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Sample records for carrads cross layer

  1. Resource Allocation and Cross Layer Control in Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-25

    nontrivial manner in order to support information transfer. In this paper we will present abstract models that capture the cross layer interaction from the...nontrivial manner in order to support information transfer. In this paper we will present abstract models that capture the cross layer inter- action from...parameters of the others. Our cross-layer model in this paper captures the interaction of these mechanisms, where all the physical and access layer

  2. Cross-layer Optimization for Next Generation Wi-Fi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redieteab, Getachew

    2013-01-01

    From the initial 1997 specification to the undergoing IEEE 802.11ac standardization, a leap in throughput has been observed with every new generation. The expectations for next generations on issues like throughput, range, reliability, and power consumption are even higher. This is quite a challenge considering all the work already done. Cross-layer optimization of physical (PHY) and medium access control (MAC) layers can be an interesting exploration path for further enhancement. During this thesis we have studied cross-layer optimization techniques, with a focus on the IEEE 802.11ac standard. A new multichannel aggregation scheme involving cross-knowledge between PHY and MAC layers has been proposed to improve performance in collision-prone environments. We have shown that some functionalities directly involved PHY and MAC layers. An accurate modeling of both PHY and MAC mechanisms is thus needed to have a realistic characterization of such functionalities. A cross-layer simulator, compliant with IEEE 802.11ac specifications, has thus been implemented. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first simulator incorporating detailed PHY and MAC functionalities for the IEEE 802.11ac standard. The multiple-user multiple-input, multiple-output (MU-MIMO) technique, which is one of the main innovations of the IEEE 802.11ac, needs both PHY and MAC layer considerations. We have thus used the implemented cross-layer simulator to evaluate the performance of MU-MIMO and compared it with the single-user MIMO (SU-MIMO). The aim of these studies was to evaluate the 'real' gains of MU-MIMO solutions (accounting for PHY+MAC) over SU-MIMO solutions and not the generally accepted ones. The impact of the channel sounding interval has particularly been studied. Finally, we have proposed a short PHY layer version of acknowledgment frames for overhead reduction in IEEE 802.11ah communications.

  3. Cross sections of deposited layers investigated by micronuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jet-Efda Contributors Petersson, P.; Bergsåker, H.; Possnert, G.; Coad, J. P.; Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S.; Hakola, A.

    2011-08-01

    Cross sections of deposited layers from the divertor of the Joint European Torus (JET) have been investigated, microscopically and by ion microbeam analysis. The thickness of these layers on the studied samples varies between about 50 μm and 800 μm depending on the exposure time and poloidal location of the sample. For most of the thicker layers a laminar structure is observed. In some locations changes, such as gaps, are also observed along the laminar structure as well as more complex structures. The possibility to use the layers as historical reference was also investigated.

  4. Laminar boundary layers with uniform shear cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    Laminar boundary layers with fully developed uniform shear cross flows are considered. The first streamwise laminar flow is a Blasius boundary layer flow, the second is uniform shear flow over a semi-infinite plate, and the third is the flow induced by a power-law stretching surface. In the first two cases, the effect of streamwise plate motion is taken into account by the parameter λ. In each case, the similarity solutions reduce the governing boundary layer equations to a primary ordinary differential equation for the streamwise flow and a secondary linear equation coupled to the primary solution for the cross flow. It is found that an infinity of solutions exist in each problem and the unique solution in each case is found by applying the Glauert criterion. In some instances, a simple exact solution for the cross flow is presented. Results for the wall shear stresses and velocity profiles are given in graphical form.

  5. Cross-equatorial and boundary layer exchange: A FGGE review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Global Weather Experiment (FGGE) provided unique data on the interesting phenomenon of cross-equatorial flow. Such motion is a key element of the seasonal cycle of the tropics, especially in monsoonal regions. The IIb obserations, IIIb assimilations, and implied dynamics of the flows are reviewed. Additional emphasis is given to the low level branches concentrated in the planetary boundary layer, including air sea interaction and vertical turbulence processes. The results of a recent MONEX Boundary Layer Workshop are summarized.

  6. Cross-Layer Design and Optimization for Wireless Sensor Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    A survey on sensor networks,” IEEE Communications Magazine , Vol. 40, No. 8, pp. 102-116, Aug 2002. [5] Sameer Tilak, Nael B. Abu-Ghazaleh...2004. [9] Jeyhan Karagoux, “High-Rate Wireless Personal Area Networks,” IEEE Communications Magazine ,” Vol.39 No.12, pp. 96-102, Dec. 2001. [10...rate adaptation and energy-saving mechanisms based on cross-layer information for packet-switched data networks", IEEE Communications Magazine , Vol

  7. Modeling cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. M.; Speck, J. S.; Romanov, A. E.; Bobeth, M.; Pompe, W.

    2002-02-01

    We propose and investigate a model for the development of cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers. The model incorporates two important elements: (i) strain relaxation due to dislocation glide in the layer (film) interior that is also associated with misfit dislocation formation at the film/substrate interface and (ii) lateral surface transport that eliminates surface steps that originated from dislocation glide. A combination of dislocation-assisted strain relaxation and surface step flow leads to the appearance of surface height undulations during layer growth. A Monte Carlo simulation technique was applied to model dislocation nucleation events in the course of strain relaxation. The simulation was used to model the influence of dislocations on film surface height profiles. The surface height displacement was calculated from the analytic elasticity solutions for edge dislocations near a free surface. The results of the modeling predict that the average amplitude of the surface undulations and their apparent wavelength both increase with increasing film relaxation and film thickness. The developed cross-hatch pattern is characterized by an atomically smooth but mesoscopically (lateral dimensions ˜0.1-10 μm) rough surface morphology. The conclusions of the model are in agreement with atomic force microscopy observations of cross-hatch surface relief in In0.25Ga0.75As/GaAs samples grown well beyond the critical thickness for misfit dislocation formation.

  8. Cross-Layer Adaptive Feedback Scheduling of Wireless Control Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Feng; Ma, Longhua; Peng, Chen; Sun, Youxian; Dong, Jinxiang

    2008-01-01

    There is a trend towards using wireless technologies in networked control systems. However, the adverse properties of the radio channels make it difficult to design and implement control systems in wireless environments. To attack the uncertainty in available communication resources in wireless control systems closed over WLAN, a cross-layer adaptive feedback scheduling (CLAFS) scheme is developed, which takes advantage of the co-design of control and wireless communications. By exploiting cross-layer design, CLAFS adjusts the sampling periods of control systems at the application layer based on information about deadline miss ratio and transmission rate from the physical layer. Within the framework of feedback scheduling, the control performance is maximized through controlling the deadline miss ratio. Key design parameters of the feedback scheduler are adapted to dynamic changes in the channel condition. An event-driven invocation mechanism for the feedback scheduler is also developed. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is efficient in dealing with channel capacity variations and noise interference, thus providing an enabling technology for control over WLAN. PMID:27879934

  9. A Cross-Layer PEP for DVB-RCS Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giambene, Giovanni; Hadzic, Snezana

    The aim of this paper is to consider the problems of TCP performance in broadband GEO satellite networks and to propose a cross-layer approach for a transport-layer PEP that makes spoofing actions on ACKs to modify them in case the satellite network is congested. This approach is investigated here from the signaling standpoint with a special attention to the BSM reference model and considering a specific GEO satellite network architecture based on the DVB-S2/-RCS standards. The proposed PEP can prevent congestion in the satellite network, thus allowing a better TCP performance. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EU SatNEx II FP6 Network of Excellence.

  10. Crossing shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanswami, N.; Knight, D. D.; Bogdonoff, S. M.; Horstman, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional interactions between crossing shock waves generated by symmetric sharp fins and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate are investigated experimentally and theoretically at Mach number 2.95 and freestream unit Reynolds number 1.96 x 10 to the 7th/ft. The incoming boundary layer has a thickness of 4 mm at the location of the fin leading edges. A comparison of experimental and computational results for two sets of fin angles (11 x 11 and 9 x 9 deg) shows general agreement with regard to surface pressure measurements and surface streamline patterns. The principal feature of the streamline structure is a collision of counterrotating vortical structures emanating from near the fin leading edges and meeting at the geometric centerline of the interaction.

  11. Cooperative Communication Mechanism and Architecture for Cross-Layer Coordination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    receives the CTS and as a side effect can determine the quality of the channel. The sender’s MAC can use this information to set the transmission rate of...Figure 7 shows the process in detail. In step 0, the PHY receives some data and decodes it estimating the channel quality as a side effect . In step 1...be a system that we and other researchers can use effectively to validate a wide variety of cross-layer algorithms and protocols. 3

  12. A Closed-loop Cross-Layer Scheme for Wireless Multiuser Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lili; Wang, Yang

    To improve transmission efficiency of wireless communication systems, cross-layer design is investigated, which can adapt to the dynamically variable wireless channel characters. In this paper, a novel cross-layer design for multi-user system is proposed to improve system performance. The Beamforming-MIMO cross-layer system is scheduled through combining multilevel adaptive modulation (AM) at physical layer with truncated automatic repeat request (ARQ) protocol at data link layer, and feed backing modulation mode, ARQ request and transmit weight vector from receiver, in order to improve multi-antennas system performance. This paper derives close-form expressions of the system spectral efficiency and the outage probability for wireless multiuser MIMO transmissions. It shows by simulation that, compared to Alamouti's cross-layer system and SISO cross-layer system, this cross-layer system can achieve better performance. And we analyze the impact of the transmit antenna number and mobile user number on the performance.

  13. Cross-layer optimization for wireless video communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dapeng; He, Zhihai

    2007-01-01

    With the rapid growth of wireless networks and increasing popularity of portable video devices, wireless video communication is poised to become the enabling technology for many multimedia applications over wireless networks. Real-time wireless video transmission typically has requirements on quality of service (QoS). However, wireless channels are unreliable and the channel capacities are time-varying, which may cause severe degradation to video presentation quality. In addition, for portable devices, video compression and wireless transmission are tightly coupled through the constraints on data rate, power, and delay. These issues make it particularly challenging to design an efficient real-time video compression and wireless transmission system on a portable device. In this paper, we take a cross-layer approach to this problem; our objective is to maximize the video quality under the constraints of resource and delay. Specifically, we minimize the end-to-end video distortion under the constraints of resource and delay, over the parameters in physical, link, and application (video) layers. This formulation is general and capable of capturing the fundamental aspects of the design of wireless video communication systems. Based on this formulation, we study how the resources could be intelligently allocated to maximize the video quality and analyze the performance limits of the wireless video communication system under resource constraints.

  14. Cross linking molecular systems to form ultrathin dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Danqin

    Dehydrogenation leads to cross linking of polymer or polymer like formation in very different systems: self-assembled monolayers and in closo -carboranes leading to the formation of semiconducting and dielectric boron carbide. We find evidence of intermolecular interactions for a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed from a large molecular adsorbate, [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol, from the dispersion of the molecular orbitals with changing the wave vector k and from the changes with temperature. With the formation self assembled molecular (SAM) layer, the molecular orbitals hybridize to electronic bands, with indications of significant band dispersion of the unoccupied molecular orbitals. Although organic adsorbates and thin films are generally regarded as "soft" materials, the effective Debye temperature, indicative of the dynamic motion of the lattice normal to the surface, can be very high, e.g. in the multilayer film formed from [1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-dimethanethiol (BPDMT). Depending on molecular orientation, the effective Debye temperature can be comparable to that of graphite due to the 'stiffness' of the benzene rings, but follows the expected Debye-Waller behavior for the core level photoemission intensities with temperature. This is not always the case. We find that a monomolecular film formed from [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol deviates from Debye-Waller temperature behavior and is likely caused by temperature dependent changes in molecular orientation. We also find evidence for the increase in dielectric character with polymerization (cross-linking) in spite of the decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gap upon irradiation of TPDMT. The changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, with cross-linking, are roughly consistent with the band dispersion. The decomposition and cross-linking processes are also accompanied by changes in molecular orientation. The energetics of the three isomeric carborane cage compounds [ closo-1,2-orthocarborane, closo-1

  15. Wireless Visual Sensor Network Resource Allocation using Cross-Layer Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    channel coding. 2. RESOURCE ALLOCATION USING CROSS - LAYER OPTIMIZATION This work considers a wireless visual sensor network that...SUBJECT TERMS Cross - layer , visual sensor network , Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), resource allocation, H.265, spread spectrum, joint source- channel ...DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2008 – August 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE WIRELESS VISUAL SENSOR NETWORK RESOURCE ALLOCATION USING CROSS -

  16. Final report for CCS cross-layer reliability visioning study

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Dehon, Andre; Carter, Nicj

    2010-12-20

    The geometric rate of improvement of transistor size and integrated circuit performance known as Moore's Law has been an engine of growth for our economy, enabling new products and services, creating new value and wealth, increasing safety, and removing menial tasks from our daily lives. Affordable, highly integrated components have enabled both life-saving technologies and rich entertainment applications. Anti-lock brakes, insulin monitors, and GPS-enabled emergency response systems save lives. Cell phones, internet appliances, virtual worlds, realistic video games, and mp3 players enrich our lives and connect us together. Over the past 40 years of silicon scaling, the increasing capabilities of inexpensive computation have transformed our society through automation and ubiquitous communications. Looking forward, increasing unpredictability threatens our ability to continue scaling integrated circuits at Moore's Law rates. As the transistors and wires that make up integrated circuits become smaller, they display both greater differences in behavior among devices designed to be identical and greater vulnerability to transient and permanent faults. Conventional design techniques expend energy to tolerate this unpredictability by adding safety margins to a circuit's operating voltage, clock frequency or charge stored per bit. However, the rising energy costs needed to compensate for increasing unpredictability are rapidly becoming unacceptable in today's environment where power consumption is often the limiting factor on integrated circuit performance and energy efficiency is a national concern. Reliability and energy consumption are both reaching key inflection points that, together, threaten to reduce or end the benefits of feature size reduction. To continue beneficial scaling, we must use a cross-layer, Jull-system-design approach to reliability. Unlike current systems, which charge every device a substantial energy tax in order to guarantee correct operation in

  17. Ice Layer Cross-Section In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image of shows a cross sectional view of the ice layers. Note the subtle peach banding on the left side of the image. The time variation that the bands represent is not yet understood.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 83.5, Longitude 118.2 East (241.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Ice Layer Cross-Section In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image of shows a cross sectional view of the ice layers. Note the subtle peach banding on the left side of the image. The time variation that the bands represent is not yet understood.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 83.5, Longitude 118.2 East (241.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer

    PubMed Central

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H.; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S. White, Matthew.; S. Sariciftci, Niyazi.; Scharber, Markus C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium–tin–oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor–acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  20. Physical and Cross-Layer Security Enhancement and Resource Allocation for Wireless Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashar, Muhammad Shafi Al

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present novel physical (PHY) and cross-layer design guidelines and resource adaptation algorithms to improve the security and user experience in the future wireless networks. Physical and cross-layer wireless security measures can provide stronger overall security with high efficiency and can also provide better…

  1. Physical and Cross-Layer Security Enhancement and Resource Allocation for Wireless Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashar, Muhammad Shafi Al

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present novel physical (PHY) and cross-layer design guidelines and resource adaptation algorithms to improve the security and user experience in the future wireless networks. Physical and cross-layer wireless security measures can provide stronger overall security with high efficiency and can also provide better…

  2. Spin and valley resolved Landau level crossing in tri-layer ABA stacked graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Biswajit; Gupta, Vishakha; Borah, Abhinandan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deshmukh, Mandar

    We present quantum Hall measurements on a high quality encapsulated tri-layer graphene device. Low temperature field effect mobility of this device is around 500,000 cm2/Vs and we see SdH oscillations at a magnetic field as low as 0.3 T. Quantum Hall measurements confirm that the chosen tri layer graphene is Bernal (ABA) stacked. Due to the presence of both mass-less monolayer like Dirac fermions and massive bi-layer like Dirac fermions in Bernal stacked tri-layer graphene, there are Landau level crossings between monolayer and bi-layer bands in quantum Hall regime. Although most of the Landau Level crossings are predominantly present on the electron sides, we also observe signatures of the crossings on the hole side. This behaviour is consistent with the asymmetry of electron and hole in ABA tri-layer graphene. We observe a series of crossings of the spin and valley resolved Landau Levels.

  3. The Balanced Cross-Layer Design Routing Algorithm in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Fuzzy Logic

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Martínez, José-Fernán; Díaz, Vicente Hernández

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the cross-layer design for the wireless sensor network communication protocol has become more and more important and popular. Considering the disadvantages of the traditional cross-layer routing algorithms, in this paper we propose a new fuzzy logic-based routing algorithm, named the Balanced Cross-layer Fuzzy Logic (BCFL) routing algorithm. In BCFL, we use the cross-layer parameters’ dispersion as the fuzzy logic inference system inputs. Moreover, we give each cross-layer parameter a dynamic weight according the value of the dispersion. For getting a balanced solution, the parameter whose dispersion is large will have small weight, and vice versa. In order to compare it with the traditional cross-layer routing algorithms, BCFL is evaluated through extensive simulations. The simulation results show that the new routing algorithm can handle the multiple constraints without increasing the complexity of the algorithm and can achieve the most balanced performance on selecting the next hop relay node. Moreover, the Balanced Cross-layer Fuzzy Logic routing algorithm can adapt to the dynamic changing of the network conditions and topology effectively. PMID:26266412

  4. The Balanced Cross-Layer Design Routing Algorithm in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Fuzzy Logic.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Martínez, José-Fernán; Hernández Díaz, Vicente

    2015-08-10

    Recently, the cross-layer design for the wireless sensor network communication protocol has become more and more important and popular. Considering the disadvantages of the traditional cross-layer routing algorithms, in this paper we propose a new fuzzy logic-based routing algorithm, named the Balanced Cross-layer Fuzzy Logic (BCFL) routing algorithm. In BCFL, we use the cross-layer parameters' dispersion as the fuzzy logic inference system inputs. Moreover, we give each cross-layer parameter a dynamic weight according the value of the dispersion. For getting a balanced solution, the parameter whose dispersion is large will have small weight, and vice versa. In order to compare it with the traditional cross-layer routing algorithms, BCFL is evaluated through extensive simulations. The simulation results show that the new routing algorithm can handle the multiple constraints without increasing the complexity of the algorithm and can achieve the most balanced performance on selecting the next hop relay node. Moreover, the Balanced Cross-layer Fuzzy Logic routing algorithm can adapt to the dynamic changing of the network conditions and topology effectively.

  5. Hypersonic crossing shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, M. I.; Horstman, K. C.; Horstman, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data for two three-dimensional intersecting shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction flows at Mach 8.3 are presented. The test bodies, composed of two sharp fins fastened to a flat plate test bed, were designed to generate flows with varying degrees of pressure gradient, boundary-layer separation, and turning angle. The data include surface pressure and heat transfer distributions as well as mean flow field surveys both in the undisturbed and interaction regimes. The data are presented in a convenient form to be used to validate existing or future computational models of these hypersonic flows.

  6. Cross Stream Differencing for Integral Boundary Layer Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    smaller artificial viscosity. R6sum6 Un sch6ma de differentiation transversale de premier ordre explicite, stable et efficace, avec une faible erreur de...DIFFERENCING FOR INTEGRAL BOUNDARY LAYER EQUATIONS 4 AU-HORS (Last name, first name, middle initial, If military, show rank, e.g. Doe, Mal John EJ Hally

  7. Cross layers decision making and fusion model in layered sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnaw, Abdulqadir; Zein-Sabatto, Saleh; Malkani, Mohan

    2012-06-01

    Layered sensing systems involve operation of several layers of sensing with different capabilities integrated into one whole system. The integrated layers of sensing must share information and local decisions across layers for better situation awareness. This research focused on the development of a model for decision making and fusion at the information level in layered sensing systems using the cloud model for uncertainty processing. In this research, the addition of a new processing level to the Joint Directors of Laboratories (JDL) processing model is proposed. The new processing level is called "Information Assessment, Fusion, and Control (IAFC)". Through this level, the different layers of a layered sensing system evaluate information about a given situation in terms of threat level and make a decision. The information assessment and control processing module were able to assess the threat level of a situation accurately and exchange assessments in order to determine the overall situation's threat level among all layers. The uncertain decisions were fused together to a unified decision using the cloud model of uncertainty processing methodology. Using this methodology, a cognitive element was added to the process of information assessment module leading to more accurate situation awareness.

  8. Cross-Layer Design in Wireless Cognitive Networks (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    24,2010 at 14:07:59 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. 1 can be obtained by sharing of information across the layers of the protocol stack...Downloaded on June 24,2010 at 14:07:59 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. 2 2. Cognitive Networks A cognitive infrastructure consists...24,2010 at 14:07:59 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. 3 [16] discussed cognitive network management using reinforcement learning for

  9. Optimizing Airborne Networking Performance with Cross-Layer Design Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code ) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std...the link layer must adapt to the changes, by increasing the transmit power or using a better coding scheme. This would temporarily solve the problem...transport of compressed video. Video standards, such as MPEG [2] and H.263 [3], use motion- compensated predictive (MCP) coding to reduce the temporal

  10. Morphology of the cross section of silica layer in rice husk.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sung Chun; Jung, In Ok; Kim, Moon Yong; So, Soo Jeong; Yoon, Chan; Kim, Chul; Lei, Guo; Han, Chong Soo

    2011-02-01

    The physical adsorption of nitrogen and gas flow experiments on the silica layer in rice husk indicated that an existence of nano meter sized through holes. In this study, the external shape of the holes on the cross section of the layer was investigated with a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer, an atomic force microscope and scanning tunneling microscope. In the energy dispersive mapping image, 2-5 micron thick silica layer under outer cellulose layer, silica nano particles in the middle cellulose layer and sub micron silica layer in inner cellulose layer were observed. The cross section of the layer showed 20 nm building units with approximately 100 nm convexities. The atomic force microscopic image also showed the approximately 100 nm convexities as well as a roughness of approximately 20 nm. When osmium was coated on the silica layer, the wells with 2 approximately 5 nm horizontal and approximately 2 nm vertical lengths were observed on the plate surface in scanning tunneling microscopic image. From the results, it was suggested that the holes in the rice husk silica layer are almost straight and not zigzag spaces originated from the simple packing of nano particles.

  11. Maintaining network security: how macromolecular structures cross the peptidoglycan layer.

    PubMed

    Scheurwater, Edie M; Burrows, Lori L

    2011-05-01

    Peptidoglycan plays a vital role in bacterial physiology, maintaining cell shape and resisting cellular lysis from high internal turgor pressures. Its integrity is carefully maintained by controlled remodeling during growth and division by the coordinated activities of penicillin-binding proteins, lytic transglycosylases, and N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidases. However, its small pore size (∼2 nm) and covalently closed structure make it a formidable barrier to the assembly of large macromolecular cell-envelope-spanning complexes involved in motility and secretion. Here, we review the strategies used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble such macromolecular complexes across the peptidoglycan layer, while preserving its essential structural role. In addition, we discuss evidence that suggests that peptidoglycan can be integrated into cell-envelope-spanning complexes as a structural and functional extension of their architecture.

  12. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  13. Nanomechanics of layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte complexes: a manifestation of ionic cross-links and fixed charges.

    PubMed

    Han, Biao; Chery, Daphney R; Yin, Jie; Lu, X Lucas; Lee, Daeyeon; Han, Lin

    2016-01-28

    This study investigates the roles of two distinct features of ionically cross-linked polyelectrolyte networks - ionic cross-links and fixed charges - in determining their nanomechanical properties. The layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(acrylic acid) (PAH/PAA) network is used as the model material. The densities of ionic cross-links and fixed charges are modulated through solution pH and ionic strength (IS), and the swelling ratio, elastic and viscoelastic properties are quantified via an array of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanomechanical tools. The roles of ionic cross-links are underscored by the distinctive elastic and viscoelastic nanomechanical characters observed here. First, as ionic cross-links are highly sensitive to solution conditions, the instantaneous modulus, E0, exhibits orders-of-magnitude changes upon pH- and IS-governed swelling, distinctive from the rubber elasticity prediction based on permanent covalent cross-links. Second, ionic cross-links can break and self-re-form, and this mechanism dominates force relaxation of PAH/PAA under a constant indentation depth. In most states, the degree of relaxation is >90%, independent of ionic cross-link density. The importance of fixed charges is highlighted by the unexpectedly more elastic nature of the network despite low ionic cross-link density at pH 2.0, IS 0.01 M. Here, the complex is a net charged, loosely cross-linked, where the degree of relaxation is attenuated to ≈50% due to increased elastic contribution arising from fixed charge-induced Donnan osmotic pressure. In addition, this study develops a new method for quantifying the thickness of highly swollen polymer hydrogel films. It also underscores important technical considerations when performing nanomechanical tests on highly rate-dependent polymer hydrogel networks. These results provide new insights into the nanomechanical characters of ionic polyelectrolyte complexes, and lay the ground for further

  14. Ambient Intelligence Context-Based Cross-Layer Design in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Seet, Boon-Chong; Al-Anbuky, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    By exchanging information directly between non-adjacent protocol layers, cross-layer (CL) interaction can significantly improve and optimize network performances such as energy efficiency and delay. This is particularly important for wireless sensor networks (WSNs) where sensor devices are energy-constrained and deployed for real-time monitoring applications. Existing CL schemes mainly exploit information exchange between physical, medium access control (MAC), and routing layers, with only a handful involving application layer. For the first time, we proposed a framework for CL optimization based on user context of ambient intelligence (AmI) application and an ontology-based context modeling and reasoning mechanism. We applied the proposed framework to jointly optimize MAC and network (NET) layer protocols for WSNs. Extensive evaluations show that the resulting optimization through context awareness and CL interaction for both MAC and NET layer protocols can yield substantial improvements in terms of throughput, packet delivery, delay, and energy performances. PMID:25317760

  15. A novel cross-layer protocol design for planetary satellite network systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lixin; Dai, Guanzhong; Zhang, Zhi; Zhao, Yuting; Xu, Hao; Yang, Deming

    2005-11-01

    The Planetary Satellite Network consists of the satellites orbiting the planets to provide communication relay and navigation services to the surface elements, which are often spread out to form an Ad hoc network. However, the current TCP/IP layered protocols have very poor performance in the Planetary Satellite Network, which is characterized by extremely high propagation delays, link errors, asymmetrical bandwidth and blackouts. In this paper, a novel cross-layer protocol design that supports adaptability and optimization across multiple layers of the protocol stack is presented to solve the performance problem of the Planetary Satellite Network. This cross-layer feedback design on a Planetary Satellite device aims to optimize overall network performance by increasing local interaction among protocols, decreasing remote communications, and consequently saving network bandwidth, improving the QoS performance.

  16. A survey on multimedia-based cross-layer optimization in visual sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel G; Guedes, Luiz Affonso

    2011-01-01

    Visual sensor networks (VSNs) comprised of battery-operated electronic devices endowed with low-resolution cameras have expanded the applicability of a series of monitoring applications. Those types of sensors are interconnected by ad hoc error-prone wireless links, imposing stringent restrictions on available bandwidth, end-to-end delay and packet error rates. In such context, multimedia coding is required for data compression and error-resilience, also ensuring energy preservation over the path(s) toward the sink and improving the end-to-end perceptual quality of the received media. Cross-layer optimization may enhance the expected efficiency of VSNs applications, disrupting the conventional information flow of the protocol layers. When the inner characteristics of the multimedia coding techniques are exploited by cross-layer protocols and architectures, higher efficiency may be obtained in visual sensor networks. This paper surveys recent research on multimedia-based cross-layer optimization, presenting the proposed strategies and mechanisms for transmission rate adjustment, congestion control, multipath selection, energy preservation and error recovery. We note that many multimedia-based cross-layer optimization solutions have been proposed in recent years, each one bringing a wealth of contributions to visual sensor networks.

  17. A Survey on Multimedia-Based Cross-Layer Optimization in Visual Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Daniel G.; Guedes, Luiz Affonso

    2011-01-01

    Visual sensor networks (VSNs) comprised of battery-operated electronic devices endowed with low-resolution cameras have expanded the applicability of a series of monitoring applications. Those types of sensors are interconnected by ad hoc error-prone wireless links, imposing stringent restrictions on available bandwidth, end-to-end delay and packet error rates. In such context, multimedia coding is required for data compression and error-resilience, also ensuring energy preservation over the path(s) toward the sink and improving the end-to-end perceptual quality of the received media. Cross-layer optimization may enhance the expected efficiency of VSNs applications, disrupting the conventional information flow of the protocol layers. When the inner characteristics of the multimedia coding techniques are exploited by cross-layer protocols and architectures, higher efficiency may be obtained in visual sensor networks. This paper surveys recent research on multimedia-based cross-layer optimization, presenting the proposed strategies and mechanisms for transmission rate adjustment, congestion control, multipath selection, energy preservation and error recovery. We note that many multimedia-based cross-layer optimization solutions have been proposed in recent years, each one bringing a wealth of contributions to visual sensor networks. PMID:22163908

  18. Effective inelastic scattering cross-sections for background analysis in HAXPES of deeply buried layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risterucci, P.; Renault, O.; Zborowski, C.; Bertrand, D.; Torres, A.; Rueff, J.-P.; Ceolin, D.; Grenet, G.; Tougaard, S.

    2017-04-01

    Inelastic background analysis of HAXPES spectra was recently introduced as a powerful method to get access to the elemental distribution in deeply buried layers or interfaces, at depth up to 60 nm below the surface. However the accuracy of the analysis highly relies on suitable scattering cross-sections able to describe effectively the transport of photoelectrons through overlayer structures consisting of individual layers with potentially very different scattering properties. Here, we show that within Tougaard's practical framework as implemented in the Quases-Analyze software, the photoelectron transport through thick (25-40 nm) multi-layer structures with widely different cross-sections can be reliably described with an effective cross-section in the form of a weighted sum of the individual cross-section of each layer. The high-resolution core-level analysis partly provides a guide for determining the nature of the individual cross-sections to be used. We illustrate this novel approach with the practical case of a top Al/Ti bilayer structure in an AlGaN/GaN power transistor device stack before and after sucessive annealing treatments. The analysis provides reliable insights on the Ti and Ga depth distributions up to nearly 50 nm below the surface.

  19. Performance analysis of STT-RAM with cross shaped free layer using Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharat Kumary, Tangudu; Ghosh, Bahniman; Awadhiya, Bhaskar; Verma, Ankit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of a spin transfer torque random access memory (STT-RAM) cell with a cross shaped Heusler compound based free layer using micromagnetic simulations. We have designed a free layer using a Cobalt based Heusler compound. Simulation results clearly show that the switching time from one state to the other state has been reduced, also it has been found that the critical switching current density (to switch the magnetization of the free layer of the STT RAM cell) is reduced.

  20. Electrostatic modulation and enzymatic cross-linking of interfacial layers impacts gastrointestinal fate of multilayer emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2015-08-01

    In this study, membrane properties were modulated using layer-by-layer electrostatic depositioning in combination with salt and/or enzyme treatment to control the gastrointestinal fate of emulsified oils. Lipid droplets coated by a single-layer of biopolymers (gelatin) were prepared by high pressure homogenization. Lipid droplets coated by a double-layer of biopolymers (gelatin-pectin) were prepared by electrostatically depositing sugar beet pectin on the gelatin-coated droplets. Laccase was added to the double-layer emulsions to covalently crosslink the adsorbed pectin molecules, whereas sodium chloride was added to modulate interfacial properties through electrostatic screening effects. Non-cross-linked and cross-linked double-layer emulsions (with and without salt) were then passed through a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) that included mouth, gastric and intestinal phases. Free fatty acid release profiles suggested that the stability of the emulsified droplets within the GIT played a more important role in determining the rate and extent of lipid digestion than the initial interfacial layer properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Two-layer synchronized ternary quantum-dot cellular automata wire crossings.

    PubMed

    Bajec, Iztok Lebar; Pečar, Primož

    2012-04-16

    : Quantum-dot cellular automata are an interesting nanoscale computing paradigm. The introduction of the ternary quantum-dot cell enabled ternary computing, and with the recent development of a ternary functionally complete set of elementary logic primitives and the ternary memorizing cell design of complex processing structures is becoming feasible. The specific nature of the ternary quantum-dot cell makes wire crossings one of the most problematic areas of ternary quantum-dot cellular automata circuit design. We hereby present a two-layer wire crossing that uses a specific clocking scheme, which ensures the crossed wires have the same effective delay.

  2. Cross-layer restoration with software defined networking based on IP over optical transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Cheng, Lei; Deng, Junni; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Lee, Young

    2015-10-01

    The IP over optical transport network is a very promising networking architecture applied to the interconnection of geographically distributed data centers due to the performance guarantee of low delay, huge bandwidth and high reliability at a low cost. It can enable efficient resource utilization and support heterogeneous bandwidth demands in highly-available, cost-effective and energy-effective manner. In case of cross-layer link failure, to ensure a high-level quality of service (QoS) for user request after the failure becomes a research focus. In this paper, we propose a novel cross-layer restoration scheme for data center services with software defined networking based on IP over optical network. The cross-layer restoration scheme can enable joint optimization of IP network and optical network resources, and enhance the data center service restoration responsiveness to the dynamic end-to-end service demands. We quantitatively evaluate the feasibility and performances through the simulation under heavy traffic load scenario in terms of path blocking probability and path restoration latency. Numeric results show that the cross-layer restoration scheme improves the recovery success rate and minimizes the overall recovery time.

  3. Q-learning-based cross-layer Learning Engine design for cognitive radio network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Congbin; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Yanchao; Ma, Jinghui

    2013-03-01

    In cognitive radio (CR) networks, Learning Engine has considerable significance on dynamic spectrum access (DSA) and implementation of cognitive function. In this paper, a cross-layer learning engine design scheme is proposed by jointly considering physical-layer dynamic channel selection, modulation and coding scheme, data-link layer frame length in CR networks, with the purpose to maximize system throughput and simultaneously meet heterogeneous Quality of Service (QoS) requirements. The wireless fading channel is modeled as a continuous state space Markov decision process (MDP) and the licensed network activity is abstracted as a finite-state one. We introduce Q-learning algorithm to realize the function of learning from state space and adapt wireless environment. And meanwhile a large scale Qfunction approximator based on support vector machine (SVM) is employed to effectively reduce storage requirement and decrease the operation complexity. A cross-layer learning engine communication platform is realized by using Matlab simulator. the simulation results demonstrate that while lacking system prior knowledge, the learning engine can effectively achieve configuration function by system cross-layer learning approach, and furthermore, it can converge to the best—i.e., realize reconfiguration function in CR networks while meeting users' QoS.

  4. Obtaining Cross-Sections of Paint Layers in Cultural Artifacts Using Femtosecond Pulsed Lasers.

    PubMed

    Harada, Takaaki; Spence, Stephanie; Margiolakis, Athanasios; Deckoff-Jones, Skylar; Ploeger, Rebecca; Shugar, Aaron N; Hamm, James F; Dani, Keshav M; Dani, Anya R

    2017-01-26

    Recently, ultrafast lasers exhibiting high peak powers and extremely short pulse durations have created a new paradigm in materials processing. The precision and minimal thermal damage provided by ultrafast lasers in the machining of metals and dielectrics also suggests a novel application in obtaining precise cross-sections of fragile, combustible paint layers in artwork and cultural heritage property. Cross-sections of paint and other decorative layers on artwork provide critical information into its history and authenticity. However, the current methodology which uses a scalpel to obtain a cross-section can cause further damage, including crumbling, delamination, and paint compression. Here, we demonstrate the ability to make controlled cross-sections of paint layers with a femtosecond pulsed laser, with minimal damage to the surrounding artwork. The femtosecond laser cutting overcomes challenges such as fragile paint disintegrating under scalpel pressure, or oxidation by the continuous-wave (CW) laser. Variations in laser power and translational speed of the laser while cutting exhibit different benefits for cross-section sampling. The use of femtosecond lasers in studying artwork also presents new possibilities in analyzing, sampling, and cleaning of artwork with minimal destructive effects.

  5. Obtaining Cross-Sections of Paint Layers in Cultural Artifacts Using Femtosecond Pulsed Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Takaaki; Spence, Stephanie; Margiolakis, Athanasios; Deckoff-Jones, Skylar; Ploeger, Rebecca; Shugar, Aaron N.; Hamm, James F.; Dani, Keshav M.; Dani, Anya R.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, ultrafast lasers exhibiting high peak powers and extremely short pulse durations have created a new paradigm in materials processing. The precision and minimal thermal damage provided by ultrafast lasers in the machining of metals and dielectrics also suggests a novel application in obtaining precise cross-sections of fragile, combustible paint layers in artwork and cultural heritage property. Cross-sections of paint and other decorative layers on artwork provide critical information into its history and authenticity. However, the current methodology which uses a scalpel to obtain a cross-section can cause further damage, including crumbling, delamination, and paint compression. Here, we demonstrate the ability to make controlled cross-sections of paint layers with a femtosecond pulsed laser, with minimal damage to the surrounding artwork. The femtosecond laser cutting overcomes challenges such as fragile paint disintegrating under scalpel pressure, or oxidation by the continuous-wave (CW) laser. Variations in laser power and translational speed of the laser while cutting exhibit different benefits for cross-section sampling. The use of femtosecond lasers in studying artwork also presents new possibilities in analyzing, sampling, and cleaning of artwork with minimal destructive effects. PMID:28772468

  6. IEEE 802.16 Packet Scheduling with Traffic Prioritization and Cross-Layer Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, João; Sargento, Susana; Gomes, Álvaro; Fontes, Francisco; Neves, Pedro

    WiMAX is emerging as a broadband wireless access technology to satisfy end user expectations, containing a new set of advantages in terms of throughput, coverage and QoS support at the MAC level which allows convergence of several different types of applications and services. For that reason, the allocation of resources or scheduling becomes of greater importance. This paper focuses on a cross-layer scheduling optimization solution for IEEE 802.16. The relevant features of the proposed packet scheduling optimization scheme consist: of prioritization of users within the same traffic class, allowing for example to an operator, differentiated treatment among users, for instance distinguishing between premium or gold users and silver users; and also cross layer optimization which implies radio resource optimization and a more effective scheduler decision. Simulation scenarios are presented to demonstrate how the scheduling solution allocates resources through particular WiMAX MAC layer implementation in the NS-2 simulator. Results show that the new mechanism implementation results in an improvement to the simple Round Robin fashion present in the original simulation model, being able to increase differentiation between different classes and decrease packets delay, due to its cross-layer processing and traffic prioritization.

  7. Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Macroscopic Absorption Cross Section for Neutron Absorbing Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyani, Abouzar; Rostam, G. Gh.; Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Bakhsh, Hossin Jahan; Mahdavi, Farzad

    2011-12-01

    Objective of this study is measuring the macroscopic cross section of a neutron absorbing layer for thermal neutrons. For this purpose a neutron source and BF 3 detector have been applied. For measuring macroscopic cross section of thermal neutrons by the Formula, it is necessary to provide suitable geometric conditions in order to assume the production and build-up coefficient to be the unit value (=1). To fulfill required conditions for this assumption, surface of the detector is covered with a 2 mm thick layer of cadmium. Radiation window of the detector has a 3 cm diameter, situated directly in front of the source. By placing the cadmium cover over the detector, variation of values verses thickness of absorbent layer, renders linear function behavior, making it possible to measure the macroscopic cross section. The next stage is applying the MCNP code by simulating F1 tally and cosine-cards for calculating Total Macroscopic Cross-Section. Validation of this study is achieved through comparison of simulation by the MCNP code and results rendered by experiment measurements.

  8. Cross-Field Current Instabilities in Thin Ionization Layers and the Enhanced Aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jay R. Johnson and Hideo Okuda

    2008-05-20

    Nearly half of the time, auroral displays exhibit thin, bright layers known as \\enhanced aurora." There is a substantial body of evidence that connects these displays with thin, dense, heavy ion layers in the E-region. Based on the spectral characteristics of the enhanced layers, it is believed that they result when wave-particle interaction heats ambient electrons to energies at or just above the 17 eV ionization energy of N2. While there are several possible instabilities that could produce suprathermal electrons in thin layers, there has been no clear theoretical investigation which examines in detail how wave instabilities in the thin ionization layers could develop and produce the suprathermal electrons. We examine instabilities which would occur in thin, dense, heavy ion layers using extensive analytical analysis combined with particle simulations. We analyze a cross field current instability that is found to be strongly unstable in the heavy ion layers. Electrostatic simulations show that substantial heating of the ambient electrons occurs with energization at or above the N2 ionization energy.

  9. Vision for cross-layer optimization to address the dual challenges of energy and reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Dehon, Andre; Carter, Nicholas P

    2009-01-01

    We are rapidly approaching an inflection point where the conventional target of producing perfect, identical transistors that operate without upset can no longer be maintained while continuing to reduce the energy per operation. With power requirements already limiting chip performance, continuing to demand perfect, upset-free transistors would mean the end of scaling benefits. The big challenges in device variability and reliability are driven by uncommon tails in distributions, infrequent upsets, one-size-fits-all technology requirements, and a lack of information about the context of each operation. Solutions co-designed across traditional layer boundaries in our system stack can change the game, allowing architecture and software (a) to compensate for uncommon variation, environments, and events, (b) to pass down invariants and requirements for the computation, and (c) to monitor the health of collections of deVices. Cross-layer codesign provides a path to continue extracting benefits from further scaled technologies despite the fact that they may be less predictable and more variable. While some limited multi-layer mitigation strategies do exist, to move forward redefining traditional layer abstractions and developing a framework that facilitates cross-layer collaboration is necessary.

  10. The Study of Cross-layer Optimization for Wireless Rechargeable Sensor Networks Implemented in Coal Mines.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xu; Shi, Lei; Han, Jianghong; Lu, Jingting

    2016-01-28

    Wireless sensor networks deployed in coal mines could help companies provide workers working in coal mines with more qualified working conditions. With the underground information collected by sensor nodes at hand, the underground working conditions could be evaluated more precisely. However, sensor nodes may tend to malfunction due to their limited energy supply. In this paper, we study the cross-layer optimization problem for wireless rechargeable sensor networks implemented in coal mines, of which the energy could be replenished through the newly-brewed wireless energy transfer technique. The main results of this article are two-fold: firstly, we obtain the optimal relay nodes' placement according to the minimum overall energy consumption criterion through the Lagrange dual problem and KKT conditions; secondly, the optimal strategies for recharging locomotives and wireless sensor networks are acquired by solving a cross-layer optimization problem. The cyclic nature of these strategies is also manifested through simulations in this paper.

  11. The Study of Cross-layer Optimization for Wireless Rechargeable Sensor Networks Implemented in Coal Mines

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xu; Shi, Lei; Han, Jianghong; Lu, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks deployed in coal mines could help companies provide workers working in coal mines with more qualified working conditions. With the underground information collected by sensor nodes at hand, the underground working conditions could be evaluated more precisely. However, sensor nodes may tend to malfunction due to their limited energy supply. In this paper, we study the cross-layer optimization problem for wireless rechargeable sensor networks implemented in coal mines, of which the energy could be replenished through the newly-brewed wireless energy transfer technique. The main results of this article are two-fold: firstly, we obtain the optimal relay nodes’ placement according to the minimum overall energy consumption criterion through the Lagrange dual problem and KKT conditions; secondly, the optimal strategies for recharging locomotives and wireless sensor networks are acquired by solving a cross-layer optimization problem. The cyclic nature of these strategies is also manifested through simulations in this paper. PMID:26828500

  12. The room-temperature shapes of four-layer unsymmetric cross-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear extension of classical lamination theory developed by Hyer (1981) for predicting the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates is reformulated using relaxed restrictions regarding the inplane strains. The inplane residual strains of unsymmetric laminates which have cooled from curing into a cylindrical room-temperature shape are examined numerically. Results show that the residual strains are compressive and practically independent of spatial location on the laminate. In addition, the room temperature shapes of the four-layer unsymmetric cross-ply laminates are predicted, and it is shown that the temperature shapes are a strong function of their size and their stacking arrangement. It is demonstrated that, depending on the parameters selected, the room-temperature shape of a four-layer cross-ply unsymmetric laminate can be a unique saddle shape, a unique cylindrical shape, or a cylindrical shape that can be snapped through to another cylindrical shape.

  13. Performance Comparison of Cross-Like Hall Plates with Different Covering Layers

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Fei; Zhang, Zhenyan; Toh, Eng-Huat; Liu, Xinfu; Ding, Yinjie; Pan, Yifan; Li, Chengjie; Li, Li; Sha, Jin; Pan, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of the covering layers on the performance of a cross-like Hall plate. Three different structures of a cross-like Hall plate in various sizes are designed and analyzed. The Hall plate sensitivity and offset are characterized using a self-built measurement system. The effect of the P-type region over the active area on the current-related sensitivity is studied for different Hall plate designs. In addition, the correlation between the P-type covering layer and offset is analyzed. The best structure out of three designs is determined. Besides, a modified eight-resistor circuit model for the Hall plate is presented with improved accuracy by taking the offset into account. PMID:25559001

  14. Implementation of a Cross-Layer Sensing Medium-Access Control Scheme.

    PubMed

    Su, Yishan; Fu, Xiaomei; Han, Guangyao; Xu, Naishen; Jin, Zhigang

    2017-04-10

    In this paper, compressed sensing (CS) theory is utilized in a medium-access control (MAC) scheme for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). We propose a new, cross-layer compressed sensing medium-access control (CL CS-MAC) scheme, combining the physical layer and data link layer, where the wireless transmission in physical layer is considered as a compress process of requested packets in a data link layer according to compressed sensing (CS) theory. We first introduced using compressive complex requests to identify the exact active sensor nodes, which makes the scheme more efficient. Moreover, because the reconstruction process is executed in a complex field of a physical layer, where no bit and frame synchronizations are needed, the asynchronous and random requests scheme can be implemented without synchronization payload. We set up a testbed based on software-defined radio (SDR) to implement the proposed CL CS-MAC scheme practically and to demonstrate the validation. For large-scale WSNs, the simulation results show that the proposed CL CS-MAC scheme provides higher throughput and robustness than the carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) and compressed sensing medium-access control (CS-MAC) schemes.

  15. Charge regulation and energy dissipation while compressing and sliding a cross-linked chitosan hydrogel layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Tyrode, Eric; Claesson, Per M

    2015-04-01

    Interactions between a silica surface and a surface coated with a grafted cross-linked hydrogel made from chitosan/PAA multilayers are investigated, utilizing colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. Attractive double-layer forces are found to dominate the long-range interaction over a broad range of pH and ionic strength conditions. The deduced potential at the hydrogel/aqueous interface is found to be very low. This situation is maintained in the whole pH-range investigated, even though the degree of protonation of chitosan changes significantly. This demonstrates that pH-variations change the concentration of counterions within the hydrogel to keep the interior close to uncharged, which is similar to what has been observed for polyelectrolyte brushes. Changes in pH and ionic strength affect the adhesion force and the friction force between the silica surface and the hydrogel layer, but not the friction coefficient. This suggests that the main energy dissipation mechanism arises from processes occurring within the hydrogel layer, rather than at the silica/hydrogel interface, and we suggest that it is related to stretching of polymer chains between the cross-linking points. We also find that an increased cross-linking density, from 40% to 100%, in the hydrogel reduces the friction coefficient.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Crossing Shock Wave-Turbulent Boundary Layer-Bleed Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun; Hingst, Warren R.; Davis, David O.

    1996-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of a symmetric crossing shock wave/turbulent boundary layer/bleed interaction are presented for a freestream unit Reynolds number of 1.68 x 10(exp 7)/m, a Mach number of 2.81, and deflection angles of 8 degrees. The data obtained in this study are bleed mass flow rate using a trace gas technique, qualitative information in the form of oil flow visualization, flow field Pitot pressures, and static pressure measurements using pressure sensitive paint. The main objective of this test is two-fold. First, this study is conducted to explore boundary layer control through mass flow removal near a large region of separated flow caused by the interaction of a double fin-induced shock wave and an incoming turbulent boundary layer. Also, a comprehensive data set is needed for computational fluid dynamics code validation.

