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Sample records for carrying human prototype

  1. A prototype for cartographic human body analysis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Elizabeth; Marcos, Adérito; Santos, Maribel Yasmina; Espregueira-Mendes, João

    2008-01-01

    A cartographic-oriented model uses algebraic map operations to perform spatial analysis of medical data relative to the human body. A prototype system uses 3D visualization techniques to deliver analysis results. A prototype implementation suggests the model might provide the basis for a medical application tool that introduces new information insight.

  2. HSI Prototypes for Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jokstad, Håkon; McDonald, Rob

    2015-09-01

    This report describes in detail the design and features of three Human System Interface (HSI) prototypes developed by the Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program under Contract 128420 through Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The prototypes are implemented for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator and installed in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL. The three prototypes are: 1) Power Ramp display 2) RCS Heat-up and Cool-down display 3) Estimated time to limit display The power ramp display and the RCS heat-up/cool-down display are designed to provide good visual indications to the operators on how well they are performing their task compared to their target ramp/heat-up/cool-down rate. The estimated time to limit display is designed to help operators restore levels or pressures before automatic or required manual actions are activated.

  3. Assessment of a human computer interface prototyping environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1993-01-01

    A Human Computer Interface (HCI) prototyping environment with embedded evaluation capability has been successfully assessed which will be valuable in developing and refining HCI standards and evaluating program/project interface development, especially Space Station Freedom on-board displays for payload operations. The HCI prototyping environment is designed to include four components: (1) a HCI format development tool, (2) a test and evaluation simulator development tool, (3) a dynamic, interactive interface between the HCI prototype and simulator, and (4) an embedded evaluation capability to evaluate the adequacy of an HCI based on a user's performance.

  4. Rapid prototyping of database systems in human genetics data collection.

    PubMed

    Gersting, J M

    1987-06-01

    This work examines some of the problems encountered in developing small and large database application systems involving human genetics data collection efforts that include data on individuals as well as family pedigree data. Rapid prototyping of a database application requires software tools to produce the application with little or no programming. Features of MEGADATS-4 that provide for rapid prototyping and for producing stand-alone applications are examined. PMID:3668405

  5. Rapid prototyping of database systems in human genetics data collection.

    PubMed

    Gersting, J M

    1987-06-01

    This work examines some of the problems encountered in developing small and large database application systems involving human genetics data collection efforts that include data on individuals as well as family pedigree data. Rapid prototyping of a database application requires software tools to produce the application with little or no programming. Features of MEGADATS-4 that provide for rapid prototyping and for producing stand-alone applications are examined.

  6. Human milk: mother nature's prototypical probiotic food?

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michelle K; McGuire, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "probiotic" is generally attributed to Dr. Ilya Mechnikov, who hypothesized that longevity could be enhanced by manipulating gastrointestinal microbes using naturally fermented foods. In 2001, a report of the FAO and WHO (2001 Oct, http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/fs_-management/en/probiotics.pdf) proposed a more restrictive definition of probiotic, as follows: "a live micro-organism which, when administered in adequate amounts, confers a health benefit on the host." As such, answering the fundamental question posed here-"Is human milk a probiotic?"-requires first grappling with the concept and meaning of the term probiotic. Nonetheless, one must also be convinced that human milk contains bacteria. Indeed, there are scores of publications providing evidence of a paradigm shift in this regard. Variation in the human-milk microbiome may be associated with maternal weight, mode of delivery, lactation state, gestation age, antibiotic use, and maternal health. Milk constituents (e.g., fatty acids and complex carbohydrates) might also be related to the abundance of specific bacterial taxa in milk. Whether these bacteria affect infant health is likely, but more studies are needed to test this hypothesis. In summary, a growing literature suggests that human milk, like all other fluids produced by the body, indeed contains viable bacteria. As such, and recognizing the extensive literature relating breastfeeding to optimal infant health, we propose that human milk should be considered a probiotic food. Determining factors that influence which bacteria are present in milk and if and how they influence the mother's and/or the recipient infant's health remain basic science and public health realms in which almost nothing is known. PMID:25593150

  7. Human milk: mother nature's prototypical probiotic food?

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michelle K; McGuire, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "probiotic" is generally attributed to Dr. Ilya Mechnikov, who hypothesized that longevity could be enhanced by manipulating gastrointestinal microbes using naturally fermented foods. In 2001, a report of the FAO and WHO (2001 Oct, http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/fs_-management/en/probiotics.pdf) proposed a more restrictive definition of probiotic, as follows: "a live micro-organism which, when administered in adequate amounts, confers a health benefit on the host." As such, answering the fundamental question posed here-"Is human milk a probiotic?"-requires first grappling with the concept and meaning of the term probiotic. Nonetheless, one must also be convinced that human milk contains bacteria. Indeed, there are scores of publications providing evidence of a paradigm shift in this regard. Variation in the human-milk microbiome may be associated with maternal weight, mode of delivery, lactation state, gestation age, antibiotic use, and maternal health. Milk constituents (e.g., fatty acids and complex carbohydrates) might also be related to the abundance of specific bacterial taxa in milk. Whether these bacteria affect infant health is likely, but more studies are needed to test this hypothesis. In summary, a growing literature suggests that human milk, like all other fluids produced by the body, indeed contains viable bacteria. As such, and recognizing the extensive literature relating breastfeeding to optimal infant health, we propose that human milk should be considered a probiotic food. Determining factors that influence which bacteria are present in milk and if and how they influence the mother's and/or the recipient infant's health remain basic science and public health realms in which almost nothing is known.

  8. Human embryonic stem cells carrying mutations for severe genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Tsvia; Malcov, Mira; Telias, Michael; Gold, Veronica; Schwartz, Tamar; Azem, Foad; Amit, Ami; Yaron, Yuval; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) carrying specific mutations potentially provide a valuable tool for studying genetic disorders in humans. One preferable approach for obtaining these cell lines is by deriving them from affected preimplantation genetically diagnosed embryos. These unique cells are especially important for modeling human genetic disorders for which there are no adequate research models. They can be further used to gain new insights into developmentally regulated events that occur during human embryo development and that are responsible for the manifestation of genetically inherited disorders. They also have great value for the exploration of new therapeutic protocols, including gene-therapy-based treatments and disease-oriented drug screening and discovery. Here, we report the establishment of 15 different mutant human embryonic stem cell lines derived from genetically affected embryos, all donated by couples undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis in our in vitro fertilization unit. For further information regarding access to HESC lines from our repository, for research purposes, please email dalitb@tasmc.health.gov.il. PMID:20186514

  9. Developing a Prototype ALHAT Human System Interface for Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsh, Robert L.; Chua, Zarrin K.; Heino, Todd A.; Strahan, Al; Major, Laura; Duda, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project is to safely execute a precision landing anytime/anywhere on the moon. This means the system must operate in any lighting conditions, operate in the presence of any thruster generated regolith clouds, and operate without the help of redeployed navigational aids or prepared landing site at the landing site. In order to reach this ambitious goal, computer aided technologies such as ALHAT will be needed in order to permit these landings to be done safely. Although there will be advanced autonomous capabilities onboard future landers, humans will still be involved (either onboard as astronauts or remotely from mission control) in any mission to the moon or other planetary body. Because many time critical decisions must be made quickly and effectively during the landing sequence, the Descent and Landing displays need to be designed to be as effective as possible at presenting the pertinent information to the operator, and allow the operators decisions to be implemented as quickly as possible. The ALHAT project has established the Human System Interface (HSI) team to lead in the development of these displays and to study the best way to provide operators enhanced situational awareness during landing activities. These displays are prototypes that were developed based on multiple design and feedback sessions with the astronaut office at NASA/ Johnson Space Center. By working with the astronauts in a series of plan/build/evaluate cycles, the HSI team has obtained astronaut feedback from the very beginning of the design process. In addition to developing prototype displays, the HSI team has also worked to provide realistic lunar terrain (and shading) to simulate a "out the window" view that can be adjusted to various lighting conditions (based on a desired date/time) to allow the same terrain to be viewed under varying lighting terrain. This capability will be critical to determining the

  10. HCV infective virions can be carried by human platelets.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, A; Gennero, L; Cutufia, M; Enrietto, M; Morra, E; Pescarmona, P; Ponzetto, A

    2004-01-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that platelets (PLTs) can bind and transport HIV-1 infectious virions. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-HIV-1 co-infection occurs frequently among users of illicit intravenous drugs, thereby increasing the severity of HIV disease and the evolution towards chronic active hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma of HCV-related hepatitis. In the present study we investigated whether or not PLTs can carry HCV, and studied the binding mechanisms. Purified PLTs, obtained from healthy donors, HCV negative and HIV negative, were adsorbed with HCV-containing serum and then employed to infect a THP-1 monocytoid cell line. Replication of HCV was observed as shown by positivity for the E2 antigen within THP-1 cells, by indirect immunofluorescence; moreover, HCV-RNA was detected in supernatants of THP-1 cells at day 7 post-incubation with HCV-adsorbed PLTs. The binding of HCV to PLTs seems to involve fibronectin (FN), as already shown in the case of HIV-1. Indeed, treatment with RGD (Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser), the key oligopeptide of FN binding, inhibits the ability of HCV to be carried by PLTs in infective forms; the same phenomenon occurs with Mabs to FN. Moreover the infection of THP-1 cells seems to increase FN surface expression, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence tests.

  11. Suitability of virtual prototypes to support human factors/ergonomics evaluation during the design.

    PubMed

    Aromaa, Susanna; Väänänen, Kaisa

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the use of virtual prototyping has increased in product development processes, especially in the assessment of complex systems targeted at end-users. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of virtual prototyping to support human factors/ergonomics evaluation (HFE) during the design phase. Two different virtual prototypes were used: augmented reality (AR) and virtual environment (VE) prototypes of a maintenance platform of a rock crushing machine. Nineteen designers and other stakeholders were asked to assess the suitability of the prototype for HFE evaluation. Results indicate that the system model characteristics and user interface affect the experienced suitability. The VE system was valued as being more suitable to support the assessment of visibility, reach, and the use of tools than the AR system. The findings of this study can be used as a guidance for the implementing virtual prototypes in the product development process. PMID:27184306

  12. Mice carrying a human GLUD2 gene recapitulate aspects of human transcriptome and metabolome development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Guo, Song; Jiang, Xi; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Naumann, Ronald; Enard, Wolfgang; Tomita, Masaru; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Khaitovich, Philipp; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    Whereas all mammals have one glutamate dehydrogenase gene (GLUD1), humans and apes carry an additional gene (GLUD2), which encodes an enzyme with distinct biochemical properties. We inserted a bacterial artificial chromosome containing the human GLUD2 gene into mice and analyzed the resulting changes in the transcriptome and metabolome during postnatal brain development. Effects were most pronounced early postnatally, and predominantly genes involved in neuronal development were affected. Remarkably, the effects in the transgenic mice partially parallel the transcriptome and metabolome differences seen between humans and macaques analyzed. Notably, the introduction of GLUD2 did not affect glutamate levels in mice, consistent with observations in the primates. Instead, the metabolic effects of GLUD2 center on the tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that GLUD2 affects carbon flux during early brain development, possibly supporting lipid biosynthesis. PMID:27118840

  13. Habitat for Humanity High R-Value Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-19

    This case study describes a partnership between Habitat for Humanity of Greater Lowell, Massachusetts, Building Science Corporation, and the community to build a comfortable, healthy, durable and energy efficient single family home.

  14. Human Milk: Mother Nature’s Prototypical Probiotic Food?1234

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Michelle K; McGuire, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The concept of “probiotic” is generally attributed to Dr. Ilya Mechnikov, who hypothesized that longevity could be enhanced by manipulating gastrointestinal microbes using naturally fermented foods. In 2001, a report of the FAO and WHO (2001 Oct, http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/fs_-management/en/probiotics.pdf) proposed a more restrictive definition of probiotic, as follows: “a live micro-organism which, when administered in adequate amounts, confers a health benefit on the host.” As such, answering the fundamental question posed here—“Is human milk a probiotic?”—requires first grappling with the concept and meaning of the term probiotic. Nonetheless, one must also be convinced that human milk contains bacteria. Indeed, there are scores of publications providing evidence of a paradigm shift in this regard. Variation in the human-milk microbiome may be associated with maternal weight, mode of delivery, lactation state, gestation age, antibiotic use, and maternal health. Milk constituents (e.g., fatty acids and complex carbohydrates) might also be related to the abundance of specific bacterial taxa in milk. Whether these bacteria affect infant health is likely, but more studies are needed to test this hypothesis. In summary, a growing literature suggests that human milk, like all other fluids produced by the body, indeed contains viable bacteria. As such, and recognizing the extensive literature relating breastfeeding to optimal infant health, we propose that human milk should be considered a probiotic food. Determining factors that influence which bacteria are present in milk and if and how they influence the mother’s and/or the recipient infant’s health remain basic science and public health realms in which almost nothing is known. PMID:25593150

  15. Prototype case-based reasoning human assistant for space crew assessment and mission management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Robert B.; Holland, Albert W.; Wood, JoAnna

    1993-03-01

    We present a prototype human assistant system for space crew assessment and mission management. Our system is based on case episodes from American and Russian space missions and analog environments such as polar stations and undersea habitats. The general domain of small groups in isolated and confined environments represents a near ideal application area for case-based reasoning (CBR) -- there are few reliable rules to follow, and most domain knowledge is in the form of cases. We define the problem domain and outline a unique knowledge representation system driven by conflict and communication triggers. The prototype system is able to represent, index, and retrieve case studies of human performance. We index by social, behavioral, and environmental factors. We present the problem domain, our current implementation, our research approach for an operational system, and prototype performance and results.

  16. A prototype case-based reasoning human assistant for space crew assessment and mission management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B.; Holland, Albert W.; Wood, Joanna

    1993-01-01

    We present a prototype human assistant system for space crew assessment and mission management. Our system is based on case episodes from American and Russian space missions and analog environments such as polar stations and undersea habitats. The general domain of small groups in isolated and confined environments represents a near ideal application area for case-based reasoning (CBR) - there are few reliable rules to follow, and most domain knowledge is in the form of cases. We define the problem domain and outline a unique knowledge representation system driven by conflict and communication triggers. The prototype system is able to represent, index, and retrieve case studies of human performance. We index by social, behavioral, and environmental factors. We present the problem domain, our current implementation, our research approach for an operational system, and prototype performance and results.

  17. Human Factors and Technical Considerations for a Computerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas Anthony; Lew, Roger Thomas; Medema, Heather Dawne; Boring, Ronald Laurids; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    A prototype computerized operator support system (COSS) has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment. A COSS demonstration scenario has been developed for the prototype involving the Chemical & Volume Control System (CVCS) of the PWR simulator. It involves a primary coolant leak outside of containment that would require tripping the reactor if not mitigated in a very short timeframe. The COSS prototype presents a series of operator screens that provide the needed information and soft controls to successfully mitigate the event.

  18. Allelic exclusion in transgenic mice carrying mutant human IgM genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Expression of the membrane-bound version of the human mu chain in transgenic mice results in the allelic exclusion of endogenous mouse Ig heavy chain genes (6). The secreted version of the human Ig transgene has no such effect. F1 hybrid animals that carry transgenes for both secreted and membrane-bound human mu chains produce both forms of the human heavy chain while strongly suppressing endogenous mouse mu expression. The simultaneous expression of the two rearranged transgenes in primary B cells suggests that allelic exclusion operates before the formation of a second functionally rearranged heavy chain gene in vivo. PMID:3133444

  19. Cochlear implant insertion forces in microdissected human cochlea to evaluate a prototype array.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yann; Miroir, Mathieu; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Sutter, Jasmine; Bensidhoum, Morad; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Bozorg Grayeli, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implant array insertion forces are potentially related to cochlear trauma. We compared these forces between a standard (Digisonic SP; Neurelec, Vallauris, France) and an array prototype (Neurelec) with a smaller diameter. The arrays were inserted by a mechatronic tool in 23 dissected human cochlea specimens exposing the basilar membrane. The array progression under the basilar membrane was filmed together with dynamic force measurements. Insertion force profiles and depth of insertion were compared. The recordings showed lower insertion forces beyond 270° of insertion and deeper insertions with the thin prototype array. This will potentially allow larger cochlear coverage with less trauma.

  20. An Estimate of the Average Number of Recessive Lethal Mutations Carried by Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ziyue; Waggoner, Darrel; Stephens, Matthew; Ober, Carole; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-01-01

    The effects of inbreeding on human health depend critically on the number and severity of recessive, deleterious mutations carried by individuals. In humans, existing estimates of these quantities are based on comparisons between consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples, an approach that confounds socioeconomic and genetic effects of inbreeding. To overcome this limitation, we focused on a founder population that practices a communal lifestyle, for which there is almost complete Mendelian disease ascertainment and a known pedigree. Focusing on recessive lethal diseases and simulating allele transmissions, we estimated that each haploid set of human autosomes carries on average 0.29 (95% credible interval [0.10, 0.84]) recessive alleles that lead to complete sterility or death by reproductive age when homozygous. Comparison to existing estimates in humans suggests that a substantial fraction of the total burden imposed by recessive deleterious variants is due to single mutations that lead to sterility or death between birth and reproductive age. In turn, comparison to estimates from other eukaryotes points to a surprising constancy of the average number of recessive lethal mutations across organisms with markedly different genome sizes. PMID:25697177

  1. Cystic fibrosis mice carrying the missense mutation G551D replicate human genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, S J; Alton, E W; Smith, S N; Lunn, D P; Farley, R; Lovelock, P K; Thomson, S A; Hume, D A; Lamb, D; Porteous, D J; Dorin, J R; Wainwright, B J

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a mouse carrying the human G551D mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) by a one-step gene targeting procedure. These mutant mice show cystic fibrosis pathology but have a reduced risk of fatal intestinal blockage compared with 'null' mutants, in keeping with the reduced incidence of meconium ileus in G551D patients. The G551D mutant mice show greatly reduced CFTR-related chloride transport, displaying activity intermediate between that of cftr(mlUNC) replacement ('null') and cftr(mlHGU) insertional (residual activity) mutants and equivalent to approximately 4% of wild-type CFTR activity. The long-term survival of these animals should provide an excellent model with which to study cystic fibrosis, and they illustrate the value of mouse models carrying relevant mutations for examining genotype-phenotype correlations. Images PMID:8605891

  2. Human thymic epithelial primary cells produce exosomes carrying tissue-restricted antigens.

    PubMed

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Lundberg, Vanja; Berglund, Martin; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Telemo, Esbjörn; Lindgren, Susanne; Ekwall, Olov

    2015-09-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by cells into the extracellular space and have been shown to be present in thymic tissue both in mice and in humans. The source of thymic exosomes is however still an enigma and hence it is not known whether thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are able to produce exosomes. In this work, we have cultured human TECs and isolated exosomes. These exosomes carry tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), for example, myelin basic protein and desmoglein 3. The presence of TRAs indicates a possible role for thymic epithelium-derived exosomes in the selection process of thymocytes. The key contribution of these exosomes could be to disseminate self-antigens from the thymic epithelia, thus making them more accessible to the pool of maturing thymocytes. This would increase the coverage of TRAs within the thymus, and facilitate the process of positive and negative selection.

  3. Physical human lumen carotid reconstruction: life-size models by rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pili, Piero; Murgia, Fabrizio; Pusceddu, Gabriella; Franzoni, Gregorio; Tuveri, Massimiliano

    2003-05-01

    Rapid Prototyping (RP) is a technique used in industry for manufacturing prototypes. Its capability to physically reproduce geometrical complex shapes is getting increasing interest in many fields of medicine. In the field of vascular surgery, replicas of artery lumen have utility in complex cases or when standard imaging is felt to be equivocal. Replicas can also facilitate experimental studies of computational vascular fluid-dynamics permitting in-vitro reproductions of blood flow in living subjects before and after surgery. The VIrtual VAscular (VIVA) project at CRS4, developed a system able to process three-dimensional (3D) datasets extracted from a Computer Tomography (CT) apparatus, visualize them, reconstruct the geometry of arteries of specific patients, and simulate blood flow in them. In this paper, the applicability of RP techniques to VIVA's real size replicas of an autoptic carotid vessel lumen is presented and an overview of the RP based system developed is provided. The techniques used in our prototype are discussed and experimental results for the creation of a human carotid lumen replica are analyzed. We discuss in detail the pipeline of manufacturing process: 3D geometric reconstruction from segmented points, geometry tessellation, STL (Stereo Lithography format) conversion. Moreover we illustrate some technical details of the specific RP technique used to build the lumen replicas, which is called Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM), the materials used for prototypes, throughput time and costs of the FDM models realized. The system is totally based on open-source software. This enables us to control each step of the pipeline, from data acquisition to STL export file. In this context, we present main sources of error encountered during all manufacturing process stages.

  4. Neanderthal paintings? Production of prototypical human (Homo sapiens) faces shows systematic distortions.

    PubMed

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Wirth, Benedikt Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    People's sketches of human faces seem to be systematically distorted: the eye position is always higher than in reality. This bias was experimentally analyzed by a series of experiments varying drawing conditions. Participants either drew prototypical faces from memory (studies 1 and 2: free reconstruction; study 3: cued reconstruction) or directly copied average faces (study 4). Participants consistently showed this positioning bias, which is even in accord with facial depictions published in influential research articles by famous face researchers (study 5). We discuss plausible explanations for this reliable and stable bias, which is coincidentally similar to the morphology of Neanderthals.

  5. Infrared A radiation promotes survival of human melanocytes carrying ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kimeswenger, Susanne; Schwarz, Agatha; Födinger, Dagmar; Müller, Susanne; Pehamberger, Hubert; Schwarz, Thomas; Jantschitsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The link between solar radiation and melanoma is still elusive. Although infrared radiation (IR) accounts for over 50% of terrestrial solar energy, its influence on human skin is not well explored. There is increasing evidence that IR influences the expression patterns of several molecules independently of heat. A previous in vivo study revealed that pretreatment with IR might promote the development of UVR-induced non-epithelial skin cancer and possibly of melanoma in mice. To expand on this, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of IR on UVR-induced apoptosis and DNA repair in normal human epidermal melanocytes. The balance between these two effects is a key factor of malignant transformation. Human melanocytes were exposed to physiologic doses of IR and UVR. Compared to cells irradiated with UVR only, simultaneous exposure to IR significantly reduced the apoptotic rate. However, IR did not influence the repair of UVR-induced DNA damage. IR partly reversed the pro-apoptotic effects of UVR via modification of the expression and activity of proteins mainly of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, IR enhances the survival of melanocytes carrying UVR-induced DNA damage and thereby might contribute to melanomagenesis.

  6. Using ethnographic methods to carry out human factors research in software engineering.

    PubMed

    Karn, J S; Cowling, A J

    2006-08-01

    This article describes how ethnographic methods were used to observe and analyze student teams working on software engineering (SE) projects. The aim of this research was to uncover the effects of the interplay of different personality types, as measured by a test based on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), on the workings of an SE team. Using ethnographic methods allowed the researchers to record the effects of personality type on behavior toward teammates and how this related to the amount of disruption and positive ideas brought forward from each member, also examined in detail were issues that were either dogged by disruption or that did not have sufficient discussion devoted to them and the impact that they had on the outcomes of the project. Initial findings indicate that ethnographic methods are a valuable weapon to have in one's arsenal when carrying out research into human factors of SE. PMID:17186760

  7. Using ethnographic methods to carry out human factors research in software engineering.

    PubMed

    Karn, J S; Cowling, A J

    2006-08-01

    This article describes how ethnographic methods were used to observe and analyze student teams working on software engineering (SE) projects. The aim of this research was to uncover the effects of the interplay of different personality types, as measured by a test based on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), on the workings of an SE team. Using ethnographic methods allowed the researchers to record the effects of personality type on behavior toward teammates and how this related to the amount of disruption and positive ideas brought forward from each member, also examined in detail were issues that were either dogged by disruption or that did not have sufficient discussion devoted to them and the impact that they had on the outcomes of the project. Initial findings indicate that ethnographic methods are a valuable weapon to have in one's arsenal when carrying out research into human factors of SE.

  8. MCP-1 binds to oxidized LDL and is carried by lipoprotein(a) in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Philipp; Tafelmeier, Maria; Chittka, Dominik; Choi, Soo-Ho; Zhang, Li; Byun, Young Sup; Almazan, Felicidad; Yang, Xiaohong; Iqbal, Navaid; Chowdhury, Punam; Maisel, Alan; Witztum, Joseph L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoprotein oxidation plays an important role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) induces profound inflammatory responses in vascular cells, such as production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2], a key chemokine in the initiation and progression of vascular inflammation. Here we demonstrate that OxLDL also binds MCP-1 and that the OxLDL-bound MCP-1 retains its ability to recruit monocytes. A human MCP-1 mutant in which basic amino acids Arg-18 and Lys-19 were replaced with Ala did not bind to OxLDL. The MCP-1 binding to OxLDL was inhibited by the monoclonal antibody E06, which binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) in OxLDL. Because OxPLs are carried by lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] in human plasma, we tested to determine whether Lp(a) binds MCP-1. Recombinant wild-type but not mutant MCP-1 added to human plasma bound to Lp(a), and its binding was inhibited by E06. Lp(a) captured from human plasma contained MCP-1 and the Lp(a)-associated endogenous MCP-1 induced monocyte migration. These results demonstrate that OxLDL and Lp(a) bind MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo and that OxPLs are major determinants of the MCP-1 binding. The association of MCP-1 with OxLDL and Lp(a) may play a role in modulating monocyte trafficking during atherogenesis. PMID:23667177

  9. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  10. Virtual Prototyping of a Lander for the Fast Transfer of Humans to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, M.; McSorley, A.

    This paper uses virtual prototyping as a technique to elucidate the challenging problem of landing humans on Mars. If no countermeasures are taken during the transit from Earth the capability of humans to perform effectively on the surface of Mars will be seriously compromised. Microgravity will cause atrophy of load bearing bones and muscles weakening the crew. New treatments and technologies together with a fast transfer to Mars could help mitigate these effects. A consequence of using fast interplanetary trajectories, however, is the high arrival speed at Mars and if aerocapture is used, high mechanical and heat loads on the lander. The high decelerations could be non-survivable for weakened crewmembers. It is therefore highly desirable to use a vehicle aeroshell that can reduce the g levels to a safe level. Aeroshell options in terms of g-levels were considered using computer simulations together with other mission requirements such as sufficient living space and good payload mass efficiency. The results were then used to choose an aeroshell for the lander. Some details of the lander, such as internal layout, aerodynamic control surfaces, location of rocket engines, were then further prototyped in virtual environments.

  11. A LAMP-based schematic prototype instrument for detection of microorganisms in human outer space activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongfei; Liu, Zhiheng; Li, Junxiong; Zhu, Baoli

    One of the main tasks of human outer space exploration is to detect signs of life. Based on meteoritic evidence, common ancestry hypothesis has been posed. Therefore, searching for the fundamental molecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) that constitute life as we know on Earth is feasible and now the typical approach. To achieve this goal, portable, robust, and highly sensitive instrument is also needed. In this study, based on Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique that targets life information storage molecular, DNA, we designed a schematic prototype instrument for microorganism detection. First, we designed LAMP primers used for amplification of DNA markers of Bacteria, Archaea, and Fungus; then, we optimized the LAMP reaction system for space using; and finally, we designed a prototype instrument and operating software system that are compatible with the LAMP reaction system. The results of simulation experiments showed that our instrument performed well for detecting representative microorganisms and the device can achieve semi-automatization. The detection process, from sample preparation to signal visualization, was completed in 1.5 hour. Our study provides a new method and corresponding device for detection of DNA molecular, which has great potential for applications in outer space exploration. Besides, the instrument we designed can also been used for monitoring changes of terrestrial microorganisms in outer space, for example in aircraft.

  12. Initial Usability Testing of a Hand-held Electronic Logbook Prototype for the Human Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Andrea H.; Whitmore, Mihriban

    1996-01-01

    The Apple(R) Newton(TM) MessagePad 110 was flown aboard the KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft for microgravity usability testing. The Newton served as the initial hand-held electronic logbook prototype for the International Space Station (ISS) Human Research Facility (HRF). Subjects performed three different tasks with the Newton: (1) using the stylus to tap on different sections of the screen in order to launch an application and to select options within it; (2) using the stylus to write, and; (3) correcting handwriting recognition errors in a handwriting-intensive application. Subjects rated handwriting in microgravity 'Borderline' and had great difficulties finding a way in which to adequately restrain themselves at the lower body in order to have their hands free for the Newton. Handwriting recognition was rated 'Unacceptable,' but this issue is hardware-related and not unique to the microgravity environment. It is suggested that the restraint and handwriting issues are related and require further joint research with the current Handheld Electronic Logbook prototype: the Norand Pen*key Model #6300.

  13. African dust carries microbes across the ocean: are they affecting human and ecosystem health?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Griffin, Dale W.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric transport of dust from northwest Africa to the western Atlantic Ocean region may be responsible for a number of environmental hazards, including the demise of Caribbean corals; red tides; amphibian diseases; increased occurrence of asthma in humans; and oxygen depletion (eutrophication) in estuaries. Studies of satellite images suggest that hundreds of millions of tons of dust are trans-ported annually at relatively low altitudes across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean Sea and southeastern United States. The dust emanates from the expanding Sahara/Sahel desert region in Africa and carries a wide variety of bacteria and fungi. The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the NASA/Goddard Spaceflight Center, is conducting a study to identify microbes--bacteria, fungi, viruses--transported across the Atlantic in African soil dust. Each year, millions of tons of desert dust blow off the west African coast and ride the trade winds across the ocean, affecting the entire Caribbean basin, as well as the southeastern United States. Of the dust reaching the U.S., Florida receives about 50 percent, while the rest may range as far north as Maine or as far west as Colorado. The dust storms can be tracked by satellite and take about one week to cross the Atlantic.

  14. Construction and identification of recombinant adenovirus carrying human TIMP-1shRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y L; Xie, H; Lin, H L; Feng, Q; Liu, Y

    2015-01-16

    The aim of this study was to construct the recombinant adenovirus carrying human TIMP-1shRNA gene expression system for preliminary identification to lay the foundation for the further study of gene therapy. Using the Adeno-X system, the recombinant adenovirus plasmid pAdeno-X green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease (TIMP)-1 small hairpin (1shRNA) was constructed by including the target gene fragment of the TIMP-1shRNA shuttle plasmid pShuttle2-GFP-TIMP-1shRNA and the backbone plasmid pAdeno-X by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Recombinant plasmids were transfected into HEK293A cells to package the recombinant adenovirus rvAdeno-XGFP-TIMP-1shRNA. The recombinant adenovirus was identified by polymerase chain reaction, and the viral titer and infection efficiency were detected using GFP. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digestion demonstrated that rvAdeno-XGFP-TIMP-1shRNA had been successfully constructed, which has a strong ability to infect the kidney. The TIMP-1shRNA adenovirus expression vector was successfully constructed using homologous recombination methods.

  15. Alzheimer's Disease: Prototype of Cognitive Deterioration, Valuable Lessons to Understand Human Cognition.

    PubMed

    Noroozian, Maryam

    2016-02-01

    It is important for neurologists to become more familiar with neuropsychological evaluation for Alzheimer disease. The growth of this method in research, as an available, inexpensive, and noninvasive diagnostic approach, which can be administered even by non-specialist-trained examiners, makes this knowledge more necessary than ever. Such knowledge has a basic role in planning national programs in primary health care systems for prevention and early detection of Alzheimer disease. This is more crucial in developing countries, which have higher rates of dementia prevalence along with cardiovascular risk factors, lack of public knowledge about dementia, and limited social support. In addition compared to the neurological hard signs which are tangible and measurable, the concept of cognition seems to be more difficult for the neurologists to evaluate and for the students to understand. Dementia in general and Alzheimer's disease as the prototype of cognitive disorders specifically, play an important role to explore all domains of human cognition through its symptomatology and neuropsychological deficits.

  16. Effect of Changing Weight and Mass on Human Performance in a Lunar Prototype Spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Jason R.; Chappell, Steven P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Physical effort, compensation, and controllability in a spacesuit can be affected by suit mass and gravity level. Because of limitations in certain reduced-gravity simulators and the finite selection of lunar prototype suits, it is difficult to ascertain how a change in suit mass affects suited human performance. One method of simulating a change in mass is to vary the total gravity-adjusted weight (TGAW), which is defined as the sum of the suit mass and subject mass, multiplied by the gravity level. PURPOSE: To determine if two methods of changing TGAW during parabolic flight - changing suit mass or gravity level - affect subjective ratings of suited human performance equally. METHODS: A custom weight support structure was connected to a lunar prototype spacesuit, allowing the addition of mass to the suit while maintaining a near-constant center of mass. In the varied-weight (VW) series, suit mass (120 kg) was constant at 0.1 G, 0.17 G, and 0.3 G, yielding TGAWs of 196, 333, and 588 N, assuming an 80-kg subject. In the varied-mass (VM) series, gravity level was constant at 0.17 G and suit mass was 89, 120, and 181 kg, yielding TGAWs of 282, 333, and 435 N. The 333 N condition was common to both series. Direct comparison was not possible due to limited adjustability of suit mass and limited options for parabolic profiles. Five astronaut subjects (80.3 11.8 kg) completed 4 different tasks (walk, bag pickup, lunge, and shoveling) in all conditions and provided ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and the gravity compensation and performance scale (GCPS) upon completion of each task. RESULTS: Where VM and VW series overlapped, RPE and GCPS trendlines were similar. Mean RPE and GCPS at 333 N was 8.4 and 3.7. Mean RPE and GCPS for VM was 7.8 and 3.8 for 282 N and 9.8 and 4.1 for 435 N. Extrapolation of the VM trend to match VW TGAWs 196 and 588 N predicts an RPE of 6.5 and 12.3 and GCPS of 4.4 and 5.9, whereas the measured VW values for RPE were 8.1 and 9.8 and GCPS were

  17. Effect of Changing Weight and Mass on Human Performance in a Lunar Prototype Spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steve; Lee, Lesley; Gemhardt, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Physical effort, compensation, and controllability in a spacesuit can be affected by suit mass and gravity level. Because of limitations in certain reduced-gravity simulators and the finite selection of lunar prototype suits, it is difficult to ascertain how a change in suit mass affects suited human performance. One method of simulating a change in mass is to vary the total gravity-adjusted weight (TGAW), which is defined as the sum of the suit mass and subject mass, multiplied by the gravity level. PURPOSE: To determine if two methods of changing TGAW during parabolic flight - changing suit mass or gravity level - affect subjective ratings of suited human performance equally.METHODS: A custom weight support structure was connected to a lunar prototype spacesuit, allowing the addition of mass to the suit while maintaining a near-constant center of mass. In the varied-weight (VW) series, suit mass (120 kg) was constant at 0.1-g, 0.17-g, and 0.3-g, yielding TGAWs of 196, 333, and 588 N, assuming an 80-kg subject. In the varied-mass (VM) series, gravity level was constant at 0.17-g and suit mass was 89, 120, and 181 kg, yielding TGAWs of 282, 333, and 435 N. The 333 N condition was common to both series. Direct comparison was not possible due to limited adjustability of suit mass and limited options for parabolic profiles. Five astronaut subjects (80.311.8 kg) completed 4 different tasks (walk, bag pickup, lunge, and shoveling) in all conditions and provided ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and the gravity compensation and performance scale (GCPS) upon completion of each task. RESULTS: Where VM and VW series overlapped, RPE and GCPS trend lines were similar. Mean RPE and GCPS at 333 N was 8.4 and 3.7. Mean RPE and GCPS for VM was 7.8 and 3.8 for 282 N and 9.8 and 4.1 for 435 N. Extrapolation of the VM trend to match VW TGAWs 196 and 588 N predicts an RPE of 6.5 and 12.3 and GCPS of 4.4 and 5.9, whereas the measured VW values for RPE were 8.1 and 9.8 and GCPS were

  18. Human cytomegalovirus clinical isolates carry at least 19 genes not found in laboratory strains.

    PubMed Central

    Cha, T A; Tom, E; Kemble, G W; Duke, G M; Mocarski, E S; Spaete, R R

    1996-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence comparisons were performed on a highly heterogeneous region of three human cytomegalovirus strains, Toledo, Towne, and AD169. The low-passage, virulent Toledo genome contained a DNA segment of approximately 13 kbp that was not found in the Towne genome and a segment of approximately 15 kbp that was not found in the AD169 genome. The Towne strain contained approximately 4.7 kbp of DNA that was absent from the AD169 genome, and only about half of this segment was present, arranged in an inverted orientation, in the Toledo genome. These additional sequences were located at the unique long (UL)/b' (IRL) boundary within the L component of the viral genome. A region representing nucleotides 175082 to 178221 of the AD169 genome was conserved in all three strains; however, substantial reduction in the size of the adjacent b' sequence was found. The additional DNA segment within the Toledo genome contained 19 open reading frames not present in the AD169 genome. The additional DNA segment within the Towne genome contained four new open reading frames, only one of which shared homology with the Toledo genome. This comparison was extended to five additional clinical isolates, and the additional Toledo sequence was conserved in all. These findings reveal a dramatic level of genome sequence complexity that may explain the differences that these strains exhibit in virulence and tissue tropism. Although the additional sequences have not altered the predicted size of the viral genome (230 to 235 kbp), a total of 22 new open reading frames (denoted UL133 to UL154), many of which have sequence characteristics of glycoproteins, are now defined as cytomegalovirus specific. Our work suggests that wild-type virus carries more than 220 genes, some of which are lost by large-scale deletion and rearrangement of the UL/b' region during laboratory passage. PMID:8523595

  19. A Nano-Thin Film-Based Prototype QCM Sensor Array for Monitoring Human Breath and Respiratory Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Selyanchyn, Roman; Wakamatsu, Shunichi; Hayashi, Kenshi; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor array was developed for multi-purpose human respiration assessment. The sensor system was designed to provide feedback for human respiration. Thorough optimization of measurement conditions: air flow, temperature in the QCM chamber, frequency measurement rate, and electrode position regarding to the gas flow—was performed. As shown, acquisition of respiratory parameters (rate and respiratory pattern) could be achieved even with a single electrode used in the system. The prototype system contains eight available QCM channels that can be potentially used for selective responses to certain breath chemicals. At present, the prototype machine is ready for the assessment of respiratory functions in larger populations in order to gain statistical validation. To the best of our knowledge, the developed prototype is the only respiratory assessment system based on surface modified QCM sensors. PMID:26263994

  20. A Nano-Thin Film-Based Prototype QCM Sensor Array for Monitoring Human Breath and Respiratory Patterns.

    PubMed

    Selyanchyn, Roman; Wakamatsu, Shunichi; Hayashi, Kenshi; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor array was developed for multi-purpose human respiration assessment. The sensor system was designed to provide feedback for human respiration. Thorough optimization of measurement conditions: air flow, temperature in the QCM chamber, frequency measurement rate, and electrode position regarding to the gas flow-was performed. As shown, acquisition of respiratory parameters (rate and respiratory pattern) could be achieved even with a single electrode used in the system. The prototype system contains eight available QCM channels that can be potentially used for selective responses to certain breath chemicals. At present, the prototype machine is ready for the assessment of respiratory functions in larger populations in order to gain statistical validation. To the best of our knowledge, the developed prototype is the only respiratory assessment system based on surface modified QCM sensors. PMID:26263994

  1. A Nano-Thin Film-Based Prototype QCM Sensor Array for Monitoring Human Breath and Respiratory Patterns.

    PubMed

    Selyanchyn, Roman; Wakamatsu, Shunichi; Hayashi, Kenshi; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor array was developed for multi-purpose human respiration assessment. The sensor system was designed to provide feedback for human respiration. Thorough optimization of measurement conditions: air flow, temperature in the QCM chamber, frequency measurement rate, and electrode position regarding to the gas flow-was performed. As shown, acquisition of respiratory parameters (rate and respiratory pattern) could be achieved even with a single electrode used in the system. The prototype system contains eight available QCM channels that can be potentially used for selective responses to certain breath chemicals. At present, the prototype machine is ready for the assessment of respiratory functions in larger populations in order to gain statistical validation. To the best of our knowledge, the developed prototype is the only respiratory assessment system based on surface modified QCM sensors.

  2. A decision support system prototype including human factors based on the TOGA meta-theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, M.; Memmi, F.; Gadomski, A. M.; Sepielli, M.

    2012-07-01

    The human contribution to the risk of operation of complex technological systems is often not negligible and sometimes tends to become significant, as shown by many reports on incidents and accidents occurred in the past inside Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). An error of a human operator of a NPP can derive by both omission and commission. For instance, complex commission errors can also lead to significant catastrophic technological accidents, as for the case of the Three Mile Island accident. Typically, the problem is analyzed by focusing on the single event chain that has provoked the incident or accident. What is needed is a general framework able to include as many parameters as possible, i.e. both technological and human factors. Such a general model could allow to envisage an omission or commission error before it can happen or, alternatively, suggest preferred actions to do in order to take countermeasures to neutralize the effect of the error before it becomes critical. In this paper, a preliminary Decision Support System (DSS) based on the so-called (-) TOGA meta-theory approach is presented. The application of such a theory to the management of nuclear power plants has been presented in the previous ICAPP 2011. Here, a human factor simulator prototype is proposed in order to include the effect of human errors in the decision path. The DSS has been developed using a TRIGA research reactor as reference plant, and implemented using the LabVIEW programming environment and the Finite State Machine (FSM) model The proposed DSS shows how to apply the Universal Reasoning Paradigm (URP) and the Universal Management Paradigm (UMP) to a real plant context. The DSS receives inputs from instrumentation data and gives as output a suggested decision. It is obtained as the result of an internal elaborating process based on a performance function. The latter, describes the degree of satisfaction and efficiency, which are dependent on the level of responsibility related to

  3. The Lake Tahoe Basin: A systems analysis of its characteristics and human carrying capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliland, Martha W.; Clark, B. David

    1981-09-01

    A systems analysis of the Lake Tahoe Basin indicates significant and accelerating environmental deterioration within the basin, suggests that Tahoe is poised for yet another round of urban expansion, delineates the portion of Tahoe's resources that are consumed by gaming recreation vis-à-vis outdoor recreation, and identifies the Federal government as a contributor to Tahoe's problems. In response to the need for a holistic approach to basin-wide planning and management, ecological carrying capacity concepts are explored as they may be applicable to the Basin's growth patterns, and ideas on establishing a carrying capacity for Tahoe are developed.

  4. Ecological Footprints and Appropriated Carrying Capacity: Measuring the Natural Capital Requirements of the Human Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ress, William E.; Wackernagel, Mathis

    1996-01-01

    Contrasts conventional economic rationality with economic principles. Develops an empirical approach based on a reinterpretation of carrying capacity that can account for technological advances and trade. Discusses the necessity of diverting much of the present consumption to investment in the maintenance of natural capital stocks. (AIM)

  5. Generation of KCL035 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in HBB gene.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-03-01

    The KCL035 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a mutation in the HBB gene, which is linked to the β-thalassemia syndrome. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345970

  6. Generation of KCL035 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in HBB gene

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL035 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a mutation in the HBB gene, which is linked to the β-thalassemia syndrome. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345970

  7. Human germ cell formation in xenotransplants of induced pluripotent stem cells carrying X chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Antonia A; Chiang, H Rosaria; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Reijo Pera, Renee A

    2014-09-22

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial loss of the second sex chromosome and is characterized by spontaneous fetal loss in >90% of conceptions. Survivors possess an array of somatic and germline clinical characteristics. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an opportunity for insight into genetic requirements of the X chromosome linked to Turner syndrome. We derived iPSCs from Turner syndrome and control individuals and examined germ cell development as a function of X chromosome composition. We demonstrate that two X chromosomes are not necessary for reprogramming or maintenance of pluripotency and that there are minimal differences in gene expression, at the single cell level, linked to X chromosome aneuploidies. Formation of germ cells, as assessed in vivo through a murine xenotransplantation model, indicated that undifferentiated iPSCs, independent of X chromosome composition, are capable of forming germ-cell-like cells (GCLCs) in vivo. In combination with clinical data regarding infertility in women with X chromosome aneuploidies, results suggest that two intact X chromosomes are not required for human germ cell formation, qualitatively or quantitatively, but rather are likely to be required for maintenance of human germ cells to adulthood.

  8. Post-human and scientific research: how engineering carried out the project.

    PubMed

    Ghilardi, Giampaolo; Accoto, Dino

    2014-01-01

    We start with a definition of robot in order to understand which are legitimate robotics' objectives. Then it is provided an outline of new robot generations and their industrial and biomedical applications. We consider the consequences of this new kind of technology on the notion of intelligence, stressing how the exteroceptive sensor systems provide a new bottom up approach to the AI debate. We consider three challenges Robotics have to face nowadays. First materials and components, which are built with technologies top-down, set huge limits in terms of weight, speed, safety and cost, not to mention reliability and durability. Second the methodological aspects: the challenge concerns the management of complexity. How to achieve intelligent and adaptive behaviours out of the control system of the robot, which must remain intrinsically simple? A third issue we address is the cultural one: the unreasonable expectations of the general public often provoked by a misunderstanding of the notion of intelligence itself. We consider then what makes human specifically human from a broader philosophic point of view, pointing out how the will is strangely absent in the AI debate. We show three advantages connected with this different perspective instead of the classical one intellect centered. First, while intellect is not used only by man, will is. Second, desire involves intellect while the reciprocal is not necessarily true. Third, looking at robotics and more specifically to cybernetics the key concept of these fields are control and governance, whereas both of them are specifically relate to the domain of will rather than intellect. We look then into the concept of participation as essential to the understanding of the notion of will, to overcome some roboethics' issues related to the adoption of the still dominant rationalistic paradigm. PMID:25684378

  9. Generation of KCL018 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in the DMPK gene

    PubMed Central

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Devito, Liani; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL018 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting one allele of the DMPK gene encoding the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (2200 trinucleotide repeats; 14 for the normal allele). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27346000

  10. Generation of KCL027 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in the HTT gene

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Laureen; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Hobbs, Carl; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL027 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting one allele of the HTT gene encoding huntingtin (43 trinucleotide repeats; 21 for the normal allele). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:27345982

  11. Generation of KCL017 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in VHL gene

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL017 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting splicing site of the VHL gene encoding von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (676 + 3 A > T). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345980

  12. Generation of KCL026 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in SMN1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL026 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a mutation in the SMN1 gene encoding survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric (exons 7 and 8 deletion). Mutations in this gene are associated with spinal muscular atrophy. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345977

  13. Generation of KCL013 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in the HTT gene

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Laureen; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL013 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting one allele of the HTT gene encoding huntingtin (42 trinucleotide repeats; 17 for the normal allele). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345987

  14. Generation of KCL016 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in VHL gene

    PubMed Central

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL016 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting splicing site of the VHL gene encoding von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (676 + 3A > T). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345783

  15. Generation of KCL012 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in the HTT gene

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Laureen; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Hobbs, Carl; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL012 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting one allele of the HTT gene encoding huntingtin (46 trinucleotide repeats; 17 for the normal allele). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:27345979

  16. Generation of KCL028 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in the HTT gene

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Laureen; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Hobbs, Carl; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL028 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting one allele of the HTT gene encoding huntingtin (43 trinucleotide repeats; 21 for the normal allele). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:27345983

  17. Generation of KCL025 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in NF1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL025 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation in the NF1 gene encoding neurofibromin (c.3739–3742 ΔTTTG). Mutations in this gene have been linked to neurofibromatosis type 1, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and Watson syndrome. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345978

  18. Generation of KCL036 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in the HTT gene

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Laureen; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Hobbs, Carl; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL036 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting one allele of the HTT gene encoding huntingtin (38 trinucleotide repeats; 14 for the normal allele). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:27346001

  19. Generation of KCL024 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in NF1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL024 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation in the NF1 gene encoding neurofibromin (c.3739–3742 ∆ TTTG). Mutations in this gene have been linked to neurofibromatosis type 1, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and Watson syndrome. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345975

  20. Generation of KCL017 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in VHL gene.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-03-01

    The KCL017 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting splicing site of the VHL gene encoding von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (676+3A>T). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345980

  1. Generation of KCL016 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in VHL gene.

    PubMed

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL016 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation affecting splicing site of the VHL gene encoding von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (676+3A>T). The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345783

  2. IS-EPOS - a prototype of EPOS Thematic Core Service for seismic processes induced by human operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Leptokaropoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    The community focused on seismic processes induced by human operations has been organized within EPOS Integration Program as Working Group 10 Infrastructure for Georesources. This group has brought together representatives from the scientific community and industry from 13 European countries. WG10 aims to integrate the research infrastructure (RI) in the area of seismicity induced (IS) by human activity: tremors and rockbursts in underground mines, seismicity associated with conventional and unconventional oil and gas production, induced by geothermal energy extraction and by underground reposition and storage of liquids (e.g. water disposal associated with energy extraction) and gases (CO2 sequestration, inter alia) and triggered by filling surface water reservoirs, etc. WG10 priority is to create new research opportunities in the field responding to global challenges connected with exploitation of georesources. WG10 has prepared the model of integration fulfilling the scientific mission and raising the visibility of stakeholders. The end-state Induced Seismicity Thematic Core Service (IS TCS) has been designed together with key metrics for TCS benefits in four areas: scientific, societal, economic and capacity building. IS-EPOS project, funded by National Centre for Research and Development, Poland within the program "Innovative Economy Operational Program Priority Axis 2 - R&D Infrastructure", aims at building a prototype of IS TCS. The prototype will implement fully the designed logic of IS TCS. Research infrastructure integrated within the prototype will comprise altogether seven comprehensive data cases of seismicity linked to deep mining related, associating geothermal production and triggered by reservoir impoundment. The implemented thematic services will enable studies within the use-case "Clustering of induced earthquakes". The IS TCS prototype is expected to reach full functionality by the end of 2014.

