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Sample records for carrying mobilizable transgenes

  1. Characterization of a Bacteroides Mobilizable Transposon, NBU2, Which Carries a Functional Lincomycin Resistance Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Shoemaker, Nadja B.; Wang, Gui-Rong; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2000-01-01

    The mobilizable Bacteroides element NBU2 (11 kbp) was found originally in two Bacteroides clinical isolates, Bacteroides fragilis ERL and B. thetaiotaomicron DOT. At first, NBU2 appeared to be very similar to another mobilizable Bacteroides element, NBU1, in a 2.5-kbp internal region, but further examination of the full DNA sequence of NBU2 now reveals that the region of near identity between NBU1 and NBU2 is limited to this small region and that, outside this region, there is little sequence similarity between the two elements. The integrase gene of NBU2, intN2, was located at one end of the element. This gene was necessary and sufficient for the integration of NBU2. The integrase of NBU2 has the conserved amino acids (R-H-R-Y) in the C-terminal end that are found in members of the lambda family of site-specific integrases. This was also the only region in which the NBU1 and NBU2 integrases shared any similarity (28% amino acid sequence identity and 49% sequence similarity). Integration of NBU2 was site specific in Bacteroides species. Integration occurred in two primary sites in B. thetaiotaomicron. Both of these sites were located in the 3′ end of a serine-tRNA gene NBU2 also integrated in Escherichia coli, but integration was much less site specific than in B. thetaiotaomicron. Analysis of the sequence of NBU2 revealed two potential antibiotic resistance genes. The amino acid sequences of the putative proteins encoded by these genes had similarity to resistances found in gram-positive bacteria. Only one of these genes was expressed in B. thetaiotaomicron, the homolog of linA, a lincomycin resistance gene from Staphylococcus aureus. To determine how widespread elements related to NBU1 and NBU2 are in Bacteroides species, we screened 291 Bacteroides strains. Elements with some sequence similarity to NBU2 and NBU1 were widespread in Bacteroides strains, and the presence of linAN in Bacteroides strains was highly correlated with the presence of NBU2, suggesting

  2. Transgenic pig carrying green fluorescent proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Miles, Edward L; O'Gorman, Chad; Zhao, Jianguo; Samuel, Melissa; Walters, Eric; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Miriam; Prather, Randall S; Wells, Kevin D; Sutovsky, Peter

    2013-04-16

    Among its many functions, the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates substrate-specific proteolysis during the cell cycle, apoptosis, and fertilization and in pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and liver cirrhosis. Proteasomes are present in human and boar spermatozoa, but little is known about the interactions of proteasomal subunits with other sperm proteins or structures. We have created a transgenic boar with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged 20S proteasomal core subunit α-type 1 (PSMA1-GFP), hypothesizing that the PSMA1-GFP fusion protein will be incorporated into functional sperm proteasomes. Using direct epifluorescence imaging and indirect immunofluorescence detection, we have confirmed the presence of PSMA1-GFP in the sperm acrosome. Western blotting revealed a protein band corresponding to the predicted mass of PSMA1-GFP fusion protein (57 kDa) in transgenic spermatozoa. Transgenic boar fertility was confirmed by in vitro fertilization, resulting in transgenic blastocysts, and by mating, resulting in healthy transgenic offspring. Immunoprecipitation and proteomic analysis revealed that PSMA1-GFP copurifies with several acrosomal membrane-associated proteins (e.g., lactadherin/milk fat globule E8 and spermadhesin alanine-tryptophan-asparagine). The interaction of MFGE8 with PSMA1-GFP was confirmed through cross-immunoprecipitation. The identified proteasome-interacting proteins may regulate sperm proteasomal activity during fertilization or may be the substrates of proteasomal proteolysis during fertilization. Proteomic analysis also confirmed the interaction/coimmunoprecipitation of PSMA1-GFP with 13/14 proteasomal core subunits. These results demonstrate that the PSMA1-GFP was incorporated in the assembled sperm proteasomes. This mammal carrying green fluorescent proteasomes will be useful for studies of fertilization and wherever the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a role in cellular function or pathology.