  17. Maximized reliability with minimal cross-layer cutset under arbitrary link failure probability in multilayer optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Chen, Bowen; Zhang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the maximized cross-layer reliability under arbitrary link failure probability in multilayer optical networks. A concept of minimal cross-layer cutset is first defined and a reliability model with arbitrary physical link failure probability is built in the multilayer optical networks. In order to reduce the scale of cutset enumeration, we introduce two metrics to estimate cross-layer reliability, i.e., the minimum cross-layer node reliability and the minimum cross-layer edge reliability (MCER). Furthermore, we develop two linear programming (LP) models and two heuristic algorithms to maximize the cross-layer reliability of multilayer optical networks, i.e., the minimum shared-risk mapping algorithm and the least shared failure probability algorithm. Simulation results show that: (i) the cross-layer reliability of the two proposed algorithms is close to the LP solutions under logical networks with different sizes, which achieves better results in terms of additional resources utilization compared with the shortest path algorithm; (ii) less difference between the results of our proposed algorithms and the results of the shortest path algorithm is accompanied by a small standard deviation of failure probability distribution. Moreover, the superiority of our proposed algorithms becomes more remarkable with the increasing of the standard deviation.

  18. Solid lipid nanoparticles coated with cross-linked polymeric double layer for oral delivery of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taoran; Ma, Xiaoyu; Lei, Yu; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-12-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are regarded as promising carriers to improve the safety and effectiveness of delivery for drugs and nutrients, however, the clinic applications for oral administration are limited by their poor stability in gastrointestinal conditions. In this study, surface modification was explored to confer new physicochemical properties to SLNs and thus achieve enhanced functionalities. Novel SLNs with biopolymeric double layer (DL) coating using two natural biopolymers, i.e. caseinate (NaCas) and pectin, were prepared to encapsulate and deliver curcumin, a lipophilic bioactive compound studied as a model drug/nutrient. The DL coating was chemically cross-linked by creating covalent bonds between NaCas and pectin, using two different cross-linkers, i.e. glutaraldehyde (GA) and 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-Hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS). Prior to cross-linking, the mean particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential of DL-SLNs were 300-330nm, 0.25-0.30, -45-40mV, respectively. It was found that cross-linking with GA had a more prominent effect on particle size and polydispersity index than EDC/NHS. The cross-linking process significantly improved physicochemical properties of DL-SLNs, resulting in higher encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity, better stability and slower release profile in simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Particularly, an optimal zero-order release kinetic was observed for EDC/NHS crosslinked DL-SLNs. The electron microscopy revealed that both cross-linked DL-SLNs exhibited spherical shape with homogeneous size and smooth surface. Encapsulation of curcumin in SLNs dramatically enhanced its antioxidant activity in aqueous condition. The cross-linking process further helped spray drying of SLNs by forming homogenous powder particles. These results indicated that coating with cross-linked polymers could significantly improve the physicochemical properties of SLNs and expand their potentials as

  19. Biomimetic hydration lubrication with various polyelectrolyte layers on cross-linked polyethylene orthopedic bearing materials.

    PubMed

    Kyomoto, Masayuki; Moro, Toru; Saiga, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Masami; Ito, Hideya; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takatori, Yoshio; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Natural joints rely on fluid thin-film lubrication by the hydrated polyelectrolyte layer of cartilage. However, current artificial joints with polyethylene (PE) surfaces have considerably less efficient lubrication and thus much greater wear, leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening. This is considered a common factor limiting prosthetic longevity in total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, such wear could be mitigated by surface modification to mimic the role of cartilage. Here we report the development of nanometer-scale hydrophilic layers with varying charge (nonionic, cationic, anionic, or zwitterionic) on cross-linked PE (CLPE) surfaces, which could fully mimic the hydrophilicity and lubricity of the natural joint surface. We present evidence to support two lubrication mechanisms: the primary mechanism is due to the high level of hydration in the grafted layer, where water molecules act as very efficient lubricants; and the secondary mechanism is repulsion of protein molecules and positively charged inorganic ions by the grafted polyelectrolyte layer. Thus, such nanometer-scaled hydrophilic polymers or polyelectrolyte layers on the CLPE surface of acetabular cup bearings could confer high durability to THA prosthetics.

  20. The 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis of crossing, glancing shocks/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional viscous flow analysis is performed for a configuration where two crossing and glancing shocks interact with a turbulent boundary layer. A time marching 3-D full Navier-Stokes code, called PARC3D, is used to compute the flow field, and the solution is compared to the experimental data obtained at the NASA Lewis Research Center's 1 x 1 ft supersonic wind tunnel facility. The study is carried out as part of the continuing code assessment program in support of the generic hypersonic research at NASA Lewis. Detailed comparisons of static pressure fields and oil flow patterns are made with the corresponding solution on the wall containing the shock/boundary layer interaction in an effort to validate the code for hypersonic inlet applications.

  1. The Interaction of a Circular Synthetic Jet with a Cross-Flow Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; R. J. Pink; Jennifer M. Shuster; Douglas R. Smith

    2005-06-01

    The interaction of a circular synthetic jet with a laminar cross-flow boundary layer was investigated experimentally in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction flow facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Two orifice orientations were investigated, straight and inclined. For each orifice, phase-averaged and time-averaged PIV measurements were made at L◦/D◦ = 1.0 and 2.0 with ReU◦ = 250 and r = 1.12. Refractive index matching between the working fluid and the model material permitted experimental measurements of the flow field inside the actuator orifice and cavity simultaneously. At L◦/D◦ = 1.0, the vortex ring formed at the orifice during the expulsion portion of the actuator cycle blocks the boundary layer causing the flow to divert over and around the ring. This vortex ring does not escape the near-vicinity of the orifice and is subsequently re-ingested. At the same stroke, inclining the orifice axis 30◦ downstream leads to a jet comprised of a train of vortex rings that penetrates the cross-flow. At L◦/D◦ = 2.0, both the straight and inclined orifices create large discrete vortex rings that penetrate deep into the cross-flow, and consequently do not affect the boundary layer much beyond the near-field of the orifice.

  2. Performance improvement of a cross-flow hydro turbine by air layer effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. D.; Yoon, H. Y.; Inagaki, M.; Ooike, S.; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, Y. H.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is not only to investigate the effects of air layer in the turbine chamber on the performance and internal flow of the cross-flow turbine, but also to suggest a newly developed air supply method. Field test is performed in order to measure the output power of the turbine by a new air supply method. CFD analysis on the performance and internal flow of the turbine is conducted by an unsteady state calculation using a two-phase flow model in order to embody the air layer effect on the turbine performance effectively.The result shows that air layer effect on the performance of the turbine is considerable. The air layer located in the turbine runner passage plays the role of preventing a shock loss at the runner axis and suppressing a recirculation flow in the runner. The location of air suction hole on the chamber wall is very important factor for the performance improvement. Moreover, the ratio between air from suction pipe and water from turbine inlet is also significant factor of the turbine performance.

  3. A study of the unsteadiness of crossing shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poddar, K.; Bogdonoff, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    The unsteadiness of crossing shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at a nominal Mach number of 3 was examined by measuring wall pressure fluctuations using multiple, high frequency response, pressure transducers. The unsteadiness in the initial part of the interaction for all the interactions is similar to that of single fin interaction as studied by Tran and Bogdonoff (1987). However, for stronger interactions, flow downstream of the inviscid shock crossing position has a significant unsteady characteristic. In this unsteady region of the interaction, mean surface pressure rises significantly over the value obtained from the inviscid shock approximation. The energy spectrum of the fluctuating pressure signal shows a significant increase in the energy level at the higher frequencies.

  4. Ladder and cross terms in second-order distorted Born approximation. [for bounded layer of random discrete scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Y. Q.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    In the strong fluctuation theory for a bounded layer of random discrete scatterers, the second moments of the fields in the second-order distorted Born approximation are obtained for copolarized and cross-polarized fields. The backscattering cross sections per unit area are calculated by including the mutual coherence of the fields due to the coincidental ray paths, and that due to the opposite ray paths, corresponding to the ladder and cross terms in the Feynman diagramatic representation. It is proved that the contributions from ladder and cross terms for the copolarized backscattering cross sections are the same, while the contributions for the cross-polarized backscattering cross sections are of the same order. The bistatic scattering coefficients in the second-order approximation for both the ladder and cross terms are also obtained. The contributions from the cross terms explain the enhancement in the backscattering direction.

  5. Study of cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature series in a nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Viñas, Carmen; Viana, Samuel; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The main characteristic of the Planetary Boundary Layer is the turbulent flow that can be understood as the motions of many superimposed eddies with different scales, which are very irregular and produce mixing among the atmospheric properties. Spectral analysis is a widely used statistical tool to know the size of eddies into the flow. The Turbulent Kinetic Energy is split in fractions for each scale of eddy by mean the power spectrum of the wind velocity components. Also, the fluctuation of the other variables as temperature, humidity, gases concentrations or material particles presents in the atmosphere can be divided according to the importance of different scales in a similar way than the wind. A Cross-spectrum between two time series is used in meteorology to know their correlation in frequency space. Specially, coespectrum, or real part of cross-spectrum, amplitud and coherence give us many information about the low or high correlation between two variables in a particular frecuency or scale (Stull, 1988). In this work we have investigated cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature measured along the summer 2009 at the CIBA, Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere, located in Valladolid province (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000; Viana et al., 2009). In these experimental dataset, among other instrumentation, two sonic anemometers (20 Hz, sampling rate) at 1.5 m and 10 m height are available. Cross-spectra between variables of the two levels, specially, wind vertical component and sonic temperature, under stable stratification are studied in order to improve the knowledge of the proprieties of the momentum and heat fluxes near the ground in the PBL. Nevertheless, power spectral of horizontal components of the wind, at both levels, have been also analysed. The spectra and cross-spectra were performed by mean the Blackman-Tukey method, widely utilised in the time series studies (Blackman & Tukey, 1958) and, where it is

  6. A Novel Cross-Layer Routing Protocol Based on Network Coding for Underwater Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Shilian; Bu, Renfei; Zhang, Eryang

    2017-01-01

    Underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) have attracted increasing attention in recent years because of their numerous applications in ocean monitoring, resource discovery and tactical surveillance. However, the design of reliable and efficient transmission and routing protocols is a challenge due to the low acoustic propagation speed and complex channel environment in UWSNs. In this paper, we propose a novel cross-layer routing protocol based on network coding (NCRP) for UWSNs, which utilizes network coding and cross-layer design to greedily forward data packets to sink nodes efficiently. The proposed NCRP takes full advantages of multicast transmission and decode packets jointly with encoded packets received from multiple potential nodes in the entire network. The transmission power is optimized in our design to extend the life cycle of the network. Moreover, we design a real-time routing maintenance protocol to update the route when detecting inefficient relay nodes. Substantial simulations in underwater environment by Network Simulator 3 (NS-3) show that NCRP significantly improves the network performance in terms of energy consumption, end-to-end delay and packet delivery ratio compared with other routing protocols for UWSNs. PMID:28786915

  7. Fabrication and characterization of short-period double-layer cross-grating with holographic lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cunbao; Yan, Shuhua; You, Fusheng

    2017-01-01

    A cross-grating with short period and double layer is designed, and a method combining holographic lithography and lithography-etch-lithography-etch is proposed to manufacture it. The scalar diffraction theory and the rigorous coupled wave analysis are employed to analyze the diffraction characteristics of the double-layer cross-grating (DLCG). It reveals that the efficiencies of the (±1,±1) orders possess perfect complementarity under normal incidence. The equivalent high efficiency for TE and TM polarization can be realized which means the high signal-to-noise ratio and fringe contrast can be simultaneously achieved for heterodyne grating interferometers (HGIs). Furthermore, a gold-coated DLCG with grating pitch of 2 μm and pattern area of 60 mm×60 mm etched on the quartz substrate is fabricated with the proposed method. The displacement resolution, measurement range and long-term stability can be reliably guaranteed for HGIs with this grating. The characteristics of the DLCG are also experimentally tested and compared with the theoretical analysis. Reasonable consistency is obtained and the capabilities of both the DLCG and the fabrication method are verified.

  8. Cross-layer ultrasound video streaming over mobile WiMAX and HSUPA networks.

    PubMed

    Alinejad, Ali; Philip, Nada Y; Istepanian, Robert S H

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the evolution of 4G-based mobile multimedia network systems will contribute significantly to future mobile healthcare (m-health) applications that require high bandwidth and fast data rates. Central to the success of such emerging applications is the compatibility of broadband networks, such as mobile Worldwide Interoperability For Microwave Access (WiMAX) and High-Speed Uplink Packet Access (HSUPA), and especially their rate adaption issues combined with the acceptable real-time medical quality of service requirements. In this paper, we address the relevant challenges of cross-layer design requirements for real-time rate adaptation of ultrasound video streaming in mobile WiMAX and HSUPA networks. A comparative performance analysis of such approach is validated in two experimental m-health test bed systems for both mobile WiMAX and HSUPA networks. The experimental results have shown an improved performance of mobile WiMAX compared to the HSUPA using the same cross-layer optimization approach.

  9. Cross Layer Design for Optimizing Transmission Reliability, Energy Efficiency, and Lifetime in Body Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Xu, Yixuan; Liu, Anfeng

    2017-01-01

    High transmission reliability, energy efficiency, and long lifetime are pivotal issues for wireless body area networks (WBANs). However, these performance metrics are not independent of each other, making it hard to obtain overall improvements through optimizing one single aspect. Therefore, a Cross Layer Design Optimal (CLDO) scheme is proposed to simultaneously optimize transmission reliability, energy efficiency, and lifetime of WBANs from several layers. Firstly, due to the fact that the transmission power of nodes directly influences the reliability of links, the optimized transmission power of different nodes is deduced, which is able to maximize energy efficiency in theory under the premise that requirements on delay and jitter are fulfilled. Secondly, a relay decision algorithm is proposed to choose optimized relay nodes. Using this algorithm, nodes will choose relay nodes that ensure a balance of network energy consumption, provided that all nodes transmit with optimized transmission power and the same packet size. Thirdly, the energy consumption of nodes is still unbalanced even with optimized transmission power because of their different locations in the topology of the network. In addition, packet size also has an impact on final performance metrics. Therefore, a synthesized cross layer method for optimization is proposed. With this method, the transmission power of nodes with more residual energy will be enhanced while suitable packet size is determined for different links in the network, leading to further improvements in the WBAN system. Both our comprehensive theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the performance of our proposed scheme is better than reported in previous studies. Relative to the relay selection and power control game (RSPCG) scheme, the CLDO scheme can enhance transmission reliability by more than 44.6% and prolong the lifetime by as much as 33.2%. PMID:28422062

  10. Cross Layer Design for Optimizing Transmission Reliability, Energy Efficiency, and Lifetime in Body Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xu, Yixuan; Liu, Anfeng

    2017-04-19

    High transmission reliability, energy efficiency, and long lifetime are pivotal issues for wireless body area networks (WBANs. However, these performance metrics are not independent of each other, making it hard to obtain overall improvements through optimizing one single aspect. Therefore, a Cross Layer Design Optimal (CLDO) scheme is proposed to simultaneously optimize transmission reliability, energy efficiency, and lifetime of WBANs from several layers. Firstly, due to the fact that the transmission power of nodes directly influences the reliability of links, the optimized transmission power of different nodes is deduced, which is able to maximize energy efficiency in theory under the premise that requirements on delay and jitter are fulfilled. Secondly, a relay decision algorithm is proposed to choose optimized relay nodes. Using this algorithm, nodes will choose relay nodes that ensure a balance of network energy consumption, provided that all nodes transmit with optimized transmission power and the same packet size. Thirdly, the energy consumption of nodes is still unbalanced even with optimized transmission power because of their different locations in the topology of the network. In addition, packet size also has an impact on final performance metrics. Therefore, a synthesized cross layer method for optimization is proposed. With this method, the transmission power of nodes with more residual energy will be enhanced while suitable packet size is determined for different links in the network, leading to further improvements in the WBAN system. Both our comprehensive theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the performance of our proposed scheme is better than reported in previous studies. Relative to the relay selection and power control game (RSPCG) scheme, the CLDO scheme can enhance transmission reliability by more than 44.6% and prolong the lifetime by as much as 33.2%.

  11. Robust System and Cross-Layer Design for H.264/AVC-Based Wireless Video Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhammer, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    H.264/AVC is an essential component in emerging wireless video applications, thanks to its excellent compression efficiency and network-friendly design. However, a video coding standard itself is only a single component within a complex system. Its effectiveness strongly depends on the appropriate configuration of encoders, decoders, as well as transport and network features. The applicability of different features depends on application constraints, the availability and quality of feedback and cross-layer information, and the accessible quality-of-service (QoS) tools in modern wireless networks. We discuss robust integration of H.264/AVC in wireless real-time video applications. Specifically, the use of different coding and transport-related features for different application types is elaborated. Guidelines for the selection of appropriate coding tools, encoder and decoder settings, as well as transport and network parameters are provided and justified. Selected simulation results show the superiority of lower layer error control over application layer error control and video error resilience features.

  12. Cross-layer Energy Optimization Under Image Quality Constraints for Wireless Image Transmissions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Na; Demirkol, Ilker; Heinzelman, Wendi

    2013-01-01

    Wireless image transmission is critical in many applications, such as surveillance and environment monitoring. In order to make the best use of the limited energy of the battery-operated cameras, while satisfying the application-level image quality constraints, cross-layer design is critical. In this paper, we develop an image transmission model that allows the application layer (e.g., the user) to specify an image quality constraint, and optimizes the lower layer parameters of transmit power and packet length, to minimize the energy dissipation in image transmission over a given distance. The effectiveness of this approach is evaluated by applying the proposed energy optimization to a reference ZigBee system and a WiFi system, and also by comparing to an energy optimization study that does not consider any image quality constraint. Evaluations show that our scheme outperforms the default settings of the investigated commercial devices and saves a significant amount of energy at middle-to-large transmission distances. PMID:23508852

  13. Cross-Layer Algorithms for QoS Enhancement in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Navrati; Roy, Abhishek; Shin, Jitae

    A lot of emerging applications like advanced telemedicine and surveillance systems, demand sensors to deliver multimedia content with precise level of QoS enhancement. Minimizing energy in sensor networks has been a much explored research area but guaranteeing QoS over sensor networks still remains an open issue. In this letter we propose a cross-layer approach combining Network and MAC layers, for QoS enhancement in wireless multimedia sensor networks. In the network layer a statistical estimate of sensory QoS parameters is performed and a nearoptimal genetic algorithmic solution is proposed to solve the NP-complete QoS-routing problem. On the other hand the objective of the proposed MAC algorithm is to perform the QoS-based packet classification and automatic adaptation of the contention window. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed protocol is capable of providing lower delay and better throughput, at the cost of reasonable energy consumption, in comparison with other existing sensory QoS protocols.

  14. A cross-layer duty cycle MAC protocol supporting a pipeline feature for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fei; Xie, Rong; Shu, Lei; Kim, Young-Chon

    2011-01-01

    Although the conventional duty cycle MAC protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) such as RMAC perform well in terms of saving energy and reducing end-to-end delivery latency, they were designed independently and require an extra routing protocol in the network layer to provide path information for the MAC layer. In this paper, we propose a new cross-layer duty cycle MAC protocol with data forwarding supporting a pipeline feature (P-MAC) for WSNs. P-MAC first divides the whole network into many grades around the sink. Each node identifies its grade according to its logical hop distance to the sink and simultaneously establishes a sleep/wakeup schedule using the grade information. Those nodes in the same grade keep the same schedule, which is staggered with the schedule of the nodes in the adjacent grade. Then a variation of the RTS/CTS handshake mechanism is used to forward data continuously in a pipeline fashion from the higher grade to the lower grade nodes and finally to the sink. No extra routing overhead is needed, thus increasing the network scalability while maintaining the superiority of duty-cycling. The simulation results in OPNET show that P-MAC has better performance than S-MAC and RMAC in terms of packet delivery latency and energy efficiency.

  15. A Cross-Layer Duty Cycle MAC Protocol Supporting a Pipeline Feature for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fei; Xie, Rong; Shu, Lei; Kim, Young-Chon

    2011-01-01

    Although the conventional duty cycle MAC protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) such as RMAC perform well in terms of saving energy and reducing end-to-end delivery latency, they were designed independently and require an extra routing protocol in the network layer to provide path information for the MAC layer. In this paper, we propose a new cross-layer duty cycle MAC protocol with data forwarding supporting a pipeline feature (P-MAC) for WSNs. P-MAC first divides the whole network into many grades around the sink. Each node identifies its grade according to its logical hop distance to the sink and simultaneously establishes a sleep/wakeup schedule using the grade information. Those nodes in the same grade keep the same schedule, which is staggered with the schedule of the nodes in the adjacent grade. Then a variation of the RTS/CTS handshake mechanism is used to forward data continuously in a pipeline fashion from the higher grade to the lower grade nodes and finally to the sink. No extra routing overhead is needed, thus increasing the network scalability while maintaining the superiority of duty-cycling. The simulation results in OPNET show that P-MAC has better performance than S-MAC and RMAC in terms of packet delivery latency and energy efficiency. PMID:22163895

  16. Cross Layer PHY-MAC Protocol for Wireless Static and Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaszko, Sylwia; Blondia, Chris

    2008-12-01

    Multihop mobile wireless networks have drawn a lot of attention in recent years thanks to their wide applicability in civil and military environments. Since the existing IEEE 802.11 distributed coordination function (DCF) standard does not provide satisfactory access to the wireless medium in multihop mobile networks, we have designed a cross-layer protocol, (CroSs-layer noise aware power driven MAC (SNAPdMac)), which consists of two parts. The protocol first concentrates on the flexible adjustment of the upper and lower bounds of the contention window (CW) to lower the number of collisions. In addition, it uses a power control scheme, triggered by the medium access control (MAC) layer, to limit the waste of energy and also to decrease the number of collisions. Thanks to a noticeable energy conservation and decrease of the number of collisions, it prolongs significantly the lifetime of the network and delays the death of the first node while increasing both the throughput performance and the sending bit rate/throughput fairness among contending flows.

  17. Frame Transmission Efficiency-Based Cross-Layer Congestion Notification Scheme in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    He, Huaguang; Li, Taoshen; Feng, Luting; Ye, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Different from the traditional wired network, the fundamental cause of transmission congestion in wireless ad hoc networks is medium contention. How to utilize the congestion state from the MAC (Media Access Control) layer to adjust the transmission rate is core work for transport protocol design. However, recent works have shown that the existing cross-layer congestion detection solutions are too complex to be deployed or not able to characterize the congestion accurately. We first propose a new congestion metric called frame transmission efficiency (i.e., the ratio of successful transmission delay to the frame service delay), which describes the medium contention in a fast and accurate manner. We further present the design and implementation of RECN (ECN and the ratio of successful transmission delay to the frame service delay in the MAC layer, namely, the frame transmission efficiency), a general supporting scheme that adjusts the transport sending rate through a standard ECN (Explicit Congestion Notification) signaling method. Our method can be deployed on commodity switches with small firmware updates, while making no modification on end hosts. We integrate RECN transparently (i.e., without modification) with TCP on NS2 simulation. The experimental results show that RECN remarkably improves network goodput across multiple concurrent TCP flows. PMID:28714898

  18. Frame Transmission Efficiency-Based Cross-Layer Congestion Notification Scheme in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    He, Huaguang; Li, Taoshen; Feng, Luting; Ye, Jin

    2017-07-15

    Different from the traditional wired network, the fundamental cause of transmission congestion in wireless ad hoc networks is medium contention. How to utilize the congestion state from the MAC (Media Access Control) layer to adjust the transmission rate is core work for transport protocol design. However, recent works have shown that the existing cross-layer congestion detection solutions are too complex to be deployed or not able to characterize the congestion accurately. We first propose a new congestion metric called frame transmission efficiency (i.e., the ratio of successful transmission delay to the frame service delay), which describes the medium contention in a fast and accurate manner. We further present the design and implementation of RECN (ECN and the ratio of successful transmission delay to the frame service delay in the MAC layer, namely, the frame transmission efficiency), a general supporting scheme that adjusts the transport sending rate through a standard ECN (Explicit Congestion Notification) signaling method. Our method can be deployed on commodity switches with small firmware updates, while making no modification on end hosts. We integrate RECN transparently (i.e., without modification) with TCP on NS2 simulation. The experimental results show that RECN remarkably improves network goodput across multiple concurrent TCP flows.

  19. Collision avoidance in TV white spaces: a cross-layer design approach for cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukalas, Fotis; Karetsos, George T.

    2015-07-01

    One of the most promising applications of cognitive radio networks (CRNs) is the efficient exploitation of TV white spaces (TVWSs) for enhancing the performance of wireless networks. In this paper, we propose a cross-layer design (CLD) of carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) mechanism at the medium access control (MAC) layer with spectrum sensing (SpSe) at the physical layer, for identifying the occupancy status of TV bands. The proposed CLD relies on a Markov chain model with a state pair containing both the SpSe and the CSMA/CA from which we derive the collision probability and the achievable throughput. Analytical and simulation results are obtained for different collision avoidance and SpSe implementation scenarios by varying the contention window, back off stage and probability of detection. The obtained results depict the achievable throughput under different collision avoidance and SpSe implementation scenarios indicating thereby the performance of collision avoidance in TVWSs-based CRNs.

  20. Constraints of nonresponding flows based on cross layers in the networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Chao; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Dong

    2016-02-01

    In the active queue management (AQM) scheme, core routers cannot manage and constrain user datagram protocol (UDP) data flows by the sliding window control mechanism in the transport layer due to the nonresponsive nature of such traffic flows. However, the UDP traffics occupy a large part of the network service nowadays which brings a great challenge to the stability of the more and more complex networks. To solve the uncontrollable problem, this paper proposes a cross layers random early detection (CLRED) scheme, which can control the nonresponding UDP-like flows rate effectively when congestion occurs in the access point (AP). The CLRED makes use of the MAC frame acknowledgement (ACK) transmitting congestion information to the sources nodes and utilizes the back-off windows of the MAC layer throttling data rate. Consequently, the UDP-like flows data rate can be restrained timely by the sources nodes in order to alleviate congestion in the complex networks. The proposed CLRED can constrain the nonresponsive flows availably and make the communication expedite, so that the network can sustain stable. The simulation results of network simulator-2 (NS2) verify the proposed CLRED scheme.

  1. Cross-modality Sharpening of Visual Cortical Processing through Layer 1-Mediated Inhibition and Disinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Leena A.; Mesik, Lukas; Ji, Xu-ying; Fang, Qi; Li, Hai-fu; Li, Ya-tang; Zingg, Brian; Zhang, Li I.; Tao, Huizhong Whit

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cross-modality interaction in sensory perception is advantageous for animals’ survival. How cortical sensory processing is cross-modally modulated and what are the underlying neural circuits remain poorly understood. In mouse primary visual cortex (V1), we discovered that orientation selectivity of layer (L)2/3 but not L4 excitatory neurons was sharpened in the presence of sound or optogenetic activation of projections from primary auditory cortex (A1) to V1. The effect was manifested by decreased average visual responses yet increased responses at the preferred orientation. It was more pronounced at lower visual contrast, and was diminished by suppressing L1 activity. L1 neurons were strongly innervated by A1-V1 axons and excited by sound, while visual responses of L2/3 vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) neurons were suppressed by sound, both preferentially at the cell's preferred orientation. These results suggest that the cross-modality modulation is achieved primarily through L1 neuron and L2/3 VIP-cell mediated inhibitory and disinhibitory circuits. PMID:26898778

  2. Wall parallel cross-correlations of volumetric PTV measurements in a perturbed turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan Ming; Longmire, Ellen

    2016-11-01

    A canonical turbulent boundary layer (Reτ = 2500) was perturbed by a narrowly spaced (0.2 δ) array of cylinders extending normal to the wall. Two array heights were considered, H = 0.2 δ and H = δ . Volumetric PTV measurements were acquired to understand 3-D variations in large scale structures within the log region of the unperturbed and perturbed flow. The recovery in the streamwise velocity coherence across the depth of the log region was analyzed using cross correlations between wall parallel planes. Conditional cross correlations are analyzed to examine the recovery in coherence specific to low momentum regions (LMRs), which can be signatures of vortex packets. The measurement volume was 0.70 δ (streamwise,x), 0.90 δ (spanwise,y), 0.12 δ (wall-normal,z). In the unperturbed flow, LMRs frequently extended through the entire depth (155 <=z+ <= 465). The cross correlations between planes at z+ = 155 and z+ = 465 exhibited strong skewness indicative of forward leaning structures. By comparison, downstream of the H = δ array, the wall normal extent of individual LMRs was frequently limited to the lower part of the measurement volume. The cross correlation magnitude and skewness remained suppressed relative to unperturbed flow up to 4.7 δ downstream. These observations suggest reduced coherence of LMRs and high momentum regions across the log region. This result was consistent with previous planar PIV measurements at z+ = 500 that showed hardly any long LMRs over distances up to 7 δ downstream of the H = δ array.

  3. Investigation of a hypersonic crossing shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanswami, N; Knight, D. D.; Horstman, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study is presented for the interaction between crossing shock waves generated by (10 deg, 10 deg) sharp fins and a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at Mach 8.3. The theoretical model is the full 3D mean compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations incorporating the algebraic turbulent eddy viscosity model of Baldwin and Lomax (1978). A grid refinement study indicated that adequate resolution of the flow field has been achieved. Computed results agree well with experiment for surface pressure and surface flow patterns and for pitot pressure and yaw angle profiles in the flow field. The computations, however, significantly overpredict surface heat transfer. Analysis of the computed flow field results indicates the formation of complex streamline and wave structures within the interaction region.

  4. A Cross-Layer User Centric Vertical Handover Decision Approach Based on MIH Local Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan, Maaz; Yousaf, Muhammad; Qayyum, Amir; Malik, Shahzad

    Vertical handover decision algorithm that is based on user preferences and coupled with Media Independent Handover (MIH) local triggers have not been explored much in the literature. We have developed a comprehensive cross-layer solution, called Vertical Handover Decision (VHOD) approach, which consists of three parts viz. mechanism for collecting and storing user preferences, Vertical Handover Decision (VHOD) algorithm and the MIH Function (MIHF). MIHF triggers the VHOD algorithm which operates on user preferences to issue handover commands to mobility management protocol. VHOD algorithm is an MIH User and therefore needs to subscribe events and configure thresholds for receiving triggers from MIHF. In this regard, we have performed experiments in WLAN to suggest thresholds for Link Going Down trigger. We have also critically evaluated the handover decision process, proposed Just-in-time interface activation technique, compared our proposed approach with prominent user centric approaches and analyzed our approach from different aspects.

  5. Peclet number analysis of cross-flow in porous gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC).

    PubMed

    Suresh, P V; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2016-10-01

    Adoption of hydrogen economy by means of using hydrogen fuel cells is one possible solution for energy crisis and climate change issues. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is an important type of fuel cells, suffers from the problem of water management. Cross-flow is induced in some flow field designs to enhance the water removal. The presence of cross-flow in the serpentine and interdigitated flow fields makes them more effective in proper distribution of the reactants on the reaction layer and evacuation of water from the reaction layer than diffusion-based conventional parallel flow fields. However, too much of cross-flow leads to flow maldistribution in the channels, higher pressure drop, and membrane dehydration. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the amount of cross-flow required for effective distribution of reactants and removal of water in the gas diffusion layer. Unit cells containing two adjacent channels with gas diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layer at the bottom have been considered for the parallel, interdigitated, and serpentine flow patterns. Computational fluid dynamics-based simulations are carried out to study the reactant transport in under-the-rib area with cross-flow in the GDL. A new criterion based on the Peclet number is presented as a quantitative measure of cross-flow in the GDL. The study shows that a cross-flow Peclet number of the order of 2 is required for effective removal of water from the GDL. Estimates show that this much of cross-flow is not usually produced in the U-bends of Serpentine flow fields, making these areas prone to flooding.

  6. Influences of an Aluminum Covering Layer on the Performance of Cross-Like Hall Devices.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Fei; Liu, Xinfu; Ding, Yinjie; Toh, Eng-Huat; Zhang, Zhenyan; Pan, Yifan; Wang, Zhen; Li, Chengjie; Li, Li; Sha, Jin; Pan, Hongbing

    2016-01-15

    This work studies the effects of an aluminum covering on the performance of cross-like Hall devices. Four different Hall sensor structures of various sizes were designed and fabricated. The sensitivity and offset of the Hall sensors, two key points impacting their performance, were characterized using a self-built measurement system. The work analyzes the influences of the aluminum covering on those two aspects of the performance. The aluminum layer covering mainly leads to an eddy-current effect in an unstable magnetic field and an additional depletion region above the active region. Those two points have influences on the sensitivity and the offset voltage, respectively. The analysis guides the designer whether to choose covering with an aluminum layer the active region of the Hall sensor as a method to reduce the flicker noise and to improve the stability of the Hall sensor. Because Hall devices, as a reference element, always suffer from a large dispersion, improving their stability is a crucial issue.

  7. Molecular-scale dynamics of light-induced spin cross-over in a two-dimensional layer

    PubMed Central

    Bairagi, Kaushik; Iasco, Olga; Bellec, Amandine; Kartsev, Alexey; Li, Dongzhe; Lagoute, Jérôme; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Miserque, Frédéric; Dappe, Yannick J; Smogunov, Alexander; Barreteau, Cyrille; Boillot, Marie-Laure; Mallah, Talal; Repain, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Spin cross-over molecules show the unique ability to switch between two spin states when submitted to external stimuli such as temperature, light or voltage. If controlled at the molecular scale, such switches would be of great interest for the development of genuine molecular devices in spintronics, sensing and for nanomechanics. Unfortunately, up to now, little is known on the behaviour of spin cross-over molecules organized in two dimensions and their ability to show cooperative transformation. Here we demonstrate that a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements and ab initio calculations allows discriminating unambiguously between both states by local vibrational spectroscopy. We also show that a single layer of spin cross-over molecules in contact with a metallic surface displays light-induced collective processes between two ordered mixed spin-state phases with two distinct timescale dynamics. These results open a way to molecular scale control of two-dimensional spin cross-over layers. PMID:27425776

  8. Solution-processed cross-linkable hole selective layer for polymer solar cells in the inverted structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanming; Gong, Xiong; Hsu, Ben B. Y.; Yip, Hin-Lap; Jen, Alex K.-Y.; Heeger, Alan J.

    2010-11-01

    Solution-processed cross-linkable tetraphenyldiamine-containing material (TPD-BVB) as a highly efficient hole selective transport layer was demonstrated. Polymer solar cells (PSCs) with an inverted structure fabricated with a thin cross-linked TPD-BVB film show comparable efficiency and superior long-term air stability when compared to devices fabricated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). Thus, solution-processed TPD-BVB is an attractive alternative to PEDOT:PSS as a hole extraction layer in inverted structure PSCs.

  9. Integrating cross-frequency and within band functional networks in resting-state MEG: A multi-layer network approach.

    PubMed

    Tewarie, Prejaas; Hillebrand, Arjan; van Dijk, Bob W; Stam, Cornelis J; O'Neill, George C; Van Mieghem, Piet; Meier, Jil M; Woolrich, Mark W; Morris, Peter G; Brookes, Matthew J

    2016-11-15

    Neuronal oscillations exist across a broad frequency spectrum, and are thought to provide a mechanism of interaction between spatially separated brain regions. Since ongoing mental activity necessitates the simultaneous formation of multiple networks, it seems likely that the brain employs interactions within multiple frequency bands, as well as cross-frequency coupling, to support such networks. Here, we propose a multi-layer network framework that elucidates this pan-spectral picture of network interactions. Our network consists of multiple layers (frequency-band specific networks) that influence each other via inter-layer (cross-frequency) coupling. Applying this model to MEG resting-state data and using envelope correlations as connectivity metric, we demonstrate strong dependency between within layer structure and inter-layer coupling, indicating that networks obtained in different frequency bands do not act as independent entities. More specifically, our results suggest that frequency band specific networks are characterised by a common structure seen across all layers, superimposed by layer specific connectivity, and inter-layer coupling is most strongly associated with this common mode. Finally, using a biophysical model, we demonstrate that there are two regimes of multi-layer network behaviour; one in which different layers are independent and a second in which they operate highly dependent. Results suggest that the healthy human brain operates at the transition point between these regimes, allowing for integration and segregation between layers. Overall, our observations show that a complete picture of global brain network connectivity requires integration of connectivity patterns across the full frequency spectrum. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Cross-diffusion-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in a double-layer system: General classification and nonlinear simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budroni, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Cross diffusion, whereby a flux of a given species entrains the diffusive transport of another species, can trigger buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface of initially stable stratifications. Starting from a simple three-component case, we introduce a theoretical framework to classify cross-diffusion-induced hydrodynamic phenomena in two-layer stratifications under the action of the gravitational field. A cross-diffusion-convection (CDC) model is derived by coupling the fickian diffusion formalism to Stokes equations. In order to isolate the effect of cross-diffusion in the convective destabilization of a double-layer system, we impose a starting concentration jump of one species in the bottom layer while the other one is homogeneously distributed over the spatial domain. This initial configuration avoids the concurrence of classic Rayleigh-Taylor or differential-diffusion convective instabilities, and it also allows us to activate selectively the cross-diffusion feedback by which the heterogeneously distributed species influences the diffusive transport of the other species. We identify two types of hydrodynamic modes [the negative cross-diffusion-driven convection (NCC) and the positive cross-diffusion-driven convection (PCC)], corresponding to the sign of this operational cross-diffusion term. By studying the space-time density profiles along the gravitational axis we obtain analytical conditions for the onset of convection in terms of two important parameters only: the operational cross-diffusivity and the buoyancy ratio, giving the relative contribution of the two species to the global density. The general classification of the NCC and PCC scenarios in such parameter space is supported by numerical simulations of the fully nonlinear CDC problem. The resulting convective patterns compare favorably with recent experimental results found in microemulsion systems.

  11. Cross-diffusion-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in a double-layer system: General classification and nonlinear simulations.

    PubMed

    Budroni, M A

    2015-12-01

    Cross diffusion, whereby a flux of a given species entrains the diffusive transport of another species, can trigger buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface of initially stable stratifications. Starting from a simple three-component case, we introduce a theoretical framework to classify cross-diffusion-induced hydrodynamic phenomena in two-layer stratifications under the action of the gravitational field. A cross-diffusion-convection (CDC) model is derived by coupling the fickian diffusion formalism to Stokes equations. In order to isolate the effect of cross-diffusion in the convective destabilization of a double-layer system, we impose a starting concentration jump of one species in the bottom layer while the other one is homogeneously distributed over the spatial domain. This initial configuration avoids the concurrence of classic Rayleigh-Taylor or differential-diffusion convective instabilities, and it also allows us to activate selectively the cross-diffusion feedback by which the heterogeneously distributed species influences the diffusive transport of the other species. We identify two types of hydrodynamic modes [the negative cross-diffusion-driven convection (NCC) and the positive cross-diffusion-driven convection (PCC)], corresponding to the sign of this operational cross-diffusion term. By studying the space-time density profiles along the gravitational axis we obtain analytical conditions for the onset of convection in terms of two important parameters only: the operational cross-diffusivity and the buoyancy ratio, giving the relative contribution of the two species to the global density. The general classification of the NCC and PCC scenarios in such parameter space is supported by numerical simulations of the fully nonlinear CDC problem. The resulting convective patterns compare favorably with recent experimental results found in microemulsion systems.

  12. Cross-scale modelling of transpiration from stomata via the leaf boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Defraeye, Thijs; Derome, Dominique; Verboven, Pieter; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart

    2014-09-01

    Leaf transpiration is a key parameter for understanding land surface-climate interactions, plant stress and plant structure–function relationships. Transpiration takes place at the microscale level, namely via stomata that are distributed discretely over the leaf surface with a very low surface coverage (approx. 0·2-5%). The present study aims to shed more light on the dependency of the leaf boundary-layer conductance (BLC) on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. An innovative three-dimensional cross-scale modelling approach was applied to investigate convective mass transport from leaves, using computational fluid dynamics. The gap between stomatal and leaf scale was bridged by including all these scales in the same computational model (10⁻⁵-10⁻¹ m), which implies explicitly modelling individual stomata. BLC was strongly dependent on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Leaf BLC at low surface coverage ratios (CR), typical for stomata, was still relatively high, compared with BLC of a fully wet leaf (hypothetical CR of 100%). Nevertheless, these conventional BLCs (CR of 100%), as obtained from experiments or simulations on leaf models, were found to overpredict the convective exchange. In addition, small variations in stomatal CR were found to result in large variations in BLCs. Furthermore, stomata of a certain size exhibited a higher mass transfer rate at lower CRs. The proposed cross-scale modelling approach allows us to increase our understanding of transpiration at the sub-leaf level as well as the boundary-layer microclimate in a way currently not feasible experimentally. The influence of stomatal size, aperture and surface density, and also flow-field parameters can be studied using the model, and prospects for further improvement of the model are presented. An important conclusion of the study is that existing measures of conductances (e.g. from artificial leaves) can be significantly erroneous because they do not account for microscopic

  13. Cross-scale modelling of transpiration from stomata via the leaf boundary layer

    PubMed Central

    Defraeye, Thijs; Derome, Dominique; Verboven, Pieter; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf transpiration is a key parameter for understanding land surface–climate interactions, plant stress and plant structure–function relationships. Transpiration takes place at the microscale level, namely via stomata that are distributed discretely over the leaf surface with a very low surface coverage (approx. 0·2–5 %). The present study aims to shed more light on the dependency of the leaf boundary-layer conductance (BLC) on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Methods An innovative three-dimensional cross-scale modelling approach was applied to investigate convective mass transport from leaves, using computational fluid dynamics. The gap between stomatal and leaf scale was bridged by including all these scales in the same computational model (10−5–10−1 m), which implies explicitly modelling individual stomata. Key Results BLC was strongly dependent on stomatal surface coverage and air speed. Leaf BLC at low surface coverage ratios (CR), typical for stomata, was still relatively high, compared with BLC of a fully wet leaf (hypothetical CR of 100 %). Nevertheless, these conventional BLCs (CR of 100 %), as obtained from experiments or simulations on leaf models, were found to overpredict the convective exchange. In addition, small variations in stomatal CR were found to result in large variations in BLCs. Furthermore, stomata of a certain size exhibited a higher mass transfer rate at lower CRs. Conclusions The proposed cross-scale modelling approach allows us to increase our understanding of transpiration at the sub-leaf level as well as the boundary-layer microclimate in a way currently not feasible experimentally. The influence of stomatal size, aperture and surface density, and also flow-field parameters can be studied using the model, and prospects for further improvement of the model are presented. An important conclusion of the study is that existing measures of conductances (e.g. from artificial leaves) can be

  14. Suppression of Cross Contamination in Multi-Layer Thin Film Prepared by Using Rotating Hexagonal Sputtering Cathode.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Yeon; Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, single- and multi-layered thin films were prepared on a glass substrate using a newly developed rotating hexagonal sputtering cathode in a single chamber. The rotatinghexagonal sputtering cathode can install up to six different sputtering targets or six single targets in a cathode. Using the rotating hexagonal cathode, we prepared a single-layered AZO film and a multi-layer film to evaluate the performance of hexagonal gun. Cross-contamination, which is often observed in multi-layer thin film preparation, was suppressed to nearly zero by controlling process parameters and revising hardware. Energy-saving effects of five-layered glass were also verified by measuring the temperature.

  15. Cross-layer active predictive congestion control protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiangwen; Xu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Renjian; Wu, Yinfeng

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks (WSNs), there are numerous factors that may cause network congestion problems, such as the many-to-one communication modes, mutual interference of wireless links, dynamic changes of network topology and the memory-restrained characteristics of nodes. All these factors result in a network being more vulnerable to congestion. In this paper, a cross-layer active predictive congestion control scheme (CL-APCC) for improving the performance of networks is proposed. Queuing theory is applied in the CL-APCC to analyze data flows of a single-node according to its memory status, combined with the analysis of the average occupied memory size of local networks. It also analyzes the current data change trends of local networks to forecast and actively adjust the sending rate of the node in the next period. In order to ensure the fairness and timeliness of the network, the IEEE 802.11 protocol is revised based on waiting time, the number of the node's neighbors and the original priority of data packets, which dynamically adjusts the sending priority of the node. The performance of CL-APCC, which is evaluated by extensive simulation experiments. is more efficient in solving the congestion in WSNs. Furthermore, it is clear that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of improving the fairness and lifetime of networks.

  16. Cross-Layer Active Predictive Congestion Control Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiangwen; Xu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Renjian; Wu, Yinfeng

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks (WSNs), there are numerous factors that may cause network congestion problems, such as the many-to-one communication modes, mutual interference of wireless links, dynamic changes of network topology and the memory-restrained characteristics of nodes. All these factors result in a network being more vulnerable to congestion. In this paper, a cross-layer active predictive congestion control scheme (CL-APCC) for improving the performance of networks is proposed. Queuing theory is applied in the CL-APCC to analyze data flows of a single-node according to its memory status, combined with the analysis of the average occupied memory size of local networks. It also analyzes the current data change trends of local networks to forecast and actively adjust the sending rate of the node in the next period. In order to ensure the fairness and timeliness of the network, the IEEE 802.11 protocol is revised based on waiting time, the number of the node's neighbors and the original priority of data packets, which dynamically adjusts the sending priority of the node. The performance of CL-APCC, which is evaluated by extensive simulation experiments. is more efficient in solving the congestion in WSNs. Furthermore, it is clear that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of improving the fairness and lifetime of networks. PMID:22408506

  17. Cross-layer Design for MIMO Systems with Transmit Antenna Selection and Imperfect CSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangbin; Liu, Yan; Rui, Yun; Zhou, Tingting; Yin, Xin

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, by combining adaptive modulation and automatic repeat request (ARQ), a cross-layer design (CLD) scheme for multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) system with transmit antenna selection (TAS) and imperfect channel state information (CSI) is presented. Based on the imperfect CSI, the probability density function of the effective signal to noise ratio (SNR) is derived, and the fading gain switching thresholds are also derived subject to a target packet loss rate and fixed power constraint. According to these results, we further derive the average spectrum efficiency (SE) and packet error rate (PER) of the system. As a result, closed-form expressions of the average SE and PER are obtained, respectively. The derived expressions include the expressions under perfect CSI as special cases, and can provide good performance evaluation for the CLD system with imperfect CSI. Simulation results verify the validity of the theoretical analysis. The results show that the CLD system with TAS provides better SE than that with space-time block coding, but the SE and PER performance of the system with imperfect CSI are worse than those with perfect CSI due to the estimation error.

  18. Cross-layer optimization for video transmission over multirate GMC-CDMA wireless links.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Saurav K; Partasides, George; Kondi, Lisimachos P

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of video transmission over wireless generalized multicarrier code division multiple access (GMC-CDMA) systems. Such systems offer deterministic elimination of multiple access interference. A scalable video source codec is used and a multirate setup is assumed, i.e., each video user is allowed to occupy more than one GMC-CDMA channels. Furthermore, each of these channels can utilize a different number of subcarriers. We propose a cross-layer optimization method to select the source coding rate, channel coding rate, number of subcarriers per GMC-CDMA channel and transmission power per GMC-CDMA channel given a maximum transmission power for each video user and an available chip rate. Universal rate distortion characteristics (URDC) are used to approximate the expected distortion at the receiver. The proposed algorithm is optimal in the operational rate distortion sense, subject to the specific setup used and the approximation caused by the use of the URDC. Experimental results are presented and conclusions are drawn.