  3. Generation of KCL029 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in WAS gene

    PubMed Central

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL029 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a c.814 T > C mutation in the WAS gene, which is linked to the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare, inherited, X-linked, recessive disease characterized by immune dysregulation and microthrombocytopenia. The line is also carrier for a mutation p.N1152H in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator CFTR. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345811

  4. Generation of KCL029 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in WAS gene.

    PubMed

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL029 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a c.814T>C mutation in the WAS gene, which is linked to the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare, inherited, X-linked, recessive disease characterized by immune dysregulation and microthrombocytopenia. The line is also carrier for a mutation p.N1152H in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator CFTR. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345811

  5. A functional polyester carrying free hydroxyl groups promotes the mineralization of osteoblast and human mesenchymal stem cell extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaoping; You, Zhengwei; Gao, Jin; Fan, Xianqun; Wang, Yadong

    2014-06-01

    Functional groups can control biointerfaces and provide a simple way to make therapeutic materials. We recently reported the design and synthesis of poly(sebacoyl diglyceride) (PSeD) carrying a free hydroxyl group in its repeating unit. This paper examines the use of this polymer to promote biomineralization for application in bone tissue engineering. PSeD promoted more mineralization of extracellular matrix secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells and rat osteoblasts than poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), which is currently widely used in bone tissue engineering. PSeD showed in vitro osteocompatibility and in vivo biocompatibility that matched or surpassed that of PLGA, as well as supported the attachment, proliferation and differentiation of rat osteoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells. This demonstrates the potential of PSeD for use in bone regeneration. PMID:24560799

  6. Neanderthal origin of the haplotypes carrying the functional variant Val92Met in the MC1R in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiliang; Hu, Ya; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ruyue; Yan, Shi; Wang, Jiucun; Jin, Li

    2014-08-01

    Skin color is one of the most visible and important phenotypes of modern humans. Melanocyte-stimulating hormone and its receptor played an important role in regulating skin color. In this article, we present evidence of Neanderthal introgression encompassing the melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor gene MC1R. The haplotypes from Neanderthal introgression diverged with the Altai Neanderthal 103.3 ka, which postdates the anatomically modern human-Neanderthal divergence. We further discovered that all of the putative Neanderthal introgressive haplotypes carry the Val92Met variant, a loss-of-function variant in MC1R that is associated with multiple dermatological traits including skin color and photoaging. Frequency of this Neanderthal introgression is low in Europeans (∼5%), moderate in continental East Asians (∼30%), and high in Taiwanese aborigines (60-70%). As the putative Neanderthal introgressive haplotypes carry a loss-of-function variant that could alter the function of MC1R and is associated with multiple traits related to skin color, we speculate that the Neanderthal introgression may have played an important role in the local adaptation of Eurasians to sunlight intensity.

  7. Characterization of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions in prion protein-humanized mice carrying distinct codon 129 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ironside, James W; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2013-07-26

    To date, all clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) patients are homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129M/M) of the prion protein (PrP) gene. However, the appearance of asymptomatic secondary vCJD infection in individuals with a PRNP codon 129 genotype other than M/M and transmission studies using animal models have raised the concern that all humans might be susceptible to vCJD prions, especially via secondary infection. To reevaluate this possibility and to analyze in detail the transmission properties of vCJD prions to transgenic animals carrying distinct codon 129 genotype, we performed intracerebral inoculation of vCJD prions to humanized knock-in mice carrying all possible codon 129 genotypes (129M/M, 129M/V, or 129V/V). All humanized knock-in mouse lines were susceptible to vCJD infection, although the attack rate gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The amount of PrP deposition including florid/amyloid plaques in the brain also gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The biochemical properties of protease-resistant abnormal PrP in the brain and transmissibility of these humanized mouse-passaged vCJD prions upon subpassage into knock-in mice expressing bovine PrP were not affected by the codon 129 genotype. These results indicate that individuals with the 129V/V genotype may be more susceptible to secondary vCJD infection than expected and may lack the neuropathological characteristics observed in vCJD patients with the 129M/M genotype. Besides the molecular typing of protease-resistant PrP in the brain, transmission studies using knock-in mice carrying bovine PrP may aid the differential diagnosis of secondary vCJD infection, especially in individuals with the 129V/V genotype.

  8. Very low cost stand-off suicide bomber detection system using human gait analysis to screen potential bomb carrying individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greneker, Gene, III

    2005-05-01

    Individuals who carry bombs on their bodies and detonate those bombs in public places are a security problem. There is belief that suicide bombings currently used in the mid-east may spread to the United States if the organized terrorist groups operating in the United States are not identified and the cell members arrested. While bombs in vehicles are the primary method currently used to spread terror in Iraq, U. S. warfighters are starting to face suicide bombers. This may become more of the situation if a stand-off detection capability is developed for the vehicle bomb case. This paper presents a concept, that if developed and commercialized, could provide an inexpensive suicide bomber screening system that could be used to screen individuals approaching a checkpoint while the individual is still 500 to 1,000 feet from the checkpoint. The proposed system measures both the radar cross-section of the individual and the radar derived gait characteristics that are associated with individuals carrying a bomb on their body. GTRI researchers propose to use human gait characteristics, as detected by radar, to determine if a human subject who is carrying no visible load on the body is actually carrying a concealed load under their clothes. The use of radar gait as a metric for the detection (as opposed to a video system) of a suicide bomber is being proposed because detection of gait characteristics are thought to be less sensitive to where the bomb is located on the body, lighting conditions, and the fact that the legs may be shrouded in a robe. The detection of a bomb using radar gait analysis may also prove to be less sensitive to changing tactics regarding where the bomb is placed on the body. An inert suicide bomb vest was constructed using water pipes to simulate the explosive devices. Wiring was added to simulated detonators. The vest weighs approximately 35 pounds. Radar data was taken on the volunteer subject wearing the vest that simulated the suicide bomb. This

  9. Development of a Prototype Human Resources Data Handbook for Systems Engineering: An Application to Fire Control Systems. Final Report for Period October 1971-June 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Lawrence E.; And Others

    The methods and problems encountered in the development of a prototype human resources data handbook are discussed. The goal of the research was to determine whether it was feasible to consolidate, in a single comprehensive handbook, human resources data applicable to system design and development. Selected for this purpose were data on the…

  10. Gene Editing of Human Embryonic Stem Cells via an Engineered Baculoviral Vector Carrying Zinc-finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yuning; Lee, Chi-Lin; Joo, Kye-Il; Zarzar, Jonathan; Liu, Yarong; Dai, Bingbing; Fox, Victoria; Wang, Pin

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are renewable cell sources that have potential applications in regenerative medicine. The development of technologies to produce permanent and site-specific genome modifications is in demand to achieve future medical implementation of hES cells. We report herein that a baculoviral vector (BV) system carrying zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) can successfully modify the hES cell genome. BV-mediated transient expression of ZFNs specifically disrupted the CCR5 locus in transduced cells and the modified cells exhibited resistance to HIV-1 transduction. To convert the BV to a gene targeting vector, a DNA donor template and ZFNs were incorporated into the vector. These hybrid vectors yielded permanent site-specific gene addition in both immortalized human cell lines (10%) and hES cells (5%). Modified hES cells were both karyotypically normal and pluripotent. These results suggest that this baculoviral delivery system can be engineered for site-specific genetic manipulation in hES cells. PMID:21326219

  11. Using Biomarkers in Sewage to Monitor Community-Wide Human Health: Isoprostances as Conceptual Prototype

    EPA Science Inventory

    Timely assessment of the aggregate health of small-area human populations is essential for guiding the optimal investment of resources needed for preventing, avoiding, controlling, or mitigating exposure risks. Seeking those interventions yielding the greatest benefit with respec...

  12. Improved LAboratory Prototype ELectrolarynx (LAPEL): using inverse filtering of the frequency response function of the human throat.

    PubMed

    Norton, R L; Bernstein, R S

    1993-01-01

    The electrolarynx (EL) provides a valued means of verbal communication for people who have lost their larynx. Existing ELs have some drawbacks such as harsh, raucous, and unpleasant sound and the presence of background noise. This study presents an experimental analysis of two commercial ELs and describes the development and testing of an improved LAboratory Prototype ELectrolarynx (LAPEL) which more accurately simulates the sound of a natural larynx and has lower background noise. This natural sound is obtained by determining the frequency response function (FRF) of the tissue of the human neck and using this information to tailor the input signal to the EL by inverse filtering such that its output spectrum resembles that of the natural larynx. The result was subjectively judged to have a superior and more natural sound than existing electrolarynxes.

  13. Replicon typing of plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-15 among Enterobacteriaceae isolated at the environment, livestock and human interface.

    PubMed

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Glier, Melinda; Hächler, Herbert; Stephan, Roger

    2015-07-15

    One of the currently most important antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae is based on the production of ESBL enzymes that inactivate β-lactam antibiotics including cephalosporins and monobactams by hydrolyzing their β-lactam ring. In humans, the most prevalent ESBL enzyme type is encoded by blaCTX-M-15. CTX-M-15 producing enterobacterial strains were also frequently isolated from environmental samples including surface water and freshwater fish. Plasmids, which can be grouped in different plasmid incompatibility types, play a key role in the horizontal spread of these multidrug resistance genes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of plasmids that carry blaCTX-M-15 genes among Enterobacteriaceae isolated at the environment, livestock and human interface. In total, 81 blaCTX-M-15-harboring isolates collected between 2009 and 2014 were tested for its ability to transfer blaCTX-M-15 by conjugation. These plasmids were further typed. Transfer of a single blaCTX-M-15-harboring plasmid was observed in 32 (39.5%) of the isolates. The most frequent replicon types detected among these plasmids are IncF-type plasmids (n=12) (mostly multi replicon plasmids with a combination of following replicons: IncFII, IncFIA and IncFIB), followed by IncI1 (n=8), IncK (n=3) and IncR (n=1). A noticeable number of plasmids (n=8) could not be assigned to any of the tested replicon types. Knowledge about the plasmid types circulating in bacterial populations is indispensable for understanding epidemiological dynamics and for establishing intervention strategies to stop further dissemination of particular plasmids.

  14. WearDY: Wearable dynamics. A prototype for human whole-body force and motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Nori, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Motion capture is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications towards human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of dynamic information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for human wearable dynamic (WearDY) motion capture for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. Our conceptual framework encompasses traditional passive markers based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational framework for estimating dynamic quantities originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present preliminary experimental analysis of our framework on subjects performing a two Degrees-of-Freedom bowing task and we estimate the motion and dynamic quantities. We discuss the implication of our proposal towards the design of a novel wearable force and motion capture suit and its applications.

  15. Genomic organization of the human NSP gene, prototype of a novel gene family encoding reticulons

    SciTech Connect

    Roebroek, A.J.M.; Ayoubi, T.A.Y.; Velde, H.J.K. van de; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Pauli, I.G.L.; Van De Ven, W.J.M.

    1996-03-01

    Recently, cDNA cloning and expression of three mRNA variants of the human NSP gene were described. This neuroendocrine-specific gene encodes three NSP protein isoforms with unique amino-terminal parts, but common carboxy-terminal parts. The proteins, with yet unknown function, are associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and therefore are named NSP reticulons. Potentially, these proteins are neuroendocrine markers of a novel category in human lung cancer diagnosis. Here, the genomic organization of this gene was studied by analysis of genomic clones isolated from lambda phage and YAC libraries. The NSP exons were found to be dispersed over a genomic region of about 275 kb. The present elucidation of the genomic organization of the NSP gene explains the generation of NSP mRNA variants encoding NSP protein isoforms. Multiple promoters rather than alternative splicing of internal exons seem to be involved in this diversity. Furthermore, comparison of NSP genomic and cDNA sequences with databank nucleotide sequences resulted in the discovery of other human members of this novel family of reticulons encoding genes. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Greenbrier Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-18

    This case study describes a prototype home that is the model home for the Homes at Greenbrier in Oakdale, Connecticut, and demonstrates the builder's concept of “attainable sustainable” of offering high performance homes at mid-market prices.

  17. Modeling human impact in the past: a dynamic soil model as a step towards quantifying agricultural carrying capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Loo, Maarten; Verstraeten, Gert

    2015-04-01

    to come up with adaptive water management techniques, or relocate their agricultural activities in order to reach the same level of crop yields as before land degradation. In order to validate this human-environment coupling however, a more detailed archaeobotanical analysis is required. Nevertheless, these novel methods of quantifying agricultural carrying capacity should allow to nuance traditional views of direct links between landscape degradation and societal crisis, and open the debate on the higher resilience of these societies in the past.

  18. In vivo transcriptional targeting into the retinal vasculature using recombinant baculovirus carrying the human flt-1 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustín; Clapp, Carmen; Aranda, Jorge; Vaca, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Background Endothelial cells are a target for gene therapy because they are implicated in a number of vascular diseases. Recombinant baculovirus have emerged as novel gene delivery vectors. However, there is no information available concerning the use of endothelial-specific promoters in the context of the baculovirus genome. In the present study, we have generated a recombinant baculovirus containing the human flt-1 promoter (BacFLT-GFP) driving the expression of the green fluorescent protein. Transcriptional gene targeting was analyzed in vitro in different mammalian cell lines and in vivo in adult rat retinal vasculature. Results BacFLT-GFP evoked the highest levels of expression in the endothelial cell line BUVEC-E6E7-1, similar to those reached by recombinant baculovirus carrying the CMV promoter (112% relative to BacCMV-GFP, n = 4). Interestingly, BacFLT-GFP directed high levels of expression in rat glioma C6 and in human glioblastoma CH235 cells (34.78% and 47.86% relative to BacCMV-GFP, respectively). Histone deacetylase inhibitors such as butyrate or trichostatin A enhanced the transcriptional activity of both BacCMV-GFP and BacFLT-GFP. Thus, in this study histone deacetylation appears to be a central mechanism for the silencing of baculovirus, independently of the promoter utilized. In vivo transcriptional targeting was demonstrated in adult rat retinal vasculature by intravitreal delivery of BacFLT-GFP and immunohistochemical staining with von Willebrand factor (vWF). Analysis by fluorescence microscopy and deconvolved three-dimensional confocal microscopy of retinal whole mounts obtained after 3 days of baculovirus injection showed that most GFP-expressing cells localized to the inner limiting membrane (ILM) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) and colocalize with vWF (70%, n = 10) in blood vessels, confirming the endothelial phenotype of the transduced cells. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that the restricted expression in endothelial cells

  19. Large-Scale Production of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Serotype-9 Carrying the Human Survival Motor Neuron Gene.

    PubMed

    Rashnonejad, Afrooz; Chermahini, Gholamhossein Amini; Li, Shaoyong; Ozkinay, Ferda; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors are a suitable vector for gene therapy studies because of desired characteristics such as low immunogenicity, transfection of non-dividing and dividing cells, and long-term expression of the transgene. In this study, the large-scale production of single stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the human survival motor neuron (SMN) gene (AAV9-SMN) suitable for in vivo gene therapy studies of SMA was described. SMN cDNA has been cloned into pAAV-CB6-PI and pAAVsc-CB6-PI with and without its specific UTRs, respectively. Both plasmids bear CMV enhancer/beta-actin (CB) promoter, CMV IE enhancer, and polyadenylation signal sequences. 2.5 μg of constructed pAAV-CB6-PI-SMN and pAAVsc-CB6-PI-SMN cause to, respectively, 4.853- and 2.321-fold increases in SMN protein levels in transfected cells compared to untransfected cells. Ss and scAAV9-SMN vectors were also produced from these plasmids by transient transfection of HEK293 cells using CaCl2 solution. The silver staining and electron microscopy analysis demonstrated good quality of both isolated vectors, ssAAV9-SMN and scAAV9-SMN, with the titers of 2.00E+13 and 1.00E+13 GC/ml. The results of this study show that, the plasmid containing UTR elements causes to twice more SMN gene expression in transfected cells. The quality control results show that both produced ss and scAAV9-SMN are suitable for in vivo studies.

  20. Design and fabrication of a prototype for an automatic transport system for transferring human and other wastes to an incinerator unit onboard spacecraft, phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labak, L. J.; Remus, G. A.; Mansnerus, R.

    1971-01-01

    Three transport system concepts were experimentally evaluated for transferring human and nonhuman wastes from a collection site to an incineration unit onboard spacecraft. The operating parameters, merits, and shortcomings of a porous-pneumatic, nozzle-pneumatic, and a mechanical screw-feed system were determined. An analysis of the test data was made and a preliminary design of two prototype systems was prepared.

  1. Effects of prototypic calcium channel blockers in methadone-maintained humans responding under a naloxone discrimination procedurea

    PubMed Central

    Oliveto, Alison; Mancino, Michael; Sanders, Nichole; Cargile, Christopher; Guise, J. Benjamin; Bickel, Warren; Gentry, W. Brooks

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs) attenuate the expression of opioid withdrawal and the dihydropyridine L-type CCB isradipine has been shown to block the behavioral effects of naloxone in opioid-maintained humans. This study determined whether two prototypic L-type CCBs with differing chemical structures, the benzothiazepine diltiazem and the phenylalkamine verapamil, attenuate the behavioral effects of naloxone in methadone-maintained humans trained to distinguish between low-dose naloxone (0.15 mg/70 kg, i.m.) and placebo under an instructed novel-response drug discrimination procedure. Once discrimination was acquired, diltiazem (0, 30, 60, 120 mg) and verapamil (0, 30, 60, 120 mg), alone and combined with the training dose of naloxone, were tested. Diltiazem alone produced 33–50% naloxone- and novel-appropriate responding at 30 and 60 mg and essentially placebo-appropriate responding at 120 mg. Verapamil alone produced 20–40% naloxone- and 0% novel-appropriate responding. Diltiazem at 60 mg decreased several ratings associated with positive mood and increased VAS ratings of “Bad Drug Effects” relative to placebo, whereas verapamil increased ratings associated with euphoria. When administered with naloxone, diltiazem produced 94–100% naloxone-appropriate-responding with 6% novel-appropriate responding at 60 mg (n=3). When administered with naloxone, verapamil produced 60–80% naloxone- and 0% novel-appropriate responding (n=5). Diltiazem decreased diastolic blood pressure and heart rate whereas verapamil decreased ratings of arousal relative to placebo. These results suggest that CCBs with different chemical structures can be differentiated behaviorally, and that diltiazem and verapamil do not attenuate the discriminative stimulus effects of naloxone in humans at the doses tested. PMID:23524089

  2. The Tsukuba hypertensive mouse (transgenic mouse carrying human genes for both renin and angiotensinogen) as a model of human malignant hypertension: development of lesions and morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimokama, T; Haraoka, S; Horiguchi, H; Sugiyama, F; Murakami, K; Watanabe, T

    1998-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has a pivotal role in hypertension. The Tsukuba hypertensive mouse (THM; a transgenic mouse carrying human genes for both renin and angiotensinogen) was generated to allow further examination of the renin-angiotensin system in a variety of pathologic conditions. We evaluated the development of renal lesions in these mice and in controls by morphometric, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural methods. Blood pressure was significantly higher in THM than in control mice; 1 year after birth, it was approximately 40 mmHg higher. The kidney-to-body weight ratio was also higher in THM than in control. Morphometrical analysis revealed that the glomerular sclerosis index was significantly elevated in THM with 10% of the glomeruli sclerotic at 18 months. The grade of vascular lesion and the frequency of fibronoid arteritis of the kidney exhibited the same tendency as the glomerular sclerosis index. Murine renin was located exclusively in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, whereas human renin was expressed not only in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, but also in periarteriolar smooth muscle cells and in mesangial and epithelial cells of the glomeruli. Light and electron microscopy revealed significant fibrinoid arteritis of the kidney in THM and also "onion skinning", both pathognomonic for malignant nephrosclerosis. THM may be an excellent model of human malignant hypertension. PMID:9504863

  3. Generation of KCL021 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a ΔF508 mutation in the CFTR gene

    PubMed Central

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL021 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a ΔF508 mutation affecting the CFTR gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345808

  4. Generation of KCL021 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a ΔF508 mutation in the CFTR gene.

    PubMed

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL021 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a ΔF508 mutation affecting the CFTR gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345808

  5. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(21)-1 - Disclosure of return information to the Department of Health and Human Services to carry out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disclosure of return information to the Department of Health and Human Services to carry out eligibility requirements for health insurance affordability programs. 301.6103(l)(21)-1 Section 301.6103(l)(21)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  6. Increased nicotine response in iPSC-derived human neurons carrying the CHRNA5 N398 allele

    PubMed Central

    Oni, Eileen N.; Halikere, Apoorva; Li, Guohui; Toro-Ramos, Alana J.; Swerdel, Mavis R.; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Moore, Jennifer C.; Bello, Nicholas T.; Bierut, Laura J.; Goate, Alison; Tischfield, Jay A.; Pang, Zhiping P.; Hart, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation in nicotinic receptor alpha 5 (CHRNA5) has been associated with increased risk of addiction-associated phenotypes in humans yet little is known the underlying neural basis. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were derived from donors homozygous for either the major (D398) or the minor (N398) allele of the nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs16969968, in CHRNA5. To understand the impact of these nicotinic receptor variants in humans, we differentiated these iPSCs to dopamine (DA) or glutamatergic neurons and then tested their functional properties and response to nicotine. Results show that N398 variant human DA neurons differentially express genes associated with ligand receptor interaction and synaptic function. While both variants exhibited physiological properties consistent with mature neuronal function, the N398 neuronal population responded more actively with an increased excitatory postsynaptic current response upon the application of nicotine in both DA and glutamatergic neurons. Glutamatergic N398 neurons responded to lower nicotine doses (0.1 μM) with greater frequency and amplitude but they also exhibited rapid desensitization, consistent with previous analyses of N398-associated nicotinic receptor function. This study offers a proof-of-principle for utilizing human neurons to study gene variants contribution to addiction. PMID:27698409

  7. DNA ligase III and DNA ligase IV carry out genetically distinct forms of end joining in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sehyun; Harvey, Adam; Zimbric, Jacob; Wang, Yongbao; Nguyen, Thanh; Jackson, Pauline J.; Hendrickson, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Ku-dependent C-NHEJ (classic non-homologous end joining) is the primary DNA EJing (end joining) repair pathway in mammals. Recently, an additional EJing repair pathway (A-NHEJ; alternative-NHEJ) has been described. Currently, the mechanism of A-NHEJ is obscure although a dependency on LIGIII (DNA ligase III) is often implicated. To test the requirement for LIGIII in A-NHEJ we constructed a LIGIII conditionally-null human cell line using gene targeting. Nuclear EJing activity appeared unaffected by a deficiency in LIGIII as, surprisingly, so were random gene targeting integration events. In contrast, LIGIII was required for mitochondrial function and this defined the gene’s essential activity. Human Ku:LIGIII and Ku:LIGIV (DNA ligase IV) double knockout cell lines, however, demonstrated that LIGIII is required for the enhanced A-NHEJ activity that is observed in Ku-deficient cells. Most unexpectedly, however, the majority of EJing events remained LIGIV-dependent. In conclusion, although human LIGIII has an essential function in mitochondrial maintenance, it is dispensable for most types of nuclear DSB repair, except for the A-NHEJ events that are normally suppressed by Ku. Moreover, we describe that a robust Ku-independent, LIGIV-dependent repair pathway exists in human somatic cells. PMID:24837021

  8. Identification of human papillomavirus type 156, the prototype of a new human gammapapillomavirus species, by a generic and highly sensitive PCR strategy for long DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Chouhy, Diego; Bolatti, Elisa M; Piccirilli, Gustavo; Sánchez, Adriana; Fernandez Bussy, Ramón; Giri, Adriana A

    2013-03-01

    This study developed a hanging-droplet long PCR, a generic and highly sensitive strategy to facilitate the identification of new human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes. This novel procedure used for the first time the hanging-droplet PCR technique for the amplification of long DNA fragments with generic primers targeting the L1 and E1 regions. It was first applied to the amplification of types belonging to the highly divergent genus Gammapapillovirus (γ-PV). The hanging-droplet long PCR was 100-fold more sensitive than a simple long PCR procedure, detecting as few as ten copies of HPV-4. Nineteen skin samples, potentially containing putative HPV types from the γ-PV genus, were also screened. The method identified four γ-PV genomic halves from new and previously described putative types, and made the full characterization of HPV-156 possible. This novel virus meets the criteria for a new species within the γ-PV genus, with nucleotide identities in the L1 ORF ranging from 58.3 to 67.3 % compared with representative types of the current γ-PV species. HPV-156 showed the highest identity to HPV-60 (67.3 %) from species γ-4, and was consistently closely related to it in both late- and early-gene-derived phylogenies. In conclusion, this report provides a versatile and highly sensitive approach that allowed identification of the prototype of a new species within the γ-PV genus. Its application with primers targeting the different genera in which both human and non-human PVs are distributed may facilitate characterization of the missing members of the family Papillomaviridae.

  9. Electronic prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopcroft, J.

    1987-01-01

    The potential benefits of automation in space are significant. The science base needed to support this automation not only will help control costs and reduce lead-time in the earth-based design and construction of space stations, but also will advance the nation's capability for computer design, simulation, testing, and debugging of sophisticated objects electronically. Progress in automation will require the ability to electronically represent, reason about, and manipulate objects. Discussed here is the development of representations, languages, editors, and model-driven simulation systems to support electronic prototyping. In particular, it identifies areas where basic research is needed before further progress can be made.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the main neutralization and hemagglutination determinants of all human adenovirus prototypes as a basis for molecular classification and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Madisch, Ijad; Harste, Gabi; Pommer, Heidi; Heim, Albert

    2005-12-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) are responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. The neutralization epsilon determinant (loops 1 and 2) and the hemagglutination gamma determinant are relevant for the taxonomy of HAdV. Precise type identification of HAdV prototypes is crucial for detection of infection chains and epidemiology. epsilon and gamma determinant sequences of all 51 HAdV were generated to propose molecular classification criteria. Phylogenetic analysis of epsilon determinant sequences demonstrated sufficient genetic divergence for molecular classification, with the exception of HAdV-15 and HAdV-29, which also cannot be differentiated by classical cross-neutralization. Precise sequence divergence criteria for typing (<2.5% from loop 2 prototype sequence and <2.4% from loop 1 sequence) were deduced from phylogenetic analysis. These criteria may also facilitate identification of new HAdV prototypes. Fiber knob (gamma determinant) phylogeny indicated a two-step model of species evolution and multiple intraspecies recombination events in the origin of HAdV prototypes. HAdV-29 was identified as a recombination variant of HAdV-15 (epsilon determinant) and a speculative, not-yet-isolated HAdV prototype (gamma determinant). Subanalysis of molecular evolution in hypervariable regions 1 to 6 of the epsilon determinant indicated different selective pressures in subclusters of species HAdV-D. Additionally, gamma determinant phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that HAdV-8 did not cluster with -19 and -37 in spite of their having the same tissue tropism. The phylogeny of HAdV-E4 suggested origination by interspecies recombination between HAdV-B (hexon) and HAdV-C (fiber), as in simian adenovirus 25, indicating additional zoonotic transfer. In conclusion, molecular classification by systematic sequence analysis of immunogenic determinants yields new insights into HAdV phylogeny and evolution.

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Main Neutralization and Hemagglutination Determinants of All Human Adenovirus Prototypes as a Basis for Molecular Classification and Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Madisch, Ijad; Harste, Gabi; Pommer, Heidi; Heim, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) are responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. The neutralization ɛ determinant (loops 1 and 2) and the hemagglutination γ determinant are relevant for the taxonomy of HAdV. Precise type identification of HAdV prototypes is crucial for detection of infection chains and epidemiology. ɛ and γ determinant sequences of all 51 HAdV were generated to propose molecular classification criteria. Phylogenetic analysis of ɛ determinant sequences demonstrated sufficient genetic divergence for molecular classification, with the exception of HAdV-15 and HAdV-29, which also cannot be differentiated by classical cross-neutralization. Precise sequence divergence criteria for typing (<2.5% from loop 2 prototype sequence and <2.4% from loop 1 sequence) were deduced from phylogenetic analysis. These criteria may also facilitate identification of new HAdV prototypes. Fiber knob (γ determinant) phylogeny indicated a two-step model of species evolution and multiple intraspecies recombination events in the origin of HAdV prototypes. HAdV-29 was identified as a recombination variant of HAdV-15 (ɛ determinant) and a speculative, not-yet-isolated HAdV prototype (γ determinant). Subanalysis of molecular evolution in hypervariable regions 1 to 6 of the ɛ determinant indicated different selective pressures in subclusters of species HAdV-D. Additionally, γ determinant phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that HAdV-8 did not cluster with -19 and -37 in spite of their having the same tissue tropism. The phylogeny of HAdV-E4 suggested origination by interspecies recombination between HAdV-B (hexon) and HAdV-C (fiber), as in simian adenovirus 25, indicating additional zoonotic transfer. In conclusion, molecular classification by systematic sequence analysis of immunogenic determinants yields new insights into HAdV phylogeny and evolution. PMID:16306598

  12. Safe housing ensured by an electric field screen that excludes insect-net permeating haematophagous mosquitoes carrying human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Kakutani, K.; Nonomura, T.; Kimbara, J.; Osamura, K.; Kusakar, S.; Toyoda, H.

    2015-10-01

    An electric field screen can be used to keep mosquitoes out of houses with open windows. In this study, doubly charged dipolar electric field screens (DD-screens) were used to capture mosquitoes entering through a window. The screen had two components: three layers of insulated conductor iron wires (ICWs) in parallel arrays and two electrostatic direct current (DC) voltage generators that supplied negative or positive voltages to the ICWs. Within each layer, the ICWs were parallel at 5-mm intervals, and connected to each other and to a negative or positive voltage generator. The negatively and positively charged ICWs are represented as ICW(-) and ICW(+), respectively. The screen consisted of one ICW(+) layer with an ICW(-) layer on either side. The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and house mosquito (Culex pipiens) were used as models of vectors carrying viral pathogens. Adult mosquitoes were blown into the space between the ICWs by sending compressed air through the tip of an insect aspirator to determine the voltage range that captured all of the test insects. Wind speed was measured at the surface of the ICW using a sensitive anemometer. The result showed that at ≥ 1.2 kV, the force was strong enough that the ICWs captured all of the mosquitoes, despite a wind speed of 7 m/s. Therefore, the DD-screen could serve as a physical barrier to prevent noxious mosquitoes from entering houses with good air penetration.

  13. Epigenetic characterization of the FMR1 promoter in induced pluripotent stem cells from human fibroblasts carrying an unmethylated full mutation.

    PubMed

    de Esch, Celine E F; Ghazvini, Mehrnaz; Loos, Friedemann; Schelling-Kazaryan, Nune; Widagdo, W; Munshi, Shashini T; van der Wal, Erik; Douben, Hannie; Gunhanlar, Nilhan; Kushner, Steven A; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; de Vrij, Femke M S; Geijsen, Niels; Gribnau, Joost; Willemsen, Rob

    2014-10-14

    Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM) individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene. PMID:25358783

  14. Epigenetic Characterization of the FMR1 Promoter in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Carrying an Unmethylated Full Mutation

    PubMed Central

    de Esch, Celine E.F.; Ghazvini, Mehrnaz; Loos, Friedemann; Schelling-Kazaryan, Nune; Widagdo, W.; Munshi, Shashini T.; van der Wal, Erik; Douben, Hannie; Gunhanlar, Nilhan; Kushner, Steven A.; Pijnappel, W.W.M. Pim; de Vrij, Femke M.S.; Geijsen, Niels; Gribnau, Joost; Willemsen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Summary Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM) individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene. PMID:25358783

  15. Seropathotypes, Phylogroups, Stx subtypes, and intimin types of wildlife-carried, shiga toxin-producing escherichia coli strains with the same characteristics as human-pathogenic isolates.

    PubMed

    Mora, Azucena; López, Cecilia; Dhabi, Ghizlane; López-Beceiro, Ana M; Fidalgo, Luís E; Díaz, Eduardo A; Martínez-Carrasco, Carlos; Mamani, Rosalía; Herrera, Alexandra; Blanco, Jesús E; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Jorge

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains in wildlife that have spread in Europe, living near human settlements; to analyze their epidemiological role in maintenance and transmission to domestic livestock; and to assess the potential health risk of wildlife-carried strains. STEC strains were recovered from 53% of roe deer, 8.4% of wild boars, and 1.9% of foxes sampled in the northwest of Spain (Galicia). Of the 40 serotypes identified, 21 were classified as seropathotypes associated with human disease, accounting for 81.5% of the wildlife-carried STEC strains, including the enterohemorrhagic serotypes O157:H7-D-eae-γ1, O26:[H11]-B1-eae-β1, O121:H19-B1-eae-ε1, and O145:[H28]-D-eae-γ1. None of the wildlife-carried strains belonged to the highly pathogenic serotype O104:H4-B1 from the recent Germany outbreak. Forty percent of wildlife-carried STEC strains shared serotypes, phylogroups, intimin types, and Stx profiles with isolates from human patients from the same geographic area. Furthermore, wildlife-carried strains belonging to serotypes O5:HNM-A, O26:[H11]-B1, O76:H19-B1, O145:[H28]-D, O146:H21-B1, and O157:H7-D showed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles with >85% similarity to human-pathogenic STEC strains. We also found a high level of similarity among STEC strains of serotypes O5:HNM-A, O26:[H11]-B1, and O145:HNM-D of bovine (feces and beef) and wildlife origins. Interestingly, O146:H21-B1, the second most frequently detected serotype in this study, is commonly associated with human diarrhea and isolated from beef and vegetables sold in Galicia. Importantly, at least 3 STEC isolates from foxes (O5:HNM-A-eae-β1, O98:[H21]-B1-eae-ζ1, and O146:[H21]-B1) showed characteristics similar to those of human STEC strains. In conclusion, roe deer, wild boar, and fox in Galicia are confirmed to be carriers of STEC strains potentially pathogenic for humans and seem to play an

  16. Synthesis of multivalent sialyllactosamine-carrying glyco-nanoparticles with high affinity to the human influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Umemura, Seiichiro; Sugiyama, Naohiro; Kuwano, Natsuki; Koizumi, Ami; Sawada, Tadakazu; Yanase, Michiyo; Takaha, Takeshi; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi; Usui, Taichi

    2016-11-20

    A series of multivalent sialoglyco-conjugated nanoparticles were efficiently synthesized by using highly-branched α-glucuronic acid-linked cyclic dextrins (GlcA-HBCD) as a backbone. The sialoglycoside-moieties, with varying degrees of substitution, could be incorporated onto the preformed nanoparticles. These synthesized particles, which are highly soluble in aqueous solution, were shown to have a spherical nanostructure with a diameter of approximately 15nm. The interactions of the sialoglyco-nanoparticles (Neu5Acα2,6LacNAc-GlcA-HBCDs) with human influenza virus strain A/Beijing/262/95 (H1N1) were investigated using a hemagglutination inhibition assay. The sialoglyco-nanoparticle, in which the number of sialic acid substitution is 30, acted as a powerful inhibitor of virus binding activity. We show that both distance and multiplicity of effective ligand-virus formation play important roles in enhancing viral inhibition. Our results indicate that the GlcA-HBCD backbone can be used as a novel spherical nanocluster material for preparing a variety of glyco-nanoparticles to facilitate molecular recognition.

  17. Synthesis of multivalent sialyllactosamine-carrying glyco-nanoparticles with high affinity to the human influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Umemura, Seiichiro; Sugiyama, Naohiro; Kuwano, Natsuki; Koizumi, Ami; Sawada, Tadakazu; Yanase, Michiyo; Takaha, Takeshi; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi; Usui, Taichi

    2016-11-20

    A series of multivalent sialoglyco-conjugated nanoparticles were efficiently synthesized by using highly-branched α-glucuronic acid-linked cyclic dextrins (GlcA-HBCD) as a backbone. The sialoglycoside-moieties, with varying degrees of substitution, could be incorporated onto the preformed nanoparticles. These synthesized particles, which are highly soluble in aqueous solution, were shown to have a spherical nanostructure with a diameter of approximately 15nm. The interactions of the sialoglyco-nanoparticles (Neu5Acα2,6LacNAc-GlcA-HBCDs) with human influenza virus strain A/Beijing/262/95 (H1N1) were investigated using a hemagglutination inhibition assay. The sialoglyco-nanoparticle, in which the number of sialic acid substitution is 30, acted as a powerful inhibitor of virus binding activity. We show that both distance and multiplicity of effective ligand-virus formation play important roles in enhancing viral inhibition. Our results indicate that the GlcA-HBCD backbone can be used as a novel spherical nanocluster material for preparing a variety of glyco-nanoparticles to facilitate molecular recognition. PMID:27561476

  18. Ignitor Prototype Construction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galas-So, G.; Lanzavecchia, L.; Dalmut, G.; Dra-Go, G.; Laurenti, A.; Marabotto, R.; Ghia, G.; Munaro, G.; Pirozzi, M.; Destefanis, L.; Andreani, R.; Crescenzi, C.; Cucchiaro, A.; Gasparotto, M.; Pizzuto, A.; Coppi, B.

    1997-11-01

    The design solutions adopted for Ignitor have been validated by a comprehensive engineering R&D program. The prototype construction program has been conducted by the industrial Consortium CITIF (ANSALDO and FIAT, with ABB as the main subcontractor). The manufacturing of full size prototypes of the most important components of the machine as well as tests on the adopted materials and on critical component interfaces have been carried out and have provided all the information necessary to continue the construction of the machine with the necessary confidence. In particular, an extensive test program has been launched to identify the mechanical properties of the ETP cold rolled copper plates produced for the toroidal field magnet. Tests under combined compressive/shear loads to evaluate the copper-insulation bonding shear strength have given positive results.

  19. Isolation of a lysogenic bacteriophage carrying the stx(1(OX3)) gene, which is closely associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains from sheep and humans.

    PubMed

    Koch, C; Hertwig, S; Lurz, R; Appel, B; Beutin, L

    2001-11-01

    A specific PCR for the detection of a variant of the gene encoding Shiga toxin 1 (stx(1)) called stx(1(OX3)) (GenBank accession no. Z36901) was developed. The PCR was used to investigate 148 Stx(1)-producing Escherichia coli strains from human patients (n = 72), cattle (n = 27), sheep (n = 48), and a goat (n = 1) for the presence of the stx(1(OX3)) gene. The stx(1(OX3)) gene was present in 38 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains from sheep belonging to serogroups O5, O125, O128, O146, and OX3 but was absent from Stx(1)-positive ovine STEC O91 strains. The stx(1(OX3)) gene was also detected in 22 STEC strains from humans with nonbloody diarrhea and from asymptomatic excreters. Serotypes O146:H21 and O128:H2 were most frequently associated with stx(1(OX3))-carrying STEC from sheep and humans. In contrast, Stx(1)-producing STEC strains from cattle and goats and 50 STEC strains from humans were all negative for the stx(1(OX3)) gene. The stx(1(OX3))-negative strains belonged to 13 serotypes which were different from those of the stx(1(OX3))-positive STEC strains. Moreover, the stx(1(OX3)) gene was not associated with STEC belonging to enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroups O26, O103, O111, O118, O145, and O157. A bacteriophage carrying the stx(1(OX3)) gene (phage 6220) was isolated from a human STEC O146:H21 strain. The phage was able to lysogenize laboratory E. coli K-12 strain C600. Phage 6220 shared a similar morphology and a high degree of DNA homology with Stx(2)-encoding phage 933W, which originates from EHEC O157. In contrast, few similarities were found between phage 6220 and Stx(1)-encoding bacteriophage H-19B from EHEC O26.

  20. Molecular, Physiological, and Motor Performance Defects in DMSXL Mice Carrying >1,000 CTG Repeats from the Human DM1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Aline; Medja, Fadia; Nicole, Annie; Vignaud, Alban; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Ferry, Arnaud; Decostre, Valérie; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Baraibar, Martin; Gomes-Pereira, Mário; Puymirat, Jack; Bassez, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Munnich, Arnold; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3′UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro–RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice). After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice). Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing), were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances). We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic therapeutic

  1. Novel erm(T)-carrying multiresistance plasmids from porcine and human isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 that also harbor cadmium and copper resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    This study describes three novel erm(T)-carrying multiresistance plasmids that also harbor cadmium and copper resistance determinants. The plasmids, designated pUR1902, pUR2940, and pUR2941, were obtained from porcine and human methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of the clonal lineage ST398. In addition to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance gene erm(T), all three plasmids also carry the tetracycline resistance gene tet(L). Furthermore, plasmid pUR2940 harbors the trimethoprim resistance gene dfrK and the MLSB resistance gene erm(C), while plasmids pUR1902 and pUR2941 possess the kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene aadD. Sequence analysis of approximately 18.1 kb of the erm(T)-flanking region from pUR1902, 20.0 kb from pUR2940, and 20.8 kb from pUR2941 revealed the presence of several copies of the recently described insertion sequence ISSau10, which is probably involved in the evolution of the respective plasmids. All plasmids carried a functional cadmium resistance operon with the genes cadD and cadX, in addition to the multicopper oxidase gene mco and the ATPase copper transport gene copA, which are involved in copper resistance. The comparative analysis of S. aureus RN4220 and the three S. aureus RN4220 transformants carrying plasmid pUR1902, pUR2940, or pUR2941 revealed an 8-fold increase in CdSO4 and a 2-fold increase in CuSO4 MICs. The emergence of multidrug resistance plasmids that also carry heavy metal resistance genes is alarming and requires further surveillance. The colocalization of antimicrobial resistance genes and genes that confer resistance to heavy metals may facilitate their persistence, coselection, and dissemination.

  2. Mars Spark Source Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; Weiland, Karen J.; VanderWal, Randall L.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware has been developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma that will allow their identification and quantification. Trace metal measurements are vital for the assessment of the potential toxicity of the Martian environment for human exploration. The current method of X-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations only of major species. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. This paper describes the Mars Spark Source Prototype hardware, the results of the characterization tests, and future plans for hardware development.

  3. The targeted inhibitory effects of human amniotic fluid stem cells carrying CXCR4 promoter and DAL-1 on non-small cell lung carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Li, S; Cai, T; Wang, H; Xie, X; Liu, Z; Zhang, Y

    2016-02-01

    The differentially expressed in adenocarcinoma of the lung-1 (DAL-1) protein has been demonstrated to be suppressive to various types of tumors including lung cancer. This study aimed to determine the targeted effects of human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFS cells) carrying CXCR4 promoter driven conditionally replicable adenovirus vector overexpressing DAL-1 (Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1) on non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) growth. The apoptotic effects of virus vectors were assessed using flow cytometry, and the cytotoxicity analyzed by CCK-8 assay. In vivo imaging system was used to determine the homing capability of hAFS cells. A549 cell xenograft mouse model was created to assess the in vivo effect of DAL-1 overexpression on NSCLC growth. We found that infection of Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 increased the apoptosis of A549 NSCLC cells but not 16HBE normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 administered via intratumoral injection led to significant reduced growth and greater necrosis of A549 xenograft tumors comparing to null vector treated animals. When infused via tail vein, hAFS cells carrying Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 homed to lung cancer xenografts, caused virus replication and DAL-1 overexpression, and led to significant lower growth and greater necrosis of A549 cell xenografts comparing to non-treatment control. In conclusion, hAFS cells are capable of carrying Ad-CXCR4-DAL-1 vectors, specifically targeting to lung cancer, and causing oncolytic effects when administered in vivo.

  4. Transgenic mice containing a 248-kb yeast artificial chromosome carrying the human beta-globin locus display proper developmental control of human globin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, K R; Clegg, C H; Huxley, C; Josephson, B M; Haugen, H S; Furukawa, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated using a purified 248-kb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) bearing an intact 82-kb human beta-globin locus and 148 kb of flanking sequence. Seventeen of 148 F0 pups were transgenic. RNase protection analysis of RNA isolated from the blood of 13 gamma- and beta-globin-positive founders showed that only the human beta-globin gene was expressed in the adult founders. Studies of F1 and F2 fetuses demonstrated that the genes of the beta-locus YAC displayed the proper developmental switches in beta-like globin gene expression. Expression of epsilon- and gamma-globin, but not beta-globin, was observed in the yolk sac, there was only minor gamma and mostly beta expression in the 14-day liver, and only beta mRNA in the blood of the adult animals. Structural data showed that the locus was intact. These results indicate that it is now possible to dissect regulatory mechanisms within the context of an entire locus in vivo by using the ability to perform mutagenesis efficiently in yeast via homologous recombination, followed by purification of the altered YAC and its introduction into mice. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8356061

  5. Maximizing modern distribution of complex anatomical spatial information: 3D reconstruction and rapid prototype production of anatomical corrosion casts of human specimens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianyi; Nie, Lanying; Li, Zeyu; Lin, Lijun; Tang, Lei; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical corrosion casts of human specimens are useful teaching aids. However, their use is limited due to ethical dilemmas associated with their production, their lack of perfect reproducibility, and their consumption of original specimens in the process of casting. In this study, new approaches with modern distribution of complex anatomical spatial information were explored to overcome these limitations through the digitalization of anatomical casts of human specimens through three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, rapid prototype production, and Web-based 3D atlas construction. The corrosion cast of a lung, along with its associated arteries, veins, trachea, and bronchial tree was CT-scanned, and the data was then processed by Mimics software. Data from the lung casts were then reconstructed into 3D models using a hybrid method, utilizing both "image threshold" and "region growing." The fine structures of the bronchial tree, arterial, and venous network of the lung were clearly displayed and demonstrated their distinct relationships. The multiple divisions of bronchi and bronchopulmonary segments were identified. The 3D models were then uploaded into a rapid prototype 3D printer to physically duplicate the cast. The physically duplicated model of the lung was rescanned by CT and reconstructed to detect its production accuracy. Gross observation and accuracy detection were used to evaluate the duplication and few differences were found. Finally, Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) was used to edit the 3D casting models to construct a Web-based 3D atlas accessible through Internet Explorer with 3D display and annotation functions.