  3. Transgenic pig carrying green fluorescent proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Edward L.; O’Gorman, Chad; Zhao, Jianguo; Samuel, Melissa; Walters, Eric; Yi, Young-Joo; Prather, Randall S.; Wells, Kevin D.; Sutovsky, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Among its many functions, the ubiquitin–proteasome system regulates substrate-specific proteolysis during the cell cycle, apoptosis, and fertilization and in pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and liver cirrhosis. Proteasomes are present in human and boar spermatozoa, but little is known about the interactions of proteasomal subunits with other sperm proteins or structures. We have created a transgenic boar with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged 20S proteasomal core subunit α-type 1 (PSMA1-GFP), hypothesizing that the PSMA1-GFP fusion protein will be incorporated into functional sperm proteasomes. Using direct epifluorescence imaging and indirect immunofluorescence detection, we have confirmed the presence of PSMA1-GFP in the sperm acrosome. Western blotting revealed a protein band corresponding to the predicted mass of PSMA1-GFP fusion protein (57 kDa) in transgenic spermatozoa. Transgenic boar fertility was confirmed by in vitro fertilization, resulting in transgenic blastocysts, and by mating, resulting in healthy transgenic offspring. Immunoprecipitation and proteomic analysis revealed that PSMA1-GFP copurifies with several acrosomal membrane-associated proteins (e.g., lactadherin/milk fat globule E8 and spermadhesin alanine-tryptophan-asparagine). The interaction of MFGE8 with PSMA1-GFP was confirmed through cross-immunoprecipitation. The identified proteasome-interacting proteins may regulate sperm proteasomal activity during fertilization or may be the substrates of proteasomal proteolysis during fertilization. Proteomic analysis also confirmed the interaction/coimmunoprecipitation of PSMA1-GFP with 13/14 proteasomal core subunits. These results demonstrate that the PSMA1-GFP was incorporated in the assembled sperm proteasomes. This mammal carrying green fluorescent proteasomes will be useful for studies of fertilization and wherever the ubiquitin–proteasome system plays a role in cellular function or pathology. PMID:23550158

  4. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Werbowy, Olesia; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively). The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2) nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake. PMID:26848973

  5. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Wolf, Sonya J; Samulski, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV's high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package "large" genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161-169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568-8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002). This method involves "splitting" the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124-130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15(4):750-755, 2007). The other major

  6. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Wolf, Sonya J.; Samulski, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber’s congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV’s high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package “large” genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161–169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568–8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002). This method involves “splitting” the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124–130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15

  7. Neuropathological changes in transgenic mice carrying copies of a transcriptionally activated Mos protooncogene.

    PubMed

    Propst, F; Rosenberg, M P; Cork, L C; Kovatch, R M; Rauch, S; Westphal, H; Khillan, J; Schulz, N T; Vande Woude, G F; Neumann, P E; Newmann, P E

    1990-12-01

    Independent transgenic mouse lines carrying the mouse Mos protooncogene linked to a retroviral transcriptional control sequence display behavioral abnormalities including circling, head tilting, and head bobbing. This dominant phenotype shows various degrees of penetrance in different transgenic founder animals and lines. Neuronal and axonal degeneration, gliosis, and inflammatory infiltrates are found in all transgenic mouse lines in which behavioral traits are present. Recordings of auditory-evoked potentials in mice of one of these lines demonstrate that transgenic mice are deaf; in these mice spiral ganglia degenerate and most of the cochlear hair cells are absent. By using an S1 nuclease protection assay, we have detected RNA expression of the transgene in all tissues examined and, in particular, at high levels in brain. In situ hybridization experiments show that Mos expression can be detected in specific areas of the central nervous system. Lesions are present in areas with demonstrable overexpression of Mos.

  8. Amount of mobilizable stem cells in perturbed hemopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gidali, J.; Feher, I.

    1985-05-01

    The level of mobilizable 9-day colony-forming units (CFU-s), which represents a constant fraction of the normal mouse bone marrow CFU-s pool, was assayed in BDF1 mice with perturbed hemopoiesis (i.e., during increased turnover of CFU-s or increased CFU-s traffic after irradiation). After low-level irradiation, regeneration of the mobilizable CFU-s fraction was significantly slower than that of bone marrow CFU-s. Depletion of the mobilizable CFU-s pool was observed if a permanently increased outflow of CFU-s from the bone marrow was induced by endotoxin injection. After 40% withdrawal of the blood volume, the mobilizable CFU-s pool expanded marginally. Assuming that the level of mobilizable CFU-s is a consequence of production and outflow from the bone marrow compartment, changes in the pool size of mobilizable CFU-s may be a sensitive indicator of balanced or unbalanced hemopoiesis.