  19. Laser interferometer skin-friction measurements of crossing-shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.; Narayanswami, N.; Knight, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    Wall shear stress measurements beneath crossing-shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions have been made for three interactions of different strengths. The interactions are generated by two sharp fins at symetric angles of attack mounted on a flat plate. The shear stress measurements were made for fin angles of 7 and 11 deg at Mach 3 and 15 deg at Mach 3.85. The measurements were made using a laser interferometer skin-friction meter, a device that determines the wall shear by optically measuring the time rate of thinning of an oil film placed on the test model surface. Results of the measurements reveal high skin-friction coefficients in the vicinity of the fin/plate junction and the presence of quasi-two-dimensional flow separation on the interaction center line. Additionally, two Navier-Stokes computations, one using a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and one using a k-epsilon model, are compared with the experimental results for the Mach 3.85, 15-deg interaction case. Although the k-epsilon model did a reasonable job of predicting the overall trend in portions of the skin-friction distribution, neither computation fully captured the physics of the near-surface flow in this complex interaction.

  20. Cross-sectional observation of nanostructured catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte fuel cell using FIB/SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayanagi, Yuta; Shimizu, Takahiro; Hashimasa, Yoshiyuki; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yohtaro; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2015-04-01

    The catalyst layer structure of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) affects fuel cell performance. Cross-sectional observation is the most simple and effective way to evaluate the catalyst layer structure. Although focused ion beam (FIB) is a common tool for cross-sectional observation, sputtering of the ion beam causes heat damage to the MEA sample, which in previous studies was mitigated by sample cooling using liquid nitrogen. In this study, the sample holder and FIB stage were newly developed for cross-sectional observation of MEA catalyst layers, which suppressed heat damage by thermoelectric cooling using Peltier elements. Two types of degradation mode tests, load cycle and startup-shutdown cycle, were conducted on the MEA sample and their cross-sectional observations were performed using newly developed scanning electron microscope stages, which can mount the sample holder directly. The growth of platinum nanoparticles corresponding to the degradation of the active surface area was clearly observed for the sample subjected to the load cycle test. On the other hand, the corrosion of carbon particles was observed for the startup-shutdown sample. Since the cross-sectional samples were fabricated without heat damage by FIB with the newly developed stage, the difference in microstructure for these modes could be clearly distinguished.

  1. Layering

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-01

    At the bottom of this image from NASA Mars Odyssey is the cliff-face that is the sidewall of Ophir Chasma. Layering is easily visible in the upper cliff wall, with the thickness of the surface clearly visible.

  2. Cross-Layer Scheme to Control Contention Window for Per-Flow in Asymmetric Multi-Hop Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Pham Thanh; Nakagawa, Kenji

    The IEEE 802.11 MAC standard for wireless ad hoc networks adopts Binary Exponential Back-off (BEB) mechanism to resolve bandwidth contention between stations. BEB mechanism controls the bandwidth allocation for each station by choosing a back-off value from one to CW according to the uniform random distribution, where CW is the contention window size. However, in asymmetric multi-hop networks, some stations are disadvantaged in opportunity of access to the shared channel and may suffer severe throughput degradation when the traffic load is large. Then, the network performance is degraded in terms of throughput and fairness. In this paper, we propose a new cross-layer scheme aiming to solve the per-flow unfairness problem and achieve good throughput performance in IEEE 802.11 multi-hop ad hoc networks. Our cross-layer scheme collects useful information from the physical, MAC and link layers of own station. This information is used to determine the optimal Contention Window (CW) size for per-station fairness. We also use this information to adjust CW size for each flow in the station in order to achieve per-flow fairness. Performance of our cross-layer scheme is examined on various asymmetric multi-hop network topologies by using Network Simulator (NS-2).

  3. Cross-layer cluster-based energy-efficient protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Mammu, Aboobeker Sidhik Koyamparambil; Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; Sainz, Nekane; de la Iglesia, Idoia

    2015-04-09

    Recent developments in electronics and wireless communications have enabled the improvement of low-power and low-cost wireless sensors networks (WSNs). One of the most important challenges in WSNs is to increase the network lifetime due to the limited energy capacity of the network nodes. Another major challenge in WSNs is the hot spots that emerge as locations under heavy traffic load. Nodes in such areas quickly drain energy resources, leading to disconnection in network services. In such an environment, cross-layer cluster-based energy-efficient algorithms (CCBE) can prolong the network lifetime and energy efficiency. CCBE is based on clustering the nodes to different hexagonal structures. A hexagonal cluster consists of cluster members (CMs) and a cluster head (CH). The CHs are selected from the CMs based on nodes near the optimal CH distance and the residual energy of the nodes. Additionally, the optimal CH distance that links to optimal energy consumption is derived. To balance the energy consumption and the traffic load in the network, the CHs are rotated among all CMs. In WSNs, energy is mostly consumed during transmission and reception. Transmission collisions can further decrease the energy efficiency. These collisions can be avoided by using a contention-free protocol during the transmission period. Additionally, the CH allocates slots to the CMs based on their residual energy to increase sleep time. Furthermore, the energy consumption of CH can be further reduced by data aggregation. In this paper, we propose a data aggregation level based on the residual energy of CH and a cost-aware decision scheme for the fusion of data. Performance results show that the CCBE scheme performs better in terms of network lifetime, energy consumption and throughput compared to low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH) and hybrid energy-efficient distributed clustering (HEED).

  4. Cross-Layer Cluster-Based Energy-Efficient Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mammu, Aboobeker Sidhik Koyamparambil; Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; Sainz, Nekane; de la Iglesia, Idoia

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in electronics and wireless communications have enabled the improvement of low-power and low-cost wireless sensors networks (WSNs). One of the most important challenges in WSNs is to increase the network lifetime due to the limited energy capacity of the network nodes. Another major challenge in WSNs is the hot spots that emerge as locations under heavy traffic load. Nodes in such areas quickly drain energy resources, leading to disconnection in network services. In such an environment, cross-layer cluster-based energy-efficient algorithms (CCBE) can prolong the network lifetime and energy efficiency. CCBE is based on clustering the nodes to different hexagonal structures. A hexagonal cluster consists of cluster members (CMs) and a cluster head (CH). The CHs are selected from the CMs based on nodes near the optimal CH distance and the residual energy of the nodes. Additionally, the optimal CH distance that links to optimal energy consumption is derived. To balance the energy consumption and the traffic load in the network, the CHs are rotated among all CMs. In WSNs, energy is mostly consumed during transmission and reception. Transmission collisions can further decrease the energy efficiency. These collisions can be avoided by using a contention-free protocol during the transmission period. Additionally, the CH allocates slots to the CMs based on their residual energy to increase sleep time. Furthermore, the energy consumption of CH can be further reduced by data aggregation. In this paper, we propose a data aggregation level based on the residual energy of CH and a cost-aware decision scheme for the fusion of data. Performance results show that the CCBE scheme performs better in terms of network lifetime, energy consumption and throughput compared to low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH) and hybrid energy-efficient distributed clustering (HEED). PMID:25860073

  5. In situ neutralisation of uncarbonated bauxite residue mud by cross layer leaching with carbonated bauxite residue mud.

    PubMed

    Santini, T C; Hinz, C; Rate, A W; Carter, C M; Gilkes, R J

    2011-10-30

    Unameliorated residue mud from the Bayer process generates highly alkaline leachates (pH ca. 13) after deposition in storage areas. Pre-deposition treatment of bauxite residue mud (BRM) with CO(2) gas (carbonation) lowers leachate pH to ca. 10.5. Laboratory scale leaching columns were used to investigate the potential for in situ pH reduction in existing uncarbonated BRM deposits through exposure to carbonated mud leachate. Leachates from uncarbonated and carbonated residues in single and dual-layer column configurations were analysed for pH, electrical conductivity, carbonate and bicarbonate content, and element concentrations. Air-dried solids were analysed by X-ray diffraction before and after leaching. Cross layer leaching lowers leachate pH from uncarbonated BRM. Leachate pH was significantly lower in dual layer and carbonated residue than in uncarbonated residue between one and 400 pore volumes leached. Carbonated residue porewater as well as dawsonite and calcite dissolution were identified as sources of (bi-)carbonate. Leachate concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Ga and La were immediately reduced in dual layer treatments compared with uncarbonated residue. No element analysed exhibited a significantly higher leachate concentration in dual layer treatments than the highest observed concentration in single layer treatments. The implementation of dual layer leaching in the field therefore presents an opportunity to improve leachate quality from existing uncarbonated residue deposits and justifies further testing at field scale. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. SCTPmx: An SCTP Fast Handover Mechanism Using a Single Interface Based on a Cross-Layer Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yunsop; Teraoka, Fumio

    Recently, SCTP is attracting attention to support mobility in the Internet because it does not require additional equipment such as the Home Agent of Mobile IP. This paper focuses on an SCTP fast handover mechanism using a single interface because it is assumed that small mobile devices have a single interface per communication medium such as IEEE802.11b due to hardware limitations. The proposed mechanism called SCTPmx employs a cross layer control information exchange system called LIESto predict handover. LIES was originally designed to achieve network layer fast handover and then it was extended by adding the network layer primitives for efficient interaction among the link layer, the network layer, and the transport layer. Prior to handover, SCTPmx can generate a new address that will be used after handover and can execute duplicate address detection of IPv6. SCTPmx can suppress the delay caused by channel scanning at the link layer by employing selective background scanning mechanism which allows to continue data communication during channel scanning. In addition, SCTPmx can notify the correspondent node of the new address before handover. SCTPmx was implemented on FreeBSD. SCTPmx achieved better than 25 times lower handover latency (100msec) and 2 times higher throughput than previous proposals.

  7. Observing System Simulation Experiments of cross-layer Lagrangian data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santitissadeekorn, Naratip; Spiller, Elaine T.; Jones, Christopher; Rutarindwa, Regis; Liu, Liyan; Ide, Kayo

    2014-06-01

    We conduct Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) with Lagrangian data assimilation (LaDA) in two-layer point-vortex systems, where the trajectories of passive tracers (drifters or floats) are observed on one layer that is coupled to another layer with different dynamics. Depending on the initial position of the observed tracers, the model studied here can exhibit nonlinear features that cause the standard Kalman filter and its variants to fail. For this reason, we adopt a Monte Carlo approach known as particle filtering, which takes the nonlinear dynamics into account. The main objective of this paper is to understand the effects of drifter placement and layer coupling on the precision skill of assimilating Lagrangian data into multi-layered models. Therefore, we analyze the quality of the assimilated vortex estimates by assimilating path data from passive tracers launched at different locations, on different layers and in systems with various coupling strengths between layers. We consider two cases: vortices placed on different layers (heton) and on the same layer (non-heton). In both cases we find that launch location, launch layer and coupling strength all play a significant role in assimilation precision skill. However, the specifics of the interplay of these three factors are quite different for the heton case versus the non-heton case.

  8. Analytic expressions for atomic layer deposition: Coverage, throughput, and materials utilization in cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, the authors present analytic models for atomic layer deposition (ALD) in three common experimental configurations: cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial ALD. These models, based on the plug-flow and well-mixed approximations, allow us to determine the minimum dose times and materials utilization for all three configurations. A comparison between the three models shows that throughput and precursor utilization can each be expressed by universal equations, in which the particularity of the experimental system is contained in a single parameter related to the residence time of the precursor in the reactor. For the case of cross-flow reactors, the authors show how simple analytic expressions for the reactor saturation profiles agree well with experimental results. Consequently, the analytic model can be used to extract information about the ALD surface chemistry (e.g., the reaction probability) by comparing the analytic and experimental saturation profiles, providing a useful tool for characterizing new and existing ALD processes.

  9. Crystallization in organo-mineral micro-domains in the crossed-lamellar layer of Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina).

    PubMed

    Nouet, Julius; Baronnet, Alain; Howard, Lauren

    2012-02-01

    Crossed-lamellar shell microstructure consists of a sophisticated arrangement of interspersed lamellae, which is very commonly found in Gastropoda or Bivalvia shell layers. Its smallest constitutive microstructural units are usually described as sub-micrometric fibers, or rods, and form very ordered and regular patterns. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging confirms the presence of even smaller building units in the form of organo-mineral granules, and we further investigate their internal structure within aragonite crossed-lamellar internal layer of Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina) shell. Their coalescence may have controlled anisotropically the propagation of the crystallographic coherence through this complex microstructure, as suggested by the propagation of the microtwinning pattern between neighboring granules.

  10. Nuclear reaction analysis with ion microbeam of cross sections of surface layers deposited in a tokamak divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Emmoth, B.; Petersson, P.; Possnert, G.; Coad, J. P.; Likonen, J.; Renvall, T.

    2007-05-01

    Ion micro beam analysis has been applied to the investigation of plasma deposited layers covering the divertor tiles in the JET tokamak. Since the layers are about 100 μm thick they are too thick to be completely investigated by ordinary ion beam analysis. Cross sections of the layers were prepared by cutting and polishing. Elemental depth profiles were determined from the two dimensional images that could be derived by nuclear reaction analysis and resonant backscattering spectrometry, using ion beams focused to a few μm spot size. A combination of analysis methods are shown, which allow measurements of the concentration profiles of carbon, beryllium, deuterium, oxygen and stainless steel components at levels of a few percent, with an accuracy better than 10%.

  11. Cross-Layer Design for Robust and Scalable Video Transmission in Dynamic Wireless Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    CNR for Several Beta Values 64- QAM ........................................... 47 Table 19 Illustrate the Calculations for the Different Modulation ... modulation at the physical layer to the bit streams with different QoS requirements at the application layer. Unfortunately, for most non-binary...quadrature amplitude modulation ( QAM ) and hierarchical phase shift keying (PSK) modulation schemes in terms of exponential and complementary error

  12. A hydrated phospholipid polymer-grafted layer prevents lipid-related oxidative degradation of cross-linked polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Kyomoto, Masayuki; Moro, Toru; Yamane, Shihori; Takatori, Yoshio; Tanaka, Sakae; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The surface and substrate of a cross-linked polyethylene (CLPE) liner are designed to achieve resistance against oxidative degradation in the construction of hip joint replacements. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the oxidative degradation caused by lipid absorption of a highly hydrophilic nanometer-scaled thickness layer prepared by grafting a poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) layer and a high-dose gamma-ray irradiated CLPE with vitamin E blending (HD-CLPE[VE]). The HD-CLPE(VE) and PMPC-grafted HD-CLPE(VE) exhibited extremely high oxidation resistance regardless of lipid absorption, even though residual-free radical levels were detectable. The water wettability of the PMPC-grafted CLPE and PMPC-grafted HD-CLPE(VE) surfaces was considerably greater than that of untreated surfaces. The hydrated PMPC-grafted layer also exhibited extremely low solubility for squalene. Lipids such as squalene and cholesterol esters diminished the oxidation resistance of CLPE despite the vitamin E improvement. Notably, the PMPC-grafted surface was resistant to lipid absorption and diffusion as well as subsequent lipid-related oxidative degradation, likely because of the presence of the hydrated PMPC-grafted layer. Together, these results provide preliminary evidence that the resistance against lipid absorption and diffusion of a hydrated PMPC-grafted layer might positively affect the extent of resistance to the in vivo oxidation of orthopedic implants.

  13. On the Nonlinear Evolution of a Stationary Cross-Flow Vortex in a Fully Three-Dimensional Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear stability of a fully three-dimensional boundary layer flow in an incompressible fluid and derive an equation governing the nonlinear development of a stationary cross-flow vortex. The amplitude equation is a novel integro-differential equation which has spatial derivatives of the amplitude occurring in the kernal function. It is shown that the evolution of the cross-flow vortex is strongly coupled to the properties of an unsteady wall layer which is in fact driven by an unknown slip velocity, proportional to the amplitude of the cross-flow vortex. The work is extended to obtain the corresponding equation for rotating disk flow. A number of special cases are examined and the numerical solution for one of cases, and further analysis, demonstrates the existence of finite-distance as well as focussing type singularities. The numerical solutions also indicate the presence of a new type of nonlinear wave solution for a certain set of parameter values.

  14. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Methods Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF) OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI) and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Results Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9) and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5), respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. Conclusions The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the proportion of kneeling

  15. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2012-09-25

    Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF) OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI) and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9) and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5), respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the proportion of kneeling postures e.g. by working with tools used

  16. Interaction of two glancing, crossing shock waves with a turbulent boundary-layer at various Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hingst, Warren R.; Williams, Kevin E.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary experimental investigation was conducted to study two crossing, glancing shock waves of equal strengths, interacting with the boundary-layer developed on a supersonic wind tunnel wall. This study was performed at several Mach numbers between 2.5 and 4.0. The shock waves were created by fins (shock generators), spanning the tunnel test section, that were set at angles varying from 4 to 12 degrees. The data acquired are wall static pressure measurements, and qualitative information in the form of oil flow and schlieren visualizations. The principle aim is two-fold. First, a fundamental understanding of the physics underlying this flow phenomena is desired. Also, a comprehensive data set is needed for computational fluid dynamic code validation. Results indicate that for small shock generator angles, the boundary-layer remains attached throughout the flow field. However, with increasing shock strengths (increasing generator angles), boundary layer separation does occur and becomes progressively more severe as the generator angles are increased further. The location of the separation, which starts well downstream of the shock crossing point, moves upstream as shock strengths are increased. At the highest generator angles, the separation appears to begin coincident with the generator leading edges and engulfs most of the area between the generators. This phenomena occurs very near the 'unstart' limit for the generators. The wall pressures at the lower generator angles are nominally consistent with the flow geometries (i.e. shock patterns) although significantly affected by the boundary-layer upstream influence. As separation occurs, the wall pressures exhibit a gradient that is mainly axial in direction in the vicinity of the separation. At the limiting conditions the wall pressure gradients are primarily in the axial direction throughout.

  17. Surface and flow field measurements in a symmetric crossing shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. O.; Hingst, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of a symmetric crossing shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction are presented for a Mach number of 3.44 and deflection angles of 2, 6, 8, and 9 degrees. The interaction strengths vary from weak to strong enough to cause a large region of separated flow. Measured quantities include surface static pressure (both steady and unsteady) and flowfield Pitot pressures. Pitot profiles in the plane of symmetry through the interaction region are shown for various deflection angles. Oil flow visualization and the results of a trace gas streamline tracking technique are also presented.

  18. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy of antiphase boundaries in epitaxially grown GaP layers on Si(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Prohl, Christopher; Lenz, Andrea; Döscher, Henning; Kleinschmidt, Peter; Hannappel, Thomas

    2016-05-15

    In a fundamental cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy investigation on epitaxially grown GaP layers on a Si(001) substrate, differently oriented antiphase boundaries are studied. They can be identified by a specific contrast and by surface step edges starting/ending at the position of an antiphase boundary. Moreover, a change in the atomic position of P and Ga atoms along the direction of growth is observed in agreement with the structure model of antiphase boundaries in the GaP lattice. This investigation opens the perspective to reveal the orientation and position of the antiphase boundaries at the atomic scale due to the excellent surface sensitivity of this method.

  19. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions: An Additional Layer of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Immink, Richard G H; Angenent, Gerco C

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger protein complexes. The importance of protein-protein interactions between members of a particular plant TF family has long been recognised; however, a significant number of interfamily TF interactions has recently been reported. The biological implications and the molecular mechanisms involved in cross-family interactions have now started to be elucidated and the examples illustrate potential roles in the bridging of biological processes. Hence, cross-family TF interactions expand the molecular toolbox for plants with additional mechanisms to control and fine-tune robust gene expression patterns and to adapt to their continuously changing environment.

  20. An MILP-Based Cross-Layer Optimization for a Multi-Reader Arbitration in the UHF RFID System

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinchul; Lee, Chaewoo

    2011-01-01

    In RFID systems, the performance of each reader such as interrogation range and tag recognition rate may suffer from interferences from other readers. Since the reader interference can be mitigated by output signal power control, spectral and/or temporal separation among readers, the system performance depends on how to adapt the various reader arbitration metrics such as time, frequency, and output power to the system environment. However, complexity and difficulty of the optimization problem increase with respect to the variety of the arbitration metrics. Thus, most proposals in previous study have been suggested to primarily prevent the reader collision with consideration of one or two arbitration metrics. In this paper, we propose a novel cross-layer optimization design based on the concept of combining time division, frequency division, and power control not only to solve the reader interference problem, but also to achieve the multiple objectives such as minimum interrogation delay, maximum reader utilization, and energy efficiency. Based on the priority of the multiple objectives, our cross-layer design optimizes the system sequentially by means of the mixed-integer linear programming. In spite of the multi-stage optimization, the optimization design is formulated as a concise single mathematical form by properly assigning a weight to each objective. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed optimization design. PMID:22163743

  1. An MILP-based cross-layer optimization for a multi-reader arbitration in the UHF RFID system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinchul; Lee, Chaewoo

    2011-01-01

    In RFID systems, the performance of each reader such as interrogation range and tag recognition rate may suffer from interferences from other readers. Since the reader interference can be mitigated by output signal power control, spectral and/or temporal separation among readers, the system performance depends on how to adapt the various reader arbitration metrics such as time, frequency, and output power to the system environment. However, complexity and difficulty of the optimization problem increase with respect to the variety of the arbitration metrics. Thus, most proposals in previous study have been suggested to primarily prevent the reader collision with consideration of one or two arbitration metrics. In this paper, we propose a novel cross-layer optimization design based on the concept of combining time division, frequency division, and power control not only to solve the reader interference problem, but also to achieve the multiple objectives such as minimum interrogation delay, maximum reader utilization, and energy efficiency. Based on the priority of the multiple objectives, our cross-layer design optimizes the system sequentially by means of the mixed-integer linear programming. In spite of the multi-stage optimization, the optimization design is formulated as a concise single mathematical form by properly assigning a weight to each objective. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed optimization design.

  2. Cross-sectional imaging of individual layers and buried interfaces of graphene-based heterostructures and superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, S. J.; Gholinia, A.; Jalil, R.; Romani, S.; Britnell, L.; Elias, D. C.; Novoselov, K. S.; Ponomarenko, L. A.; Geim, A. K.; Gorbachev, R.

    2012-09-01

    By stacking various two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals on top of each other, it is possible to create multilayer heterostructures and devices with designed electronic properties. However, various adsorbates become trapped between layers during their assembly, and this not only affects the resulting quality but also prevents the formation of a true artificial layered crystal upheld by van der Waals interaction, creating instead a laminate glued together by contamination. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has shown that graphene and boron nitride monolayers, the two best characterized 2D crystals, are densely covered with hydrocarbons (even after thermal annealing in high vacuum) and exhibit only small clean patches suitable for atomic resolution imaging. This observation seems detrimental for any realistic prospect of creating van der Waals materials and heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces. Here we employ cross sectional TEM to take a side view of several graphene-boron nitride heterostructures. We find that the trapped hydrocarbons segregate into isolated pockets, leaving the interfaces atomically clean. Moreover, we observe a clear correlation between interface roughness and the electronic quality of encapsulated graphene. This work proves the concept of heterostructures assembled with atomic layer precision and provides their first TEM images.

  3. Interaction strength and model geometry effects on the structure of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield structure of a range of symmetric crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions of varying strength is presented. The test geometry, consisting of a symmetric pair of opposing sharp fins at angle of attack, alpha, mounted to a flat plate, is studied experimentally for a range of alpha from 7 to 15 degrees at Mach numbers of 3 and 4. Results reveal that the basic flowfield shock structure remains similar in nature over the range of interaction strengths examined, with the only changes being in the scale and location of the various features present. The separated flow regions are classified as being either completely or partially separated, the completely separated case being the one in which the entire incoming boundary layer separates from the plate surface. For the current experiments, all but the weakest of the interactions exhibited complete boundary layer separation. Finally, the effects of model geometry are analyzed by comparing data for shock generators of varying lengths, with the results showing no evidence of upstream influence due to the shock generator trailing edges.

  4. Interaction strength and model geometry effects on the structure of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield structure of a range of symmetric crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions of varying strength is presented. The test geometry, consisting of a symmetric pair of opposing sharp fins at angle of attack, alpha, mounted to a flat plate, is studied experimentally for a range of alpha from 7 to 15 degrees at Mach numbers of 3 and 4. Results reveal that the basic flowfield shock structure remains similar in nature over the range of interaction strengths examined, with the only changes being in the scale and location of the various features present. The separated flow regions are classified as being either completely or partially separated, the completely separated case being the one in which the entire incoming boundary layer separates from the plate surface. For the current experiments, all but the weakest of the interactions exhibited complete boundary layer separation. Finally, the effects of model geometry are analyzed by comparing data for shock generators of varying lengths, with the results showing no evidence of upstream influence due to the shock generator trailing edges.

  5. Inclined cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, N.; Hambleton, W. T.; Marusic, Ivan

    2005-10-01

    This work can be viewed as a reprise of Head & Bandyopadhyay's (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 107, p. 297) original boundary-layer visualization study although in this instance we make use of stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV), techniques to obtain a quantitative view of the turbulent structure. By arranging the laser light-sheet and image plane of a stereo PIV system in inclined spanwise/wall-normal planes (inclined at both 45(°) and 135(°) to the streamwise axis) a unique quantitative view of the turbulent boundary layer is obtained. Experiments are repeated across a range of Reynolds numbers, Re_{tau} {≈} 690-2800. Despite numerous experimental challenges (due to the large out-of-plane velocity components), mean flow and Reynolds stress profiles indicate that the salient features of the turbulent flow have been well resolved. The data are analysed with specific attention to a proposed hairpin eddy model. In-plane two-dimensional swirl is used to identify vortical eddy structures piercing the inclined planes. The vast majority of this activity occurs in the 135(°) plane, indicating an inclined eddy structure, and Biot-Savart law calculations are carried out to aid in the discussion. Conditional averaging and linear stochastic estimation results also support the presence of inclined eddies, arranged about low-speed regions. In the 135(°) plane, instantaneous swirl patterns exhibit a predisposition for counter-rotating vortex pairs (arranged with an ejection at their confluence). Such arrangements are consistent with the hairpin packet model. Correlation and scaling results show outer-scaling to be the correct way to quantify the characteristic spanwise length scale across the log and wake regions of the boundary layers (for the range of Reynolds numbers tested). A closer investigation of two-point velocity correlation contours indicates the occurrence of a distinct two-regime behaviour, in which contours (and hence streamwise velocity fluctuations) either appear

  6. Black synthetic quartz glass layer for optical fiber cross-talk reduction fabricated by VAD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Soichi; Fukuda, Kaoru; Onishi, Gen; Fujii, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    In this report the new black-glass fiber-preform fabricated by the vapor-phase axial deposition (VAD) method to realize high-resolution optical bundle fibers is discussed with the Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and the transmittance spectrum measurement. The black glass consists of SiO2, GeO2, Bi2O3 and Al2O3. Firstly, the rod-shaped soot of SiO2 and GeO2 is prepared by blowing SiCl4 and GeCl4 into the oxyhydrogen burner. Then the soot is dipped into the solution of the Bi and Al compounds. After drying the soot with Bi and Al penetrated, the soot is consolidated into the glass preform by heating with the carbon heater at 1650 degrees Celsius. The diameter of the obtained preform is 10.5 mm and the black glass layer thickness is 2.6 mm located at the periphery. The Bi concentration distribution shows the content of several wt% in the black glass layer. The black glass preform is drawn into the black optical fiber being expected to make a clear image because of no light leaking from the neighboring optical fibers as compared to the conventional fiber endoscope.

  7. Cross-layer optimization of video streaming in single-hop wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsin; Hefeeda, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Video streaming over wireless networks is getting very popular because of the high bandwidth and the support of quality of service offered by recent wireless standards, such as IEEE 802.11e. We consider optimizing the quality of video streaming in single-hop wireless networks that are composed of multiple wireless stations. Our optimization problem controls parameters in different layers to optimally allocate the wireless network resources among all stations. We address this problem in two steps. First, we formulate an abstract optimization problem for video streaming in single-hop wireless networks in general. This formulation exposes the important interaction between parameters belonging to different layers in the network stack. Then, we instantiate and solve the general problem for the recent IEEE 802.11e WLANs, which support prioritized traffic classes. We show how the calculated optimal solutions can efficiently be implemented in the distributed mode of the IEEE 802.11e standard. We evaluate our proposed solution using extensive simulations in the OPNET simulator, which captures most features of realistic wireless networks. In addition, to show the practicability of our solution, we have implemented it in the driver of an off-the-shelf wireless adapter that complies with the IEEE 802.11e standard. Our experimental and simulation results show that significant quality improvement in video streams can be achieved using our solution, without incurring any significant communication or computational overhead.

  8. Level-crossing statistics of the horizontal wind speed in the planetary surface boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul J.; Hurst, Robert B.

    2001-09-01

    The probability density of the times for which the horizontal wind remains above or below a given threshold speed is of some interest in the fields of renewable energy generation and pollutant dispersal. However there appear to be no analytic or conceptual models which account for the observed power law form of the distribution of these episode lengths over a range of over three decades, from a few tens of seconds to a day or more. We reanalyze high resolution wind data and demonstrate the fractal character of the point process generated by the wind speed level crossings. We simulate the fluctuating wind speed by a Markov process which approximates the characteristics of the real (non-Markovian) wind and successfully generates a power law distribution of episode lengths. However, fundamental questions concerning the physical basis for this behavior and the connection between the properties of a continuous-time stochastic process and the fractal statistics of the point process generated by its level crossings remain unanswered. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Computation of a Synthetic Jet in a Turbulent Cross-Flow Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    A series of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations are performed for the flow of a synthetic jet issuing into a turbulent boundary layer through a circular orifice. This is one of the validation test cases from a synthetic jet validation workshop held in March 2004. Several numerical parameters are investigated, and the effects of three different turbulence models are explored. Both long-time-averaged and time-dependent phase-averaged results are compared to experiment. On the whole, qualitative comparisons of the mean flow quantities are fairly good. There are many differences evident in the quantitative comparisons. The calculations do not exhibit a strong dependence on the type of turbulence model employed.

  10. The distribution of crossed and uncrossed optic fibers in the different layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus in the tree shrew (Tupaia glis).

    PubMed

    Hajdu, F; Hassler, R; Wagner, A

    1982-01-01

    The laminar distribution of crossed and uncrossed optic fibers was studied in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in the tree shrew (Tupaia glis) following unilateral enucleation. For the investigation of the termination of optic fibers the transneuronal degeneration method and experimental EM were employed. By using formvar film-coated slot grids, all six layers of the LGN could be studied in a single ultrathin section. Degeneration of crossed optic fibers was observed in layers 1, 3, 4 and 5 of the contralateral LGN. The uncrossed retinofugal fibers supply layers 2 and 6 of the LGN. The degeneration in layer 4 was less pronounced than that in the other layers. Ipsilateral and contralateral optic fibers were well separated. Filamentous as well as dark types of degeneration were found in the LGN after enucleation. The optic terminals (RL boutons) were seen only in the synaptic glomeruli.

  11. Evaluation of simulated cross-formational travel times using water age measurements in layered aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papafotiou, Alexandros; Ewing, John; Deeds, Neil; Kreitler, Charlie

    2013-04-01

    The recent hydrologic droughts in the southwestern USA have brought forward the necessity for sustainable management of groundwater that was recharged several thousands of years ago, also known as fossil water, as this resource is not directly rechargeable even through heavy rain events. Groundwater age studies can enable water authorities to map the origins of groundwater, quantify water ages in aquifers and plan sustainable water resource policies on local and regional scales. In this study, numerical groundwater availability models (GAMs) are combined with water age measurements to perform a water age analysis of the Wilcox, Carrizo, Queen City, Sparta, Jackson and Yegua aquifers that span central Texas dipping toward the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The 3D GAMs have initially been calibrated using well data. The water age analysis is carried out using 2D simulations to characterize down dip flow, cross-formational flow in the aquifers and the impact on associated water ages in representative transects extracted from the 3D models, including a discussion on bridging the gap between the 3D hydrogeological system and its simplified 2D representations. A systematic quantification of water age sensitivity to formation hydraulic conductivities and recharge at the aquifer outcrops is performed, whereby travel times in the simulated aquifers are compared to water age measurements obtained from C-14 and Tritium age dating techniques. The analysis therefore delivers the spectrum of water age isolines under consideration of model parameter uncertainty, evaluating the predictive ability of cross-formational water age studies when using 2D transect models.

  12. Evolution of the cross-equatorial atmospheric boundary layer in the east Pacific: Observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Szoeke, Simon P.

    The NCAR C-130 research aircraft flew eight missions observing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) along 95°W, 1°S--12°N. The positive air-sea temperature difference over the equatorial cold tongue results in a shallow stable layer with reduced surface winds. Stratocumulus clouds at the ABL top tend to clear over the cold water, especially at times of enhanced humidity above the ABL. In the 0°--4°N ABL heat budget, cold advection and radiative cooling were balanced by surface and entrainment heating, where each of the four terms was about 30 W m-2. The humidity budget was a near balance between dry advection and surface evaporation (each about 150 W m-2). The entrainment rate estimated from the downstream-deepening of the inversion was 12 +/- 3 mm s -1. Principal component analysis of the sea-level pressure along 95°W, 1°S--12°N from daily TAO buoy observations and the eight flights shows that the principal mode of variability in the perturbation pressure explains 77% of the pressure variability. The pressure anomalies are the same at 1.6 km as at the surface. The timeseries of the first mode of the TAO observations shows that most of the variance is in the 2--7 day window. Low pressure at 12°N is associated with southerly and westerly surface wind anomalies, and enhanced convection in the ITCZ. A "quasi-Lagrangian" large-eddy simulation (LES) is used to model the ABL along 95°W from 8°S to 4°N. Large-scale tendencies are prescribed as a function of latitude. Surface stability accounts for the minimum in surface wind over the equatorial cold tongue and the maximum over the warm water to the north, in accordance with Wallace, Mitchell, and Deser (1989). Additional simulations show the robustness of the model ABL to changes in pressure gradients, zonal advection, free-tropospheric humidity, and initial conditions. Once formed at the southern edge of the cold tongue, modeled stratus clouds demonstrate a remarkable ability to maintain themselves over the

  13. Antibacterial carboxymethyl cellulose/Ag nanocomposite hydrogels cross-linked with layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Mehdi; Namazi, Hassan; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of antibacterial nanocomposite hydrogels through the combination of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC), layered double hydroxides (LDH), and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). CMC-LDH hydrogels were prepared by intercalating CMC into different LDHs. Then, Ag/CMC-LDH nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared through in situ formation of AgNPs within the CMC-LDHs. XRD analysis confirmed the intercalating CMC into the LDH sheets and formation of intercalated structures, as well as formation of AgNPs within the CMC-LDHs. SEM and TEM micrographs indicated well distribution of AgNPs within the Ag/CMC-LDHs. The prepared hydrogels showed a pH sensitive swelling behavior. The Ag/CMC-LDH nanocomposite hydrogels have rather higher swelling in different aqueous solutions in comparison with CMC-LDHs. The antibacterial activity of CMC-LDHs increased considerably after formation of AgNPs and was stable for more than one month. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cross-Layer Self-Adaptive/Self-Aware System Software for Exascale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gioiosa, Roberto; Kestor, Gokcen; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2014-10-22

    The extreme level of parallelism coupled with the limited available power budget expected in the exascale era brings unprecedented challenges that demand optimization of performance, power and resiliency in unison. Scalability on such systems is of paramount importance, while power and reliability issues may change the execution environment in which a parallel application runs. To solve these challenges exascale systems will require an introspective system software that combines system and application observations across all system stack layers with online feedback and adaptation mechanisms. In this paper we propose the design of a novel self-aware, self-adaptive system software in which a kernel-level Monitor, which continuously inspects the evolution of the target system through observation of Sensors, is combined with a user-level Controller, which reacts to changes in the execution environment, explores opportunities to increase performance, save power and adapts applications to new execution scenarios. We show that the monitoring system accurately monitors the evolution of parallel applications with a runtime overhead below 1-2%. As a test case, we design and implement a user-runtime system that aims at optimizing application’s performance and system power consumption on complex hierarchical architectures. Our results show that our adaptive system reaches 98% of performance efficiency of manually-tuned applications.

  15. Cross-Plane Seebeck Coefficient Measurement of Misfit Layered Compounds (SnSe)n(TiSe2)n (n = 1,3,4,5).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Bauers, Sage R; Poudel, Nirakar; Hamann, Danielle; Wang, Xiaoming; Choi, David S; Esfarjani, Keivan; Shi, Li; Johnson, David C; Cronin, Stephen B

    2017-03-08

    We report cross-plane thermoelectric measurements of misfit layered compounds (SnSe)n(TiSe2)n (n = 1,3,4,5), approximately 50 nm thick. Metal resistance thermometers are fabricated on the top and bottom of the (SnSe)n(TiSe2)n material to measure the temperature difference and heat transport through the material directly. By varying the number of layers in a supercell, n, we vary the interface density while maintaining a constant global stoichiometry. The Seebeck coefficient measured across the (SnSe)n(TiSe2)n samples was found to depend strongly on the number of layers in the supercell (n). When n decreases from 5 to 1, the cross-plane Seebeck coefficient decreases from -31 to -2.5 μV/K, while the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity decreases by a factor of 2, due to increased interfacial phonon scattering. The cross-plane Seebeck coefficients of the (SnSe)n(TiSe2)n are very different from the in-plane Seebeck coefficients, which are higher in magnitude and less sensitive to the number of layers in a supercell, n. We believe this difference is due to the different carrier types in the n-SnSe and p-TiSe2 layers and the effect of tunneling on the cross-plane transport.

  16. Effect of Wall Suction on Cross-Flow Absolute Instability of a Rotating Disk Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joanna; Corke, Thomas; Matlis, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The effect of uniform suction on the absolute instability of Type I cross-flow modes on a rotating disk is examined. Specifically it investigates if wall suction transforms the absolute instability into a global mode as postulated in the numerical simulations of Davies and Carpenter (2003). The experiment is designed so that a suction parameter of a =W0 /(νω) 1 / 2 = 0 . 2 locates the absolute instability critical Reynolds number, Rca = 650 , on the disk. Uniform wall suction is applied from R = 317 to 696. The design for wall suction follows that of Gregory and Walker (1950), where an array of holes through the disk communicate between the measurement side of the disk and the underside of the disk in an enclosure that is maintained at a slight vacuum. The measurement surface is covered by a 20 micron pore size Polyethylene sheet. Temporal disturbances are introduced using the method of Othman and Corke (2006), and the evolution of the resulting wave packets are documented. The present results indicate a rapid transition to turbulence near Rca.

  17. A Review of Protocol Implementations and Energy Efficient Cross-Layer Design for Wireless Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Laurie; Wang, Xinheng; Chen, Tao

    2012-01-01

    The issues inherent in caring for an ever-increasing aged population has been the subject of endless debate and continues to be a hot topic for political discussion. The use of hospital-based facilities for the monitoring of chronic physiological conditions is expensive and ties up key healthcare professionals. The introduction of wireless sensor devices as part of a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) integrated within an overall eHealth solution could bring a step change in the remote management of patient healthcare. Sensor devices small enough to be placed either inside or on the human body can form a vital part of an overall health monitoring network. An effectively designed energy efficient WBAN should have a minimal impact on the mobility and lifestyle of the patient. WBAN technology can be deployed within a hospital, care home environment or in the patient's own home. This study is a review of the existing research in the area of WBAN technology and in particular protocol adaptation and energy efficient cross-layer design. The research reviews the work carried out across various layers of the protocol stack and highlights how the latest research proposes to resolve the various challenges inherent in remote continual healthcare monitoring. PMID:23202185

  18. Stochastic modelling of intermittent fluctuations in the scrape-off layer: Correlations, distributions, level crossings, and moment estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, O. E. Kube, R.; Theodorsen, A.; Pécseli, H. L.

    2016-05-15

    A stochastic model is presented for intermittent fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas. The fluctuations in the plasma density are modeled by a super-position of uncorrelated pulses with fixed shape and duration, describing radial motion of blob-like structures. In the case of an exponential pulse shape and exponentially distributed pulse amplitudes, predictions are given for the lowest order moments, probability density function, auto-correlation function, level crossings, and average times for periods spent above and below a given threshold level. Also, the mean squared errors on estimators of sample mean and variance for realizations of the process by finite time series are obtained. These results are discussed in the context of single-point measurements of fluctuations in the scrape-off layer, broad density profiles, and implications for plasma–wall interactions due to the transient transport events in fusion grade plasmas. The results may also have wide applications for modelling fluctuations in other magnetized plasmas such as basic laboratory experiments and ionospheric irregularities.

  19. Analytic expressions for Atomic Layer Deposition: coverage, throughput, and materials utilization in cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial ALD

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the authors present analytic models for atomic layer deposition (ALD) in three common experimental configurations: cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial ALD. These models, based on the plug-flow and well-mixed approximations, allow us to determine the minimum dose times and materials utilization for all three configurations. A comparison between the three models shows that throughput and precursor utilization can each be expressed by universal equations, in which the particularity of the experimental system is contained in a single parameter related to the residence time of the precursor in the reactor. For the case of cross-flow reactors, the authors show how simple analytic expressions for the reactor saturation profiles agree well with experimental results. Consequently, the analytic model can be used to extract information about the ALD surface chemistry (e. g., the reaction probability) by comparing the analytic and experimental saturation profiles, providing a useful tool for characterizing new and existing ALD processes. (C) 2014 American Vacuum Society

  20. Characterization of Clay Layers in the Vadose Zone Using Attenuation Tomography via Cross Borehole Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.; Alumbaugh, D.; Hall, L.

    2001-12-01

    Cross Borehole Ground Penetrating Radar (XBGPR) is currently being used to monitor the change in moisture content and to test the feasibility of using attenuation tomography in order to monitor the conductive solute transport in the vadose zone at a test site in Socorro, New Mexico. The test site is a fluvial deposit containing alternating layers of sand and clay. Data collection began in December 1998 using five wells along an 11-meter profile intersecting a three-meter by three-meter infiltrometer. The infiltrometer has been discharging water at a constant rate of 2.5 cm/day since February 1999 in order to ensure the constant flux source. The first arrival time and electric field amplitude are collected by the XBGPR acquisition system and are used in recovering the water content and attenuation coefficient of the subsurface, respectively. After an initial phase in isolating the specific pre-inversion processing steps necessary to produce the attenuation images, as well as determine the accuracy of this imaging method, our efforts have turned to analyzing the spatial distribution of the substance attenuation properties. The results show that two clay layers with a high attenuation coefficient can be well identified by the XBGPR in the time-lapse images. However, comparing with the concurrent moisture images produced by the velocity images, the repeated attenuation images also suggest that the infiltration of water and increase of water content do not have a considerable influence on the attenuation coefficients. Currently, sodium chloride solution has been discharge through the infiltrometer in the test site, and frequent data collecting has been conducted to recognize any change of the attenuation coefficient. Our future research will focus on using the same processing technique developed in the initial phase to identify the transport of the sodium chloride solution through the vadose zone.

  1. Wear evaluation of a cross-linked medical grade polyethylene by ultra thin layer activation compared to gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroosnijder, Marinus F.; Hoffmann, Michael; Sauvage, Thierry; Blondiaux, Gilbert; Vincent, Laetitia

    2005-01-01

    Most of today's artificial joints rely on an articulating couple consisting of a CoCrMo alloy and a medical grade polyethylene. The wear of the polyethylene component is the major cause for long-term failure of these prostheses since the wear debris leads to adverse biological reactions. The polyethylene wear is usually measured by gravimetric methods, which are limited due to a low sensitivity and accuracy. To demonstrate the reliability of ultra thin layer activation (UTLA) as an alternative technique, wear tests on a cross-linked ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene (XLPE) sliding against CoCrMo were performed on a wear tester featuring multi-directional sliding motion. The amount of polyethylene wear was evaluated by both UTLA and gravimetry. The particular TLA method used in this work employed the implantation of 7Be radioactive recoils into the polyethylene surface by means of a light mass particle beam. The results indicate that apart from its relatively high sensitivity, UTLA also offers the possibility for on-line measurements of polyethylene wear. This makes it a viable and complementary technique in wear test studies for medical implant purposes especially for those involving wear resistant materials and for rapid wear screening.

  2. Energy Efficient Medium Access Control Protocol for Clustered Wireless Sensor Networks with Adaptive Cross-Layer Scheduling.

    PubMed

    Sefuba, Maria; Walingo, Tom; Takawira, Fambirai

    2015-09-18

    This paper presents an Energy Efficient Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol for clustered wireless sensor networks that aims to improve energy efficiency and delay performance. The proposed protocol employs an adaptive cross-layer intra-cluster scheduling and an inter-cluster relay selection diversity. The scheduling is based on available data packets and remaining energy level of the source node (SN). This helps to minimize idle listening on nodes without data to transmit as well as reducing control packet overhead. The relay selection diversity is carried out between clusters, by the cluster head (CH), and the base station (BS). The diversity helps to improve network reliability and prolong the network lifetime. Relay selection is determined based on the communication distance, the remaining energy and the channel quality indicator (CQI) for the relay cluster head (RCH). An analytical framework for energy consumption and transmission delay for the proposed MAC protocol is presented in this work. The performance of the proposed MAC protocol is evaluated based on transmission delay, energy consumption, and network lifetime. The results obtained indicate that the proposed MAC protocol provides improved performance than traditional cluster based MAC protocols.

  3. Cross layer design for optimised region of interest of ultrasound video data over mobile WiMAX.

    PubMed

    Debono, Carl J; Micallef, Brian W; Philip, Nada Y; Alinejad, Ali; Istepanian, Robert S H; Amso, Nazar N

    2012-11-01

    The application of advanced error concealment techniques applied as a post-process to conceal lost video information in error-prone channels, such as the wireless channel, demand additional processing at the receiver. This increases the delivery delay and needs more computational power. However, in general, only a small region within medical video is of interest to the physician and thus if only this area is considered, the number of computations can be curtailed. In this paper we present a technique whereby the Region of Interest (ROI) specified by the physician is used to delimit the area where the more complex concealment techniques are applied. A cross layer design approach in mobile WiMAX wireless communication environment is adopted in this paper to provide an optimized Quality of Experience (QoE) in the region that matters most to the mobile physician while relaxing the requirements in the background, ensuring real-time delivery. Results show that a diagnostically acceptable Peak Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (PSNR) of about 36 dB can still be achieved within reasonable decoding time.

  4. Energy Efficient Medium Access Control Protocol for Clustered Wireless Sensor Networks with Adaptive Cross-Layer Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Sefuba, Maria; Walingo, Tom; Takawira, Fambirai

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an Energy Efficient Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol for clustered wireless sensor networks that aims to improve energy efficiency and delay performance. The proposed protocol employs an adaptive cross-layer intra-cluster scheduling and an inter-cluster relay selection diversity. The scheduling is based on available data packets and remaining energy level of the source node (SN). This helps to minimize idle listening on nodes without data to transmit as well as reducing control packet overhead. The relay selection diversity is carried out between clusters, by the cluster head (CH), and the base station (BS). The diversity helps to improve network reliability and prolong the network lifetime. Relay selection is determined based on the communication distance, the remaining energy and the channel quality indicator (CQI) for the relay cluster head (RCH). An analytical framework for energy consumption and transmission delay for the proposed MAC protocol is presented in this work. The performance of the proposed MAC protocol is evaluated based on transmission delay, energy consumption, and network lifetime. The results obtained indicate that the proposed MAC protocol provides improved performance than traditional cluster based MAC protocols. PMID:26393608

  5. Optimal Policy of Cross-Layer Design for Channel Access and Transmission Rate Adaptation in Cognitive Radio Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Jiang; Li, Shaoqian

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the cross-layer design of joint channel access and transmission rate adaptation in CR networks with multiple channels for both centralized and decentralized cases. Our target is to maximize the throughput of CR network under transmission power constraint by taking spectrum sensing errors into account. In centralized case, this problem is formulated as a special constrained Markov decision process (CMDP), which can be solved by standard linear programming (LP) method. As the complexity of finding the optimal policy by LP increases exponentially with the size of action space and state space, we further apply action set reduction and state aggregation to reduce the complexity without loss of optimality. Meanwhile, for the convenience of implementation, we also consider the pure policy design and analyze the corresponding characteristics. In decentralized case, where only local information is available and there is no coordination among the CR users, we prove the existence of the constrained Nash equilibrium and obtain the optimal decentralized policy. Finally, in the case that the traffic load parameters of the licensed users are unknown for the CR users, we propose two methods to estimate the parameters for two different cases. Numerical results validate the theoretic analysis.