  6. Identification of novel vga(A)-carrying plasmids and a Tn5406-like transposon in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis of human and animal origin.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Aspiroz, Carmen; Rezusta, Antonio; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Simon, Carmen; Gómez, Paula; Ortega, Carmelo; Revillo, Maria José; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Nine staphylococcal strains of human and animal origin with a lincomycin-resistant/erythromycin-susceptible phenotype and carrying vga genes were characterised to determine the genetic elements involved in the dissemination of these uncommon resistance genes. These strains were typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and/or spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was studied by disk diffusion and agar dilution methods. Presence of the genes lnu(A), lnu(B), vga(A), vga(A)v, vga(B), vga(C), vga(E), lsa(B) and cfr was studied by PCR. Transformation experiments were carried out in all strains, and the plasmid or chromosomal gene location was determined by Southern blot analysis. Genetic environments of the vga genes were analysed by PCR mapping or inverse PCR and sequencing. Five meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 strains and three Staphylococcus epidermidis strains harboured the gene vga(A), and one MRSA-ST8 strain contained the gene vga(A)v. One MRSA-ST398 strain, which also contained the gene lnu(A), showed the highest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to lincomycin. The vga(A)v-positive strain presented lower MIC values than the vga(A)-positive strains. Presence of the pVGA plasmid was confirmed in two MRSA-ST398 strains. Four novel vga(A)-carrying plasmids were detected: pUR2355 (in two MRSA and one meticillin-susceptible S. epidermidis); pUR4128 (one MRSA); pUR3036 [one meticillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE)]; and pUR3937 (one MRSE). The plasmid pUR4128 was very similar to pUR2355. Plasmids pUR3036 and pUR3937 were related and were very similar to plasmid pSE-12228-06. The gene vga(A)v was located in a transposon analogous to Tn5406. Therefore, four novel vga(A)-carrying plasmids and a variant of Tn5406 were identified in this study.

  7. Identification of novel vga(A)-carrying plasmids and a Tn5406-like transposon in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis of human and animal origin.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Aspiroz, Carmen; Rezusta, Antonio; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Simon, Carmen; Gómez, Paula; Ortega, Carmelo; Revillo, Maria José; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Nine staphylococcal strains of human and animal origin with a lincomycin-resistant/erythromycin-susceptible phenotype and carrying vga genes were characterised to determine the genetic elements involved in the dissemination of these uncommon resistance genes. These strains were typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and/or spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was studied by disk diffusion and agar dilution methods. Presence of the genes lnu(A), lnu(B), vga(A), vga(A)v, vga(B), vga(C), vga(E), lsa(B) and cfr was studied by PCR. Transformation experiments were carried out in all strains, and the plasmid or chromosomal gene location was determined by Southern blot analysis. Genetic environments of the vga genes were analysed by PCR mapping or inverse PCR and sequencing. Five meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 strains and three Staphylococcus epidermidis strains harboured the gene vga(A), and one MRSA-ST8 strain contained the gene vga(A)v. One MRSA-ST398 strain, which also contained the gene lnu(A), showed the highest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to lincomycin. The vga(A)v-positive strain presented lower MIC values than the vga(A)-positive strains. Presence of the pVGA plasmid was confirmed in two MRSA-ST398 strains. Four novel vga(A)-carrying plasmids were detected: pUR2355 (in two MRSA and one meticillin-susceptible S. epidermidis); pUR4128 (one MRSA); pUR3036 [one meticillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE)]; and pUR3937 (one MRSE). The plasmid pUR4128 was very similar to pUR2355. Plasmids pUR3036 and pUR3937 were related and were very similar to plasmid pSE-12228-06. The gene vga(A)v was located in a transposon analogous to Tn5406. Therefore, four novel vga(A)-carrying plasmids and a variant of Tn5406 were identified in this study. PMID:22901706

  8. Impaired Action Potential Initiation in GABAergic Interneurons Causes Hyperexcitable Networks in an Epileptic Mouse Model Carrying a Human NaV1.1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na+ channels in interneurons and persistent Na+ currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca2+ imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. PMID:25378155

  9. Functional characterization of a VEGF-A-targeting Anticalin, prototype of a novel therapeutic human protein class.

    PubMed

    Gille, Hendrik; Hülsmeyer, Martin; Trentmann, Stefan; Matschiner, Gabriele; Christian, Hans Jürgen; Meyer, Todd; Amirkhosravi, Ali; Audoly, Laurent P; Hohlbaum, Andreas M; Skerra, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Human tear lipocalin (Tlc) was utilized as a protein scaffold to engineer an Anticalin that specifically binds and functionally blocks vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), a pivotal inducer of physiological angiogenesis that also plays a crucial role in several neovascular diseases. Starting from a naive combinatorial library where residues that form the natural ligand-binding site of Tlc were randomized, followed by affinity maturation, the final Anticalin PRS-050 was selected to bind all major splice forms of VEGF-A with picomolar affinity. Moreover, this Anticalin cross-reacts with the murine ortholog. PRS-050 efficiently antagonizes the interaction between VEGF-A and its cellular receptors, and it inhibits VEGF-induced mitogenic signaling as well as proliferation of primary human endothelial cells with subnanomolar IC50 values. Intravitreal administration of the Anticalin suppressed VEGF-induced blood-retinal barrier breakdown in a rabbit model. To allow lasting systemic neutralization of VEGF-A in vivo, the plasma half-life of the Anticalin was extended by site-directed PEGylation. The modified Anticalin efficiently blocked VEGF-mediated vascular permeability as well as growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice, concomitantly with reduction in microvessel density. In contrast to bevacizumab, the Anticalin did not trigger platelet aggregation and thrombosis in human FcγRIIa transgenic mice, thus suggesting an improved safety profile. Since neutralization of VEGF-A activity is well known to exert beneficial effects in cancer and other neovascular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration, this Anticalin offers a novel potent small protein antagonist for differentiated therapeutic intervention in oncology and ophthalmology. PMID:26650228

  10. Functional characterization of a VEGF-A-targeting Anticalin, prototype of a novel therapeutic human protein class.

    PubMed

    Gille, Hendrik; Hülsmeyer, Martin; Trentmann, Stefan; Matschiner, Gabriele; Christian, Hans Jürgen; Meyer, Todd; Amirkhosravi, Ali; Audoly, Laurent P; Hohlbaum, Andreas M; Skerra, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Human tear lipocalin (Tlc) was utilized as a protein scaffold to engineer an Anticalin that specifically binds and functionally blocks vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), a pivotal inducer of physiological angiogenesis that also plays a crucial role in several neovascular diseases. Starting from a naive combinatorial library where residues that form the natural ligand-binding site of Tlc were randomized, followed by affinity maturation, the final Anticalin PRS-050 was selected to bind all major splice forms of VEGF-A with picomolar affinity. Moreover, this Anticalin cross-reacts with the murine ortholog. PRS-050 efficiently antagonizes the interaction between VEGF-A and its cellular receptors, and it inhibits VEGF-induced mitogenic signaling as well as proliferation of primary human endothelial cells with subnanomolar IC50 values. Intravitreal administration of the Anticalin suppressed VEGF-induced blood-retinal barrier breakdown in a rabbit model. To allow lasting systemic neutralization of VEGF-A in vivo, the plasma half-life of the Anticalin was extended by site-directed PEGylation. The modified Anticalin efficiently blocked VEGF-mediated vascular permeability as well as growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice, concomitantly with reduction in microvessel density. In contrast to bevacizumab, the Anticalin did not trigger platelet aggregation and thrombosis in human FcγRIIa transgenic mice, thus suggesting an improved safety profile. Since neutralization of VEGF-A activity is well known to exert beneficial effects in cancer and other neovascular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration, this Anticalin offers a novel potent small protein antagonist for differentiated therapeutic intervention in oncology and ophthalmology.

  11. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  12. Three Huntington’s Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Laureen; Neueder, Andreas; Földes, Gabor; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Hobbs, Carl; Jolinon, Nelly; Mioulane, Maxime; Sakai, Takao; Harding, Sian E.; Ilic, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ) motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients. PMID:25993131

  13. Rapid Population Growth and Human Carrying Capacity: Two Perspectives. World Bank Staff Working Papers No. 690 and Population and Development Series No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahar, Dennis J., Ed.; And Others

    Two perspectives on carrying capacity and population growth are examined. The first perspective, "Carrying Capacity and Rapid Population Growth: Definition, Cases, and Consequences" (Robert Muscat), explores the possible meanings of the idea of carrying capacity under developing country conditions, looks at historical and present-day cases of…

  14. Glycoforms of human endothelial CD34 that bind L-selectin carry sulfated sialyl Lewis x capped O- and N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Gerard Hernandez; Helin, Jari; Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Cummings, Richard D.; Mäkitie, Antti; Renkonen, Risto

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial sialomucin CD34 functions as an L-selectin ligand mediating lymphocyte extravasation only when properly glycosylated to express a sulfated carbohydrate epitope, 6-sulfo sialyl Lewis x (6-sulfo SLex). It is thought that multivalent 6-sulfo SLex expression promotes high-affinity binding to L-selectin by enhancing avidity. However, the reported low amount of 6-sulfo SLex in total human CD34 is inconsistent with this model and prompted us to re-evaluate CD34 glycosylation. We separated CD34 into 2 glycoforms, the L-selectin–binding and nonbinding glycoforms, L-B-CD34 and L-NB-CD34, respectively, and analyzed released O- and N-glycans from both forms. L-B-CD34 is relatively minor compared with L-NB-CD34 and represented less than 10% of total tonsillar CD34. MECA-79, a mAb to sulfated core-1 O-glycans, bound exclusively to L-B-CD34 and this form contained all sulfated and fucosylated O-glycans. 6-Sulfo SLex epitopes occur on core-2 and extended core-1 O-glycans with approximately 20% of total L-B-CD34 O-glycans expressing 6-sulfo SLex. N-glycans containing potential 6-sulfo SLex epitopes were also present in L-B-CD34, but their removal did not abolish binding to L-selectin. Thus, a minor glycoform of CD34 carries relatively abundant 6-sulfo SLex epitopes on O-glycans that are important for its recognition by L-selectin. PMID:19359410

  15. Characteristics of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Escherichia coli O26:H11 Strains Isolated in France between 2010 and 2013 and Carrying the stx2d Gene Only

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Sabine; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Bonacorsi, Stephane; Liguori, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli O26:H11 that were positive for stx2 alone (n = 23), which were not epidemiologically related or part of an outbreak, were isolated from pediatric patients in France between 2010 and 2013. We were interested in comparing these strains with the new highly virulent stx2a-positive E. coli O26 clone sequence type 29 (ST29) that has emerged recently in Europe, and we tested them by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), stx2 subtyping, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) sequencing, and plasmid (ehxA, katP, espP, and etpD) and chromosomal (Z2098, espK, and espV) virulence gene profiling. We showed that 16 of the 23 strains appeared to correspond to this new clone, but the characteristics of 12 strains differed significantly from the previously described characteristics, with negative results for both plasmid and chromosomal genetic markers. These 12 strains exhibited a ST29 genotype and related CRISPR arrays (CRISPR2a alleles 67 or 71), suggesting that they evolved in a common environment. This finding was corroborated by the presence of stx2d in 7 of the 12 ST29 strains. This is the first time that E. coli O26:H11 carrying stx2d has been isolated from humans. This is additional evidence of the continuing evolution of virulent Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O26 strains. A new O26:H11 CRISPR PCR assay, SP_O26_E, has been developed for detection of these 12 particular ST29 strains of E. coli O26:H11. This test is useful to better characterize the stx2-positive O26:H11 clinical isolates, which are associated with severe clinical outcomes such as bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:25428148

  16. Carrying Backpacks: Physical Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    It is estimated that more than 40 million U.S. youth carry school materials in backs, routinely carrying books, laptop computers, personal and other items used on a daily basis. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that 7,277 emergency visits each year result from injuries related to backpacks. Injury can occur when a child…

  17. Cross-reactive lysis of human targets infected with prototypic and clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains by murine anti-HIV-1 IIIB env-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chada, S; DeJesus, C E; Townsend, K; Lee, W T; Laube, L; Jolly, D J; Chang, S M; Warner, J F

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of murine anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB env cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to recognize and lyse HIV-1-infected cells, we have constructed a human cell line (Hu/Dd) expressing both the CD4 receptor and the murine H-2Dd major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I protein. This cell line can be productively infected with HIV-1 and can also function as a target for murine CD8+, class I MHC-restricted CTL directed against the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 IIIB. The ability of BALB/c anti-HIV-1 IIIB env CTL to specifically recognize and lyse Hu/Dd target cells infected with divergent HIV-1 strains was tested by using both prototypic and clinical HIV-1 strains. CTL generated by immunization of mice with syngeneic cells expressing either the native or V3 loop-deleted (delta V3) envelope glycoprotein from HIV-1 IIIB were able to recognize and specifically lyse Hu/Dd target cells infected with the HIV-1 prototypic isolates IIIB, MN, WMJ II, SF2, and CC as well as several HIV-1 clinical isolates. These results demonstrate that CTL determinants for HIV-1 env exist outside the hypervariable V3 region, anti-HIV-1 IIIB env CTL appear to recognize common determinants on diverse HIV-1 strains, and classification of HIV-1 strains based on neutralizing antibody reactivities does not appear to correspond to CTL recognition and lysis. The results suggest that the cell-mediated components of the immune system may have a broader recognition of divergent HIV-1 strains than do the humoral components. Images PMID:8497058

  18. The gene mutated in cocoa mice, carrying a defect of organelle biogenesis, is a homologue of the human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome-3 gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Li, W; Zhang, Q; Novak, E K; Sviderskaya, E V; Wilson, A; Bennett, D C; Roe, B A; Swank, R T; Spritz, R A

    2001-11-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a group of human disorders of organelle biogenesis characterized by defective synthesis of melanosomes, lysosomes, and platelet dense granules. In the mouse, at least 15 loci are associated with mutant phenotypes similar to human HPS. We have identified the gene mutated in cocoa (coa) mice, which is associated with an HPS-like mutant phenotype and thus represents a strong candidate for human HPS. Analysis of coa-mutant mice and cultured coa-mutant mouse melanocytes indicates that the normal coa gene product is involved in early stages of melanosome biogenesis and maturation.

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Human-Pathogenic Escherichia coli O26:H11 Strains Carrying the stx2 Gene Only and Circulating in France

    PubMed Central

    Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Bonacorsi, Stephane; Liguori, Sandrine; Ison, Sarah A.; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26:H11 is one of the most frequent pathogens associated with diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In this report, we present the draft genome sequences of seven strains of STEC O26:H11 carrying the stx2a or stx2d gene only and isolated in France from HUS patients. PMID:26227606

  20. Dynamic NETosis is Carried Out by Live Neutrophils in Human and Mouse Bacterial Abscesses and During Severe Gram-Positive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yipp, Bryan G.; Petri, Björn; Salina, Davide; Jenne, Craig N.; Scott, Brittney N. V.; Zbytnuik, Lori D.; Pittman, Keir; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Wu, Kaiyu; Meijndert, H. Christopher; Malawista, Stephen E.; de Boisfleury Chevance, Anne; Zhang, Kunyan; Conly, John; Kubes, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released, as neutrophils die in vitro, in a process requiring hours, leaving a temporal gap for invasive microbes to exploit. Functional neutrophils undergoing NETosis have not been documented. During Gram-positive skin infections, we directly visualized live PMN in vivo rapidly releasing NETs, which prevented bacterial dissemination. NETosis occurred during crawling thereby casting large areas of NETs. NET-releasing PMN developed diffuse decondensed nuclei ultimately becoming devoid of DNA. Cells with abnormal nuclei displayed unusual crawling behavior highlighted by erratic pseudopods and hyperpolarization consistent with the nucleus being a fulcrum for crawling. A combined requirement of Tlr2 and complement mediated opsonization tightly regulated NET release. Additionally live human PMN developed decondensed nuclei and formed NETS in vivo and intact anuclear neutrophils were abundant in Gram-positive human abscesses. Therefore early in infection, non-cell death NETosis occurs in vivo during Gram-positive infection in mice and humans. PMID:22922410

  1. Human and Financial Capital in the Rural Educational Environment: The Effects of Exceeding the Carrying Capacity Threshold on Standardized Test Scores in Rural Indiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peoples, Glenn

    The Rural Educational Environment (REE) is a complex mixture of demographic and economic forces that interact to impact the rural school corporation. The condition of REE financial and human capital indicates REE health and may influence student performance on standardized tests. This paper proposes an ecosystem model of the impact of financial,…

  2. Carrying on the Good Fight: Summary Paper from Think Tank 2000--Advancing the Civil and Human Rights of People with Disabilities from Diverse Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This paper summarizes a May 2000 conference about advancing the civil and human rights of people with disabilities from diverse cultures. The conference included people with disabilities from diverse cultures and members of national civil rights organizations. The conference identified five priority areas for attention: (1) cultivating leadership…

  3. Early detection and visualization of human adenovirus serotype 5-viral vectors carrying foot-and-mouth disease virus or luciferase transgenes in cell lines and bovine tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vaccines containing capsid-coding regions from foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have been demonstrated to induce effective immune responses and provide homologous protective immunity against FMDV in cattle. However, basic mechanisms ...

  4. PRMS Data Warehousing Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2002-01-01

    Project and Resource Management System (PRMS) is a web-based, mid-level management tool developed at KSC to provide a unified enterprise framework for Project and Mission management. The addition of a data warehouse as a strategic component to the PRMS is investigated through the analysis, design and implementation processes of a data warehouse prototype. As a proof of concept, a demonstration of the prototype with its OLAP's technology for multidimensional data analysis is made. The results of the data analysis and the design constraints are discussed. The prototype can be used to motivate interest and support for an operational data warehouse.

  5. PRMS Data Warehousing Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2001-01-01

    Project and Resource Management System (PRMS) is a web-based, mid-level management tool developed at KSC to provide a unified enterprise framework for Project and Mission management. The addition of a data warehouse as a strategic component to the PRMS is investigated through the analysis design and implementation processes of a data warehouse prototype. As a proof of concept, a demonstration of the prototype with its OLAP's technology for multidimensional data analysis is made. The results of the data analysis and the design constraints are discussed. The prototype can be used to motivate interest and support for an operational data warehouse.

  6. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  7. Colleyville Eco House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-16

    This case study describes the construction of a prototype high-performance home that includes a high efficiency ground source heat pump, unvented roof with low density spray foam insulation, and supplemental dehumidification.

  8. ICI Showcase House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-16

    Building Science Corporation collaborated with ICI Homes in Daytona Beach, FL on a 2008 prototype Showcase House that demonstrates the energy efficiency and durability upgrades that ICI currently promotes through its in-house efficiency program called EFactor.

  9. Prototype resupply scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Steve; Hughes, Angi; Byrd, Jim

    1987-01-01

    Resupply scheduling for the Space Station presents some formidable logistics problems. One of the most basic problems is assigning supplies to a series of shuttle resupply missions. A prototype logistics expert system which constructs resupply schedules was developed. This prototype is able to reconstruct feasible resupply plans. In addition, analysts can use the system to evaluate the impact of adding, deleting or modifying launches, cargo space, experiments, etc.

  10. A Primer on Prototyping.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Dylan; Biron, David

    2015-01-01

    Standard mechanical components, such as adapters or mounts, are ubiquitous in research laboratories, C. elegans labs included. Recently, in-house prototyping and fabricating both standard and custom mechanical parts has become simple and cost effective. Here we describe the basic steps, equipment, and considerations required for rapid prototyping of a handful of simple yet useful designs. These examples were chosen for their simplicity, as well as for demonstrating specific practicalities. They are thus appropriate as training exercises. PMID:26423979

  11. A Primer on Prototyping.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Dylan; Biron, David

    2015-01-01

    Standard mechanical components, such as adapters or mounts, are ubiquitous in research laboratories, C. elegans labs included. Recently, in-house prototyping and fabricating both standard and custom mechanical parts has become simple and cost effective. Here we describe the basic steps, equipment, and considerations required for rapid prototyping of a handful of simple yet useful designs. These examples were chosen for their simplicity, as well as for demonstrating specific practicalities. They are thus appropriate as training exercises.

  12. Phenotypic Characterization of Mice Carrying Homozygous Deletion of KLF11, a Gene in Which Mutations Cause Human Neonatal and MODY VII Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mathison, Angela; Escande, Carlos; Calvo, Ezequiel; Seo, Seungmae; White, Thomas; Salmonson, Ann; Faubion, William A.; Buttar, Navtej; Iovanna, Juan; Lomberk, Gwen; Chini, Eduardo N.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that amino acid changes in the human Kruppel-Like Factor (KLF) 11 protein is associated with the development of maturity onset diabetes of the young VII, whereas complete inactivation of this pathway by the −331 human insulin mutation causes neonatal diabetes mellitus. Here, we report that Klf11−/− mice have decreased circulating insulin levels, alterations in the control of blood glucose and body weight, as well as serum dyslipidemia, but do not develop diabetes. Functional assays using ex vivo liver tissue sections demonstrate that Klf11−/− mice display increased insulin sensitivity. Genome-wide experiments validated by pathway-specific quantitative PCR arrays reveal that the Klf11−/− phenotype associates to alterations in the regulation of gene networks involved in lipid metabolism, in particular those regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Combined, these results demonstrate that the major phenotype given by the whole-body deletion of Klf11 in mouse is not diabetes but increased insulin sensitivity, likely due to altered transcriptional regulation in target tissues. The absence of diabetes in the Klf11−/− mouse either indicates an interspecies difference for the role of this transcription factor in metabolic homeostasis between mouse and humans, or potentially highlights the fact that other molecular factors can compensate for its absence. Nevertheless, the data of this study, gathered at the whole-organism level, further support a role for KLF11 in metabolic processes like insulin sensitivity, which regulation is critical in several forms of diabetes. PMID:26248217

  13. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  14. Foraging search: Prototypical intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobus, George

    2000-05-01

    We think because we eat. Or as Descartes might have said, on a little more reflection, "I need to eat, therefore I think." Animals that forage for a living repeatedly face the problem of searching for a sparsely distributed resource in a vast space. Furthermore, the resource may occur sporadically and episodically under conditions of true uncertainty (nonstationary, complex and non-linear dynamics). I assert that this problem is the canonical problem solved by intelligence. It's solution is the basis for the evolution of more advanced intelligence in which the space of search includes that of concepts (objects and relations) encoded in cortical structures. In humans the conscious experience of searching through concept space we call thinking. The foraging search model is based upon a higher-order autopoeitic system (the forager) employing anticipatory processing to enhance its success at finding food while avoiding becoming food or having accidents in a hostile world. I present a semi-formal description of the general foraging search problem and an approach to its solution. The latter is a brain-like structure employing dynamically adaptive neurons. A physical robot, MAVRIC, embodies some principles of foraging. It learns cues that lead to improvements in finding targets in a dynamic and nonstationary environment. This capability is based on a unique learning mechanism that encodes causal relations in the neural-like processing element. An argument is advanced that searching for resources in the physical world, as per the foraging model, is a prototype for generalized search for conceptual resources as when we think. A problem represents a conceptual disturbance in a homeostatic sense. The finding of a solution restores the homeostatic balance. The establishment of links between conceptual cues and solutions (resources) and the later use of those cues to think through to solutions of quasi-isomorphic problems is, essentially, foraging for ideas. It is a quite

  15. Infrared eye: an operational prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrette, Paul C.; Fortin, Jean; St-Germain, Daniel; Delisle, Jean

    1998-09-01

    A new concept of surveillance system called Wide Area Coverage Infrared Surveillance System (WACISS), based on the human vision, was developed and a first laboratory prototype was demonstrated recently. A second prototype, more operational, is named the Infrared Eye is being built and will be tested in cooperation with the NRCC Flight Research Laboratory. The Infrared Eye will use the new pixel-less quantum well infrared photodetector sensors, coupled to light emitting diodes (QWIP/LED), currently being developed at NRCC Institute for Microstructural Science under DREV sponsorship. The multiple advantages of the pixel-less QWIP/LED over conventional sensors will considerably simplify the design of the system. As the WACISS, the IR Eye will integrate two cameras: the first, with a wide field-of- view, will be used for detection while the second camera, with a narrower field with higher resolution for identification, will be mobile within the WFOV and slaved to the operator's line-of-sight by means of an eye-tracking system. The images from both cameras will be fused and shown simultaneously on a standard high resolution CRT display unit, interfaced with the eye-tracking unit. The basic concepts pertaining to the project and the design constraints of this second prototype are presented.

  16. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena.

  17. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena. PMID:26015715

  18. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena. PMID:26015715

  19. UNESCO CD-ROM. Prototype Evaluation Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This document reports the result of a study carried out to evaluate the installation and use of the UNESCO CD-ROM prototype. A questionnaire in English and French was sent to about 267 institutions around the world. Replies were received from 97 bodies, giving a response rate of about 36%. Almost all respondents were information professionals in…

  20. LSST data pipeline prototyping plans and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulla, G M; Brase, J; Cook, K; Miller, M

    2004-05-27

    In this document we describe our approach and strategy for building the prototype for the image-stream analysis data pipeline. We start by describing the main research areas upon which we will be focusing; we then describe our plans on how to carry these research ideas to implement the data pipeline.

  1. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4: interaction with constitutive nitric oxide synthases in human sperm and prostasomes which carry Ca2+/CaM-dependent serine kinase.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Rachel E; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Deletion of the gene encoding the widely conserved plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4), a major Ca(2+) efflux pump, leads to loss of sperm motility and male infertility in mice. PMCA4's partners in sperm and how its absence exerts its effect on fertility are unknown. We hypothesize that in sperm PMCA4 interacts with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) which are rapidly activated by Ca(2+), and that these fertility-modulating proteins are present in prostasomes, which deliver them to sperm. We show that in human sperm PMCA4 is present on the acrosome, inner acrosomal membrane, posterior head, neck, midpiece and the proximal principal piece. PMCA4 localization showed inter- and intra-individual variation and was most abundant at the posterior head/neck junction, co-localizing with NOSs. Co-immunoprecipitations (Co-IP) revealed a close association of PMCA4 and the NOSs in Ca(2+) ionophore-treated sperm but much less so in uncapacitated untreated sperm. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) showed a similar Ca(2+)-related association: PMCA4 and the NOSs are within 10 nm apart, and preferentially so in capacitated, compared with uncapacitated, sperm. FRET efficiencies varied, being significantly (P < 0.001) higher at high cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in capacitated sperm than at low [Ca(2+)]c in uncapacitated sperm for the PMCA4-eNOS complex. These dynamic interactions were not seen for PMCA4-nNOS complexes, which had the highest FRET efficiencies. Further, along with Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent serine kinase (CASK), PMCA4 and the NOSs are present in the seminal plasma, specifically in prostasomes where Co-IP showed complexes similar to those in sperm. Finally, flow cytometry demonstrated that following co-incubation of sperm and seminal plasma, PMCA4 and the NOSs can be delivered in vitro to sperm via prostasomes. Our findings indicate that PMCA4 interacts simultaneously with the NOSs preferentially at

  2. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4: interaction with constitutive nitric oxide synthases in human sperm and prostasomes which carry Ca2+/CaM-dependent serine kinase.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Rachel E; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Deletion of the gene encoding the widely conserved plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4), a major Ca(2+) efflux pump, leads to loss of sperm motility and male infertility in mice. PMCA4's partners in sperm and how its absence exerts its effect on fertility are unknown. We hypothesize that in sperm PMCA4 interacts with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) which are rapidly activated by Ca(2+), and that these fertility-modulating proteins are present in prostasomes, which deliver them to sperm. We show that in human sperm PMCA4 is present on the acrosome, inner acrosomal membrane, posterior head, neck, midpiece and the proximal principal piece. PMCA4 localization showed inter- and intra-individual variation and was most abundant at the posterior head/neck junction, co-localizing with NOSs. Co-immunoprecipitations (Co-IP) revealed a close association of PMCA4 and the NOSs in Ca(2+) ionophore-treated sperm but much less so in uncapacitated untreated sperm. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) showed a similar Ca(2+)-related association: PMCA4 and the NOSs are within 10 nm apart, and preferentially so in capacitated, compared with uncapacitated, sperm. FRET efficiencies varied, being significantly (P < 0.001) higher at high cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in capacitated sperm than at low [Ca(2+)]c in uncapacitated sperm for the PMCA4-eNOS complex. These dynamic interactions were not seen for PMCA4-nNOS complexes, which had the highest FRET efficiencies. Further, along with Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent serine kinase (CASK), PMCA4 and the NOSs are present in the seminal plasma, specifically in prostasomes where Co-IP showed complexes similar to those in sperm. Finally, flow cytometry demonstrated that following co-incubation of sperm and seminal plasma, PMCA4 and the NOSs can be delivered in vitro to sperm via prostasomes. Our findings indicate that PMCA4 interacts simultaneously with the NOSs preferentially at

  3. Power API Prototype

    2014-12-04

    The software serves two purposes. The first purpose of the software is to prototype the Sandia High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification effort. The specification can be found at http://powerapi.sandia.gov . Prototypes of the specification were developed in parallel with the development of the specification. Release of the prototype will be instructive to anyone who intends to implement the specification. More specifically, our vendor collaborators will benefit from the availability of the prototype.more » The second is in direct support of the PowerInsight power measurement device, which was co-developed with Penguin Computing. The software provides a cluster wide measurement capability enabled by the PowerInsight device. The software can be used by anyone who purchases a PowerInsight device. The software will allow the user to easily collect power and energy information of a node that is instrumented with PowerInsight. The software can also be used as an example prototype implementation of the High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification.« less

  4. Power API Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-04

    The software serves two purposes. The first purpose of the software is to prototype the Sandia High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification effort. The specification can be found at http://powerapi.sandia.gov . Prototypes of the specification were developed in parallel with the development of the specification. Release of the prototype will be instructive to anyone who intends to implement the specification. More specifically, our vendor collaborators will benefit from the availability of the prototype. The second is in direct support of the PowerInsight power measurement device, which was co-developed with Penguin Computing. The software provides a cluster wide measurement capability enabled by the PowerInsight device. The software can be used by anyone who purchases a PowerInsight device. The software will allow the user to easily collect power and energy information of a node that is instrumented with PowerInsight. The software can also be used as an example prototype implementation of the High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

  5. Characterization of Mutants of Human Small Heat Shock Protein HspB1 Carrying Replacements in the N-Terminal Domain and Associated with Hereditary Motor Neuron Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Muranova, Lydia K.; Weeks, Stephen D.; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Gusev, Nikolai B.

    2015-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties of the mutations G34R, P39L and E41K in the N-terminal domain of human heat shock protein B1 (HspB1), which have been associated with hereditary motor neuron neuropathy, were analyzed. Heat-induced aggregation of all mutants started at lower temperatures than for the wild type protein. All mutations decreased susceptibility of the N- and C-terminal parts of HspB1 to chymotrypsinolysis. All mutants formed stable homooligomers with a slightly larger apparent molecular weight compared to the wild type protein. All mutations analyzed decreased or completely prevented phosphorylation-induced dissociation of HspB1 oligomers. When mixed with HspB6 and heated, all mutants yielded heterooligomers with apparent molecular weights close to ~400 kDa. Finally, the three HspB1 mutants possessed lower chaperone-like activity towards model substrates (lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase and insulin) compared to the wild type protein, conversely the environmental probe bis-ANS yielded higher fluorescence with the mutants than with the wild type protein. Thus, in vitro the analyzed N-terminal mutations increase stability of large HspB1 homooligomers, prevent their phosphorylation-dependent dissociation, modulate their interaction with HspB6 and decrease their chaperoning capacity, preventing normal functioning of HspB1. PMID:25965061

  6. "Christian carrying goomies".

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Dr. Passingan Usurup tells critics of his pragmatic approach on condom promotion that he is a Christian carrying condoms for Christ. He is head of the University of Papua New Guinea Medical Center and is credited with developing an AIDS/HIV policy for the Papua New Guinea Defence Force. The condoms were named Goomy and promoted at launching in 1992 in a blue packet under the slogan "The bond that guards." Goomy was chosen as the name because it is pidgin for rubber, chewing gum, and anything associated with rubber. Blue packets were chosen over the calls of most soldiers for a camouflage design because of its universal appeal as the color of the sea and sky and because it was the preference of women in the airlines. Once firmly ensconced in his role at the University, Usurup plans to develop a policy for students and staff and help to conduct AIDS prevention and education activities on campus. He will encourage students to test for HIV rather than highlighting the gloom and doom of infection and disease.

  7. Human glioblastoma cells persistently infected with simian virus 40 carry nondefective episomal viral DNA and acquire the transformed phenotype and numerous chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Steinberg, V I; Kosz-Vnenchak, M

    1985-02-01

    A stable, persistent infection of A172 human glioblastoma cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) was readily established after infection at an input of 450 PFU per cell. Only 11% of the cells were initially susceptible to SV40, as shown by indirect immunofluorescent staining for the SV40 T antigen at 48 h. However, all cells produced T antigen by week 11. In contrast, viral capsid proteins were made in only about 1% of the cells in the established carrier system. Weekly viral yields ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) PFU/ml. Most of the capsid protein-producing cells contained enormous aberrant (lobulated or multiple) nuclei. Persistent viral DNA appeared in an episomal or "free" state exclusively in Southern blots and was indistinguishable from standard SV40 DNA by restriction analysis. Viral autointerference activity was not detected, and yield reduction assays did not indicate defective interfering particle activity, further implying that variant viruses were not a factor in this carrier system. Interferon was also not a factor in the system, as shown by direct challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Persistent infection resulted in cellular growth changes (enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency) characteristic of SV40 transformation. Persistent infection also led to an increased frequency of cytogenetic effects. These included sister chromatid exchanges, a variety of chromosomal abnormalities (ring chromosomes, acentric fragments, breaks, and gaps), and an increase in the chromosome number. Nevertheless, the persistently infected cells continued to display a bipolar glial cell-like morphology with extensive process extension and intercellular contacts.

  8. Regulation of viability, differentiation and death of human melanoma cells carrying neural stem cell biomarkers: a possibility for neural trans-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2015-07-01

    During embryonic development, melanoblasts, the precursors of melanocytes, emerge from a subpopulation of the neural crest stem cells and migrate to colonize skin. Melanomas arise during melanoblast differentiation into melanocytes and from young proliferating melanocytes through somatic mutagenesis and epigenetic regulations. In the present study, we used several human melanoma cell lines from the sequential phases of melanoma development (radial growth phase, vertical growth phase and metastatic phase) to compare: (i) the frequency and efficiency of the induction of cell death via apoptosis and necroptosis; (ii) the presence of neural and cancer stem cell biomarkers as well as death receptors, DR5 and FAS, in both adherent and spheroid cultures of melanoma cells; (iii) anti-apoptotic effects of the endogenous production of cytokines and (iv) the ability of melanoma cells to perform neural trans-differentiation. We demonstrated that programed necrosis or necroptosis, could be induced in two metastatic melanoma lines, FEMX and OM431, while the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis was prevalent in a vast majority of melanoma lines. All melanoma lines used in the current study expressed substantial levels of pluripotency markers, SOX2 and NANOG. There was a trend for increasing expression of Nestin, an early neuroprogenitor marker, during melanoma progression. Most of the melanoma lines, including WM35, FEMX and A375, can grow as a spheroid culture in serum-free media with supplements. It was possible to induce neural trans-differentiation of 1205Lu and OM431 melanoma cells in serum-free media supplemented with insulin. This was confirmed by the expression of neuronal markers, doublecortin and β3-Tubulin, by significant growth of neurites and by the negative regulation of this process by a dominant-negative Rac1N17. These results suggest a relative plasticity of differentiated melanoma cells and a possibility for their neural trans-differentiation without the

  9. Prototyping the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Advanced Ceramics Research (ACR) of Tucson, Arizona, researches transforming scientific concepts into technological achievement. Through the SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) program, ACR developed a high pressure and temperature fused deposition system, a prototyping system that is known as extrusion freeform fabrication. This system is useful in manufacturing prosthetics. ACR also developed a three-dimensional rapid prototyping process in which physical models are quickly created directly from computer generated models. Marshall Space Flight Center also contracted ACR to fabricate a set of ceramic engines to be appraised for a solar thermal rocket engine test program.

  10. Effects of Cationic Microbubble Carrying CD/TK Double Suicide Gene and αVβ3 Integrin Antibody in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiale; Zhou, Ping; Li, Lan; Zhang, Yan; Shao, Yang; Tang, Li; Tian, Shuangming

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mostly derived from hepatitis or cirrhosisis, is one of the most common types of liver cancer. T-cell mediated immune response elicited by CD/TK double suicide gene has shown a substantial antitumor effect in HCC. Integrin αVβ3 over expresssion has been suggested to regulate the biology behavior of HCC. In this study, we investigated the strategy of incorporating CD/TK double suicide gene and anti-αVβ3 integrin monoclonal antibodies into cationic microbubbles (CMBsαvβ3), and evaluated its killing effect in HCC cells. Methods To improve the transfection efficiency of targeted CD/TK double suicide gene, we adopted cationic microbubbles (CMBs), a cationic delivery agent with enhanced DNA-carrying capacity. The ultrasound and high speed shearing method was used to prepare the non-targeting cationic microbubbles (CMBs). Using the biotin-avidin bridge method, αVβ3 integrin antibody was conjugated to CMBs, and CMBsαvβ3 was generated to specifically target to HepG2 cells. The morphology and physicochemical properties of the CMBsαvβ3 was detected by optical microscope and zeta detector. The conjugation of plasmid and the antibody in CMBsαvβ3 were examined by immunofluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. The binding capacities of CMBsαvβ3 and CMBs to HCC HepG2 and normal L-02 cells were compared using rosette formation assay. To detect EGFP fluorescence and examine the transfection efficiencies of CMBsαvβ3 and CMBs in HCC cells, fluorescence microscope and contrast-enhanced sonography were adopted. mRNA and protein level of CD/TK gene were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. To evaluate the anti-tumor effect of CMBsαvβ3, HCC cells with CMBsαvβ3 were exposed to 5-flurocytosine / ganciclovir (5-FC/GCV). Then, cell cycle distribution after treatment were detected by PI staining and flow cytometry. Apoptotic cells death were detected by optical microscope and assessed by MTT assay and TUNEL

  11. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  12. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  13. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  14. MIND performance and prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera-Villanueva, A.

    2008-02-21

    The performance of MIND (Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector) at a neutrino factory has been revisited in a new analysis. In particular, the low neutrino energy region is studied, obtaining an efficiency plateau around 5 GeV for a background level below 10{sup -3}. A first look has been given into the detector optimisation and prototyping.

  15. Prototype Facility Educational Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Div. of Professional-Technical Education, Boise.

    This document presents prototypical educational specifications to guide the building and renovation of Idaho vocational schools so they can help communities meet the advanced, professional-technical programs of the future. The specifications start with points to consider when determining school site suitability. The document then sets forth…

  16. Comparative Field Tests of Pressurised Rover Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G. A.; Wood, N. B.; Clarke, J. D.; Piechochinski, S.; Bamsey, M.; Laing, J. H.

    The conceptual designs, interior layouts and operational performances of three pressurised rover prototypes - Aonia, ARES and Everest - were field tested during a recent simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. A human factors experiment, in which the same crew of three executed the same simulated science mission in each of the three vehicles, yielded comparative data on the capacity of each vehicle to safely and comfortably carry explorers away from the main base, enter and exit the vehicle in spacesuits, perform science tasks in the field, and manage geological and biological samples. As well as offering recommendations for design improvements for specific vehicles, the results suggest that a conventional Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV) would not be suitable for analog field work; that a pressurised docking tunnel to the main habitat is essential; that better provisions for spacesuit storage are required; and that a crew consisting of one driver/navigator and two field science crew specialists may be optimal. From a field operations viewpoint, a recurring conflict between rover and habitat crews at the time of return to the habitat was observed. An analysis of these incidents leads to proposed refinements of operational protocols, specific crew training for rover returns and again points to the need for a pressurised docking tunnel. Sound field testing, circulating of results, and building the lessons learned into new vehicles is advocated as a way of producing ever higher fidelity rover analogues.

  17. Advances in rapid prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{trademark} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{trademark} resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable firs article and small lots size production parts. They use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  18. Prototype Slide Stainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The prototype slide staining system capable of performing both one-component Wright's staining of blood smears and eight-step Gram staining of heat fixed slides of microorganisms is described. Attention was given to liquid containment, waste handling, absence of contamination from previous staining, and stability of the staining reagents. The unit is self-contained, capable of independent operation under one- or zero-g conditions, and compatible with Skylab A.

  19. Ghana Watershed Prototype Products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    Introduction/Background A number of satellite data sets are available through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for monitoring land surface features. Representative data sets include Landsat, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The Ghana Watershed Prototype Products cover an area within southern Ghana, Africa, and include examples of the aforementioned data sets along with sample SRTM derivative data sets.

  20. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  1. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  2. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Munley, John T.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the experimental setup of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR thermosyphon prototype cooling system. A nitrogen thermosyphon prototype of such a system has been built and tested at PNNL. This document presents the experimental setup of the prototype that successfully demonstrated the heat transfer performance of the system.

  3. 35. CARRIE FURNACE No. 6 AND CAST HOUSE. THE CARRIE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. CARRIE FURNACE No. 6 AND CAST HOUSE. THE CARRIE BOILER SHOP IS ON THE RIGHT, IN FRONT OF HOT BLAST STOVES. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  4. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  5. MRSA carrying mecC in captive mara

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Gongora, C.; Harrison, E. M.; Moodley, A.; Guardabassi, L.; Holmes, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), virulence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus ST130 isolated from mara (Dolichotis patagonum), a large rodent species native to South America and kept in captivity at Copenhagen Zoo. Methods The presence of mecC was confirmed by PCR in 15 S. aureus ST130 isolated from mara during a previous study. WGS was performed on two randomly selected isolates to characterize their genomes with respect to SCCmec, virulence and resistance gene content. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested using commercial broth microdilution tests. Results All the isolates belonged to spa type t528 ST130 and carried mecC. Based on WGS, mecC was 100% identical to the prototype sequence of S. aureus strain LGA251. The sequence of SCCmec type XI in the mara isolates had 23 SNPs compared with the one described in LGA251. The two sequenced strains harboured a set of virulence factors and other genomic features previously observed in ST130. Both strains carried norA as the only putative antimicrobial resistance gene in addition to mecC. Conclusions Our findings support the notion that a genetically conserved mecC-carrying MRSA ST130 clone is widespread in a variety of unrelated hosts in Denmark. Since the mara at Copenhagen Zoo have limited contact with humans and other animal species, it remains unclear whether mara are natural hosts of ST130 or acquired this lineage from unknown sources. The broad host range of MRSA ST130 supports its designation as a generalist lineage. PMID:25722301

  6. On fast carry select adders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamanna, M.; Whitaker, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for a high-speed carry select adder with very long bit lengths utilizing a conflict-free bypass scheme. The proposed scheme has almost half the number of transistors and is faster than a conventional carry select adder. A comparative study is also made between the proposed adder and a Manchester carry chain adder which shows that the proposed scheme has the same transistor count, without suffering any performance degradation, compared to the Manchester carry chain adder.

  7. Carrying Position Influences Infant Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A total of 32 3-month-old infants were carried by their mothers in a soft infant carrier designed to place the infants facing either inward or outward. A within-subject comparison found that when infants were carried facing in, they spent significantly more time sleeping, while infants carried facing out were more active. (MDM)

  8. A Prototyping Environment for Research on Human-Machine Interfaces in Process Control: Use of Microsoft WPF for Microworld and Distributed Control System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Thomas A. Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    Operators of critical processes, such as nuclear power production, must contend with highly complex systems, procedures, and regulations. Developing human-machine interfaces (HMIs) that better support operators is a high priority for ensuring the safe and reliable operation of critical processes. Human factors engineering (HFE) provides a rich and mature set of tools for evaluating the performance of HMIs, but the set of tools for developing and designing HMIs is still in its infancy. Here we propose that Microsoft Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is well suited for many roles in the research and development of HMIs for process control.

  9. Maximizing Modern Distribution of Complex Anatomical Spatial Information: 3D Reconstruction and Rapid Prototype Production of Anatomical Corrosion Casts of Human Specimens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jianyi; Nie, Lanying; Li, Zeyu; Lin, Lijun; Tang, Lei; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical corrosion casts of human specimens are useful teaching aids. However, their use is limited due to ethical dilemmas associated with their production, their lack of perfect reproducibility, and their consumption of original specimens in the process of casting. In this study, new approaches with modern distribution of complex anatomical…

  10. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  11. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  12. Prototype optical SETI observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Stuart A.

    1996-06-01

    The Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (OSETI) is based on the premise that there are ETIs within our galaxy which are targeting star systems like our own with free-space beams. Upon these beams will ride attention- getting beacon signals and wideband data channels. Perhaps the wideband channels form part of a Galactic Information Superhighway, a Galactic Internet to which we are presently oblivious. The Columbus Optical SETI Observatory described in this paper is intended to be a prototype observatory which might lead to a new renaissance in both optical SETI and optical astronomy. It is hoped that the observatory design will be emulated by both the professional and amateur communities. The modern-day OSETI observatory is one that is more affordable than ever. With the aid of reasonably priced automatic telescopes, low-cost PCs, software and signal processing boards, Optical SETI can become accessible to all nations, professional scientific groups, amateur astronomy societies and even individuals.

  13. Performance Evaluations of Prototype Houses: Minimum 40% Residential Building Energy Savings Level Habitat for Humanity of Greater Newburgh Liberty Street Project: April 2003--September 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert, R.; Magee, A.

    2005-06-01

    Habitat for Humanity International (HfHI) is a nonprofit organization that engages volunteers and would-be homebuyers in programs that emphasize sweat-equity and self-help. Habitat is among the top-ten housing producers in the United States. In collaboration with the HfHI Department of Construction & Environmental Resources, Steven Winter Associates, Inc., (SWA) began working with the Habitat for Humanity of Greater Newburgh (HfHGN) affiliate in Newburgh, New York, in April 2003. Since October 1999, HfHGN has acquired and renovated abandoned houses for an average cost of $45,000 per home. The affiliate serves area families living in overcrowded, substandard housing and spending 50% to 80% of their income on housing. In August 2003, HfHGN began their first new construction project, six row houses located on Liberty Street in Newburgh.

  14. Structured prototyping as risk management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda SH.; Gardner, J. A.; Willoughby, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented for integrating the systems-engineering management recommendation of prototyping into the traditional project-management process for developing large-scale systems. The suggested methodology begins with the identification of life-cycle risk areas, outlines the structure and conduct of the prototyping process, and defines the composition of the prototyping team. The methodology includes a step-by-step procedure for creating, executing, and documenting a prototyping test plan to evaluate design alternatives. It is argued that managers who adopt this methodology and apply it rigorously will increase the likelihood that the systems they build will be operationally effective and will be accepted by the intended users.

  15. The PIAA Coronagraph Prototype: First Laboratory Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluzhnik, Eugene; Guyon, O.; Colley, S.; Gallet, B.; Ridgway, S.; Woodruff, R.; Tanaka, S.; Warren, M.