  9. Establishment of transgenic mice carrying gene encoding human zinc finger protein 191

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xia; Yang, Hua; Wang, Shui-Liang; Gong, Xue-Lian; Feng, Hao; Guo, Bao-Yu; Yu, Long; Wang, Zhu-Gang; Fu, Ji-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Human zinc finger protein 191 (ZNF191) was cloned and characterized as a Krüppel-like transcription factor, which might be relevant to many diseases such as liver cancer, neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. Although progress has been made recently, the biological function of ZNF191 remains largely unidentified. The aim of this study was to establish a ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model, which would promote the functional study of ZNF191. METHODS: Transgene fragments were microinjected into fertilized eggs of mice. The manipulated embryos were transferred into the oviducts of pseudo-pregnant female mice. The offsprings were identified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. ZNF 191 gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. Transgenic founder mice were used to establish transgenic mouse lineages. The first generation (F1) and the second generation (F2) mice were identified by PCR analysis. Ten-week transgenic mice were used for pathological examination. RESULTS: Four mice were identified as carrying copies of ZNF191 gene. The results of RT-PCR showed that ZNF 191 gene was expressed in the liver, testis and brain in one of the transgenic mouse lineages. Genetic analysis of transgenic mice demonstrated that ZNF 191 gene was integrated into the chromosome at a single site and could be transmitted stably. Pathological analysis showed that the expression of ZNF 191 did not cause obvious pathological changes in multiple tissues of transgenic mice. CONCLUSION: ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model would facilitate the investigation of biological functions of ZNF191 in vivo. PMID:14716836

  10. Efficient expansion of human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene with lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Nanba, Daisuke; Matsushita, Natsuki; Toki, Fujio; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2013-10-18

    The development of an appropriate procedure for lentiviral gene transduction into keratinocyte stem cells is crucial for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine for genetic disorders of the skin. However, there is little information available on the efficiency of lentiviral transduction into human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells and the effects of gene transduction procedures on growth potential of the stem cells by systematic assessment. In this study, we explored the conditions for efficient expansion of human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene with a lentiviral vector, by using the culture of keratinocytes on a feeder layer of 3 T3 mouse fibroblasts. The gene transduction and expansion of keratinocytes carrying a transgene were analyzed by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and flow cytometry. Polybrene (hexadiamine bromide) markedly enhanced the efficiency of lentiviral gene transduction, but negatively affected the maintenance of the keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells at a concentration higher than 5 μg/ml. Rho-assiciated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632, a small molecule which enhanced keratinocyte proliferation, significantly interfered with the lentiviral transduction into cultured human keratinocytes. However, a suitable combination of polybrene and Y-27632 effectively expanded keratinocytes carrying a transgene. This study provides information for effective expansion of cultured human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene. This point is particularly significant for the application of genetically modified keratinocyte stem/progenitor stem cells in regenerative medicine.

  11. Efficient expansion of human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene with lentiviral vector

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The development of an appropriate procedure for lentiviral gene transduction into keratinocyte stem cells is crucial for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine for genetic disorders of the skin. However, there is little information available on the efficiency of lentiviral transduction into human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells and the effects of gene transduction procedures on growth potential of the stem cells by systematic assessment. Methods In this study, we explored the conditions for efficient expansion of human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene with a lentiviral vector, by using the culture of keratinocytes on a feeder layer of 3 T3 mouse fibroblasts. The gene transduction and expansion of keratinocytes carrying a transgene were analyzed by Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and flow cytometry. Results Polybrene (hexadiamine bromide) markedly enhanced the efficiency of lentiviral gene transduction, but negatively affected the maintenance of the keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells at a concentration higher than 5 μg/ml. Rho-assiciated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632, a small molecule which enhanced keratinocyte proliferation, significantly interfered with the lentiviral transduction into cultured human keratinocytes. However, a suitable combination of polybrene and Y-27632 effectively expanded keratinocytes carrying a transgene. Conclusions This study provides information for effective expansion of cultured human keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells carrying a transgene. This point is particularly significant for the application of genetically modified keratinocyte stem/progenitor stem cells in regenerative medicine. PMID:24406242

  12. Transgenic lettuce seedlings carrying hepatitis B virus antigen HBsAg.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Jackson; Hansen, Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    The obtainment of transgenic edible plants carrying recombinant antigens is a desired issue in search for economic alternatives viewing vaccine production. Here we report a strategy for genetic transformation of lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) using the surface antigen HBsAg of hepatitis B virus. Transgenic lettuce seedlings were obtained through the application of a regulated balance of plant growth regulators. Genetic transformation process was acquired by cocultivation of cotyledons with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring the recombinant plasmid. It is the first description of a lettuce Brazilian variety 'Vitória de Verão' genetically modified.