  6. Genetic parameters for body weight, carcass chemical composition and yield in a broiler-layer cross developed for QTL mapping

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Beatriz do Nascimento; Ramos, Salvador Boccaletti; Savegnago, Rodrigo Pelicioni; Ledur, Mônica Corrêa; Nones, Kátia; Klein, Claudete Hara; Munari, Danísio Prado

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate genetic and phenotypic correlations of body weight at 6 weeks of age (BW6), as well as final carcass yield, and moisture, protein, fat and ash contents, using data from 3,422 F2 chickens originated from reciprocal cross between a broiler and a layer line. Variance components were estimated by the REML method, using animal models for evaluating random additive genetic and fixed contemporary group (sex, hatch and genetic group) effects. The heritability estimates (h2) for BW6, carcass yield and percentage of carcass moisture were 0.31 ± 0.07, 0.20 ± 0.05 and 0.33 ± 0.07, respectively. The h2 for the percentages of protein, fat and ash on a dry matter basis were 0.48 ± 0.09, 0.55 ± 0.10 and 0.36 ± 0.08, respectively. BW6 had a positive genetic correlation with fat percentage in the carcass, but a negative one with protein and ash contents. Carcass yield, thus, appears to have only low genetic association with carcass composition traits. The genetic correlations observed between traits, measured on a dry matter basis, indicated that selection for carcass protein content may favor higher ash content and a lower percentage of carcass fat. PMID:21931515

  7. A novel approach to evaluate the permeability of cake layer during cross-flow filtration in the flocculants added membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanmin; Gao, Jifeng; Jiang, Tao; Gao, Dawen; Zhang, Shurong; Li, Hongyan; Yang, Fenglin

    2011-12-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of the cake layer formation mechanism in the flocculants added MBRs, a model was developed on the basis of particle packing model considering cake collapse effect and a frictional force balance equation to predict the porosity and permeability of the cake layers. The important characteristic parameters of the flocs (e.g., floc size, fractal dimensions) and operating parameters of MBRs (e.g., transmembrane pressure, cross-flow velocity) are considered in this model. With this new model, the calculated results of porosities and specific cake resistances under different MBR operational conditions agree fairly well with the experimental data.

  8. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Wavelet Cross-Spectrum Analysis of Multi-Scale Disturbance Instability and Transition on Sharp Cone Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian; Jiang, Nan

    2008-05-01

    Experimental measurement of hypersonic boundary layer stability and transition on a sharp cone with a half angle of 5° is carried out at free-coming stream Mach number 6 in a hypersonic wind tunnel. Mean and fluctuation surface-thermal-flux characteristics of the hypersonic boundary layer flow are measured by Pt-thin-film thermocouple temperature sensors installed at 28 stations on the cone surface along longitudinal direction. At hypersonic speeds, the dominant flow instabilities demonstrate that the growth rate of the second mode tends to exceed that of the low-frequency mode. Wavelet-based cross-spectrum technique is introduced to obtain the multi-scale cross-spectral characteristics of the fluctuating signals in the frequency range of the second mode. Nonlinear interactions both of the second mode disturbance and the first mode disturbance are demonstrated to be dominant instabilities in the initial stage of laminar-turbulence transition for hypersonic shear flow.

  9. Cross-linking of interfacial layers affects the salt and temperature stability of multilayered emulsions consisting of fish gelatin and sugar beet pectin.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Fischer, Lutz; Weiss, Jochen

    2011-10-12

    This study assessed the stabilizing effect of enzymatic cross-linking on double-coated emulsions (beet pectin-fish gelatin). The beet pectin layer was cross-linked via ferulic acid groups using laccase (an enzyme that is known to catalyze the oxidation of phenolic groups). Fish gelatin-coated oil droplets (primary emulsion) were mixed at pH 3.5 to promote electrostatic deposition of the beet pectin molecules onto the surfaces of the oil droplets (secondary emulsion). Laccase was then added to promote cross-linking of the adsorbed beet pectin layer. Cross-linked pectin-coated oil droplets had similar or significantly better stability (p < 0.05) than oil droplets of primary or secondary emulsions to NaCl addition (0-500 mM), CaCl(2) addition (0-250 mM), and thermal processing (30-90 °C for 30 min). Freeze-thaw stability and creaming behavior of enzyme-treated, secondary emulsions after two cycles (-8 °C for 22 h; 25 °C for 2 h) were significantly improved (p < 0.05). These results may have important implications for food manufacturers that are in need of emulsions with improved physical stability, for example, emulsions used in frozen foods for sauces or dips.

  10. Materials based on carbon-filled porous layers of PVC cyclam derivatives cross-linked with the surfaces of asbestos fabric fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Petukhova, G. A.; Bardishev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Novikov, A. K.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Petrova, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of bilayer materials with porous upper layers composed of PVC hydroxyethylcyclam derivatives filled with carbon and a layer consisting of hydroxyethylcyclam, cross-linked via Si-O-C groups with the silica chains of a developed surface of asbestos fabric, is described. The aza-crown groups in these materials are bound with aqua complexes of H2SO4 or NaOH. The structure of the materials is examined, their adsorption characteristics are determined, and the rate of motion of H+ or OH- ions in electrochemical bridges is measured, while the formation of H2 and O2 in their cathodic and anodic polarization is determined as a function of voltage. It is shown that the upper layer of these materials is adsorption-active and electronand H+- or OH-- conductive, while the bottom layer is only H+- or OH-- conductive; through it, the upper layer is supplied with the H+ or OH- ions needed for the regeneration of the aqua complexes broken down to H2 and O2 on carbon particles.

  11. Control of Stationary Cross-Flow Modes in a Mach 3.5 Boundary Layer Using Patterned Passive and Active Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuele, Chan Yong

    2011-01-01

    Spanwise-periodic roughness designed to excite selected wavelengths of stationary cross- ow modes was investigated in a 3-D boundary layer at Mach 3.5. The test model was a sharp-tipped 14deg right-circular cone. The model and integrated sensor traversing system were placed in the Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low Disturbance Tunnel (SLDT) equipped with a "quiet design" nozzle at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was oriented at a 4:2deg angle of attack to produce a mean cross-fl ow velocity component in the boundary layer over the cone. Five removable cone tips have been investigated. One has a smooth surface that is used to document the baseline ("natural") conditions. Two had minute (20 - 40 micron) "dimples" that are equally spaced around the circumference, at a streamwise location that is just upstream of the linear stability neutral growth branch for cross- ow modes. The azimuthal mode numbers of the dimpled tips were selected to either enhance the most amplified wave numbers, or to suppress the growth of the most amplified wave numbers. Two of the cone tips had an array of plasma streamwise vortex generators that were designed to simulate the disturbances produced by the passive patterned roughness. The results indicate that the stationary cross-fl ow modes were highly receptive to the patterned roughness of both passive and active types. The patterned passive roughness that was designed to suppress the growth of the most amplified modes had an azimuthal wavelength that was 66% smaller that that of the most amplified stationary cross- ow mode. This had the effect to increase the transition Reynolds number from 25% to 50% depending on the measurement technique. The application of the research is on turbulent transition control on swept wings of supersonic aircraft. The plasma-based roughness has the advantage over the passive roughness of being able to be adaptable to different conditions that would occur during a flight mission.

  12. Control of stationary cross-flow modes in a mach 3.5 boundary layer using patterned passive and active roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuele, Chan Yong

    Spanwise-periodic roughness designed to excite selected wavelengths of stationary cross-flow modes was investigated in a 3-D boundary layer at Mach 3.5. The test model was a sharp-tipped 14° right-circular cone. The model and integrated sensor traversing system were placed in the Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low Disturbance Tunnel (SLDT) equipped with a "quiet design" nozzle at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was oriented at a 4.2 angle of attack to produce a mean cross-flow velocity component in the boundary layer over the cone. Five removable cone tips have been investigated. One has a smooth surface that is used to document the baseline ("natural") conditions. Two had minute (20 - 40 mum) "dimples" that are equally spaced around the circumference, at a streamwise location that is just upstream of the linear stability neutral growth branch for cross-flow modes. The azimuthal mode numbers of the dimpled tips were selected to either enhance the most amplified wave numbers, or to suppress the growth of the most amplified wave numbers. Two of the cone tips had an array of plasma streamwise vortex generators that were designed to simulate the disturbances produced by the passive patterned roughness. The results indicate that the stationary cross-flow modes were highly receptive to the patterned roughness of both passive and active types. The patterned passive roughness that was designed to suppress the growth of the most amplified modes had an azimuthal wavelength that was 66% smaller that that of the most amplified stationary cross-flow mode. This had the effect to increase the transition Reynolds number from 25% to 50% depending on the measurement technique. The application of the research is on turbulent transition control on swept wings of supersonic aircraft. The plasma-based roughness has the advantage over the passive roughness of being able to be adaptable to different conditions that would occur during a flight mission.

  13. Influence of layer thickness and composition of cross-linked multilayered oil-in-water emulsions on the release behavior of lutein.

    PubMed

    Beicht, Johanna; Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Fischer, Lutz; Weiss, Jochen

    2013-10-01

    Multilayering and enzymatic cross-linking of emulsions may cause alterations in the release behavior of encapsulated core material due to changes in thickness, porosity and permeability of the membrane. An interfacial engineering technology based on the layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition of oppositively charged biopolymers onto the surfaces of emulsion droplets in combination with an enzymatic treatment was used to generate emulsions with different droplet interfaces to test this hypothesis. Release behavior of primary, secondary (coated) and laccase-treated secondary emulsions carrying lutein, an oxygenated carotenoid, was characterized and studied. Fish gelatin (FG), whey protein isolate (WPI) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) were used as primary emulsifiers under acidic conditions (pH 3.5) to facilitate the adsorption of a negatively charged biopolymer (sugar beet pectin). Laccase was added to promote cross-linking of adsorbed beet pectin. The release of lutein-loaded emulsions was investigated and quantified by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Primary WPI-stabilized emulsions showed a five times higher release of lutein after 48 h than secondary emulsions (pH 3.5). Primary DTAB-stabilized emulsions released 7.2% of encapsulated lutein within the observation period, whereas beet pectin-DTAB-coated emulsions released only 0.13% of lutein. Cross-linking of adsorbed pectin did not significantly decrease release of lutein in comparison to non-cross-linked secondary emulsions. Additionally, release of lutein was also affected by changes in the pH of the surrounding medium. Results suggest that modulating the interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsion by biopolymer deposition and/or cross-linking may be a useful approach to generate food-grade delivery systems that have specific release-over-time profiles of incorporated active ingredients.

  14. The split-cross-bridge resistor for measuring the sheet resistance, linewidth, and line spacing of conducting layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Hershey, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    A new test structure was developed for evaluating the line spacing between conductors on the same layer using an electrical measurement technique. This compact structure can also be used to measure the sheet resistance, linewidth, and line pitch of the conducting layer. Using an integrated-circuit fabrication process, this structure was fabricated in diffused polycrystalline silicon and metal layers and measured optically and electrically. For the techniques used, the optical measurements were typically one-quarter micron greater than the electrical measurements. Most electrically measured line pitch values were within 2 percent of the designed value. A small difference between the measured and designed line pitch is used to validate sheet resistance, linewidth, and line spacing values.

  15. Well-Constructed Single-Layer Molybdenum Disulfide Nanorose Cross-Linked by Three Dimensional-Reduced Graphene Oxide Network for Superior Water Splitting and Lithium Storage Property

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanyan; Kuai, Long; Liu, Yanguo; Wang, Pengpeng; Arandiyan, Hamidreza; Cao, Sufeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Fengyun; Wang, Qing; Geng, Baoyou; Sun, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    A facile one-step solution reaction route for growth of novel MoS2 nanorose cross-linked by 3D rGO network, in which the MoS2 nanorose is constructed by single-layered or few-layered MoS2 nanosheets, is presented. Due to the 3D assembled hierarchical architecture of the ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets and the interconnection of 3D rGO network, as well as the synergetic effects of MoS2 and rGO, the as-prepared MoS2-NR/rGO nanohybrids delivered high specific capacity, excellent cycling and good rate performance when evaluated as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Moreover, the nanohybrids also show excellent hydrogen-evolution catalytic activity and durability in an acidic medium, which is superior to MoS2 nanorose and their nanoparticles counterparts. PMID:25735416

  16. Limpet Shells from the Aterian Level 8 of El Harhoura 2 Cave (Témara, Morocco): Preservation State of Crossed-Foliated Layers.

    PubMed

    Nouet, Julius; Chevallard, Corinne; Farre, Bastien; Nehrke, Gernot; Campmas, Emilie; Stoetzel, Emmanuelle; El Hajraoui, Mohamed Abdeljalil; Nespoulet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The exploitation of mollusks by the first anatomically modern humans is a central question for archaeologists. This paper focuses on level 8 (dated around ∼ 100 ka BP) of El Harhoura 2 Cave, located along the coastline in the Rabat-Témara region (Morocco). The large quantity of Patella sp. shells found in this level highlights questions regarding their origin and preservation. This study presents an estimation of the preservation status of these shells. We focus here on the diagenetic evolution of both the microstructural patterns and organic components of crossed-foliated shell layers, in order to assess the viability of further investigations based on shell layer minor elements, isotopic or biochemical compositions. The results show that the shells seem to be well conserved, with microstructural patterns preserved down to sub-micrometric scales, and that some organic components are still present in situ. But faint taphonomic degradations affecting both mineral and organic components are nonetheless evidenced, such as the disappearance of organic envelopes surrounding crossed-foliated lamellae, combined with a partial recrystallization of the lamellae. Our results provide a solid case-study of the early stages of the diagenetic evolution of crossed-foliated shell layers. Moreover, they highlight the fact that extreme caution must be taken before using fossil shells for palaeoenvironmental or geochronological reconstructions. Without thorough investigation, the alteration patterns illustrated here would easily have gone unnoticed. However, these degradations are liable to bias any proxy based on the elemental, isotopic or biochemical composition of the shells. This study also provides significant data concerning human subsistence behavior: the presence of notches and the good preservation state of limpet shells (no dissolution/recrystallization, no bioerosion and no abrasion/fragmentation aspects) would attest that limpets were gathered alive with tools by

  17. Limpet Shells from the Aterian Level 8 of El Harhoura 2 Cave (Témara, Morocco): Preservation State of Crossed-Foliated Layers

    PubMed Central

    Nouet, Julius; Chevallard, Corinne; Farre, Bastien; Nehrke, Gernot; Campmas, Emilie; Stoetzel, Emmanuelle; El Hajraoui, Mohamed Abdeljalil; Nespoulet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The exploitation of mollusks by the first anatomically modern humans is a central question for archaeologists. This paper focuses on level 8 (dated around ∼ 100 ka BP) of El Harhoura 2 Cave, located along the coastline in the Rabat-Témara region (Morocco). The large quantity of Patella sp. shells found in this level highlights questions regarding their origin and preservation. This study presents an estimation of the preservation status of these shells. We focus here on the diagenetic evolution of both the microstructural patterns and organic components of crossed-foliated shell layers, in order to assess the viability of further investigations based on shell layer minor elements, isotopic or biochemical compositions. The results show that the shells seem to be well conserved, with microstructural patterns preserved down to sub-micrometric scales, and that some organic components are still present in situ. But faint taphonomic degradations affecting both mineral and organic components are nonetheless evidenced, such as the disappearance of organic envelopes surrounding crossed-foliated lamellae, combined with a partial recrystallization of the lamellae. Our results provide a solid case-study of the early stages of the diagenetic evolution of crossed-foliated shell layers. Moreover, they highlight the fact that extreme caution must be taken before using fossil shells for palaeoenvironmental or geochronological reconstructions. Without thorough investigation, the alteration patterns illustrated here would easily have gone unnoticed. However, these degradations are liable to bias any proxy based on the elemental, isotopic or biochemical composition of the shells. This study also provides significant data concerning human subsistence behavior: the presence of notches and the good preservation state of limpet shells (no dissolution/recrystallization, no bioerosion and no abrasion/fragmentation aspects) would attest that limpets were gathered alive with tools by

  18. Ionic liquids in a poly ethylene oxide cross-linked gel polymer as an electrolyte for electrical double layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudoy, V.; Tran Van, F.; Deschamps, M.; Ghamouss, F.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, we developed a gel polymer electrolyte via the incorporation of a room temperature ionic liquid into a cross-linked polymer matrix. The cross-linked gel electrolyte was prepared using a free radical polymerization of methacrylate and dimethacrylate oligomers dissolved in 1-propyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide. Combining the advantages of the ionic liquids and of conventional polymers, the cross-linked gel polymer electrolyte was used both as a separator and as an electrolyte for a leakage-free and non-flammable EDLC supercapacitor. The quasi-all solid-state supercapacitors showed rather good capacitance, power and energy densities by comparison to a liquid electrolyte-based EDLC.

  19. A Framework for Supporting Survivability, Network Planning and Cross-Layer Optimization in Future Multi-Domain Terabit Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Ilya; Huang, Shu; Gopidi, Rajesh

    2015-01-28

    This final project report describes the accomplishments, products and publications from the award. It includes the overview of the project goals to devise a framework for managing resources in multi-domain, multi-layer networks, as well the details of the mathematical problem formulation and the description of the prototype built to prove the concept.

  20. Concerning the interaction of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a three-dimensional boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassom, Andrew P.; Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    Recently there has been much work devoted to considering some of the many and varied interaction mechanisms which may be operative in three-dimensional boundary layer flows. This paper is concerned with resonant triads of crossflow vortices. The effects of interactions upon resonant triads is examined where each member of the triad has the property of being linearly neutrally stable so that the importance of the interplay between modes can be relatively easily assessed. Modes within the boundary layer flow above a rotating disc are investigated because of the similarity between this disc flow and many important practical flows and, secondly, because the selected flow is an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations which makes its theoretical analysis especially attractive. It is demonstrated that the desired triads of linearly neutrally stable modes can exist within the chosen boundary layer flow. Evolution equations are obtained to describe the development of the amplitudes of these modes once the interaction mechanism is accounted for. It is found that the coefficients of the interaction terms within the evolution equations are, in general, given by quite intricate expressions although some elementary numerical work shows that the evaluation of these coefficients is practicable. The basis of the work lends itself to generalization to more complicated boundary layers, and effects of detuning or non-parallelism could be provided for within the asymptotic framework.

  1. Controlling the Release of Indomethacin from Glass Solutions Layered with a Rate Controlling Membrane Using Fluid-Bed Processing. Part 1: Surface and Cross-Sectional Chemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dereymaker, Aswin; Scurr, David J; Steer, Elisabeth D; Roberts, Clive J; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2017-04-03

    Fluid bed coating has been shown to be a suitable manufacturing technique to formulate poorly soluble drugs in glass solutions. Layering inert carriers with a drug-polymer mixture enables these beads to be immediately filled into capsules, thus avoiding additional, potentially destabilizing, downstream processing. In this study, fluid bed coating is proposed for the production of controlled release dosage forms of glass solutions by applying a second, rate controlling membrane on top of the glass solution. Adding a second coating layer adds to the physical and chemical complexity of the drug delivery system, so a thorough understanding of the physical structure and phase behavior of the different coating layers is needed. This study aimed to investigate the surface and cross-sectional characteristics (employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS)) of an indomethacin-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) glass solution, top-coated with a release rate controlling membrane consisting of either ethyl cellulose or Eudragit RL. The implications of the addition of a pore former (PVP) and the coating medium (ethanol or water) were also considered. In addition, polymer miscibility and the phase analysis of the underlying glass solution were investigated. Significant differences in surface and cross-sectional topography of the different rate controlling membranes or the way they are applied (solution vs dispersion) were observed. These observations can be linked to the polymer miscibility differences. The presence of PVP was observed in all rate controlling membranes, even if it is not part of the coating solution. This could be attributed to residual powder presence in the coating chamber. The distribution of PVP among the sample surfaces depends on the concentration and the rate controlling polymer used. Differences can again be linked to polymer miscibility. Finally, it was shown that the underlying glass solution layer

  2. Numerical simulation of crossing/turbulent boundary layer interaction at Mach 8.3 comparison of zero and two-equation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanswami, N.; Horstman, C. C.; Knight, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D hypersonic crossing shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction is examined numerically. The test geometry consists of a pair of opposing sharp fins of angle alpha = 15 deg mounted on a flat plate. The freestream Mach number is 8.28. Two theoretical models are evaluated. The full 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulent eddy viscosity model and the Rodi turbulence model. Computed results for both cases show good agreement with experiment for flat plate surface pressure and for pitot pressure and yaw angle profiles in the flowfield. General agreement is obtained for surface flow direction. Fair to poor agreement is obtained for surface heat transfer, indicating a need for more accurate turbulence models. The overall flowfield structure is similar to that observed in previous crossing shock interaction studies.

  3. Transformation of multiwall carbon nanotubes to onions with layers cross-linked by sp3 bonds under high pressure and shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, A. M.; Bredikhina, A. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Skryleva, E. A.; Parkhomenko, Yu. N.; Popov, M. Yu.; Blank, V. D.

    2017-08-01

    A pressure-induced phase transition of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) to a new structure at room temperature is studied using a shear diamond anvil cell, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman procedures. We observe a cardinal pressure-induced change in the nanoparticles shape from multi-shell tubes to multi-shell spheres. MWNT transforms to onions with layers cross-linked by sp3 bonds under the 45-65 GPa compressive stress combined with shear deformation at room temperature. TEM and XPS results show that about 40% of the carbon atoms in the new phase are sp3-bounded.

  4. Enhanced performance of polymer solar cell with ZnO nanoparticle electron transporting layer passivated by in situ cross-linked three-dimensional polymer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongwei; Song, Tao; Xia, Zhouhui; Wei, Huaixin; Sun, Baoquan

    2013-12-01

    An in situ cross-linked three-dimensional polymer network has been developed to passivate ZnO nanoparticles as an electron transporting layer (ETL) to improve the performance of inverted organic solar cells. The passivated ZnO ETL-based devices achieve efficiencies of 3.26% for poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and 7.37% for poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b‧]dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  5. The attenuation of the higher-order cross-section modes in a duct with a thin porous layer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yean; Horoshenkov, Kirill V

    2005-02-01

    A numerical method for sound propagation of higher-order cross-sectional modes in a duct of arbitrary cross-section and boundary conditions with nonzero, complex acoustic admittance has been considered. This method assumes that the cross-section of the duct is uniform and that the duct is of a considerable length so that the longitudinal modes can be neglected. The problem is reduced to a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) solution, from which a set of cross-sectional eigen-values and eigen-functions are determined. This result is used to obtain the modal frequencies, velocities and the attenuation coefficients. The 2D FE solution is then extended to three-dimensional via the normal mode decomposition technique. The numerical solution is validated against experimental data for sound propagation in a pipe with inner walls partially covered by coarse sand or granulated rubber. The values of the eigen-frequencies calculated from the proposed numerical model are validated against those predicted by the standard analytical solution for both a circular and rectangular pipe with rigid walls. It is shown that the considered numerical method is useful for predicting the sound pressure distribution, attenuation, and eigen-frequencies in a duct with acoustically nonrigid boundary conditions. The purpose of this work is to pave the way for the development of an efficient inverse problem solution for the remote characterization of the acoustic boundary conditions in natural and artificial waveguides.

  6. The attenuation of the higher-order cross-section modes in a duct with a thin porous layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yean; Horoshenkov, Kirill V.

    2005-02-01

    A numerical method for sound propagation of higher-order cross-sectional modes in a duct of arbitrary cross-section and boundary conditions with nonzero, complex acoustic admittance has been considered. This method assumes that the cross-section of the duct is uniform and that the duct is of a considerable length so that the longitudinal modes can be neglected. The problem is reduced to a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) solution, from which a set of cross-sectional eigen-values and eigen-functions are determined. This result is used to obtain the modal frequencies, velocities and the attenuation coefficients. The 2D FE solution is then extended to three-dimensional via the normal mode decomposition technique. The numerical solution is validated against experimental data for sound propagation in a pipe with inner walls partially covered by coarse sand or granulated rubber. The values of the eigen-frequencies calculated from the proposed numerical model are validated against those predicted by the standard analytical solution for both a circular and rectangular pipe with rigid walls. It is shown that the considered numerical method is useful for predicting the sound pressure distribution, attenuation, and eigen-frequencies in a duct with acoustically nonrigid boundary conditions. The purpose of this work is to pave the way for the development of an efficient inverse problem solution for the remote characterization of the acoustic boundary conditions in natural and artificial waveguides. .

  7. Cell-Passage Activity Is Required for the Malarial Parasite to Cross the Liver Sinusoidal Cell Layer

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Tomoko; Yano, Kazuhiko; Chinzei, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    Liver infection is an obligatory step in malarial transmission, but it remains unclear how the sporozoites gain access to the hepatocytes, which are separated from the circulatory system by the liver sinusoidal cell layer. We found that a novel microneme protein, named sporozoite microneme protein essential for cell traversal (SPECT), is produced by the liver-infective sporozoite of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei. Targeted disruption of the spect gene greatly reduced sporozoite infectivity to the liver. In vitro cell invasion assays revealed that these disruptants can infect hepatocytes normally but completely lack their cell passage ability. Their apparent liver infectivity was, however, restored by depletion of Kupffer cells, hepatic macrophages included in the sinusoidal cell layer. These results show that malarial sporozoites access hepatocytes through the liver sinusoidal cell layer by cell traversal motility mediated by SPECT and strongly suggest that Kupffer cells are main routes for this passage. Our findings may open the way for novel malaria transmission-blocking strategies that target molecules involved in sporozoite migration to the hepatocyte. PMID:14737184

  8. An Improved Cross-Layering Design for IPv6 Fast Handover with IEEE 802.16m Entry Before Break Handover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ronny Yongho; Jung, Inuk; Kim, Young Yong

    IEEE 802.16m is an advanced air interface standard which is under development for IMT-Advanced systems, known as 4G systems. IEEE 802.16m is designed to provide a high data rate and a Quality of Service (QoS) level in order to meet user service requirements, and is especially suitable for mobilized environments. There are several factors that have great impact on such requirements. As one of the major factors, we mainly focus on latency issues. In IEEE 802.16m, an enhanced layer 2 handover scheme, described as Entry Before Break (EBB) was proposed and adopted to reduce handover latency. EBB provides significant handover interruption time reduction with respect to the legacy IEEE 802.16 handover scheme. Fast handovers for mobile IPv6 (FMIPv6) was standardized by Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) in order to provide reduced handover interruption time from IP layer perspective. Since FMIPv6 utilizes link layer triggers to reduce handover latency, it is very critical to jointly design FMIPv6 with its underlying link layer protocol. However, FMIPv6 based on new handover scheme, EBB has not been proposed. In this paper, we propose an improved cross-layering design for FMIPv6 based on the IEEE 802.16m EBB handover. In comparison with the conventional FMIPv6 based on the legacy IEEE 802.16 network, the overall handover interruption time can be significantly reduced by employing the proposed design. Benefits of this improvement on latency reduction for mobile user applications are thoroughly investigated with both numerical analysis and simulation on various IP applications.

  9. Cross-stacked carbon nanotube film as an additional built-in current collector and adsorption layer for high-performance lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Kong, Weibang; Li, Mengya; Wu, Hengcai; Jiang, Kaili; Li, Qunqing; Zhang, Yihe; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-02-01

    Cross-stacked carbon nanotube (CNT) film is proposed as an additional built-in current collector and adsorption layer in sulfur cathodes for advanced lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. On one hand, the CNT film with high conductivity, microstructural rough surface, high flexibility and mechanical durability retains stable and direct electronic contact with the sulfur cathode materials, therefore decreasing internal resistivity and suppressing polarization of the cathode. On the other hand, the highly porous structure and the high surface area of the CNT film provide abundant adsorption points to support and confine sulfur cathode materials, alleviate their aggregation and promote high sulfur utilization. Moreover, the lightweight and compact structure of the CNT film adds no extra weight or volume to the sulfur cathode, benefitting the improvement of energy densities. Based on these characteristics, the sulfur cathode with a 100-layer cross-stacked CNT film presents excellent rate performances with capacities of 986, 922 and 874 mAh g-1 at cycling rates of 0.2C, 0.5C and 1C for sulfur loading of 60 wt%, corresponding to an improvement of 52%, 109% and 146% compared to that without a CNT film. Promising cycling performances are also demonstrated, offering great potential for scaled-up production of sulfur cathodes for Li-S batteries.

  10. Seasonal Ozone Variations in the Isentropic Layer between 330 and 380 K as Observed by SAGE 2: Implications of Extratropical Cross-Tropopause Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Cunnold, Derek M.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Olson, Jennifer R.; Kent, Geoffrey S.; Skeens, Kristi, M.

    1998-01-01

    To provide observational evidence on the extratropical cross-tropopause transport between the stratosphere and the troposphere via quasi-isentropic processes in the middleworld (the part of the atmosphere in which the isentropic surfaces intersect the tropopause), this report presents an analysis of the seasonal variations of the ozone latitudinal distribution in the isentropic layer between 330 K and 380 K based on the measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II. The results from SAGE II data analysis are consistent with (1) the buildup of ozone-rich air in the extratropical middleworld through the large-scale descending mass circulation during winter, (2) the spread of ozone-rich air in the isentropic layer from midlatitudes to subtropics via quasi-isentropic transport during spring, (3) significant photochemical ozone removal and the absence of an ozone-rich supply of air to the layer during summer, and (4) air mass exchange between the subtropics and the extratropics during the summer monsoon period. Thus the SAGE II observed ozone seasonal variations in the middleworld are consistent with the existing model calculated annual cycle of the diabatic circulation as well as the conceptual role of the eddy quasi-adiabatic transport in the stratosphere-troposphere exchange reported in the literature.

  11. Rapid imaging of misfit dislocations in SiGe/Si in cross-section and through oxide layers using electron channeling contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Kunal; Wacaser, Brent A.; Bedell, Stephen W.; Sadana, Devendra K.

    2017-06-01

    Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is emerging as a technique for rapid and high-resolution characterization of individual crystalline defects in a scanning electron microscope. However, the application of ECCI to semiconductor materials has been limited to bare samples in plan-view geometry. In this paper, two modalities of this technique are demonstrated with relevance to semiconductor manufacturing and failure analysis: (1) The use of ECCI to reveal misfit dislocation defects along a cleaved cross-section of a SiGe compositionally graded buffer grown on Si and (2) plan-view imaging of misfit dislocations in metamorphic SiGe/Si layers covered by amorphous oxide layers, where the partial loss of contrast due to the oxide layers is quantified and the effect of the beam accelerating voltage is studied. These results demonstrate the power of ECCI in inspecting crystallographic defects non-destructively over large areas, which is highly desirable for substrate quality control in manufacturing of products based on crystalline materials.

  12. Dipole Polarizabilities and Absorption Cross Sections of Two-Particle Nanoclusters of Conductive Homogeneous and Layered Particles with the Degenerate Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, M. G.; Nalbandyan, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency dependences of the dipole polarizabilities of clusters consisting of two solid conducting spherical nanoparticles and double-layer metal nanoparticles are investigated versus the geometrical parameters of the system with taking into account the degeneracy of electron gas of its metallic components. It is established that the spectra of the dynamic polarizabilities and absorption cross-sections of clusters have a complex multiresonant structure and strong dependence on the configuration parameters of the cluster, the degree of degeneracy of the metal, and kinetic characteristics of its electron gas. Spectral transformations of the absorption cross-sections of nanoclusters are illustrated under variation of the radii of particles or theirs nuclei, characteristic lengths of the Thomas-Fermi screening, and frequency of electron collisions. The anisotropic nature of absorption of electromagnetic field energy by a cluster is established: it is shown that the value of the absorption cross section depends on the direction of the electric field strength vector relative to the axis of the cluster.

  13. Error-resilient low-delay H.264/802.11 transmission via cross-layer coding with feedback channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiew, Tuan-Kiang; Hill, Paul; Ferre, Pierre; Agrafiotis, Dimitris; Chung-How, James T. H.; Nix, Andy; Bull, David R.

    2005-07-01

    We propose a method of providing error resilient H.264 video over 802.11 wireless channels by using a feedback mechanism which does not incur an additional delay typically found in ARQ-type feedback. Our system uses the TCP/IP and UDP/IP protocols, located between the medium access control (MAC) layer of 802.11, and the H.264 video application layer. The UDP protocol is used to transfer time sensitive video data without delay; however, packet losses introduce excessive artifacts which propagate to subsequent frames. Error resilience is achieved by a feedback mechanism-the decoder conveys the packet-loss information as small TCP packets to the video source as negative acknowledgements. By using multiple reference frames, slice-based coding and timely intra-refresh, the encoder makes use of this feedback information to perform subsequent temporal prediction without propagating the error to future frames. We take static measurements of the actual channel and use the packet loss and delay patterns to test our algorithms. Simulations show an improvement of 0.5~5 dB in PSNR over plain UDP-based video transmission. Our method improves the overall quality of service of interactive video transmission over wireless LAN; it can be used as a model for future media-aware wireless network protocol designs.

  14. Slantingly cross loading sample system enables simultaneous performance of separation and mixture to detect molecular interactions on thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shimizu-Yumoto, Hiroko; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Ichimura, Kazuo; Nakayama, Masayoshi

    2012-07-06

    Anthocyanins are major flower pigments that can be affected by copigments, colorless compounds that can modify anthocyanin coloration to more intense and bluer. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is an available technique to separate and analyze anthocyanins and copigments. To easily and comprehensively detect copigments, we added function of mixture of compounds to TLC; by slantingly cross loading samples on TLC, compounds are symmetrically developed at various angle lines from the upper origin to individual R(f) values and cross each other in an orderly fashion, where mixture is simultaneously performed with separation. Occurrence of copigments can be detected as a coloration change on the developed line of anthocyanin. Pink sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus L.) petals were analyzed by the cross-TLC and a more intense spot and a paler spot on the anthocyanin line were detected. As each spot overlapped with an ultraviolet absorbance line, each of these ultraviolet absorption compounds was purified and identified as kaempferol 3-rhamnoside and 2-cyanoethyl-isoxazolin-5-one, respectively. Whereas kaempferol 3-rhamnoside is a flavonoid and had a general copigment effect of more intense and bluer coloration change, 2-cyanoethyl-isoxazolin-5-one is a compound whose structure is outside of conventional categories of copigments and had a novel effect to change anthocyanin coloration paler while maintaining color tone. We determined that the search for copigments should be carried out without pre-existing prediction of structures and effects. We have shown that slantingly cross loading samples system on plate-type chromatography is an effective technique for such comprehensive analysis of molecular interaction. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cross-type orbital ordering in the layered hybrid organic-inorganic compound (C6H5CH2CH2NH3 )2CuCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugroho, A. A.; Hu, Z.; Kuo, C. Y.; Haverkort, M. W.; Pi, T. W.; Onggo, D.; Valldor, M.; Tjeng, L. H.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties and the underlying type of orbital ordering in the layered hybrid organic-inorganic compound (C6H5CH2CH2NH3 )2CuCl4 by using ac-magnetic susceptibility and polarization-dependent soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Cu-L2 and Cu-L3 edges. We have established that the compound has a long-range ferromagnetic ordering both in plane and out of plane and we found from the analysis of the absorption spectra that the orbital ordering of the Cu2 + holes involves the cross-type dx2-z2/dy2-z2 arrangement which is different from the dx2-y2 arrangement found in the parent compounds of the high-Tc cuprate superconductors.

  16. Laser Interferometer Skin-Friction measurements of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    Wall shear stress measurements beneath crossingshock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions have been made for three interactions of different strengths. The interactions are generated by two sharp fins at symmetric angles of attack mounted on a flat plate. The shear stress measurements were made for fin angles of 7 and 11 degrees at Mach 3 and 15 degrees at Mach 4. The measurements were made using a Laser Interferometer Skin Friction (LISF) meter; a device which determines the wail shear by optically measuring the time rate of thinning of an oil film placed on the test model surface. Results of the measurements reveal high skin friction coefficients in the vicinity of the fin/plate junction and the presence of quasi-two-dimensional flow separation on the interaction centerline. Additionally, two Navier-Stokes computations, one using a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and one using a k- model, are compared to the experimental results for the Mach 4, 15 degree interaction case. While the k- model did a reasonable job of predicting the overall trend in portions of the skin friction distribution, neither computation fully captured the physics of the near surface flow in this complex interaction.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Effect of Wall Suction on Cross-Flow Absolute Instability in a Rotating Disk Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joanna; Corke, Thomas; Matlis, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The research is intended to investigate the effect of uniform suction on the absolute instability of Type I cross-flow modes on a rotating disk. Specifically it is designed to investigate if wall suction will transform the absolute instability into a global mode as postulated in the numerical simulations of Davies and Carpenter (2003). The disk is designed so that with a suction parameter of a = w /(νω) 1 / 2 = 0 . 4 , the radial location of the absolute instability critical Reynolds number, RCa = 803 , occurs on the disk. Uniform wall suction is applied from R = 449 to 919. The design for wall suction follows that of Gregory and Walker (1950), where an array of holes through the disk communicate between the measurement side of the disk and the underside of the disk in an enclosure that is maintained at a slight vacuum. The holes in the measurement surface are covered by a stretched silk cloth that provides a smooth, finely porous surface. A companion numerical simulation was performed to investigate the effect of the size and vacuum pressure of the underside enclosure on the uniformity of the measurement surface suction. Temporal disturbances are introduced using the method of Othman and Corke (2006), and the evolution of the resulting wave packets is documented.

  18. Impact of leaky wells on nitrate cross-contamination in a layered aquifer system: Methodology for and demonstration of quantitative assessment and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Eun-Hee; Lee, Eunhee; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-10-01

    Poorly constructed wells can cause deterioration of groundwater quality by carrying surface contaminants into a deep subsurface aquifer system. In this study, the impact of leaky wells on groundwater contamination was quantitatively evaluated in a layered aquifer system of the Gosan agricultural fields, Jeju Island, Korea, where degradation in groundwater quality by nitrate has been reported. We introduce a leaky-well module and a double-domain integration method to compute nitrate cross-contamination through a layered aquifer system. The simulation results clearly revealed that the leaky wells rapidly degraded the water quality of the underlying aquifer by acting as a direct pathway for nitrate-rich shallow groundwater. The model results predicted that in order to decrease the NO3-N concentration at the regional groundwater wells below the maximum contamination level (MCL), the maximum allowable fertilizer amount of Gosan would be 45-65% of the currently applied fertilizer level, whereas sealing of the regional groundwater wells would rapidly decrease the NO3-N concentration below the MCL without reducing fertilizer usage. Our study demonstrated that the well conditions and hydrogeological system play major roles in the occurrence of nitrate in the underlying aquifer in Gosan; therefore, a proper groundwater management plan against nitrate contamination should be established on the basis of a comprehensive understanding of the hydrogeologic system of the area.

  19. Modeling of Turbulent Boundary Layer Surface Pressure Fluctuation Auto and Cross Spectra - Verification and Adjustments Based on TU-144LL Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rackl, Robert; Weston, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The literature on turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations provides several empirical models which were compared to the measured TU-144 data. The Efimtsov model showed the best agreement. Adjustments were made to improve its agreement further, consisting of the addition of a broad band peak in the mid frequencies, and a minor modification to the high frequency rolloff. The adjusted Efimtsov predicted and measured results are compared for both subsonic and supersonic flight conditions. Measurements in the forward and middle portions of the fuselage have better agreement with the model than those from the aft portion. For High Speed Civil Transport supersonic cruise, interior levels predicted by use of this model are expected to increase by 1-3 dB due to the adjustments to the Efimtsov model. The space-time cross-correlations and cross-spectra of the fluctuating surface pressure were also investigated. This analysis is an important ingredient in structural acoustic models of aircraft interior noise. Once again the measured data were compared to the predicted levels from the Efimtsov model.

  20. Prevention of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on a vitamin E-blended, cross-linked polyethylene surface with a poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) layer.

    PubMed

    Kyomoto, Masayuki; Shobuike, Takeo; Moro, Toru; Yamane, Shihori; Takatori, Yoshio; Tanaka, Sakae; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-09-01

    In the construction of artificial hip joint replacements, the surface and substrate of a cross-linked polyethylene (CLPE) liner are designed to achieve high wear resistance and prevent infection by bacteria. In this study, we fabricated a highly hydrophilic and antibiofouling poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine [MPC]) (PMPC)-graft layer on the vitamin E-blended CLPE (HD-CLPE(VE)) surface. The 100-nm-thick, smooth, and electrically neutral PMPC layer was successfully fabricated on the HD-CLPE(VE) surface using photoinduced graft polymerization. The PMPC-grafted HD-CLPE(VE) was found to prevent bacterial adherence and biofilm formation on the surface because of the formation of a highly hydrophilic polyzwitterionic layer on the surface of HD-CLPE(VE), which can serve as an extremely efficient antibiofouling layer. The number of bacterial adhered on the PMPC-grafted HD-CLPE(VE) surface was reduced by 100-fold or more by PMPC grafting, regardless of the biofilm-production characteristics of the strains. In contrast, vitamin E blending did not affect bacterial adhesion. Moreover, the number of planktonic bacteria did not differ significantly, regardless of PMPC grafting and vitamin E blending. In conclusion, the PMPC-grafted HD-CLPE(VE) provided bacteriostatic effects associated with smooth, highly hydrophilic surfaces with a neutral electrostatic charge owing to the zwitterionic structure of the MPC unit. Thus, this modification may prove useful for the production of artificial hip joint replacement materials. Our preliminary in vitro findings suggest that improved bacteriostatic performance of the HD-CLPE(VE) surface in orthopedic implants is possible via PMPC grafting. The results also indicate that surface modifications affect the anti-infection properties of the orthopedic implants and demonstrate that the application of a PMPC-grafted HD-CLPE(VE) surface may be a promising approach to extend the longevity and clinical outcomes of total hip arthroplasty

  1. Nanocomposites of C3N4 with Layers of MoS2 and Nitrogenated RGO, Obtained by Covalent Cross-linking: Synthesis, Characterization and HER Activity.

    PubMed

    Pramoda, K; Gupta, Uttam; Chhetri, Manjeet; Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Pati, Swapan K; Rao, Chintamani Nagesa Ramachandra

    2017-03-07

    Generation of hydrogen by photochemical, electrochemical and other means is a vital area of research today and a variety of materials has been explored as catalysts for this purpose. C3N4, MoS2 and nitrogenated RGO (NRGO) are some of the important catalytic materials investigated for the HER reaction but the observed catalytic activities are somewhat marginal. Prompted by preliminary reports that covalent cross-linking of 2D materials to generate hetero assemblies or nanocomposites may have beneficial effect on the catalytic activity, we have synthesized nanocomposites wherein C3N4 is covalently bonded to MoS2 or NRGO nanosheets. The photochemical HER activity of the C3N4-MoS2 nanocomposite is found to be remarkable with a activity of 12778 µmoles h-1g-1 and a TOF of 2.35 h-1. The physical mixture of C3N4 and MoS2, on the other hand, does not exhibit notable catalytic activity. Encouraged by this result, we have studied electrochemical HER activity of these composites as well. C3N4-MoS2 shows superior activity relative to a physical mixture of MoS2 and C3N4. DFT calculations have been carried out to understand the HER activity of the nanocomposites. Charge-transfer between the components and greater planarity of cross-linked layers are important causes of the superior catalytic activity of the nanocomposites. Covalent linking of such 2D materials appears to be a worthwhile strategy for catalysis and other applications.

  2. Turbulent Mixing and Vertical Heat Transfer in the Surface Mixed Layer of the Arctic Ocean: Implication of a Cross-Pycnocline High-Temperature Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yusuke; Takeda, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the mixing processes in the vicinity of surface mixed layer (SML) of the Arctic Ocean. Turbulence activity and vertical heat transfer are quantitatively characterized in the Northwind Abyssal Plain, based on the RV Mirai Arctic cruise, during the transition from late summer to early winter 2014. During the cruise, noticeable storm events were observed, which came over the ship's location and contributed to the deepening of the SML. According to the ship-based microstructure observation, within the SML, the strong wind events produced enhanced dissipation rates of turbulent kinetic energy in the order of magnitude of ɛ = 10-6-10-4W kg-1. On thermal variance dissipation rate, χ increases toward the base of SML, reaching O(10-7) K2 s-1, resulting in vertical heat flux of O(10) W m-2. During the occasional energetic mixing events, the near-surface warm water was transferred downward and penetrated through the SML base, creating a cross-pycnocline high-temperature anomaly (CPHTA) at approximately 20-30 m depth. Near CPHTA, the vertical heat flux was anomalously magnified to O(10-100) W m-2. Following the fixed-point observation, in the regions of marginal and thick ice zones, the SML heat content was monitored using an autonomous drifting buoy, UpTempO. During most of the ice-covered period, the ocean-to-ice turbulent heat flux was dominant, rather than the diapycnal heat transfer across the SML bottom interface.

  3. Cross-sectional TEM study of the microstructure of superconducting X-ray detectors based on thin W-Al layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáfrán, G.; Loidl, M.; Meier, O.; Seidel, W.; Pröbst, F.

    2002-06-01

    The relation between structural and morphological properties and the performance of X-ray detectors have been studied by means of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and low temperature electrical measurements. The detectors consist of a strip of an aluminium thin film in contact with superconducting phase transition thermometers based on tungsten films at its both ends. Soft X-ray photons are absorbed in the sapphire substrate underneath the Al film and create high energy phonons. These phonons enter the superconducting film and break up Cooper-pairs into quasiparticles which then diffuse into the W films and create correlated thermal signals in both thermometers. XTEM investigations revealed a polycrystalline structure of the Al films above both the bare sapphire and chemically etched areas of the highly oriented W films, while the Al is single crystalline above the intact W film surface showing an orientational relationship: (2 0 0) Al∥(0 2 0) W∥( 0 1 1¯ 2)Al 2O 3 and [0 2¯ 2 ] Al∥[2 0 0] W∥[ 1 0 1¯ 2¯] Al2O3. No remarkable difference in morphology and structure of the layers of the two detector sides was observed. On the other hand, irregular saw-tooth-like interfaces of different profiles of low slope were found between the chemically etched regions of the W sensor films and the overlapping Al diffusion film. The observed strong asymmetry of the correlated signals is attributed to the disturbed quasiparticle propagation through the observed different interface structures of the two detector sides.