    2006-12-01

    The phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) coronagraph combines the main advantages of classical pupil apodization with high throughput ( 100%), high angular resolution ( 2λ/D) and low chromaticity. These advantages can allow direct imaging of nearby extrasolar planets with a 4-meter telescope. The PIAA coronagraph laboratory prototype has been successfully manufactured and starts to operate at the Subary Telescope facility. We present here our first laboratory results with this prototype where we have achieved 2x10-6 contrast within 2 λ/D. We also discuss the main constrains limiting the contrast and describe our future efforts. This work was carried out under JPL contract numbers 1254445 and 1257767 for Development of Technologies for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission, with the support and hospitality of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  16. Whole genotype constellation of prototype feline rotavirus strains FRV-1 and FRV64 and their phylogenetic relationships with feline-like human rotavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Gauchan, Punita; Sasaki, Eriko; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Do, Loan Phuong; Doan, Yen Hai; Mochizuki, Masami; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    Feline rotaviruses, members of the species Rotavirus A, are an infrequent source of zoonotic infections, and were previously shown by RNA-RNA hybridization assays to possess two distinct genomic RNA constellations, represented by strains FRV-1 and FRV64. Due to the lack of whole genome sequence information for FRV-1, human rotavirus strain AU-1 has been used as a surrogate for the genotype constellation of feline rotaviruses. The aim of this study was to determine the whole genome sequence of FRV-1 and FRV64 to help understand the genetic relationships among existing feline rotaviruses from the evolutionary perspective. The genotype constellations of FRV-1 and FRV64 were G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T3-E3-H3 and G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C2-M3-A9-N2-T3-E3-H6, respectively. FRV-1 has a genotype constellation identical to that of the AU-1 strain. Although for individual genes they shared lineages, with the exception of genes encoding VP2, VP6 and VP7, the sequence identity between FRV-1 and AU-1 was considered to be sufficiently high for the AU-1 to be regarded as an example of the direct transmission of a feline rotavirus to a child. On the other hand, the FRV64 strain was not only similar in all the 11 genome segments to another feline rotavirus strain, Cat97, but also to canine rotavirus strains (K9 and CU-1) and feline/canine-like human rotavirus strains (Ro1845 and HCR3A). In conclusion, this study revealed intermingled sharing of genotypes and lineages among feline rotaviruses, suggesting the occurrence of frequent reassortment events over the course of evolution to emerge in four genotype constellations represented by FRV-1, FRV64/Cat97, Cat2 and BA222 strains.

  17. Whole genotype constellation of prototype feline rotavirus strains FRV-1 and FRV64 and their phylogenetic relationships with feline-like human rotavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Gauchan, Punita; Sasaki, Eriko; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Do, Loan Phuong; Doan, Yen Hai; Mochizuki, Masami; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    Feline rotaviruses, members of the species Rotavirus A, are an infrequent source of zoonotic infections, and were previously shown by RNA-RNA hybridization assays to possess two distinct genomic RNA constellations, represented by strains FRV-1 and FRV64. Due to the lack of whole genome sequence information for FRV-1, human rotavirus strain AU-1 has been used as a surrogate for the genotype constellation of feline rotaviruses. The aim of this study was to determine the whole genome sequence of FRV-1 and FRV64 to help understand the genetic relationships among existing feline rotaviruses from the evolutionary perspective. The genotype constellations of FRV-1 and FRV64 were G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T3-E3-H3 and G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C2-M3-A9-N2-T3-E3-H6, respectively. FRV-1 has a genotype constellation identical to that of the AU-1 strain. Although for individual genes they shared lineages, with the exception of genes encoding VP2, VP6 and VP7, the sequence identity between FRV-1 and AU-1 was considered to be sufficiently high for the AU-1 to be regarded as an example of the direct transmission of a feline rotavirus to a child. On the other hand, the FRV64 strain was not only similar in all the 11 genome segments to another feline rotavirus strain, Cat97, but also to canine rotavirus strains (K9 and CU-1) and feline/canine-like human rotavirus strains (Ro1845 and HCR3A). In conclusion, this study revealed intermingled sharing of genotypes and lineages among feline rotaviruses, suggesting the occurrence of frequent reassortment events over the course of evolution to emerge in four genotype constellations represented by FRV-1, FRV64/Cat97, Cat2 and BA222 strains. PMID:25351516

  18. Complex flow dynamics around 3D microbot prototypes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aranda, Sergio; Galindo-Rosales, Francisco J; Campo-Deaño, Laura

    2016-02-28

    A new experimental setup for the study of the complex flow dynamics around 3D microbot prototypes in a straight microchannel has been developed and assessed. The ultimate aim of this work is focused on the analysis of the morphology of different microbot prototypes to get a better insight into their efficiency when they swim through the main conduits of the human circulatory system. The setup consists of a fused silica straight microchannel with a 3D microbot prototype fastened in the center of the channel cross-section by an extremely thin support. Four different prototypes were considered: a cube, a sphere and two ellipsoids with aspect ratios of 1 : 2 and 1 : 4, respectively. Flow visualization and micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measurements were performed using Newtonian and viscoelastic blood analogue fluids. An efficiency parameter, ℑ, to discriminate the prototypes in terms of flow disturbance has been proposed.

  19. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  20. Helios Prototype on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Helios Prototype is an enlarged version of the Centurion flying wing, which flew a series of test flights at Dryden in late 1998. The craft has a wingspan of 247 feet, 41 feet greater than the Centurion, 2 1/2 times that of its solar-powered Pathfinder flying wing and longer than either the Boeing 747 jetliner or Lockheed C-5 transport aircraft. It is one of several remotely-piloted aircraft-also known as uninhabited aerial vehicles or UAV's-being developed as technology demonstrators by several small airframe manufacturers under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., of Monrovia, Calif., the unique craft is intended to demonstrate two key missions: the ability to reach and sustain horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude on a single-day flight, and to maintain flight above 50,000 feet altitude for at least four days, both on electrical power derived from non-polluting solar energy. During later flights, AeroVironment's flight test team will evaluate new motor-control software which may allow the pitch of the aircraft (the nose-up or nose-down attitude in relation to the horizon) to be controlled entirely by the motors. If successful, production versions of the Helios could eliminate the elevators on the wing's trailing edge now used for pitch control, saving weight and increasing the area of the wing available for installation of solar cells.

  1. Mars Spark Source Prototype Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware was developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample, and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma to identify and quantify them. Trace metal measurements are vital in assessing whether or not the Martian environment will be toxic to human explorers. The current method of x-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations of major species only. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The new instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but it would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated the development of the MSSP as part of Glenn's Director's Discretionary Fund project for the Spark Analysis Detection of Trace Metal Species in Martian Dusts and Soils. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a compact, sensitive optical instrument for the detection of trace hazardous metals in Martian dusts and soils.

  2. Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus from human and animal origins: genetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility, and characterization of a vancomycin-resistant calf isolate carrying a vanA-Tn1546-like element.

    PubMed

    Romero-Hernández, Beatriz; Tedim, Ana P; Sánchez-Herrero, José Francisco; Librado, Pablo; Rozas, Julio; Muñoz, Gloria; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Del Campo, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the antibiotic susceptibility and genetic diversity of 41 Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates: 18 isolates obtained from animals and 23 human clinical isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the semiautomatic Wider system and genetic diversity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI. Animal isolates grouped separately in the PFGE analysis, but no statistical differences in antimicrobial resistance were found between the two groups. The LMG 17956 sequence type 28 (ST28) strain recovered from the feces of a calf exhibited high levels of resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin (MIC, ≥256 mg/liter). Its glycopeptide resistance mechanism was characterized by Southern blot hybridization and a primer-walking strategy, and finally its genome, determined by whole-genome sequencing, was compared with four closely related S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus genomes. Hybridization experiments demonstrated that a Tn1546-like element was integrated into the bacterial chromosome. In agreement with this finding, whole-genome sequencing confirmed a partial deletion of the vanY-vanZ region and partial duplication of the vanH gene. The comparative genomic analyses revealed that the LMG 17956 ST28 strain had acquired an unusually high number of transposable elements and had experienced extensive chromosomal rearrangements, as well as gene gain and loss events. In conclusion, S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates from animals seem to belong to lineages separate from those infecting humans. In addition, we report a glycopeptide-resistant isolate from a calf carrying a Tn1546-like element integrated into its chromosome.

  3. Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus from Human and Animal Origins: Genetic Diversity, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Characterization of a Vancomycin-Resistant Calf Isolate Carrying a vanA-Tn1546-Like Element

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Hernández, Beatriz; Tedim, Ana P.; Sánchez-Herrero, José Francisco; Librado, Pablo; Rozas, Julio; Muñoz, Gloria; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the antibiotic susceptibility and genetic diversity of 41 Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates: 18 isolates obtained from animals and 23 human clinical isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the semiautomatic Wider system and genetic diversity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI. Animal isolates grouped separately in the PFGE analysis, but no statistical differences in antimicrobial resistance were found between the two groups. The LMG 17956 sequence type 28 (ST28) strain recovered from the feces of a calf exhibited high levels of resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin (MIC, ≥256 mg/liter). Its glycopeptide resistance mechanism was characterized by Southern blot hybridization and a primer-walking strategy, and finally its genome, determined by whole-genome sequencing, was compared with four closely related S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus genomes. Hybridization experiments demonstrated that a Tn1546-like element was integrated into the bacterial chromosome. In agreement with this finding, whole-genome sequencing confirmed a partial deletion of the vanY-vanZ region and partial duplication of the vanH gene. The comparative genomic analyses revealed that the LMG 17956 ST28 strain had acquired an unusually high number of transposable elements and had experienced extensive chromosomal rearrangements, as well as gene gain and loss events. In conclusion, S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates from animals seem to belong to lineages separate from those infecting humans. In addition, we report a glycopeptide-resistant isolate from a calf carrying a Tn1546-like element integrated into its chromosome. PMID:25605355

  4. The NASA Langley Mars Tumbleweed Rover Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffrey; Chattin, Richard L.; Copeland, Benjamin M.; Krizann, Shawn A.

    2005-01-01

    Mars Tumbleweed is a concept for an autonomous rover that would achieve mobility through use of the natural winds on Mars. The wind-blown nature of this vehicle make it an ideal platform for conducting random surveys of the surface, scouting for signs of past or present life as well as examining the potential habitability of sites for future human exploration. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been studying the dynamics, aerodynamics, and mission concepts of Tumbleweed rovers and has recently developed a prototype Mars Tumbleweed Rover for demonstrating mission concepts and science measurement techniques. This paper will provide an overview of the prototype design, instrumentation to be accommodated, preliminary test results, and plans for future development and testing of the vehicle.

  5. Investigation of standing wave formation in a human skull for a clinical prototype of a large-aperture, transcranial MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) phased array: An experimental and simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Junho; Pulkkinen, Aki; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    Standing wave formation in an ex vivo human skull was investigated using a clinical prototype of a 30 cm diameter with 15 cm radius of curvature, low frequency (230 kHz), hemispherical transcranial Magnetic Resonance guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) phased-array. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted with changing aperture size and f-number configurations of the phased array, and qualitatively and quantitatively examined the acoustic pressure variation at the focus due to standing waves. The results demonstrated that the nodes and anti-nodes of standing wave produced by the small aperture array were clearly seen at approximately every 3 mm. The effect of the standing wave became more pronounced as the focus was moved closer to skull base. However, a sharp focus was seen for the full array, and there was no such standing wave pattern in the acoustic plane or near the skull base. This study showed that the fluctuation pressure amplitude would be greatly reduced by using a large-scale, hemispherical phased array with a low f-number. PMID:22049360

  6. Augmented oxygen-mediated transcriptional activation of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression and increased susceptibilities to hyperoxic lung injury in transgenic mice carrying the human CYP1A1 or mouse 1A2 promoter in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiwu; Couroucli, Xanthi I; Wang, Lihua; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2011-04-01

    Supplemental oxygen administration is frequently administered to pre-term and term infants having pulmonary insufficiency. However, hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)A enzymes have been implicated in hyperoxic lung injury. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that hyperoxia induces CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes by transcriptional activation of the corresponding promoters in vivo, and transgenic mice expressing the human CYP1A1 or the mouse 1A2 promoter would be more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than wild type (WT) mice. Adult WT (CD-1) (12week-old) mice, transgenic mice carrying a 10kb human CYP1A1 promoter and the luciferase (luc) reporter gene (CYP1A1-luc), or mice expressing the mouse CYP1A2 promoter (CYP1A2-luc) were maintained in room air or exposed to hyperoxia for 24-72h. Hyperoxia exposure of CYP1A1-luc mice for 24 and 48h resulted in 2.5- and 1.25-fold increases, respectively, in signal intensities, compared to room air controls. By 72h, the induction had declined to control levels. CYP1A2-luc mice also showed enhanced luc expression after 24-48h, albeit to a lesser extent than those expressing the CYP1A1 promoter. Also, these mice showed decreased levels of endogenous CYP1A1 and 1A2 expression after prolonged hyperoxia, and were also more susceptible to lung injury than similarly exposed WT mice, with CYP1A2-luc mice showing the greatest injury. Our results support the hypothesis that hyperoxia induces CYP1A enzymes by transcriptional activation of its corresponding promoters, and that decreased endogenous expression of these enzymes contribute to the increased susceptibilities to hyperoxic lung injury in the transgenic animals. In summary, this is the first report providing direct evidence of hyperoxia-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression in vivo by mechanisms entailing transcriptional activation of the corresponding promoters, a phenomenon that has

  7. Energy saver prototype accelerating resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; May, M.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Turkot, F.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1981-06-01

    A fixed frequency rf accelerating resonator has been built and tested for the Fermilab Energy Saver. The design parameters and prototype resonator test results are given. The resonator features a high permeability nickel alloy resistor which damps unwanted modes and corona rolls designed with the aid of the computer code SUPERFISH. In bench measurements, the prototype resonator has achieved peak accelerating voltages of 500 kV for a 1% duty cycle and cw operation at 360 kV. 4 refs.

  8. Delineating prototypes of training psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Weis, David A; Schottenbauer, Michele A; Gray, Sheila Hafter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract There is no reported research comparing psychotherapy for trainees to psychotherapy for clinical patients. This preliminary study examines similarities and differences between the Training Psychotherapy Experience (TPE), an elective offered to residents in a large psychiatry training program, and psychotherapy conducted by the same clinicians in their private practices (TAU). We used the Psychotherapy Process Q-set (PQS; Ablon & Jones, 1988; Ablon, Levy, & Katzenstein, 2006). All program consultants who perform TPE were offered their standard fee to complete one PQS while envisioning a typical TPE session and another while envisioning a typical TAU session, using their own assessment of what happens in such sessions. These data were subjected to factor analysis to develop prototypes (TAU and TPE) that could be compared with each other and with validated prototypes developed by Ablon and Jones (1998, 2002). Twenty-two of the 25 clinicians who perform TPE (88%) responded to the study. We found two distinct prototypes in both TPE and TAU. One correlated significantly with Ablon and Jones' Cognitive-Behavioral and Interpersonal prototypes, and the other with their Psychodynamic prototype. There was no significant difference between corresponding TPE and TAU prototypes. We conclude, first, TPE offers trainees an experience of psychotherapy that is very similar to psychotherapy of actual patients. Second, experienced clinicians integrate a broad array of useful interventions into both TPE and TAU. PMID:19591565

  9. Advanced ASON prototyping research activities in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, WeiSheng; Jin, Yaohui; Guo, Wei; Su, Yikai; He, Hao; Sun, Weiqiang

    2005-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of prototyping research activities of automatically switched optical networks and transport networks (ASONs/ASTNs) in China. In recent years, China has recognized the importance and benefits of the emerging ASON/ASTN techniques. During the period of 2001 and 2002, the national 863 Program of China started the preliminary ASON research projects with the main objectives to build preliminary ASON testbeds, develop control plane protocols and test their performance in the testbeds. During the period of 2003 and 2004, the 863 program started ASTN prototyping equipment projects for more practical applications. Totally 12 ASTN equipments are being developed by three groups led by Chinese venders: ZTE with Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT), Wuhan Research Institute of Posts and Telecommunication (WRI) with Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU), and Huawei Inc. Meanwhile, as the ASTN is maturing, some of the China"s carries are participating in the OIF"s World Interoperability Demonstration, carrying out ASTN test, or deploying ASTN backbone networks. Finally, several ASTN backbone networks being tested or deployed now will be operated by the carries in 2005. The 863 Program will carry out an ASTN field trail in Yangtse River Delta, and finally deploy the 3TNET. 3TNET stands for Tbps transmission, Tbps switching, and Tbps routing, as well as a network integrating the above techniques. A task force under the "863" program is responsible for ASTN equipment specifications and interoperation agreements, technical coordination among all the participants, schedule of the whole project during the project undergoing, and organization of internetworking of all the equipments in the laboratories and field trials.

  10. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  11. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  12. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6900 - Hand-carried stretcher.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hand-carried stretcher. 880.6900 Section 880.6900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.6900 Hand-carried stretcher. (a) Identification. A hand-carried stretcher is a...

  15. Actions of the prototypical 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT at human alpha2-adrenoceptors: (+)8-OH-DPAT, but not (-)8-OH-DPAT is an alpha2B subtype preferential agonist.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Tourette, Amélie; Tardif, Stéphanie; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Croville, Guillaume; Cussac, Didier

    2010-08-25

    8-OH-DPAT [8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin] is the prototypical agonist at serotonin 5-HT1A receptors; however, activity at other targets contributes to the functional effects of the compound as well. We examined the properties of 8-OH-DPAT and its enantiomers at recombinant human (h)alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes, using a panel of radioligand binding and functional tests. In competition binding experiments using [3H]-RX821002, about 10-fold selectivity of (+)8-OH-DPAT for the halpha2B subtype (pKi about 7) over halpha2A- and halpha2C-adrenoceptors was observed. In contrast, the S(-) enantiomer of 8-OH-DPAT showed similar weak affinities for the three receptor subtypes (pKis<6). The binding affinity of (+)8-OH-DPAT at the halpha2B- and the halpha2A-adrenoceptor was found sensitive to GTPgammaS, a receptor/G protein-uncoupling agent, indicating agonist properties of the drug. Furthermore, using [35S]GTPgammaS binding determination at CHO-halpha2B or CHO-halpha2A cell membranes and G protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) current recordings in Xenopus oocytes expressing halpha2B, partial agonist activity of (+)8-OH-DPAT at the respective receptors was confirmed in these two different functional assays. Potency of (+)8-OH-DPAT for stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS incorporation was lower at the halpha2A- than at the halpha2B-adrenoceptor, consistent with binding affinities. Thus, (+)8-OH-DPAT and, as a consequence, racemic (+/-)8-OH-DPAT are partial agonists at halpha2-adrenoceptors with selectivity for the halpha2B subtype, a property that might contribute to the effects of the compound described in native systems.

  16. Integration/evaluation of a HCI prototyping environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1994-01-01

    Components of a human computer interface (HCI) prototyping environment have been integrated and evaluated. This environment will be valuable in developing and refining HCI standards and evaluating program/project interface development, especially the International Space Station Alpha's on-board displays for payload operations. This environment, which allows for rapid prototyping and evaluation of graphical interfaces, includes four components: (1) a HCI format development tool, (2) a test and evaluation simulator development tool, (3) a dynamic, interactive interface between the HCI prototype and simulator, and (4) an embedded evaluation capability to evaluate the adequacy of a HCI based on a user's performance. The objective of the research was to determine whether or not the functional components could be integrated and could provide the needed functionality for a rapid prototyping environment.

  17. Loren Shriver carries Olympic torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver proudly displays the Olympic torch that he carried to the top of Launch Pad 39A as his contribution to the July 7, 1996 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. Nineteen other KSC runners also participated in the relay effort at the Center. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind Shriver, poised for the STS-79 mission, which will feature the fourth docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  18. Drinker prototypes in American society.

    PubMed

    Klein, H; Pittman, D J

    1990-01-01

    Based on a national probability sample of 2,401 Americans age 21 and over (1,069 of whom were deemed "drinkers" on the basis of having consumed at least one alcoholic beverage in the past 7 days), this study develops profiles of the drinker and heavier drinking prototypes for beer, distilled spirits, wine, and wine cooler drinkers. Both beer-drinking prototypes are mainly composed of less well-educated males who drink beer in circumstances unconnected with any mealtime setting. Wine drinkers are more often women (although the heavy drinking prototype is more likely to be a man), usually with education at or beyond the "some college" level, who typically drink wine in moderation with a meal such as dinner. Both prototypes of the distilled spirits drinkers are likely to be men, age 45 or over, who are not currently married, who usually drink in a bar, before a meal, when they feel somewhat happy or calm. Wine cooler drinkers are much more heterogeneous, and hence less distinguishable than the other drinking prototypes. The heavier wine cooler drinker, however, is likely to be single, with 12 or 13 years of schooling. This person usually drinks when feeling very stimulated, very happy, very romantic, or else very bored, and often does so at bars or in friends' homes.

  19. A prototype retinal prosthesis for visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O; Rjeily, Dany M Abou; Nasreddine, Rayan W; Andari, Majid A; Taok, Habib H

    2007-01-01

    Vision loss has severe impacts on its victims, carrying with it physiological, psychological, social, and economic consequences thereby degrading the quality of life and depriving the individual from performing many of the daily living activities. This article describes the design and development of a prototype retinal prosthesis for visual stimulation. The system consists of a webcam, a notebook computer, and a prototype excitatory circuit. The system is driven by a MATLAB-based custom-built software. Live webcam images are converted to an 8 x 8 mosaic of 256 gray scale shades. Subsequently, electrical impulses are generated by the excitatory circuit in real-time to topographically stimulate the corresponding epiretinal cells. Following their conversion to gray scale, recorded data from the central pixel of the mosaic yielded: 36.24 nC for black, 48.48 nC for red, 55.68 nC for green, 67.68 nC for blue, and 91.92 nC for white. These results correlate well with data reported in the literature. The hallmark of this work is in the potential of partial restoration of sight that would add quality to the life of individuals with vision loss. PMID:18003325

  20. Facial Prototype Formation in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inn, Donald; And Others

    This study examined memory representation as it is exhibited in young children's formation of facial prototypes. In the first part of the study, researchers constructed images of faces using an Identikit that provided the features of hair, eyes, mouth, nose, and chin. Images were varied systematically. A series of these images, called exemplar…

  1. Expo 86: An Escalation Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jerry; Staw, Barry M.

    1986-01-01

    British Columbia remained committed to its decision to host a world's fair (Expo 86) despite rapidly increasing deficit projections. Expo is examined as a prototypical example of the escalation of commitment. Theory is proposed that integrates determinants of escalation from several levels of analysis over time. (CJH)

  2. EUSO-TA prototype telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisconti, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    EUSO-TA is one of the prototypes developed for the JEM-EUSO project, a space-based large field-of-view telescope to observe the fluorescence light emitted by cosmic ray air showers in the atmosphere. EUSO-TA is a ground-based prototype located at the Telescope Array (TA) site in Utah, USA, where an Electron Light Source and a Central Laser Facility are installed. The purpose of the EUSO-TA project is to calibrate the prototype with the TA fluorescence detector in presence of well-known light sources and cosmic ray air showers. In 2015, the detector started the first measurements and tests using the mentioned light sources have been performed successfully. A first cosmic ray candidate has been observed, as well as stars of different magnitude and color index. Since Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are very promising for fluorescence telescopes of next generation, they are under consideration for the realization of a new prototype of EUSO Photo Detector Module (PDM). The response of this sensor type is under investigation through simulations and laboratory experimentation.

  3. Prototypes for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presented are brief descriptions of the winning entries in this magazine's contest for existing programs to serve as prototypes for wide-scale use in elementary schools of the 1980s. Top prizes went to computer literacy, energy education, and nutrition projects. Twenty runners-up are also described. Project addresses are included. (SJL)

  4. OTF Mission Operations Prototype Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Walter F.; Lucord, Steven A.; Stevens, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Reports on the progress of the JSC/OTF prototype of a CCSDS SM&C protocol based communications link between two space flight operations control centers. Varied implementations using software architectures from current web enterprise venues are presented. The AMS protocol (CCSDS Blue Book standard 735.1) was used for messaging and link communications.

  5. Rapid Prototyping Enters Mainstream Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winek, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Explains rapid prototyping, a process that uses computer-assisted design files to create a three-dimensional object automatically, speeding the industrial design process. Five commercially available systems and two emerging types--the 3-D printing process and repetitive masking and depositing--are described. (SK)

  6. Prototype of calorimetric flow microsensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, Oleg

    2012-11-01

    An analytical model of calorimetric flow sensor has been developed. The results of the application of this model are utilized to develop a calorimetric flow microsensor with optimal functional characteristics. The technology to manufacture the microsensor is described. A prototype of the microsensor suitable to be used in the mass air flow meter has been designed. The basic characteristics of the microsensor are presented.

  7. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion it will be tested in the 11' human-rated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model. The paper also provides a discussion of significant Z-2 configuration features, and how these components evolved from proposal concepts to final designs.

  8. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David; Jones, Bobby; Lee, Ryan; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion the Z-2 will be tested in the 11 foot human-rated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' that the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model.

  9. Flight research with the MIT Daedalus prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussolari, Steven R.; Youngren, Harold H.; Langford, John S.

    1987-01-01

    The MIT Light Eagle human-powered aircraft underwent long-duration testing over Rogers Dry Lake in California during January, 1987. Designed as a prototype for the MIT Daedalus Project, the Light Eagle's forty-eight flights provided pilot training, established new distance records for human-powered flight, and provided quantitative data through a series of instrumented flight experiments. The experiments focused on: (1) evaluating physiological loads on the pilot, (2) determining airframe power requirements, and (3) developing an electronic flight control system. This paper discusses the flight test program, its results and their implications for the follow-on Daedalus aircraft, and the potential uses of the Light Eagle as a low Reynolds number testbed.

  10. Characterization of the ATLAS Micromegas quadruplet prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulou, O.; Bianco, M.; Danielsson, H.; Degrange, J.; Farina, E. M.; Gomez, F. P.; Iengo, P.; Kuger, F.; Lin, T. H.; Schott, M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Valderanis, C.; Vergain, M.; Wotschack, J.

    2016-07-01

    A Micromegas [1] detector with four active layers, serving as prototype for the upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer [2], was designed and constructed in 2014 at CERN and represents the first example of a Micromegas quadruplet ever built. The detector has been realized using the resistive-strip technology and decoupling the amplification mesh from the readout structure. The four readout layers host overall 4096 strips with a pitch of 415 μm; two layers have strips running parallel (η in the ATLAS reference system, for measuring the muon bending coordinate) and two layers have inclined strips by ±1.5° angle with respect to the η coordinate in order to provide measurement of the second coordinate. A detector characterization carried out with cosmic muons and under X-ray irradiation is presented with the obtained results.

  11. Prototyping the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, C.; Kalicy, G.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The design of the Barrel DIRC detector for the future PANDA experiment at FAIR contains several important improvements compared to the successful BABAR DIRC, such as focusing and fast timing. To test those improvements as well as other design options a prototype was build and successfully tested in 2012 with particle beams at CERN. The prototype comprises a radiator bar, focusing lens, mirror, and a prism shaped expansion volume made of synthetic fused silica. An array of micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes measures the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons with sub-nanosecond resolution. The development of a fast reconstruction algorithm allowed to tune construction details of the detector setup with test beam data and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  12. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  13. Prototype Morphing Fan Nozzle Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gang-Bing

    2004-01-01

    Ongoing research in NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch to develop smart materials technologies for aeropropulsion structural components has resulted in the design of the prototype morphing fan nozzle shown in the photograph. This prototype exploits the potential of smart materials to significantly improve the performance of existing aircraft engines by introducing new inherent capabilities for shape control, vibration damping, noise reduction, health monitoring, and flow manipulation. The novel design employs two different smart materials, a shape-memory alloy and magnetorheological fluids, to reduce the nozzle area by up to 30 percent. The prototype of the variable-area fan nozzle implements an overlapping spring leaf assembly to simplify the initial design and to provide ease of structural control. A single bundle of shape memory alloy wire actuators is used to reduce the nozzle geometry. The nozzle is subsequently held in the reduced-area configuration by using magnetorheological fluid brakes. This prototype uses the inherent advantages of shape memory alloys in providing large induced strains and of magnetorheological fluids in generating large resistive forces. In addition, the spring leaf design also functions as a return spring, once the magnetorheological fluid brakes are released, to help force the shape memory alloy wires to return to their original position. A computerized real-time control system uses the derivative-gain and proportional-gain algorithms to operate the system. This design represents a novel approach to the active control of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Researchers have estimated that such engines will reduce thrust specific fuel consumption by 9 percent over that of fixed-geometry fan nozzles. This research was conducted under a cooperative agreement (NCC3-839) at the University of Akron.

  14. Shear sensitive silicon piezoresistive tactile sensor prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Beebe, David J.

    1998-09-01

    Shear sensing ability it important in many fields such as robotics, rehabilitation, teleoperation and human computer interfaces. A shear sensitive tactile sensor prototype is developed based on the principles of the piezoresistive effect in silicon, and using microfabrication technology. Analogous to the conventional silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor, piezoresistive resistors embedded in a silicon diaphragm are used to sense stress change. An additional mesa is fabricated on the top of the diaphragm and serves to transform an applied force to a stress. Both the shear and normal components of the force are resolved by measuring the resistance changes of the four resistors placed at the corners of a prism mesa. The prototype is tested both statically and dynamically when a spatial force of 0 - 300 gram is applied. Good linearity (R > 0.98) and high repeatability are observed. In this paper, the force sensing mechanism and force determination approach are described. The fabrication process is presented. The preliminary testing results are presented and discussed.

  15. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  16. Robotic Lander Prototype Completes Initial Tests

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Robotic Lunar Lander Development Project at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., completed an initial series of integrated tests on a new lander prototype. The prototype lander ...

  17. [Prototyping as an alternative to cranioplasty using methylmethacrylate: technical note].

    PubMed

    Yacubian-Fernandes, Adriano; Laronga, Paulo Roberto; Coelho, Régis Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Silva, Mateus Violin

    2004-09-01

    The prototyping is a method for reconstruction of human body segments by computer software. It has been used in neurosurgery for cranial reproduction in patients allowing the programming of surgical procedures and the production of prosthesis to reconstruct bone failures in the skull. We present two cases of cranioplasty performed with the use of acrylic prosthesis constructed by prototyping. After 10 months of follow-up, they do not present signs of infection and show good aesthetic result. The advantages pointed at the literature for this method (reduction of surgical time, easy technical handle, and good aesthetic result) were confirmed.

  18. An approach for assessing software prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, V. E.; Card, D. N.; Agresti, W. W.; Jordan, Q. L.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure for evaluating a software prototype is presented. The need to assess the prototype itself arises from the use of prototyping to demonstrate the feasibility of a design or development stategy. The assessment procedure can also be of use in deciding whether to evolve a prototype into a complete system. The procedure consists of identifying evaluations criteria, defining alterative design approaches, and ranking the alternatives according to the criteria.

  19. Prototyping of Computer-Based Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, D. E.; Black, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    Defines prototyping as an original version or model on which a completed software system for computer-based training is formed; examines the development process of a prototype; describes how prototyping can assist in facilitating communication between educational technology, software engineering, and project management; and discusses why…

  20. Prototype Abstraction by Monkeys ("Macaca Mulatta")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David; Redford, Joshua S.; Haas, Sarah M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors analyze the shape categorization of rhesus monkeys ("Macaca mulatta") and the role of prototype- and exemplar-based comparison processes in monkeys' category learning. Prototype and exemplar theories make contrasting predictions regarding performance on the Posner-Homa dot-distortion categorization task. Prototype theory--which…

  1. A Computuerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Tom Ulrich; Richard Villim

    2013-11-01

    on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment.

  2. A Computuerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Tom Ulrich; Richard Villim

    2013-08-01

    on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment.

  3. Global change and carrying capacity: Implications for life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Paul R.; Daily, Gretchen C.; Ehrlich, Anne H.; Matson, Pamela; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Determining the long-term number of people that the planet can support without irreversibly reducing its ability to support people in the future, i.e., the carrying capacity of the Earth, is an exceedingly complex problem. About all that is known for certain is that, with present and foreseeable technologies, the human population has already exceeded the capacity. The reduction in carrying capacity that can be expected to result from direct human impacts on resources and the environment and from our indirect impacts of the climate system is discussed. Global warming and modeling global change and food security are also discussed with respect to carrying capacity.

  4. A MEMS turbine prototype for respiration harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreke, U.; Habibiabad, S.; Azgin, K.; Beyaz, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The design, manufacturing, and performance characterization of a MEMS-scale turbine prototype is reported. The turbine is designed for integration into a respiration harvester that can convert normal human breathing into electrical power through electromagnetic induction. The device measures 10 mm in radius, and employs 12 blades located around the turbine periphery along with ball bearings around the center. Finite element simulations showed that an average torque of 3.07 μNm is induced at 12 lpm airflow rate, which lies in normal breathing levels. The turbine and a test package were manufactured using CNC milling on PMMA. Tests were performed at respiration flow rates between 5-25 lpm. The highest rotational speed was measured to be 9.84 krpm at 25 lpm, resulting in 8.96 mbar pressure drop across the device and 370 mW actuation power.

  5. Rapid prototyping of ossicular replacement prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsianikov, A.; Chichkov, B.; Adunka, O.; Pillsbury, H.; Doraiswamy, A.; Narayan, R. J.

    2007-05-01

    Materials used in ossicular replacement prostheses must demonstrate appropriate biological compatibility, acoustic transmission, stability, and stiffness properties. Prostheses prepared using Teflon ®, titanium, Ceravital and other conventional materials have demonstrated several problems, including migration, perforation of the tympanic membrane, difficulty in shaping the prostheses, and reactivity with the surrounding tissues. We have used two-photon polymerization for rapid prototyping of Ormocer ® middle-ear bone replacement prostheses. Ormocer ® surfaces fabricated using two-photon polymerization exhibited acceptable cell viability and cell growth profiles. The Ormocer ® prosthesis was able to be inserted and removed from the site of use in the frozen human head without fracture. Our results demonstrate that two-photon polymerization is able to create ossicular replacement prostheses and other medical devices with a larger range of sizes, shapes and materials than other microfabrication techniques.

  6. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David; Jones, Bobby; Lee, Ryan; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion it will be tested in the 11' humanrated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model. The paper also provides a discussion of significant Z-2 configuration features, and how these components evolved from proposal concepts to final designs.

  7. Rapid Prototyping Integrated With Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    Most reverse engineering approaches involve imaging or digitizing an object then creating a computerized reconstruction that can be integrated, in three dimensions, into a particular design environment. Rapid prototyping (RP) refers to the practical ability to build high-quality physical prototypes directly from computer aided design (CAD) files. Using rapid prototyping, full-scale models or patterns can be built using a variety of materials in a fraction of the time required by more traditional prototyping techniques (refs. 1 and 2). Many software packages have been developed and are being designed to tackle the reverse engineering and rapid prototyping issues just mentioned. For example, image processing and three-dimensional reconstruction visualization software such as Velocity2 (ref. 3) are being used to carry out the construction process of three-dimensional volume models and the subsequent generation of a stereolithography file that is suitable for CAD applications. Producing three-dimensional models of objects from computed tomography (CT) scans is becoming a valuable nondestructive evaluation methodology (ref. 4). Real components can be rendered and subjected to temperature and stress tests using structural engineering software codes. For this to be achieved, accurate high-resolution images have to be obtained via CT scans and then processed, converted into a traditional file format, and translated into finite element models. Prototyping a three-dimensional volume of a composite structure by reading in a series of two-dimensional images generated via CT and by using and integrating commercial software (e.g. Velocity2, MSC/PATRAN (ref. 5), and Hypermesh (ref. 6)) is being applied successfully at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The building process from structural modeling to the analysis level is outlined in reference 7. Subsequently, a stress analysis of a composite cooling panel under combined thermomechanical loading conditions was performed to validate

  8. Mechanical Prototyping and Manufacturing Internship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The internship was located at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Innovation Design Center (IDC), which is a facility where the JSC workforce can meet and conduct hands-on innovative design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of ideas and concepts relevant to NASA's mission. The tasks of the internship included mechanical prototyping design and manufacturing projects in service of research and development as well as assisting the users of the IDC in completing their manufacturing projects. The first project was to manufacture hatch mechanisms for a team in the Systems Engineering and Project Advancement Program (SETMAP) hexacopter competition. These mechanisms were intended to improve the performance of the servomotors and offer an access point that would also seal to prevent cross-contamination. I also assisted other teams as they were constructing and modifying their hexacopters. The success of this competition demonstrated a proof of concept for aerial reconnaissance and sample return to be potentially used in future NASA missions. I also worked with Dr. Kumar Krishen to prototype an improved thermos and a novel, portable solar array. Computer-aided design (CAD) software was used to model the parts for both of these projects. Then, 3D printing as well as conventional techniques were used to produce the parts. These prototypes were then subjected to trials to determine the success of the designs. The solar array is intended to work in a cluster that is easy to set up and take down and doesn't require powered servomechanisms. It could be used terrestrially in areas not serviced by power grids. Both projects improve planetary exploration capabilities to future astronauts. Other projects included manufacturing custom rail brackets for EG-2, assisting engineers working on underwater instrument and tool cases for the NEEMO project, and helping to create mock-up parts for Space Center Houston. The use of the IDC enabled efficient completion of these projects at

  9. Integration-free T cell-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient with lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS) carrying an insertion-deletion complex mutation in the FOXC2 gene.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Munenari; Kawagoe, Shiho; Okano, Hirotaka James; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-05-01

    Expanded human T cells from a Japanese male with lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS) were used to generate integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by exogenous expression of four reprogramming factors, OCT3/4, SOX2, cMYC, KLF4, using Sendai virus vector (SeVdp). The authenticity of established iPSC line, LDS-iPSC8, was confirmed by the expression of stem cell markers and the differentiation capability into three germ layers. LDS-iPSC8 may be a useful cell resource for the establishment of in vitro LDS modeling and the study for vascular and lymph vessel development. PMID:27346194

  10. A Brief Analysis of Sister Carrie's Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hanying

    2010-01-01

    Carrie is always dreaming while the rocking chair is rocking again and again, this is the deep impression on us after we read "Sister Carrie" which is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser. In this novel the protagonist Sister Carrie is a controversial person. This paper tries to analyze the character of Sister Carrie in order to find out…

  11. Computer-assisted trauma care prototype.

    PubMed

    Holzman, T G; Griffith, A; Hunter, W G; Allen, T; Simpson, R J

    1995-01-01

    Each year, civilian accidental injury results in 150,000 deaths and 400,000 permanent disabilities in the United States alone. The timely creation of and access to dynamically updated trauma patient information at the point of injury is critical to improving the state of care. Such information is often non-existent, incomplete, or inaccurate, resulting in less than adequate treatment by medics and the loss of precious time by medical personnel at the hospital or battalion aid station as they attempt to reassess and treat the patient. The Trauma Care Information Management System (TCIMS) is a prototype system for facilitating information flow and patient processing decisions in the difficult circumstances of civilian and military trauma care activities. The program is jointly supported by the United States Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and a consortium of universities, medical centers, and private companies. The authors' focus has been the human-computer interface for the system. We are attempting to make TCIMS powerful in the functions it delivers to its users in the field while also making it easy to understand and operate. To develop such a usable system, an approach known as user-centered design is being followed. Medical personnel themselves are collaborating with the authors in its needs analysis, design, and evaluation. Specifically, the prototype being demonstrated was designed through observation of actual civilian trauma care episodes, military trauma care exercises onboard a hospital ship, interviews with civilian and military trauma care providers, repeated evaluation of evolving prototypes by potential users, and study of the literature on trauma care and human factors engineering. This presentation at MedInfo '95 is still another avenue for soliciting guidance from medical information system experts and users. The outcome of this process is a system that provides the functions trauma care personnel desire in a manner that can be easily and

  12. Computer-assisted trauma care prototype.

    PubMed

    Holzman, T G; Griffith, A; Hunter, W G; Allen, T; Simpson, R J

    1995-01-01

    Each year, civilian accidental injury results in 150,000 deaths and 400,000 permanent disabilities in the United States alone. The timely creation of and access to dynamically updated trauma patient information at the point of injury is critical to improving the state of care. Such information is often non-existent, incomplete, or inaccurate, resulting in less than adequate treatment by medics and the loss of precious time by medical personnel at the hospital or battalion aid station as they attempt to reassess and treat the patient. The Trauma Care Information Management System (TCIMS) is a prototype system for facilitating information flow and patient processing decisions in the difficult circumstances of civilian and military trauma care activities. The program is jointly supported by the United States Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and a consortium of universities, medical centers, and private companies. The authors' focus has been the human-computer interface for the system. We are attempting to make TCIMS powerful in the functions it delivers to its users in the field while also making it easy to understand and operate. To develop such a usable system, an approach known as user-centered design is being followed. Medical personnel themselves are collaborating with the authors in its needs analysis, design, and evaluation. Specifically, the prototype being demonstrated was designed through observation of actual civilian trauma care episodes, military trauma care exercises onboard a hospital ship, interviews with civilian and military trauma care providers, repeated evaluation of evolving prototypes by potential users, and study of the literature on trauma care and human factors engineering. This presentation at MedInfo '95 is still another avenue for soliciting guidance from medical information system experts and users. The outcome of this process is a system that provides the functions trauma care personnel desire in a manner that can be easily and

  13. The hetero-transplantation of human bone marrow stromal cells carried by hydrogel unexpectedly demonstrates a significant role in the functional recovery in the injured spinal cord of rats.

    PubMed

    Raynald; Li, Yanbin; Yu, Hao; Huang, Hua; Guo, Muyao; Hua, Rongrong; Jiang, Fenjun; Zhang, Kaihua; Li, Hailong; Wang, Fei; Li, Lusheng; Cui, FuZhai; An, Yihua

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often causes a disturbance in the microenvironment in the lesion site resulting in sudden loss of sensory and motor function. Transplantation of stem cells provides a promising strategy in the treatment of SCI. But limited growth and immunological incompatibility of the stem cells with the host limits the application of this strategy. In order to get better survival and integration with the host, we employed a hyaluronic acid (HA) based scaffold covalently modified by poly-l-Lysine (PLL) as a vehicle to deliver the human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to the injured spinal cord of rats. The BMSCs were chosen as an ideal candidate for its advantage of low expression of major histocompatibility complex II. The data unexpectedly showed that the hetero-transplanted cells survived well in the lesion site even at 8 weeks post injury. Both the immunofluorescent and the electrophysiological assay indicated better survival of the transplanted cells and improved axonal growth in SCI rats transplanted with BMSCs in HA-PLL in contrast to the groups without either BMSCs or the HA scaffold transplantation. These promotions may account for the functional recovery assessed by Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale in the HA-PLL seeded with BMSCs group. These data suggests that hetero-transplantation of human BMSCs delivered by HA scaffold demonstrates a significant role in the functional recovery in the injured spinal cord of rats. PMID:26523673

  14. Ehrlichia chaffeensis: a Prototypical Emerging Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Christopher D.; Childs, James E.

    2003-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular, tick-transmitted bacterium that is maintained in nature in a cycle involving at least one and perhaps several vertebrate reservoir hosts. The moderate to severe disease caused by E. chaffeensis in humans, first identified in 1986 and reported for more than 1,000 patients through 2000, represents a prototypical “emerging infection.” Knowledge of the biology and natural history of E. chaffeensis, and of the epidemiology, clinical features, and laboratory diagnosis of the zoonotic disease it causes (commonly referred to as human monocytic ehrlichiosis [HME]) has expanded considerably in the period since its discovery. In this review, we summarize briefly the current understanding of the microbiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations associated with this pathogen but focus primarily on discussing various ecological factors responsible for the recent recognition of this important and potentially life-threatening tick-borne disease. Perhaps the most pivotal element in the emergence of HME has been the staggering increases in white-tailed deer populations in the eastern United States during the 20th century. This animal serves as a keystone host for all life stages of the principal tick vector (Amblyomma americanum) and is perhaps the most important vertebrate reservoir host for E. chaffeensis. The contributions of other components, including expansion of susceptible human populations, growth and broadening geographical distributions of other potential reservoir species and A. americanum, and improvements in confirmatory diagnostic methods, are also explored. PMID:12525424

  15. Prototype casting fabrication by stereolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cromwell, W.E.

    1992-03-01

    The evolution of the new technology of producing CAD models by ultraviolet solidification of resin materials (``STEREOLITHOGRAPHY``) continues to progress. The potential application area of rigid fabrication of prototype investment castings is becoming more feasible as we continue to successfully yield experimental castings by the ``SHELL`` processing method. This supplemental (to 11/90 publication) report briefly reviews the original project objectives, activities related to these objectives since November 1990, and progress made through December 1991. We discuss several new case studies involving new resin materials (and other materials) tested along with investment casting processing results. The most recent success, the processing of the highly complex ``C`` HOUSING design by the ``shell`` mold process in both aluminum and steel, will be discussed. This is considered a major breakthrough toward establishing this new technology as a viable approach to the rapid development of prototype investment castings, employing the most common aerospace (precision) cast process. Our future planning calls for expanding the study to help the investment casting industry in refining related processing techniques and to continue our evaluation of new resins suitable for the casting process. Present project planning calls for the completion of this study by the third quarter FY93 or sooner. We believe that with the continued excellent cooperation of our casting supplier study team and an accelerated effort by resin materials producers to further refine related materials, we can achieve all objectives during the planned time frame.

  16. Prototype casting fabrication by stereolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cromwell, W.E.

    1992-03-01

    The evolution of the new technology of producing CAD models by ultraviolet solidification of resin materials ( STEREOLITHOGRAPHY'') continues to progress. The potential application area of rigid fabrication of prototype investment castings is becoming more feasible as we continue to successfully yield experimental castings by the SHELL'' processing method. This supplemental (to 11/90 publication) report briefly reviews the original project objectives, activities related to these objectives since November 1990, and progress made through December 1991. We discuss several new case studies involving new resin materials (and other materials) tested along with investment casting processing results. The most recent success, the processing of the highly complex C'' HOUSING design by the shell'' mold process in both aluminum and steel, will be discussed. This is considered a major breakthrough toward establishing this new technology as a viable approach to the rapid development of prototype investment castings, employing the most common aerospace (precision) cast process. Our future planning calls for expanding the study to help the investment casting industry in refining related processing techniques and to continue our evaluation of new resins suitable for the casting process. Present project planning calls for the completion of this study by the third quarter FY93 or sooner. We believe that with the continued excellent cooperation of our casting supplier study team and an accelerated effort by resin materials producers to further refine related materials, we can achieve all objectives during the planned time frame.

  17. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  18. A simian-human immunodeficiency virus carrying the rt gene from Chinese CRF01_AE strain of HIV is sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and has a highly genetic stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Nan; Ju, Bin; Dong, Zhihui; Cong, Zhe; Jiang, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 subtype CRF01_AE is one of the major HIV-1 subtypes that dominate the global epidemic. However, its drug resistance, associated mutations, and viral fitness have not been systemically studied, because available chimeric simian-HIVs (SHIVs) usually express the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (rt) gene of subtype B HIV-1, which is different from subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1. In this study, a recombinant plasmid, pRT-SHIV/AE, was constructed to generate a chimeric RT-SHIV/AE by replacing the rt gene of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239) with the counterpart of Chinese HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE. The infectivity, replication capacity, co-receptor tropism, drug sensitivity, and genetic stability of RT-SHIV/AE were characterized. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE effectively infected and replicated in human T cell line and rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (rhPBMC). The rt gene of RT-SHIV/AE lacked the common mutation (T215I) associated with drug resistance. RT-SHIV-AE retained infectivity and immunogenicity, similar to that of its counterpart RT-SHIV/TC virus following intravenous inoculation in Chinese rhesus macaque. RT-SHIV-AE was more sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) than the RT-SHIV/TC. RT-SHIV/AE was genetically stable in Chinese rhesus macaque. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE may be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of the rt-based antiviral drugs against the subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1.