  13. A Mutation of the Prdm9 Mouse Hybrid Sterility Gene Carried by a Transgene.

    PubMed

    Mihola, O; Trachtulec, Z

    2017-01-01

    PRDM9 is a protein with histone-3-methyltransferase activity, which specifies the sites of meiotic recombination in mammals. Deficiency of the Prdm9 gene in the laboratory mouse results in complete arrest of the meiotic prophase of both sexes. Moreover, the combination of certain PRDM9 alleles from different mouse subspecies causes hybrid sterility, e.g., the male-specific meiotic arrest found in the (PWD/Ph × C57BL/6J)F1 animals. The fertility of all these mice can be rescued using a Prdm9-containing transgene. Here we characterized a transgene made from the clone RP24-346I22 that was expected to encompass the entire Prdm9 gene. Both (PWD/Ph × C57BL/6J)F1 intersubspecific hybrid males and Prdm9-deficient laboratory mice of both sexes carrying this transgene remained sterile, suggesting that Prdm9 inactivation occurred in the Tg(RP24-346I22) transgenics. Indeed, comparative qRT-PCR analysis of testicular RNAs from transgene-positive versus negative animals revealed similar expression levels of Prdm9 mRNAs from the exons encoding the C-terminal part of the protein but elevated expression from the regions coding for the N-terminus of PRDM9, indicating that the transgenic carries a new null Prdm9 allele. Two naturally occurring alternative Prdm9 mRNA isoforms were overexpressed in Tg(RP24-346I22), one formed via splicing to a 3'-terminal exon consisting of short interspersed element B2 and one isoform including an alternative internal exon of 28 base pairs. However, the overexpression of these alternative transcripts was apparently insufficient for Prdm9 function or for increasing the fertility of the hybrid males.

  14. Mobilizable RDF/d-RDF burning program

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, K.; Campbell, J.

    1982-03-01

    The Mobilizable RDF/d-RDF Burning Program was conceived to promote the utilization of refuse-derived fuels (RDF) as a supplement to existing fossil fuel sources in industrial-sized boilers. The program explores the design, development, and eventual construction of densified-RDF (d-RDF) for use in boiler combustion testing as a supplement to stoker coal or wood wastes. The equipment would be mounted on trailers and assembled and operated at preselected sites throughout the country where approximately 750 tons of RDF would be produced and test burned in a local boiler. The equipment, to include a transportable RDF boiler metering and feed system, would then be moved and operated at two to three test sites annually. The program is intended to encourage the construction of permanent resource recovery facilities by involving local waste handling groups in operating the equipment and producing fuel, and potential local fuel users in testing the fuel in their boilers. The Mobilizable Program was developed from two separate tasks. The first task developed the concept behind the program and defined its operational and organizational structure. The second task, a follow-up to the first, was intended principally to finalize test locations, develop equipment designs and specifications, and formalize a management program. This report summarizes the principal findings of both tasks. It identifies the criteria used to identify test locations, outlines the program's management structure, presents design and performance specifications for both the fuel production equipment and boiler fuel feed systems, and provides a detailed evaluation of the parameters involved in burning RDF in industrial-sized boilers. Final conclusions and recommendations identify problem areas encountered in the program, and discuss possible future directions for such a program.

  15. Generating a transgenic mouse line stably expressing human MHC surface antigen from a HAC carrying multiple genomic BACs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Ishikura, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Suzuki, Junpei; Nakayama, Manabu; Okamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Tuneko; Koseki, Haruhiko; Ohara, Osamu; Ikeno, Masashi; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector is a promising tool to improve the problematic suppression and position effects of transgene expression frequently seen in transgenic cells and animals produced by conventional plasmid or viral vectors. We generated transgenic mice maintaining a single HAC vector carrying two genomic bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from human HLA-DR loci (DRA and DRB1). Both transgenes on the HAC in transgenic mice exhibited tissue-specific expression in kidney, liver, lung, spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, and thymus cells in RT-PCR analysis. Stable functional expression of a cell surface HLA-DR marker from both transgenes, DRA and DRB1 on the HAC, was detected by flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes and maintained through at least eight filial generations. These results indicate that the de novo HAC system can allow us to manipulate multiple BAC transgenes with coordinated expression as a surface antigen through the generation of transgenic animals.