  4. Cross-sectional study of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness at 7 years after an acute episode of unilateral primary acute angle closure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacky W Y; Woo, Tiffany T Y; Yau, Gordon S K; Yip, Stan; Yick, Doris W F; Wong, Jasper; Wong, Raymond L M; Wong, Ian Y H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the long-term retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) status and determinants of RNFL thinning after an episode of unilateral primary acute angle closure (AAC). This cross-sectional study analyzed the medical records of consecutive patients with a single episode of unilateral AAC from 1999 to 2009 in Hong Kong. The peripapillary RNFL thickness was correlated with age, gender, presenting intraocular pressure (IOP), time to laser iridotomy, time to cataract extraction, follow-up duration, as well as the last IOP, vertical cup-to-disc ratio (CDR), and vision. The fellow uninvolved eye was used as a proxy comparison of RNFL loss in the attack eye. In 40 eligible patients, the mean age was 68.3 ± 8.7 years with a male-to-female ratio of 1:7. The mean presenting IOP was 49.2 ± 14.0 mm Hg and the time from presentation to laser iridotomy was 6.7 ± 6.9 days. Forty percent of subjects received a cataract extraction at 3.2 ± 2.9 years after the attack. The last IOP, CDR, and LogMAR vision were 16.0 ± 3.8 mm Hg, 0.6 ± 0.2, and 0.6 ± 0.6 LogMAR units, respectively, at 7.9 ± 2.4 years. The RNFL thickness in the attack eye (69.2 ± 19.1 μm) was 25.2 ± 17.9% thinner than the fellow eye (93.0 ± 17.8 μm) at 7.5 ± 2.9 years post-AAC. Using univariate analysis, the last vertical CDR (odds ratio [OR] = 17.2, P = 0.049) and LogMAR visual acuity (VA) (OR = 6.6, P = 0.03) were the only significant predictors for RNFL thinning whereas none of the other covariates showed significant associations (P > 0.1). At 7.5 years following unilateral AAC, the RNFL thickness was 25% thinner than the fellow eye. CDR enlargement and poor VA were the only significant predictors for RNFL loss.

  5. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Mechanism for propagation of rate signals through a 10-layer feedforward neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Yu, Wan-Qing; Xu, Ding; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2009-12-01

    Using numerical simulations, we explore the mechanism for propagation of rate signals through a 10-layer feedforward network composed of Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons with sparse connectivity. When white noise is afferent to the input layer, neuronal firing becomes progressively more synchronous in successive layers and synchrony is well developed in deeper layers owing to the feedforward connections between neighboring layers. The synchrony ensures the successful propagation of rate signals through the network when the synaptic conductance is weak. As the synaptic time constant τsyn varies, coherence resonance is observed in the network activity due to the intrinsic property of HH neurons. This makes the output firing rate single-peaked as a function of τsyn, suggesting that the signal propagation can be modulated by the synaptic time constant. These results are consistent with experimental results and advance our understanding of how information is processed in feedforward networks.

  6. Reduction of cross-talks between circuit and sensor layer in the Kyoto's X-ray astronomy SOI pixel sensors with Double-SOI wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Shunichi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Ayaki; Matsumura, Hideaki; Ito, Makoto; Arai, Yasuo; Kurachi, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakashima, Shinya; Mori, Koji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Takebayashi, Nobuaki; Noda, Koki; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Tamasawa, Kouki; Ozawa, Yusuke; Sato, Tadashi; Konno, Takahiro; Kawahito, Shoji; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kamehama, Hiroki; Shrestha, Sumeet; Hara, Kazuhiko; Honda, Shunsuke

    2016-09-01

    We have been developing silicon-on-insulator pixel sensors, "XRPIXs," for future X-ray astronomy satellites. XRPIXs are equipped with a function of "event-driven readout," with which we can read out only hit pixels by trigger signals and hence realize good time resolution reaching ∼ 10 μs . The current version of XRPIX suffers from a problem that the spectral performance degrades in the event-driven readout mode compared to the frame-readout mode, in which all the pixels are read out serially. Previous studies have clarified that one of the causes is capacitive coupling between the sense node and the trigger signal line in the circuit layer. In order to solve the problem, we adopt the Double SOI structure having a middle silicon layer between the circuit and the sensor layers. We expect the middle silicon layer to work as an electrostatic shield and reduces the capacitive coupling. In this paper, we report the spectroscopic performance of XRPIX with the middle silicon layer. We successfully reduce the capacitive coupling and the readout noise.

  7. Gas-Barrier Hybrid Coatings by the Assembly of Novel Poly(vinyl alcohol) and Reduced Graphene Oxide Layers through Cross-Linking with Zirconium Adducts.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ning; Capezzuto, Filomena; Buonocore, Giovanna G; Lavorgna, Marino; Xia, Hesheng; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-14

    Gas-barrier materials obtained by coating poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates have already been studied in the recent literature. However, because of the benefits of using cheaper, biodegradable, and nonpolar polymers, multilayered hybrid coatings consisting of alternate layers of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets and a novel high amorphous vinyl alcohol (HAVOH) with zirconium (Zr) adducts as binders were successfully fabricated through a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approach. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed that rGO nanoplatelets were uniformly dispersed over the HAVOH polymer substrate. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies revealed that multilayer (HAVOH/Zr/rGO)n hybrid coatings exhibited a brick-wall structure with HAVOH and rGO as buildings blocks. It has been shown that 40 layers of HAVOH/Zr/rGO ultrathin films deposited on PET substrates lead to a decrease of 1 order of magnitude of oxygen permeability with respect to the pristine PET substrate. This is attributed to the effect of zirconium polymeric adducts, which enhance the assembling efficiency of rGO and compact the layers, as confirmed by NMR characterization, resulting in a significant increment of the oxygen-transport pathways. Because of their high barrier properties and high flexibility, these films are promising candidates in a variety of applications such as packaging, selective gas films, and protection of flexible electronics.

  8. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  9. A Comparative SEM Investigation of Smear Layer Remaining on Dentinal Walls by Three Rotary NiTi Files with Different Cross Sectional Designs in Moderately Curved Canals

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Pooja; Vats, Asit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the smear layer formed on root canal walls during canal preparation of extracted human teeth by Twisted, Mtwo, and ProTaper rotary nickel titanium instruments. Materials and Methods: Sixty single rooted human premolar teeth with root curvature <250 were selected and randomly divided into three Groups (n= 20 teeth per Group). Three types of rotary nickel titanium instruments were used, Twisted (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA), Mtwo (VDW, Munich, Germany) and ProTaper (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) according to manufacturer’s instructions to instrument the root canals. Irrigation for all groups was performed after each instrument change with 3ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite followed by Glyde (File Prep, Dentsply, Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) as chelator paste and lubricant. Three different areas (coronal, middle and apical thirds) of the root canal were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The canal wall of each sample was assessed and compared using a predefined scale for the presence or absence of smear layer. Data were analysed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey HSD test Results: All three groups showed statistically significant more smear layer in the apical thirds of the canal as compared to the coronal and middle thirds (p<0.001). Mtwo rotary file system produced significantly less smear layer (p<0.001) compared to Twisted and ProTaper rotary instruments in the apical portion. Twisted Files resulted in less smear layer formation in the apical thirds of the canal compared to ProTaper rotary instruments but were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Completely clean root canals were not found after instrumentation with any of the three instruments. Under the confines of this study Mtwo instruments produced significantly cleaner dentin wall surfaces throughout the canal length in comparison to Twisted and ProTaper rotary files. Twisted Files proved to be comparable to Pro

  10. Decomposition of total solvation energy into core, side-chains and water contributions: Role of cross correlations and protein conformational fluctuations in dynamics of hydration layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sayantan; Mukherjee, Saumyak; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical coupling between water and amino acid side-chain residues in solvation dynamics is investigated by selecting residues often used as natural probes, namely tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine, located at different positions on protein surface. Such differently placed residues are found to exhibit different timescales of relaxation. The total solvation response measured by the probe is decomposed in terms of its interactions with (i) protein core, (ii) side-chain and (iii) water. Significant anti cross-correlation among these contributions are observed. When the motion of the protein side-chains is quenched, solvation either becomes faster or slower depending on the location of the probe.

  11. Effect of Cross-Field Drifts and Core Rotation on Flows in the Main Scrape-Off Layer of DIII-D L-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, M; Boedo, J A; Brooks, N H; Isler, R C; Leonard, A W; Porter, G D; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Bray, B D; Fenstermacher, M E; Groebner, R J; Moyer, R A; Rudakov, D L; Yu, J H; Zeng, L

    2008-10-13

    The flow velocities of deuterons and low charge-state carbon ions have been measured simultaneously for the first time at the crown of the main SOL for low-density plasmas in DIII-D. The dependences of the flow fields on the direction of the cross-field drifts (E x B and B x {del}B) and core plasma rotation were investigated. The measurements indicate that the carbon ion flow direction and magnitude along the magnetic field lines are not necessarily determined by the deuteron flow field, but other physics must also play a role. The deuteron velocities at the plasma crown are high (20-30 km/s) in configurations with the ion B x {del}B drift toward the divertor X-point, while nearly zero in configurations with the opposite B x {del}B drift direction. The flow velocities of doubly charged carbon ions are independent of the ion B x {del}B drift direction, and the measurements suggest a stagnation point in the flow field at the crown of the plasma. Both deuteron and carbon ion flow velocities in the SOL were found to be independent of the direction of core plasma rotation. Simulations with the UEDGE code have been carried out to better understand the underlying physics processes. Including the cross-field drifts in the simulations produced divertor solutions that are in significantly closer agreement with the measurements. They do not, however, reproduce the measured flow fields at the crown for the configuration with the ion B x {del}B drift toward the divertor X-point.

  12. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03581 Polar Layers

    This image shows just one example of the bright and dark markings that appear during summer time. The marks are related to the polar layers. If you happen to see a wild-eyed guy sticking his tongue out at you, you'll know why this image qualifies for the old 'art' category of THEMIS releases.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6S, Longitude 34.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. New Cross-Talk Layer between Ultraconserved Non-Coding RNAs, MicroRNAs and Polycomb Protein YY1 in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Colonna, Vincenza; Romanelli, Alessandra; Terracciano, Daniela; Ferro, Matteo; Perdonà, Sisto; Castaldo, Luigi; Febbraio, Ferdinando; de Nigris, Filomena; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved elements in mammals, and exert key regulatory functions. Growing evidence shows that miRNAs can interact with another class of non-coding RNAs, so-called transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs), which take part in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic regulation processes. We report here the interaction of miRNAs and T-UCRs as a network modulating the availability of these non-coding RNAs in bladder cancer cells. In our cell system, antagomiR-596 increased the expression of T-UCR 201+. Moreover, T-UCR 8+ silencing increased miR-596 expression, which in turn reduced total T-UCR 283+, showing that the perturbation of one element in this network changes the expression of other interactors. In addition, we identify the polycomb protein Yin Yang 1 (YY1) as mediator of binding between miR-596 and T-UCR 8+. These new findings describe for the first time a network between T-UCRs, miRNAs and YY1 protein, highlighting the existence of an additional layer of gene expression regulation. PMID:27983635

  14. Investigation of the foam influence on the wind-wave momentum exchange and cross-polarization microwave radar return within laboratory modeling of atmosphere-ocean boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Daniil; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vdovin, Maxim; Ermoshkin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    The effect of foam presence on the transfer processes and the parameters of the surface roughness within the laboratory simulation of wind-wave interaction was carried out on the Thermostratified Wind-Wave Tank (TSWiWaT) IAP, using a specially designed foam generator. The parameters of air flow profiles and waves elevation were measured with scanning Pitot gauge and wire wave gauges respectively in the range of equivalent wind speed U10 from 12 to 38 m/s (covering strong winds) on the clean water and with foam. It was shown that the foam reduces the amplitudes and slopes of the waves in comparison with the clean water in the hole range of wind speeds investigated, and the peak frequency and wave numbers remain almost constant. The drag coefficient calculating by profiling method demonstrated similar behavior (almost independent on U10) for case of foam and increased compared with clear water, particularly noticeable for low wind speeds. Simultaneously the investigations of influence of the foam on the peculiarity of the microwave radio back scattering of X-diapason was investigated. These measurements were carried for different sensing angles (30, 40 i 50 degrees from vertical) and for four polarizations: co-polarized HH and VV, and de-polarized HV and VH. It was shown that foam leads to decrease of specific radar cross section of the wavy surface in comparison with clean water. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants No. 15-35-20953, 14-05-00367, 16-55-52022) and project ASIST of FP7. The experiment is supported by Russian Science Foundation (Agreement No. 15-17-20009), radilocation measurments are partially supported by Russian Science Foundation (Agreement No. 14-17-00667).

  15. Relationship between years in the trade and the development of radiographic knee osteoarthritis and MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis in floor layers. A cross-sectional study of a historical cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rytter, Søren; Marott, Jacob Louis; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objectives An increased risk of developing knee disorders including radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been shown among workers with kneeling working demands. There may also be a dose-related association between duration of employment in occupations with kneeling work and development of radiographic knee OA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected meniscal tears and bursitis. Design A cross-sectional study of a historical cohort. Setting Members of the trade unions for floor layers and graphic designers in Denmark. Participants 92 male floor layers and 49 graphic designers aged 36–70 years were randomly selected among participants from a clinical and radiographic study of 156 floor layers and 152 graphic designers. Outcome measures Radiographic tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) knee-OA and MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis. Results were adjusted for age, earlier knee traumas, sports activities and body mass index in logistic regression models. Association between TF OA and years in the floor-laying trade was graphically examined by a restricted cubic spline with four knots. Results Increase in number of years with exposure to kneeling work is associated with radiographic TF knee OA with ORs 0.7, 95% CI 0.07 to 4.42; OR 1.89, 95% CI 0.29 to 12.3; OR 4.82, 95% CI 1.38 to 17 for <20 years, 20–30 years and >30 years of kneeling work, respectively. MRI-verified medial meniscal tears was increased among subjects with kneeling work with OR 1.96, 95% CI 0.79 to 4.88 to OR 4.73, 95% CI 1.16 to 19.4 but was not associated with duration of employment. Periarticular bursitis was increased in subjects with <20 years of kneeling working activity. Lateral meniscal tears and PF knee OA were not associated with duration of kneeling working activity or with kneeling work in general. Conclusions The findings suggest a dose–response relationship for radiographic TF knee OA in floor layers with a significant amount of kneeling work and an

  16. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  17. South Layers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-20

    This MOC image shows remnants of layered materials near the west rim of South Crater, Mars. The composition of these layered rocks is unknown -- are they the remains of sedimentary rocks or accumulations of dust and ice?

  18. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  19. Nonmixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Pierre; Giovangigli, Vincent; Matuszewski, Lionel

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the impact of nonideal diffusion on the structure of supercritical cryogenic binary mixing layers. This situation is typical of liquid fuel injection in high-pressure rocket engines. Nonideal diffusion has a dramatic impact in the neighborhood of chemical thermodynamic stability limits where the components become quasi-immiscible and ultimately form a nonmixing layer. Numerical simulations are performed for mixing layers of H2 and N2 at a pressure of 100 atm and temperature around 120-150 K near chemical thermodynamic stability limits.

  20. Layers and Erosion and more Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 4 November 2003

    This image is located within a set of eroded layered rocks known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. Careful inspection of this image reveals four separate layers. Starting at the bottom of the image, as well as the bottom of the sequence of layers, is a somewhat hilly, cratered plain. Above that is a mud or lava flow with a lobate edge that is characteristic of fluid flow. Above that is a layer with a spectacular rayed crater. This layer shows linear erosional patterns that are probably caused by persistent wind abrasion, typical of rocks in this area. And finally, a more blocky unit lies on top, mostly eroded away.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 3.6, Longitude 218.6 East (141.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Layers in Melas Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger annotated version

    This scene of layered deposits is from Melas Chasma, part of the Valles Marineris valley network. The area consists of a series of plateaus and cliffs that form a step-like terrain similar to the Grand Staircase-Escalante region of southwest Utah. The upper-right half of the image covers the highest plateau, and lower cliffs and plateaus step down in elevation toward the lower left of the image. Dunes of dark sand commonly cover the flat plateaus and distinct layers of bedrock are exposed in the cliffs. The orientations of these layers may help scientists to understand how the layers formed and the kind of environment that the layers formed in. Black rectangles on the left side of the image are areas where the image data was lost during transmission from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to Earth. This subscene [above] shows a series of boulder tracks on the left side of the image. The boulders fell from the cliffs above and left behind a series of small depressions. Each depression was made as the boulder bounced and rolled along the surface. In many cases, the tracks can be followed to the specific boulder that made them. Also visible in this subscene are cross-sections through the layered bedrock. This bedrock likely formed through settling of sand-sized particles out of the air or out of a body of water that has since drained away. These layers are 'cross-bedded', which means that subsequent layers are not parallel to each other but are instead oriented at an angle to other layers. The fact that these layers are cross-bedded indicates that the sand-sized particles were moved horizontally along the surface as they settled, just like sand dunes or ripples at the bottom of a stream. The size and shape of these cross-beds may help scientists to determine if the layers formed underwater or on land.

    Image PSP_001377_1685 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging

  2. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  3. Spallanzani Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    31 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a layered, light-toned mesa among other layered materials exposed in a mound that covers much of the floor of Spallanzani Crater.

    Location near: 58.3oS, 273.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  4. Layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  5. Observations of the magnetopause current layer: Cases with no boundary layer and tests of recent models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence for the probable existence of magnetospheric boundary layers was first presented by Hones, et al. (1972), based on VELA satellite plasma observations (no magnetic field measurements were obtained). This magnetotail boundary layer is now known to be the tailward extension of the high-latitude boundary layer or plasma mantle (first uniquely identified using HEOS 2 plasma and field observations by Rosenbauer et al., 1975) and the low-latitude boundary layer (first uniquely identified using IMP 6 plasma and field observations by Eastman et al., 1976). The magnetospheric boundary layer is the region of magnetosheath-like plasma located Earthward of, but generally contiguous with the magnetopause. This boundary layer is typically identified by comparing low-energy (less than 10 keV) ion spectra across the magnetopause. Low-energy electron measurements are also useful for identifying the boundary layer because the shocked solar wind or magnetosheath has a characteristic spectral signature for electrons as well. However, there are magnetopause crossings where low-energy electrons might suggest a depletion layer outside the magnetopause even though the traditional field-rotation signature indicates that this same region is a boundary layer Earthward of the current layer. Our analyses avoided crossings which exhibit such ambiguities. Pristine magnetopause crossings are magnetopause crossings for which the current layer is well defined and for which there is no adjoining magnetospheric boundary layer as defined above. Although most magnetopause models to date apply to such crossings, few comparisons between such theory and observations of pristine magnetopause crossings have been made because most crossings have an associated magnetospheric boundary layer which significantly affects the applicable boundary conditions for the magnetopause current layer. Furthermore, almost no observational studies of magnetopause microstructure have been done even though key

  6. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  7. Layered Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    28 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a frost-covered slope in the south polar region of Mars. The layered nature of the terrain in the south polar region is evident in a series of irregular, somewhat stair-stepped bands that run across the image.

    Location near: 84.3oS, 27.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  8. Exhumed Layers Near the Nili Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-24

    NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows densely fractured light-toned rock in the vicinity of the Nili Fossae. The light-toned material is finely layered; these layers can be seen in cross-section along a scarp face at the bottom of the image.

  9. Glancing shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction with boundary layer suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, P. J.; Greber, I.; Hingst, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    Tests conducted to ascertain the stagnation pressure and flow angularity profiles of a turbulent boundary layer subjected to boundary layer suction (BLS) as it crosses a glancing sidewall shock wave have determined that the boundary layer does not separate upon crossing the shock wave. Without BLS, the upstream influence of the shock wave-induced wall static pressure rise was extensive, of the order of four bloundary layer thicknesses; for the same case, with suction, the extent of upstream influence was 50 percent lower. In addition, flow angularities at the wall were found to be smaller with suction than without it.

  10. Glancing shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction with boundary layer suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, P. J.; Greber, I.; Hingst, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    Tests conducted to ascertain the stagnation pressure and flow angularity profiles of a turbulent boundary layer subjected to boundary layer suction (BLS) as it crosses a glancing sidewall shock wave have determined that the boundary layer does not separate upon crossing the shock wave. Without BLS, the upstream influence of the shock wave-induced wall static pressure rise was extensive, of the order of four bloundary layer thicknesses; for the same case, with suction, the extent of upstream influence was 50 percent lower. In addition, flow angularities at the wall were found to be smaller with suction than without it.

  11. Double Layers in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Alton C. (Editor); Moorehead, Tauna W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: laboratory double layers; ion-acoustic double layers; pumping potential wells; ion phase-space vortices; weak double layers; electric fields and double layers in plasmas; auroral double layers; double layer formation in a plasma; beamed emission from gamma-ray burst source; double layers and extragalactic jets; and electric potential between plasma sheet clouds.

  12. Becquerel Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-350, 4 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops in Becquerel Crater of western Arabia Terra. These materials were deposited in the crater some time in the distant past, and later eroded to their present form. They probably consist of fine-grained sediments; they could have been deposited directly from dust and/or volcanic ash settling out of the martian atmosphere, or silt and sand settling to the floor of an ancient lake. The image does not provide enough information to distinguish between the two possibilities. The picture is located near 21.5oN, 8.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  13. Ozone Layer Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Ozone Layer Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Ozone Layer Protection Welcome to EPA's ozone layer protection web ...

  14. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Wavelength Red-Shift of Long Wavelength InGaN/GaN Multi-Quantum Well by Using an InGaN Underlying Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Rong; Wen, Feng; Tong, Liang-Zhu; Huang, De-Xiu

    2009-07-01

    Long-wavelength GaN based light-emitting diodes are of importance in full color displays, monolithic white light- emitting diodes and solid-state lighting, etc. However, their epitaxial growth faces great challenges because high indium (In) compositions of InGaN are difficult to grow. In order to enhance In incorporation and lengthen the emission wavelength of a InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW), we insert an InGaN underlying layer underneath the MQW. InGaN/GaN MQWs with various InGaN underlying layers, such as graded InyGa1-yN material with linearly increasing In content, or InyGa1-yN with fixed In content but different thicknesses, are grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Experimental results demonstrate the enhancement of In incorporation and the emission wavelength redshift by the insertion of an InGaN underlying layer.

  15. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  16. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-02-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  17. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  18. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  19. Tailoring graphene layer-to-layer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongtao; Wu, Bin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Lifeng; Li, Jingbo; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-06-01

    A layered material grown between a substrate and the upper layer involves complex interactions and a confined reaction space, representing an unusual growth mode. Here, we show multi-layer graphene domains grown on liquid or solid Cu by the chemical vapor deposition method via this ‘double-substrate’ mode. We demonstrate the interlayer-induced coupling effect on the twist angle in bi- and multi-layer graphene. We discover dramatic growth disunity for different graphene layers, which is explained by the ideas of a chemical ‘gate’ and a material transport process within a confined space. These key results lead to a consistent framework for understanding the dynamic evolution of multi-layered graphene flakes and tailoring the layer-to-layer growth for practical applications.

  20. Spray Layer-by-Layer Assembled Clay Composite Thin Films as Selective Layers in Reverse Osmosis Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Jason R; Liu, Chaoyang; Hammond, Paula T

    2015-06-24

    Spray layer-by-layer assembled thin films containing laponite (LAP) clay exhibit effective salt barrier and water permeability properties when applied as selective layers in reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. Negatively charged LAP platelets were layered with poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDAC), poly(allylamine) (PAH), and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in bilayer and tetralayer film architectures to generate uniform films on the order of 100 nm thick that bridge a porous poly(ether sulfone) support to form novel RO membranes. Nanostructures were formed of clay layers intercalated in a polymeric matrix that introduced size-exclusion transport mechanisms into the selective layer. Thermal cross-linking of the polymeric matrix was used to increase the mechanical stability of the films and improve salt rejection by constraining swelling during operation. Maximum salt rejection of 89% was observed for the tetralayer film architecture, with an order of magnitude increase in water permeability compared to commercially available TFC-HR membranes. These clay composite thin films could serve as a high-flux alternative to current polymeric RO membranes for wastewater and brackish water treatment as well as potentially for forward osmosis applications. In general, we illustrate that by investigating the composite systems accessed using alternating layer-by-layer assembly in conjunction with complementary covalent cross-linking, it is possible to design thin film membranes with tunable transport properties for water purification applications.

  1. Water Crossings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of "Water Crossings," a Project WET activity, with preservice elementary teachers in a science methods course. Discusses how the activity integrates applications from physical science with history and geography concepts. Explains that the teaching strategy used is a version of the scientific method. (WRM)

  2. Symmetry breaking in few layer graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Aaron; Ohta, Taisuke; McChesney, Jessica L.; Emtsev, Konstantin V.; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticle dynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axis screening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of the spectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiC using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this paper we review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extracting such parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments against the possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

  3. Symmetry Breaking in Few Layer Graphene Films

    SciTech Connect

    Bostwick, A.; Ohta, T.; McChesney, J.L.; Emtsev, K.; Seyller,Th.; Horn, K.; Rotenberg, E.

    2007-05-25

    Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticledynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axisscreening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of thespectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiCusing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this articlewe review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extractingsuch parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments againstthe possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

  4. Innovation in Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Joseph J; Cui, Jiwei; Björnmalm, Mattias; Braunger, Julia A; Ejima, Hirotaka; Caruso, Frank

    2016-12-14

    Methods for depositing thin films are important in generating functional materials for diverse applications in a wide variety of fields. Over the last half-century, the layer-by-layer assembly of nanoscale films has received intense and growing interest. This has been fueled by innovation in the available materials and assembly technologies, as well as the film-characterization techniques. In this Review, we explore, discuss, and detail innovation in layer-by-layer assembly in terms of past and present developments, and we highlight how these might guide future advances. A particular focus is on conventional and early developments that have only recently regained interest in the layer-by-layer assembly field. We then review unconventional assemblies and approaches that have been gaining popularity, which include inorganic/organic hybrid materials, cells and tissues, and the use of stereocomplexation, patterning, and dip-pen lithography, to name a few. A relatively recent development is the use of layer-by-layer assembly materials and techniques to assemble films in a single continuous step. We name this "quasi"-layer-by-layer assembly and discuss the impacts and innovations surrounding this approach. Finally, the application of characterization methods to monitor and evaluate layer-by-layer assembly is discussed, as innovation in this area is often overlooked but is essential for development of the field. While we intend for this Review to be easily accessible and act as a guide to researchers new to layer-by-layer assembly, we also believe it will provide insight to current researchers in the field and help guide future developments and innovation.

  5. Polaritonic emission via surface plasmon cross coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, C.; Bellessa, J.; Symonds, C.; Plenet, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    In this letter the authors demonstrate that the emission of plasmon/exciton polaritons in an organic semiconductor can be extracted using surface plasmon cross coupling. A J-aggregated cyanine dye layer is deposited on a silver film and then the whole structure is periodically corrugated. As a result of this corrugation, the dispersion lines of the surface modes on both sides of the silver layer may cross. At this crossing point, an increase in the polaritonic emission is observed. The contributions of unpolarized incoherent states and of the TM polarized polaritons emission are separated.

  6. Coherent X-ray radiation by relativistic electron in a structure “amorphous layer-vacuum-periodic layered medium”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Gladkikh, J. P.; Nemtsev, S. N.; Zagorodnyuk, R. A.; Noskov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic theory of coherent X-ray radiation by relativistic electron crossing a three-layer structure consisting of an amorphous substance layer, a layer of vacuum and a layer with artificial periodic structure has been developed. The process of radiation and propagation of X-ray waves in an artificial periodic structure have been considered based on two-wave approximation of dynamic diffraction theory in Laue scattering geometry.

  7. South Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 July 2003

    Similar to ice cores taken from Greenland and Antarctica, Mars also has fine-scale layered deposits in both the north and south polar regions. In this image from the south pole, alternating light and dark bands represent varying amounts of dust or sand mixed in with carbon dioxide ice. These layers are related in part to climate cycles caused by variations in the tilt of Mars' rotational axis, as well as other orbital variations that occur on geologic time scales (tens of thousands of years).

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1, Longitude 260.4 East (99.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Link Layer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühleisen, M.; Bültmann, D.; Klagges, K.; Schinnenburg, M.

    The Data Link Layer (DLL) is located above the PHY layer described in the previous chapter and below the network layer described in Chapter 16. All data received from these layers is digital. Today most parts of the DLL are implemented in software, either as device drivers running on general purpose Central Processing Units (CPUs) or as firmware running on dedicated network interface hardware.

  9. Stable Layers in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalov, A.; Berman, N. S.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Yu, F.; Pardyjak, E.

    1998-11-01

    Field experimental studies on the establishment and growth of the nocturnal stable layer near the ground were made in January, 1998 using a tethered balloon at a site in Phoenix, Arizona. Days and nights with clear skies and light surface winds were of particular interest because small particle and carbon monoxide concentrations can be high during such times. Closest to the ground a shallow stable layer 20 meters deep with a buoyancy frequency (N) of 0.05 1/s rapidly developed before sundown. The height of this layer and N remained constant throughout the night. Above the 20-meter level, there was a transition layer which was also stable with N = 0.025 1/s. This transition layer grew throughout the night and reached 120 meters by dawn. Above the transition layer was a neutrally stable (residual) layer left over from the previous day. An unsteady layer 10 to 100 m thick with N = 0.025 1/s was also found at the top of the troposphere with the neutrally stable troposphere below and the stable stratosphere above. The growth and/or decay of turbulence in such stable layers will be discussed in light of recent theoretical developments.

  10. Instability limits for spontaneous double layer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J. Jr.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; VanDervort, R. W.; Magee, R. M.; Reynolds, E.

    2013-11-15

    We present time-resolved measurements that demonstrate that large amplitude electrostatic instabilities appear in pulsed, expanding helicon plasmas at the same time as particularly strong double layers appear in the expansion region. A significant cross-correlation between the electrostatic fluctuations and fluctuations in the number of ions accelerated by the double layer electric field is observed. No correlation is observed between the electrostatic fluctuations and ions that have not passed through the double layer. These measurements confirm that the simultaneous appearance of the electrostatic fluctuations and the double layer is not simple coincidence. In fact, the accelerated ion population is responsible for the growth of the instability. The double layer strength, and therefore, the velocity of the accelerated ions, is limited by the appearance of the electrostatic instability.

  11. Plastic energies in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, N.K.; Moore, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    We estimate the energy cost associated with two pancake vortices colliding in a layered superconductor. It is argued that this energy sets the plastics energy scale and is the analogue of the crossing energy for vortices in the continuum case. The starting point of the calculation is the Lawrence-Doniach version of the Ginzburg-Landau free energy for type-II superconductors. The magnetic fields considered are along the {ital c} direction and assumed to be sufficiently high that the lowest Landau-level approximation is valid. For Bi-2212, where it is known that layering is very important, the results are radically different from what would have been obtained using a three-dimensional anisotropic continuum model. We then use the plastic energy for Bi-2212 to successfully explain recent results from Hellerqvist {ital et} {ital al}. on its longitudinal resistance.

  12. A POROUS, LAYERED HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.; Opher, M. E-mail: drake@umd.edu

    2013-09-01

    The picture of the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the domains of the Sun and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-as a pristine interface with a large rotation in the magnetic field fails to describe recent Voyager 1 (V1) data. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the global heliosphere reveal that the rotation angle of the magnetic field across the HP at V1 is small. Particle-in-cell simulations, based on cuts through the MHD model at V1's location, suggest that the sectored region of the heliosheath (HS) produces large-scale magnetic islands that reconnect with the interstellar magnetic field while mixing LISM and HS plasma. Cuts across the simulation reveal multiple, anti-correlated jumps in the number densities of LISM and HS particles, similar to those observed, at the magnetic separatrices. A model is presented, based on both the observations and simulations, of the HP as a porous, multi-layered structure threaded by magnetic fields. This model further suggests that contrary to the conclusions of recent papers, V1 has already crossed the HP.

  13. Emissivity of layered fibrous materials.

    PubMed

    Golombok, M; Shirvill, L C

    1988-09-15

    The radiant energy properties of fibrous materials may be described by an effective surface emissivity, which is a function of the material construction. The important parameters are porosity and the emissivity of the solid component. The layered construction leads to a unit cell model determining radiant heat transfer through the material to the environment. Geometric absorption cross sections are used as radiation view factors in a pseudoenclosed configuration. The emissivities are obtained by comparison to a material made from black fibers and are in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  14. Diffusion processes in the magnetopause boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Thorne, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative estimate is calculated for the effect of wave-particle scattering on the structure of the magnetopause boundary layer. It is assumed that large cross-B electric fields are absent in the observed penetration of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetopause boundary layer, thus allowing for cross-field transport comparable to 10% of the Bohm diffusion. It is shown that magnetosheath ions, resonant with low frequency electrostatic waves, can account for the typical boundary layer thickness when transported at 10% of the diffusion rate 1000 sq km/sec. The conditions are required to occur at all local times and under all interplanetary conditions. Significant mass and momentum transfer are then possible across the magnetopause when field merging is not occurring.

  15. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Victor A.; Alaferdov, Andrei V.; Vaz, Alfredo R.; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S.; Moshkalev, Stanislav A.

    2015-06-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000 K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in “cold-wall” reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material.

  16. Burning Graphene Layer-by-Layer

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Victor A.; Alaferdov, Andrei V.; Vaz, Alfredo R.; Perim, Eric; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvao, Douglas S.; Moshkalev, Stanislav A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, in single layer or multi-layer forms, holds great promise for future electronics and high-temperature applications. Resistance to oxidation, an important property for high-temperature applications, has not yet been extensively investigated. Controlled thinning of multi-layer graphene (MLG), e.g., by plasma or laser processing is another challenge, since the existing methods produce non-uniform thinning or introduce undesirable defects in the basal plane. We report here that heating to extremely high temperatures (exceeding 2000 K) and controllable layer-by-layer burning (thinning) can be achieved by low-power laser processing of suspended high-quality MLG in air in “cold-wall” reactor configuration. In contrast, localized laser heating of supported samples results in non-uniform graphene burning at much higher rates. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to reveal details of oxidation mechanisms leading to uniform layer-by-layer graphene gasification. The extraordinary resistance of MLG to oxidation paves the way to novel high-temperature applications as continuum light source or scaffolding material. PMID:26100466

  17. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  18. Many-Layered Rock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-08-23

    This MOC image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks in a crater in the northwestern part of Schiaparelli basin. The repetition of these horizontal layers suggests the sediments could have been deposited in an ancient crater lake

  19. Colorful Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-23

    The North Polar layered deposits provide a record of recent climate changes on Mars as seen by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. Color variations between layers are due to differences in composition of the dust.

  20. Modelling Layer parallel stylolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Daniel; Pataki Rood, Daisy; Beaudoin, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    We modeled the geometrical roughening of mainly layer-dominated stylolites in order to understand their structural evolution, to present an advanced classification of stylolite shapes and to relate this classification to chemical compaction and stylolite sealing capabilities. Our simulations show that layer-dominated stylolites can grow in three distinct stages, an initial slow nucleation, a fast layer-pinning phase and a final freezing stage if the layer dissolves completely during growth. Dissolution of the pinning layer and thus destruction of the compaction tracking capabilities is a function of the background noise in the rock and the dissolution rate of the layer itself. Low background noise needs a slower dissolving layer for pinning to be successful but produces flatter teeth than higher background noise. We present an advanced classification based on our simulations and separate stylolites into four classes: rectangular layer type, seismogram pinning type, suture/sharp peak type and simple wave-like type.

  1. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  2. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  3. The ozone layer.

    PubMed

    van der Leun, Jan C

    2004-08-01

    The intention of this paper is to stimulate the interest for the ozone layer, especially among young colleagues in photobiology; the "layer" is not only important, but also fascinating. In spite of remarkably effective action, the recovery of the ozone layer will be a long-term process. It will need the attention, also of scientists, for decades to come.

  4. Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids of layered double hydroxide and layered metal oxide: highly active visible light photocatalysts with improved chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Hyo Na; Kim, In Young; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-09-28

    Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids highly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation are synthesized by self-assembly between oppositely charged 2D nanosheets of Zn-Cr-layered double hydroxide (Zn-Cr-LDH) and layered titanium oxide. The layer-by-layer ordering of two kinds of 2D nanosheets is evidenced by powder X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high resolution-transmission electron microscopy. Upon the interstratification process, the original in-plane atomic arrangements and electronic structures of the component nanosheets remain intact. The obtained heterolayered nanohybrids show a strong absorption of visible light and a remarkably depressed photoluminescence signal, indicating an effective electronic coupling between the two component nanosheets. The self-assembly between 2D inorganic nanosheets leads to the formation of highly porous stacking structure, whose porosity is controllable by changing the ratio of layered titanate/Zn-Cr-LDH. The resultant heterolayered nanohybrids are fairly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation with a rate of ∼1.18 mmol h(-1) g(-1), which is higher than the O(2) production rate (∼0.67 mmol h(-1) g(-1)) by the pristine Zn-Cr-LDH material, that is, one of the most effective visible light photocatalysts for O(2) production, under the same experimental condition. This result highlights an excellent functionality of the Zn-Cr-LDH-layered titanate nanohybrids as efficient visible light active photocatalysts. Of prime interest is that the chemical stability of the Zn-Cr-LDH is significantly improved upon the hybridization, a result of the protection of the LDH lattice by highly stable titanate layer. The present findings clearly demonstrate that the layer-by-layer-ordered assembly between inorganic 2D nanosheets is quite effective not only in improving the photocatalytic activity of the component semiconductors but also in synthesizing novel porous LDH-based hybrid materials with improved chemical

  5. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  6. Layering, interface and edge effects in multi-layered composite medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S. K.; Shah, A. H.; Karunesena, W.

    1990-01-01

    Guided waves in a cross-ply laminated plate are studied. Because of the complexity of the exact dispersion equation that governs the wave propagation in a multi-layered fiber-reinforced plate, a stiffness method that can be applied to any number of layers is presented. It is shown that, for a sufficiently large number of layers, the plate can be modeled as a homogeneous anisotropic plate. Also studied is the reflection of guided waves from the edge of a multilayered plate. These results are quite different than in the case of a single homogeneous plate.

  7. Cross-Layered Security Analysis of Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    protocols and link state routing (e.g. secure OLSR ) versus distance vector routing (e.g. SAODV). Some of the routing attacks are launched from the MAC...that pose the greatest security threats when controlled by the adversary. 3.1 Outsiders Outsiders are attackers that do not have any compromised...attempt to jam the communications channel, they can create a wormhole, and as an extreme attack , we assume they can eliminate nodes from the network

  8. XLAYER: A Cross-Layer Communications Substrate for Tactical Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    networks. Multicast Forwarding A controller provides efficient multicast packet forwarding in MANETs based on the approach followed by the OLSR Basic...predictive routing protocol based on OLSR . In most link state-based protocols like OLSR , changes in local topology are often detected through periodic...mobility and propagation models. As shown in Figure 8, a distributed corrective model can be added to OLSR for route calculation. In Figure 8, Pt is the

  9. Cross Layered Multi-Meshed Tree Scheme for Cognitive Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    BC D F G E 1 11 12 121 11113 14 141142 143 1421 131 132 Figure 9 Cluster Formation-bas s r es Approved...based on Meshed Trees A BC D F G E 1 11 12 121 111 13 14 141142 143 14 131 132 CH2 CH K L H J M 2 211 21 22 221 23 24 241 25 252 251 Figure 10...receives; when it gets the Figure 38 Reactive Routing-based on Meshed Trees Clusters A BC D F G E 1 11 12 121 111 13 14 1411142 143 14 131 132 CH CH K

  10. Cross-Layer Modeling Framework for Energy-Efficient Resilience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    ignored in concept-phase definitions of power -aware chip- and system-level (micro)architectural proposals. In this paper, we describe our ongoing...thrust is on developing an analytical modeling framework that enables the study of fundamental power -performance- reliability trade-offs, while...leakage storage-class technologies as appropriate. T4: Ultra-efficient microarchitecture to provide low power resilience solution support at the

  11. Multimedia-Based Integration of Cross-Layer Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Kbps, and for Table Tennis are 2025, 1400, and 800 Kbps. Monte- Carlo simulations were performed for 120 random channel realizations. Each channel... Fuente , R. Globisch, C. Hellge, and T. Wiegand, “Priority-based media delivery using SVC with RTP and HTTP streaming,” Springer Multimed. Tools Appl

  12. Piezoelectric Resonator with Two Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephanou, Philip J. (Inventor); Black, Justin P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A piezoelectric resonator device includes: a top electrode layer with a patterned structure, a top piezoelectric layer adjacent to the top layer, a middle metal layer adjacent to the top piezoelectric layer opposite the top layer, a bottom piezoelectric layer adjacent to the middle layer opposite the top piezoelectric layer, and a bottom electrode layer with a patterned structure and adjacent to the bottom piezoelectric layer opposite the middle layer. The top layer includes a first plurality of electrodes inter-digitated with a second plurality of electrodes. A first one of the electrodes in the top layer and a first one of the electrodes in the bottom layer are coupled to a first contact, and a second one of the electrodes in the top layer and a second one of the electrodes in the bottom layer are coupled to a second contact.

  13. Modeling Transport Layer Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasnauskas, Raimondas; Weingaertner, Elias

    In a layered communication architecture, transport layer protocols handle the data exchange between processes on different hosts over potentially lossy communication channels. Typically, transport layer protocols are either connection-oriented or are based on the transmission of individual datagrams. Well known transport protocols are the connection-oriented Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) [372] and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) [370] as well as the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) [340] and DCCP, the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol [259]. In this chapter, we focus on the modeling process of the transport layer. While we mostly use TCP and UDP as a base of comparison from this point, we emphasize that the methodologies discussed further on are conferrable to virtually any transport layer in any layered communication architecture.

  14. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-25

    where an atomic layer of an element is deposited , or removed, in a surface limited reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in...the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as underpotential deposition (UPD). 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15, NUMBER OF...reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as

  15. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  16. View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing spikes and flooring nails (Lower board layer exposed) - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  17. Local Deplanation Of Double Reinforced Beam Cross Section Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltov, Anguel; Yanakieva, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Bending of beams, double reinforced by means of thin composite layers, is considered in the study. Approximate numerical solution is proposed, considering transitional boundary areas, where smooth quadratic transition of the elasticity modulus and deformations take place. Deplanation of the cross section is also accounted for in the areas. Their thickness is found equalizing the total stiffness of the cross section and the layer stiffness. Deplanation of the cross section of the transitional area is determined via the longitudinal deformation in the reinforcing layer, accounting for the equilibrium between the internal and the external moment, generated by the longitudinal stresses in the cross section. A numerical example is given as an illustration demonstrating model's plausibility. The model allows the design and the calculation of recycled concrete beams double reinforced by means of thin layers. The approach is in agreement with modern design of nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB).

  18. Vortex boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1986-01-01

    Parametric studies to identify a vortex generator were completed. Data acquisition in the first chosen configuration, in which a longitudinal vortex pair generated by an isolated delta wing starts to merge with a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate fairly close to the leading edge is nearly completed. Work on a delta-wing/flat-plate combination, consisting of a flow visualization and hot wire measurements taken with a computer controlled traverse gear and data logging system were completed. Data taking and analysis have continued, and sample results for another cross stream plane are presented. Available data include all mean velocity components, second order mean products of turbulent fluctuations, and third order mean products. Implementation of a faster data logging system was accomplished.

  19. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  20. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  1. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  2. North Polar Layers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-28

    The North Polar layered deposits are a 3-kilometer thick stack of dusty water ice layers that are about 1000 kilometers across. The layers record information about climate stretching back a few million years into Martian history. In many locations erosion has created scarps and troughs that expose this layering. The tan colored layers are the dusty water ice of the polar layered deposits; however a section of bluish layers are is visible below them. These bluish layers contain sand-sized rock fragments that likely formed a large polar dunefield before the overlying dusty ice was deposited. The lack of a polar ice cap in this past epoch attests to the variability of the Martian climate, which undergoes larger changes over time than that of the Earth. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.6 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 63.6 centimeters (25 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 191 centimeters (75.2 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21465

  3. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  4. Three dimensional boundary layers in internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodonyi, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical study of the effects of viscous-inviscid interactions in three-dimensional duct flows is presented. In particular interacting flows for which the oncoming flow is not fully-developed were considered. In this case there is a thin boundary layer still present upstream of the surface distortion, as opposed to the fully-developed pipe flow situation wherein the flow is viscous across the cross section.

  5. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOEpatents

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  6. Layering in Spallanzani Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-22

    In this image from NASA Mars Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we can see quite a spectacular layering pattern inside an impact crater called Spallanzani. Seeing layering is always exciting to geologists because it implies that the region has experienced multiple climatic conditions or geologic processes through time. The study of layering is so important in geology that it has its own dedicated branch of study: stratigraphy! Commonly, layering implies different lithologies (i.e., rock types). However, sometimes the layers could be of very similar composition but formed in different periods of time. This could happen for example in the case of annual flood deposits from rivers, multiple volcanic eruptions, or annual or periodic deposition of ice-rich material. We can also see in this image another feature called terracing, which happens when the layers form distinctive planes on top of one another like terraces. This could imply that the layers are being eroded with time but some of the layers are being eroded quicker than others because they are less resistant to erosion. So what is the composition of these layers? Spallanzani Crater lies in the high latitudes of the Southern hemisphere (around 60 degrees in latitude) so there is a good possibility that the deposits are ice-rich. If we look more closely we will notice fractured mounds, which sometimes indicate the presence of subsurface ice. Another interesting observation is the presence of grooves in the shaded slopes of some of the layers. Perhaps these grooves formed because of the sublimation (the direct transfer of solid ice to water vapor) of ice from these slopes since slopes tend to get warmer than the surrounding terrains. A close inspection of this image may help answer this question and investigate the multiple cycles in which these deposits were laid down as well as the duration of these individual cycles. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19367

  7. Acquiring Peak Samples from Phytoplankton Thin Layers and Intermediate Nepheloid Layers by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle with Adaptive Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; McEwen, R.; Ryan, J. P.; Bellingham, J. G.; Harvey, J.; Vrijenhoek, R.

    2010-12-01

    Phytoplankton thin layers (PTLs) affect many fundamental aspects of coastal ocean ecology including primary productivity, development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and the survival and growth of zooplankton and fish larvae. Intermediate nepheloid layers (INLs) that contain suspended particulate matter transported from the bottom boundary layer of continental shelves and slopes also affect biogeochemistry and ecology of ocean margins. To better understand the impacts of these types of layers, we have developed an adaptive sampling method for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to detect a layer (adjusting detection parameters in situ), acquire water samples from peaks in the layer, and acquire control samples outside the layer. We have used the method in a number of field experiments with the AUV Dorado, which is equipped with ten water samplers (called "gulpers"). In real time, the algorithm tracks background levels of fluorescence and optical backscatter and the peaks' baseline to ensure that detection is tuned to the ambient conditions. The algorithm cross-checks fluorescence and backscatter signals to differentiate PTLs from INLs. To capture peak water samples with minimal delay, the algorithm exploits the AUV's sawtooth (i.e., yo-yo) trajectory: the vehicle crosses the detected layer twice in one yo-yo cycle. At the first crossing, it detects the layer's peak and saves its signal height. Sampling is triggered at the second crossing when the signal reaches the saved peak height plus meeting additional timing and depth conditions. The algorithm is also capable of triggering gulpers to acquire control samples outside the layer for comparison with ambient water. The sequence of peak and control samples can be set based on need. In recent AUV Dorado missions, the algorithm triggered the gulpers to acquire peak and control samples from INLs and PTLs in Monterey Bay. Zooplankton analysis of some peak samples showed very high concentrations of mussel and barnacle

  8. The North American Product Standard for Cross-Laminated Timber

    Treesearch

    Borjen Yeh; Sylvain Gagnon; Tom Williamson; Ciprian Pirvu; Conroy Lum; Dave Kretschmann

    2012-01-01

    Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a prefabricated solid engineered wood product made of at least three orthogonally bonded layers of solid-sawn lumber or structural composite lumber that are laminated by gluing of longitudinal and transverse layers with structural adhesives to form a solid rectangular-shaped, straight, and plane timber intended for roof, floor, or wall...

  9. Chapter 2: Manufacturing Cross-laminated timber manufacturing

    Treesearch

    Borjen Yeh; Dave Kretschmann; Brad (Jianhe) Wang

    2013-01-01

    Cross-laminated timber ( CLT) is defined as a prefabricated solid engineered wood product made of at least three orthogonally bonded layers of solid-sawn lumber or structural composite lumber (SCL) that are laminated by gluing oflongitudinal and transverse layers with structural adhesives to form a solid rectangular-shaped, straight, and plane timber intended for roof...