  19. L1CAM from human melanoma carries a novel type of N-glycan with Galβ1-4Galβ1- motif. Involvement of N-linked glycans in migratory and invasive behaviour of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hoja-Łukowicz, Dorota; Link-Lenczowski, Paweł; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Pocheć, Ewa; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Bergquist, Jonas; Lityńska, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Dramatic changes in glycan biosynthesis during oncogenic transformation result in the emergence of marker glycans on the cell surface. We analysed the N-linked glycans of L1CAM from different stages of melanoma progression, using high-performance liquid chromatography combined with exoglycosidase sequencing, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and lectin probes. L1CAM oligosaccharides are heavily sialylated, mainly digalactosylated, biantennary complex-type structures with galactose β1-4/3-linked to GlcNAc and with or without fucose α1-3/6-linked to GlcNAc. Hybrid, bisected hybrid, bisected triantennary and tetraantennary complex oligosaccharides, and β1-6-branched complex-type glycans with or without lactosamine extensions are expresses at lower abundance. We found that metastatic L1CAM possesses only α2-6-linked sialic acid and the loss of α2-3-linked sialic acid in L1CAM is a phenomenon observed during the transition of melanoma cells from VGP to a metastatic stage. Unexpectedly, we found a novel monoantennary complex-type oligosaccharide with a Galβ1-4Galβ1- epitope capped with sialic acid residues A1[3]G(4)2S2-3. To our knowledge this is the first report documenting the presence of this oligosaccharide in human cancer. The novel and unique N-glycan should be recognised as a new class of human melanoma marker. In functional tests we demonstrated that the presence of cell surface α2-3-linked sialic acid facilitates the migratory behaviour and increases the invasiveness of primary melanoma cells, and it enhances the motility of metastatic cells. The presence of cell surface α2-6-linked sialic acid enhances the invasive potential of both primary and metastatic melanoma cells. Complex-type oligosaccharides in L1CAM enhance the invasiveness of metastatic melanoma cells. PMID:22544341

  20. Resource Prospector (RP) - Early Prototyping and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D.; Colaprete, A.; Quinn, J.; Bluethmann, B.; Trimble, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Prospector (RP) is an In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) technology demonstration mission under study by the NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate's (HEOMD) Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Division. The mission, currently planned to launch in 2020, will demonstrate extraction of oxygen from lunar regolith to validate ISRU capability. The mission will address key Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs) for robotic and human exploration to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs), and ultimately Mars, as well as meet the strategic goals of the Global Exploration Roadmap (GER), offered by the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG). In this roadmap, the use of local resources is specifically addressed relating to human exploration. RP will provide knowledge to inform the selection of future mission destinations, support the development of exploration systems, and reduce the risk associated with human exploration. Expanding human presence beyond low-Earth orbit to asteroids and Mars will require the maximum possible use of local materials, so-called in-situ resources. The moon presents a unique destination to conduct robotic investigations that advance ISRU capabilities, as well as providing significant exploration and science value. Lunar regolith contains useful resources such as oxygen, water, silicon, and light metals, like aluminum and titanium. Oxygen can be separated from the regolith for life support (breathable air), or used to create rocket propellant (oxidizer). Regolith can be used to protect against radiation exposure, be processed into solar cells, or used to manufacture construction materials such as bricks and glass. RP will characterize the constituents and distribution of water and other volatiles at the poles of the Moon, enabling innovative uses of local resources, in addition to validating ISRU capabilities. This capability, as well as a deeper understanding of regolith, will be valuable in the

  1. The influence of user expertise and prototype fidelity in usability tests.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Jürgen; Seibel, Katrin; Rüttinger, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    An empirical study examined the impact of user expertise and prototype fidelity on the outcomes of a usability test. User expertise (expert vs. novice) and prototype fidelity (paper prototype, 3D mock-up, and fully operational appliance) were manipulated as independent variables in a 2x3 between-subjects design. Employing a floor scrubber as a model product, 48 users carried out several cleaning tasks. Usability problems identified by participants were recorded. Furthermore, performance, system management strategies and perceived usability were measured. The results showed that experts reported more usability problems than novices but these were considered to be less severe than those reported by novices. Reduced fidelity prototypes were generally suitable to predict product usability of the real appliance. The implications for the running of usability tests are specific to the fidelity of the prototype.

  2. Second Generation Prototype Design and Testing for a High Altitude Venus Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. L.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Plett, G. A.; Said, M.; Fairbrother, D.; Sandy, C.; Frederickson, T.; Sharpe, G.; Day, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a second generation prototype balloon intended for flight in the upper atmosphere of Venus. The design of this new prototype incorporates lessons learned from the construction and testing of the first generation prototype, including finite element analyses of the balloon stresses and deformations, measured leak performance after handling and packaging, permeability and optical property measurements on material samples, and sulfuric acid testing. An improved design for the second generation prototype was formulated based on these results, although the spherical shape and 5.5 m diameter size were retained. The resulting balloon has a volume of 87 cubic meters and is capable of carrying a 45 kg payload at a 55 km altitude at Venus. The design and fabrication of the new prototype is described, along with test data for inflation and leakage performance.

  3. Prototype classification: insights from machine learning.

    PubMed

    Graf, Arnulf B A; Bousquet, Olivier; Rätsch, Gunnar; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    We shed light on the discrimination between patterns belonging to two different classes by casting this decoding problem into a generalized prototype framework. The discrimination process is then separated into two stages: a projection stage that reduces the dimensionality of the data by projecting it on a line and a threshold stage where the distributions of the projected patterns of both classes are separated. For this, we extend the popular mean-of-class prototype classification using algorithms from machine learning that satisfy a set of invariance properties. We report a simple yet general approach to express different types of linear classification algorithms in an identical and easy-to-visualize formal framework using generalized prototypes where these prototypes are used to express the normal vector and offset of the hyperplane. We investigate non-margin classifiers such as the classical prototype classifier, the Fisher classifier, and the relevance vector machine. We then study hard and soft margin classifiers such as the support vector machine and a boosted version of the prototype classifier. Subsequently, we relate mean-of-class prototype classification to other classification algorithms by showing that the prototype classifier is a limit of any soft margin classifier and that boosting a prototype classifier yields the support vector machine. While giving novel insights into classification per se by presenting a common and unified formalism, our generalized prototype framework also provides an efficient visualization and a principled comparison of machine learning classification.

  4. Coronary Artery-Bypass-Graft Surgery Increases the Plasma Concentration of Exosomes Carrying a Cargo of Cardiac MicroRNAs: An Example of Exosome Trafficking Out of the Human Heart with Potential for Cardiac Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Emanueli, Costanza; Fiorentino, Francesca; Reeves, Barnaby C.; Beltrami, Cristina; Mumford, Andrew; Clayton, Aled; Gurney, Mark; Shantikumar, Saran; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exosome nanoparticles carry a composite cargo, including microRNAs (miRs). Cultured cardiovascular cells release miR-containing exosomes. The exosomal trafficking of miRNAs from the heart is largely unexplored. Working on clinical samples from coronary-artery by-pass graft (CABG) surgery, we investigated if: 1) exosomes containing cardiac miRs and hence putatively released by cardiac cells increase in the circulation after surgery; 2) circulating exosomes and exosomal cardiac miRs correlate with cardiac troponin (cTn), the current “gold standard” surrogate biomarker of myocardial damage. Methods and Results The concentration of exosome-sized nanoparticles was determined in serial plasma samples. Cardiac-expressed (miR-1, miR-24, miR-133a/b, miR-208a/b, miR-210), non-cardiovascular (miR-122) and quality control miRs were measured in whole plasma and in plasma exosomes. Linear regression analyses were employed to establish the extent to which the circulating individual miRs, exosomes and exosomal cardiac miR correlated with cTn-I. Cardiac-expressed miRs and the nanoparticle number increased in the plasma on completion of surgery for up to 48 hours. The exosomal concentration of cardiac miRs also increased after CABG. Cardiac miRs in the whole plasma did not correlate significantly with cTn-I. By contrast cTn-I was positively correlated with the plasma exosome level and the exosomal cardiac miRs. Conclusions The plasma concentrations of exosomes and their cargo of cardiac miRs increased in patients undergoing CABG and were positively correlated with hs-cTnI. These data provide evidence that CABG induces the trafficking of exosomes from the heart to the peripheral circulation. Future studies are necessary to investigate the potential of circulating exosomes as clinical biomarkers in cardiac patients. PMID:27128471

  5. Study of a water-cooled convective divertor prototype for the DEMO fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, P.; Oliveri, E.; Vella, G.

    2000-04-01

    The plasma facing components of a fusion power reactor have a large impact on the overall plant design, its performance and availability and on the cost of electricity. The present work concerns a study of feasibility for a water-cooled prototype of the convective divertor component of the DEMO fusion reactor. The study has been carried out in two steps. In the first one thermal-hydraulic and neutronic parametric analyses have been performed to find out the prototype optimized configuration. In the second step thermo-mechanical analyses have been carried out on the obtained configuration to investigate the potential and limits of the proposed prototype, with a particular reference to the maximum heat flux it can undergo without incoming both in critical heat flux and in mechanical stress limits. The results show that the proposed divertor prototype is able to safely withstand peak heat fluxes of 9 MW/m2.

  6. Study of a Water-Cooled Convective Divertor Prototype for the DEMO Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    P. Di Maio; E. Oliveri; G. Vella

    2000-12-31

    The plasma facing components of a fusion power reactor have a large impact on the overall plant design, its performance and availability and on the cost of electricity. The present work concerns a study of feasibility for a water-cooled prototype of the convective divertor component of the DEMO fusion reactor. The study has been carried out in two steps. In the first one thermal-hydraulic and neutronic parametric analyses have been performed to find out the prototype optimized configuration. In the second step thermo-mechanical analyses have been carried out on the obtained configuration to investigate the potential and limits of the proposed prototype, with a particular reference to the maximum heat flux it can undergo without incoming both in critical heat flux and in mechanical stress limits. the results show that the proposed divertor prototype is able to safely withstand peak heat fluxes of 9 MW/m{sup 2}.

  7. Molecular cytogenetic analyses of HIG, a novel human cell line carrying t(1;3)(p36.3;q25.3) established from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blastic crisis.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriko; Ogawa, Seishi; Motokura, Tohru; Hangaishi, Akira; Wang, Lili; Qiao, Ying; Nannya, Yasuhito; Kogi, Mieko; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-12-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities involving 1p36, 3q21, and/or 3q26 have been reported in a subset of myeloid neoplasms having characteristic dysmegakaryopoiesis, and the overexpression of EVI1 on 3q26 or of MEL1 on 1p36 has been implicated in their pathogenesis. We describe molecular cytogenetic analyses of a novel human cell line, HIG, established from a unique case in which a novel translocation t(1;3)(p36;q26) appeared as the sole additional chromosomal abnormality at the time of blastic transformation of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient displayed clinical features resembling those of the 3q21q26 syndrome. The HIG cell line retained der(1)t(1;3)(p36;q26) but lost t(9;22)(q34;q11). To identify the relevant gene that would be deregulated by this translocation, we molecularly cloned the translocation's breakpoints. They were distant from the breakpoint cluster regions of the 3q21q26 syndrome or t(1;3)(p36;q21), and neither the EVI1 nor the MEL1 transcript was detected in the HIG cell line. None of the genes located within 150 kilobase pairs of the breakpoints were aberrantly expressed, suggesting that in this case other gene(s) more distant from the breakpoints are deregulated by possible remote effects. Further analyses of the deregulated genes in the HIG cell line should provide important insight into the mechanisms involved in these types of leukemias.

  8. Rendering for machine vision prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Jacek

    2008-09-01

    Machine Vision systems for manufacturing quality inspection are interdisciplinary solutions including lighting, optics, cameras, image processing, segmentation, feature analysis, classification as well as integration with manufacturing process. The design and optimization of the above systems, especially image acquisition setup is mainly driven by experiment. This requires deep know-how and well equipped laboratory, which does not guarantee the optimal development process and results. This paper proposes novel usage of rendering, originating from 3D computer graphics, for machine vision prototyping and optimization. The invented technique and physically-based rendering aids selection or optimization of luminaires, tolerancing of mechanical construction and object handling, robustness predetermination or surface flaw simulation. The rendering setup utilizes mesh modeling, bump and normal mapping and light distribution sharpening with IES data files. The performed light simulation experiments for metal surfaces (face surface of bearing rollers) are validated.

  9. The EUROMEDIES EDI prototype system.

    PubMed

    Pramataris, K; Doukidis, G; Giaglis, G; Raptakis, J

    1996-01-01

    EDI is expected to be the dominant form of business communication between organisations moving to the Electronic Commerce era of 2000. The healthcare sector is already using EDI in the hospital supply function as well as in the clinical area and the reimbursement process. In this paper, we examine the use of EDI in the healthcare administration sector and move specifically its application to the Medical Devices Vigilance System. At a first place, the potential of this approach is examined, after an initial brief presentation of the EDI concept and its application in healthcare. This presentation is followed by an overall description of the EDI prototype system, which was developed in the context of the EUROMEDIES Concerted Action, in order to facilitate the requirements definition phase. PMID:10172831

  10. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Abler, Daniel; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components. PMID:23824127

  11. Prototype casting fabrication by stereolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cromwell, W.E.

    1990-11-01

    A new product development technology is emerging which could have a major impact on the investment casting industry. It's identified by several names, the most common of which is STEREOLITHOGRAPHY.'' This technology involves a three-dimensional printing process which will yield plastic parts (polymer models) from solid, surface, or wireframe CAD files. The concept links a CAD database to a process which guides a laser beam to solidify liquid photo-curable polymer into a programmed shaped. The process can produce models in far less time and at far less cost than can be done by other known (conventional) model producing methods. Parts that would normally require weeks or months to prototype with conventional processes can be produced in a matter of hours by Stereolithography. The Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division, is engaged in a development project (funded by the Department of Energy) which is aimed at establishing this process as a practical, expedient, and cost-effective method fabricating prototype investment castings. The early phases of the project include procurement of a special designed test unit for several companies (Service Centers) involved in fabrication of models. These models are produced in various materials and used in experimental casting programs being conducted with four casting suppliers (two ferrous and two non-ferrous). This presentation will cover the objectives of the project and the results obtained up to this time. We will also briefly review future plans for the continuation of the project, until this new technology has been proven as a viable process for rapid development of investment castings.

  12. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson

    NASA Video Gallery

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  13. A prototype Upper Atmospheric Research Collaboratory (UARC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Atkins, D. E; Weymouth, T. E.; Olson, G. M.; Niciejewski, R.; Finholt, T. A.; Prakash, A.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Killeen, T.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    The National Collaboratory concept has great potential for enabling 'critical mass' working groups and highly interdisciplinary research projects. We report here on a new program to build a prototype collaboratory using the Sondrestrom Upper Atmospheric Research Facility in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland and a group of associated scientists. The Upper Atmospheric Research Collaboratory (UARC) is a joint venture of researchers in upper atmospheric and space science, computer science, and behavioral science to develop a testbed for collaborative remote research. We define the 'collaboratory' as an advanced information technology environment which enables teams to work together over distance and time on a wide variety of intellectual tasks. It provides: (1) human-to-human communications using shared computer tools and work spaces; (2) group access and use of a network of information, data, and knowledge sources; and (3) remote access and control of instruments for data acquisition. The UARC testbed is being implemented to support a distributed community of space scientists so that they have network access to the remote instrument facility in Kangerlussuaq and are able to interact among geographically distributed locations. The goal is to enable them to use the UARC rather than physical travel to Greenland to conduct team research campaigns. Even on short notice through the collaboratory from their home institutions, participants will be able to meet together to operate a battery of remote interactive observations and to acquire, process, and interpret the data.

  14. APPLICATION OF THE 1:2,000,000-SCALE DATA BASE: A NATIONAL ATLAS SECTIONAL PROTOTYPE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, Donna M.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the potential to produce a National Atlas sectional prototype from the 1:2,000,000-scale data base was concluded recently by the National Mapping Division, U. S. Geological Survey. This paper discusses the specific digital cartographic production procedures involved in the preparation of the prototype map, as well as the theoretical and practical cartographic framework for the study. Such items as data organization, data classification, digital techniques, data conversions, and modification of traditional design specifications for an automated environment are discussed. The bulk of the cartographic work for the production of the prototype was carried out in raster format on the Scitex Response-250 mapping system.

  15. Subsea processing and control system in the GASP project; Testing of the prototype system

    SciTech Connect

    Nordvik, H.S. )

    1992-03-01

    The subsea production and processing system developed under the Goodfellow Assocs. Subsea Production (GASP) project involved two stages of separation that led to the production of exportable-quality crude oil by pipeline. The produced gas is transported along a separate line. This paper described key elements of the subsea process system. A prototype system was developed during the second phase of the project. The system was tested under dry and submerged conditions in a dry dock. Key features of the prototype system and the tests carried out are described. Prototype testing proved the viability of the GASP system and helped identify areas requiring particular attention and improvement for future applications.

  16. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in the crop year NAP assistance is requested... and such practices can be expected to have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in...

  17. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  18. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  19. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  20. IMMR Phase 1 Prototyping Plan Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vowell, C. W.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Smith, Bryon; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the phase I plan of the prototype of the IMMR by the Multilateral Medical Operations Panel (MMOP) Medical Informatics & Technology (MIT) Working Group. It reviews the Purpose of IMMR Prototype Phase 1 (IPP1); the IPP1 Plan Overview, the IMMR Prototype Phase 1 Plan for PDDs and MIC and MIC-DDs, Plan for MICs, a nd the IPP1 objectives

  1. Wearable photoplethysmography device prototype for wireless cardiovascular monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kviesis-Kipge, E.; Grabovskis, A.; Marcinkevics, Z.; Mecnika, V.; Rubenis, O.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a prototype system of the smart garment for real time telemetric monitoring of human cardiovascular activity. Two types of photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors for low noise and artefact free signal recording from various sites of the human body that were suitable for integration into smart textile were investigated. The reflectance sensors with single and multiple photodiodes based on "pulse-duration-based signal conversion" signal acquisition principle were designed and evaluated. The technical parameters of the system were measured both on bench and in vivo. Overall, both types of PPG sensors showed acceptable signal quality SNR 86.56±3.00 dB, dynamic range 89.84 dB. However, in-vivo condition tests revealed lower noise and higher accuracy achieved by applying the multiple photodiodes sensor. We concluded that the proposed PPG device prototype is simple and reliable, and therefore, can be utilized in low-cost smart garments.

  2. Development based on carrying capacity. A strategy for environmental protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, D.I.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental degradation has accelerated in recent years because economic development activities have been inconsistent with a sustainable environment. In human ecology, the concept of 'carrying capacity' implies an optimum level of development and population size based on a complex of interacting factors - physical, institutional, social, and psychological. Development studies which have explicitly recognized carrying capacity have shown that this approach can be used to promote economic activities which are consistent with a sustainable social and physical environment. The concept of carrying capacity provides a framework for integrating physical, socioeconomic, and environmental systems into planning for a sustainable environment. ?? 1993.

  3. An Enhanced Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Matthew R.; Morris, K. Robert

    2009-01-01

    A Validation Network (VN) prototype is currently underway that compares data from the Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument on NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite to similar measurements from the U.S. national network of operational weather radars. This prototype is being conducted as part of the ground validation activities of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. GPM will carry a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar instrument (DPR) with similar characteristics to the TRMM PR. The purpose of the VN is to identify and resolve significant discrepancies between the U.S. national network of ground radar (GR) observations and satellite observations. The ultimate goal of such comparisons is to understand and resolve the first order variability and bias of precipitation retrievals in different meteorological/hydrological regimes at large scales. This paper presents a description of, and results from, an improved algorithm for volume matching and comparison of PR and ground radar observations.

  4. Carry it on the bad side!

    PubMed

    Tan, V; Klotz, M J; Greenwald, A S; Steinberg, M E

    1998-10-01

    Patients with diseased hips often must carry objects while walking, yet they are rarely instructed which hand to use because little has been published on the subject. We sought to evaluate the situation mathematically by determining the hip forces that result when a load is carried in the ipsilateral versus the contralateral hand. Using a free-body diagram of single-leg supported stance, we found that when a load was carried in the contralateral hand, the resultant forces on the hip were increased considerably. Conversely, when the weight was carried in the ipsilateral hand, the forces were actually lower than when no weight was carried at all. Thus, carrying a weight on the opposite side resulted in hip forces that were substantially greater than when the weight was carried on the same side. PMID:9796709

  5. The Perception of Prototypical Motion: Synchronization Is Enhanced with Quantitatively Morphed Gestures of Musical Conductors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollner, Clemens; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Parkinson, Jim; Hove, Michael J.; Keller, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic theories have long suggested perceptual advantages for prototypical exemplars of a given class of objects or events. Empirical evidence confirmed that morphed (quantitatively averaged) human faces, musical interpretations, and human voices are preferred over most individual ones. In this study, biological human motion was morphed and…

  6. Virtual prototyping: a cost-effective emerging methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Anees; Feng, Chen; Sarepaka, RamaGopal V.

    1995-08-01

    The development of modern optical instruments has evolved into a complex multi-disciplinary activity with the explosion of sophisticated applications. For specialized optical systems, the development of even a prototype has become a costly exercise. This paper presents a new concept of virtual prototyping for optical systems to minimize the development time, cost and risk. This process employs the computer-aided design and modeling tools to address the broad issues of system layout, optical and optomechanical design, structural and thermal analysis for the real operating environment, tolerance budgeting and optimization procedures. The Center for Applied Optics at the University of Alabama in Huntsville has developed the necessary computer interfaces between the various stages of optical system design, development and evaluation. As a common database is used for the optical and mechanical design and analyses, the possibility of a human error is eliminated while minimizing the time and effort required to accomplish these critical tasks. The virtual prototyping concept works in an iterative fashion to achieve the desired system performance at a minimum cost. This technique has been successfully employed in the design and development of several optical instruments for space, military and commercial applications, covering a broad spectrum from UV to IR. The performance specifications and the results of virtual prototyping for some typical systems are also presented.

  7. Innovative oxygen separation membrane prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2006-08-15

    Improvements are still needed to gas separation processes to gain industry acceptance of coal gasification systems. The Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) technology, being developed by the US Department of Energy and its partners, offers an opportunity to lower overall plant cost and improve efficiency compared to cryogenic distillation and pressure swing adsorption methods. The technology is based on a novel class of perovskite ceramic oxides which can selectively separate oxygen ions from a stream of air at high temperature and pressure. Those ions are transported across the ITM leaving non-permeate air which can be integrated with a fuel-fired gas system, enabling co-production of power and steam along with the concentrated, high-purity oxygen. The project is at the second phase, to scale up the ITM Oxygen ceramic devices to demonstrate the technology at the 1-5 tpd capability in the Subscale Engineering Prototype. A third phase to demonstrate commercial viability extends to the end of the decade. 2 figs.

  8. Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This contract and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and demonstration of a different technology for construction of lightweight mirrors. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities; Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (less than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or quaternary mirror into a quasi-continuous surface with individual subapertures phased so that near diffraction limited imaging in the visible wavelength region is achieved. Continuous compensation of optical wavefront due to perturbations caused by imperfections, natural disturbances, and equipment induced vibrations/deflections to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance in the visible wavelength region. Demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating such systems with reduced mass and cost compared to past approaches. While the SSD could not be expected to satisfy all of the above capabilities, the intent was to start identifying and understanding new technologies that might be applicable to these goals.

  9. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  10. Dissipative Prototyping Methods: A Manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesley, P.

    Taking a designer's unique perspective using examples of practice in experimental installation and digital protoyping, this manifesto acts as provocation for change and unlocking new potential by encouraging changes of perspective about the material realm. Diffusive form-language is proposed as a paradigm for architectural design. This method of design is applied through 3D printing and related digital fabrication methods, offering new qualities that can be implemented in design of realms including present earth and future interplanetary environments. A paradigm shift is encouraged by questioning conventional notions of geometry that minimize interfaces and by proposing the alternatives of maximized interfaces formed by effusive kinds of formal composition. A series of projects from the Canadian research studio of the Hylozoic Architecture group are described, providing examples of component design methods employing diffusive forms within combinations of tension-integrity structural systems integrated with hybrid metabolisms employing synthetic biology. Cultural implications are also discussed, drawing from architectural theory and natural philosophy. The conclusion of this paper suggests that the practice of diffusive prototyping can offer formative strategies contributing to design of future living systems.

  11. Sonification Prototype for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Schertenleib, A. M.; Diaz Merced, W. L.

    2005-12-01

    As an alternative and adjunct to visual displays, auditory exploration of data via sonification (data controlled sound) and audification (audible playback of data samples) is promising for complex or rapidly/temporally changing visualizations, for data exploration of large datasets (particularly multi-dimensional datasets), and for exploring datasets in frequency rather than spatial dimensions (see also International Conferences on Auditory Display ). Besides improving data exploration and analysis for most researchers, the use of sound is especially valuable as an assistive technology for visually-impaired people and can make science and math more exciting for high school and college students. Only recently have the hardware and software come together to make a cross-platform open-source sonification tool feasible. We have developed a prototype sonification data analysis tool using the JavaSound API and NASA GSFC's ViSBARD software . Wanda Diaz Merced, a blind astrophysicist from Puerto Rico, is instrumental in advising on and testing the tool.

  12. Software Prototyping: Designing Systems for Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spies, Phyllis Bova

    1983-01-01

    Reports on major change in computer software development process--the prototype model, i.e., implementation of skeletal system that is enhanced during interaction with users. Expensive and unreliable software, software design errors, traditional development approach, resources required for prototyping, success stories, and systems designer's role…

  13. dE/dx prototype test

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.; Rust, D.

    1980-10-01

    A small prototype of a multiwire dE/dx detector was tested in SLAC's test beam. The basic concept of the detector was similar to the JADE drift cell design. The purpose of the test was to decide on some design parameters for a full size prototype, which is now in construction.

  14. A prototype space flight intravenous injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    Medical emergencies, especially those resulting from accidents, frequently require the administration of intravenous fluids to replace lost body liquids. The development of a prototype space flight intravenous injection system is presented. The definition of requirements, injectable concentrates development, water polisher, reconstitution hardware development, administration hardware development, and prototype fabrication and testing are discussed.

  15. In Search of the Prototypical Fraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Vince Wright makes a convincing argument for presenting children with a different "prototype" of a fraction to the typical one-half. Consider how the prototype that Wright mentions may be applied to a variety of fraction concepts. We are sure that you will never look at a doughnut in quite the same way.

  16. Rapid Prototyping of Mobile Learning Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federley, Maija; Sorsa, Timo; Paavilainen, Janne; Boissonnier, Kimo; Seisto, Anu

    2014-01-01

    This position paper presents the first results of an on-going project, in which we explore rapid prototyping method to efficiently produce digital learning solutions that are commercially viable. In this first phase, rapid game prototyping and an iterative approach was tested as a quick and efficient way to create learning games and to evaluate…

  17. Borehole prototype for seismic high-resolution exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Rüdiger; Jaksch, Katrin; Krauß, Felix; Krüger, Kay; Groh, Marco; Jurczyk, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Target reservoirs for the exploitation of hydrocarbons or hot water for geothermal energy supply can comprise small layered structures, for instance thin layers or faults. The resolution of 2D and 3D surface seismic methods is often not sufficient to determine and locate these structures. Borehole seismic methods like vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and seismic while drilling (SWD) use either receivers or sources within the borehole. Thus, the distance to the target horizon is reduced and higher resolution images of the geological structures can be achieved. Even these methods are limited in their resolution capabilities with increasing target depth. To localize structures more accuracy methods with higher resolution in the range of meters are necessary. The project SPWD -- Seismic Prediction While Drilling aims at s the development of a borehole prototype which combines seismic sources and receivers in one device to improve the seismic resolution. Within SPWD such a prototype has been designed, manufactured and tested. The SPWD-wireline prototype is divided into three main parts. The upper section comprises the electronic unit. The middle section includes the upper receiver, the upper clamping unit as well as the source unit and the lower clamping unit. The lower section consists of the lower receiver unit and the hydraulic unit. The total length of the prototype is nearly seven meters and its weight is about 750 kg. For focusing the seismic waves in predefined directions of the borehole axis the method of phased array is used. The source unit is equipped with four magnetostrictive vibrators. Each can be controlled independently to get a common wave front in the desired direction of exploration. Source signal frequencies up to 5000 Hz are used, which allows resolutions up to one meter. In May and September 2013 field tests with the SPWD-wireline prototype have been carried out at the KTB Deep Crustal Lab in Windischeschenbach (Bavaria). The aim was to proof the

  18. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... factors, such as soil type, elevation, and topography, result in a significant difference of carrying... management and maintenance practices are improvements over those practices generally associated with...

  19. Weapon-Carrying and Youth Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Randy M.; Hammermeister, Jon

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the prevalence of weapon-carrying among adolescents, focusing on the reasons why they carry weapons, ways that firearms are obtained, firearms and violence, and the controlling of weapons in schools. Details weapon-security measures and argues for cooperative action among schools, communities, and government. (RJM)

  20. Carrie Chapman Catt and Woman Suffrage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the material for this issue of the "Goldfinch," which explores the life of Carrie Chapman Catt, came from the archives of the State Historical Society of Iowa. Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was an Iowan who advocated woman suffrage and spent 26 years actively working for that cause. The issue contains a biography of Catt, and information…

  1. Prototype Performance of Novel Muon Telescope Detector at STAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan,L.

    2008-04-05

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution.

  2. Prototype performance of novel muon telescope detector at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan,L.; Ames, V.

    2008-02-04

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design [l]. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRF'C. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution.

  3. A prototype combinatorial scheduler for space-borne observational instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilstrap, Lewey O.; Botten, Leroy H.; Strang, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype scheduler has been developed for observations to be carried out by the NASA Gamma Ray Observatory. The purpose of the scheduling system is to provide an automated method to determine optimized schedules conforming to all scheduling guidelines. Strategies used in creating COMPTEL/EGRET schedules and in scheduling OSSE targets are examined. It is concluded that the hybrid scheduler creates optimal schedules, or very nearly optimal schedules, and reduces the estimated scheduling time by 18 or 19 orders of magnitude, from about 10 to the 14th years to as few as 561 seconds.

  4. The experimental results and analysis of a borehole radar prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sixin; Wu, Junjun; Dong, Hang; Fu, Lei; Wang, Fei

    2012-04-01

    A prototype of borehole radar has been successfully tested in three sites for different purposes under a field condition. The objective of the prototype is providing an effective down-hole tool for detecting targets in deep boreholes situated in a relatively high conductivity area such as the metal ores. The first testing site is at a geothermal field. The fractures extending more than 20 m from the borehole are delineated by the borehole radar in the single-hole reflection mode. The second testing site is located in a jade mine for basement evaluation. The cross-hole measurement mode was used to detect the cavities made by previous unorganized mining activities. Several high-velocity anomalies were found in the velocity profile and presumably the targets of the mine shafts and tunnels. The third test site is located in a mineralized belt characterized by low resistivity less than 1000 Ohm m, the surface-borehole measurement was carried out and the data were processed with velocity tomography. The low-velocity zone corresponds to a mineralized zone from geological records. The three testing results proved the readiness of this borehole radar prototype for further deployment in more complicated and realistic field situations.

  5. A Prototype of Reflection Pulse Oximeter Designed for Mobile Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiang; Dong, Zhongfei; Zhao, Zhangyan; Zhang, Xu

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a pulse oximeter prototype designed for mobile healthcare. In this prototype, a reflection pulse oximeter is embedded into the back cover of a smart handheld device to offer the convenient measurement of both heart rate (HR) and SpO2 (estimation of arterial oxygen saturation) for home or mobile applications. Novel and miniaturized circuit modules including a chopper network and a filtering amplifier were designed to overcome the influence of ambient light and interferences that are caused by embedding the sensor into a flat cover. A method based on adaptive trough detection for improved HR and SpO2 estimation is proposed with appropriate simplification for its implementation on mobile devices. A fast and effective photoplethysmogram validation scheme is also proposed. Clinical experiments have been carried out to calibrate and test our oximeter. Our prototype oximeter can achieve comparable performance to a clinical oximeter with no significant difference revealed by paired t -tests ( p = 0.182 for SpO2 measurement and p = 0.496 for HR measurement). The design of this pulse oximeter will facilitate fast and convenient measurement of SpO2 for mobile healthcare.

  6. Assessment of the usability of a digital learning technology prototype for monitoring intracranial pressure 1

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Lilian Regina; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Zem-Mascarenhas, Silvia Helena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the usability of a digital learning technology prototype as a new method for minimally invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure. Method: descriptive study using a quantitative approach on assessing the usability of a prototype based on Nielsen's ten heuristics. Four experts in the area of Human-Computer interaction participated in the study. Results: the evaluation delivered eight violated heuristics and 31 usability problems in the 32 screens of the prototype. Conclusion: the suggestions of the evaluators were critical for developing an intuitive, user-friendly interface and will be included in the final version of the digital learning technology. PMID:27579932

  7. Simulation in a dynamic prototyping environment: Petri nets or rules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.; Price, Shannon; Hale, Joseph P.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of a prototyped user interface is best supported by a simulation of the system. A simulation allows for dynamic evaluation of the interface rather than just a static evaluation of the screen's appearance. This allows potential users to evaluate both the look (in terms of the screen layout, color, objects, etc.) and feel (in terms of operations and actions which need to be performed) of a system's interface. Because of the need to provide dynamic evaluation of an interface, there must be support for producing active simulations. The high-fidelity training simulators are delivered too late to be effectively used in prototyping the displays. Therefore, it is important to build a low fidelity simulator, so that the iterative cycle of refining the human computer interface based upon a user's interactions can proceed early in software development.

  8. Eurobot Ground Prototype Control System Overview & Tests Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, Andrea; Martelli, Andrea; Pensavalle, Emanuele; Ferraris, Simona; Didot, Frederic

    2010-08-01

    In the planned missions on Moon and Mars, robotics can play a key role, as robots can both assist astronauts and, above all, relieve them of dangerous or too difficult tasks. To this aim, both cooperative capabilities and a great level of autonomy are needed: the robotic crew assistant must be able to work on its own, without supervision by humans, and to help astronauts to accomplish tasks otherwise unfeasible for them. Within this context, a project named Eurobot Ground Prototype, conducted in conjunction with ESA and Thales Alenia Space, is presented. EGP is a dual-arm mobile manipulator and exploits both stereo cameras and force/torque sensors in order to rely on visual and force feedback. This paper provides an overview of the performed and on going activities within the Eurobot Ground Prototype project.

  9. Simulation in a dynamic prototyping environment: Petri nets or rules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.; Price, Shannon W.; Hale, Joseph P.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of a prototyped user interface is best supported by a simulation of the system. A simulation allows for dynamic evaluation of the interface rather than just a static evaluation of the screen's appearance. This allows potential users to evaluate both the look (in terms of the screen layout, color, objects, etc.) and feel (in terms of operations and actions which need to be performed) of a system's interface. Because of the need to provide dynamic evaluation of an interface, there must be support for producing active simulations. The high-fidelity training simulators are normally delivered too late to be effectively used in prototyping the displays. Therefore, it is important to build a low fidelity simulator, so that the iterative cycle of refining the human computer interface based upon a user's interactions can proceed early in software development.

  10. Evaluation of a prototype infrasound system

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, R.; Sandoval, T.; Breding, D.; Kromer, D.

    1997-08-01

    Under Department of Energy sponsorship, Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory cooperated to develop a prototype infrasonic array, with associated documentation, that could be used as part of the International Monitoring System. The United States Government or foreign countries could procure commercially available systems based on this prototype to fulfill their Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) obligations. The prototype is a four-element array in a triangular layout as recommended in CD/NTB/WP.224 with an element at each corner and one in the center. The prototype test configuration utilize an array spacing of 1 km. The prototype infrasound system has the following objectives: (1) Provide a prototype that reliably acquires and transmits near real-time infrasonic data to facilitate the rapid location and identification of atmospheric events. (2) Provide documentation that could be used by the United States and foreign countries to procure infrasound systems commercially to fulfill their CTBT responsibilities. Infrasonic monitoring is an effective, low cost technology for detecting atmospheric explosions. The low frequency components of explosion signals propagate to long ranges (few thousand kilometers) where they can be detected with an array of sensors. Los Alamos National Laboratory`s expertise in infrasound systems and phenomenology when combined with Sandia`s expertise in providing verification quality system for treaty monitoring make an excellent team to provide the prototype infrasound sensor system. By September 1997, the prototype infrasound system will have been procured, integrated, evaluated and documented. Final documentation will include a system requirements document, an evaluation report and a hardware design document. The hardware design document will describe the various hardware components used in the infrasound prototype and their interrelationships.

  11. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  12. The four INTA-300 rocket prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calero, J. S.

    1985-03-01

    A development history and performance capability assessment is presented for the INTA-300 'Flamenco' sounding rocket prototype specimens. The Flamenco is a two-stage solid fuel rocket, based on British sounding rocket technology, that can lift 50 km payloads to altitudes of about 300 km. The flight of the first two prototypes, in 1974 and 1975, pointed to vibration problems which reduced the achievable apogee, and the third prototype's flight was marred by a premature detonation that destroyed the rocket. The fourth Flamenco flight, however, yielded much reliable data.

  13. Characterization of Prototype LSST CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    OCONNOR,P.; FRANK, J.; GEARY, J.C.; GILMORE, D.K.; KOTOV, I.; RADEKA, V.; TAKACS, P.; TYSON, J.A.

    2008-06-23

    The ambitious science goals of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be achieved in part by a wide-field imager that will achieve a new level of performance in terms of area, speed, and sensitivity. The instrument performance is dominated by the focal plane sensors, which are now in development. These new-generation sensors will make use of advanced semiconductor technology and will be complemented by a highly integrated electronics package located inside the cryostat. A test laboratory has been set up at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to characterize prototype sensors and to develop test and assembly techniques for eventual integration of production sensors and electronics into modules that will form the final focal plane. As described in [1], the key requirements for LSST sensors are wideband quantum efficiency (QE) extending beyond lpm in the red, control of point spread function (PSF), and fast readout using multiple amplifiers per chip operated in parallel. In addition, LSST's fast optical system (f71.25) places severe constraints on focal plane flatness. At the chip level this involves packaging techniques to minimize warpage of the silicon die, and at the mosaic level careful assembly and metrology to achieve a high coplanarity of the sensor tiles. In view of the long lead time to develop the needed sensor technology, LSST undertook a study program with several vendors to fabricate and test devices which address the most critical performance features [2]. The remainder of this paper presents key results of this study program. Section 2 summarizes the sensor requirements and the results of design optimization studies, and Section 3 presents the sensor development plan. In Section 4 we describe the test bench at BNL. Section 5 reports measurement results obtained to date oh devices fabricated by several vendors. Section 6 presents a summary of the paper and an outlook for the future work. We present characterization methods and results on a

  14. [Application status of rapid prototyping technology in artificial bone based on reverse engineering].

    PubMed

    Fang, Ao; Zheng, Min; Fan, Ding

    2015-02-01

    Artificial bone replacement has made an important contribution to safeguard human health and improve the quality of life. The application requirements of rapid prototyping technology based on reverse engineering in individualized artificial bone with individual differences are particularly urgent. This paper reviewed the current research and applications of rapid prototyping and reverse engineering in artificial bone. The research developments and the outlook of bone kinematics and dynamics simulation are also introduced.

  15. CCP: Sierra Nevada Captive-Carry Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) Space System's Dream Chaser design passed one of its most complex tests to date with a successful captive-carry test conducted near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan A...

  16. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Carrying capacities shall be stated in terms of sheep units yearlong, in the ratio of horses, mules, and..., goats, cattle, horses, mules, and burros one year of age or older shall be counted against the...

  17. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... eczema should probably avoid aquariums. continue Dogs and Cats Dogs and cats are popular pets but can carry infections such ... be in the intestinal tract of infected dogs, cats, hamsters, birds, and certain farm animals. A person ...

  18. To carry or not to carry--is this the question? Disentangling the carry effect in multi-digit addition.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian; Dressel, Katharina; Domahs, Frank; Wood, Guilherme; Willmes, Klaus; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2010-09-01

    Recent research has suggested addition performance to be determined by both the need for a carry operation and problem size. Nevertheless, it has remained debatable, how these two factors are interrelated. In the current study, this question was pursued by orthogonally manipulating carry and problem size in two-digit addition verification. As the two factors interacted reliably, our results indicate that the carry effect is moderated by number magnitude processing rather than representing a purely procedural, asemantic sequence of processing steps. Moreover, it was found that the carry effect may not be a purely categorical effect but may be driven by continuous characteristics of the sum of the unit digits as well. Since the correct result of a carry problem can only be derived by integrating and updating the magnitudes of tens and units within the place-value structure of the Arabic number system, the present study provides evidence for the idea that decomposed processing of tens and units also transfers to mental arithmetic.

  19. Mechanical analysis of infant carrying in hominoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Lia Q.

    2008-04-01

    In all higher nonhuman primates, species survival depends upon safe carrying of infants clinging to body hair of adults. In this work, measurements of mechanical properties of ape hair (gibbon, orangutan, and gorilla) are presented, focusing on constraints for safe infant carrying. Results of hair tensile properties are shown to be species-dependent. Analysis of the mechanics of the mounting position, typical of heavier infant carrying among African apes, shows that both clinging and friction are necessary to carry heavy infants. As a consequence, a required relationship between infant weight, hair-hair friction coefficient, and body angle exists. The hair-hair friction coefficient is measured using natural ape skin samples, and dependence on load and humidity is analyzed. Numerical evaluation of the equilibrium constraint is in agreement with the knuckle-walking quadruped position of African apes. Bipedality is clearly incompatible with the usual clinging and mounting pattern of infant carrying, requiring a revision of models of hominization in relation to the divergence between apes and hominins. These results suggest that safe carrying of heavy infants justify the emergence of biped form of locomotion. Ways to test this possibility are foreseen here.

  20. Validation of a station-prototype designed to integrate temporally soil N2O fluxes: IPNOA Station prototype.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laville, Patricia; Volpi, Iride; Bosco, Simona; Virgili, Giorgio; Neri, Simone; Continanza, Davide; Bonari, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    and 1.7 % in 2015, in the range of IPCC ones. The instrumentation was working almost permanently during these two years. The proximity sensors fitted on the chambers allowed showing that the chambers were functioning normally for about 90% of the time. A cross-comparison carried out in September 2015 with the "mobile IPNOA prototype"; a high-sensibility transportable instrument (previously validated), allowed showing a good agreement between the 2 instrumentations.

  1. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Shiga toxin gene (stx1)-positive Escherichia coli O91:H14 carrying blaCTX-M-15 on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid isolated from a human patient in Germany.

    PubMed

    Arvand, Mardjan; Bettge-Weller, Gudrun; Fruth, Angelika; Uphoff, Helmut; Pfeifer, Yvonne

    2015-05-01

    In 2011, the Shiga toxin- and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 caused a serious outbreak of gastroenteritis in Germany. This strain carried bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(TEM-1) on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid. During screening of individuals at risk for acquisition of the epidemic E. coli O104:H4, we isolated another ESBL-producing and Shiga toxin-positive E. coli belonging to serotype O91:H14 from feces of a human patient. Interestingly, the patient also carried a further ESBL-producing but Shiga toxin-negative E. coli. Both strains harbored bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(TEM-1) on an IncI1-ST31 plasmid, which was indistinguishable regarding size and plasmid restriction pattern from the plasmid of the epidemic E. coli O104:H4 strain. The patient had traveled to India 6 months prior to the isolation of the E. coli strains. This is the first report of an ESBL-producing, Shiga toxin-positive E. coli of serogroup O91. Our data suggest a high propensity of the IncI1-ST31 plasmid to spread in the human and/or animal population.

  2. SpaceX Test Fires Engine Prototype

    NASA Video Gallery

    One of NASA's industry partners, SpaceX, fires its new SuperDraco engine prototype in preparation for the ninth milestone to be completed under SpaceX's funded Space Act Agreement (SAA) with NASA's...

  3. GreenCraft Greenspoint House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-16

    This case study describes a prototype house demonstrating energy efficiency and durability upgrades including an unvented roof with low density spray foam insulation and supplemental dehumidification, along with high performance windows and HVAC system.

  4. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Eight prototype systems were developed. The systems are 3, 25, and 75-ton size units. The manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation of the systems is described. Size activities for the various systems are included.

  5. Prototype solar-heating system - installation manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Manual for prototype solar-heating system gives detailed installation procedures for each of seven subsystems. Procedures for operation and maintenance are also included. It discusses architectural considerations, building construction considerations, and checkout-test procedures.

  6. Rapid Production of Composite Prototype Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, T. K.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research was to provide a mechanism to cost-effectively produce composite hardware prototypes. The task was to take a hands-on approach to developing new technologies that could benefit multiple future programs.

  7. Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

  8. Gun carrying by high school students in Boston, MA: does overestimation of peer gun carrying matter?

    PubMed

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1,700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a gun, 9% of boys and 2% of girls. Students substantially overestimated the percentage of their peers who carried guns; the likelihood that a respondent carried a gun was strongly associated with their perception of the level of peer gun carrying. Most respondents believed it was easier for other youth to obtain guns than it was for them. Social marketing campaigns designed to lower young people's perceptions about the prevalence of peer gun carrying may be a promising strategy for reducing actual gun carrying among youth.

  9. Summary Scientific Performance of EUCLID Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) plan to partner to build the EUCLID mission. EUCLID is a mission concept for studying the Dark Energy that is hypothesized to account for the accelerating cosmic expansion. For the past year, NASA has been building detector prototypes at Teledyne Imaging Sensors. This talk will summarize the measured scientific performance of these detector prototypes for astrophysical and cosmological applications.