  16. Fitness of Transgenic Mosquito Aedes aegypti Males Carrying a Dominant Lethal Genetic System

    PubMed Central

    Massonnet-Bruneel, Blandine; Corre-Catelin, Nicole; Lacroix, Renaud; Lees, Rosemary S.; Hoang, Kim Phuc; Nimmo, Derric; Alphey, Luke; Reiter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    OX513A is a transgenic strain of Aedes aegypti engineered to carry a dominant, non-sex-specific, late-acting lethal genetic system that is repressed in the presence of tetracycline. It was designed for use in a sterile-insect (SIT) pest control system called RIDL® (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal gene) by which transgenic males are released in the field to mate with wild females; in the absence of tetracycline, the progeny from such matings will not survive. We investigated the mating fitness of OX513A in the laboratory. Male OX513A were as effective as Rockefeller (ROCK) males at inducing refractoriness to further mating in wild type females and there was no reduction in their ability to inseminate multiple females. They had a lower mating success but yielded more progeny than the wild-type comparator strain (ROCK) when one male of each strain was caged with a ROCK female. Mating success and fertility of groups of 10 males—with different ratios of RIDL to ROCK—competing for five ROCK females was similar, but the median longevity of RIDL males was somewhat (18%) lower. We conclude that the fitness under laboratory conditions of OX513A males carrying a tetracycline repressible lethal gene is comparable to that of males of the wild-type comparator strain. PMID:23690948

  17. Fitness of transgenic mosquito Aedes aegypti males carrying a dominant lethal genetic system.

    PubMed

    Massonnet-Bruneel, Blandine; Corre-Catelin, Nicole; Lacroix, Renaud; Lees, Rosemary S; Hoang, Kim Phuc; Nimmo, Derric; Alphey, Luke; Reiter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    OX513A is a transgenic strain of Aedes aegypti engineered to carry a dominant, non-sex-specific, late-acting lethal genetic system that is repressed in the presence of tetracycline. It was designed for use in a sterile-insect (SIT) pest control system called RIDL® (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal gene) by which transgenic males are released in the field to mate with wild females; in the absence of tetracycline, the progeny from such matings will not survive. We investigated the mating fitness of OX513A in the laboratory. Male OX513A were as effective as Rockefeller (ROCK) males at inducing refractoriness to further mating in wild type females and there was no reduction in their ability to inseminate multiple females. They had a lower mating success but yielded more progeny than the wild-type comparator strain (ROCK) when one male of each strain was caged with a ROCK female. Mating success and fertility of groups of 10 males-with different ratios of RIDL to ROCK-competing for five ROCK females was similar, but the median longevity of RIDL males was somewhat (18%) lower. We conclude that the fitness under laboratory conditions of OX513A males carrying a tetracycline repressible lethal gene is comparable to that of males of the wild-type comparator strain.

  18. [Molecular and pathological analyses of newly established transgenic rats carrying human endogenous retrovirus gene, ERV3].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S

    2000-03-01

    Endogeneous retroviruses are known to be integrated in eukaryotic genome as proviral DNA similarly to infectious retroviruses. They are present in many kinds of living things, but their functions, especially those in humans, are unclear. To investigate the function of human endogeneous retroviruses, we chose endogeneous retrovirus type 3 (ERV3) which is a single copy type of human endogeneous retrovirus with mRNA expression in organ tissues in vivo. The full provirus genome of ERV3 was subcloned as a transgene and two lines of transgenic rats carrying ERV3 gene (ERV3 rats) were established. One line of ERV3 rats, ETR5, showed tandem insertion of multiple copies of the transgene and expressed ERV3 mRNA in various organs. High levels of the mRNA expression were detected in both lacrimal and salivary glands. In placentas, where ERV3 is expected to express at high levels in humans, the mRNA expression was evident from 12 days gestation in ETR5 rats. Another line, ETR16, showed a single copy insertion and expressed ERV3 mRNAs only in the lacrimal and salivary glands. By Northern analysis, the expected size (3.5 kb) of ERV3 env transcription as was already shown in human tissues was confirmed in ETR16, but high expression of an additional large transcript (4.0 kb) was detected in ETR5. The result of RT-PCR analysis of the transcript in ETR5 indicated that the tandem insertion in ETR5 genome probably caused mis-promoting and mis-terminal poly(A) splicing in the 3'LTR, resulting in the extension of ERV3 env transcript to 4.0 kb mRNA with an addition of nontranslated LTR sequence. By Western blot using an antiserum against oligopeptides synthesized from ERV3 env sequences, protein product of the transgene was shown to be an 85 kDa band in the lacrimal gland of ETR5. Although no pathological significance was evident in these transgenic rats under conditions without any treatment, ERV3 rats may be a suitable model for analysis of the ERV3 function in vivo.

  19. Influence of Nitrogen Availability on Growth of Two Transgenic Birch Species Carrying the Pine GS1a Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Vadim G.; Kovalenko, Nina P.; Shestibratov, Konstantin A.