  10. Characterization of triple layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Toribio F.; Cortes, M. Teresa

    2001-07-01

    We reported the characterization of a macroscopic electrochemomechanical actuator like triple layer (3x1 cm) formed by polypyrrole)/double- sided, non-conducting and flexible tape/ polypyrrole that works in liquid electrolytes under electrochemical control. This triple layer has characteristics of artificial muscle. The influence of variables that control the volume change in the polymer as electrolyte concentration, or temperature has been studied. Variations of time, energy and charge under different conditions are described. We have found that the triple layer acts, at the same time, as sensor and actuator. Therefore, physical magnitudes like the electrolyte concentration or the temperature in the cell can be obtained from electrical energy consumed by a muscle. We have evaluated the influence of variables as area of the triple layer or the trailing weight, which don't participate in the electrochemical reaction. We propose an explication to the results, which show a correlation between the trailed mass and the consumed charge required to move a constant angle those masses by the triple layer. When different surface areas of the triple layer has been evaluated we found that the consumed electrical charge is proportional to area (the mass) of the triple layer. The triple layer can make macroscopical movements in short times, their position is absolutely controlled with the electrical charge, and it has capacity to lift masses. These characteristics allow their use in the design of tools. So, we present a macroscopic tool constituted by two triple layers, which allows catch and translate objects in liquid medium (nipper).

  11. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  12. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  13. Ventilated Oscillatory Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    AD-A266 226IllII !i III ll11111 II •" Ventilated Oscillatory Boundary Layers 0 Daniel -. Conley Douglas L. I nman C 0 UM U U U U till 1% w 1% W" Z t...A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF PAGES WHICH DO NOT REPRODUCE LEGIBLY. VENlTILATiD SCIILLAORY BOUNDARY LAYERS Daniel C. C7onley DoL’laN L. . ... La olDla...Wave Crest ........ 5. Boundary Layer Development Under the Wave Trough W 6 . Laboratory Observations .................. ................ 7

  14. Compliant layer chucking surface

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Spence, Paul A.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2004-12-28

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a thin layer of complaint material is deposited on the surface of a chuck to mitigate the deformation that an entrapped particle might cause in the part, such as a mask or a wafer, that is clamped to the chuck. The harder particle will embed into the softer layer as the clamping pressure is applied. The material composing the thin layer could be a metal or a polymer for vacuum or electrostatic chucks. It may be deposited in various patterns to affect an interrupted surface, such as that of a "pin" chuck, thereby reducing the probability of entrapping a particle.

  15. Layered South Polar Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 March 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed in the walls of a crater-like form (only partially seen here) in the south polar region. These layers record some of the history of the martian south pole, although deciphering this record will require human or robotic explorers to get a closer view. The layered outcrop is located near 84.6oS, 359.6oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  16. Concentric layer ramjet fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burdette, G.W.; Francis, J.P.

    1988-03-08

    This patent describes a solid fuel ramjet grain comprising concentric layers of solid ramjet fuel having a perforation therethrough along the center axis of the grain. The performation is connected to a combustion after-chamber. The solid ramjet fuel layers comprises a pure hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene hydrocarbon fuel or a mixture of a hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene hydrocarbon fuel and from about 5 to about 60 percent by weight of an additive to increase the fuel regression rate selected from the group consisting of magnesium, boron carbide, aluminum, and zirconium such that, when buried in the operation of the ramjet, each fuel layer produces a different level of thrust.

  17. Multi-layer coatings

    DOEpatents

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Brophy, Brenor L.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.; Gonsalves, Peter R.

    2016-06-28

    Disclosed herein are coating materials and methods for applying a top-layer coating that is durable, abrasion resistant, highly transparent, hydrophobic, low-friction, moisture-sealing, anti-soiling, and self-cleaning to an existing conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating. The top coat imparts superior durability performance and new properties to the under-laying conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating without reducing the anti-reflectiveness of the coating. Methods and data for optimizing the relative thickness of the under-layer high temperature anti-reflective coating and the top-layer thickness for optimizing optical performance are also disclosed.

  18. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  19. Development of retinal layers.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim Tuyen; Chédotal, Alain

    2014-03-01

    A noticeable characteristic of nervous systems is the arrangement of synapses into distinct layers. Such laminae are fundamental for the spatial organisation of synaptic connections transmitting different kinds of information. A major example of this is the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the vertebrate retina, which is subdivided into at least ten sublayers. Another noticeable characteristic of these retina layers is that neurons are displayed in the horizontal plane in a non-random array termed as mosaic patterning. Recent studies of vertebrate and invertebrate systems have identified molecules that mediate these interactions. Here, we review the last mechanisms and molecules mediating retinal layering. Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Terby's Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 March 2004 Layered rock outcrops are common all across Mars, and the Mars rover, Opportunity, has recently investigated some layered rocks in Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rocks in northern Terby Crater, located just north of the giant Hellas Basin near 27.5oS, 285.8oW. Hundreds of layers are exposed in a deposit several kilometers thick within Terby. A history of events that shaped the northern Hellas region is recorded in these rocks, just waiting for a person or robot to investigate. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  1. Terby's Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 March 2004 Layered rock outcrops are common all across Mars, and the Mars rover, Opportunity, has recently investigated some layered rocks in Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rocks in northern Terby Crater, located just north of the giant Hellas Basin near 27.5oS, 285.8oW. Hundreds of layers are exposed in a deposit several kilometers thick within Terby. A history of events that shaped the northern Hellas region is recorded in these rocks, just waiting for a person or robot to investigate. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  2. Covalent Fusion of layered Incompatible Gels in Immiscible Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Santidan; Singh, Awaneesh; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Balazs, Anna C.

    We carry out dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to model a two layered stackable gel where the gels are incompatible and are present in immiscible solvent. The bottom layer of the gel is created first and then a solution of new initiators, monomers and cross-linkers is introduced on top of it. These components then undergo polymerization and form the second gel layer. We study all possible combinations of free radical polymerization (FRP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanisms with the two layers of the gel. For example, the bottom layer gel is created via ATRP, whereas the top layer gel follows FRP. Our focus is to do a systematic study of all these combinations and find out the factors responsible for combining two incompatible gels in immiscible solvents.

  3. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  4. A Cloud-Oriented Cross-Domain Security Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    A Cloud-Oriented Cross -Domain Security Architecture Thuy D. Nguyen, Mark A. Gondree, David J. Shifflett, Jean Khosalim, Timothy E. Levin, Cynthia...to support a cloud of cross -domain services, hosted within a federation of multilevel secure (MLS) MYSEA servers. The MYSEA cloud supports single...sign on, service replication, and network-layer quality of security service. This new cross - domain, distributed architecture follows the consumption

  5. Tests on Double Layer Metalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    28 page report describes experiments in fabrication of integrated circuits with double-layer metalization. Double-layer metalization requires much less silicon "real estate" and allows more flexibility in placement of circuit elements than does single-layer metalization.

  6. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  7. Layered electrode for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Swathirajan, Swathy; Mikhail, Youssef M.

    2001-01-01

    There is provided an electrode structure comprising a current collector sheet and first and second layers of electrode material. Together, the layers improve catalyst utilization and water management.

  8. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Brian Wayne

    1992-01-01

    Presented here are initial investigations into an electrochemical method whereby thin films of compound semiconductors are produced by epitaxial growth of the constituent elements. This method is the electrochemical analogue of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) (a vacuum-based technique which relies on sequential formation of atomic layers of the constituent elements) and has been termed "Electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy" (ECALE). These preliminary studies are centered on the formation of CdTe, though in principle they could be extended to a number of other compound semiconductors. A background introduction on topics relevant to epitaxial growth in electrochemical systems will be presented. Predictions of underpotential behavior in the CdTe system will be made using potential -pH (Pourbaix) diagrams. Development of the method will proceed from our initial studies of Cd and Te underpotential deposition (UPD) on a number of metallic substrates, followed by results demonstrating the ECALE formation of two monolayers of CdTe on polycrystalline and single crystal gold substrates. The final chapter will present current attempts to design and construct an automated, computer-controlled thin-layer electrochemical flow cell, which is to be used for the deposition of thicker layers (up to 1 mu m) of compound semiconductors.

  9. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL RETINAL LAYER THICKNESSES AND DIABETIC PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY USING RETINAL LAYER SEGMENTATION ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyung; Lee, Min Woo; Byeon, Suk Ho; Kim, Sung Soo; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Lee, Sung Chul; Kim, Min

    2017-09-07

    To evaluate clinical correlations between the thicknesses of individual retinal layers in the foveal area of diabetic patients and the presence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study enrolled a total of 120 eyes from 120 patients. The eyes were divided into 3 groups: normal controls (n = 42 eyes), patients with diabetes mellitus (n = 42 eyes) but no DPN, and patients with diabetes mellitus and DPN (n = 36 eyes). The primary outcome measures were the thickness of all retinal layers in the central 1-mm zone measured using the segmentation analysis of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Correlations between the thicknesses of the individual retinal layers and the presence of DPN were also analyzed. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine which change in layer thickness had the most significant association with the presence of DPN. The mean thicknesses and the ratios of retinal nerve fiber layers to total retina thicknesses in the DPN group were 10.77 ± 1.79 μm and 4.10 ± 0.55%, which was significantly lower than those in normal controls and the diabetes mellitus with no DPN group (P = 0.014 and P = 0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analyses also showed that the decrease in thicknesses of the retinal nerve fiber layers and the inner nuclear layer are significant factors for predicting a higher risk for DPN development (odds ratio = 7.407 and 1.757; P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). A decrease in the retinal nerve fiber layer and the inner nuclear layer thickness was significantly associated with the presence of DPN.

  10. Effect of continuous layer in CGC perpendicular recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonobe, Y.; Tham, K. K.; Umezawa, T.; Takasu, C.; Dumaya, J. A.; Leo, P. Y.

    2006-08-01

    The effect of continuous layer on CoCrPt-SiO 2 granular layer is studied in coupled granular continuous (CGC) perpendicular recording media. In the cross-section transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, magnetic grain in the granular layer shows columnar structure, while Co/Pd multilayer shows continuous layer. The plane-view TEM image of the granular layer shows well-isolated grain structure with average grain size of around 6 nm, and grain-to-grain separation width of around 2 nm. Therefore, the interactions among the grains are negligible ( J˜0). By depositing a continuous layer on a CoCrPt-SiO 2 granular layer, the grains in the granular layer are magnetically coupled through capping layer that leads to the suppression of magnetic anisotropy dispersion. This CGC structure reduces the coercivity dispersion ( ΔH/H) from 0.26 to 0.15 and saturation field ( Hs) from 10.4 to 6.7 kOe. The reduction of Hs and ΔH/H improves the OW by 21.3 dB. The small ΔH/H also maintains SNR of CGC media with strong magnetic exchange coupling. Furthermore, the coupling of grains through continuous layer enlarges the magnetic nucleation field ( Hn) from 0.4 to -1.7 kOe. Consequently, CGC media shows better thermal stability compared to non-CGC media.

  11. North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 December 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of finely-detailed layers in the martian north polar region. The polar ice cap, which is made up of frozen water (whereas the south polar cap is mostly frozen carbon dioxide), is underlain by a thick sequence of layers. Some have speculated that these layers may record the history of changes in martian climate during the past few hundreds of millions of years. This picture is located near 86.0oN, 30.2oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  12. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  13. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Schmitz, Craig P.; Nouri, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMPJ) has been identified by the propulsion community as the rigorous boundary layer program in connection with the existing JANNAF reference programs. The improvements made to BLIMPJ and described herein have potential applications in the design of the future Orbit Transfer Vehicle engines. The turbulence model is validated to include the effects of wall roughness and a way is devised to treat multiple smooth-rough surfaces. A prediction of relaminarization regions is examined as is the combined effects of wall cooling and surface roughness on relaminarization. A turbulence model to represent the effects of constant condensed phase loading is given. A procedure is described for thrust decrement calculation in thick boundary layers by coupling the T-D Kinetics Program and BLIMPJ and a way is provided for thrust loss optimization. Potential experimental studies in rocket nozzles are identified along with the required instrumentation to provide accurate measurements in support of the presented new analytical models.

  14. South Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-516, 17 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded, stair-stepped layers in the south polar region of Mars. These layers have been considered, for the past three decades, to consist of a mixture of dust and ice. The Mars Polar Lander (MPL) mission was designed to test this hypothesis. However, sadly, MPL was lost during descent in December 1999. This exposure of south polar layered material is located near 86.3oS, 187.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  15. Superfluid Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagg, G. W.; Parker, N. G.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2017-03-01

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  16. MHD turbulent mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Benjamin, R.A.; Cho, J.; Leitner, S.N.

    2005-09-28

    Turbulent mixing layers have been proposed to explain observations of line ratios of highly ionized elements in the interstellar medium. We present preliminary results of numerical simulations of turbulent mixing layers in a magnetized medium. We developed a MHD code with radiative cooling. The magnetic field is expected to be a controlling factor by suppressing instabilities that lead to the turbulent mixing. Our results suggest that the difference in turbulent mixing in the unmagnetized case as compared to the case of a weak magnetic field, {beta} = Pgas/Pmag {approx} 10, is insignificant. With a more thorough exploration of parameter space, this work will provide more reliable diagnostics of turbulent mixing layers than those available today.

  17. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  18. Layered Topological Crystalline Insulators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngkuk; Kane, C L; Mele, E J; Rappe, Andrew M

    2015-08-21

    Topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) are insulating materials whose topological property relies on generic crystalline symmetries. Based on first-principles calculations, we study a three-dimensional (3D) crystal constructed by stacking two-dimensional TCI layers. Depending on the interlayer interaction, the layered crystal can realize diverse 3D topological phases characterized by two mirror Chern numbers (MCNs) (μ1,μ2) defined on inequivalent mirror-invariant planes in the Brillouin zone. As an example, we demonstrate that new TCI phases can be realized in layered materials such as a PbSe (001) monolayer/h-BN heterostructure and can be tuned by mechanical strain. Our results shed light on the role of the MCNs on inequivalent mirror-symmetric planes in reciprocal space and open new possibilities for finding new topological materials.

  19. Evaluation of dry etching and defect repair of EUVL mask absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tsukasa; Nishiguchi, Masaharu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Motonaga, Toshiaki; Sasaki, Shiho; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Tanaka, Yuusuke; Nishiyama, Iwao

    2004-12-01

    EUVL mask process of absorber layer, buffer layer dry etching and defect repair were evaluated. TaGeN and Cr were selected for absorber layer and buffer layer, respectively. These absorber layer and buffer layer were coated on 6025 Qz substrate. Two dry etching processes were evaluated for absorber layer etching. One is CF4 plasma process and the other is Cl2 plasma process. Etch bias uniformity, selectivity, cross section profile and resist damage were evaluated for each process. Disadvantage of CF4 plasma process is low resist selectivity and Cl2 plasma process is low Cr selectivity. CF4 plasma process caused small absorber layer damage on isolate line and Cl2 plasma process caused Cr buffer layer damage. To minimize these damages overetch time was evaluated. Buffer layer process was also evaluated. Buffer layer process causes capping layer damage. Therefore, etching time was optimized. FIB-GAE and AFM machining were applied for absorber layer repair test. XeF2 gas was used for FIB-GAE. Good selectivity between absorber layer and buffer layer was obtained using XeF2 gas. However, XeF2 gas causes side etching of TaGeN layer. AFM machining repair technique was demonstrated for TaGeN layer repair.

  20. Layers and Dark Dunes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-08

    The target of this observation as seen by ASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is a circular depression in a dark-toned unit associated with a field of cones to the northeast. At the image scale of a Context Camera image, the depression appears to expose layers especially on the sides or walls of the depression, which are overlain by dark sands presumably associated with the dark-toned unit. HiRISE resolution, which is far higher than that of the Context Camera and its larger footprint, can help identify possible layers. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19358

  1. North Polar Layer Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 November 2004 Both the north and south polar ice caps overlie a thick accumulation of layered material. For more than three decades, these deposits have been assumed to consist of a mixture of dust and ice. This October 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the north polar layers exposed on a slope located near 79.1oN, 348.4oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  2. Layers Inside 'Endurance'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This view of rock layers exposed in the upper portion of the inner slope of 'Endurance Crater' was captured by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from the rover's position inside the crater during Opportunity's 134th sol on June 9, 2004. Scientists and engineers are assessing possible targets and routes among these rocks. The view is looking down into the crater, so the layers at the top of the image lie lower in the crater than the rocks in the foreground.

  3. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  4. Layers Inside 'Endurance'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This view of rock layers exposed in the upper portion of the inner slope of 'Endurance Crater' was captured by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from the rover's position inside the crater during Opportunity's 134th sol on June 9, 2004. Scientists and engineers are assessing possible targets and routes among these rocks. The view is looking down into the crater, so the layers at the top of the image lie lower in the crater than the rocks in the foreground.

  5. Layers Inside 'Endurance'

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-06-15

    This view of rock layers exposed in the upper portion of the inner slope of "Endurance Crater" was captured by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from the rover's position inside the crater during Opportunity's 134th sol on June 9, 2004. Scientists and engineers are assessing possible targets and routes among these rocks. The view is looking down into the crater, so the layers at the top of the image lie lower in the crater than the rocks in the foreground. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06263

  6. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  7. Layers and Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 December 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an outcrop of light-toned layered rock and a plethora of dark streaks on the floor of a crater in southern Noachis Terra. The streaks were created by dozens of dust devils which disrupted and perhaps removed some of the thin layer of dust that coats the surface. This view is located near 55.5oS, 333.4oW. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower right. The 500 meter scale bar is approximately 547 yards long.

  8. On the origin of pure optical rotation in twisted-cross metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Barr, Lauren E; Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Tremain, Ben; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Hendry, Euan; Hibbins, Alastair P

    2016-07-26

    We present an experimental and computational study of the response of twisted-cross metamaterials that provide near dispersionless optical rotation across a broad band of frequencies from 19 GHz to 37 GHz. We compare two distinct geometries: firstly, a bilayer structure comprised of arrays of metallic crosses where the crosses in the second layer are twisted about the layer normal; and secondly where the second layer is replaced by the complementary to the original, i.e. an array of cross-shaped holes. Through numerical modelling we determine the origin of rotatory effects in these two structures. In both, pure optical rotation occurs in a frequency band between two transmission minima, where alignment of electric and magnetic dipole moments occurs. In the cross/cross metamaterial, the transmission minima occur at the symmetric and antisymmetric resonances of the coupled crosses. By contrast, in the cross/complementary-cross structure the transmission minima are associated with the dipole and quadrupole modes of the cross, the frequencies of which appear intrinsic to the cross layer alone. Hence the bandwidth of optical rotation is found to be relatively independent of layer separation.

  9. On the origin of pure optical rotation in twisted-cross metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Lauren E.; Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Tremain, Ben; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Hendry, Euan; Hibbins, Alastair P.

    2016-07-01

    We present an experimental and computational study of the response of twisted-cross metamaterials that provide near dispersionless optical rotation across a broad band of frequencies from 19 GHz to 37 GHz. We compare two distinct geometries: firstly, a bilayer structure comprised of arrays of metallic crosses where the crosses in the second layer are twisted about the layer normal; and secondly where the second layer is replaced by the complementary to the original, i.e. an array of cross-shaped holes. Through numerical modelling we determine the origin of rotatory effects in these two structures. In both, pure optical rotation occurs in a frequency band between two transmission minima, where alignment of electric and magnetic dipole moments occurs. In the cross/cross metamaterial, the transmission minima occur at the symmetric and antisymmetric resonances of the coupled crosses. By contrast, in the cross/complementary-cross structure the transmission minima are associated with the dipole and quadrupole modes of the cross, the frequencies of which appear intrinsic to the cross layer alone. Hence the bandwidth of optical rotation is found to be relatively independent of layer separation.

  10. On the origin of pure optical rotation in twisted-cross metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Lauren E.; Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Tremain, Ben; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Hendry, Euan; Hibbins, Alastair P.

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental and computational study of the response of twisted-cross metamaterials that provide near dispersionless optical rotation across a broad band of frequencies from 19 GHz to 37 GHz. We compare two distinct geometries: firstly, a bilayer structure comprised of arrays of metallic crosses where the crosses in the second layer are twisted about the layer normal; and secondly where the second layer is replaced by the complementary to the original, i.e. an array of cross-shaped holes. Through numerical modelling we determine the origin of rotatory effects in these two structures. In both, pure optical rotation occurs in a frequency band between two transmission minima, where alignment of electric and magnetic dipole moments occurs. In the cross/cross metamaterial, the transmission minima occur at the symmetric and antisymmetric resonances of the coupled crosses. By contrast, in the cross/complementary-cross structure the transmission minima are associated with the dipole and quadrupole modes of the cross, the frequencies of which appear intrinsic to the cross layer alone. Hence the bandwidth of optical rotation is found to be relatively independent of layer separation. PMID:27457405

  11. Polarization aberrations of crossed folding mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, David G.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1995-08-01

    Polarization aberrations due to varying polarization state across the field of view (FOV) are investigated for crossed folding mirrors. We define crossed mirrors as oriented in space such that s-polarized light incident on the first mirror is p-polarized at the second mirror. This completely compensates for polarization state changes at one point in the field of view. The resulting polarization aberrations are explored across the FOV using the example of aluminum mirrors overcoated with a 12 layer, highly reflective, dielectric stack. The polarization aberration is very low along a band across the field of view. For arbitrary points in the FOV, the retardance and diattenuation are slightly elliptical.

  12. Undergraduate Cross Registration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grupe, Fritz H.

    This report discusses various aspects of undergraduate cross-registration procedures, including the dimensions, values, roles and functions, basic assumptions, and facilitating and encouragment of cross-registration. Dimensions of cross-registration encompass financial exchange, eligibility, program limitations, type of grade and credit; extent of…

  13. Plasmons in layered films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, J. K.; Allen, P. B.

    1985-06-01

    A random-phase-approximation theory is given for the electronic collective modes of a film containing N equally spaced layers of two-dimensional electron gas. Raman line shapes are predicted. The Giuliani-Quinn surface-plasmon intensity is enhanced in transmission geometry.

  14. Layer-Cake Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedford, Rebecca; Warny, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a safe, fun, effective way to introduce geology concepts to elementary school children of all ages: "coring" layer cakes. This activity introduces the concepts and challenges that geologists face and at the same time strengthens students' inferential, observational, and problem-solving skills. It also addresses…

  15. Teaching the Double Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockris, J. O'M.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various methods for teaching the double layer in electrochemistry courses. Topics addressed include measuring change in absolute potential difference (PD) at interphase, conventional electrode potential scale, analyzing absolute PD, metal-metal and overlap electron PDs, accumulation of material at interphase, thermodynamics of electrified…

  16. South Polar Layered Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-559, 29 November 2003

    Both the north and south polar regions of Mars exhibit thick deposits of layered sediment. These have been known since the Mariner 9 (1972) and Viking (1976-1980) orbiter missions. The layered deposits are considered to contain a record of climate changes that occurred in the relatively recent martian past, but most of that record will have to wait until some time in the future when a lander or people can go there to study them. Meanwhile, pictures such as this from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) provide opportunities to view the layers where they are exposed on slopes. Here, numerous layers have been exposed by erosion in the south polar region. The picture was obtained in October 2003 and is located near 86.4oS, 112.4oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide, and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  17. Undoped Buffer Layer Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    boiled for several hours in aqua regia , followed by boiling for several more hours in deionized water before being dried in air and loaded into the...different from Report) 1S. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES it. IKy WORDS (Canal... an reverse 4aaIo It eesarav d Ientify by block nuinbr) Epitaxial layer MBE

  18. Layer-Cake Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedford, Rebecca; Warny, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a safe, fun, effective way to introduce geology concepts to elementary school children of all ages: "coring" layer cakes. This activity introduces the concepts and challenges that geologists face and at the same time strengthens students' inferential, observational, and problem-solving skills. It also addresses…

  19. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  20. Cross-functional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Many companies, including Xerox and Texas Instruments, are using cross functional systems to deal with the increasingly complex and competitive business environment. However, few firms within the aerospace industry appear to be aware of the significant benefits that cross functional systems can provide. Those benefits are examined and a flexible methodology is discussed that companies can use to identify and develop cross functional systems that will help improve organizational performance. In addition, some of the managerial issues are addressed that cross functional systems may raise and specific examples are used to explore networking's contributions to cross functional systems.

  1. Reactivity and applications of layered silicates and layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Thangaraj; Inayat, Alexandra; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2014-07-21

    Layered materials, such as layered sodium silicates and layered double hydroxides (LDHs), are well-known for their remarkable adsorption, intercalation and swelling properties. Their tunable interlayers offer an interesting avenue for the fabrication of pillared nanoporous materials, organic-inorganic hybrid materials and catalysts or catalyst supports. This perspective article provides a summary of the reactivity and applications of layered materials including aluminium-free layered sodium silicates (kanemite, ilerite (RUB-18 or octosilicate) and magadiite) and layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Recent developments in the use of layered sodium silicates as precursors for the preparation of various porous, functional and catalytic materials including zeolites, mesoporous materials, pillared layered silicates, organic-inorganic nanocomposites and synthesis of highly dispersed nanoparticles supported on silica are reviewed in detail. Along this perspective, we have attempted to illustrate the reactivity and transformational potential of LDHs in order to deduce the main differences and similarities between these two types of layered materials.

  2. A microwave scattering model for layered vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karam, Mostafa A.; Fung, Adrian K.; Lang, Roger H.; Chauhan, Narinder S.

    1992-01-01

    A microwave scattering model was developed for layered vegetation based on an iterative solution of the radiative transfer equation up to the second order to account for multiple scattering within the canopy and between the ground and the canopy. The model is designed to operate over a wide frequency range for both deciduous and coniferous forest and to account for the branch size distribution, leaf orientation distribution, and branch orientation distribution for each size. The canopy is modeled as a two-layered medium above a rough interface. The upper layer is the crown containing leaves, stems, and branches. The lower layer is the trunk region modeled as randomly positioned cylinders with a preferred orientation distribution above an irregular soil surface. Comparisons of this model with measurements from deciduous and coniferous forests show good agreements at several frequencies for both like and cross polarizations. Major features of the model needed to realize the agreement include allowance for: (1) branch size distribution, (2) second-order effects, and (3) tree component models valid over a wide range of frequencies.

  3. Flow visualization of turbulent boundary layer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, M. R.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    1980-01-01

    The results from flow visualization experiments performed using an argon-ion laser to illuminate longitudinal and transverse sections of the smoke filled boundary layer in zero pressure gradient are discussed. Most of the experiments were confined to the range 600 Re sub theta 10,000. Results indicate that the boundary layer consists almost exclusively of vortex loops or hairpins, some of which may extend through the complete boundary layer thickness and all of which are inclined at a more or less constant characteristic angle of approximately 45 deg to the wall. Since the cross-stream dimensions of the hairpins appear to scale roughly with the wall variables U sub tau and nu, while their length is limited only by the boundary layer thickness, there are very large scale effects on the turbulence structure. At high Reynolds numbers (Re sub theta = 10,000) there is little evidence of large-scale coherent motions, other than a slow overturning of random agglomerations of the hairpins just mentioned.

  4. Electroluminescent devices based on cross-linked polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozano, Luisa D.; Carter, Kenneth R.; Lee, Victor Y.; Miller, Robert D.; DiPietro, Richard; Scott, J. Campbell

    2003-09-01

    We report the electrical and optical properties of two-component blends of electron and hole transporting materials in single and bilayer structures for organic light emitting diode (OLED) applications. The materials considered were a blue-emitting bipolar transporting polyfluorene, poly(9,9-di-n-hexylfluorene) (DHF), and a hole-transporting material, poly-[4-nhexyltriphenylamine] (HTPA). We compare the steady state OLED performance, transport, and optical properties of devices and describe morphology studies of the polymer films based on cross-linkable (x) blends with the analogous non-cross-linkable blends. The cross-linkable blends exhibit highest efficiency at low concentrations of the hole transporting material. At these concentrations the single layer OLEDs reach efficiencies greater than 0.1%, and are higher than for single layer x-DHF or the binary non-cross-linkable blend by more than an order of magnitude. Bilayer structures with homogeneous x-HTPA as hole transport layer show efficiencies between 0.08% and 0.96%, depending on the blend concentration in the emitting layer and on the top contact. We interpret these results in terms of the relative degree of phase segregation in the cross-linked networks versus the non-cross-linkable blends.

  5. Peeling Back the Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols.

    Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed.

    Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers.

    The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior.

    The Mazatzal targets were named

  6. Boundary layer control by acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papathanasiou, A. G.; Nagel, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program in which the effectiveness of a single large eddy break-up device (LEBU) blade is enhanced by proper acoustic excitation is described. An acoustic pulse, phase-locked to the incident large eddies and directed at the LEBU can enhance the large eddy cancellation process and can in effect lead to a decrease in the skin friction coefficient. Cross-correlation data and turbulence intensity measurements show that this acoustic excitation causes eddy cancellation at the trailing edge of the manipulator plate. It is concluded that both reduced turbulent boundary layer mixing and significant drag reduction can be achieved upon proper acoustic input to a LEBU.

  7. Role of Cu layer thickness on the magnetic anisotropy of pulsed electrodeposited Ni/Cu/Ni tri-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanapal, K.; Prabhu, D.; Gopalan, R.; Narayanan, V.; Stephen, A.

    2017-07-01

    The Ni/Cu/Ni tri-layer film with different thickness of Cu layer was deposited using pulsed electrodeposition method. The XRD pattern of all the films show the formation of fcc structure of nickel and copper. This shows the orientated growth in the (2 2 0) plane of the layered films as calculated from the relative intensity ratio. The layer formation in the films were observed from cross sectional view using FE-SEM and confirms the decrease in Cu layer thickness with decreasing deposition time. The magnetic anisotropy behaviour was measured using VSM with two different orientations of layered film. This shows that increasing anisotropy energy with decreasing Cu layer thickness and a maximum of  -5.13  ×  104 J m-3 is observed for copper deposited for 1 min. From the K eff.t versus t plot, development of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the layered system is predicted below 0.38 µm copper layer thickness.

  8. The layer boundary effect on multi-layer mesoporous TiO2 film based dye sensitized solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Kai; Zhao, Yixin

    2016-10-10

    Multi-layer mesoporous TiO2 prepared by screen printing is widely used for fabrication of high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Here, we compare the three types of ~10 um thick mesoporous TiO2 films, which were screen printed as 1-, 2- and 4-layers using the same TiO2 nanocrystal paste. The layer boundary of the multi-layer mesoporous TiO2 films was observed in the cross-section SEM. The existence of a layer boundary could reduce the photoelectron diffusion length with the increase of layer number. However, the photoelectron diffusion lengths of the Z907 dye sensitized solar cells based on these different layered mesoporous TiO2 films aremore » all longer than the film thickness. Consequently, the photovoltaic performance seems to have little dependence on the layer number of the multi-layer TiO2 based DSSCs.« less

  9. Layered seal for turbomachinery

    DOEpatents

    Sarawate, Neelesh Nandkumar; Morgan, Victor John; Weber, David Wayne

    2015-11-20

    The present application provides seal assemblies for reducing leakages between adjacent components of turbomachinery. The seal assemblies may include outer shims, and at least a portion of the outer shims may be substantially impervious. At least one of the outer shims may be configured for sealing engagement with seal slots of the adjacent components. The seal assemblies may also include at least one of an inner shim and a filler layer positioned between the outer shims. The at least one inner shim may be substantially solid and the at least one filler layer may be relatively porous. The seal assemblies may be sufficiently flexible to account for misalignment between the adjacent components, sufficiently stiff to meet assembly requirements, and sufficiently robust to operating meet requirements associated with turbomachinery.

  10. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  11. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  12. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  13. Layered Composite Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Cole, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Laminated composite material construction is gaining popularity within industry as an attractive alternative to metallic designs where high strength at reduced weights is of prime consideration. This has necessitated the development of an effective analysis capability for the static, dynamic and buckling analyses of structural components constructed of layered composites. Theoretical and user aspects of layered composite analysis and its incorporation into CSA/NASTRAN are discussed. The availability of stress and strain based failure criteria is described which aids the user in reviewing the voluminous output normally produced in such analyses. Simple strategies to obtain minimum weight designs of composite structures are discussed. Several example problems are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and user convenient features of the capability.

  14. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  15. 1. WEIDER'S CROSSING STONE HOUSE. WEIDER'S CROSSING WAS ONCE A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WEIDER'S CROSSING STONE HOUSE. WEIDER'S CROSSING WAS ONCE A SIZABLE COMMUNITY. THIS IS ONE OF ONLY TWO HOUSES REMAINING MARKING WEIDER'S CROSSING. - Weider's Crossing Stone House, Weissport, Carbon County, PA

  16. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Schmitz, C.; Frost, C.; Engel, C. D.; Fuller, C. E.; Bender, R. L.; Pond, J.

    1984-01-01

    High chamber pressure expander cycles proposed for orbit transfer vehicles depend primarily on the heat energy transmitted from the combustion products through the thrust wall chamber wall. The heat transfer to the nozzle wall is affected by such variables as wall roughness, relamarization, and the presence of particles in the flow. Motor performance loss for these nozzles with thick boundary layers is inaccurate using the existing procedure coded BLIMPJ. Modifications and innovations to the code are examined. Updated routines are listed.

  17. Origins of Igneous Layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Bruce

    Anyone who has ever seen a photo of a layered intrusion, let alone visited one first hand, or even seen a thin section from one, cannot help but be impressed by the stunning record of crystal growth and deposition. Such bodies stand as majestic monuments of undeniable evidence that intricate magmatic processes exist, processes that couple crystallization, convection, and crystal sorting to form rocks so highly ordered and beautiful that they are a wonder to behold. These are the altars to which petrologists must carry their conceived petrologic processes for approval.Although significant in number, the best layered intrusions seem to be found almost always in remote places. Their names, Bushveld, Muskox, Kiglapait, Stillwater, Duke Island, Skaergaard, Rhum, ring through igneous petrology almost as historic military battles (Saratoga, Antietam, Bull Run, Manassas, Gettysburg) do through American history. People who have worked on such bodies are almost folk heros: Wager, Deer, Brown, Jackson, Hess, Irvine, McBirney, Morse; these names are petrologic household words. Yet with all this fanfare and reverence, layered instrusions are nearly thought of as period pieces, extreme examples of what can happen, but not generally what does. This is now all changing with the increasing realization that these bodies are perhaps highly representative of all magmatic bodies. They are simply more dynamically complete, containing more of the full range of interactions, and of course, exposing a more complete record. They are one end of a spectrum containing lava flows, lava lakes, large sills, plutons, and layered intrusions. This book uniquely covers this range with an abundance of first-hand field observations and a good dose of process conceptualization, magma physics, and crystal growth kinetics.

  18. Layered bismuth vanadate ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Osipyan, V.G.; Savchenko, L.M.; Elbakyan, V.L.; Avakyan, P.B.

    1987-08-01

    The authors synthesize new layered bismuth vanadate ferroelectrics. The x-ray diffraction characteristics of Bi/sub 2/VO/sub 5.5/ are shown. Thermal expansion of ceramics with various compositions are presented, as are the temperature dependences of the dielectric constant of the ceramic with various compositions. Unit-cell parameters, Curie temperature, electrical conductivity and the dielectric characteristics of the compositions studied are shown.

  19. The atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book is aimed at researchers in the atmospheric and associated sciences who require a moderately advanced text on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in which the many links between turbulence, air-surface transfer, boundary-layer structure and dynamics, and numerical modeling are discussed and elaborated upon. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction, with Chapters 2 and 3 dealing with the development of mean and turbulence equations, and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modelling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, and Chapters 4 and 5 deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL is treated in Chapter 6, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter 7 then extends the discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is seen as particularly relevant since the extensive stratocumulus regions over the sub-tropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic are now identified as key players in the climate system. Finally, Chapters 8 and 9 bring much of the book's material together in a discussion of appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes for the general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate simulation.

  20. Crater with Exposed Layers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-17

    On Earth, geologists can dig holes and pull up core samples to find out what lies beneath the surface. On Mars, geologists cannot dig holes very easily themselves, but a process has been occurring for billions of years that has been digging holes for them: impact cratering. Impact craters form when an asteroid, meteoroid, or comet crashes into a planet's surface, causing an explosion. The energy of the explosion, and the resulting size of the impact crater, depends on the size and density of the impactor, as well as the properties of the surface it hits. In general, the larger and denser the impactor, the larger the crater it will form. The impact crater in this image is a little less than 3 kilometers in diameter. The impact revealed layers when it excavated the Martian surface. Layers can form in a variety of different ways. Multiple lava flows in one area can form stacked sequences, as can deposits from rivers or lakes. Understanding the geology around impact craters and searching for mineralogical data within their layers can help scientists on Earth better understand what the walls of impact craters on Mars expose. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12328

  1. Interpretive 2-D treatment of scrape-off-layer plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M.; Allen, A.; Daughton, W.

    1996-12-31

    The width of the scrape-off-layer in a tokamak is determined by cross field transport. In Alcator C-mod the plasma parameters in the scrape-off-layer are measured at upstream and divertor plate locations. We solve a 2-D scrape-off-layer heat conduction equation in the flux geometry (as determined by EFIT) of the C-mod experiment. Bolometric measurements are utilized for the radiative loss term. We use the end wall probe measurements of electron temperature as a boundary condition and the fast scanning probe measurements of upstream temperature are treated as constraints to determine the cross field transport and thermal conductivity. Results are compared with 1-D onion-skin-model predictions.

  2. Nonlinear Cross Gramians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Tudor C.; Scherpen, Jacquelien M. A.

    We study the notion of cross Gramians for nonlinear gradient systems, using the characterization in terms of prolongation and gradient extension associated to the system. The cross Gramian is given for the variational system associated to the original nonlinear gradient system. We obtain linearization results that correspond to the notion of a cross Gramian for symmetric linear systems. Furthermore, first steps towards relations with the singular value functions of the nonlinear Hankel operator are studied and yield promising results.

  3. Cross resonant optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, P; Huang, J S; Duò, L; Finazzi, M; Hecht, B

    2009-06-26

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale.

  4. Solution processed organic light-emitting diodes using the plasma cross-linking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kongduo; Liu, Yang; Gong, Junyi; Zeng, Pan; Kong, Xun; Yang, Xilu; Yang, Cheng; Yu, Yan; Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong

    2016-09-01

    Solution processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) present challenges, especially regarding dissolution of the first layer during deposition of a second layer. In this work, we first demonstrated a plasma cross-linking technology to produce a solution processed OLED. The surfaces of organic films can be cross-linked after mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment for several tens of seconds and resist corrosion of organic solvent. The film thickness and surface morphology of emissive layers (EMLs) with plasma treatment and subsequently spin-rinsed with chlorobenzene are nearly unchanged. The solution processed triple-layer OLED is successfully fabricated and the current efficiency increases 50% than that of the double-layer OLED. Fluorescent characteristics of EMLs are also observed to investigate factors influencing the efficiency of the triple-layer OLED. Plasma cross-linking technology may open up a new pathway towards fabrication of all-solution processed multilayer OLEDs and other soft electronic devices.

  5. Effects of stratification on an ocean surface Ekman layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations are used to investigate the effects of stratification on structural and turbulent dynamics of an upper-ocean Ekman layer that is driven by a constant wind stress (friction velocity u*) at low latitude with Coriolis parameter f. The surface layer evolves in the presence of interior stratification whose buoyancy frequency varies among cases, taking three values: N / f = 19 , 60 and 192. At quasi-steady state, a stratified turbulent Ekman layer forms with a surface current veering to the right of the wind direction. The thickness of the Ekman layer decreases with increasing N and is found to scale with u*, f, and N, similar to the neutral atmospheric boundary layer of Zilitinkevich & Esau (2002) that is capped by a stratified layer with buoyancy frequency, N. As N increases, the speed of the Ekman current increases but the Ekman transport is invariant. The surface veering angle also increases with larger N. The shear rate and buoyancy frequency are elevated at the base of the Ekman layer. The peak of down-wind Reynolds stress occurs near the surface and scales with u*2 in all cases while the peak of cross-wind Reynolds stress occurs in the middle of the Ekman layer and decreases with increasing N.

  6. Diversity in S-layers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chaohua; Guo, Gang; Ma, Qiqi; Zhang, Fengjuan; Ma, Funing; Liu, Jianping; Xiao, Dao; Yang, Xiaolin; Sun, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Surface layers, referred simply as S-layers, are the two-dimensional crystalline arrays of protein or glycoprotein subunits on cell surface. They are one of the most common outermost envelope components observed in prokaryotic organisms (Archaea and Bacteria). Over the past decades, S-layers have become an issue of increasing interest due to their ubiquitousness, special features and functions. Substantial work in this field provides evidences of an enormous diversity in S-layers. This paper reviews and illustrates the diversity from several different aspects, involving the S-layer-carrying strains, the structure of S-layers, the S-layer proteins and genes, as well as the functions of S-layers.

  7. Modern Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Colin F.; Poole, Salwa K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the important modern developments of thin-layer chromatography are introduced. Discussed are the theory and instrumentation of thin-layer chromatography including multidimensional and multimodal techniques. Lists 53 references. (CW)

  8. Protecting the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  9. Unsteady Shear Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-29

    plunging airfoils, elliptic jets with mass entrainment and impinging ’ j ets. Additionally, the 3-D vortical flow over a backward facing step was...reattachment length is only about 4 step depths which is much shorter than that in a 2-D J . .1 r r*~ % 4,V rq ~ 4 case. The reattachment line shows a ...Boundary Layers", R.F. Blackwelder and J.H. Haritonidis, J . Fluid Mech., 132, 87, 1983. 2. "Breakdown of Streamwise Vortices near a Wall", J.D

  10. The Keck keyword layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. R.; Lupton, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Each Keck instrument presents a consistent software view to the user interface programmer. The view consists of a small library of functions, which are identical for all instruments, and a large set of keywords, that vary from instrument to instrument. All knowledge of the underlying task structure is hidden from the application programmer by the keyword layer. Image capture software uses the same function library to collect data for the image header. Because the image capture software and the instrument control software are built on top of the same keyword layer, a given observation can be 'replayed' by extracting keyword-value pairs from the image header and passing them back to the control system. The keyword layer features non-blocking as well as blocking I/O. A non-blocking keyword write operation (such as setting a filter position) specifies a callback to be invoked when the operation is complete. A non-blocking keyword read operation specifies a callback to be invoked whenever the keyword changes state. The keyword-callback style meshes well with the widget-callback style commonly used in X window programs. The first keyword library was built for the two Keck optical instruments. More recently, keyword libraries have been developed for the infrared instruments and for telescope control. Although the underlying mechanisms used for inter-process communication by each of these systems vary widely (Lick MUSIC, Sun RPC, and direct socket I/O, respectively), a basic user interface has been written that can be used with any of these systems. Since the keyword libraries are bound to user interface programs dynamically at run time, only a single set of user interface executables is needed. For example, the same program, 'xshow', can be used to display continuously the telescope's position, the time left in an instrument's exposure, or both values simultaneously. Less generic tools that operate on specific keywords, for example an X display that controls optical

  11. Cooperating systems: Layered MAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochowiak, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Distributed intelligent systems can be distinguished by the models that they use. The model developed focuses on layered multiagent system conceived of as a bureaucracy in which a distributed data base serves as a central means of communication. The various generic bureaus of such a system is described and a basic vocabulary for such systems is presented. In presenting the bureaus and vocabularies, special attention is given to the sorts of reasonings that are appropriate. A bureaucratic model has a hierarchy of master system and work group that organizes E agents and B agents. The master system provides the administrative services and support facilities for the work groups.

  12. Layered Rocks of Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    04 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops exposed by erosion in southern Melas Chasma, one of the major Valles Marineris troughs. Such outcrops are common in southern Melas; they resemble the rock outcrops seen in some of the chaotic terrains and other Valles Marineris chasms. This image is located near 11.9oS, 74.6oW, and is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  13. Layered Rocks in Ritchey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 May 2004 This March 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light- and dark-toned layered rock outcrops on the floor of Ritchey Crater, located near 28.9oS, 50.8oW. Some or all of these rocks may be sedimentary in origin. Erosion has left a couple of buttes standing on a more erosion-resistant plain. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  14. Layered Manufacturing: Challenges and Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014215 TITLE: Layered Manufacturing : Challenges and Opportunities ...Research Society LL1.4 Layered Manufacturing : Challenges and Opportunities Khershed P. Cooper Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research...Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5343, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Layered Manufacturing (LM) refers to computer-aided manufacturing processes in which parts are made

  15. Surface-imprinted nanostructured layer-by-layer film for molecular recognition of theophylline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jia; Liu, Zhihua; Fu, Long; Shi, Feng; Ma, Hongwei; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Zhang, Xi

    2008-10-21

    In this article we report the introduction of the cooperativity of various specific interactions combined with photo-cross-linking of the interlayers to yield binding sites that can realize better selectivity and imprinting efficiency of a surface molecularly imprinted LbL film (SMILbL), thus providing a new approach toward fabrication of nanostructured molecularly imprinted thin films. It involves preassembly of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) conjugated of the theophylline residue template via a disulfide bridge, denoted as PAAtheo 15, in solution, and layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of PAAtheo 15 and a positively charged photoreactive diazo resin (DAR) to form multilayer thin film with designed architecture. After photo-cross-linking of the film and template removal, binding sites specific to 7-(beta-hydroxyethyl)theophylline (Theo-ol) molecules are introduced within the film. Binding assay demonstrates that the SMILbL has a high selectivity of SMILbL to Theo-ol over caffeine. A control experiment demonstrates that the selectivity of SMILbL derives from nanostructured recognition sites among the layers. The imprinting amount per unit mass of the film can be 1 order of magnitude larger than that of the conventional bulk molecular imprinting systems. As this concept of construction SMILbL can be easily extended to the other molecules by the following similar protocol: its applications in building many other different molecular recognition systems are greatly anticipated.

  16. Twenty-Layer Optical Disc Fabricated by Web Coating and Lamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Tatsuo; Mochizuki, Hidehiro; Sasaki, Toshio; Kitahara, Toshiyuki; Tsuyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Kenichirou; Ito, Masaharu

    2013-09-01

    We developed a new fabrication method for multilayer optical discs for the high-throughput production of such discs. We used web coating and lamination to prepare a stacked unit. The stacked unit was a layered structure consisting of a recording layer, a UV resin layer, a recording layer, and a pressure-sensitive adhesive layer. We obtained a 20-layer disc simply by laminating the stacked units 10 times. The transmittance of the 20 recording layers was 87% owing to the high transparency of the two-photon recording material. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of the disc showed a clear multilayer structure. The recording layers of the disc were recorded using a pulse laser without interlayer cross write. The thickness variation of the transparent part of the disc was within +/-2 µm, and the tilt angles of the disc satisfied the Blu-ray disc (BD) specifications.

  17. Nanostructured Ultrathin Carbazole Polymer Layers for Improved Hole-Transport and Injection Properties on ITO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Advincula, Rigoberto

    2010-03-01

    This talk will focus on strategies to modify Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) surfaces, an important substrate for display and photovoltaic devices using macromolecular grafting, layer-by-layer, and electrodeposition methods of carbazole derivatives. An important consequence is the improved morphology of rough ITO surfaces and better interfacial adhesion. This involves the use of surface initiated polymerization (SIP) to directly modify and graft carbazole containing layers. Alternatively, layer-by-layer deposition of hole-transport and injecting layers allow for controlled layer thickness and layer ordering. Lastly, the use of electropolymerizable conjugated polymer network precursors allow for a highly cross-linked films with improved stability and charge carrier transport. The use of surface sensitive analytical methods is key to defining structure-property relationships. Several device configurations and performance will be described.