  10. Preliminary Component Integration Using Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Salvail, Pat; Gordon, Gail (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rapid prototyping is a very important tool that should be used by both design and manufacturing disciplines during the development of elements for the aerospace industry. It helps prevent lack of adequate communication between design and manufacturing engineers (which could lead to costly errors) through mutual consideration of functional models generated from drawings. Rapid prototyping techniques are used to test hardware for design and material compatibility at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Effects of box handle position and carrying range on bi-manual carrying capacity for females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Swei-Pi; Loiu, Yi; Chien, Te Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a psychophysical approach to examine the effects on carrying capacity for bi-manual carrying tasks involving different handle positions and carrying ranges. A total of 16 female subjects participated in the experiment in groups of two people, and each group of subjects performed the tasks in a random order with 12 different combinations of carrying task. The independent variables are handle position (upper, middle, lower) and carrying range (F-F: floor height carried to floor height, F-W: floor height carried to waist height, W-W: waist height carried to waist height, W-F: waist height carried to floor height), the dependent variable is the maximum acceptable carried weight (MAWC), heart rate (HR), and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE). The results show that the handle position has a significant effect on MAWC and overall RPE but no significant effect on HR. Carrying range has a significant effect on the MAWC and HR, but no significant effect on overall HR. The handle position and carrying range have a significant interaction on the MAWC and HR. The RPE for different body parts shows significant differences, and the hands feel the most tired. Overall, this study confirms that the lower handle position with the W-W carrying range is the best combination for a two-person carrying task. PMID:26212410

  12. Dynamics of carrying a load with a handle suspension.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Jeffrey; Kelley, Kevin; Seipel, Justin

    2015-04-13

    Carrying loads with a compliant pole or backpack suspension can reduce the peak forces of the load acting on the body when the suspension natural frequency is tuned below the stepping frequency. Here we investigate a novel application for a load suspension that could be used to carry a load by hand, which is a common yet difficult method of load carriage and results in inherently asymmetric dynamics during load carriage. We hypothesize that the asymmetric dynamics of carrying a load in one hand will result in multiple locomotion frequency modes which can affect the forces of carrying a load with a handle suspension. We tested an adjustable-stiffness hand-held load suspension with four different natural frequency values while walking and running compared to a rigid handle. As expected, the peak forces acting on the body decrease compared to a rigid handle as the effective suspension stiffness decreases below the stepping frequency. However, the asymmetric dynamics of carrying a load with one hand introduce another frequency mode at half the stepping frequency which increases the peak forces acting on the body when the natural frequency of the handle is tuned near this frequency. We conclude that hand-held load suspensions should be designed to have a natural frequency below the half-stepping frequency of walking to minimize the peak forces and the musculoskeletal stress on the human body while carrying loads with one hand. PMID:25766388

  13. Locomotion while load-carrying in reduced gravities.

    PubMed

    Wickman, L A; Luna, B

    1996-10-01

    Supporting the mass of a protective suit and portable life support system (PLSS) will impose an energy requirement on planetary astronauts. To design extravehicular protective equipment for planetary missions, scientists must learn more about human physical capabilities while load-carrying in reduced gravities. In this study, an underwater treadmill and weighting system were used to simulate reduced-gravity locomotion while load-carrying. The test matrix included 3 gravity levels, 6 subjects, 2 locomotion speeds, and a range of load sizes. Energy expenditure, calculated from measured oxygen consumption, is positively correlated with gravity level, speed, and load size. The data are used to project that individuals in average physical condition will be able to walk for 8 h on the Moon while carrying up to 170% of their body mass without undue fatigue, and on Mars with up to 50% of their body mass. These approximate limits, especially for Martian gravity, may prove quite a challenge for designers of advanced protective systems. Requirements for regenerable and non-venting PLSS components have been driving the total projected masses of advanced PLSSs increasingly higher, perhaps beyond what is reasonable to carry. However, the larger mass can be beneficial in maintaining bone mass. Using Whalen's model (1988), the daily planetary walking times required to maintain bone mass were calculated for a range of carried load sizes. The calculated times were unattainably high, suggesting that some combination of loads carrying and supplemental bone maintenance measures will likely be required to maintain bone mass in reduced gravity environments.

  14. A Simulation Framework for Virtual Prototyping of Robotic Exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Priyanshu; Neptune, Richard R; Deshpande, Ashish D

    2016-06-01

    A number of robotic exoskeletons are being developed to provide rehabilitation interventions for those with movement disabilities. We present a systematic framework that allows for virtual prototyping (i.e., design, control, and experimentation (i.e. design, control, and experimentation) of robotic exoskeletons. The framework merges computational musculoskeletal analyses with simulation-based design techniques which allows for exoskeleton design and control algorithm optimization. We introduce biomechanical, morphological, and controller measures to optimize the exoskeleton performance. A major advantage of the framework is that it provides a platform for carrying out hypothesis-driven virtual experiments to quantify device performance and rehabilitation progress. To illustrate the efficacy of the framework, we present a case study wherein the design and analysis of an index finger exoskeleton is carried out using the proposed framework. PMID:27018453

  15. A Simulation Framework for Virtual Prototyping of Robotic Exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Priyanshu; Neptune, Richard R; Deshpande, Ashish D

    2016-06-01

    A number of robotic exoskeletons are being developed to provide rehabilitation interventions for those with movement disabilities. We present a systematic framework that allows for virtual prototyping (i.e., design, control, and experimentation (i.e. design, control, and experimentation) of robotic exoskeletons. The framework merges computational musculoskeletal analyses with simulation-based design techniques which allows for exoskeleton design and control algorithm optimization. We introduce biomechanical, morphological, and controller measures to optimize the exoskeleton performance. A major advantage of the framework is that it provides a platform for carrying out hypothesis-driven virtual experiments to quantify device performance and rehabilitation progress. To illustrate the efficacy of the framework, we present a case study wherein the design and analysis of an index finger exoskeleton is carried out using the proposed framework.

  16. A prototype sensor system for the early detection of microbially linked spoilage in stored wheat grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lacy Costello, B. P. J.; Ewen, R. J.; Gunson, H.; Ratcliffe, N. M.; Sivanand, P. S.; Spencer-Phillips, P. T. N.

    2003-04-01

    Sensors based on composites of metal oxides were fabricated and tested extensively under high-humidity and high-flow conditions with exposure to vapours reported to increase in the headspace of wheat grain (Triticum aestivum cv Hereward) colonized by fungi. The sensors that exhibited high sensitivity to target vapours combined with high stability were selected for inclusion into a four-sensor array prototype system. A sampling protocol aligned to parallel gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and human olfactory assessment studies was established for use with the sensor system. The sensor system was utilized to assess irradiated wheat samples that had been conditioned to 25% moisture content and inoculated with pathogens known to cause spoilage of grain in storage. These included the fungi Penicillium aurantiogriseum, Penicillium vulpinum, Penicillium verrucosum, Fusarium culmorum, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus flavus and the actinomycete, Streptomyces griseus. The sensor system successfully tracked the progress of the infections from a very early stage and the results were compared with human olfactory assessment panels run concurrently. A series of dilution studies were undertaken using previously infected grain mixed with sound grain, to improve the sensitivity and maximize the differentiation of the sensor system. An optimum set of conditions including incubation temperature, incubation time, sampling time, and flow rate were ascertained utilizing this method. The sensor system differentiated samples of sound grain from samples of sound grain with 1% (w/w) fungus infected grain added. Following laboratory trials, the prototype sensor system was evaluated in a commercial wheat grain intake facility. Thresholds calculated from laboratory tests were used to differentiate between sound and infected samples (classified by intake laboratory technicians) collected routinely from trucks delivering grain for use in food manufacture. All samples identified as having

  17. Field evaluation of prototype electrofibrous filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, W.D.; Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.H.; Lum, B.Y.

    1982-09-30

    New prototype electrofibrous filters were designed, built and evaluated in laboratory tests and in field installations. Two prototypes were designed for use in nuclear ventilation ducts as prefilters to HEPA filters. One prototype is designed to be a permanent component of the ventilation system while the other is a disposable unit. The disposable electrofibrous prefilter was installed in the exhaust stream of a glove box in which barrels of uranium turnings are burned. Preliminary tests show the disposal prefilter is effectively prolonging the HEPA filter life. An earlier prototype of the rolling prefilter was upgraded to meet the increased requirements for installation in a nuclear facility. This upgraded prototype was evaluated in the fire test facility at LLNL and shown to be effective in protecting HEPA filters from plugging under the most severe smoke conditions. The last prototype described in this report is a recirculating air filter. After demonstrating a high performance in laboratory tests the unit was shipped to Savannah River where it is awaiting installation in a Pu fuel fabrication facility. An analysis of the particulate problem in Savannah River indicates that four recirculating air filter will save $172,000 per year in maintenance costs.

  18. MPACT Fast Neutron Multiplicity System Prototype Development

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Chichester; S.A. Pozzi; J.L. Dolan; M.T. Kinlaw; S.J. Thompson; A.C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; A. Enqvist; J.T. Johnson; S.M. Watson

    2013-09-01

    This document serves as both an FY2103 End-of-Year and End-of-Project report on efforts that resulted in the design of a prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter leveraged upon the findings of previous project efforts. The prototype design includes 32 liquid scintillator detectors with cubic volumes 7.62 cm in dimension configured into 4 stacked rings of 8 detectors. Detector signal collection for the system is handled with a pair of Struck Innovative Systeme 16-channel digitizers controlled by in-house developed software with built-in multiplicity analysis algorithms. Initial testing and familiarization of the currently obtained prototype components is underway, however full prototype construction is required for further optimization. Monte Carlo models of the prototype system were performed to estimate die-away and efficiency values. Analysis of these models resulted in the development of a software package capable of determining the effects of nearest-neighbor rejection methods for elimination of detector cross talk. A parameter study was performed using previously developed analytical methods for the estimation of assay mass variance for use as a figure-of-merit for system performance. A software package was developed to automate these calculations and ensure accuracy. The results of the parameter study show that the prototype fast neutron multiplicity counter design is very nearly optimized under the restraints of the parameter space.

  19. U-PLANT GEOGRAPHIC ZONE CLEANUP PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as ''cleanup items'') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living document that will

  20. U Plant Geographic Zone Cleanup Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, L.D.; Leary, K.D.; Lackey, M.B.; Robertson, J.R.

    2006-07-01

    The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as 'cleanup items') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) [1] was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living document that will

  1. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, F; Sindoni, L; Caccioli, F; Ududec, C

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations. PMID:27627325

  2. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravelli, F.; Sindoni, L.; Caccioli, F.; Ududec, C.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  3. Arithmetic coding with constrained carry operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfoodh, Abo-Talib; Said, Amir; Yea, Sehoon

    2015-03-01

    Buffer or counter-based techniques are adequate for dealing with carry propagation in software implementations of arithmetic coding, but create problems in hardware implementations due to the difficulty of handling worst-case scenarios, defined by very long propagations. We propose a new technique for constraining the carry propagation, similar to "bit-stuffing," but designed for encoders that generate data as bytes instead of individual bits, and is based on the fact that the encoder and decoder can maintain the same state, and both can identify the situations when it desired to limit carry propagation. The new technique adjusts the coding interval in a way that corresponds to coding an unused data symbol, but selected to minimize overhead. Our experimental results demonstrate that the loss in compression can be made very small using regular precision for arithmetic operations.

  4. A translational platform for prototyping closed-loop neuromodulation systems

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Pedram; Khambhati, Ankit; Stanslaski, Scott; Carlson, David; Jensen, Randy; Linde, Dave; Dani, Siddharth; Lazarewicz, Maciej; Cong, Peng; Giftakis, Jon; Stypulkowski, Paul; Denison, Tim

    2013-01-01

    While modulating neural activity through stimulation is an effective treatment for neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, an opportunity for improving neuromodulation therapy remains in automatically adjusting therapy to continuously optimize patient outcomes. Practical issues associated with achieving this include the paucity of human data related to disease states, poorly validated estimators of patient state, and unknown dynamic mappings of optimal stimulation parameters based on estimated states. To overcome these challenges, we present an investigational platform including: an implanted sensing and stimulation device to collect data and run automated closed-loop algorithms; an external tool to prototype classifier and control-policy algorithms; and real-time telemetry to update the implanted device firmware and monitor its state. The prototyping system was demonstrated in a chronic large animal model studying hippocampal dynamics. We used the platform to find biomarkers of the observed states and transfer functions of different stimulation amplitudes. Data showed that moderate levels of stimulation suppress hippocampal beta activity, while high levels of stimulation produce seizure-like after-discharge activity. The biomarker and transfer function observations were mapped into classifier and control-policy algorithms, which were downloaded to the implanted device to continuously titrate stimulation amplitude for the desired network effect. The platform is designed to be a flexible prototyping tool and could be used to develop improved mechanistic models and automated closed-loop systems for a variety of neurological disorders. PMID:23346048

  5. Energy and time resolution of a LYSO matrix prototype for the Mu2e experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Flood, K.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Miyashita, T.; Morescalchi, L.; Ott, P.; Pezzullo, G.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.; Tassielli, G.; Tereshchenko, V.; Thomas, A.

    2016-07-01

    We have measured the performances of a LYSO crystal matrix prototype tested with electron and photon beams in the energy range 60-450 MeV. This study has been carried out to determine the achievable energy and time resolutions for the calorimeter of the Mu2e experiment.

  6. Energy and time resolution of a LYSO matrix prototype for the Mu2e experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dane, E.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Flood, K.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Miyashita, T.; Morescalchi, L.; Ott, P.; Pezzullo, G.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.; Tassielli, G.; Tereshchenko, V.; Thomas, A.

    2015-09-28

    We have measured the performances of a LYSO crystal matrix prototype tested with electron and photon beams in the energy range 60–450 MeV. Furthermore, this study has been carried out to determine the achievable energy and time resolutions for the calorimeter of the Mu2e experiment.

  7. Functional proteome of macrophage carried nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy demonstrates enhanced particle carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L; Veerubhotla, Ram S; Liu, Han; Xiong, Huangui; Yu, Fang; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Gendelman, Howard E

    2013-05-01

    Our laboratory developed long-acting nanoformulations of antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) to improve drug compliance, reduce toxicities, and facilitate access of drug to viral reservoirs. These all function to inevitably improve treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Formulations are designed to harness the carrying capacities of mononuclear phagocytes (MP; monocytes and macrophages) and to use these cells as Trojan horses for drug delivery. Such a drug distribution system limits ART metabolism and excretion while facilitating access to viral reservoirs. Our prior works demonstrated a high degree of nanoART sequestration in macrophage recycling endosomes with broad and sustained drug tissue biodistribution and depots with limited untoward systemic toxicities. Despite such benefits, the effects of particle carriage on the cells' functional capacities remained poorly understood. Thus, we employed pulsed stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture to elucidate the macrophage proteome and assess any alterations in cellular functions that would affect cell-drug carriage and release kinetics. NanoART-MP interactions resulted in the induction of a broad range of activation-related proteins that can enhance phagocytosis, secretory functions, and cell migration. Notably, we now demonstrate that particle-cell interactions serve to enhance drug loading while facilitating drug tissue depots and transportation. PMID:23544708

  8. Must-Carry and Public Broadcasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Elizabeth K.

    Because of the United States Court of Appeal's ruling ("Quincy Cable TV vs. Federal Communications Commission") that government regulation of what cable television stations can broadcast violates their First Amendment rights, a number of consequences have arisen concerning what cable stations are required to broadcast (must-carry rules), and how…

  9. Lorentz Contraction and Current-Carrying Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kampen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The force between two parallel current-carrying wires is investigated in the rest frames of the ions and the electrons. A straightforward Lorentz transformation shows that what appears as a purely magnetostatic force in the ion frame appears as a combined magnetostatic and electrostatic force in the electron frame. The derivation makes use of a…

  10. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  11. Femur Model Reconstruction Based on Reverse Engineering and Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tongming; Zhang, Zheng; Ni, Hongjun; Deng, Jiawen; Huang, Mingyu

    Precise reconstruction of 3D models is fundamental and crucial to the researches of human femur. In this paper we present our approach towards tackling this problem. The surface of a human femur was scanned using a hand-held 3D laser scanner. The data obtained, in the form of point cloud, was then processed using the reverse engineering software Geomagic and the CAD/CAM software CimatronE to reconstruct a digital 3D model. The digital model was then used by the rapid prototyping machine to build a physical model of human femur using 3D printing. The geometric characteristics of the obtained physical model matched that of the original femur. The process of "physical object - 3D data - digital 3D model - physical model" presented in this paper provides a foundation of precise modeling for the digital manufacturing, virtual assembly, stress analysis, and simulated surgery of artificial bionic femurs.

  12. A decimal carry-free adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikmehr, Hooman; Phillips, Braden; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2005-02-01

    Recently, decimal arithmetic has become attractive in the financial and commercial world including banking, tax calculation, currency conversion, insurance and accounting. Although computers are still carrying out decimal calculation using software libraries and binary floating-point numbers, it is likely that in the near future, all processors will be equipped with units performing decimal operations directly on decimal operands. One critical building block for some complex decimal operations is the decimal carry-free adder. This paper discusses the mathematical framework of the addition, introduces a new signed-digit format for representing decimal numbers and presents an efficient architectural implementation. Delay estimation analysis shows that the adder offers improved performance over earlier designs.

  13. Proof-Carrying Code with Correct Compilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, Andrew W.

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1990s, proof-carrying code was able to produce machine-checkable safety proofs for machine-language programs even though (1) it was impractical to prove correctness properties of source programs and (2) it was impractical to prove correctness of compilers. But now it is practical to prove some correctness properties of source programs, and it is practical to prove correctness of optimizing compilers. We can produce more expressive proof-carrying code, that can guarantee correctness properties for machine code and not just safety. We will construct program logics for source languages, prove them sound w.r.t. the operational semantics of the input language for a proved-correct compiler, and then use these logics as a basis for proving the soundness of static analyses.

  14. Advance prototype silver ion water bactericide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Allen, E. T.

    1974-01-01

    An advance prototype unit was designed and fabricated to treat anticipated fuel cell water. The unit is a single canister that contains a membrane-type prefilter and a silver bromide contacting bed. A seven day baseline simulated mission test was performed; the performance was satisfactory and the effluent water was within all specifications for potability. After random vibrations another seven day simulated mission test was performed, and results indicate that simulated launch vibrations have no effects on the design and performance of the advanced prototype. Bench tests and accelerated breadboard tests were conducted to define the characteristics of an upgraded model of the advance prototype unit which would have 30 days of operating capability. A preliminary design of a silver ion generator for the shuttle orbiter was also prepared.

  15. NASA DFRC Practices for Prototype Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the practices that Dryden uses for qualification of the prototypes of aircraft. There are many views of aircraft that Dryden has worked with. Included is a discussion of basic considerations for strength, a listing of standards and references, a discussion of typical safety of flight approaches, a discussion of the prototype design, using the X-29A as an example, and requirements for new shapes (i.e., the DAST-ARW1 , F-8 Super Critical Wing, AFTI/F-111 MAW), new control laws (i.e., AAW F-18), new operating envelope (i.e., F-18 HARV), limited sope add-on or substitute structure (i.e., SR-71 LASRE, ECLIPSE, F-16XL SLFC), and extensively modified or replaced structure (i.e., SOFIA, B747SP). There is a listing of causes for the failure of the prototype.

  16. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper. PMID:27065436

  17. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper.

  18. Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Theories of natural language and concepts have been unable to model the flexibility, creativity, context-dependence, and emergence, exhibited by words, concepts and their combinations. The mathematical formalism of quantum theory has instead been successful in capturing these phenomena such as graded membership, situational meaning, composition of categories, and also more complex decision making situations, which cannot be modeled in traditional probabilistic approaches. We show how a formal quantum approach to concepts and their combinations can provide a powerful extension of prototype theory. We explain how prototypes can interfere in conceptual combinations as a consequence of their contextual interactions, and provide an illustration of this using an intuitive wave-like diagram. This quantum-conceptual approach gives new life to original prototype theory, without however making it a privileged concept theory, as we explain at the end of our paper. PMID:27065436

  19. Lightweight composite fighting cover prototype development program

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Frame, B.J.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Akerman, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Army Field Assistance Science and Technology Program requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the use of lightweight composite materials in construction of overhead covers for reinforced infantry fighting positions. In recent years, ORNL researchers have designed and tested several concepts for lightweight ballistic protection structures, and they have developed numerous prototype composite structures for military and civilian applications. In the current program, composite panel designs and materials are tested and optimized to meet anticipated static and dynamic load conditions for the overhead cover structure. Ten prototype composite covers were built at ORNL for use in Army field tests. Each composite cover has a nominal surface area of 12 ft[sup 2] and a nominal weight of 8 lb. Four of the prototypes are made with folding sections to improve their handling characteristics. The composite covers exhibit equivalent performance in Army field tests to covers made with conventional materials that weigh four times as much.

  20. Performance of the SDHCAL technological prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, G.

    2016-07-01

    The SDHCAL technological prototype is a 1 × 1 × 1.3 m3 high-granularity Semi-Digital Hadronic CALorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chambers as sensitive medium. It is one of the two HCAL options considered by the ILD Collaboration to be proposed for the detector of the future International Linear Collider project. The prototype is made of up to 50 GRPC detectors of 1 m2 size and 3 mm thickness each with an embedded semi-digital electronics readout that is autotriggering and power-pulsed. The GRPC readout is finely segmented into pads of 1 cm2. This proceeding describes the prototype, its operation and its performance in energy reconstruction. Aspects of the GRPC readout modelling and comparisons with simulations are also presented.

  1. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Ferrante, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface. 8 figs.

  2. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Ferrante, Todd A.

    1998-01-01

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface.

  3. The calming effect of maternal carrying in different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gianluca; Setoh, Peipei; Yoshida, Sachine; Kuroda, Kumi O

    2015-01-01

    Attachment theory postulates that mothers and their infants possess some basic physiological mechanisms that favor their dyadic interaction and bonding. Many studies have focused on the maternal physiological mechanisms that promote attachment (e.g., mothers' automatic responses to infant faces and/or cries), and relatively less have examined infant physiology. Thus, the physiological mechanisms regulating infant bonding behaviors remain largely undefined. This review elucidates some of the neurobiological mechanisms governing social bonding and cooperation in humans by focusing on maternal carrying and its beneficial effect on mother-infant interaction in mammalian species (e.g., in humans, big cats, and rodents). These studies show that infants have a specific calming response to maternal carrying. A human infant carried by his/her walking mother exhibits a rapid heart rate decrease, and immediately stops voluntary movement and crying compared to when he/she is held in a sitting position. Furthermore, strikingly similar responses were identified in mouse rodents, who exhibit immobility, diminished ultra-sonic vocalizations and heart rate. In general, the studies described in the current review demonstrate the calming effect of maternal carrying to be comprised of a complex set of behavioral and physiological components, each of which has a specific postnatal time window and is orchestrated in a well-matched manner with the maturation of the infants. Such reactions could have been evolutionarily adaptive in mammalian mother-infant interactions. The findings have implications for parenting practices in developmentally normal populations. In addition, we propose that infants' physiological response may be useful in clinical assessments as we discuss possible implications on early screening for child psychopathology (e.g., autism spectrum disorders and perinatal brain disorders).

  4. The calming effect of maternal carrying in different mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Gianluca; Setoh, Peipei; Yoshida, Sachine; Kuroda, Kumi O.

    2015-01-01

    Attachment theory postulates that mothers and their infants possess some basic physiological mechanisms that favor their dyadic interaction and bonding. Many studies have focused on the maternal physiological mechanisms that promote attachment (e.g., mothers’ automatic responses to infant faces and/or cries), and relatively less have examined infant physiology. Thus, the physiological mechanisms regulating infant bonding behaviors remain largely undefined. This review elucidates some of the neurobiological mechanisms governing social bonding and cooperation in humans by focusing on maternal carrying and its beneficial effect on mother–infant interaction in mammalian species (e.g., in humans, big cats, and rodents). These studies show that infants have a specific calming response to maternal carrying. A human infant carried by his/her walking mother exhibits a rapid heart rate decrease, and immediately stops voluntary movement and crying compared to when he/she is held in a sitting position. Furthermore, strikingly similar responses were identified in mouse rodents, who exhibit immobility, diminished ultra-sonic vocalizations and heart rate. In general, the studies described in the current review demonstrate the calming effect of maternal carrying to be comprised of a complex set of behavioral and physiological components, each of which has a specific postnatal time window and is orchestrated in a well-matched manner with the maturation of the infants. Such reactions could have been evolutionarily adaptive in mammalian mother–infant interactions. The findings have implications for parenting practices in developmentally normal populations. In addition, we propose that infants’ physiological response may be useful in clinical assessments as we discuss possible implications on early screening for child psychopathology (e.g., autism spectrum disorders and perinatal brain disorders). PMID:25932017

  5. A prototype radar fracture mapping system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a prototype radar system for fracture detection have been completed. This system uses directional antennas for both the transmitter and the receiver in a single tool which provides both the distance and the direction of a fracture in a downhole application. Electronic circuits in the system generate 50 kW peak power impulse with -100 dbm minimum detectable sensitivity. Unique downhole sampling and uphole data reconstruction techniques are used to obtain high frequency data using standard logging cable. In a recent test conducted in a lake, radar returns from a target were clearly observed. Problems encountered in the prototype and the future test plans are discussed.

  6. Accelerator Tests of the KLEM Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, P.; Baranova, N.; Christl, M.; Chilingarian, A.; Chupin, I.; Derrickson, J.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.

    2003-01-01

    The Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter (KLEM) device is planned for direct measurement of the elemental energy spectra of high-energy (10(exp 11)-10(exp 16) eV) cosmic rays. The first KLEM prototype has been tested at CERN with 180 GeV pion beam in 2001. A modified KLEM prototype will be tested in proton and heavy ion beams to give more experimental data on energy resolution and charge resolution with KLEM method. The first test results are presented and compared with simulations.

  7. INO prototype detector and data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behere, Anita; Bhatia, M. S.; Chandratre, V. B.; Datar, V. M.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.; Jena, Satyajit; Viyogi, Y. P.; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Saha, Satyajit; Bhide, Sarika; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Nagaraj, P.; Nagesh, B. K.; Rao, Shobha K.; Reddy, L. V.; Saraf, M.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.; Upadhya, S. S.; Verma, P.; Biswas, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Subhasish; Sarma, P. R.

    2009-05-01

    India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is proposing to build a 50 kton magnetised iron calorimetric (ICAL) detector in an underground laboratory to be located in South India. Glass resistive plate chambers (RPCs) of about 2 m×2 m in size will be used as active elements for the ICAL detector. As a first step towards building the ICAL detector, a 35 ton prototype of the same is being set up over ground to track cosmic muons. Design and construction details of the prototype detector and its data acquisition system will be discussed. Some of the preliminary results from the detector stack will also be highlighted.

  8. RK-TBA prototype RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.; Anderson, D.; Giordano, G.

    1996-04-11

    A prototype rf power source based on the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is being constructed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study physics, engineering, and costing issues. The prototype is described and compared to a full scale design appropriate for driving the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Specific details of the induction core tests and pulsed power system are presented. The 1-MeV, 1.2-kA induction gun currently under construction is also described in detail.

  9. Prototyping a robotic dental testing simulator.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, K; Hyde, R A; Gao, J

    2007-05-01

    A parallel robot based on the Stewart platform is being developed to simulate jaw motion and investigate its effect on jaw function to test the wearing away of dental components such as individual teeth, crowns, bridges, full set of dentures, and implant-supported overdentures by controlling chewing motion. The current paper only describes the comparison between an alternative configuration proposed by Xu and the Stewart platform configuration. The Stewart platform was chosen as an ideal structure for simulating human mastication as it is easily assembled, has high rigidity, high load-carrying capacity, and accurate positioning capability. The kinematics and singularities of the Stewart platform have been analysed and software developed to (a) test the control algorithms/strategy of muscle movement for the six degree of freedom of mastication cycle and (b) simulate and observe various design options to be able to make the best judgement in product development. The human replica skull has been analysed and reverse engineered with further simplification before integration with the Stewart platform computer-aided design (CAD) to develop the robotic dental testing simulator. Assembly modelling of the reproduced skull was critically analysed for good occlusion in CAD environment. A pulse-width modulation (PWM) circuit plus interface was built to control position and speed of the chosen actuators. A computer numerical control (CNC) machine and wire-electro-discharge machining (wire EDM) were used to manufacture the critical parts such as lower mandible, upper maxilla, and universal joints.

  10. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was

  11. Automated Test Case Generation for an Autopilot Requirement Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Rungta, Neha; Feary, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Designing safety-critical automation with robust human interaction is a difficult task that is susceptible to a number of known Human-Automation Interaction (HAI) vulnerabilities. It is therefore essential to develop automated tools that provide support both in the design and rapid evaluation of such automation. The Automation Design and Evaluation Prototyping Toolset (ADEPT) enables the rapid development of an executable specification for automation behavior and user interaction. ADEPT supports a number of analysis capabilities, thus enabling the detection of HAI vulnerabilities early in the design process, when modifications are less costly. In this paper, we advocate the introduction of a new capability to model-based prototyping tools such as ADEPT. The new capability is based on symbolic execution that allows us to automatically generate quality test suites based on the system design. Symbolic execution is used to generate both user input and test oracles user input drives the testing of the system implementation, and test oracles ensure that the system behaves as designed. We present early results in the context of a component in the Autopilot system modeled in ADEPT, and discuss the challenges of test case generation in the HAI domain.

  12. Collective navigation of cargo-carrying swarms

    PubMed Central

    Shklarsh, Adi; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ariel, Gil; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of swarming and collective navigation of micro-organisms, insects, fish, birds and other organisms, as well as multi-agent simulations and to the study of real robots. It is well known that insect swarms can carry cargo. The studies here are motivated by a less well-known phenomenon: cargo transport by bacteria swarms. We begin with a concise review of how bacteria swarms carry natural, micrometre-scale objects larger than the bacteria (e.g. fungal spores) as well as man-made beads and capsules (for drug delivery). A comparison of the trajectories of virtual beads in simulations (using different putative coupling between the virtual beads and the bacteria) with the observed trajectories of transported fungal spores implies the existence of adaptable coupling. Motivated by these observations, we devised new, multi-agent-based studies of cargo transport by agent swarms. As a first step, we extended previous modelling of collective navigation of simple bacteria-inspired agents in complex terrain, using three putative models of agent–cargo coupling. We found that cargo-carrying swarms can navigate efficiently in a complex landscape. We further investigated how the stability, elasticity and other features of agent–cargo bonds influence the collective motion and the transport of the cargo, and found sharp phase shifts and dual successful strategies for cargo delivery. Further understanding of such mechanisms may provide valuable clues to understand cargo-transport by smart swarms of other organisms as well as by man-made swarming robots. PMID:24312731

  13. Collective navigation of cargo-carrying swarms.

    PubMed

    Shklarsh, Adi; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ariel, Gil; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-12-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of swarming and collective navigation of micro-organisms, insects, fish, birds and other organisms, as well as multi-agent simulations and to the study of real robots. It is well known that insect swarms can carry cargo. The studies here are motivated by a less well-known phenomenon: cargo transport by bacteria swarms. We begin with a concise review of how bacteria swarms carry natural, micrometre-scale objects larger than the bacteria (e.g. fungal spores) as well as man-made beads and capsules (for drug delivery). A comparison of the trajectories of virtual beads in simulations (using different putative coupling between the virtual beads and the bacteria) with the observed trajectories of transported fungal spores implies the existence of adaptable coupling. Motivated by these observations, we devised new, multi-agent-based studies of cargo transport by agent swarms. As a first step, we extended previous modelling of collective navigation of simple bacteria-inspired agents in complex terrain, using three putative models of agent-cargo coupling. We found that cargo-carrying swarms can navigate efficiently in a complex landscape. We further investigated how the stability, elasticity and other features of agent-cargo bonds influence the collective motion and the transport of the cargo, and found sharp phase shifts and dual successful strategies for cargo delivery. Further understanding of such mechanisms may provide valuable clues to understand cargo-transport by smart swarms of other organisms as well as by man-made swarming robots. PMID:24312731

  14. Spread of Plasmids Carrying Multiple GES Variants.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Bogaerts, Pierre; Bauraing, Caroline; Huang, Te-Din; Bonnin, Rémy A; Glupczynski, Youri; Naas, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    Five GES-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates that displayed an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype harbored two GES variants: GES-7 ESBL and GES-6 carbapenemase. In all isolates, the two GES alleles were located on the same integron that was inserted into an 80-kb IncM1 self-conjugative plasmid. Whole-genome sequencing suggested in vivo horizontal gene transfer of the plasmid along with clonal diffusion of Enterobacter cloacae To our knowledge, this is the first description in Europe of clustered Enterobacteriaceae isolates carrying two GES β-lactamases, of which one has extended activity toward carbapenems. PMID:27216071

  15. Carrying Synchronous Voice Data On Asynchronous Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1990-01-01

    Buffers restore synchronism for internal use and permit asynchronism in external transmission. Proposed asynchronous local-area digital communication network (LAN) carries synchronous voice, data, or video signals, or non-real-time asynchronous data signals. Network uses double buffering scheme that reestablishes phase and frequency references at each node in network. Concept demonstrated in token-ring network operating at 80 Mb/s, pending development of equipment operating at planned data rate of 200 Mb/s. Technique generic and used with any LAN as long as protocol offers deterministic (or bonded) access delays and sufficient capacity.

  16. Cost of carrying out clinical diagnostic tests.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, D J; Bingle, J P; Garratt, C J

    1978-01-01

    The total cost of performing diagnostic tests in a hospital laboratory during one year was assessed. The largest single item of expenditure was the cost of the salaries of the technical staff, while the cost of reagents (including radiopharmaceuticals) was relatively small. The total costs of carrying out diagnostic tests are much higher than is often recognised by those who request them. The use of relatively expensive, commercially available assay kits saves time and gives good value for money. It may be worth taking this into account when planning hospital budgets. PMID:647338

  17. Test Report for Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATO) Prototype.

    SciTech Connect

    Bobbe, Jeffery G.; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-06-01

    A prototype design for a plutonium air transport package capable of carrying 7.6 kg of plutonium oxide and surviving a ''worst-case'' plane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A series of impact tests were conducted on half-scale models of this design for side, end, and comer orientations at speeds close to 282 m/s onto a target designed to simulate weathered sandstone. These tests were designed to evaluate the performance of the overpack concept and impact-limiting materials in critical impact orientations. The impact tests of the Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP) prototypes were performed at SNL's 10,000-ft rocket sled track. This report describes test facilities calibration and environmental testing methods of the PMATP under specific test conditions. The tests were conducted according to the test plan and procedures that were written by the authors and approved by SNL management and quality assurance personnel. The result of these tests was that the half-scale PMATP survived the ''worst-case'' airplane crash conditions, and indicated that a full-scale PMATP, utilizing this overpack concept and these impact-limiting materials, would also survive these crash conditions.

  18. Utilizing Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirton, E. F.; Lavoie, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss our approach to, success with and future direction in rapid prototyping for architectural modeling. The premise that this emerging technology has broad and exciting applications in the building design and construction industry will be supported by visual and physical evidence. This evidence will be presented in the form of…

  19. ACTS propagation terminal prototype planning and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Pergal, F.; Chakraborty, D.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1990-01-01

    The planning and design of a prototype propagation receiving terminal for beacon signals at 27 and 20 GHz bands are examined. The developmental plan is discussed, followed by technical design considerations including, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system salient features and frequency plan, beacon signal parameters and specifications, system calculations, and terminal hardware design issues.

  20. Desktop Prototyping of Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.H.

    2000-03-30

    It has been shown possible to prepare nanoscale nickel oxide by the NRC plasma process. Dispersion were successfully made from the nickel oxide that could be ink-jetted using Sanders International ModelMaker equipment. Ink-jetted layers were sintered to nickel metal thus demonstrating the feasibility of desktop prototyping of metal and alloy miniature components.

  1. Classroom Evaluation of a Rapid Prototyping System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennyson, Stephen A.; Krueger, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces rapid prototyping which creates virtual models through a variety of automated material additive processes. Relates experiences using JP System 5 in freshman and sophomore engineering design graphics courses. Analyzes strengths and limitations of the JP System 5 and discusses how to use it effectively. (Contains 15 references.)…

  2. A Prototype Expert System for Fishway Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Michael J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes the development of a prototype expert system to recommend the most suitable type of fishway for given design conditions. Recommendations are provided on the basis of fishway hydraulics, fish passage performance, and cost requirements. An appendix provides an example consultation. (MDH)

  3. Web tools for rapid experimental visualization prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Jonathan W.; Livingstion, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Quite often a researcher finds themselves looking at spreadsheets of high-dimensional data generated by experimental models and user studies. We can use analysis to challenge or confirm hypothesis, but unexpected results can easily be lost in the shuffle. For this reason, it would be useful to visualize the results so we can explore our data and make new discoveries. Web browsers have become increasingly capable for creating complex, multi-view applications. Javascript is quickly becoming a de facto standard for scripting, online and offline. This work demonstrates the use of web technologies as a powerful tool for rapid visualization prototyping. We have developed two prototypes: One for high-dimensional results of the abELICIT - multi-agent version of the ELICIT platform tasked with collaborating to identify the parameters of a pending attack. Another prototype displays responses to a user study on the effectiveness of multi-layer visualization techniques. We created coordinated multiple views prototypes in the Google Chrome web browser written in Javascript, CSS and HTML. We will discuss the benefits and shortcomings of this approach.

  4. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  5. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B&W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  6. Demonstration of MMACE prototype TWT design system

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The MMACE (Microwave and Millimeter-wave Advanced Computational Environment) design system is a software framework for integrating both existing and future microwave power tube design tools into a cohesive, productive whole. The first phase of the MMACE Program developed a detailed understanding of vacuum electronics design requirements and constructed a prototype design environment to test and evaluate framework concepts. MMACE has focused on five key features: (1) ``project``-based management of design data and codes; (2) common ``master`` geometry for all codes; (3) sharing of common data by all codes; (4) a smooth integration of geometry-driven codes with parametric codes; and (5) a consistent graphical user interface across codes. The prototype TWT design system was created to evaluate these concepts, using a representative collection of existing design and analysis tools. The selected tools include parametric design tools, a gun code, a magnetostatic code, PIC codes, and thermomechanical codes. Usability has been enhanced by implementing a consistent user interface via code wrappers which allow users to easily access, input and modify design data. Appropriate input files for each code are automatically created from the common data model and user-supplied code-specific data. This presentation will describe and demonstrate the key technical capabilities of the MMACE prototype system for designing helix TWT`s. In addition to the technical presentation, a hands-on demonstration will permit attendees to interact with the prototype and evaluate its technical capabilities and its ``look and feel``.

  7. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25, and 75 ton size units.

  8. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports are given on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems. This effort calls for the development, manufacturing, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

  9. Hazard Communication and Training. A Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a prototype hazard communication and training program for manufacturers. Discusses the necessary ingredients of such a program, including chemical inventorying, labeling hazardous chemicals, maintaining a current file of material safety data sheets, and written training programs. Includes samples of material safety data sheets, labeling…

  10. Integration of rapid prototyping into product development

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is a vertically multi-disciplined research and development laboratory with a long history of designing and developing d electro-mechanical products in the national interest. Integrating new technologies into the prototyping phase of our development cycle is necessary to reduce the cycle time from initial design to finished product. The introduction of rapid prototyping machines into the marketplace promises to revolutionize the process of producing prototype parts with relative speed and production-like quality. Issues of accuracy, feature definition, and surface finish continue to drive research and development of these processes. Sandia uses Stereolithography (SL) and Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) capabilities to support internal product development efforts. The primary use of SL and SLS is to produce patterns for investment casting in support of a Sandia managed program called FASTCAST that integrates computational technologies and experimental data into the investment casting process. These processes are also used in the design iteration process to produce proof-of-concept models, hands-on models for design reviews, fit-check models, visual aids for manufacturing, and functional parts in assemblies. This presentation will provide an overview of the SL and SLS processes and an update of our experience and success in integrating these technologies into the product development cycle. Also presented will be several examples of prototype parts manufactured using SL and SLS with a focus on application, accuracy, surface and feature definition.

  11. Design data brochure: SIMS prototype system 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Information is provided on the design and performance of the IBM SIMS Prototype System 2, solar domestic hot water system, for single family residences. The document provides sufficient data to permit procurement, installation, operation, and maintenance by qualified architectural engineers or contractors.

  12. Conceptual Design of a Prototype LSST Database

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E; Cook, K H; Abdulla, G; Brase, J

    2004-10-07

    This document describes a preliminary design for Prototype LSST Database (LSST DB). They identify key components and data structures and provide an expandable conceptual schema for the database. The authors discuss the potential user applications and post-processing algorithm to interact with the database, and give a set of example queries.

  13. Installation package - SIMS prototype system 1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This report consists of details for the installation, operation and maintenance of a prototype heating and hot water system, designed for residential or light commercial applications. This system consists of the following subsystems: air type collectors, pebble bed thermal storage, air handling unit, air to water heat exchanger, hot water preheat tank, auxiliary energy, ducting system.

  14. PyTrilinos Rapid Prototyping Package

    2005-03-01

    PyTrilinos provides access to selected Trilinos packages from the python scripting language. This allows interactive and dynamic creation of Trilinos objects, rapid prototyping that does not require compilation, and "gluing" Trilinos scripts to other python modules, such as plotting, etc. The currently supported packages are Epetra, EpetraExt, and NOX.

  15. Automatic TLI recognition system beta prototype testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the beta prototype automatic target recognition system ATR3, and some performance tests done with this system. This is a fully operational system, with a high computational speed. It is useful for findings any kind of target in digitized image data, and as a general purpose image analysis tool.

  16. Integrating Rapid Prototyping into Graphic Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Renmei; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Integrating different science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas can help students learn and leverage both the equipment and expertise at a single school. In comparing graphic communications classes with classes that involve rapid prototyping (RP) technologies like 3D printing, there are sufficient similarities between goals,…

  17. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark A.; Martin, Rodney Alexander; Waterman, Robert D.; Oostdyk, Rebecca Lynn; Ossenfort, John P.; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The automation of pre-launch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits: improving safety, reducing cost, and reducing launch delays. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype demonstrated anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage Thrust Vector Control and for the associated ground hydraulics while the vehicle was in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and while it was on the launch pad. The prototype combines three existing tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool from Qualtech Systems Inc. for fault isolation and diagnostics. The second tool, SHINE (Spacecraft Health Inference Engine), is a rule-based expert system that was developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification, and used the outputs of SHINE as inputs to TEAMS. The third tool, IMS (Inductive Monitoring System), is an anomaly detection tool that was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The three tools were integrated and deployed to KSC, where they were interfaced with live data. This paper describes how the prototype performed during the period of time before the launch, including accuracy and computer resource usage. The paper concludes with some of the lessons that we learned from the experience of developing and deploying the prototype.

  18. Dynamic Prototypicality Effects in Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayaert, Greet; Op de Beeck, Hans P.; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    In recent studies, researchers have discovered a larger neural activation for stimuli that are more extreme exemplars of their stimulus class, compared with stimuli that are more prototypical. This has been shown for faces as well as for familiar and novel shape classes. We used a visual search task to look for a behavioral correlate of these…

  19. Metabolic rate of carrying added mass: a function of walking speed, carried mass and mass location.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2014-11-01

    The effort of carrying additional mass at different body locations is important in ergonomics and in designing wearable robotics. We investigate the metabolic rate of carrying a load as a function of its mass, its location on the body and the subject's walking speed. Novel metabolic rate prediction equations for walking while carrying loads at the ankle, knees and back were developed based on experiments where subjects walked on a treadmill at 4, 5 or 6km/h bearing different amounts of added mass (up to 2kg per leg and 22kg for back). Compared to previously reported equations, ours are 7-69% more accurate. Results also show that relative cost for carrying a mass at a distal versus a proximal location changes with speed and mass. Contrary to mass carried on the back, mass attached to the leg cannot be modeled as an increase in body mass. PMID:24793822

  20. Evaluation of the Oxygen Concentrator Prototypes: Pressure Swing Adsorption Prototype and Electrochemical Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilkey, Kelly M.; Olson, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    An oxygen concentrator is needed to provide enriched oxygen in support of medical contingency operations for future exploration human spaceflight programs. It would provide continuous oxygen to an ill or injured crew member in a closed cabin environment. Oxygen concentration technology is being pursued to concentrate oxygen from the ambient environment so oxygen as a consumable resource can be reduced. Because oxygen is a critical resource in manned spaceflight, using an oxygen concentrator to pull oxygen out of the ambient environment instead of using compressed oxygen can provide better optimization of resources. The overall goal of this project is to develop an oxygen concentrator module that minimizes the hardware mass, volume, and power footprint while still performing at the required clinical capabilities. Should a medical event occur that requires patient oxygenation, the release of 100 percent oxygen into a small closed cabin environment can rapidly raise oxygen levels to the vehicles fire limit. The use of an oxygen concentrator to enrich oxygen from the ambient air and concentrate it to the point where it can be used for medical purposes means no oxygen is needed from the ultra-high purity (99.5+% O2) oxygen reserve tanks. By not adding oxygen from compressed tanks to the cabin environment, oxygen levels can be kept below the vehicle fire limit thereby extending the duration of care provided to an oxygenated patient without environmental control system intervention to keep the cabin oxygen levels below the fire limits. The oxygen concentrator will be a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearable device. A demonstration unit for the International Space Station (ISS) is planned to verify the technology and provide oxygen capability. For the ISS, the demonstration unit should not exceed 10 kg (approximately 22 lb), which is the soft stowage mass limit for launch on resupply vehicles for the ISS. The unit's size should allow for transport within the

  1. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark; Martin, Rodney; Waterman, Robert; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Ossenfort, John; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Automating prelaunch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits. First, it potentially improves safety by detecting faults that might otherwise have been missed so that they can be corrected before launch. Second, it potentially reduces launch delays by more quickly diagnosing the cause of anomalies that occur during prelaunch processing. Reducing launch delays will be critical to the success of NASA's planned future missions that require in-orbit rendezvous. Third, it potentially reduces costs by reducing both launch delays and the number of people needed to monitor the prelaunch process. NASA is currently developing the Ares I launch vehicle to bring the Orion capsule and its crew of four astronauts to low-earth orbit on their way to the moon. Ares I-X will be the first unmanned test flight of Ares I. It is scheduled to launch on October 27, 2009. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype is a prototype ground diagnostic system that will provide anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage thrust vector control (TVC) and for the associated ground hydraulics while it is in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and on the launch pad. It will serve as a prototype for a future operational ground diagnostic system for Ares I. The prototype combines three existing diagnostic tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool that is commercially produced by Qualtech Systems, Inc. It uses a qualitative model of failure propagation to perform fault isolation and diagnostics. We adapted an existing TEAMS model of the TVC to use for diagnostics and developed a TEAMS model of the ground hydraulics. The second tool, Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE), is a rule-based expert system developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification. The prototype

  2. The global light system laser station prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Patrick R.

    We describe the design and fabrication of a prototype Global Light System (GLS) laser station for the JEM-EUSO project. The GLS will consist of a network of ground-based Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and steered lasers to monitor and calibrate the cosmic ray detector planned for install on the International Space Station (ISS). The GLS units will generate optical signatures in the atmosphere that are comparable to tracks from cosmic ray extensive air showers (EASs). Unlike an EAS, the number, time, energy, location and direction (for lasers) of GLS events can be specified as JEM-EUSO passes 400 km overhead. Laser tracks from the GLS prototype will be recorded by prototype detectors in ground-to-ground tests. Distant tracks with low angular speed are of particular interest because these are the types of EAS tracks that will be measured by JEM-EUSO. To do these ground-to-ground tests, the prototype detectors will need to measure the laser through the atmosphere at low elevation viewing angles. The beam energy can be adjusted from 1 to 90 mJ to compensate for this additional atmospheric attenuation. The frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser produces 355 nm (7 ns pulse) light. This wavelength is near the center of the UV EAS fluorescence spectrum. The system is housed in a utility trailer that can be transported by a small truck for domestic campaigns or shipped in an industry standard 20 foot container for global deployment. In operation mode, the laser platform inside the trailer is isolated mechanically to maintain beam pointing accuracy. A retractable two stage steering head can point in any direction above the horizon. A slip ring eliminates cable wrap problems. The GLS prototype will be used to test the EUSO-TA detector and will also be used in preflight tests of the EUSO-balloon payload planned for a super pressure balloon mission.

  3. Calibration campaign against the international prototype of the kilogram in anticipation of the redefinition of the kilogram part I: comparison of the international prototype with its official copies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Michael; Barat, Pauline; Davis, Richard S.; Picard, Alain; Milton, Martin J. T.

    2015-04-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the campaign of calibration carried out with respect to the international prototype of the kilogram (IPK) in anticipation of the redefinition of the kilogram (Extraordinary Calibrations). The definition of the kilogram was realized according to the procedure outlined in the 8th Edition of the SI Brochure. Thus the IPK and its six official copies have been cleaned and washed following the BIPM procedure. The mass comparisons carried out during this campaign showed a very good repeatability. The pooled standard deviation of repeated weighings of the prototypes was 0.4 µg. The effect of cleaning and washing of the IPK was to remove a mass of 16.8 µg. The effect of cleaning and washing of the six official copies was found to be very similar, giving an average mass removed from the seven prototypes of 15 µg with a standard deviation of 2 µg. The differences in mass between the IPK and the official copies have changed by an average of 1 µg since the 3rd Periodic Verification of National Prototypes of the Kilogram (1988-1992). These results do not confirm the trend for the masses of the six official copies to diverge from the mass of the IPK that was observed during the 2nd and 3rd Periodic Verifications. All BIPM working standards and the prototypes reserved for special use have been calibrated with respect to the IPK as part of this campaign. All of them were found to have lower masses than when they were calibrated during the 3rd Periodic Verification. As a consequence, the BIPM ‘as-maintained’ mass unit in 2014 has been found to be offset by 35 µg with respect to the IPK. This result will be analyzed in a further publication.

