. Diving behaviour and decompression sickness among Galapagos underwater harvesters.

    PubMed

    Westin, A A; Asvall, J; Idrovo, G; Denoble, P; Brubakk, A O

    2005-01-01

    Diving conditions, dive profiles, vascular bubbles, and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS) in a group of Galapagos commercial divers are described. They harvest sea cucumbers from small boats with surface supplied air (hookah). Dive profiles for 12 divers were recorded using dive loggers, and bubble formation was measured in the pulmonary artery. DCS symptoms were assessed by interview. A total of 380 immersions were recorded over a nine day period. The divers did on average 6.3 immersions per day, in a yo-yo pattern. Mean overall depth was 34.5 FSW. Maximum recorded depth was 107 FSW. Average bottom time per day per diver was 175 minutes. 82 % of all ascents exceeded the recommended maximum ascent rate of 30 FSW/ min. High bubble grades were observed on six occasions, but the test was unreliable. Muscle and joint pain was reported on five occasions, in three different divers. Symptoms were typically managed by analgesics, in-water recompression or not at all. The divers were extremely reluctant to seek professional help for DCS symptoms, mostly due to the high costs of treatment. We conclude that the fishermen dive beyond standard no-decompression limits, and that DCS symptoms are common.

  18. Endothelia-Targeting Protection by Escin in Decompression Sickness Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Jiang, Zhongxin; Ning, Xiaowei; Yu, Xuhua; Xu, Jiajun; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of decompression sickness (DCS) and contributes substantively to subsequent inflammatory responses. Escin, the main active compound in horse chestnut seed extract, is well known for its endothelial protection and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the potential protection of escin against DCS in rats. Escin was administered orally to adult male rats for 7 d (1.8 mg/kg/day) before a simulated air dive. After decompression, signs of DCS were monitored, and blood and pulmonary tissue were sampled for the detection of endothelia related indices. The incidence and mortality of DCS were postponed and decreased significantly in rats treated with escin compared with those treated with saline (P < 0.05). Escin significantly ameliorated endothelial dysfunction (increased serum E-selectin and ICAM-1 and lung Wet/Dry ratio, decreased serum NO), and oxidative and inflammatory responses (increased serum MDA, MPO, IL-6 and TNF-α) (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The results suggest escin has beneficial effects on DCS related to its endothelia-protective properties and might be a drug candidate for DCS prevention and treatment. PMID:28112272

  19. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid-solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure-temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.

  20. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought. PMID:28112152