  18. Shallow scattering layer in the subarctic pacific ocean: detection by high-frequency echo sounder.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, W E; Lebrasseur, R J; Kennedy, O D

    1969-10-31

    Shallow scattering layers consisting mainly of Calanus cristatus were detected on a trans-Pacific crossing to depths of 60 meters with a high-frequency echo sounder. Biomass estimates of these layers indicate concentrations of zoo-plankton that are greater and more extensive than previously reported in the open ocean.

  19. Higher Order Crossings (HOC).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Results on the higher order crossings approach to signal detection were obtained. In politicular, the earth:s polar notion was analyzed and new...periodicities were obtained. Another application was to online testing for white noise. It was also demonstrated that a higher order crossing sequence will converge to a frequency regardless of the signal to noise ratio. (kr)

  20. Cross-Generational Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy; Thurston, Judy Kay

    2007-01-01

    What happens when you combine senior citizens, pre-service art teachers, and elementary students? Cross-generational connections based on sharing memories, ideas, skills, laughter, tears, and creativity. The authors describe the cross-generational book exchange project. This project was initiated when a group of Central Michigan University (CMU)…

  1. Cross-Generational Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy; Thurston, Judy Kay

    2007-01-01

    What happens when you combine senior citizens, pre-service art teachers, and elementary students? Cross-generational connections based on sharing memories, ideas, skills, laughter, tears, and creativity. The authors describe the cross-generational book exchange project. This project was initiated when a group of Central Michigan University (CMU)…

  2. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  3. The Boundary Layer Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, Ranah; Bowles, N. E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Hurley, J.

    2010-10-01

    The Boundary Layer Radiometer is a small, low mass (<1kg) radiometer with only a single moving part - a scan/calibration mirror. The instrument consists of a three mirror telescope system incorporating an intermediate focus for use with miniature infrared and visible filters. It also has an integrated low power blackbody calibration target to provide long-term calibration stability The instrument may be used as an upward looking boundary layer radiometer for both the terrestrial and Martian atmospheres with appropriate filters for the mid-infrared carbon dioxide band, as well as a visible channel for the detection of aerosol components such as dust. The scan mirror may be used to step through different positions from the local horizon to the zenith, allowing the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere to be retrieved. The radiometer uses miniature infrared filter assemblies developed for previous space-based instruments by Oxford, Cardiff and Reading Universities. The intermediate focus allows for the use of upstream blocking filters and baffles, which not only simplifies the design of the filters and focal plane assembly, but also reduces the risk of problems due to stray light. Combined with the calibration target this means it has significant advantages over previous generations of small radiometers.

  4. Turbulent boundary layer heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.; Clarke, A. S.; Wu, P. K. S.

    1981-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers is used to study surface roughness effects on skin friction and heat transfer. The issues of primary interest are the influence of roughness character (element shape and spacing) and the nature of roughness effects at high Mach numbers. Computations based on the model compare satisfactorily with measurements from experiments involving variations in roughness character, in low speed and modestly supersonic conditions. The more limited data base at hypersonic Mach numbers is also examined with reasonable success, although no quantitative explanation is offered for the reduction of heat transfer with increasing roughness observed by Holden at Me -9.4. The present calculations indicate that the mean velocity is approximately uniform over much of the height range below the tops of the elements, y less than or equal to k. With this constant (roughness velocity,) it is simple to estimate the form drag on the elements. This roughness velocity has been investigated by systematically exercising the present model over ranges of potential parameters. The roughness velocity is found to be primarily a function of the projected element frontal area per unit surface area, thus providing a new and simple method for predicting roughness character effects. The model further suggests that increased boundary layer temperatures should be generated by roughness at high edge Mach numbers, which would tend to reduce skin friction and heat transfer, perhaps below smooth wall levels.

  5. Thin layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Marina; Strobel, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In many experiments, it is important to be able to separate a mixture into its chemical components in order to isolate one compound or to assess the purity of the mixture. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) is one of the easiest and most versatile methods of doing this because of its low cost, simplicity, quick development time, high sensitivity, and good reproducibility. TLC is used by many industries and fields of research, including pharmaceutical production, clinical analysis, industrial chemistry, environmental toxicology, food chemistry, water, inorganic, and pesticide analysis, dye purity, cosmetics, plant materials, and herbal analysis. In its simplest form, glass plates are coated with a uniform layer of silica gel (SiO2). The dissolved sample is placed on the plate, and the plate is inserted into a screw-top jar containing the developing solvent and a piece of filter paper. When the solvent has risen to near the top of the plate, the plate is removed, dried, and visualized using UV light. Variations on this protocol are used for different purposes, including pretreating the sample, changing the sorbent, plate material, the solvent system, the development techniques, and method of detection and visualization or by coupling TLC to other techniques. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiresonant layered plasmonic films

    SciTech Connect

    DeVetter, Brent M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan; Alvine, Kyle J.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-resonant nanoplasmonic films have numerous applications in areas such as nonlinear optics, sensing, and tamper indication. While techniques such as focused ion beam milling and electron beam lithography can produce high-quality multi-resonant films, these techniques are expensive, serial processes that are difficult to scale at the manufacturing level. Here, we present the fabrication of multi-resonant nanoplasmonic films using a layered stacking technique. Periodically-spaced gold nanocup substrates were fabricated using self-assembled polystyrene nanospheres followed by oxygen plasma etching and metal deposition via magnetron sputter coating. By adjusting etch parameters and initial nanosphere size, it was possible to achieve an optical response ranging from the visible to the near-infrared. Singly resonant, flexible films were first made by performing peel-off using an adhesive-coated polyolefin film. Through stacking layers of the nanofilm, we demonstrate fabrication of multi-resonant films at a fraction of the cost and effort as compared to top-down lithographic techniques.

  7. Cross-Shelf Exchange.

    PubMed

    Brink, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress.

  8. Polar Layers in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image again illustrates the oranger/bluer nature of the polar layers.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6, Longitude 70.2 East (289.8 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Boundary layer ozone - An airborne survey above the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Browell, Edward V.; Warren, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    Ozone data obtained over the forest canopy of the Amazon Basin during July and August 1985 in the course of NASA's Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A are discussed, and ozone profiles obtained during flights from Belem to Tabatinga, Brazil, are analyzed to determine any cross-basin effects. The analyses of ozone data indicate that the mixed layer of the Amazon Basin, for the conditions of undisturbed meteorology and in the absence of biomass burning, is a significant sink for tropospheric ozone. As the coast is approached, marine influences are noted at about 300 km inland, and a transition from a forest-controlled mixed layer to a marine-controlled mixed layer is noted.

  10. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  11. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  12. Advanced atom chips with two metal layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Benito, Francisco M.; Biedermann, Grant

    2010-12-01

    A design concept, device layout, and monolithic microfabrication processing sequence have been developed for a dual-metal layer atom chip for next-generation positional control of ultracold ensembles of trapped atoms. Atom chips are intriguing systems for precision metrology and quantum information that use ultracold atoms on microfabricated chips. Using magnetic fields generated by current carrying wires, atoms are confined via the Zeeman effect and controllably positioned near optical resonators. Current state-of-the-art atom chips are single-layer or hybrid-integrated multilayer devices with limited flexibility and repeatability. An attractive feature of multi-level metallization is the ability to construct more complicated conductor patterns and thereby realize the complex magnetic potentials necessary for the more precise spatial and temporal control of atoms that is required. Here, we have designed a true, monolithically integrated, planarized, multi-metal-layer atom chip for demonstrating crossed-wire conductor patterns that trap and controllably transport atoms across the chip surface to targets of interest.

  13. Liquefaction mechanism for layered soils

    SciTech Connect

    Fiegel, G.L.; Kutter, B.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Results from four centrifuge model tests are presented. Three of the model tests involve layered soil deposits subject to base shaking; one model test involves a uniform soil deposit of sand subject to base shaking. The layered soil models consisted of fine sand overlain by a layer of relatively impermeable silica flour (silt). Pore-water pressures, accelerations, and settlements were measured during all four tests. Results from the model tests involving layered soils suggest that during liquefaction a water interlayer or very loose zone of soil may develop at the sand-silt interface due to the difference in permeabilities. In each layered model test, boils were observed on the surface of the silt layer. These boils were concentrated in the thinnest zones of the overlying silt layer and provided a vent for the excess pore-water pressure generated in the fine sand.

  14. The multiple layer solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for obtaining numerical solutions for differential equations describing the performance of separate layers in a multiple layer solar collector. The configurations comprises heat transfer fluid entering at the top of the collector and travelling down through several layers. A black absorber plate prevents reemission of thermal radiation. The overall performance is shown to depend on the number of layers, the heat transfer coefficient across each layer, and the absorption properties of the working fluid. It is found that the multiple layer system has a performance inferior to that of flat plate selective surface collectors. Air gaps insulating adjacent layers do not raise the efficiency enough to overcome the relative deficiency.

  15. Growth of thicker zinc-blende CrSb layers by using (In,Ga)As buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, J. J.; Zhao, J. H.; Bi, J. F.; Niu, Z. C.; Yang, F. H.; Wu, X. G.; Zheng, H. Z.

    2006-05-01

    Zinc-blende CrSb (zb-CrSb) layers with room-temperature ferromagnetism have been grown on (In,Ga)As buffer layers epitaxially prepared on (001) GaAs substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. Compared with the typical thickness [2-3 ML (ML denotes monolayers)] of zb-CrSb grown directly on GaAs, the thickness of zb-CrSb grown on (In,Ga)As has been increased largely; the maximum can be up to ~9 ML. High-resolution cross sectional transmission electron microscopy images show that the zb-CrSb layer is combined with (In,Ga)As buffer layer without any dislocations at the interface.

  16. Growth of thicker zinc-blende CrSb layers by using (In,Ga)As buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, J.J.; Zhao, J.H.; Bi, J.F.; Niu, Z.C.; Yang, F.H.; Wu, X.G.; Zheng, H.Z.

    2006-05-01

    Zinc-blende CrSb (zb-CrSb) layers with room-temperature ferromagnetism have been grown on (In,Ga)As buffer layers epitaxially prepared on (001) GaAs substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. Compared with the typical thickness [2-3 ML (ML denotes monolayers)] of zb-CrSb grown directly on GaAs, the thickness of zb-CrSb grown on (In,Ga)As has been increased largely; the maximum can be up to {approx}9 ML. High-resolution cross sectional transmission electron microscopy images show that the zb-CrSb layer is combined with (In,Ga)As buffer layer without any dislocations at the interface.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of novel forward osmosis membranes based on layer-by-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Saren, Qi; Qiu, Chang Quan; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2011-06-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) has received considerable interest for water- and energy-related applications in recent years. FO does not require an applied pressure and is believed to have a low fouling tendency. However, a major challenge in FO is the lack of high performance FO membranes. In the current work, novel nanofiltration (NF)-like FO membranes with good magnesium chloride retention were synthesized using layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. The membrane substrate was tailored (high porosity, finger-like pores, thin cross-section, and high hydrophilicity) to achieve a small structural parameter of 0.5 mm. Increasing the number of polyelectrolyte layers improved the selectivity of the LbL membranes while reducing their water permeability. The more selective membrane 6#LbL (with 6 polyelectrolyte layers) had much lower reverse solute transport compared to 3#LbL and 1#LbL. Meanwhile, the FO water flux was found to be strongly affected by both membrane water permeability and solute reverse transport. Severe solute reverse transport was observed for the active-layer-facing-draw-solution membrane orientation, likely due to the suppression of Donnan exclusion as a result of the high ionic strength of the draw solution. In contrast, the active-layer-facing-feed-solution orientation showed remarkable FO performance (15, 20, and 28 L/m².h at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 M MgCl₂, respectively, for membrane 3#LbL using distilled water as feed solution), superior to other NF-like FO membranes reported in the literature. To the best of the knowledge of the authors, this is the first work on the synthesis and characterization of LbL based FO membranes.

  18. Layers in Galle Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-31

    This image shows a layered deposit in Galle Crater, located in the Southern cratered highlands. The geologic history of Galle Crater is not well constrained, and it contains a variety of features that have been interpreted as fluvial, lacustrine or glacial deposits. The deposit pictured here contains multiple unconformities (sudden or irregular changes from one deposit to another), indicating periods of erosion and non deposition. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 25.7 centimeters (10.1 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 77 centimeters (30.3 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21575

  19. Wireless physical layer security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poor, H. Vincent; Schaefer, Rafael F.

    2017-01-01

    Security in wireless networks has traditionally been considered to be an issue to be addressed separately from the physical radio transmission aspects of wireless systems. However, with the emergence of new networking architectures that are not amenable to traditional methods of secure communication such as data encryption, there has been an increase in interest in the potential of the physical properties of the radio channel itself to provide communications security. Information theory provides a natural framework for the study of this issue, and there has been considerable recent research devoted to using this framework to develop a greater understanding of the fundamental ability of the so-called physical layer to provide security in wireless networks. Moreover, this approach is also suggestive in many cases of coding techniques that can approach fundamental limits in practice and of techniques for other security tasks such as authentication. This paper provides an overview of these developments.

  20. Wireless physical layer security

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Rafael F.

    2017-01-01

    Security in wireless networks has traditionally been considered to be an issue to be addressed separately from the physical radio transmission aspects of wireless systems. However, with the emergence of new networking architectures that are not amenable to traditional methods of secure communication such as data encryption, there has been an increase in interest in the potential of the physical properties of the radio channel itself to provide communications security. Information theory provides a natural framework for the study of this issue, and there has been considerable recent research devoted to using this framework to develop a greater understanding of the fundamental ability of the so-called physical layer to provide security in wireless networks. Moreover, this approach is also suggestive in many cases of coding techniques that can approach fundamental limits in practice and of techniques for other security tasks such as authentication. This paper provides an overview of these developments. PMID:28028211

  1. Improved electrodeposited actinide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelbrecht, C.; Moens, A.; Eykens, R.; Dean, A.

    1997-02-01

    Electrodeposition is a relatively simple and high-yielding method for producing actinide layers for nuclear targets. A new design of the cell has been used to deposit U, Pu, Np and Am onto metallic backings from isopropanol and onto carbon-coated polyimide films from isobutanol. The current density was 1-3 mA/cm 2. Deposition yields, determined by low geometry alpha-particle counting, were about 65% for Pu and about 90% for other elements. The same technique was used to investigate thickness homogeneity of 239Pu deposits, and it was observed that targets with mean thickness up to about 100 μg/cm 2 were thicker in the centre than at the edge, but for targets above 100 μg/cm 2, this profile was reversed. Modifications to the electrode shape were made in an attempt to improve the thickness uniformity.

  2. ISDC Data Access Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D.; Borkowski, J.; Contessi, T.; Lock, T.; Rohlfs, R.; Walter, R.

    The ISDC Data Access Layer (DAL) is an ANSI C and \\fortran 90 compatible library under development in support of the ESA INTEGRAL mission data analysis software. DALs primary purpose is to isolate the analysis software from the specifics of the data formats while at the same time providing new data abstraction and access capabilities. DAL supports the creation and manipulation of hierarchical data sets which may span multiple files and, in theory, multiple computer systems. A number of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are supported by DAL that allow software to view and access data at different levels of complexity. DAL also allows data sets to reside on disk, in conventional memory or in shared memory in a way that is transparent to the user/application.

  3. Templated quasicrystalline molecular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Joe; Young, Kirsty; Lowe, Michael; Hars, Sanger; Yadav, Thakur; Hesp, David; Dhanak, Vinod; Tsai, An-Pang; Sharma, Hem Raj; McGrath, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    Quasicrystals are materials with long range ordering but no periodicity. We report scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations of quasicrystalline molecular layers on five-fold quasicrystal surfaces. The molecules adopt positions and orientations on the surface consistent with the quasicrystalline ordering of the substrate. Carbon-60 adsorbs atop sufficiently-separated Fe atoms on icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe to form a unique quasicrystalline lattice whereas further C60 molecules decorate remaining surface Fe atoms in a quasi-degenerate fashion. Pentacene (Pn) adsorbs at tenfold-symmetric points around surface-bisected rhombic triacontahedral clusters in icosahedral Ag-In-Yb. These systems constitute the first demonstrations of quasicrystalline molecular ordering on a template. EPSRC EP/D05253X/1, EP/D071828/1, UK BIS.

  4. Layer Outcrops and Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-561, 1 December 2003

    This October 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows dark, windblown sand dunes amid outcrops of light-toned, sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. The darkest material in the scene is windblown sand; the steep slopes--the slip faces--of the dunes face toward the southwest (lower left), indicating that wind transport of sand has been from the northeast (upper right). The layered mounds are the remains of sedimentary rock that were once more extensive across this crater floor. The image is located near 8.9oN, 1.2oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  5. Ferroelectrics based absorbing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jianping; Sadaune, Véronique; Burgnies, Ludovic; Lippens, Didier

    2014-07-01

    We show that ferroelectrics-based periodic structure made of BaSrTiO3 (BST) cubes, arrayed onto a metal plate with a thin dielectric spacer film exhibit a dramatic enhancement of absorbance with value close to unity. The enhancement is found around the Mie magnetic resonance of the Ferroelectrics cubes with the backside metal layer stopping any transmitted waves. It also involves quasi-perfect impedance matching resulting in reflection suppression via simultaneous magnetic and electrical activities. In addition, it was shown numerically the existence of a periodicity optimum, which is explained from surface waves analysis along with trade-off between the resonance damping and the intrinsic loss of ferroelectrics cubes. An experimental verification in a hollow waveguide configuration with a good comparison with full-wave numerical modelling is at last reported by measuring the scattering parameters of single and dual BST cubes schemes pointing out coupling effects for densely packed structures.

  6. Layers in Tithonium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-570, 10 December 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows eroded layered bedrock outcrops in the upper walls of one of the depressions in the Tithonium Chasma trough system. Tithonium Chasma is one of the canyons of the Valles Marineris, a vast gouge that--if it occurred on Earth-would span the distance from Los Angeles, California, to New York City. The Valles Marineris canyons were not carved by running water, instead they formed mostly by the combined forces of faulting and mass movement (landslides) as gravity eroded materials from the walls. This image is located near 4.2oS, 85.1oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the lower left.

  7. Aeolian transport layer.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Murilo P; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2006-01-13

    We investigate the airborne transport of particles on a granular surface by the saltation mechanism through numerical simulation of particle motion coupled with turbulent flow. We determine the saturated flux q(s) and show that its behavior is consistent with classical empirical relations obtained from wind tunnel measurements. Our results also allow one to propose and explain a new relation valid for small fluxes, namely, q(s) = a(u*-u(t))alpha, where u* and u(t) are the shear and threshold velocities of the wind, respectively, and the scaling exponent is alpha approximately 2. We obtain an expression for the velocity profile of the wind distorted by the particle motion due to the feedback and discover a novel dynamical scaling relation. We also find a new expression for the dependence of the height of the saltation layer as a function of the wind velocity.

  8. Templated, layered manganese phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Bonhomme, Francois R.

    2004-08-17

    A new crystalline maganese phosphate composition having an empirical formula: O). The compound was determined to crystallize in the trigonal space group P-3c1 with a=8.8706(4) .ANG., c=26.1580(2) .ANG., and V (volume)=1783 .ANG..sup.3. The structure consists of sheets of corner sharing Mn(II)O.sub.4 and PO.sub.4 tetrahedra with layers of (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N and water molecules in-between. The pronated (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N molecules provide charge balancing for the inorganic sheets. A network of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and the inorganic sheets holds the structure together.

  9. Wireless physical layer security.

    PubMed

    Poor, H Vincent; Schaefer, Rafael F

    2017-01-03

    Security in wireless networks has traditionally been considered to be an issue to be addressed separately from the physical radio transmission aspects of wireless systems. However, with the emergence of new networking architectures that are not amenable to traditional methods of secure communication such as data encryption, there has been an increase in interest in the potential of the physical properties of the radio channel itself to provide communications security. Information theory provides a natural framework for the study of this issue, and there has been considerable recent research devoted to using this framework to develop a greater understanding of the fundamental ability of the so-called physical layer to provide security in wireless networks. Moreover, this approach is also suggestive in many cases of coding techniques that can approach fundamental limits in practice and of techniques for other security tasks such as authentication. This paper provides an overview of these developments.

  10. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  11. Layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolyte nanolayers on natural fibres: cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Kevin; Rusa, Mariana; Hinestroza, Juan

    2005-07-01

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) over cotton fibres is reported. Cotton fibres offer unique challenges to the deposition of nanolayers because of their unique cross section as well as the chemical heterogeneity of their surface. Cationic cotton substrates were produced by using 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride. Attenuated total reflectance FTIR, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to validate the presence of the nanolayers as well as to corroborate their self-organized structure. TEM images indicated conformal and uniform coating of the cotton fibres. XPS spectral data were found to be in quantitative agreement with previous published work that studied the LbL deposition of PSS and PAH over synthetic substrates.

  12. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  13. Tailoring interlayer structure of molecular layer-by-layer assembled polyamide membranes for high separation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Joung-Eun; Lee, Jong Suk; Park, Sang-Hee; Kim, Il Tae; Chan, Edwin P.; Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    A molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) technique was recently developed to fabricate polyamide (PA) thin film composite (TFC) membranes for water purification. In this study, the interlayer structure between the selective and support layers of the mLbL-assembled TFC membrane was tailored to achieve high performance applicable to seawater desalination. Introducing interlayers on porous supports prior to mLbL deposition allowed the effective PA growth by preventing monomer deposition within the support pores. The PA layers were grown via mLbL on supports coated by a series of interlayers: poly(piperazine-amide), cross-linked poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and a polyelectrolyte bilayer of PEI and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) (PEI/PAA). The density and distribution of surface carboxyl groups of the interlayer were found to be key parameters that determine the structure and performance of the mLbL-assembled membranes. Among the interlayers examined, the PEI/PAA interlayer not only yielded membranes with superior performance but also with a highly smooth surface beneficial for antifouling.

  14. CLARAty Functional-Layer Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesnas, Issa; Volpe, Richard; Das, Hari; Mutz, Darren; Petras, Richard; Estlin, Tara

    2003-01-01

    Functional-layer software for the Coupled Layer Architecture for Robotics Autonomy (CLARAty) is being developed. [CLARAty was described in Coupled-Layer Architecture for Advanced Software for Robots (NPO-21218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 12 (December 2002), page 48. To recapitulate: CLARAty was proposed to improve the modularity of robotic software while tightening the coupling between planning/execution and control subsystems. Whereas prior robotic software architectures have typically contained three levels, the CLARAty architecture contains two layers: a decision layer and a functional layer.] Just as an operating system provides abstraction from computational hardware, the CLARAty functional-layer software provides for abstraction for the different robotic systems. The functional-layer software establishes interrelated, object-oriented hierarchies that contain active and passive objects that represent the different levels of system abstrations and components. The functional-layer software is decomposed into a set of reusable core components and a set of extended components that adapt the reusable set to specific hardware implementations. The reusable components (a) provide behavior and interface definitions and implementations of basic functionality, (b) provide local executive capabilities, (c) manage local resources, and (d) support state and resource queries by the decision layer. Software for robotic systems can be built by use of these components.

  15. Inter-layer synchronization in multiplex networks of identical layers

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Leyva, I.; Buldú, J. M.; Gutiérrez, R.; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-06-15

    Inter-layer synchronization is a distinctive process of multiplex networks whereby each node in a given layer evolves synchronously with all its replicas in other layers, irrespective of whether or not it is synchronized with the other units of the same layer. We analytically derive the necessary conditions for the existence and stability of such a state, and verify numerically the analytical predictions in several cases where such a state emerges. We further inspect its robustness against a progressive de-multiplexing of the network, and provide experimental evidence by means of multiplexes of nonlinear electronic circuits affected by intrinsic noise and parameter mismatch.

  16. Crossing simple resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  17. Cross-Sex Friendship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Hess, Elaine

    1974-01-01

    Interview data from 800 middle-aged and elderly urban residents reveal that while only a minority report cross-sex friends, they constitute a significant segment of the interpersonal resources of a number of adults. (Author)

  18. [Cross-over studies].

    PubMed

    Bonten, Tobias N; Siegerink, Bob; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-01-01

    Randomized, parallel group clinical trials often require large groups of patients; this is expensive and takes time. A randomized cross-over trial can be an efficient and more affordable alternative. A cross-over design can be used to study chronic disorders in which treatments have temporary effects. Participants receive all treatments in consecutive periods and outcomes are measured after every period. In general, only a quarter of the total group size is needed for cross-over studies compared with parallel group studies. Results can be affected by period-effects and carry-over-effects, which can be prevented through randomization and a wash-out period of sufficient length. The dropping-out of participants has more negative consequences for cross-over studies than for parallel group studies.

  19. Cross-Country Skiing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Guy E.

    1980-01-01

    The cross-country ski program offered at Clarkson College in New York is described, including a brief outline of the course, necessary equipment, and suggestions for developing a similar course at other campuses. (JMF)

  20. Neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This handbook displays curves of neutron cross sections in the energy range of 0.01 eV to 200 MeV (and associated information) as a function of incident neutron energy. Tables include reference to all data. Information on isomeric state production is also included. This book represents the fourth edition of what was previously known as BNL-325, Neutron Cross Sections, Volume 2, the third edition of which was published in 1976.

  1. Feasibility study of a layer-oriented wavefront sensor for solar telescopes.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jose; Wöger, Friedrich

    2014-02-01

    Solar multiconjugate adaptive optics systems rely on several wavefront sensors, which measure the incoming turbulent phase along several field directions to produce a tomographic reconstruction of the turbulent phase. In this paper, we explore an alternative wavefront sensing approach that attempts to directly measure the turbulent phase present at a particular height in the atmosphere: a layer-oriented cross-correlating Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS). In an experiment at the Dunn Solar Telescope, we built a prototype layer-oriented cross-correlating SHWFS system conjugated to two separate atmospheric heights. We present the data obtained in the observations and complement these with ray-tracing computations to achieve a better understanding of the instrument's performance and limitations. The results obtained in this study strongly indicate that a layer-oriented cross-correlating SHWFS is not a practical design to measure the wavefront at a high layer in the atmosphere.

  2. Multichannel MAC Layer In Mobile Ad—Hoc Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logesh, K.; Rao, Samba Siva

    2010-11-01

    This paper we presented the design objectives and technical challenges in Multichannel MAC protocols in Mobile Ad-hoc Network. In IEEE 802.11 a/b/g standards allow use of multiple channels, only a single channel is popularly used, due to the lack of efficient protocols that enable use of Multiple Channels. Even though complex environments in ad hoc networks require a combined control of physical (PHY) and medium access control (MAC) layers resources in order to optimize performance. And also we discuss the characteristics of cross-layer frame and give a multichannel MAC approach.

  3. Spray coated nanosilver functional layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzemiński, J.; Szałapak, J.; Dybowska-Sarapuk, L.; Jakubowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    Silver coatings are highly conductive functional layers. There are many different ways to product the silver coating but most of them need vacuum or high temperature. Spray coating is a technique that is free of this disadvantages - it doesn't need a cleanroom or high temperature. What's more the layer thickness is about 10 μm. In this article the spray coating process of silver nanolayer is described. Four different inks were tested and measured. The layer resistance was measured and show as a graph. After the layer resistance was measured the adhesion test was performed. The pull-off test was performed on testing machine with special self made module. To conclude the article include the test and measurements of spray coated nanosilver functional layers. The layers was examined for the current conductivity and adhesion force.

  4. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  5. Boundary-Layer & health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  6. Synthetic Jets in Cross-flow. Part 1; Round Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation on synthetic jets from round orifices with and without cross-flow are presented. Jet Reynolds number up to 46,000 with a fully turbulent approach boundary layer, and Stokes number up to 400. are covered. The threshold of stroke length for synthetic jet formation. in the absence of the cross-flow, is found to be Lo /D approximately 0.5. Above Lo /D is approximately 10, the profiles of normalized centerline mean velocity appear to become invariant. It is reasoned that the latter threshold may be related to the phenomenon of saturation of impulsively generated vortices. In the presence of the cross-flow, the penetration height of a synthetic jet is found to depend on the momentum- flux ratio . When this ratio is defined in terms of the maximum jet velocity and the cross-flow velocity. not only all data collapse but also the jet trajectory is predicted well by correlation equation available for steady jets-in-cross-flow. Distributions of mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as turbulence intensity for a synthetic jet in cross-flow are found to be similar to those of a steady jet-in-cross-flow. A pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, corresponding to the bound vortex pair of the steady case, is clearly observed. Mean velocity distribution exhibits a dome of low momentum fluid pulled up from the boundary layer, and the entire domain is characterized by high turbulence.

  7. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  8. Outer layer effects in wind-farm boundary layers: Coriolis forces and boundary layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In LES studies of wind-farm boundary layers, scale separation between the inner and outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is frequently assumed, i.e., wind turbines are presumed to fall within the inner layer and are not affected by outer layer effects. However, modern wind turbine and wind farm design tends towards larger rotor diameters and farm sizes, which means that outer layer effects will become more important. In a prior study, it was already shown for fully-developed wind farms that the ABL height influences the power performance. In this study, we use the in-house LES code SP-Wind to investigate the importance of outer layer effects on wind-farm boundary layers. In a suite of LES cases, the ABL height is varied by imposing a capping inversion with varying inversion strengths. Results indicate the growth of an internal boundary layer (IBL), which is limited in cases with low inversion layers. We further find that flow deceleration combined with Coriolis effects causes a change in wind direction throughout the farm. This effect increases with decreasing boundary layer height, and can result in considerable turbine wake deflection near the end of the farm. The authors are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). Computations were performed on VSC infrastructiure (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government-department EWI.

  9. Multiple-layer Radiation Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Baker, Bonnie Sue

    A structure is discussed for absorbing incident radiation, either electromagnetic (EM) or sound. Such a surface structure is needed, for example, in a highly sensitive high-frequency gravitational wave or HFGW detector such as the Li-Baker. The multi-layer absorber, which is discussed, is constructed with metamaterial [MM] layer or layers on top. This MM is configured for a specific EM or sound radiation frequency band, which absorbs incident EM or sound radiation without reflection. Below these top MM layers is a substrate of conventional EM-radiation absorbing or acoustical absorbing reflective material, such as an array of pyramidal foam absorbers. Incident radiation is partially absorbed by the MM layer or layers, and then it is more absorbed by the lower absorbing and reflecting substrate. The remaining reflected radiation is even further absorbed by the MM layers on its "way out_ so that essentially all of the incident radiation is absorbed _ a nearly perfect black-body absorber. In a HFGW detector a substrate, such as foam absorbers, may outgas into a high vacuum and reduce the capability of the vacuum-producing equipment, however, the layers above this lowest substrate will seal the absorbing and reflecting substrate from any external vacuum. The layers also serve to seal the absorbing material against air or water flow past the surfaces of aircraft, watercraft or submarines. Other applications for such a multiple-level radiation absorber include stealth aircraft, missiles and submarines.

  10. Two-layer Tripole Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskiy, M. A.; Verron, J.; Yakovenko, O. I.

    Three-vortex filament problem for the case of both zero average circulation and im- pulse in a 2D two-layer incompressible fluid is investigated. In this framework, a model of tripolar structures is constructed with one vortex located in the upper layer and two vortices situated in the lower layer. Two special cases of the intensity dis- tribution were studied: (-2; 1, 1) ­ a strong central vortex is over two week vortices placed in the lower layer; (-1; 2, -1) ­ a strong central vortex is in the lower layer, and the week vortices are located one in the upper, and the second in the lower layers. The results give two types of stationary axially symmetrical configurations in the first case: a) an ordinary roundabout ­ two lower-layer vortices are rotating in the direction in- duced by the central vortex; b) an inversed roundabout ­ the lower-layer vortices are rotating in the direction opposite to the central upper layer vortex because of the in- tralayer interaction prevalence. In the second case, all three vortices form a colinear configuration and always rotate around the common vorticity center in the direction implied by the stronger vortex. Such configuration received the name of eccentric roundabout. Comparison of calcu- lation results for discrete and finite-core vortices is made. Support of RFBR (Grant 01-05-64646) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Secondary polymer layered impregnated tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Szalai, Christine E. (Inventor); Carroll, Joseph A. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low density organic polymer impregnated preformed fibrous ceramic article includes a plurality of layers. A front layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one organic polymer. A middle layer includes polymer impregnated ceramic fibers. A back layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one low temperature pyrolyzing organic polymer capable of decomposing without depositing residues.

  12. Secondary polymer layered impregnated tile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Szalai, Christine E. (Inventor); Carroll, Joseph A. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low density organic polymer impregnated preformed fibrous ceramic article includes a plurality of layers. A front layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one organic polymer. A middle layer includes polymer impregnated ceramic fibers. A back layer includes ceramic fibers or carbon fibers or combinations of ceramic fibers and carbon fibers, and is impregnated with an effective amount of at least one low temperature pyrolyzing organic polymer capable of decomposing without depositing residues.

  13. Eroded Scallops with Layers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-09

    The western Utopia Planitia in the Northern mid-latitudes of Mars is marked by a peculiar type of depression with scalloped edges and by a network of polygonal fractures. The scalloped depressions are typical features; a smooth layered terrain located between 40 and 60 degrees in both hemispheres. Scalloped depressions probably form by removal of ice-rich subsurface material by sublimation (ice transforming directly from a solid to a gaseous state), a process that may still be active today. Isolated scalloped depressions generally have a steep pole-facing scarp and a gentler equator-facing slope. This asymmetry is interpreted as being the result of difference in solar heating. Scalloped depressions may coalesce, leading to the formation of large areas of pitted terrain. The polygonal pattern of fractures resembles permafrost polygons that form in terrestrial polar and high alpine regions by seasonal-to-annual contraction of the permafrost (permanently frozen ground). On Earth, such polygons indicate the presence of ground ice. These landforms most likely show that sub-surface ice is present or has been present geologically recently at these latitudes, and they may slowly be continuing their development at the present time. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA13485

  14. The Martian surface layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Moore, Henry J.

    1992-01-01

    The global characteristics of the Martian surface layer are discussed on the basis of thermal, albedo, color, and radar data for the region between approximately 60 deg S and 60 deg N. Thermal data reveal the presence of large low- and high-inertia regions of the northern hemisphere, with much of the south covered by material of moderate inertia. There is a strong anticorrelation between inertia and albedo, a correlation between inertia and rock abundance, and, over much of the planet, a correlation of radar-derived density with inertia. Viking Orbiter color data indicate the presence of three major surface materials: low-inertia, bright-red material that is presumably dust; high-inertia, dark-grey material interpreted to be lithic material mixed with palagonitelike dust; and moderate-inertia, dark-red material that is rough at subpixel scales and interpreted to be indurated. Observations from the Viking landing sites show rocks, fines of varying cohesion and crusts. These sites have indications of aeolian erosion and deposition in the recent past.

  15. Stratified ejecta boulders as indicators of layered plutons on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research Team, Kickapoo Lunar; Kramer, Georgiana

    2014-01-01

    High resolution images of stratified ejecta boulders on the lunar nearside reveal layers of alternating low and high albedo material. We measured the thickness and albedo of each alternating light and dark layer from 29 stratified boulders located in Aristarchus Crater and Mare Undarum. The results were used to test hypotheses to explain the origin of the observed strata in these impact ejected boulders. Morphologically, these boulders demonstrate cross-bedding, trough-shaped layering, tapered layering and cumulate enclaves. We interpret these characteristics to be evidence that these layers result from periodic disruption by convection or density currents within a cooling layered igneous intrusion. We demonstrate that the layering observed in these boulders cannot be the result of known processes occurring on the surface, but instead suggests a history of complex intrusive igneous processes within the lunar crust.

  16. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Liao, Zhi; Wang, Xin-Xing; Bao, Lin-Fei; Fan, Mei-Hua; Li, Xiao-Min; Wu, Chang-Wen; Xia, Shu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment.

  17. Layer-layer competition in multiplex complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, J; de Domenico, M; Gutiérrez, G; Arenas, A; Gómez, S

    2015-12-13

    The coexistence of multiple types of interactions within social, technological and biological networks has moved the focus of the physics of complex systems towards a multiplex description of the interactions between their constituents. This novel approach has unveiled that the multiplex nature of complex systems has strong influence in the emergence of collective states and their critical properties. Here we address an important issue that is intrinsic to the coexistence of multiple means of interactions within a network: their competition. To this aim, we study a two-layer multiplex in which the activity of users can be localized in each of the layers or shared between them, favouring that neighbouring nodes within a layer focus their activity on the same layer. This framework mimics the coexistence and competition of multiple communication channels, in a way that the prevalence of a particular communication platform emerges as a result of the localization of user activity in one single interaction layer. Our results indicate that there is a transition from localization (use of a preferred layer) to delocalization (combined usage of both layers) and that the prevalence of a particular layer (in the localized state) depends on the structural properties. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin-xing; Bao, Lin-fei; Fan, Mei-hua; Li, Xiao-min; Wu, Chang-wen; Xia, Shu-wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment. PMID:26218932

  19. Natural melanin composites by layer-by-layer assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Taesik; Shim, Bong Sub

    2015-04-01

    Melanin is an electrically conductive and biocompatible material, because their conjugated backbone structures provide conducting pathways from human skin, eyes, brain, and beyond. So there is a potential of using as materials for the neural interfaces and the implantable devices. Extracted from Sepia officinalis ink, our natural melanin was uniformly dispersed in mostly polar solvents such as water and alcohols. Then, the dispersed melanin was further fabricated to nano-thin layered composites by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. Combined with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), the melanin nanoparticles behave as an LBL counterpart to from finely tuned nanostructured films. The LBL process can adjust the smart performances of the composites by varying the layering conditions and sandwich thickness. We further demonstrated the melanin loading degree of stacked layers, combination nanostructures, electrical properties, and biocompatibility of the resulting composites by UV-vis spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), multimeter, and in-vitro cell test of PC12, respectively.

  20. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Enzymes on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-01

    The use of Layer-by-layer techniques for immobilizing several types of enzymes, e.g. glucose oxidase (GOx), horse radish oxidases(HRP), and choline oxidase(CHO) on carbon nanotubes and their applications for biosenseing are presented. The enzyme is immobilized on the negatively charged CNT surface by alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and a enzyme layer. The sandwich-like layer structure (PDDA/enzyme/PDDA/CNT) formed by electrostatic assembling provides a favorable microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of enzyme and to prevent enzyme molecule leakage. The morphologies and electrocatalytic acitivity of the resulted enzyme film were characterized using TEM and electrochemical techniques, respectively. It was found that these enzyme-based biosensors are very sensitive, selective for detection of biomolecules, e.g. glucose, choline.

  1. Cross-contact chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, U. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A system is provided for use with wafers that include multiple integrated circuits that include two conductive layers in contact at multiple interfaces. Contact chains are formed beside the integrated circuits, each contact chain formed of the same two layers as the circuits, in the form of conductive segments alternating between the upper and lower layers and with the ends of the segments connected in series through interfaces. A current source passes a current through the series-connected segments, by way of a pair of current tabs connected to opposite ends of the series of segments. While the current flows, voltage measurements are taken between each of a plurality of pairs of voltage tabs, the two tabs of each pair connected to opposite ends of an interface that lies along the series-connected segments. A plot of interface conductances on normal probability chart enables prediction of the yield of good integrated circuits from the wafer.

  2. Cross-contact chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, Udo (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A system is provided for use with wafers that include multiple integrated circuits that include two conductive layers in contact at multiple interfaces. Contact chains are formed beside the integrated circuits, each contact chain formed of the same two layers as the circuits, in the form of conductive segments alternating between the upper and lower layers and with the ends of the segments connected in series through interfaces. A current source passes a current through the series-connected segments, by way of a pair of current tabs connected to opposite ends of the series of segments. While the current flows, voltage measurements are taken between each of a plurality of pairs of voltage tabs, the two tabs of each pair connected to opposite ends of an interface that lies along the series-connected segments. A plot of interface conductances on a normal probability chart, enables prediction of the yield of good integrated circuits from the wafer.

  3. Layers of looking

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The films that I make are part documentary, part film essay, part visual poem. They are created out of a series of up to 30 drawings that are animated. The process from research to completion takes about 2 years, and at the end of it there is a film and a number of drawings that can be exhibited. This paper emerges out of the realisation that in the different stages of making a drawing and a film—from planning a drawing and seeking an image as a starting point through to the finished film being projected onto a screen in a gallery—I am looking at the image in different ways. There is a close-up kind of looking when I am drawing and a reflective kind of looking when I step back to take stock. There is a way of looking at darks and lights as they are built up that is different from the way of looking at the lines crossing the edges of the grid being used to transfer an image to the drawing paper. Seeing the drawings on the wall of my studio is different from seeing the same drawings in a museum setting. PMID:23145247

  4. Layers of looking.

    PubMed

    Morris, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The films that I make are part documentary, part film essay, part visual poem. They are created out of a series of up to 30 drawings that are animated. The process from research to completion takes about 2 years, and at the end of it there is a film and a number of drawings that can be exhibited. This paper emerges out of the realisation that in the different stages of making a drawing and a film-from planning a drawing and seeking an image as a starting point through to the finished film being projected onto a screen in a gallery-I am looking at the image in different ways. There is a close-up kind of looking when I am drawing and a reflective kind of looking when I step back to take stock. There is a way of looking at darks and lights as they are built up that is different from the way of looking at the lines crossing the edges of the grid being used to transfer an image to the drawing paper. Seeing the drawings on the wall of my studio is different from seeing the same drawings in a museum setting.

  5. Microanalysis of deposited layers in the divertor of JET following operations with carbon wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Petersson, P.; Bykov, I.; Possnert, G.; Likonen, J.; Koivuranta, S.; Coad, J. P.; Widdowson, A. M.; JET EFDA contributors

    2013-07-01

    Elemental mapping of cross sections of deposited layers on inboard tiles in the JET divertor after exposure to plasma operations with carbon wall are presented. The study was made using microbeam ion beam analysis methods in combination with optical microscopy and SEM. The surfaces had been exposed to plasma through different periods of operation (1998-2007, 2007-2009 and 1998-2009). The texture and composition of the layers are non-uniform. The physical structures include columnar, lamellar and disordered globular appearances. The distribution of trapped deuterium was frequently found to be lamellar, with well-defined sub layers with higher deuterium concentration. However, 3D regions with dimensions of about 100 μm with enhanced deuterium content were also found, both at the layer surfaces and in the layer cross sections. The distributions of beryllium and Inconel components were lamellar but did not otherwise show large non-uniformity on the same scale length as the deuterium.

  6. Advanced double layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarangapani, S.; Lessner, P.; Forchione, J.; Laconti, A. B.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for large amounts of power to be delivered rapidly in a number of airborne and space systems. Conventional, portable power sources, such as batteries, are not suited to delivering high peak power pulses. The charge stored at the electrode-electrolyte double layer is, however, much more assessible on a short time scale. Devices exploiting this concept were fabricated using carbon and metal oxides (Pinnacle Research) as the electrodes and sulfuric acid as the electrolyte. The approach reported, replaces the liquid sulfuric acid electrolyte with a solid ionomer electrolyte. The challenge is to form a solid electrode-solid ionomer electrolyte composite which has a high capacitance per geometric area. The approach to maximize contact between the electrode particles and the ionomer was to impregnate the electrode particles using a liquid ionomer solution and to bond the solvent-free structure to a solid ionomer membrane. Ruthenium dioxide is the electrode material used. Three strategies are being pursued to provide for a high area electrode-ionomer contact: mixing of the RuOx with a small volume of ionomer solution followed by filtration to remove the solvent, and impregnation of the ionomer into an already formed RuOx electrode. RuOx powder and electrodes were examined by non-electrochemical techniques. X-ray diffraction has shown that the material is almost pure RuO2. The electrode structure depends on the processing technique used to introduce the Nafion. Impregnated electrodes have Nafion concentrated near the surface. Electrodes prepared by the evaporation method show large aggregates of crystals surrounded by Nafion.

  7. Streamwise vortex meander in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1993-01-01

    The present experimental study was conducted in order to determine the existence of streamwise vortex meander in a mixing layer, and if present, its significance on the measured properties. The dependence of the velocity cross-correlation on the fixed probe location was shown to be a good indicator of the stationarity of the streamwise vortex location. The cross-correlation measurements obtained here indicate that spanwise meander is negligible, although transverse apparent meander (normal to the plane of the mixing layer) was indicated. The transverse meander, exemplified by the elliptical shape of the mean streamwise vorticity contours, was expected, since the streamwise vorticity in the braid region is essentially inclined, with respect to the streamwise direction. These conclusions were supported by results of estimated spanwise profiles of the transverse velocity component. The balance of evidence suggests that the measured mean streamwise vorticity decay is representative of the decay of the vorticity rather than an artifact of meander.

  8. Acoustical scattering by multilayer spherical elastic scatterer containing electrorheological layer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liang-Wu; Dacol, Dacio K; Orris, Gregory J; Calvo, David C; Nicholas, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A computational procedure for analyzing acoustical scattering by multilayer concentric spherical scatterers having an arbitrary mixture of acoustic and elastic materials is proposed. The procedure is then used to analyze the scattering by a spherical scatterer consisting of a solid shell and a solid core encasing an electrorheological (ER) fluid layer, and the tunability in the scattering characteristics afforded by the ER layer is explored numerically. Tunable scatterers with two different ER fluids are analyzed. One, corn starch in peanut oil, shows that a significant increase in scattering cross-section is possible in moderate frequencies. Another, fine poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) beads in dodecane, shows only slight change in scattering cross-sections overall. But, when the shell is thin, a noticeable local resonance peak can appear near ka=1, and this resonance can be turned on or off by the external electric field.

  9. Functional polymer laminates from hyperthermal hydrogen induced cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David B; Trebicky, Tomas; Crewdson, Patrick; McEachran, Matthew J; Stojcevic, Goran; Arsenault, Gilles; Lau, Woon M; Gillies, Elizabeth R

    2011-12-20

    The use of a hyperthermal hydrogen induced cross-linking process to prepare laminates comprising polypropylene, poly(isobutylene-co-isoprene), and poly(vinyl acetate) is described. In this new, milder alternative to conventional plasma techniques, neutral molecular hydrogen projectiles were used to create carbon radicals on impacted surfaces by collision-induced dissociation of C-H bonds, and this process was used to cross-link polymers on a polypropylene surface. It was demonstrated that multiple layers of cross-linked materials could be added, creating polymer laminates with each layer introducing new functionalities and properties. In particular, the present work shows that the process is largely nondestructive toward ester functionalities. First, the esters were grafted to become nonleachable. Then, the esters were subsequently hydrolyzed to convert the surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Afterward, the esters could be recovered by simple esterification demonstrating that further chemical transformations were possible.

  10. Multi-layer overlay metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausschnitt, C. P.; Morningstar, J.; Muth, W.; Schneider, J.; Yerdon, R. J.; Binns, L. A.; Smith, N. P.

    2006-03-01

    A novel approach to overlay metrology, called Blossom, maximizes the number of layers measurable within a single optical field of view (FOV). As chip processing proceeds, each layer contributes a set of at least four marks, arranged symmetrically on concentric circles, to create a 90° rotationally invariant array of marks that "blossoms" to fill the FOV. Radial symmetry about the target center is maintained at each layer to minimize susceptibility to metrology lens aberrations. Overlay combinations among detectable marks within the target can be measured simultaneously. In the described embodiment, 28 distinct layers are represented within a 50μm square FOV. Thus, all the layers of a functional chip can be represented in a single target. Blossom achieves several benefits relative to overlay methods currently in practice: * Compression (>30X) of area required for overlay targets. * Nullification of within-target proximity effects. * Suppression of optical mark fidelity (OMF) errors. * Reduction of sensitivity to across-target detection noise.* Elimination of overlay error random walk among layers. * Reference mark redundancy for detection flexibility and robustness. * Integration of multi-layer and within-layer overlay control schema. * Simplification of overlay recipe creation and management. * Capture and visualization of overlay performance through the entire chip fabrication. Blossom results from 65-nm products in manufacturing are described.