    2017-01-01

    An alternative way to increase plant productivity through the use of nitrogen fertilizers is to improve the efficiency of nitrogen utilization via genetic engineering. The effects of overexpression of pine glutamine synthetase (GS) gene and nitrogen availability on growth and leaf pigment levels of two Betula species were studied. Untransformed and transgenic plants of downy birch (B. pubescens) and silver birch (B. pendula) were grown under open-air conditions at three nitrogen regimes (0, 1, or 10 mM) for one growing season. The transfer of the GS1a gene led to a significant increase in the height of only two transgenic lines of nine B. pubescens, but three of five B. pendula transgenic lines were higher than the controls. In general, nitrogen supply reduced the positive effect of the GS gene on the growth of transgenic birch plants. No differences in leaf pigment levels between control and transgenic plants were found. Nitrogen fertilization increased leaf chlorophyll content in untransformed plants but its effect on most of the transgenic lines was insignificant. The results suggest that birch plants carrying the GS gene use nitrogen more efficiently, especially when growing in nitrogen deficient soil. Transgenic lines were less responsive to nitrogen supply in comparison to wild-type plants. PMID:28067821

  20. Influence of Nitrogen Availability on Growth of Two Transgenic Birch Species Carrying the Pine GS1a Gene.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Vadim G; Kovalenko, Nina P; Shestibratov, Konstantin A

    2017-01-06

    An alternative way to increase plant productivity through the use of nitrogen fertilizers is to improve the efficiency of nitrogen utilization via genetic engineering. The effects of overexpression of pine glutamine synthetase (GS) gene and nitrogen availability on growth and leaf pigment levels of two Betula species were studied. Untransformed and transgenic plants of downy birch (B. pubescens) and silver birch (B. pendula) were grown under open-air conditions at three nitrogen regimes (0, 1, or 10 mM) for one growing season. The transfer of the GS1a gene led to a significant increase in the height of only two transgenic lines of nine B. pubescens, but three of five B. pendula transgenic lines were higher than the controls. In general, nitrogen supply reduced the positive effect of the GS gene on the growth of transgenic birch plants. No differences in leaf pigment levels between control and transgenic plants were found. Nitrogen fertilization increased leaf chlorophyll content in untransformed plants but its effect on most of the transgenic lines was insignificant. The results suggest that birch plants carrying the GS gene use nitrogen more efficiently, especially when growing in nitrogen deficient soil. Transgenic lines were less responsive to nitrogen supply in comparison to wild-type plants.

  1. Transgenic mice carrying the human poliovirus receptor: new animal models for study of poliovirus neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Horie, H; Koike, S; Kurata, T; Sato-Yoshida, Y; Ise, I; Ota, Y; Abe, S; Hioki, K; Kato, H; Taya, C

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant viruses between the virulent Mahoney and attenuated Sabin 1 strains of poliovirus type 1 were subjected to neurovirulence tests using a transgenic (Tg) mouse line, ICR-PVRTg1, that carried the human poliovirus receptor gene. The Tg mice were inoculated intracerebrally with these recombinant viruses and observed for clinical signs, histopathological lesions, and viral antigens as parameters of neurovirulence of the viruses. These parameters observed in the Tg mice were different for different inoculated viruses. Dose-dependent incidences of paralysis and of death were observed in the Tg mice inoculated with any viruses used. This indicates that values of 50% lethal dose are useful to score a wide range of neurovirulence of poliovirus. The neurovirulence of individual viruses estimated by the Tg mouse model had a strong correlation with those estimated by monkey model. Consequently, the mouse tests identified the neurovirulence determinants on the genome of poliovirus that had been identified by monkey tests. In addition, the mouse tests revealed new neurovirulence determinants, that is, different nucleotides between the two strains at positions 189 and 21 and/or 935 in the 5'-proximal 1,122 nucleotides. The Tg mice used in this study may be suitable for replacing monkeys for investigating poliovirus neurovirulence. Images PMID:8289371

  2. Pest control and resistance management through release of insects carrying a male-selecting transgene.

    PubMed

    Harvey-Samuel, Tim; Morrison, Neil I; Walker, Adam S; Marubbi, Thea; Yao, Ju; Collins, Hilda L; Gorman, Kevin; Davies, T G Emyr; Alphey, Nina; Warner, Simon; Shelton, Anthony M; Alphey, Luke