  4. Algorithm Implementation for a Prototype Time-Encoded Signature Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Theresa M.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Morris, Scott J.; Seifert, Allen; Wyatt, Cory R.

    2007-12-31

    The authors constructed a prototype Time-Encoded Signature (TES) system, complete with automated detection algorithms, useful for the detection of point-like, gamma-ray sources in search applications where detectors observe large variability in background count rates beyond statistical (Poisson) noise. The person-carried TES instrument consists of two Cesium Iodide scintillators placed on opposite sides of a Tungsten shield. This geometry mitigates systematic background variation, and induces a unique signature upon encountering point-like sources. This manuscript focuses on the development of detection algorithms that both identify point-source signatures and are computationally simple. The latter constraint derives from the instrument’s mobile (and thus low power) operation. The authors evaluated algorithms on both simulated and field data. The results of this analysis demonstrate the ability to detect sources at a wide range of source-detector distances using computationally simple algorithms.

  5. Determination of authenticity of brand perfume using electronic nose prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebicki, Jacek; Szulczynski, Bartosz; Kaminski, Marian

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the practical application of an electronic nose technique for fast and efficient discrimination between authentic and fake perfume samples. Two self-built electronic nose prototypes equipped with a set of semiconductor sensors were employed for that purpose. Additionally 10 volunteers took part in the sensory analysis. The following perfumes and their fake counterparts were analysed: Dior—Fahrenheit, Eisenberg—J’ose, YSL—La nuit de L’homme, 7 Loewe and Spice Bomb. The investigations were carried out using the headspace of the aqueous solutions. Data analysis utilized multidimensional techniques: principle component analysis (PCA), linear discrimination analysis (LDA), k-nearest neighbour (k-NN). The results obtained confirmed the legitimacy of the electronic nose technique as an alternative to the sensory analysis as far as the determination of authenticity of perfume is concerned.

  6. Development, prototyping and characterization of double sided silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topkar, Anita; Singh, Arvind; Aggarwal, Bharti; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Murali Krishna, L. V.; Das, D.

    2016-10-01

    Double sided DC-coupled silicon strip detectors with geometry of 65 mm×65 mm have been developed in India for nuclear physics experiments. The detectors have 64 P+ strips on the front side and 64 N+ strips on the backside with a pitch of 0.9 mm. These detectors were fabricated using a twelve mask layer process involving double sided wafer processing technology. Semiconductor process and device simulations were carried out in order to theoretically estimate the impact of important design and process parameters on the breakdown voltage of detectors. The performance of the first lot of prototype detectors has been studied using static characterization tests and using an alpha source. The characterization results demonstrate that the detectors have low leakage currents and good uniformity over the detector area of about 40 cm2. Overview of the detector design, fabrication process, simulation results and initial characterization results of the detectors are presented in this paper.

  7. Prototypes are attractive because they are easy on the mind.

    PubMed

    Winkielman, Piotr; Halberstadt, Jamin; Fazendeiro, Tedra; Catty, Steve

    2006-09-01

    People tend to prefer highly prototypical stimuli--a phenomenon referred to as the beauty-in-averageness effect. A common explanation of this effect proposes that prototypicality signals mate value. Here we present three experiments testing whether prototypicality preference results from more general mechanisms-fluent processing of prototypes and preference for fluently processed stimuli. In two experiments, participants categorized and rated the attractiveness of random-dot patterns (Experiment 1) or common geometric patterns (Experiment 2) that varied in levels of prototypicality. In both experiments, prototypicality was a predictor of both fluency (categorization speed) and attractiveness. Critically, fluency mediated the effect of prototypicality on attractiveness, although some effect of prototypicality remained when fluency was controlled. The findings were the same whether or not participants explicitly considered the pattern's categorical membership, and whether or not categorization fluency was salient when they rated attractiveness. Experiment 3, using the psychophysiological technique of facial electromyography, confirmed that viewing abstract prototypes elicits quick positive affective reactions.

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans carried by Odontomachus bauri ants.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Mariana Santos de; Rodrigues, William Costa; Barbosa, Glaucia; Trilles, Luciana; Wanke, Bodo; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos; Silva, Manuela da

    2012-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common causative agent of cryptococcosis worldwide. Although this fungus has been isolated from a variety of organic substrates, several studies suggest that hollow trees constitute an important natural niche for C. neoformans. A previously surveyed hollow of a living pink shower tree (Cassia grandis) positive for C. neoformans in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was chosen for further investigation. Odontomachus bauri ants (trap-jaw ants) found inside the hollow were collected for evaluation as possible carriers of Cryptococcus spp. Two out of 10 ants were found to carry phenoloxidase-positive colonies identified as C. neoformans molecular types VNI and VNII. The ants may have acted as a mechanical vector of C. neoformans and possibly contributed to the dispersal of the fungi from one substrate to another. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of C. neoformans with ants of the genus Odontomachus. PMID:22666855

  9. Cryptococcus neoformans carried by Odontomachus bauri ants.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Mariana Santos de; Rodrigues, William Costa; Barbosa, Glaucia; Trilles, Luciana; Wanke, Bodo; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos; Silva, Manuela da

    2012-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common causative agent of cryptococcosis worldwide. Although this fungus has been isolated from a variety of organic substrates, several studies suggest that hollow trees constitute an important natural niche for C. neoformans. A previously surveyed hollow of a living pink shower tree (Cassia grandis) positive for C. neoformans in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was chosen for further investigation. Odontomachus bauri ants (trap-jaw ants) found inside the hollow were collected for evaluation as possible carriers of Cryptococcus spp. Two out of 10 ants were found to carry phenoloxidase-positive colonies identified as C. neoformans molecular types VNI and VNII. The ants may have acted as a mechanical vector of C. neoformans and possibly contributed to the dispersal of the fungi from one substrate to another. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of C. neoformans with ants of the genus Odontomachus.

  10. Recent technology products from Space Human Factors research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, James P.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of the NASA Space Human Factors program and the research carried out concerning human factors are discussed with emphasis given to the development of human performance models, data, and tools. The major products from this program are described, which include the Laser Anthropometric Mapping System; a model of the human body for evaluating the kinematics and dynamics of human motion and strength in microgravity environment; an operational experience data base for verifying and validating the data repository of manned space flights; the Operational Experience Database Taxonomy; and a human-computer interaction laboratory whose products are the display softaware and requirements and the guideline documents and standards for applications on human-computer interaction. Special attention is given to the 'Convoltron', a prototype version of a signal processor for synthesizing the head-related transfer functions.

  11. Centurion Quarter-scale Prototype on Lakebed Ready for Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A battery-powered, quarter-scale prototype of the solar-powered, remotely piloted Centurion flying wing sits on the lakebed at California's El Mirage Dry Lake before one of its early research flights in March 1997. Centurion was a unique remotely piloted, solar-powered airplane developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor (ERAST) Program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Dryden joined with AeroVironment, Inc., Monrovia, California, under an ERAST Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, to design, develop, manufacture, and conduct flight development tests for the Centurion. The airplane was believed to be the first aircraft designed to achieve sustained horizontal flight at altitudes of 90,000 to 100,000 feet. Achieving this capability would meet the ERAST goal of developing an ultrahigh-altitude airplane that could meet the needs of the science community to perform upper-atmosphere environmental data missions. Much of the technology leading to the Centurion was developed during the Pathfinder and Pathfinder-Plus projects. However, in the course of its development, the Centurion became a prototype technology demonstration aircraft designed to validate the technology for the Helios, a planned future high-altitude, solar-powered aircraft that could fly for weeks or months at a time on science or telecommunications missions. Centurion had 206-foot-long wings and used batteries to supply power to the craft's 14 electric motors and electronic systems. Centurion first flew at Dryden Nov. 10, 1998, and followed up with a second test flight Nov. 19. On its third and final flight on Dec. 3, the craft was aloft for 31 minutes and reached an altitude of about 400 feet. All three flights were conducted over a section of Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to Dryden. For its third flight, the Centurion carried a simulated payload of more than 600 pounds--almost half the lightweight aircraft's empty weight. John Del Frate, Dryden's project manager

  12. Centurion Quarter-scale Prototype Pre-flight Checklist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Centurion designer Bill Parks and remote pilot Wyatt Sadler go over the checklist for a test flight of the battery-powered quarter-scale prototype of the Centurion flying wing during taxi tests in March 1997 at California's El Mirage Dry Lake. Centurion was a unique remotely piloted, solar-powered airplane developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor (ERAST) Program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Dryden joined with AeroVironment, Inc., Monrovia, California, under an ERAST Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, to design, develop, manufacture, and conduct flight development tests for the Centurion. The airplane was believed to be the first aircraft designed to achieve sustained horizontal flight at altitudes of 90,000 to 100,000 feet. Achieving this capability would meet the ERAST goal of developing an ultrahigh-altitude airplane that could meet the needs of the science community to perform upper-atmosphere environmental data missions. Much of the technology leading to the Centurion was developed during the Pathfinder and Pathfinder-Plus projects. However, in the course of its development, the Centurion became a prototype technology demonstration aircraft designed to validate the technology for the Helios, a planned future high-altitude, solar-powered aircraft that could fly for weeks or months at a time on science or telecommunications missions. Centurion had 206-foot-long wings and used batteries to supply power to the craft's 14 electric motors and electronic systems. Centurion first flew at Dryden Nov. 10, 1998, and followed up with a second test flight Nov. 19. On its third and final flight on Dec. 3, the craft was aloft for 31 minutes and reached an altitude of about 400 feet. All three flights were conducted over a section of Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to Dryden. For its third flight, the Centurion carried a simulated payload of more than 600 pounds--almost half the lightweight aircraft's empty weight. John Del

  13. Centurion Quarter-scale Prototype Pre-flight Checkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Technicians perform pre-test checks of a battery-powered quarter-scale prototype of the remotely-piloted Centurion flying wing during taxi tests In March 1997 at California's El Mirage Dry Lake. Centurion was a unique remotely piloted, solar-powered airplane developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor (ERAST) Program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Dryden joined with AeroVironment, Inc., Monrovia, California, under an ERAST Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, to design, develop, manufacture, and conduct flight development tests for the Centurion. The airplane was believed to be the first aircraft designed to achieve sustained horizontal flight at altitudes of 90,000 to 100,000 feet. Achieving this capability would meet the ERAST goal of developing an ultrahigh-altitude airplane that could meet the needs of the science community to perform upper-atmosphere environmental data missions. Much of the technology leading to the Centurion was developed during the Pathfinder and Pathfinder-Plus projects. However, in the course of its development, the Centurion became a prototype technology demonstration aircraft designed to validate the technology for the Helios, a planned future high-altitude, solar-powered aircraft that could fly for weeks or months at a time on science or telecommunications missions. Centurion had 206-foot-long wings and used batteries to supply power to the craft's 14 electric motors and electronic systems. Centurion first flew at Dryden Nov. 10, 1998, and followed up with a second test flight Nov. 19. On its third and final flight on Dec. 3, the craft was aloft for 31 minutes and reached an altitude of about 400 feet. All three flights were conducted over a section of Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to Dryden. For its third flight, the Centurion carried a simulated payload of more than 600 pounds--almost half the lightweight aircraft's empty weight. John Del Frate, Dryden's project manager for solar

  14. Centurion Quarter-scale Prototype Pre-flight Taxi Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As crewmen jog and cycle alongside, a battery-powered, quarter-scale prototype of the remotely-piloted Centurion flying wing rolls across the El Mirage Dry Lake during pre-flight taxi tests. Centurion was a unique remotely piloted, solar-powered airplane developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor (ERAST) Program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Dryden joined with AeroVironment, Inc., Monrovia, California, under an ERAST Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, to design, develop, manufacture, and conduct flight development tests for the Centurion. The airplane was believed to be the first aircraft designed to achieve sustained horizontal flight at altitudes of 90,000 to 100,000 feet. Achieving this capability would meet the ERAST goal of developing an ultrahigh-altitude airplane that could meet the needs of the science community to perform upper-atmosphere environmental data missions. Much of the technology leading to the Centurion was developed during the Pathfinder and Pathfinder-Plus projects. However, in the course of its development, the Centurion became a prototype technology demonstration aircraft designed to validate the technology for the Helios, a planned future high-altitude, solar-powered aircraft that could fly for weeks or months at a time on science or telecommunications missions. Centurion had 206-foot-long wings and used batteries to supply power to the craft's 14 electric motors and electronic systems. Centurion first flew at Dryden Nov. 10, 1998, and followed up with a second test flight Nov. 19. On its third and final flight on Dec. 3, the craft was aloft for 31 minutes and reached an altitude of about 400 feet. All three flights were conducted over a section of Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to Dryden. For its third flight, the Centurion carried a simulated payload of more than 600 pounds--almost half the lightweight aircraft's empty weight. John Del Frate, Dryden's project manager for solar

  15. Centurion Quarter-scale Prototype Prepared for Taxi Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As sunlight breaks over Southern California's El Mirage Dry Lake, Crew members prepare a battery-powered quarter-scale prototype of the remotely-piloted Centurion flying wing for a taxi test. Centurion was a unique remotely piloted, solar-powered airplane developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor (ERAST) Program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Dryden joined with AeroVironment, Inc., Monrovia, California, under an ERAST Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, to design, develop, manufacture, and conduct flight development tests for the Centurion. The airplane was believed to be the first aircraft designed to achieve sustained horizontal flight at altitudes of 90,000 to 100,000 feet. Achieving this capability would meet the ERAST goal of developing an ultrahigh-altitude airplane that could meet the needs of the science community to perform upper-atmosphere environmental data missions. Much of the technology leading to the Centurion was developed during the Pathfinder and Pathfinder-Plus projects. However, in the course of its development, the Centurion became a prototype technology demonstration aircraft designed to validate the technology for the Helios, a planned future high-altitude, solar-powered aircraft that could fly for weeks or months at a time on science or telecommunications missions. Centurion had 206-foot-long wings and used batteries to supply power to the craft's 14 electric motors and electronic systems. Centurion first flew at Dryden Nov. 10, 1998, and followed up with a second test flight Nov. 19. On its third and final flight on Dec. 3, the craft was aloft for 31 minutes and reached an altitude of about 400 feet. All three flights were conducted over a section of Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to Dryden. For its third flight, the Centurion carried a simulated payload of more than 600 pounds--almost half the lightweight aircraft's empty weight. John Del Frate, Dryden's project manager for solar

  16. End effector monitoring system: An illustrated case of operational prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Land, Sherry A.; Thronesbery, Carroll

    1994-01-01

    Operational prototyping is introduced to help developers apply software innovations to real-world problems, to help users articulate requirements, and to help develop more usable software. Operational prototyping has been applied to an expert system development project. The expert system supports fault detection and management during grappling operations of the Space Shuttle payload bay arm. The dynamic exchanges among operational prototyping team members are illustrated in a specific prototyping session. We discuss the requirements for operational prototyping technology, types of projects for which operational prototyping is best suited and when it should be applied to those projects.

  17. Construct and Concurrent Validity of a Prototype Questionnaire to Survey Public Attitudes toward Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; Reichel, Isabella K.; Yaruss, J. Scott; Lubker, Bobbie Boyd

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Construct validity and concurrent validity were investigated in a prototype survey instrument, the "Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes-Experimental Edition" (POSHA-E). The POSHA-E was designed to measure public attitudes toward stuttering within the context of eight other attributes, or "anchors," assumed to range from negative…

  18. Analysis of quench in the NHMFL REBCO prototype coils for the 32 T Magnet Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breschi, M.; Cavallucci, L.; Ribani, P. L.; Gavrilin, A. V.; Weijers, H. W.

    2016-05-01

    A 32 T all-superconductive magnet with high field REBCO inner coils is under development at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida, USA. As part of the development activity, two prototype coils with full scale radial dimensions and final design features, but with reduced axial length were constructed. The prototype coils consist of six dry-wound double pancakes modules with uninsulated conductor and insulated stainless steel cowind. Quench studies on one of the prototype coils at 4.2 K in self-field and in a background magnetic field of 15 T were performed by activating a set of quench protection heaters. In this paper, we present a numerical analysis of the experimental results of the quench tests of one of the prototype coils. The numerical analysis was carried out through a coupled electro-thermal FEM model developed at the University of Bologna. The model is based on the coupling with distributed contact resistances of the coil pancakes described as 2D elements. A homogenization procedure of the REBCO tape and other coil materials is presented, which allows reducing the number of degrees of freedom and the computational effort. The model is applied to the analysis of the current and voltage evolutions during the experimental quench tests on the prototype coil.

  19. Prototype Weigh-In-Motion Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Beshears, David L; Hively, Lee M; Scudiere, Matthew B; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2006-10-01

    using each weighing mode. WIM dynamic, WIM stop-and-go, and static-mode scale measurements were compared for total vehicle weight and the weight of the individual axles. We made WIM dynamic mode measurements with three assemblages of weight-transducer pads to assess the performance with varying numbers (2, 4, and 6) of weigh pads. Percent error in the WIM dynamic mode was 0.51%, 0.37%, and 0.37% for total vehicle weight and 0.77%, 0.50%, and 0.47% for single-axle weight for the two-, four-, and six-pad systems, respectively. Errors in the WIM stop-and-go mode were 0.55% for total vehicle weight and 0.62% for single-axle weights. In-ground scales weighed these vehicles with an error of 0.04% (within Army specifications) for total vehicle weight, and an error of 0.86% for single-axle weight. These results show that (1) the WIM error in single-axle weight was less than that obtained from in-ground static scales; (2) the WIM system eliminates time-consuming manual procedures, human errors, and safety concerns; and (3) measurement error for the WIM prototype was less than 1% (within Army requirements for this project). All the tests were performed on smooth, dry, level, concrete surfaces. Tests under non-ideal surface conditions are needed (e.g., rough but level, sun-baked asphalt, wet pavement), and future work will test WIM performance under these conditions. However, we expect the performance will be as good as, if not better than, the present WIM performance. We recommend the WIM stop-and-go mode under non-ideal surface conditions. We anticipate no performance degradation, assuming no subsurface deformation occurs.

  20. Mechatronic Prototype of Parabolic Solar Tracker

    PubMed Central

    Morón, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; Ramos, Mari Paz

    2016-01-01

    In the last 30 years numerous attempts have been made to improve the efficiency of the parabolic collectors in the electric power production, although most of the studies have focused on the industrial production of thermoelectric power. This research focuses on the application of this concentrating solar thermal power in the unexplored field of building construction. To that end, a mechatronic prototype of a hybrid paraboloidal and cylindrical-parabolic tracker based on the Arduido technology has been designed. The prototype is able to measure meteorological data autonomously in order to quantify the energy potential of any location. In this way, it is possible to reliably model real commercial equipment behavior before its deployment in buildings and single family houses. PMID:27314359

  1. Mechatronic Prototype of Parabolic Solar Tracker.

    PubMed

    Morón, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; Ramos, Mari Paz

    2016-06-15

    In the last 30 years numerous attempts have been made to improve the efficiency of the parabolic collectors in the electric power production, although most of the studies have focused on the industrial production of thermoelectric power. This research focuses on the application of this concentrating solar thermal power in the unexplored field of building construction. To that end, a mechatronic prototype of a hybrid paraboloidal and cylindrical-parabolic tracker based on the Arduido technology has been designed. The prototype is able to measure meteorological data autonomously in order to quantify the energy potential of any location. In this way, it is possible to reliably model real commercial equipment behavior before its deployment in buildings and single family houses.

  2. Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gili, J.A.; Poston, V.K.

    1993-11-01

    This is the final report of the Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project, which was funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The project had two objectives: (a) to develop and demonstrate a prototype of production-scale equipment for the dry, horizontal consolidation and packaging of spent nuclear fuel rods from commercial boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies, and (b) to report the development and demonstration results to the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. This report summarizes the activities and conclusions of the project management contractor, EG&G Idaho, Inc., and the fabrication and testing contractor, NUS Corporation (NUS). The report also presents EG&G Idaho`s assessments of the equipment and procedures developed by NUS.

  3. Relatively Inexpensive Rapid Prototyping of Small Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Parts with complex three-dimensional shapes and with dimensions up to 8 by 8 by 10 in. (20.3 by 20.3 by 25.4 cm) can be made as unitary pieces of a room-temperature-curing polymer, with relatively little investment in time and money, by a process now in use at Johnson Space Center. The process is one of a growing number of processes and techniques that are known collectively as the art of rapid prototyping. The main advantages of this process over other rapid-prototyping processes are greater speed and lower cost: There is no need to make paper drawings and take them to a shop for fabrication, and thus no need for the attendant paperwork and organizational delays. Instead, molds for desired parts are made automatically on a machine that is guided by data from a computer-aided design (CAD) system and can reside in an engineering office.

  4. Z-1 Prototype Space Suit Testing Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Space Suit team of the NASA-Johnson Space Center performed a series of test with the Z-1 prototype space suit in 2012. This paper discusses, at a summary level, the tests performed and results from those tests. The purpose of the tests were two -fold: 1) characterize the suit performance so that the data could be used in the downselection of components for the Z -2 Space Suit and 2) develop interfaces with the suitport and exploration vehicles through pressurized suit evaluations. Tests performed included isolated and functional range of motion data capture, Z-1 waist and hip testing, joint torque testing, CO2 washout testing, fit checks and subject familiarizations, an exploration vehicle aft deck and suitport controls interface evaluation, delta pressure suitport tests including pressurized suit don and doff, and gross mobility and suitport ingress and egress demonstrations in reduced gravity. Lessons learned specific to the Z -1 prototype and to suit testing techniques will be presented.

  5. SIMS prototype system 4: Design data brochure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A pre-package prototype unit having domestic hot water and room solar heating capability that uses air as the collector fluid is described. This system is designed to be used with a small single-family dwelling where a roof mounted collector array is not feasible. The prototype unit is an assemble containing 203 square feet of effective collector surface with 113 cubic feet of rock storage. The design of structure and storage is modular, which permits expansion and reduction of the collector array and storage bed in 68 square feet and 37 cubic feet increments respectively. The system is designed to be transportable. This permitted assemble and certification testing in one area and installation in another area without tear down and reassemble. Design, installation, operation, performance and maintenance of this system are described.

  6. Mechatronic Prototype of Parabolic Solar Tracker.

    PubMed

    Morón, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; Ramos, Mari Paz

    2016-01-01

    In the last 30 years numerous attempts have been made to improve the efficiency of the parabolic collectors in the electric power production, although most of the studies have focused on the industrial production of thermoelectric power. This research focuses on the application of this concentrating solar thermal power in the unexplored field of building construction. To that end, a mechatronic prototype of a hybrid paraboloidal and cylindrical-parabolic tracker based on the Arduido technology has been designed. The prototype is able to measure meteorological data autonomously in order to quantify the energy potential of any location. In this way, it is possible to reliably model real commercial equipment behavior before its deployment in buildings and single family houses. PMID:27314359

  7. Prototype-based models in machine learning.

    PubMed

    Biehl, Michael; Hammer, Barbara; Villmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An overview is given of prototype-based models in machine learning. In this framework, observations, i.e., data, are stored in terms of typical representatives. Together with a suitable measure of similarity, the systems can be employed in the context of unsupervised and supervised analysis of potentially high-dimensional, complex datasets. We discuss basic schemes of competitive vector quantization as well as the so-called neural gas approach and Kohonen's topology-preserving self-organizing map. Supervised learning in prototype systems is exemplified in terms of learning vector quantization. Most frequently, the familiar Euclidean distance serves as a dissimilarity measure. We present extensions of the framework to nonstandard measures and give an introduction to the use of adaptive distances in relevance learning.

  8. SNS EXTRACTION KICKER POWER SUPPLY PROTOTYPE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    MI,J.L.; SANDBERG,J.; SANDERS,R.; SOUKAS,A.; ZHANG,W.

    2000-06-27

    The SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) accumulator ring Extraction System consists of a Fast kicker and a Lambertson Septum magnet. The proposed design will use 14 kicker magnets powered by an Extraction Kicker Power Supply System. They will eject the high power beam from the SNS accumulator ring into RTBT (Ring to Target Beam Tunnel) through a Lambertson Septum magnet. This paper describes some test results of the SNS Extraction Kicker power supply prototype. The high repetition rate of 60 pulse per second operation is the challenging part of the design. In the prototype testing, a 3 kA damp current of 700ns pulse-width, 200 nS rise time and 60 Hz repetition rate at 32 kV PFN operation voltage has been demonstrated. An Extraction kicker power supply system design diagram is depicted.

  9. Fabrication, assembly, bench and drilling tests of two prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, R.; Duettra, P.D.; Johnson, P.; Lyons, W.C.; Miska, S.

    1987-04-01

    The first and second prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors have been fabricated, assembled and tested. All bench tests showed that the motor will produce horsepower and bit speeds approximating the predicted values. Specifically, the downhole pneumatic turbine motor produced approximately 50 horsepower at 100 rpm, while being supplied with about 3600 SCFM of compressed air. The first prototype was used in a drilling test from a depth of 389 feet to a depth of 789 feet in the Kirtland formation. This first prototype motor drilled at a rate exceeding 180 ft/hr, utilizing only 3000 SCFM of compressed air. High temperature tests (at approximately 460/sup 0/F) were carried out on the thrust assembly and the gearboxes for the two prototypes. These components operated successfully at these temperatures. Although the bench and drilling tests were successful, the tests revealed design changes that should be made before drilling tests are carried out in geothermal boreholes at the Geysers area, near Santa Rosa, California.

  10. DOE`s annealing prototype demonstration projects

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.; Nakos, J.; Rochau, G.

    1997-02-01

    One of the challenges U.S. utilities face in addressing technical issues associated with the aging of nuclear power plants is the long-term effect of plant operation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). As a nuclear plant operates, its RPV is exposed to neutrons. For certain plants, this neutron exposure can cause embrittlement of some of the RPV welds which can shorten the useful life of the RPV. This RPV embrittlement issue has the potential to affect the continued operation of a number of operating U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants. However, RPV material properties affected by long-term irradiation are recoverable through a thermal annealing treatment of the RPV. Although a dozen Russian-designed RPVs and several U.S. military vessels have been successfully annealed, U.S. utilities have stated that a successful annealing demonstration of a U.S. RPV is a prerequisite for annealing a licensed U.S. nuclear power plant. In May 1995, the Department of Energy`s Sandia National Laboratories awarded two cost-shared contracts to evaluate the feasibility of annealing U.S. licensed plants by conducting an anneal of an installed RPV using two different heating technologies. The contracts were awarded to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Center for Research and Technology Development (CRTD) and MPR Associates (MPR). The ASME team completed its annealing prototype demonstration in July 1996, using an indirect gas furnace at the uncompleted Public Service of Indiana`s Marble Hill nuclear power plant. The MPR team`s annealing prototype demonstration was scheduled to be completed in early 1997, using a direct heat electrical furnace at the uncompleted Consumers Power Company`s nuclear power plant at Midland, Michigan. This paper describes the Department`s annealing prototype demonstration goals and objectives; the tasks, deliverables, and results to date for each annealing prototype demonstration; and the remaining annealing technology challenges.

  11. Prototype ultrasonic instrument for quantitative testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnworth, L. C.; Dubois, J. L.; Kranz, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    A prototype ultrasonic instrument has been designed and developed for quantitative testing. The complete delivered instrument consists of a pulser/receiver which plugs into a standard oscilloscope, an rf power amplifier, a standard decade oscillator, and a set of broadband transducers for typical use at 1, 2, 5 and 10 MHz. The system provides for its own calibration, and on the oscilloscope, presents a quantitative (digital) indication of time base and sensitivity scale factors and some measurement data.

  12. Building a parabolic solar concentrator prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Romero, J. F. M.; Montiel, S. Vázquez y.; Granados-Agustín, F.; Cruz-Martínez, V. M.; Rodríguez-Rivera, E.; Martínez-Yáñez, L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to not further degrade the environment, people have been seeking to replace non-renewable natural resources such as fossil fuels by developing technologies that are based on renewable resources. An example of these technologies is solar energy. In this paper, we show the building and test of a solar parabolic concentrator as a prototype for the production of steam that can be coupled to a turbine to generate electricity or a steam engine in any particular industrial process.

  13. Country prototypes and translation of health programs.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Steve; Unger, Jennifer B; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2008-06-01

    This article introduces the topic of international translation of health programs. Different perspectives toward the study of national-level variables that are relevant to translation of evidence-based programming developed outside of or in a country are discussed. Concepts including national prototypes, national stereotypes, country clusters, knowledge incompatibility, and absorptive capacity are introduced. The ideas expressed in this article serve to provide direction when considering developing a health behavior program for a country, using previous programmatic knowledge from elsewhere.

  14. Rapid Prototyping Of Layered Composite Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Edwin D.

    1992-01-01

    Numerically controlled cutting accelerates fabrication of layers. Proposed method derived from stereoscopic lithography. CATIA or CAEDS computer program used to generate three-dimensional mathematical model of prototype part. In model, geometry of part specified in layers, as in stereoscopic lithography. Model data for each layer fed to computer-numerically-controlled ultrasonic cutting machine. Sheet of prepreg (uncured composite material) of specified layer thickness placed in machine and cut, under control of model data, to specified shape of layer.

  15. Demonstrating a Realistic IP Mission Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Ferrer, Arturo B.; Goodman, Nancy; Ghazi-Tehrani, Samira; Polk, Joe; Johnson, Lorin; Menke, Greg; Miller, Bill; Criscuolo, Ed; Hogie, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Flight software and hardware and realistic space communications environments were elements of recent demonstrations of the Internet Protocol (IP) mission concept in the lab. The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) Project and the Flight Software Branch at NASA/GSFC collaborated to build the prototype of a representative space mission that employed unmodified off-the-shelf Internet protocols and technologies for end-to-end communications between the spacecraft/instruments and the ground system/users. The realistic elements used in the prototype included an RF communications link simulator and components of the TRIANA mission flight software and ground support system. A web-enabled camera connected to the spacecraft computer via an Ethernet LAN represented an on-board instrument creating image data. In addition to the protocols at the link layer (HDLC), transport layer (UDP, TCP), and network (IP) layer, a reliable file delivery protocol (MDP) at the application layer enabled reliable data delivery both to and from the spacecraft. The standard Network Time Protocol (NTP) performed on-board clock synchronization with a ground time standard. The demonstrations of the prototype mission illustrated some of the advantages of using Internet standards and technologies for space missions, but also helped identify issues that must be addressed. These issues include applicability to embedded real-time systems on flight-qualified hardware, range of applicability of TCP, and liability for and maintenance of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products. The NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) funded the collaboration to build and demonstrate the prototype IP mission.

  16. JUNO Central Detector and its prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhimin

    2016-05-01

    JUNO is a multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator experiment; its R&D and civil construction all are in progress. During this July, 2015, JUNO collaboration selects the acrylic option as central detector (CD) scheme. The R&D progress of support point structure and acrylic panel of CD acrylic option all are in good shape. At the same time, a prototype detector of JUNO is designed and under construction, the goal is mainly to study different PMTs, background, electronics etc.

  17. AdaNET prototype library administration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, Lionel

    1989-01-01

    The functions of the AdaNET Prototype Library of Reusable Software Parts is described. Adopted from the Navy Research Laboratory's Reusability Guidebook (V.5.0), this is a working document, customized for use the the AdaNET Project. Within this document, the term part is used to denote the smallest unit controlled by a library and retrievable from it. A part may have several constituents, which may not be individually tracked. Presented are the types of parts which may be stored in the library and the relationships among those parts; a concept of trust indicators which provide measures of confidence that a user of a previously developed part may reasonably apply to a part for a new application; search and retrieval, configuration management, and communications among those who interact with the AdaNET Prototype Library; and the AdaNET Prototype, described from the perspective of its three major users: the part reuser and retriever, the part submitter, and the librarian and/or administrator.

  18. A prototype piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Peng, Mark V.; May, Christopher A.; Shunhavanich, Picha; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-07-01

    The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator has been proposed as a mechanism in CT scanning for personalizing the x-ray illumination on a patient- and application-specific basis. Previous simulations have shown benefits in image quality, scatter, and dose objectives. We report on the first prototype implementation. This prototype is reduced in scale and speed and is integrated into a tabletop CT system with a smaller field of view (25 cm) and longer scan time (42 s) compared to a clinical system. Stainless steel wedges were machined and affixed to linear actuators, which were in turn held secure by a frame built using rapid prototyping technologies. The actuators were computer-controlled, with characteristic noise of about 100 microns. Simulations suggest that in a clinical setting, the impact of actuator noise could lead to artifacts of only 1 HU. Ring artifacts were minimized by careful design of the wedges. A water beam hardening correction was applied and the scan was collimated to reduce scatter. We scanned a 16 cm water cylinder phantom as well as an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom. The artifacts present in reconstructed images are comparable to artifacts normally seen with this tabletop system. Compared to a flat-field reference scan, increased detectability at reduced dose is shown and streaking is reduced. Artifacts are modest in our images and further refinement is possible. Issues of mechanical speed and stability in the challenging clinical CT environment will be addressed in a future design.

  19. A Prototype Imager for the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Nils Henning

    1998-11-01

    Traditional methods of data collection in active fringe tracking Michelson stellar interferometers involve logging and analyzing the signals within the fringe tracking system for the scientific information about the object being observed. While these methods are robust and have produced excellent scientific results, they become more problematic as next-generation Michelson stellar interferometers are built with more telescopes and the aim of performing routine imaging. The Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array is one such next-generation instrument presently under construction on Mount Wilson, north of Los Angeles, California. The CHARA Array will feature a separation of the tasks of active fringe tracking and imaging, thereby increasing the bandwidth, sensitivity, and data acquisition rate. Presented is a prototype version of an imager for the CHARA Array. The prototype imager employs single-mode fiber optic strands to convey the light from simulated telescopes to a smaller, non-redundant, remapped pupil plane, which in turn feeds a low resolution prism spectrograph. The spectrograph features two cylindrical optical elements whose net effect is to focus the light to a smaller plate scale in the spectral dimension than in the orthogonal spatial dimension. The actual Array imager will build on lessons learned from the prototype and will include capability for five telescopes, further degrees of freedom in adjustment, a computer interface, and automatic intensity calibration.

  20. SOT: A rapid prototype using TAE windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Mark; Eike, David; Harris, Elfrieda; Miller, Dana

    1986-01-01

    The development of the window interface extension feature of the Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) is discussed. This feature is being used to prototype a space station payload interface in order to demonstrate and assess the benefits of using windows on a bit mapped display and also to convey the concept of telescience, the control and operation of space station payloads from remote sites. The prototype version of the TAE with windows operates on a DEC VAXstation 100. This workstation has a high resolution 19 inch bit mapped display, a keyboard and a three-button mouse. The VAXstation 100 is not a stand-alone workstation, but is controlled by software executing on a VAX/8600. A short scenario was developed utilizing the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) as an example payload. In the scenario the end-user station includes the VAXstation 100 plus an image analysis terminal used to display the CCD images. The layout and use of the prototype elements, i.e., the root menu, payload status window, and target acquisition menu is described.

  1. Prototype of linac BLM at NSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Li, Yuxiong; Gong, Guanghua; Li, Juexin; Shao, Beibei; Zhao, Zhengguo

    2007-08-01

    A prototype of the Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System for the linac and transportation line has been built up in National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Different from the storage ring, the radiation field around linac and transportation line have a duty factor of 10 -6 and a dose rate of hundreds Gy/h. The Monte-Carlo calculation gave the dose, flux, energy and direction distributions of the radiation field. According to the simulation result, the proper type of detector was chosen and the installation positions were selected accordingly. The widely used ionization chamber is not suitable to give accurate and real-time information of beam loss due to its large dimension and slow respond speed. Several PIN silicon diode-based detectors were designed and tested, and a charge-balanced integrating amplifier circuit was applied to read out the charge. A distributed data acquisition system based on embedded Ethernet technology was implemented in the prototype, which can offer a web server from the microcontroller. From preliminary tests, this new prototype was proved to be sensitive to the change of the linac status, and is a useful tool for monitoring and adjusting machine parameters. Further analyses are required to achieve a more accurate measurement of the beam loss.

  2. Prototyping Cognitive Prosthetics for People with Dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Richard; Nugent, Chris D.; Donnelly, Mark

    In the COGKNOW project, a cognitive prosthetic has been developed through the application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-based services to address the unmet needs and demands of persons with dementia. The primary aim of the developed solution was to offer guidance with conducting everyday activities for persons with dementia. To encourage a user-centred design process, a three-phased methodology was introduced to facilitate cyclical prototype development. At each phase, user input was used to guide the future development. As a prerequisite to the first phase of development, user requirements were gathered to identify a small set of functional requirements from which a number of services were identified. Following implementation of these initial services, the prototype was evaluated on a cohort of users and, through observing their experiences and recording their feedback, the design was refined and the prototype redeveloped to include a number of additional services in the second phase. The current chapter provides an overview of the services designed and developed in the first two phases.

  3. A prototype piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Peng, Mark V; May, Christopher A; Shunhavanich, Picha; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J

    2016-07-01

    The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator has been proposed as a mechanism in CT scanning for personalizing the x-ray illumination on a patient- and application-specific basis. Previous simulations have shown benefits in image quality, scatter, and dose objectives. We report on the first prototype implementation. This prototype is reduced in scale and speed and is integrated into a tabletop CT system with a smaller field of view (25 cm) and longer scan time (42 s) compared to a clinical system. Stainless steel wedges were machined and affixed to linear actuators, which were in turn held secure by a frame built using rapid prototyping technologies. The actuators were computer-controlled, with characteristic noise of about 100 microns. Simulations suggest that in a clinical setting, the impact of actuator noise could lead to artifacts of only 1 HU. Ring artifacts were minimized by careful design of the wedges. A water beam hardening correction was applied and the scan was collimated to reduce scatter. We scanned a 16 cm water cylinder phantom as well as an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom. The artifacts present in reconstructed images are comparable to artifacts normally seen with this tabletop system. Compared to a flat-field reference scan, increased detectability at reduced dose is shown and streaking is reduced. Artifacts are modest in our images and further refinement is possible. Issues of mechanical speed and stability in the challenging clinical CT environment will be addressed in a future design. PMID:27284705

  4. Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) Prototype 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Shirasaki, Y.; Honda, S.; Mizumoto, Y.; Ohishi, M.; Yasuda, N.; Masunaga, Y.; Ishihara, Y.; Abe, K.; Tsutsumi, J.; Nakamoto, H.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Morita, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We describe the architecture of the Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) prototype system version 2. JVO aims at seamless access to astronomical data archives stored in distributed data servers as well as data analysis environment. For this purpose, it is important to establish a framework for access to remote servers, including remote procedure calls (RPCs) and data transfer. A data request for distributed database is described in the JVO Query Language. The JVO system parses the query language and decomposes it into individual remote procedures, such as the retrieval of catalog images and spectra, cross matching, and workflow generation. Based on this workflow, remote procedures are called. For RPCs of JVO prototype system 1, we employed Globus toolkit 2 (GT2). However, latency time of GT2 RPCs was too long for successive short-time jobs. Therefore, we employed Globus toolkit 3 (GT3) for JVO prototype system 2. As a result, we find that Grid Service in GT3 improves performance of RPC. In addition to Grid Service, Reliable File Transfer (RFT) is used for efficient data transfer. Astronomical data stored in distributed servers are discovered through a registry server which provides metadata discussed in the IVOA registry working group and is built using a XML database.

  5. The AEI 10 m prototype interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goßler, S.; Bertolini, A.; Born, M.; Chen, Y.; Dahl, K.; Gering, D.; Gräf, C.; Heinzel, G.; Hild, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kranz, O.; Kühn, G.; Lück, H.; Mossavi, K.; Schnabel, R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Taylor, J. R.; Wanner, A.; Westphal, T.; Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.

    2010-04-01

    A 10 m prototype interferometer facility is currently being set up at the AEI in Hannover, Germany. The prototype interferometer will be housed inside a 100 m3 ultra-high vacuum envelope. Seismically isolated optical tables inside the vacuum system will be interferometrically interconnected via a suspension platform interferometer. Advanced isolation techniques will be used, such as inverted pendulums and geometrical anti-spring filters in combination with multiple-cascaded pendulum suspensions, containing an all-silica monolithic last stage. The light source is a 35 W Nd:YAG laser, geometrically filtered by passing it through a photonic crystal fibre and a rigid pre-modecleaner cavity. Laser frequency stabilisation will be achieved with the aid of a high finesse suspended reference cavity in conjunction with a molecular iodine reference. Coating thermal noise will be reduced by the use of Khalili cavities as compound end mirrors. Data acquisition and control of the experiments is based on the AdvLIGO digital control and data system. The aim of the project is to test advanced techniques for GEO 600 as well as to conduct experiments in macroscopic quantum mechanics. Reaching standard quantum-limit sensitivity for an interferometer with 100 g mirrors and subsequently breaching this limit, features most prominently among these experiments. In this paper we present the layout and current status of the AEI 10 m Prototype Interferometer project.

  6. The prototype SMOS soil moisture Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Y.; Waldteufel, P.; Richaume, P.; Cabot, F.; Wigneron, J. P.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Mahmoodi, A.; Delwart, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is ESA's (European Space Agency ) second Earth Explorer Opportunity mission, to be launched in September 2007. It is a joint programme between ESA CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and CDTI (Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnologico Industrial). SMOS carries a single payload, an L-band 2D interferometric radiometer in the 1400-1427 MHz protected band. This wavelength penetrates well through the atmosphere and hence the instrument probes the Earth surface emissivity. Surface emissivity can then be related to the moisture content in the first few centimeters of soil, and, after some surface roughness and temperature corrections, to the sea surface salinity over ocean. In order to prepare the data use and dissemination, the ground segment will produce level 1 and 2 data. Level 1 will consists mainly of angular brightness temperatures while level 2 will consist of geophysical products. In this context, a group of institutes prepared the soil moisture and ocean salinity Algorithm Theoretical Basis documents (ATBD) to be used to produce the operational algorithm. The consortium of institutes preparing the Soil moisture algorithm is led by CESBIO (Centre d'Etudes Spatiales de la BIOsphère) and Service d'Aéronomie and consists of the institutes represented by the authors. The principle of the soil moisture retrieval algorithm is based on an iterative approach which aims at minimizing a cost function given by the sum of the squared weighted differences between measured and modelled brightness temperature (TB) data, for a variety of incidence angles. This is achieved by finding the best suited set of the parameters which drive the direct TB model, e.g. soil moisture (SM) and vegetation characteristics. Despite the simplicity of this principle, the main reason for the complexity of the algorithm is that SMOS "pixels" can correspond to rather large, inhomogeneous surface areas whose contribution to the radiometric

  7. BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EVOLUTION FROM NON-CARRYING TO OXYGEN AND GAS CARRYING FLUIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The development of oxygen (O2) carrying blood substitutes has evolved from the goal of replicating blood O2 transports properties to that of preserving microvascular and organ function, reducing the inherent or potential toxicity of the material used to carry O2, and treating pathologies initiated by anemia and hypoxia. Furthermore, the emphasis has shifted from blood replacement fluid to “O2 therapeutics” that restore tissue oxygenation to specific tissues regions. This review covers the different alternatives, potential and limitations of hemoglobin based O2 carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon based O2 carriers (PFCOCs), with emphasis on the physiological conditions disturbed in the situation that they will be used. It describes how concepts learned from plasma expanders without O2 carrying capacity can be applied to maintain O2 delivery and summarizes the microvascular responses due to HBOCs and PFCOCs. This review also presents alternative applications of HBOCs and PFCOCs namely: 1) How HBOC O2 affinity can be engineered to target O2 delivery to hypoxic tissues; and 2) How the high gas solubility of PFCOCs provides new opportunities for carrying, dissolving and delivering gases with biological activity. It is concluded that current blood substitutes development has amplified their applications horizon by devising therapeutic functions for oxygen carriers requiring limited O2 delivery capacity restoration. Conversely, full, blood-like O2 carrying capacity re-establishment awaits control of O2 carrier toxicity. PMID:23820271

  8. CCSDS SM and C Mission Operations Interoperability Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucord, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the prototype of the Spacecraft Monitor and Control (SM&C) Operations for interoperability among other space agencies. This particular prototype uses the German Space Agency (DLR) to test the ideas for interagency coordination.

  9. Prototype solar-heating system-engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Space and domestic-water solar-heating prototype was tested in three phases: simulated energy function, winter normal operation, summer normal operation. Prototype was judged suitable for field installation.

  10. U.S., European ALMA Partners Award Prototype Antenna Contracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    The U.S. and European partners in the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project have awarded contracts to U.S. and Italian firms, respectively, for two prototype antennas. ALMA is a planned telescope array, expected to consist of 64 millimeter-wave antennas with 12-meter diameter dishes. The array will be built at a high-altitude, extremely dry mountain site in Chile's Atacama desert, and is scheduled to be completed sometime in this decade. On February 22, 2000, Associated Universities Inc. (AUI) signed an approximately $6.2 million contract with Vertex Antenna Systems, of Santa Clara, Calif., for construction of one prototype ALMA antenna. AUI operates the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) for the National Science Foundation under a cooperative agreement. The European partners contracted with the consortium of European Industrial Engineering and Costamasnaga, of Mestre, Italy, on February 21, 2000, for the production of another prototype. (Mestre is located on the inland side of Venice.) The two antennas must meet identical specifications, but will inherently be of different designs. This will ensure that the best possible technologies are incorporated into the final production antennas. Only one of the designs will be selected for final production. Several technical challenges must be met for the antennas to perform to ALMA specifications. Each antenna must have extremely high surface accuracy (25 micrometers, or one-third the diameter of a human hair, over the entire 12-meter diameter). This means that, when completed, the surface accuracy of the ALMA dishes will be 20 times greater than that of the Very Large Array (VLA) antennas, and about 50 times greater than dish antennas for communications or radar. The ALMA antennas must also have extremely high pointing accuracy (0.6 arcseconds). An additional challenge is that the antennas, when installed at the ALMA site in Chile, will be exposed to the ravages of weather at 16,500 feet (5000 meters

  11. Creating virtual humans for simulation-based training and planning

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, S.; Sobel, A.

    1998-05-12

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a distributed, high fidelity simulation system for training and planning small team Operations. The system provides an immersive environment populated by virtual objects and humans capable of displaying complex behaviors. The work has focused on developing the behaviors required to carry out complex tasks and decision making under stress. Central to this work are techniques for creating behaviors for virtual humans and for dynamically assigning behaviors to CGF to allow scenarios without fixed outcomes. Two prototype systems have been developed that illustrate these capabilities: MediSim, a trainer for battlefield medics and VRaptor, a system for planning, rehearsing and training assault operations.

  12. Project FIRES. Volume 4: Prototype Protective Ensemble Qualification Test Report, Phase 1B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    The qualification testing of a prototype firefighter's protective ensemble is documented. Included are descriptions of the design requirements, the testing methods, and the test apparatus. The tests include measurements of individual subsystem characteristics in areas relating to both physical testing, such as heat, flame, impact penetration and human factors testing, such as dexterity, grip, and mobility. Also, measurements related to both physical and human factors testing of the complete ensemble, such as water protection, metabolic expenditures, and compatibility are considered.