  11. Epitaxially grown polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on solid-phase crystallised seed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Varlamov, Sergey; Xue, Chaowei

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of poly-Si thin film solar cells on glass substrates using seed layer approach. The solid-phase crystallised P-doped seed layer is not only used as the crystalline template for the epitaxial growth but also as the emitter for the solar cell structure. This paper investigates two important factors, surface cleaning and intragrain defects elimination for the seed layer, which can greatly influence the epitaxial grown solar cell performance. Shorter incubation and crystallisation time is observed using a simplified RCA cleaning than the other two wet chemical cleaning methods, indicating a cleaner seed layer surface is achieved. Cross sectional transmission microscope images confirm a crystallographic transferal of information from the simplified RCA cleaned seed layer into the epi-layer. RTA for the SPC seed layer can effectively eliminate the intragrain defects in the seed layer and improve structural quality of both of the seed layer and the epi-layer. Consequently, epitaxial grown poly-Si solar cell on the RTA treated seed layer shows better solar cell efficiency, Voc and Jsc than the one on the seed layer without RTA treatment.

  12. Obtaining Thickness Maps of Corneal Layers Using the Optimal Algorithm for Intracorneal Layer Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Hossein; Kafieh, Rahele; Kazemian Jahromi, Mahdi; Jorjandi, Sahar; Mehri Dehnavi, Alireza; Hajizadeh, Fedra; Peyman, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is one of the most informative methodologies in ophthalmology and provides cross sectional images from anterior and posterior segments of the eye. Corneal diseases can be diagnosed by these images and corneal thickness maps can also assist in the treatment and diagnosis. The need for automatic segmentation of cross sectional images is inevitable since manual segmentation is time consuming and imprecise. In this paper, segmentation methods such as Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), Graph Cut, and Level Set are used for automatic segmentation of three clinically important corneal layer boundaries on OCT images. Using the segmentation of the boundaries in three-dimensional corneal data, we obtained thickness maps of the layers which are created by these borders. Mean and standard deviation of the thickness values for normal subjects in epithelial, stromal, and whole cornea are calculated in central, superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal zones (centered on the center of pupil). To evaluate our approach, the automatic boundary results are compared with the boundaries segmented manually by two corneal specialists. The quantitative results show that GMM method segments the desired boundaries with the best accuracy.

  13. Obtaining Thickness Maps of Corneal Layers Using the Optimal Algorithm for Intracorneal Layer Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Hossein; Kazemian Jahromi, Mahdi; Jorjandi, Sahar; Mehri Dehnavi, Alireza; Hajizadeh, Fedra; Peyman, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is one of the most informative methodologies in ophthalmology and provides cross sectional images from anterior and posterior segments of the eye. Corneal diseases can be diagnosed by these images and corneal thickness maps can also assist in the treatment and diagnosis. The need for automatic segmentation of cross sectional images is inevitable since manual segmentation is time consuming and imprecise. In this paper, segmentation methods such as Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), Graph Cut, and Level Set are used for automatic segmentation of three clinically important corneal layer boundaries on OCT images. Using the segmentation of the boundaries in three-dimensional corneal data, we obtained thickness maps of the layers which are created by these borders. Mean and standard deviation of the thickness values for normal subjects in epithelial, stromal, and whole cornea are calculated in central, superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal zones (centered on the center of pupil). To evaluate our approach, the automatic boundary results are compared with the boundaries segmented manually by two corneal specialists. The quantitative results show that GMM method segments the desired boundaries with the best accuracy. PMID:27247559

  14. Crossing on hyperbolic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hang; Ziff, Robert M.

    2012-05-01

    We divide the circular boundary of a hyperbolic lattice into four equal intervals and study the probability of a percolation crossing between an opposite pair as a function of the bond occupation probability p. We consider the {7,3} (heptagonal), enhanced or extended binary tree (EBT), the EBT-dual, and the {5,5} (pentagonal) lattices. We find that the crossing probability increases gradually from 0 to 1 as p increases from the lower pl to the upper pu critical values. We find bounds and estimates for the values of pl and pu for these lattices and identify the self-duality point p* corresponding to where the crossing probability equals 1/2. Comparison is made with recent numerical and theoretical results.

  15. Scattering by an impedance sphere coated with a chiral layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uslenghi, Piergiorgio L. E.

    1990-01-01

    The scattering of a plane, linearly polarized electromagnetic wave by a sphere on whose surface an impedance boundary condition holds, and that is covered with a concentric layer of chiral material, is considered. Exact, explicit expressions are derived for the scattered field coefficients. The co-polarized and cross-polarized components of the far backscattered field are determined and discussed. The value of this canonical problem as a benchmark for computer codes is pointed out.

  16. Defect Reduction in Epitaxial Growth Using Superlattice Buffer Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    Katsuyama, Y. J. Yang and S. M. Bedair, Electron Dev. Lett., vol. 8, p. 240, 1987. 0 -15 -" Journal of (ryOstal (io iih 77 (108(,) ,xQ 9i4 S9 North-I...layer facilitat the csea of Gaosu 3 (5% in H2) + 500 sccm of H , and ed cross-sectional thickness measurements. trimethylgallium (TMG) + 500 sccm of H

  17. Midlatitude sporadic-E layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. L.; Smith, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    The partially transparent echo from midlatitude sporadic E layers was recorded by ionosondes between the blanketing frequency and the maximum frequency. The theory that the midlatitude sporadic E layers are not uniform in the horizontal plane but contain localized regions of high electron density was evaluated using data obtained by incoherent scatter radar and found to provide a satisfactory explanation. The main features of midlatitude sporadic E layers are consistent with the convergence of metallic ions as described by the wind shear theory applied to gravity waves and tides. The interference of gravity waves with other gravity waves and tides can be recognized in the altitudes of occurrence and the structure of the layers. Small scale horizontal irregularities are attributed in some cases to critical level effects and in others to fluid instabilities. The convergence of a meteor trail can, under some circumstances, account for localized enhancement of the electron density in the layer.

  18. Boundary-layer moisture regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, L.

    1991-01-01

    Boundary-layer moisture fluctuations are estimated by analyzing HAPEX and FIFE data collected on 52 aircraft flight legs. Moisture fluctuations were given considerable attention in the HAPEX flights, which were 120 km long, and flew 150 m over one area of homogeneous terrain. The repetitions permit statistical consideration of motion characteristics on horizontal scales. Two prototypical boundary layer regimes are discovered: the entrainment-drying boundary layer, and the moistening boundary layer. The latter demonstrates positive moisture skewness close to the surface related to high surface evaporation. The former is characterized by boundary-layer instability, weak surface evaporation, and drier air aloft, leading to unexpected negative moisture skewness. It is noted that 10 km moisture variations with horizontal gradients are often found in narrow zones of horizontal convergence, called mesoscale moisture fronts. A negative moisture to temperature correlation, due to surface energy budget inhomogeneity, is shown to incur large mesoscale variations of relative humidity.

  19. Fragmentation of drying paint layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Katinka; Dombi, András; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-11-01

    Fragmentation of thin layers of drying granular materials on a frictional surface are studied both by experiments and computer simulations. Besides a qualitative description of the fragmentation phenomenon, the dependence of the average fragment size as a function of the layer thickness is thoroughly investigated. Experiments are done using a special nail polish, which forms characteristic crack structures during drying. In order to control the layer thickness, we diluted the nail polish in acetone and evaporated in a controlled manner different volumes of this solution on glass surfaces. During the evaporation process we managed to get an instable paint layer, which formed cracks as it dried out. In order to understand the obtained structures a previously developed spring-block model was implemented in a three-dimensional version. The experimental and simulation results proved to be in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. An earlier suggested scaling relation between the average fragment size and the layer thickness is reconfirmed.

  20. Direct simulation of high-speed mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukunda, H. S.; Sekar, B.; Carpenter, M. H.; Drummond, J. Philip; Kumar, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    A computational study of a nonreacting high-speed mixing layer is performed. A higher order algorithm with sufficient grid points is used to resolve all relevant scales. In all cases, a temporal free-stream disturbance is introduced. The resulting flow is time-sampled to generate a statistical cross section of the flow properties. The studies are conducted at two convective Mach numbers, three free-stream turbulence intensities, three Reynolds numbers, and two types of initial profiles-hyperbolic tangent (tanh) and boundary layer. The boundary-layer profile leads to more realistic predictions of the transition processes. The predicted transition Reynolds number of 0.18 x 10(exp 6) compares well with experimental data. Normalized vortex spacings for the boundary-layer case are about 3.5 and compare favorably with the 1.5 to 2.5 found in experimental measurements. The tanh profile produces spacings of about 10. The growth rate of the layer is shown to be moderately affected by the initial disturbance field, but comparison with experimental data shows moderate agreement. For the boundary-layer case, it is shown that noise at the Strouhal number of 0.007 is selectively amplified and shows little Reynolds number dependence.

  1. Bioactive macroporous titanium surface layer on titanium substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, H M; Kokubo, T; Fujibayashi, S; Nishiguchi, S; Nakamura, T

    2000-12-05

    A macroporous titanium surface layer is often formed on titanium and titanium alloy implants for morphological fixation of the implants to bone via bony ingrowth into the porous structure. The surface of titanium metal was recently shown to become highly bioactive by being subjected to 5.0 M-NaOH treatment at 60 degrees C for 24 h and subsequent heat treatment at 600 degrees C for 1 h. In the present study, the NaOH and heat treatments were applied to a macroporous titanium surface layer formed on titanium substrate by a plasma spraying method. The NaOH and heat treatments produced an uniform amorphous sodium titanate layer on the surface of the porous titanium. The sodium titanate induced a bonelike apatite formation in simulated body fluid at an early soaking period, whereby the apatite layer grew uniformly along the surface and cross-sectional macrotextures of the porous titanium. This indicates that the NaOH and heat treatments lead to a bioactive macroporous titanium surface layer on titanium substrate. Such a bioactive macroporous layer on an implant is expected not only to enhance bony ingrowth into the porous structure, but also to provide a chemical integration with bone via apatite formation on its surface in the body.

  2. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  3. Improved CLARAty Functional-Layer/Decision-Layer Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara; Rabideau, Gregg; Gaines, Daniel; Johnston, Mark; Chouinard, Caroline; Nessnas, Issa; Shu, I-Hsiang

    2008-01-01

    Improved interface software for communication between the CLARAty Decision and Functional layers has been developed. [The Coupled Layer Architecture for Robotics Autonomy (CLARAty) was described in Coupled-Layer Robotics Architecture for Autonomy (NPO-21218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 12 (December 2002), page 48. To recapitulate: the CLARAty architecture was developed to improve the modularity of robotic software while tightening coupling between planning/execution and basic control subsystems. Whereas prior robotic software architectures typically contained three layers, the CLARAty contains two layers: a decision layer (DL) and a functional layer (FL).] Types of communication supported by the present software include sending commands from DL modules to FL modules and sending data updates from FL modules to DL modules. The present software supplants prior interface software that had little error-checking capability, supported data parameters in string form only, supported commanding at only one level of the FL, and supported only limited updates of the state of the robot. The present software offers strong error checking, and supports complex data structures and commanding at multiple levels of the FL, and relative to the prior software, offers a much wider spectrum of state-update capabilities.

  4. Study of carrier blocking property of poly-linalyl acetate thin layer by electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Anderson, Liam J.; Jacob, Mohan V.

    2014-02-01

    By using electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement, we studied the carrier-blocking property of poly-linalyl acetate (PLA) thin layers sandwiched in indium-zinc-oxide (IZO)/PLA/C60/Al double-layer diodes. Results showed that the PLA layer totally blocks electrons crossing the C60 layer, and also blocks holes entering from the IZO layer. The EFISHG measurement effectively substantiates the hole-blocking electron-blocking property of the PLA layer sandwiched in double layer diodes.

  5. Higher Order Crossings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    L AD-A199 489 HIGHER ORDER CROSSIMGSCU) MRRYLANDUUNIV COLLEGE PARK B KEDEN RAY 87 AFOSR-TR-87-1768 AFOSR-82-ai87 UNCLASSIFIED FVG 12/2 ML 6oi 132. @4...20332-6448 611027 2304 A5 MIt.rA TILsk~bbibl cankusd"i Higher Order Crossings M2 PAOWNAL AUTHORS1) B. Kedem all, TYP6 OF REPORT 1 136, TIME COVERED Lj...device that is useful as a diagnostic tool for higher order crossings was introduced. The graphical tool is also useful as a descriptive similarity

  6. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  7. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  8. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  9. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  10. The Effect of Nonlinear Critical Layers on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear and spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional and spanwise periodic laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer' with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus an appropriate superposition of linear instability waves. The amplitudes of these waves are determined by either a single integro-differential equation or by a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities.

  11. Land and atmospheric controls on initiation and intensity of moist convection: CAPE dynamics and LCL crossings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The local role that land-atmosphere interactions play in the rainfall process has been explored by investigating the initiation of moist convection as the top of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) crosses the lifting condensation level (LCL). However, this LCL crossing alone is not a sufficient in...

  12. Surface layer modification of ion bombarded HDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielinski, D.; Lipinski, P.; Slusarski, L.; Grams, J.; Paryjczak, T.; Jagielski, J.; Turos, A.; Madi, N. K.

    2004-08-01

    Press-moulded, high density polyethylene (HDPE) samples were subjected to ion bombardment and effects of the modification studied. He + ions of energy 100 keV or Ar + ions of energy 130 keV were applied in the range of dose 1-30 × 10 15/cm 2 or 1-100 × 10 14/cm 2, respectively. This paper has been focused on structural changes of the surface layer. The consequences of the modification were studied with TOF-SIMS and FTIR-IRS techniques. The results point on two mechanisms taking place simultaneously: ionization of polymer macromolecules and chain scission--resulting in creation of macroradicals. Both of them produce oxidation and lead to significant release of hydrogen. The former diminishes for the highest ion doses, however, creation of molecular oxygen cannot be excluded. The latter in the case of Ar + ion bombardment is reflected by prevailing degradation of the surface layer of HDPE. Contrary to the effect of heavy ions, He + ion bombardment was found to produce significant increase of the material hardness, which was explained by crosslinking of polyethylene. A mechanism of polyacetylene formation, proceeding finally to cross-polymerization of the polymer was proposed. Apart from structural changes, the modification revealed additionally a possibility to improve the wettability of the polymer.

  13. Cross-linked polyelectrolyte multilayers for marine antifouling applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-07-10

    A polyionic multilayer film was fabricated by layer-by-layer (LbL) sequential deposition followed by cross-linking under mild conditions on a substrate surface to inhibit marine fouling. A novel polyanion, featuring methyl ester groups for an easy cross-linking was used as a generic solution for stabilization of LbL films in a harsh environment. Covalent cross-linking was confirmed by FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. AFM was used to observe film morphology and its variation because of cross-linking, as well as to measure the thickness of the LbL films. Cross-linking improved the stability of the LbL film when it was immersed in artificial seawater, natural seawater, and in a polar organic solvent (DMSO). No changes in the thickness and topography of the film were observed in these media. The LbL films prevented settlement of Amphibalanus amphitrite barnacle cyprids and reduced adhesion of the benthic diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Assay results indicated that the cross-linking process did not weaken the antifouling effect of LbL films. The high stability and low degree of fouling make these coatings potentially promising candidates in marine applications.

  14. Uncertainty Analysis of Air Radiation for Lunar Return Shock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2008-01-01

    By leveraging a new uncertainty markup technique, two risk analysis methods are used to compute the uncertainty of lunar-return shock layer radiation predicted by the High temperature Aerothermodynamic Radiation Algorithm (HARA). The effects of epistemic uncertainty, or uncertainty due to a lack of knowledge, is considered for the following modeling parameters: atomic line oscillator strengths, atomic line Stark broadening widths, atomic photoionization cross sections, negative ion photodetachment cross sections, molecular bands oscillator strengths, and electron impact excitation rates. First, a simplified shock layer problem consisting of two constant-property equilibrium layers is considered. The results of this simplified problem show that the atomic nitrogen oscillator strengths and Stark broadening widths in both the vacuum ultraviolet and infrared spectral regions, along with the negative ion continuum, are the dominant uncertainty contributors. Next, three variable property stagnation-line shock layer cases are analyzed: a typical lunar return case and two Fire II cases. For the near-equilibrium lunar return and Fire 1643-second cases, the resulting uncertainties are very similar to the simplified case. Conversely, the relatively nonequilibrium 1636-second case shows significantly larger influence from electron impact excitation rates of both atoms and molecules. For all cases, the total uncertainty in radiative heat flux to the wall due to epistemic uncertainty in modeling parameters is 30% as opposed to the erroneously-small uncertainty levels (plus or minus 6%) found when treating model parameter uncertainties as aleatory (due to chance) instead of epistemic (due to lack of knowledge).

  15. Cellular uptake and distribution of graphene oxide coated with layer-by-layer assembled polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiye; Lu, Zhenzhen; Li, Zhongjun; Nie, Guangjun; Fang, Ying

    2014-05-01

    We report a facile approach for the fabrication of a new class of graphene oxide (GO)-based nanoassemblies by layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The single-layer thickness and intrinsic negatively charged carboxyl groups of GO nanosheets provide a natural platform for LbL assembly of polyelectrolyte nanofilms by electrostatic forces at mild and aqueous conditions. The general applicability of our approach is demonstrated by the preparation of GO nanoassemblies with sizes of 100-200 nm using various charged polyelectrolytes, including synthetic polymers, polypeptides, and DNA oligonucleotides. Systemic assessment of cytotoxicity and acute stress response show that no discernable signs of cytotoxicity are associated with exposure of GO and its nanoassemblies [GO/PLL (poly ( l-lysine)), GO/PLL/PSS (poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate)), GO/PLL-PEG (PEGlayted PLL), GO/PLL/PLGA-PEG (PEGlayted poly ( l-glutamic acid))] up to 1 μg/mL. Studies on cellular uptake and subcellular localization show that a representative nanoassembly, GO/PLL-PEG, can effectively cross cell membranes and localize mainly in lysosomal compartments, without induction of noticeable harmful effects as confirmed by detection of mitochondrial depolarization and lysosomal pH.

  16. Layer-by-layer films from hyaluronan and amine modified hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Aurore; Senger, Bernard; Schaaf, Pierre; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Frisch, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a polysaccharide that is increasingly investigated for its role in cellular adhesion and for the preparation of biomimetic matrices for tissue engineering. Hyaluronan gels are prepared for application as space fillers whereas hyaluronan films are usually obtained by adsorbing or grafting a single hyaluronan layer onto a biomaterial surface. Here, we examine the possibility to employ the layer-by-layer technique to deposit thin films of cationic modified hyaluronan (HA+) and hyaluronan (HA) of controlled thicknesses. The buildup conditions are investigated and growth is compared to that of other polyelectrolyte multilayer films containing either HA as polyanion or HA+ as polycation. The films could be formed in a low ionic strength medium but required to be cross-linked prior to be put in contact with physiological medium. NIH3T3 fibroblasts were perfectly viable on self-assembled hyaluronan films with however a preference for hyaluronan ending films. These findings point out the possibility to tune the thickness of thin hyaluronan films at the nanometer scale. Such architectures could be employed for investigating cell/substrate interactions or for functionalizing biomaterial surfaces. PMID:17309215

  17. Proanthocyanidins Rapidly Stabilize the Demineralized Dentin Layer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Dusevich, V.; Wang, Y.

    2013-01-01

    While proanthocyanidins (PA) are effective in improving collagen’s resistance to collagenolytic degradation, the direct incorporation of PA into an adhesive system is detrimental to the light-curing thereof. Conversely, the use of PA as a primer could circumvent this issue, but little is known about the efficacy of PA in stabilizing collagen when applied in a clinically relevant manner. This study investigated the pre- and post-digestion morphology of an acid-etched dentin collagen layer that underwent PA treatment for time periods on a scale of seconds. The null hypothesis, that there is no difference between the PA-treated and untreated control group, had to be rejected, since it was revealed that the untreated control could not survive 1 hr of exogenous collagenase digestion, while the PA-treated collagen could sustain at least 16 hrs of digestion with no perceptible changes in collagen structure. In addition, the stabilizing effect of the gold-standard cross-linker glutaraldehyde at comparable experimental conditions was found to be almost non-existent within the 5, 15, or 30 sec of cross-linking permitted. Therefore, PA have been proven to be extraordinarily efficient in stabilizing demineralized dentin collagen against enzymatic challenges in a clinically relevant setting, likely due to the non-covalent nature of their interaction with collagen molecules. PMID:23723381

  18. Minimalist design of water-soluble cross-[beta] architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Biancalana, Matthew; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2010-08-13

    Demonstrated successes of protein design and engineering suggest significant potential to produce diverse protein architectures and assemblies beyond those found in nature. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic protein architecture through the successful design and atomic structures of water-soluble cross-{beta} proteins. The cross-{beta} motif is formed from the lamination of successive {beta}-sheet layers, and it is abundantly observed in the core of insoluble amyloid fibrils associated with protein-misfolding diseases. Despite its prominence, cross-{beta} has been designed only in the context of insoluble aggregates of peptides or proteins. Cross-{beta}'s recalcitrance to protein engineering and conspicuous absence among the known atomic structures of natural proteins thus makes it a challenging target for design in a water-soluble form. Through comparative analysis of the cross-{beta} structures of fibril-forming peptides, we identified rows of hydrophobic residues ('ladders') running across {beta}-strands of each {beta}-sheet layer as a minimal component of the cross-{beta} motif. Grafting a single ladder of hydrophobic residues designed from the Alzheimer's amyloid-{beta} peptide onto a large {beta}-sheet protein formed a dimeric protein with a cross-{beta} architecture that remained water-soluble, as revealed by solution analysis and x-ray crystal structures. These results demonstrate that the cross-{beta} motif is a stable architecture in water-soluble polypeptides and can be readily designed. Our results provide a new route for accessing the cross-{beta} structure and expanding the scope of protein design.

  19. Canadian Red Cross.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Red Cross is guided by its Fundamental Principles--humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence, voluntary service, unity, and universality--and organized in a traditional geographic hierarchical structure. Among the characteristics that have contributed to its success are a budgeting process that starts at the local level, measurement of program outcomes, and coordinated fundraising activities at the regional level.

  20. Cross-Cultural HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium that was facilitated by David C. Bjorkquist on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD) at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development conference. "Developing Managers for Overseas Assignments in the Pacific Rim: A Study of International HRD Issues in Singapore" (A. Ahad M. Osman-Gani,…

  1. Cross-Cultural HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of three papers presented at a symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD) moderated by Connie Fletcher at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Intercultural Adjustment of U.S. Expatriates in the People's Republic of China" (Hallett G. Hullinger, Robert E. Nolan)…

  2. Cross-Cultural HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of three papers presented at a symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD) moderated by Connie Fletcher at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Intercultural Adjustment of U.S. Expatriates in the People's Republic of China" (Hallett G. Hullinger, Robert E. Nolan)…

  3. Red Cross Swimming Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlasich, Cynthia

    1989-01-01

    Six new aquatic courses, developed by the Red Cross, are described. They are: Infant and Preschool Aquatics, Longfellow's Whale Tales (classroom water safety lessons for K-Six), Basic Water Safety, Emergency Water Safety, Lifeguard Training, and Safety Training for Swim Coaches. (IAH)

  4. Cross-Cultural Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opalko, Jane

    1991-01-01

    The teaching of physics principles by drawing examples from African students' surroundings in a cross-cultural environment is discussed. The concepts of pressure, center of gravity, and the action of salt on melting are described using examples that Nigerien students would understand. (KR)

  5. Cross-Cultural HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium that was facilitated by David C. Bjorkquist on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD) at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development conference. "Developing Managers for Overseas Assignments in the Pacific Rim: A Study of International HRD Issues in Singapore" (A. Ahad M. Osman-Gani,…

  6. Cross-correlation beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruigrok, Elmer; Gibbons, Steven; Wapenaar, Kees

    2016-10-01

    An areal distribution of sensors can be used for estimating the direction of incoming waves through beamforming. Beamforming may be implemented as a phase-shifting and stacking of data recorded on the different sensors (i.e., conventional beamforming). Alternatively, beamforming can be applied to cross-correlations between the waveforms on the different sensors. We derive a kernel for beamforming cross-correlated data and call it cross-correlation beamforming (CCBF). We point out that CCBF has slightly better resolution and aliasing characteristics than conventional beamforming. When auto-correlations are added to CCBF, the array response functions are the same as for conventional beamforming. We show numerically that CCBF is more resilient to non-coherent noise. Furthermore, we illustrate that with CCBF individual receiver-pairs can be removed to improve mapping to the slowness domain. An additional flexibility of CCBF is that cross-correlations can be time-windowed prior to beamforming, e.g., to remove the directionality of a scattered wavefield. The observations on synthetic data are confirmed with field data from the SPITS array (Svalbard). Both when beamforming an earthquake arrival and when beamforming ambient noise, CCBF focuses more of the energy to a central beam. Overall, the main advantage of CCBF is noise suppression and its flexibility to remove station pairs that deteriorate the signal-related beampower.

  7. Red Cross Swimming Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlasich, Cynthia

    1989-01-01

    Six new aquatic courses, developed by the Red Cross, are described. They are: Infant and Preschool Aquatics, Longfellow's Whale Tales (classroom water safety lessons for K-Six), Basic Water Safety, Emergency Water Safety, Lifeguard Training, and Safety Training for Swim Coaches. (IAH)

  8. A layer-by-layer approach to natural polymer-derived bioactive coatings on magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Kunjukunju, Sangeetha; Roy, Abhijit; Ramanathan, Madhumati; Lee, Boeun; Candiello, Joe E; Kumta, Prashant N

    2013-11-01

    The development of polyelectrolyte multilayered coatings on magnesium alloy substrates that can be used for controlled delivery of growth factors and required biomolecules from the surface of these degradable implants could have a significant impact in the field of bone tissue regeneration. The current work reports on the fabrication of multilayered coatings of alginate and poly-L-lysine on alkaline- and fluoride-pretreated AZ31 substrates using a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique under physiological conditions. Furthermore, these coatings were surface functionalized by chemical cross-linking and fibronectin immobilization, and the resultant changes in surface properties have been shown to influence the cellular activity of these multilayered films. The physicochemical characteristics of these coated substrates have been investigated using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Cytocompatibility studies using MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts show that the fluoride-pretreated, cross-linked and fibronectin-immobilized LbL-coated substrates are more bioactive and less cytotoxic than the hydroxide-pretreated, cross-linked and fibronectin-immobilized LbL-coated samples. The in vitro degradation results show that the multilayered coatings of these natural polysaccharide- and synthetic polyamino acid-based polyelectrolytes do not alter the degradation kinetics of the substrates; however, the pretreatment conditions have a significant impact on the overall coating degradation behavior. These preliminary results collectively show the potential use of LbL coatings on magnesium-based degradable scaffolds to improve their surface bioactivity.

  9. D0 layer 0 innermost layer of silicon microstrip tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Hanagaki, K.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    A new inner layer silicon strip detector has been built and will be installed in the existing silicon microstrip tracker in D0. They report on the motivation, design, and performance of this new detector.

  10. Nanoengineering Catalyst Supports via Layer-by Layer Surface Functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wenfu; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Dai, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Recent progress in the layer-by-layer surface modification of oxides for the preparation of highly active and stable gold nanocatalysts is briefly reviewed. Through a layer-by-layer surface modification approach, the surfaces of various catalyst supports including both porous and nonporous silica materials and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were modified with monolayers or multilayers of distinct metal oxide ultra-thin films. The surface-modified materials were used as supports for Au nanoparticles, resulting in highly active nanocatalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation. Good stability against sintering under high-temperature treatment was achieved for a number of the Au catalysts through surface modification of the support material. The surface modification of supports can be a viable route to control both the composition and structure of support and nanoparticle interfaces, thereby tailoring the stability and activity of the supported catalyst systems.

  11. The role of nonlinear critical layers in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer', with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus a pair of oblique instability waves - which may or may not be accompanied by an associated plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves, which are completely determined by nonlinear effects within the critical layer, satisfy either a single integro-differential equation or a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities. The physical implications of these equations are discussed.

  12. Quantitative Nanomechanical Properties of Multilayer Films Made of Polysaccharides through Spray Assisted Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Criado, Miryam; Rebollar, Esther; Nogales, Aurora; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Mijangos, Carmen; Hernández, Rebeca

    2017-01-09

    Nanomechanical properties of alginate/chitosan (Alg/Chi) multilayer films, obtained through spray assisted layer-by-layer assembly, were studied by means of PeakForce quantitative nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy (PF-QNM AFM). Prepared at two different alginate concentrations (1.0 and 2.5 mg/mL) and a fixed chitosan concentration (1.0 mg/mL), Alg/Chi films have an exponential growth in thickness with a transition to a linear growth toward a plateau by increasing the number of deposited bilayers. Height, elastic modulus, deformation, and adhesion maps were simultaneously recorded depending on the number of deposited bilayers. The elastic modulus of Alg/Chi films was found to be related to the mechanism of growth in contrast to the adhesion and deformation. A comparison of the nanomechanical properties obtained for non-cross-linked and thermally cross-linked Alg/Chi films revealed an increase of the elastic modulus after cross-linking regardless alginate concentration. The incorporation of iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs), during the spray preparation of the films, gave rise to nanocomposite Alg/Chi films with increased elastic moduli with the number of incorporated NPs layers. Deformation maps of the films strongly suggested the presence of empty spaces associated with the method of preparation. Finally, adhesion measurements point out to a significant role of NPs on the increase of the adhesion values found for nanocomposite films.

  13. Understanding Molecular Interactions within Chemically Selective Layered Polymer Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Gary J. Blanchard

    2009-06-30

    This work focuses on two broad issues. These are (1) the molecular origin of the chemical selectivity achieved with ultrathin polymer multilayers, and (2) how the viscoelastic properties of the polymer layers are affected by exposure to solvent and analytes. These issues are inter-related, and to understand them we need to design experiments that probe both the energetic and kinetic aspects of interfacial adsorption processes. This project focuses on controling the chemical structure, thickness, morphology and sequential ordering of polymer layers bound to interfaces using maleimide-vinyl ether and closely related alternating copolymerization chemistry and efficient covalent cross-linking reactions that allow for layer-by-layer polymer deposition. This chemistry has been developed during the funding cycle of this Grant. We have measure the equilibrium constants for interactions between specific layers within the polymer interfaces and size-controlled, surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles. The ability to control both size and functionality of gold nanoparticle model analytes allows us to evaluate the average “pore size” that characterizes our polymer films. We have measured the “bulk” viscosity and shear modulus of the ultrathin polymer films as a function of solvent overlayer identity using quartz crystal microbalance complex impedance measurements. We have measured microscopic viscosity at specific locations within the layered polymer interfaces with time-resolved fluorescence lifetime and depolarization techniques. We combine polymer, cross-linking and nanoparticle synthetic expertise with a host of characterization techniques, including QCM gravimetry and complex impedance analysis, steady state and time-resolved spectroscopies.

  14. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium.

    PubMed

    Wagener, V; Virtanen, S

    2016-06-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO2). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37°C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous structures. The

  15. On Multiple-Layered Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to find ways to make vortex flow fields decompose more quickly, photographs and observations are presented of vortex flow fields that indicate the presence of multiple layers of fluid rotating about a common axis. A survey of the literature indicates that multiple-layered vortices form in waterspouts, tornadoes and lift-generated vortices of aircraft. An explanation for the appearance of multiple-layered structures in vortices is suggested. The observations and data presented are intended to improve the understanding of the formation and persistence of vortex flow fields.

  16. Layer Communities in Multiplex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Ta-Chu; Porter, Mason A.

    2017-08-01

    Multiplex networks are a type of multilayer network in which entities are connected to each other via multiple types of connections. We propose a method, based on computing pairwise similarities between layers and then doing community detection, for grouping structurally similar layers in multiplex networks. We illustrate our approach using both synthetic and empirical networks, and we are able to find meaningful groups of layers in both cases. For example, we find that airlines that are based in similar geographic locations tend to be grouped together in a multiplex airline network and that related research areas in physics tend to be grouped together in a multiplex collaboration network.

  17. Formation of cracks in layered rock considering layer thickness variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xu; Lu, Jianyou; Wang, Shanyong; Wang, Shuren; Liu, Xiliang

    2017-09-01

    The formation mechanisms for layer interface-parallel discontinuities and their interactions with vertical cracks in layered rocks with varying layer thickness are investigated. The interface behaviour between rock layers is modeled by a shear displacement response and rock crack behaviour is described by a damage model. Three typical failures can be captured: (1) vertical cracking, (2) delamination and (3) interface-parallel cracking. The result further indicates these crack modes are determined by a threshold of the interfacial strength. When the interfacial strength is higher than the threshold, a combined pattern of vertical cracking and interface-parallel cracking occurs. If the strength is lower than the threshold, a combined pattern of vertical cracking and interfacial delamination can be found. If the strength for the interface is near the threshold, a combined pattern of interface-parallel cracking, vertical cracking and interfacial delamination occurs. The result shows the interface-parallel discontinuities are induced by interface-delamination, interface-parallel cracks, or their coupling behaviour. Both interfacial delamination and interface-parallel cracking can reduce the tensile stress between two adjacent cracks and thus lead to a saturation state. Layer thickness variations can further influence the infilling process of vertical cracks and the crack spacing to average layer thickness ratios.

  18. Radar cross section of a complex-shaped cavity with a loaded metal diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutishchev, S. N.

    2009-10-01

    We propose a method for calculating the monostatic radar cross section of a two-dimensional complex-shaped cavity, which contains a plane-layered medium in the form of a loaded metal diaphragm placed on a dielectric layer. The method is based on the combined boundary-integral/modal method and the variational Galerkin method with the use of dyadic Green’s functions. The results of calculating the angular dependences of the radar cross section for various parameters of the plane-layered medium are presented. Restrictions of the applicability and potential for further development of the method are indicated.

  19. Radar cross section of the cavity with a loaded metal diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutishchev, S. N.

    2008-04-01

    We propose a method for calculating the monostatic radar cross section of a two-dimensional cavity containing a plane-layered medium in the form of a loaded metal diaphragm which is located between two dielectric layers. The method is based on the modal technique and dyadic Green’s functions. The numerical results for the angular dependences of the radar cross section are presented for various parameters of the plane-layered medium. Limitations of the method and the possibilities of its further development are pointed out.

  20. Evaluation of Double Process Lithography (DPL) with bi-layer photo-resist process for contact layer-patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gong; Wu, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Double Process Lithography (DPL) has been widely accepted as a viable printing technique for critical layers at 45nm nodes and below. In addition, DPL technique also allows us to use available process tool-sets with less capability to develop the next node CMOS devices in early research and development stages with additional photo-masks. One practical issue of applying DPL technique is the process crosstalk, which is the impact of the existing etched patterns after the 1st process to the overall lithography performance during the 2nd printing process. In this paper, we evaluated the DPL process for contact holetype patterning with a 193nm silicon-containing bi-layer photo-resist. We explained the bi-layer photoresist process flow and its low process cross-talk characteristics when applied in our DPL process. We also discussed the challenges of printing small contacts in the DPL process. The preliminary experiment results indicated that silicon-containing photo-resist process is a good candidate for DPL process in the contact hole-type of patterns, and it has good characteristics of low process cross-talk. The flexibility of the drydevelop process in bi-layer resist also offered us another way to form small contacts in the substrate film. At the end, we provided some suggestions in contact pattern decomposition algorithm and related exposure-tool alignment strategies for future implementation of DPL technology.

  1. Layer-by-Layer Insight into Electrostatic Charge Distribution of Few-Layer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Rokni, Hossein; Lu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    In few-layer graphene (FLG) systems on a dielectric substrate such as SiO2, the addition of each extra layer of graphene can drastically alter their electronic and structural properties. Here, we map the charge distribution among the individual layers of finite-size FLG systems using a novel spatial discrete model that describes both electrostatic interlayer screening and fringe field effects. Our results reveal that the charge density in the region very close to the edges is screened out an order of magnitude more weakly than that across the central region of the layers. Our discrete model suggests that the interlayer charge screening length in 1–8 layer thick graphene systems depends mostly on the overall gate/molecular doping level rather than on temperature, in particular at an induced charge density >5 × 1012 cm−2, and can reliably be determined to be larger than half the interlayer spacing but shorter than the bilayer thickness. Our model can be used for designing FLG-based devices, and offers a simple rule regarding the charge distribution in FLG: approximately 70%, 20%, 6% and 3% (99% overall) of the total induced charge density reside within the four innermost layers, implying that the gate-induced electric field is not definitely felt by >4th layer. PMID:28220816

  2. Layer-by-Layer Insight into Electrostatic Charge Distribution of Few-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokni, Hossein; Lu, Wei

    2017-02-01

    In few-layer graphene (FLG) systems on a dielectric substrate such as SiO2, the addition of each extra layer of graphene can drastically alter their electronic and structural properties. Here, we map the charge distribution among the individual layers of finite-size FLG systems using a novel spatial discrete model that describes both electrostatic interlayer screening and fringe field effects. Our results reveal that the charge density in the region very close to the edges is screened out an order of magnitude more weakly than that across the central region of the layers. Our discrete model suggests that the interlayer charge screening length in 1–8 layer thick graphene systems depends mostly on the overall gate/molecular doping level rather than on temperature, in particular at an induced charge density >5 × 1012 cm‑2, and can reliably be determined to be larger than half the interlayer spacing but shorter than the bilayer thickness. Our model can be used for designing FLG-based devices, and offers a simple rule regarding the charge distribution in FLG: approximately 70%, 20%, 6% and 3% (99% overall) of the total induced charge density reside within the four innermost layers, implying that the gate-induced electric field is not definitely felt by >4th layer.

  3. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  4. Theory of nonmonotonic double layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.Y.

    1987-12-01

    A simple graphic method of solving the Vlasov--Poisson system associated with nonlinear eigenvalue conditions for arbitrary potential structures is presented. A general analytic formulation for nonmonotonic double layers is presented and illustrated with some particular closed form solutions. This class of double layers satisfies the time stationary Vlasov--Poisson system while requiring a Sagdeev potential, which is a double-valued function of the physical potential. It follows that any distribution function having a density representation as any integer or noninteger power series of potential can never satisfy the nonmonotonic double-layer boundary conditions. A Korteweg--de Vries-like equation is found showing a relationship among the speed of the nonmonotonic double layer, its scale length, and its degree of asymmetry.

  5. The plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Lennartsson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A spatially distinct, temporally variable, transition region between the magnetotail lobes and the central plasma sheet designated the plasma sheet boundary layer has been identified from a survey of particle spectra and three-dimensional distributions as sampled by the ISEE 1 LEPEDEA. The instrumentation and data presentation are described, and the signatures of the magnetotail plasma regimes are presented and discussed for the central plasma sheet and lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer. Comparisons of plasma parameters and distribution fucntions are made and the evolution of ion velocity distributions within the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed. The spatial distribution of the plasma sheet boundary layer is considered and ion composition measurements are presented.

  6. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  7. WEATHER_Layered-Precipitable-Water

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-23

    ... TOVS (HIRS) clear sky radiances Radiosonde GPS (after 1995) AIRS Level 2 TPW and Layered PW Spatial ... Parameters:  Precipitable Water Order Data:  Earthdata Search:  Earthdata Search SCAR-B ...

  8. Bedding Details in Layered Rock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-16

    This beautiful image shows terrific layers and exposed bedrock along a cliff in west Candor Chasma, which is part of the extensive Valles Marineris canyon system as seen by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  9. Layer-oriented simulation tool.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Tordi, Massimiliano; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Vernet, Elise; Marchetti, Enrico

    2004-08-01

    The Layer-Oriented Simulation Tool (LOST) is a numerical simulation code developed for analysis of the performance of multiconjugate adaptive optics modules following a layer-oriented approach. The LOST code computes the atmospheric layers in terms of phase screens and then propagates the phase delays introduced in the natural guide stars' wave fronts by using geometrical optics approximations. These wave fronts are combined in an optical or numerical way, including the effects of wave-front sensors on measurements in terms of phase noise. The LOST code is described, and two applications to layer-oriented modules are briefly presented. We have focus on the Multiconjugate adaptive optics demonstrator to be mounted upon the Very Large Telescope and on the Near-IR-Visible Adaptive Interferometer for Astronomy (NIRVANA) interferometric system to be installed on the combined focus of the Large Binocular Telescope.

  10. Terraced Craters and Layered Targets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-12

    Small impact craters usually have simple bowl shapes; however, when the target material has different layers of different strength, then more complicated crater shapes can emerge as shown in image captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  11. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  12. Layers in Arsia Mons Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-28

    This observance from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter covers a pit in the lower West flank of Arsia Mons, one of the four giant volcanos of the Tharsis region. Many layers are exposed in the pit, probably marking individual lava flows.

  13. Borax mediated layer-by-layer self-assembly of neutral poly(vinyl alcohol) and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Manna, Uttam; Patil, Satish

    2009-07-09

    We report a multilayer film of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-borate complex and chitosan by using a layer-by-layer approach. PVA is an uncharged polymer, but hydroxyl functional groups of PVA can be cross-linked by using borax as a cross-linking agent. As a result electrostatic charges and intra- and interchain cross-links are introduced in the PVA chain and provide physically cross-linked networks. The PVA-borate was then deposited on a flat substrate as well as on colloidal particles with chitosan as an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte. Quartz crystal microbalance, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy were used to follow the growth of thin film on flat substrate. Analogous experiments were performed on melamine formaldehyde colloidal particles (3-3.5 microm) to quantify the process for the preparation of hollow microcapsules. Removal of the core in 0.1 N HCl results in hollow microcapsules. Characterization of microcapsules by transmission electron microscopy revealed formation of stable microcapsules. Further, self-assembly of PVA-borate/chitosan was loaded with the anticancer drug doxorubicin, and release rates were determined at different pH values to highlight the drug delivery potential of this system.

  14. An experimental investigation of a two and a three-dimensional low speed turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, A. E.; Melnik, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental studies of a two and a three-dimensional low speed turbulent boundary layer were conducted on the side wall of a boundary layer wind tunnel. The 20 ft. long test section, with a rectangular cross section measuring 17.5 in. x 46 in., produced a 3.5 in. thick turbulent boundary layer at a free stream Reynolds number. The three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer was produced by a 30 deg swept wing-like model faired into the side wall of the test section. Preliminary studies in the two-dimensional boundary layer indicated that the flow was nonuniform on the 46 in. wide test wall. The nonuniform boundary layer is characterized by transverse variations in the wall shear stress and is primarily caused by nonuniformities in the inlet damping screens.

  15. Modeling the urban boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary and evaluation is given of the Workshop on Modeling the Urban Boundary Layer; held in Las Vegas on May 5, 1975. Edited summaries from each of the session chairpersons are also given. The sessions were: (1) formulation and solution techniques, (2) K-theory versus higher order closure, (3) surface heat and moisture balance, (4) initialization and boundary problems, (5) nocturnal boundary layer, and (6) verification of models.

  16. Shape optimization of damping layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T.-C.; Scott, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Shape optimization of unconstrained and constrained damping layers is completed. The specific problem analyzed is a cantilever beam loaded at its tip by a harmonic force. Finite element modeling and mathematical programming techniques are used to obtain the solution. Performance measures are taken to be reduction of maximum diplacement and increase in fatigue lifetime. Results include the improvement, over the uniform treatment case, of these measures when the profile of the damping layer is optimized.

  17. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  18. Viscoelastic Nanomechanics of Ionically Cross-linked Polyelectrolyte Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Biao; Lee, Daeyeon; Han, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanics of ionic polyelectrolyte networks is critical for applications where nm-to-um mechanics is the key to success. This study aims to reveal the roles of ionic cross-links and fixed charges in the viscoelasticity of layer-by-layer poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(acrylic acid) microfilms, PAH/PAA, a complex held by pH-sensitive amine-carboxyl links. AFM-nanoindentation and force relaxation (tip R =12.5um) was performed at ionic strength(IS) =0.01-1.0M, pH =5.5-2.0 (pKa of PAA =2.3). When pH changes from 5.5 to 2.0, the films swell for 4x from densely linked, net neutral state to loosely linked, positively charged one. A >100x reduction in indentation modulus was observed at all IS, suggesting the dominance of decrease in cross-link density. In most states, more than 90% force relaxation was observed, where cross-link breaking/reformation likely dominates viscoelasticity. However, at pH =2.5 and IS =0.01M, when electrical double layer repulsion is important (Debye length =3nm), relaxation was about 60%, highlighting the contribution of fixed charges. In summary, this study revealed unique viscoelastic behaviors of PAH/PAA due to the pH- and IS-dependent cross-link and charge densities.

  19. Microcystic Inner Nuclear Layer Changes and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects in Eyes with Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Akagi, Tadamichi; Yoshikawa, Munemitsu; Suda, Kenji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yugo; Nakanishi, Hideo; Miyake, Masahiro; Unoki, Noriyuki; Ikeda, Hanako Ohashi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine microcystic inner nuclear layer (INL) changes in glaucomatous eyes and to determine associated factors. Design Retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Methods Two hundred seventeen eyes of 133 patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), 41 eyes of 32 patients with preperimetric glaucoma and 181 normal eyes of 117 subjects were ultimately included. Microcystic INL lesions were examined with infrared fundus images and with 19 vertical spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images in the macular area. Results Microcystic INL changes were observed in 6.0% of eyes with POAG, but none of the normal eyes or eyes with preperimetric glaucoma showed microcystic INL changes. The proportion of eyes with advanced glaucoma was significantly larger (P = 0.013) in eyes with microcystic lesions than without. The visual field mean deviation (MD) slope was also significantly worse (P = 0.027) in eyes with microcystic lesions. No significant differences were observed in age, sex, refraction, axial length, intraocular pressure, or MD value between eyes with and without microcystic INL lesions. In several cases, microcystic INL lesions occurred along with glaucomatous visual field progression. The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness (P = 0.013) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) + inner plexiform layer thickness (P = 0.023) were significantly lower in areas with microcystic lesions than without. The INL was also significantly thicker (P = 0.002) in areas with microcystic lesions. Conclusions Microcystic INL lesions in glaucomatous eyes are closely associated with RNFL and GCL thinning and correlated with worse MD slope. These INL lesions may indicate focal and progressive damage in glaucoma. PMID:26066021

  20. Evaporation from layered porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, N.; Lehmann, P.; Or, D.

    2010-06-01

    Evaporation rates from porous media may vary considerably due to changes in internal transport mechanisms and potential interruption of hydraulic continuity; both are influenced by media pore space properties. Evaporation behavior in layered porous media is affected by thickness and sequence of layering and capillary characteristics of each layer. We propose a composite characteristic length for predicting drying front depth at the end of a period with a high and constant drying rate (stage 1 evaporation) from layered porous media. The model was tested in laboratory experiments using Hele-Shaw cells filled with alternating layers of coarse and fine sands considering different combinations of thicknesses and positions. The presence of textural interfaces affects drying rate, modifies liquid phase configuration, and affects the dynamics of the receding drying front. Neutron radiography measurements were used to delineate dynamics of liquid phase distribution with high temporal and spatial resolution. Results show that air invading an interface between fine and coarse sand layers results in a capillary pressure jump and subsequent relaxation that significantly modify liquid phase distribution compared with evaporation from homogeneous porous media. Insights are potentially useful for designing mulching strategies and capillary barriers aimed at reducing evaporative losses.