    2015-07-16

    Development and evaluation of new insect pest management tools is critical for overcoming over-reliance upon, and growing resistance to, synthetic, biological and plant-expressed insecticides. For transgenic crops expressing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis ('Bt crops') emergence of resistance is slowed by maintaining a proportion of the crop as non-Bt varieties, which produce pest insects unselected for resistance. While this strategy has been largely successful, multiple cases of Bt resistance have now been reported. One new approach to pest management is the use of genetically engineered insects to suppress populations of their own species. Models suggest that released insects carrying male-selecting (MS) transgenes would be effective agents of direct, species-specific pest management by preventing survival of female progeny, and simultaneously provide an alternative insecticide resistance management strategy by introgression of susceptibility alleles into target populations. We developed a MS strain of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, a serious global pest of crucifers. MS-strain larvae are reared as normal with dietary tetracycline, but, when reared without tetracycline or on host plants, only males will survive to adulthood. We used this strain in glasshouse-cages to study the effect of MS male P. xylostella releases on target pest population size and spread of Bt resistance in these populations. Introductions of MS-engineered P. xylostella males into wild-type populations led to rapid pest population decline, and then elimination. In separate experiments on broccoli plants, relatively low-level releases of MS males in combination with broccoli expressing Cry1Ac (Bt broccoli) suppressed population growth and delayed the spread of Bt resistance. Higher rates of MS male releases in the absence of Bt broccoli were also able to suppress P. xylostella populations, whereas either low-level MS male releases or Bt broccoli

  3. High blood pressure in transgenic mice carrying the rat angiotensinogen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, S; Mullins, J J; Bunnemann, B; Metzger, R; Hilgenfeldt, U; Zimmermann, F; Jacob, H; Fuxe, K; Ganten, D; Kaling, M

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated by injecting the entire rat angiotensinogen gene into the germline of NMRI mice. The resulting transgenic animals were characterized with respect to hemodynamics, parameters of the renin angiotension system, and expression of the transgene. The transgenic line TGM(rAOGEN)123 developed hypertension with a mean arterial blood pressure of 158 mmHg in males and 132 mmHg in females. In contrast, the transgenic line TGM(rAOGEN)92 was not hypertensive. Rat angiotensinogen was detectable only in plasma of animals of line 123. Total plasma angiotensinogen and plasma angiotensin II concentrations were about three times as high as those of negative control mice. In TGM(rAOGEN)123 the transgene was highly expressed in liver and brain. Transcripts were also detected in heart, kidney and testis. In TGM(rAOGEN)92 the brain was the main expressing organ. In situ hybridization revealed an mRNA distribution in the brain of TGM(rAOGEN)123 similar to the one in rat. In TGM(rAOGEN)92 the expression pattern in the brain was aberrant. These data indicate that overexpression of the angiotensinogen gene in liver and brain leads to the development of hypertension in transgenic mice. The TGM(rAOGEN)123 constitutes a high angiotensin II type of hypertension and may provide a new experimental animal model to study the kinetics and function of the renin angiotensin system. Images PMID:1547785

  4. Effect of Vandetanib on Lung Tumorigenesis in Transgenic Mice Carrying an Activating Egfr Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Masahiro; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Kubo, Toshio; Ichihara, Eiki; Takata, Saburo; Takigawa, Nagio; Takata, Minoru; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Vandetanib (ZactimaTM) is a novel, orally available inhibitor of both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. In the present study, a line of transgenic mice with a mouse Egfr gene mutation (delE748-A752) corresponding to a human EGFR mutation (delE746-A750) was established. The transgenic mice developed atypical adenomatous hyperplasia to adenocarcinoma of the lung at around 5 weeks of age and died of lung tumors at approximately 17 weeks of age. In the mice treated with vandetanib (6mg/kg/day), these lung tumors disappeared and the phosphorylations of EGFR and VEGFR-2 were reduced in lung tissues to levels comparable to those of non-transgenic control mice. The median overall survival time of the transgenic mice was 28 weeks in the vandetanib-treated group and 17 weeks in the vehicle-treated group. Vandetanib significantly prolonged the survival of the transgenic mice (log-rank test, p< 0.01); resistance to vandetanib occurred at 20 weeks of age and the animals died from their lung tumors at about 28 weeks of age. These data suggest that vandetanib could suppress the progression of tumors harboring an activating EGFR mutation.