  13. Global carrying capacity: how many people?

    PubMed

    1992-07-01

    During 1980-85 energy consumption in developing countries increased by 22%, of which 50% was used to maintain current levels of use and 50% pertained to real economic growth. Commercial energy consumption during 1970-89 tripled in developing countries. Population growth alone is expected to increase world energy consumption from the current 13.5 terawatts (13.5 trillion watts) to 18 terawatts by 2025 at the same level of use. The increased level of consumption (4.5 terawatts) is the equivalent of total current commercial energy consumption. One terawatt is equal to energy use from 5 billion barrels of oil yearly, 1 billion tons of coal, or 1.6 billion tons of wood. Economic development will require even greater levels of energy use. Since the oil price increases of the 1970s, developed countries increased their energy consumption by about 33%, even while becoming more fuel efficient. During 1990-2025, if developing countries double their per capita energy use and developed countries reduce their use by 50%, world energy consumption will still be almost 21 terawatts. If consumption remains constant at current levels without any population increase, the oil supply will be exhausted in 40 years. Coal consumption will last hundreds of years but air pollution will worsen, and global warming will be accelerated. Developed countries, which are wealthier, are having difficulty switching to non-fossil fuels, and the prospects for developing countries pose even greater challenges. Slowing growth buys time for technological development. World population is expected to reach 8 billion by 2020. Stabilization of growth at 8 billion would occur only if world fertility averages 1.7 children per woman by 2025. One opinion is that the carrying capacity has been reached with the present population of 5.4 billion. Others say that with changes in consumption and technological developments the earth can sustain 8 billion people. The physical limits are 1) the finite capacity of natural

  14. Senescent males carry premutagenic lesions in sperm.

    PubMed

    Velando, A; Noguera, J C; Drummond, H; Torres, R

    2011-03-01

    As organisms age, DNA of somatic cells deteriorates, but it is believed that germ cells are protected from DNA-damaging agents. In recent years, this vision has been challenged by studies on humans indicating that genomic instability in germ cells increases with age. However, nothing is known about germ line senescence in wild animals. Here, we examine DNA damage in sperm of a wild vertebrate, the blue-footed booby Sula nebouxii. One of the major types of premutagenic DNA damage generated by oxidative stress (a proximal cause of ageing) is loss of single bases resulting in apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites). We examined AP sites in the sperm of known-age males sampled during courtship on Isla Isabel, Mexico. We show that damage to the DNA of sperm increases with age of male blue-footed boobies. Moreover, we found that sexual attractiveness (foot colour) declines with age and is correlated with germ line damage of senescent males. By choosing attractive males, females might reduce the probability of their progeny bearing damaged DNA. This study reports the first evidence of senescence in the germ line of a wild vertebrate and future studies should investigate whether this burden of senescence is sidestepped by potential sexual partners.

  15. Senescent males carry premutagenic lesions in sperm.

    PubMed

    Velando, A; Noguera, J C; Drummond, H; Torres, R

    2011-03-01

    As organisms age, DNA of somatic cells deteriorates, but it is believed that germ cells are protected from DNA-damaging agents. In recent years, this vision has been challenged by studies on humans indicating that genomic instability in germ cells increases with age. However, nothing is known about germ line senescence in wild animals. Here, we examine DNA damage in sperm of a wild vertebrate, the blue-footed booby Sula nebouxii. One of the major types of premutagenic DNA damage generated by oxidative stress (a proximal cause of ageing) is loss of single bases resulting in apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites). We examined AP sites in the sperm of known-age males sampled during courtship on Isla Isabel, Mexico. We show that damage to the DNA of sperm increases with age of male blue-footed boobies. Moreover, we found that sexual attractiveness (foot colour) declines with age and is correlated with germ line damage of senescent males. By choosing attractive males, females might reduce the probability of their progeny bearing damaged DNA. This study reports the first evidence of senescence in the germ line of a wild vertebrate and future studies should investigate whether this burden of senescence is sidestepped by potential sexual partners. PMID:21332857

  16. 46 CFR 161.013-11 - Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prototype test. 161.013-11 Section 161.013-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-11 Prototype test. (a) Each manufacturer must test a prototype light identical to the lights to be certified prior...

  17. 46 CFR 161.013-11 - Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prototype test. 161.013-11 Section 161.013-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-11 Prototype test. (a) Each manufacturer must test a prototype light identical to the lights to be certified prior...

  18. 46 CFR 161.013-11 - Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prototype test. 161.013-11 Section 161.013-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-11 Prototype test. (a) Each manufacturer must test a prototype light identical to the lights to be certified prior...

  19. 46 CFR 161.013-11 - Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prototype test. 161.013-11 Section 161.013-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-11 Prototype test. (a) Each manufacturer must test a prototype light identical to the lights to be certified prior...

  20. 46 CFR 161.013-11 - Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prototype test. 161.013-11 Section 161.013-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-11 Prototype test. (a) Each manufacturer must test a prototype light identical to the lights to be certified prior...

  1. Effective Prototype Costing Policies in Research Universities: Are They Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Maureen W.; Abu-Duhou, Ibtisam

    Policy problems of prototype costing at research universities are discussed, based on a case study of a clinical treatment prototype program at a research university hospital. Prototypes programs generate reproducible knowledge with useful applications and are primarily developed in professional schools. The potential of using costing prototypes…

  2. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  3. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  4. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  5. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  6. 46 CFR 154.560 - Cargo hose: Prototype test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Prototype test. 154.560 Section 154.560... Hose § 154.560 Cargo hose: Prototype test. (a) Each cargo hose must be of a type that passes a... service temperature. (b) Each cargo hose must not be the hose used in the prototype test....

  7. Prototypes as an Indirect Measure of Attitudes Toward Disability Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Tiffany J.; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype is an ongoing, cognitive representation of common attributes and distinct characteristics that define an object or person. This mixed-method study applies the robust concept of prototype to examine perceptions of disability groups. Core, secondary, and tertiary prototype characteristics are described for six disabilities:…

  8. The network management expert system prototype for Sun Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, Albert

    1990-01-01

    Networking has become one of the fastest growing areas in the computer industry. The emergence of distributed workstations make networking more popular because they need to have connectivity between themselves as well as with other computer systems to share information and system resources. Making the networks more efficient and expandable by selecting network services and devices that fit to one's need is vital to achieve reliability and fast throughput. Networks are dynamically changing and growing at a rate that outpaces the available human resources. Therefore, there is a need to multiply the expertise rapidly rather than employing more network managers. In addition, setting up and maintaining networks by following the manuals can be tedious and cumbersome even for an experienced network manager. This prototype expert system was developed to experiment on Sun Workstations to assist system and network managers in selecting and configurating network services.

  9. The psychology of telling murder stories: do we think in scripts, exemplars, or prototypes?

    PubMed

    Wiener, Richard L; Richmond, Tracey L; Seib, Hope M; Rauch, Shannon M; Hackney, Amy A

    2002-01-01

    According to the story model of Pennington and Hastie, jurors collect information at trial and modify it with general knowledge to create case stories. Schank and Ableson argue that human memory is organized to tell and understand stories. However, Finkel and Groscup questioned the use of manipulated, experimenter-constructed narratives to demonstrate the existence of multiple prototypical crime stories. We interviewed 76 jury eligible, death qualified citizens and asked them to imagine a first-degree murder scenario, describing the events that led to the killing. We coded the presence of dichotomous variables in the resulting stories and identified at least three shared story prototypes using cluster and profile analysis. We conclude that people do not store crime stories as simple prototypes and comment on the implications of this finding for legal decision-making.

  10. Development of the Plastic Melt Waste Compactor- Design and Fabrication of the Half-Scale Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Gregory S.; Fisher, John

    2005-01-01

    A half scale version of a device called the Plastic Melt Waste Compactor prototype has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to deal with plastic based wastes that are expected to be encountered in future human space exploration scenarios such as Lunar or Martian Missions. The Plastic Melt Waste Compactor design was based on the types of wastes produced on the International Space Station, Space Shuttle, MIR and Skylab missions. The half scale prototype unit will lead to the development of a full scale Plastic Melt Waste Compactor prototype that is representative of flight hardware that would be used on near and far term space missions. This report details the progress of the Plastic Melt Waste Compactor Development effort by the Solid Waste Management group at NASA Ames Research Center.

  11. 42 CFR 55a.105 - How must grantees carry out their projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How must grantees carry out their projects? 55a.105 Section 55a.105 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.105 How must grantees carry out...

  12. 42 CFR 55a.105 - How must grantees carry out their projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How must grantees carry out their projects? 55a.105 Section 55a.105 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.105 How must grantees carry out...

  13. 42 CFR 55a.105 - How must grantees carry out their projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How must grantees carry out their projects? 55a.105 Section 55a.105 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS PROGRAM GRANTS FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.105 How must grantees carry out...

  14. Deformable Surface Accommodating Intraocular Lens: Second Generation Prototype Design Methodology and Testing

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, Sean J.; Schwiegerling, Jim T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Present an analysis methodology for developing and evaluating accommodating intraocular lenses incorporating a deformable interface. Methods: The next generation design of extruded gel interface intraocular lens is presented. A prototype based upon similar previously in vivo proven design was tested with measurements of actuation force, lens power, interface contour, optical transfer function, and visual Strehl ratio. Prototype verified mathematical models were used to optimize optical and mechanical design parameters to maximize the image quality and minimize the required force to accommodate. Results: The prototype lens produced adequate image quality with the available physiologic accommodating force. The iterative mathematical modeling based upon the prototype yielded maximized optical and mechanical performance through maximum allowable gel thickness to extrusion diameter ratio, maximum feasible refractive index change at the interface, and minimum gel material properties in Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus. Conclusions: The design prototype performed well. It operated within the physiologic constraints of the human eye including the force available for full accommodative amplitude using the eye's natural focusing feedback, while maintaining image quality in the space available. The parameters that optimized optical and mechanical performance were delineated as those, which minimize both asphericity and actuation pressure. The design parameters outlined herein can be used as a template to maximize the performance of a deformable interface intraocular lens. Translational Relevance: The article combines a multidisciplinary basic science approach from biomechanics, optical science, and ophthalmology to optimize an intraocular lens design suitable for preliminary animal trials. PMID:25938005

  15. Development of Experimental Setup of Metal Rapid Prototyping Machine using Selective Laser Sintering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. N.; Mulay, A. V.; Ahuja, B. B.

    2016-08-01

    Unlike in the traditional manufacturing processes, additive manufacturing as rapid prototyping, allows designers to produce parts that were previously considered too complex to make economically. The shift is taking place from plastic prototype to fully functional metallic parts by direct deposition of metallic powders as produced parts can be directly used for desired purpose. This work is directed towards the development of experimental setup of metal rapid prototyping machine using selective laser sintering and studies the various parameters, which plays important role in the metal rapid prototyping using SLS technique. The machine structure in mainly divided into three main categories namely, (1) Z-movement of bed and table, (2) X-Y movement arrangement for LASER movements and (3) feeder mechanism. Z-movement of bed is controlled by using lead screw, bevel gear pair and stepper motor, which will maintain the accuracy of layer thickness. X-Y movements are controlled using timing belt and stepper motors for precise movements of LASER source. Feeder mechanism is then developed to control uniformity of layer thickness metal powder. Simultaneously, the study is carried out for selection of material. Various types of metal powders can be used for metal RP as Single metal powder, mixture of two metals powder, and combination of metal and polymer powder. Conclusion leads to use of mixture of two metals powder to minimize the problems such as, balling effect and porosity. Developed System can be validated by conducting various experiments on manufactured part to check mechanical and metallurgical properties. After studying the results of these experiments, various process parameters as LASER properties (as power, speed etc.), and material properties (as grain size and structure etc.) will be optimized. This work is mainly focused on the design and development of cost effective experimental setup of metal rapid prototyping using SLS technique which will gives the feel of

  16. Advanced prototype automated iodine monitor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The technique of detecting and measuring parts-per-million concentrations of aqueous iodine by direct spectrophotometric means is discussed, and development of a prototype Automated Iodine Monitoring/Controller System (AIMS) is elaborated. The present effort is directed primarily toward reducing the power requirement and the weight of the AIMS. Other objectives include determining the maximum concentration of iodine that can be dissolved in an alcohol solution, and in an aqueous potassium iodide solution. Also discussed are the effects of a no flow condition on iodine measurements and the effect of pH on spectrophotometric iodine determinations.

  17. Preliminary flight prototype silver ion monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, J.

    1974-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary flight prototype silver ion monitoring system based on potentiometric principles and utilizing a solid-state silver sulfide electrode paired with a pressurized double-junction reference electrode housing a replaceable electrolyte reservoir is described. The design provides automatic electronic calibration utilizing saturated silver bromide solution as a silver ion standard. The problem of loss of silver ion from recirculating fluid, its cause, and corrective procedures are reported. The instability of the silver sulfide electrode is discussed as well as difficulties met in implementing the autocalibration procedure.

  18. Flight prototype regenerative particulate filter system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. C.; Garber, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The effort to design, fabricate, and test a flight prototype Filter Regeneration Unit used to regenerate (clean) fluid particulate filter elements is reported. The design of the filter regeneration unit and the results of tests performed in both one-gravity and zero-gravity are discussed. The filter regeneration unit uses a backflush/jet impingement method of regenerating fluid filter elements that is highly efficient. A vortex particle separator and particle trap were designed for zero-gravity use, and the zero-gravity test results are discussed. The filter regeneration unit was designed for both inflight maintenance and ground refurbishment use on space shuttle and future space missions.

  19. Preliminary Component Integration Utilizing Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K.; Salvail, P.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most costly errors committed during the development of an element to be used in the space industry is the lack of communication between design and manufacturing engineers. A very important tool that should be utilized in the development stages by both design and manufacturing disciplines is rapid prototyping. Communication levels are intensified with the injection of functional models that are generated from a drawing. At the Marshall Space Flight Center, this discipline is utilized on a more frequent basis as a manner by which hardware may be tested for design and material compatibility.

  20. Two building-integrated photovoltaic prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.; Nicklas, M.

    1996-11-01

    Two building-integrated photovoltaic design prototypes are presented in this paper, one for the restaurant chain Applebee`s Neighborhood Grill and Bar and one for a branch office of Central Carolina Bank. Both are being developed as integrated components for construction and each uses strategies for the recovery and use of waste heat from the photovoltaic panels. The combination of the avoided costs of the materials replaced by the panels and the value of the thermal energy produced significantly helps the economics of the systems.

  1. Prototype Variable-Area Exhaust Nozzle Designed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gangbring

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing research in NASA Glenn Research Center s Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch to develop smart materials technologies for adaptive aeropropulsion components has resulted in the design of a prototype variable-area exhaust nozzle (see the preceding photograph). The novel design exploits the potential of smart materials to improve the performance of existing fixed-area exhaust nozzles by introducing new capabilities for adaptive shape control, vibration damping, and flow manipulation. The design utilizes two different smart materials: shape memory alloy wires as actuators and magnetorheological fluids as damper locks.

  2. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.

    1997-07-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM`s). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  3. Rigid and flexible OLEDs: prototypes to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monz, Stefan; Wolf, Konrad; Möbius, Hildegard; Blankenbach, Karlheinz

    2011-03-01

    Major achievements of this research project on rigid and flexible OLEDs are: lifetime enhancement by advanced constant luminance (L) operation, integration into textiles and furthermore, the prototype production on flexible PET/ITO substrates of polymer OLEDs. Our OLEDs were manufactured with spin-coating assisted by ink-jet printing. We introduced constant luminance operation (instead of the usual constant current) which was implemented in order to extend the overall lifetime of OLEDs. A threefold lifetime improvement was achieved by maintaining 50% luminance using an advanced microcontroller-based lifetime(LT) model. Various approaches to textile integration and evaluation of environmental issues in clothes (e.g. moisture) were investigated.

  4. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  5. Prototype dining hall energy efficiency study

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucchi, R.P.; Bailey, S.A.; Zimmerman, P.W.

    1988-06-01

    The energy consumption of food service facilities is among the highest of any commercial building type, owing to the special requirements for food preparation, sanitation, and ventilation. Consequently, the US Air Force Engineering and Services Center (AFESC) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to collect and analyze end-use energy consumption data for a prototypical dining hall and make specific recommendations on cost-effective energy conservation options. This information will be used to establish or update criteria for dining hall designs and retrofits as appropriate. 6 refs., 21 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Characterisation of an AGATA symmetric prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, L.; Dimmock, M. R.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Nolan, P. J.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Santos, C.; Parisel, C.

    2007-04-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) symmetric prototype detector has been tested at the University of Liverpool. A 137Ce source, collimated to a 2 mm diameter, was scanned across the front face of the detector and data were acquired utilising digital electronics. Pulse shapes from a selection of well-defined photon interaction positions have been analysed to investigate the position sensitivity of the detector. Furthermore, the application of the electric field simulation software, Multi Geometry Simulation (MGS) to generate theoretical pulse shapes for AGATA detectors has been presented.

  7. LANSCE Wire Scanner System Prototype: Switchyard Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillo, James D

    2012-04-11

    On November 19, 2011, the beam diagnostics team of Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE accelerator facility conducted a test of a prototype wire scanner system for future deployment within the accelerator's switchyard area. The primary focus of this test was to demonstrate the wire scanner control system's ability to extend its functionality beyond acquiring lower energy linac beam profile measurements to acquiring data in the switchyard. This study summarizes the features and performance characteristics of the electronic and mechanical implementation of this system with details focusing on the test results.

  8. Advantages of using subsurface flow constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment in space applications: ground-based Mars Base prototype.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M; Alling, A; Dempster, W F; van Thillo, M; Allen, John

    2003-01-01

    Research and design of subsurface flow wetland wastewater treatment systems for a ground-based experimental prototype Mars Base facility has been carried out, using a subsurface flow approach. These systems have distinct advantages in planetary exploration scenarios: they are odorless, relatively low-labor and low-energy, assist in purification of water and recycling of atmospheric CO2, and will support some food crops. An area of 6-8 m2 may be sufficient for integration of wetland wastewater treatment with a prototype Mars Base supporting 4-5 people. Discharge water from the wetland system will be used as irrigation water for the agricultural crop area, thus ensuring complete recycling and utilization of nutrients. Since the primary requirements for wetland treatment systems are warm temperatures and lighting, such bioregenerative systems may be integrated into early Mars base habitats, since waste heat from the lights may be used for temperature maintenance in the human living environment. "Wastewater gardens (TM)" can be modified for space habitats to lower space and mass requirements. Many of its construction requirements can eventually be met with use of in-situ materials, such as gravel from the Mars surface. Because the technology requires little machinery and no chemicals, and relies more on natural ecological mechanisms (microbial and plant metabolism), maintenance requirements are minimized, and systems can be expected to have long operating lifetimes. Research needs include suitability of Martian soil and gravel for wetland systems, system sealing and liner options in a Mars Base, and wetland water quality efficiency under varying temperature and light regimes.

  9. Advantages of using subsurface flow constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment in space applications: Ground-based mars base prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M.; Alling, A.; Dempster, W. F.; van Thillo, M.; Allen, John

    Research and design of subsurface flow wetland wastewater treatment systems for a ground-based experimental prototype Mars Base facility has been carried out, using a subsurface flow approach. These systems have distinct advantages in planetary exploration scenarios: they are odorless, relatively low-labor and low-energy, assist in purification of water and recycling of atmospheric CO2, and will support some food crops. An area of 6-8 m2 may be sufficient for integration of wetland wastewater treatment with a prototype Mars Base supporting 4-5 people. Discharge water from the wetland system will be used as irrigation water for the agricultural crop area, thus ensuring complete recycling and utilization of nutrients. Since the primary requirements for wetland treatment systems are warm temperatures and lighting, such bioregenerative systems may be integrated into early Mars base habitats, since waste heat from the lights may be used for temperature maintenance in the human living environment. "Wastewater gardens ™" can be modified for space habitats to lower space and mass requirements. Many of its construction requirements can eventually be met with use of in-situ materials, such as gravel from the Mars surface. Because the technology requires little machinery and no chemicals, and relies more on natural ecological mechanisms (microbial and plant metabolism), maintenance requirements are minimized, and systems can be expected to have long operating lifetimes. Research needs include suitability of Martian soil and gravel for wetland systems, system sealing and liner options in a Mars Base, and wetland water quality efficiency under varying temperature and light regimes.

  10. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  11. A Prototype Ionization Profile Monitor for RHIC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.; Shea, T.; Sikora, R.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPMs). Each IPM will measure the integrated distribution of electrons in one plane resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The high space-charge electric field of the beam makes it necessary to image with electrons which are guided by a magnetic field. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. It consists of a collector circuit board mounted on one side of the beam and a parallel electrode on the other to provide an electric sweep field. The collector board has 48 electrodes oriented parallel to the beam with a chevron microchannel plate amplifier mounted in front of the collection traces. The detector vacuum chamber is placed in the gap of a magnet. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are integrated, amplified, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. This paper describes the prototype detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  12. Performance of a disk array prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, Ann L.; Katz, Randy H.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype disk array's component-performance limits are examined using SCSI bus traces, Sprite operating system traces, and user programs. The array performs successfully for a workload of small, random I/O operations, achieving 275 I/Os per second on 14 disks before the Sun4/280 host becomes CPU-limited. The prototype is less successful in delivering high throughput for large, sequential operations. Memory system contention on the Sun4/280 host limits throughput to 2.3 MBytes/sec under the Sprite Operating System. Throughput is also limited by the bandwidth supported by the VME backplane, disk controller and disks, and overheads associated with the SCSI protocol. We conclude that merely using a powerful host CPU and many disks will not provide the full bandwidth possible from disk arrays. Host memory bandwidth and throughput of disk controllers are equally important. In addition, operating systems should avoid unnecessary copy and cache flush operations that can saturate the host memory system.

  13. Z-1 Prototype Space Suit Testing Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Space Suit team of the NASA-Johnson Space Center performed a series of test with the Z-1 prototype space suit in 2012. This paper discusses, at a summary level, the tests performed and results from those tests. The purpose of the tests were two-fold: 1) characterize the suit performance so that the data could be used in the downselection of components for the Z-2 Space Suit and 2) develop interfaces with the suitport and exploration vehicles through pressurized suit evaluations. Tests performed included isolated and functional range of motion data capture, Z-1 waist and hip testing, joint torque testing, CO2 washout testing, fit checks and subject familiarizations, an exploration vehicle aft deck and suitport controls interface evaluation, delta pressure suitport tests including pressurized suit don and doff, and gross mobility and suitport ingress and egress demonstrations in reduced gravity. Lessons learned specific to the Z-1 prototype and to suit testing techniques will be presented.

  14. Single-channel prototype terahertz endoscopic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil; Giles, Robert

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the design and development of an innovative single-channel terahertz (THz) prototype endoscopic imaging system based on flexible metal-coated THz waveguides and a polarization specific detection technique. The continuous-wave (CW) THz imaging system utilizes a single channel to transmit and collect the reflected intrinsic THz signal from the sample. Since the prototype system relies on a flexible waveguide assembly that is small enough in diameter, it can be readily integrated with a conventional optical endoscope. This study aims to show the feasibility of waveguide enabled THz imaging. We image various objects in transmission and reflection modes. We also image normal and cancerous colonic tissues in reflectance mode using a polarization specific imaging technique. The resulting cross-polarized THz reflectance images showed contrast between normal and cancerous colonic tissues at 584 GHz. The level of contrast observed using endoscopic imaging correlates well with contrast levels observed in ex vivo THz reflectance studies of colon cancer. This indicates that the single-channel flexible waveguide-based THz endoscope presented here represents a significant step forward in clinical endoscopic application of THz technology to aid in in vivo cancer screening.

  15. Visual tracking via robust multitask sparse prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huanlong; Hu, Shiqiang; Yu, Junyang

    2015-03-01

    Sparse representation has been applied to an online subspace learning-based tracking problem. To handle partial occlusion effectively, some researchers introduce l1 regularization to principal component analysis (PCA) reconstruction. However, in these traditional tracking methods, the representation of each object observation is often viewed as an individual task so the inter-relationship between PCA basis vectors is ignored. We propose a new online visual tracking algorithm with multitask sparse prototypes, which combines multitask sparse learning with PCA-based subspace representation. We first extend a visual tracking algorithm with sparse prototypes in multitask learning framework to mine inter-relations between subtasks. Then, to avoid the problem that enforcing all subtasks to share the same structure may result in degraded tracking results, we impose group sparse constraints on the coefficients of PCA basis vectors and element-wise sparse constraints on the error coefficients, respectively. Finally, we show that the proposed optimization problem can be effectively solved using the accelerated proximal gradient method with the fast convergence. Experimental results compared with the state-of-the-art tracking methods demonstrate that the proposed algorithm achieves favorable performance when the object undergoes partial occlusion, motion blur, and illumination changes.

  16. YAP multi-crystal gamma camera prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, K.; Maly, P.; Notaristefani, F. de |; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Pergola, A.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    1995-10-01

    The Anger camera principle has shown a practical limit of a few millimeters spatial resolution. To overcome this limit, a new gamma camera prototype has been developed, based on a position-sensitive photomultiplier tue (PSPMT) coupled with a new scintillation crystal. The Hamamatsu R2486 PSPMT is a 76-mm diameter photomultiplier tube in which the electrons produced in the conventional bi-alkali photocathode are multiplied by proximity mesh dynodes and form a charge cloud around the original coordinates of the light photon striking the photocathode. A crossed wire anode array collects the charge and detects the original position. The intrinsic spatial resolution of PSPMT is better than 0.3 mm. The scintillation crystal consists of yttrium aluminum perovskit (YAP:Ce or YAlO{sub 3}:Ce). This crystal has a light efficient of about 38% relative to NaI, no hygroscopicity and a good gamma radiation absorption. To match the characteristics of the PSPMT, a special crystal assembly was produced by the Preciosa Company, consisting of a bundle of YAP:Ce pillars where single crystals have 0.6 {times} 0.6 mm{sup 2} cross section and 3 mm to 18 mm length. Preliminary results from such gamma camera prototypes show spatial resolution values ranging between 0.7 mm and 1 mm with an intrinsic detection efficiency of 37 {divided_by} 65% for 140 keV gamma energy.

  17. Experimental prototype of an electric elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiceanu, M.; Epure, S.; Ciuta, S.

    2016-08-01

    The main objective is to achieve an elevator prototype powered by a three-phase voltage system via a bidirectional static power converter ac-ac with regenerating capability. In order to diminish the power size of the electric motor up to 1/3 of rated power, the elevator contains two carriages of the same weight, one serving as the payload, and the other as counterweight. Before proper operation of the static power converter, the capacitor must be charged at rated voltage via a precharge circuit. At the moment of stabilizing the DC voltage at nominal value, the AC-AC power converter can operates in the proper limits. The functions of the control structure are: the load control task, speed and torque controls. System includes transducers for current measuring, voltage sensors and encoder. As reserve power sources the hybrid battery-photovoltaic panels are used. The control voltage is modulated by implementing four types of pulse width modulations: sinusoidal, with reduced commutation, third order harmonic insertion, and the space vector modulation. Therefore, the prototype could operates with an increased efficiency, in spite of the existing ones. The experimental results confirm the well design of the chosen solution. The control solution assures bidirectional power flow control, precharge control, and load control and it is implemented on a digital signal processor. The elevator capacity is between 300-450 kg, and it is driven by using a 1.5 kW three-phase asynchronous machine.

  18. Space-based Operations Grid Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Welch, Clara L.

    2003-01-01

    The Space based Operations Grid is intended to integrate the "high end" network services and compute resources that a remote payload investigator needs. This includes integrating and enhancing existing services such as access to telemetry, payload commanding, payload planning and internet voice distribution as well as the addition of services such as video conferencing, collaborative design, modeling or visualization, text messaging, application sharing, and access to existing compute or data grids. Grid technology addresses some of the greatest challenges and opportunities presented by the current trends in technology, i.e. how to take advantage of ever increasing bandwidth, how to manage virtual organizations and how to deal with the increasing threats to information technology security. We will discuss the pros and cons of using grid technology in space-based operations and share current plans for the prototype. It is hoped that early on the prototype can incorporate many of the existing as well as future services that are discussed in the first paragraph above to cooperating International Space Station Principle Investigators both nationally and internationally.

  19. Space-based Science Operations Grid Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Welch, Clara L.; Redman, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    Grid technology is the up and coming technology that is enabling widely disparate services to be offered to users that is very economical, easy to use and not available on a wide basis. Under the Grid concept disparate organizations generally defined as "virtual organizations" can share services i.e. sharing discipline specific computer applications, required to accomplish the specific scientific and engineering organizational goals and objectives. Grids are emerging as the new technology of the future. Grid technology has been enabled by the evolution of increasingly high speed networking. Without the evolution of high speed networking Grid technology would not have emerged. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Flight Projects Directorate, Ground Systems Department is developing a Space-based Science Operations Grid prototype to provide to scientists and engineers the tools necessary to operate space-based science payloads/experiments and for scientists to conduct public and educational outreach. In addition Grid technology can provide new services not currently available to users. These services include mission voice and video, application sharing, telemetry management and display, payload and experiment commanding, data mining, high order data processing, discipline specific application sharing and data storage, all from a single grid portal. The Prototype will provide most of these services in a first step demonstration of integrated Grid and space-based science operations technologies. It will initially be based on the International Space Station science operational services located at the Payload Operations Integration Center at MSFC, but can be applied to many NASA projects including free flying satellites and future projects. The Prototype will use the Internet2 Abilene Research and Education Network that is currently a 10 Gb backbone network to reach the University of Alabama at Huntsville and several other, as yet unidentified, Space Station based

  20. Preliminary Studies on a Small-Scale Single-Tube Pulse Detonation Rocket Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Fan, Wei; Yan, Yu; Jin, Le

    2013-06-01

    As a new concept propulsion system, the pulse detonation engine has received extensive concerns from all over the world in the past few years. With oxidizer on board, it operates as a rocket engine which is known as pulse detonation rocket engine. In this study, a rocket model powered by a single-tube pulse detonation rocket engine was fabricated to demonstrate and validate whether or not it could operate stably and reliably independently. The single-tube pulse detonation rocket prototype consisted of a wireless control unit, three tanks for oxidizer, fuel and purge gas, various valves and a detonation tube. With compact design, the pulse detonation rocket prototype had an outer diameter of 260 mm and a length of 2200 mm. Oxygen, liquid aviation kerosene and nitrogen were utilized as oxidizer, fuel and purge gas, respectively. Operation tests were carried out to obtain proper operating conditions for the pulse detonation rocket prototype first, and then sliding test was conducted. It was concluded that the pulse detonation rocket prototype could operate stably and reliably. The generated thrust was estimated and compared with theoretical value.

  1. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The introduction of advanced technology in existing nuclear power plants may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. In addition, the incorporation of advanced technology in the existing LWR fleet may entice the future workforce, who will be familiar with advanced technology, to work for these utilities rather than more newly built nuclear power plants. Advantages are being sought by developing and deploying technologies that will increase safety and efficiency. One significant opportunity for existing plants to increase efficiency is to phase out the paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used at most nuclear power plants and replace them, where feasible, with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information

  2. Saliva Microbiota Carry Caries-Specific Functional Gene Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xingzhi; Yuan, Xiao; Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Tong; Deng, Ye; Hemme, Christopher L.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Cui, Xinping; He, Zhili; Chen, Zhenggang; Guo, Dawei; Yu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Yue; Zhou, Jizhong; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva microbiota is phylogenetically divergent among host individuals yet their roles in health and disease are poorly appreciated. We employed a microbial functional gene microarray, HuMiChip 1.0, to reconstruct the global functional profiles of human saliva microbiota from ten healthy and ten caries-active adults. Saliva microbiota in the pilot population featured a vast diversity of functional genes. No significant distinction in gene number or diversity indices was observed between healthy and caries-active microbiota. However, co-presence network analysis of functional genes revealed that caries-active microbiota was more divergent in non-core genes than healthy microbiota, despite both groups exhibited a similar degree of conservation at their respective core genes. Furthermore, functional gene structure of saliva microbiota could potentially distinguish caries-active patients from healthy hosts. Microbial functions such as Diaminopimelate epimerase, Prephenate dehydrogenase, Pyruvate-formate lyase and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase were significantly linked to caries. Therefore, saliva microbiota carried disease-associated functional signatures, which could be potentially exploited for caries diagnosis. PMID:24533043

  3. Operational Prototype Development of a Global Aircraft Radiation Exposure Nowcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher; Kress, Brian; Wiltberger, Michael; Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, Dave

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles (SEP) are the primary sources of human exposure to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in the atmosphere. High-LET radiation is effective at directly breaking DNA strands in biological tissue, or producing chemically active radicals in tissue that alter the cell function, both of which can lead to cancer or other adverse health effects. A prototype operational nowcast model of air-crew radiation exposure is currently under development and funded by NASA. The model predicts air-crew radiation exposure levels from both GCR and SEP that may accompany solar storms. The new air-crew radiation exposure model is called the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model. NAIRAS will provide global, data-driven, real-time exposure predictions of biologically harmful radiation at aviation altitudes. Observations are utilized from the ground (neutron monitors), from the atmosphere (the NCEP Global Forecast System), and from space (NASA/ACE and NOAA/GOES). Atmospheric observations characterize the overhead mass shielding and the ground-and space-based observations provide boundary conditions on the incident GCR and SEP particle flux distributions for transport and dosimetry calculations. Radiation exposure rates are calculated using the NASA physics-based HZETRN (High Charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport) code. An overview of the NAIRAS model is given: the concept, design, prototype implementation status, data access, and example results. Issues encountered thus far and known and/or anticipated hurdles to research to operations transition are also discussed.

  4. Kinetics of bipedal locomotion during load carrying in capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jandy B; Schmitt, Daniel; Wright, Kristin; Eshchar, Yonat; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Fragaszy, Dorothy

    2015-08-01

    Facultative bipedalism during load transport in nonhuman primates has been argued to be an important behavior potentially leading to the evolution of obligate, extended limb bipedalism. Understanding the biomechanics of such behavior may lead to insights about associated morphology, which may translate to interpretation of features in the fossil record. Some populations of bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) spontaneously carry heavy loads bipedally during foraging activities. This study provides the first data on all three components of ground reaction force for spontaneous bipedalism during load carriage in a nonhuman primate. Five individual S. libidinosus (mean body mass = 2.4 kg ± 0.96) were videorecorded during bipedalism while carrying a stone (0.93 kg) under natural conditions. A force plate was embedded in the path of the monkeys. Spatiotemporal and force data for all three components of the ground reaction force were recorded for 28 steps. Capuchins exhibited a mean vertical peak force per total weight (Vpk) for the hindlimb of 1.19 (sd = 0.13), consistent with those of unloaded capuchins in the laboratory and for other bipedal primates, including humans. Vertical force records suggest that capuchins, along with most nonhuman primates, maintain a relatively compliant leg during both unloaded and loaded locomotion. Like all other primates, loaded capuchins maintained laterally (outward) directed medio-lateral forces, presumably to stabilize side-to-side movements of the center of mass. Medio-lateral forces suggest that at near-running speeds dynamic stability diminishes the need to generate high lateral forces. Vertical force traces exhibited a measurable impact spike at foot contact in 85% of the steps recorded. An impact spike is common in human walking and running but has not been reported in other bipedal primates. This spike in humans is thought to lead to bone and cartilage damage. The earliest biped may have experienced similar

  5. Data management system architecture for multiparameter scientific data: A prototype for seafloor observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumaz, Fawzi; Vinci, Stefano; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    During the last ten years, with the extension of local and regional geophysical monitoring networks and the development of new scientific projects, INGV has experienced a significant growing of its data patrimony in terms of quantity and variety. Financial and human resources have been invested in order to make the data reachable and obtainable via queries. The first step included the creation of a data repository as a unique access point where to upload and store the data according to a predefined format. The scientist collecting measurements have been then requested to respect a strict organization and conversion of their datasets that usually come from different instruments and experiments. In a farther step the repository has been transformed into an advanced structure such as a Relational DataBase Management System (RDBMS) providing logical links among datasets originally independent. The first prototype of the overall management system, has been developed around Italian volcanological time series respecting all the described organisational steps. The prototype allows for the first time, the simultaneous visualisation and cross-check of various time series for Italian volcanoes in a given interval. The system is a full-web architecture and can be joined using a web browser only, independently from any operating system. A user-friendly interface has been designed for the data upload, query and graphic outputs. As the prototype system was conceived to manage a large variety of geophysical time-series, it soon appeared easily adaptable to the marine data management and a useful tool to investigate possible relations among Earth processes occurring at the Benthic Boundary Layer and along the water column. Accordingly, a new version of the data management prototype is now under development around the time-series acquired during the experiments with GEOSTAR-class observatories. A description of the prototype system will be presented and a demonstration of the

  6. Prototyping of cerebral vasculature physical models

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imad S.; Kelly, Patrick D.; Singer, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prototyping of cerebral vasculature models through stereolithographic methods have the ability to accurately depict the 3D structures of complicated aneurysms with high accuracy. We describe the method to manufacture such a model and review some of its uses in the context of treatment planning, research, and surgical training. Methods: We prospectively used the data from the rotational angiography of a 40-year-old female who presented with an unruptured right paraclinoid aneurysm. The 3D virtual model was then converted to a physical life-sized model. Results: The model constructed was shown to be a very accurate depiction of the aneurysm and its associated vasculature. It was found to be useful, among other things, for surgical training and as a patient education tool. Conclusion: With improving and more widespread printing options, these models have the potential to become an important part of research and training modalities. PMID:24678427

  7. EOS distributed planning and scheduling prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Larry G.; Peters, Stephen F.; Davis, Randy

    1993-01-01

    Some of the more significant lessons learned during the development of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Distributed Planning and Scheduling Prototype are presented. The need for a central scheduler is not demonstrated. A mapping of scheduling and conflict-resolution responsibility across the nodes of the EOS distributed scheduling system is developed and shown to be both feasible and appropriate. Complex instrument scheduling is mostly accomplished at the ICC/IST (instrument control center/instrumental support terminal) with 'slidable' flexibility for slews and some kinds of calibrations resolved at the EOS Operations Center (EOC). All nodes have full visibility interinstrument contention for resource and environmental rights, e.g., vibration, thermal, and electromagnetic. The EOC assigns, by activity, initial action responsibility for conflict resolution to a node which is party to the conflict. Most interinstrument conflicts are resolved by the ICCs and ISTs during an intermediate scheduling phase while the EOC is negotiating a TDRS schedule with the NCC.

  8. The SSC full cell prototype string test

    SciTech Connect

    Kraushaar, P.; Burgett, W.; Cromer, L.

    1994-11-01

    At the conclusion of the SSC half cell magnet string testing program. In February, 1993, the preliminary data analysis revealed that several substantive technical questions remained unresolved. These questions were: (1) could the high voltages to ground (>2 kV) measured during fault (quench) conditions be substantially reduced, (2) could the number of magnetic elements that became resistive (quenched) be controlled and (3) did the cryostats of the magnetic elements provide adequate insulation and isolation to meet designed refrigeration loads. To address these and other existing question a prototypical full cell of collider magnets (ten dipoles and two quadrupoles) was assembled and tested. At the conclusion of this testing there were definitive answers to most of the questions with numerical substantiation, the notable exception being the beat leak question. These answers and other results and issues are presented in this paper.

  9. SuperB Muon Detector Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    The test objective is to optimize the muon identification in an experiment at a Super B Factory. To accomplish this, experimenters will study the muon identification capability of a detector with different iron configurations at different beam energies. The detector is a full scale prototype, composed of a stack of iron tiles. The segmentation of the iron allows the study of different configurations. Between the tiles, one or two extruded scintillator slabs can be inserted to test two different readout options; a Binary Readout and a Time Readout. In the Binary Readout option the two coordinates are given by the two orthogonal scintillator bars, and the spatial resolution is driven by the bar width. In the Time Readout option one coordinate is determined by the scintillator position and the other by the arrival time of the signal read with a TDC.

  10. Prototype Conflict Alerting Logic for Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Lee C.; Kuchar, James K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a prototype alerting system for a conceptual Free Flight environment. The concept assumes that datalink between aircraft is available and that conflicts are primarily resolved on the flight deck. Four alert stages are generated depending on the likelihood of a conflict. If the conflict is not resolved by the flight crews, Air Traffic Control is notified to take over separation authority. The alerting logic is based on probabilistic analysis through modeling of aircraft sensor and trajectory uncertainties. Monte Carlo simulations were used over a range of encounter situations to determine conflict probability. The four alert stages were then defined based on probability of conflict and on the number of avoidance maneuvers available to the flight crew. Preliminary results from numerical evaluations and from a piloted simulator study at NASA Ames Research Center are summarized.

  11. Influence of prototypes on perceptions of prejudice.

    PubMed

    Inman, M L; Baron, R S

    1996-04-01

    Two studies examined the influence of cultural stereotypes and personal factors (one's race, gender) on perceptions of racial and gender discrimination. Overall, the data suggest that our perceptions of prejudice are strongly influenced by specific expectations regarding who are the prototypic perpetrators and victims of prejudice. More general expectations regarding out-group conflict or regarding only the characteristics of the perpetrator appear to have less of an impact on such perceptions. Additionally, women were found to be more likely than men to perceive sexism directed against men and racism directed at African Americans and Caucasians. Also, African Americans were more likely than Caucasians to perceive racist events against Whites and Blacks. The implications of these data are discussed.

  12. Stochastic bifurcations in a prototypical thermoacoustic system.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, E A; Tony, J; Sreelekha, E; Sujith, R I

    2016-08-01

    We study the influence of noise in a prototypical thermoacoustic system, which represents a nonlinear self-excited bistable oscillator. We analyze the time series of unsteady pressure obtained from a horizontal Rijke tube and a mathematical model to identify the effect of noise. We report the occurrence of stochastic bifurcations in a thermoacoustic system by tracking the changes in the stationary amplitude distribution. We observe a complete suppression of a bistable zone in the presence of high intensity noise. We find that the complete suppression of the bistable zone corresponds to the nonexistence of phenomenological (P) bifurcations. This is a study in thermoacoustics to identify the parameter regimes pertinent to P bifurcation using the stationary amplitude distribution obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation.

  13. A prototype backside purge control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Timothy B.

    1992-01-01

    New light-weight aluminum-lithium alloys are considered for propellant tank and aerospace structural applications. These alloys require more precise control of the welding atmosphere. Atmospheric oxygen contamination must be eliminated by flooding both the front and back sides of the weldment with an inert gas. This gas must be maintained at a desired pressure and flow rate that does not effect the stability of the weld process. The objective of the prototype backside purge control system being developed by Nichols Research Corporation (NRC) is to monitor and regulate the backside purge process and to develop a purge chamber design that enhances process controllability. This project will be conducted in two phases. The objective of Phase 1 is to develop a purge technique concept based on an investigation into the backside purge process. Phase 2 is to evaluate the backside purge concept developed in Phase 1.

  14. MATLAB tensor classes for fast algorithm prototyping.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, Brett William; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2004-10-01

    Tensors (also known as mutidimensional arrays or N-way arrays) are used in a variety of applications ranging from chemometrics to psychometrics. We describe four MATLAB classes for tensor manipulations that can be used for fast algorithm prototyping. The tensor class extends the functionality of MATLAB's multidimensional arrays by supporting additional operations such as tensor multiplication. The tensor as matrix class supports the 'matricization' of a tensor, i.e., the conversion of a tensor to a matrix (and vice versa), a commonly used operation in many algorithms. Two additional classes represent tensors stored in decomposed formats: cp tensor and tucker tensor. We descibe all of these classes and then demonstrate their use by showing how to implement several tensor algorithms that have appeared in the literature.

  15. Stochastic bifurcations in a prototypical thermoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, E. A.; Tony, J.; Sreelekha, E.; Sujith, R. I.

    2016-08-01

    We study the influence of noise in a prototypical thermoacoustic system, which represents a nonlinear self-excited bistable oscillator. We analyze the time series of unsteady pressure obtained from a horizontal Rijke tube and a mathematical model to identify the effect of noise. We report the occurrence of stochastic bifurcations in a thermoacoustic system by tracking the changes in the stationary amplitude distribution. We observe a complete suppression of a bistable zone in the presence of high intensity noise. We find that the complete suppression of the bistable zone corresponds to the nonexistence of phenomenological (P) bifurcations. This is a study in thermoacoustics to identify the parameter regimes pertinent to P bifurcation using the stationary amplitude distribution obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation.

  16. Test of Two NB Superstructure Prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.

    2004-04-16

    An alternative layout of the TESLA linear collider [1], based on weakly coupled multi-cell superconducting structures (superstructures), significantly reduces investment cost due to a simplification in the RF system of the main accelerator. In January 1999, preparation of the beam test of the superstructure began in order to prove the feasibility of this layout. Progress in the preparation was reported frequently in Proceedings of TESLA Collaboration Meetings. Last year, two superstructures were installed in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac at DESY to experimentally verify: methods to balance the accelerating gradient in a weakly coupled system, the stability of the energy gain for the entire train of bunches in macro-pulses and the damping of Higher Order Modes (HOMs). We present results of the first cold and beam test of these two Nb prototypes.

  17. A neural network prototyping package within IRAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazell, D.; Bankman, I.

    1992-01-01

    We outline our plans for incorporating a Neural Network Prototyping Package into the IRAF environment. The package we are developing will allow the user to choose between different types of networks and to specify the details of the particular architecture chosen. Neural networks consist of a highly interconnected set of simple processing units. The strengths of the connections between units are determined by weights which are adaptively set as the network 'learns'. In some cases, learning can be a separate phase of the user cycle of the network while in other cases the network learns continuously. Neural networks have been found to be very useful in pattern recognition and image processing applications. They can form very general 'decision boundaries' to differentiate between objects in pattern space and they can be used for associative recall of patterns based on partial cures and for adaptive filtering. We discuss the different architectures we plan to use and give examples of what they can do.

  18. Commissioning subsystems of the 10 meter prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prins, Nathan; Fricke, Tobin; Mow-Lowry, Conor; Hanke, Manuela

    2015-04-01

    The best attempts at detecting the elusive gravitational waves are with L-shaped interferometers. Over the summer of 2014, I helped install subsystems of the 10 meter prototype, a gravitational wave interferometer designed to reach the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL), at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Hannover, Germany through the University of Florida's International REU. While there, the frequency reference cavity was aligned and the mode matching the cavity began. We also worked on installing and testing the intensity stabilization servo, which consisted of an out-of-vacuum photodiode for each the in-loop and out-of-loop sensing that were being connected to the LIGO Control and Data System.

  19. Prototype color field sequential television lens assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and evaluation of a prototype modular lens assembly with a self-contained field sequential color wheel is presented. The design of a color wheel of maximum efficiency, the selection of spectral filters, and the design of a quiet, efficient wheel drive system are included. Design tradeoffs considered for each aspect of the modular assembly are discussed. Emphasis is placed on achieving a design which can be attached directly to an unmodified camera, thus permitting use of the assembly in evaluating various candidate camera and sensor designs. A technique is described which permits maintaining high optical efficiency with an unmodified camera. A motor synchronization system is developed which requires only the vertical synchronization signal as a reference frequency input. Equations and tradeoff curves are developed to permit optimizing the filter wheel aperture shapes for a variety of different design conditions.

  20. Prototype rf cavity for the HISTRAP accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mosko, S.W.; Dowling, D.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    HISTRAP, a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring designed to both accelerate and decelerate very highly charged very heavy ions for atomic physics research, requires an rf accelerating system to provide /+-/2.5 kV of peak accelerating voltage per turn while tuning through a 13.5:1 frequency range in a fraction of a second. A prototype half-wave, single gap rf cavity with biased ferrite tuning was built and tested over a continuous tuning range of 200 kHz through 2.7 MHz. Initial test results establish the feasibility of using ferrite tuning at the required rf power levels. The resonant system is located entirely outside of the accelerator's 15cm ID beam line vacuum enclosure except for a single rf window which serves as an accelerating gap. Physical separation of the cavity and the beam line permits in situ vacuum baking of the beam line at 300/degree/C.