  5. Abnormal exploratory behavior in transgenic mice carrying multiple copies of the human gene for S100 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Gerlai, R; Roder, J

    1995-01-01

    S100 beta, a calcium-binding brain protein, has been implicated in brain development and hippocampal neurophysiology including long-term potentiation. Its gene maps to chromosome 21, which is duplicated in Down syndrome. S100 beta levels are elevated in both Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease, human neurodegenerative diseases associated with mental retardation and dementia. To investigate whether or not elevated S100 beta levels can cause brain dysfunctioning in mammals, transgenic mice carrying multiple copies of the human S100 beta gene were generated. Several independent lines of transgenic mice were compared to age-matched normal control mice of identical genetic background (CD1) by measuring their exploratory behaviors in novel situations. Transgenic mice exhibited a range of defects including female specific hyperactivity, lack of habituation to novelty and reduced T-maze spontaneous alternation rate. Although the neuroanatomical or physiological substrate of these abnormalities is unknown, they are similar to the behavioral manifestations of hippocampal dysfunction. The S100 beta mouse offers one of the first opportunities to investigate the relationship between over-expression of a human chromosome 21 gene product and abnormal behavior and brain functioning. PMID:7703219

  6. Hepatocarcinogenesis in transgenic mice carrying hepatitis B virus pre-S/S gene with the sW172* mutation.

    PubMed

    Lai, M-W; Liang, K-H; Lin, W-R; Huang, Y-H; Huang, S-F; Chen, T-C; Yeh, C-T

    2016-12-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrying the rtA181T/sW172* mutation conferred cross-resistance to adefovir and lamivudine. Cell-based and clinical studies indicated that HBV carrying this mutation had an increased oncogenic potential. Herein, we created transgenic mouse models to study the oncogenicity of the HBV pre-S/S gene containing this mutation. Transgenic mice were generated by transfer of the HBV pre-S/S gene together with its own promoter into C57B6 mice. Four lines of mice were created. Two of them carried wild-type gene and produced high and low levels of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) (TgWT-H and L). The other two carried the sW172* mutation with high and low intrahepatic expression levels (TgSW172*-H and L). When sacrificed 18 months after birth, none of the TgWT mice developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whereas 6/26 (23.1%) TgSW172*-H and 2/24 (8.3%) TgSW172*-L mice developed HCC (TgWT vs TgSW172*; P=0.0021). Molecular analysis of liver tissues revealed significantly increased expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 in TgSW172* mice, and decreased expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra large in TgSW172*-H mice. Higher proportion of apoptotic cells was found in TgSW172*-H mice, accompanied by increased cyclin E levels, suggesting increased hepatocyte turnover. Combined analysis of complimentary DNA microarray and microRNA array identified microRNA-873-mediated reduced expression of the CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 (CSMD3) protein, a putative tumor suppressor, in TgSW172* mice. Our transgenic mice experiments confirmed that HBV pre-S/S gene carrying the sW172* mutation had an increased oncogenic potential. Increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response, more rapid hepatocyte turnover and decreased CSMD3 expression contributed to the hepatocarcinogenesis.

  7. c-RET Molecule in Malignant Melanoma from Oncogenic RET-Carrying Transgenic Mice and Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kozue; Iida, Machiko; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Matsumoto, Yoshinari; Kato, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers and its incidence worldwide has been increasing at a greater rate than that of any other cancer. We previously reported that constitutively activated RFP-RET-carrying transgenic mice (RET-mice) spontaneously develop malignant melanoma. In this study, we showed that expression levels of intrinsic c-Ret, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf) and Gdnf receptor alpha 1 (Gfra1) transcripts in malignant melanomas from RET-transgenic mice were significantly upregulated compared with those in benign melanocytic tumors. These results suggest that not only introduced oncogenic RET but also intrinsic c-Ret/Gdnf are involved in murine melanomagenesis in RET-mice. We then showed that c-RET and GDNF transcript expression levels in human malignant melanoma cell lines (HM3KO and MNT-1) were higher than those in primary cultured normal human epithelial melanocytes (NHEM), while GFRa1 transcript expression levels were comparable among NHEM, HM3KO and MNT-1. We next showed c-RET and GFRa1 protein expression in HM3KO cells and GDNF-mediated increased levels of their phosphorylated c-RET tyrosine kinase and signal transduction molecules (ERK and AKT) sited potentially downstream of c-RET. Taken together with the finding of augmented proliferation of HM3KO cells after GDNF stimulation, our results suggest that GDNF-mediated c-RET kinase activation is associated with the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma. PMID:20422010

  8. Protection by nitric oxide against liver inflammatory injury in animals carrying a nitric oxide synthase-2 transgene.

    PubMed

    Mojena, M; Hortelano, S; Castrillo, A; Diaz-Guerra, M J; Garcia-Barchino, M J; Saez, G T; Bosca, L

    2001-03-01

    The effect of pre-existent hepatic NO synthesis on liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharide was studied in animals carrying a nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) transgene under the control of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) promoter. These animals expressed NOS-2 in liver cells under fasting conditions. Lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in D-galactosamine-conditioned mice, which enhanced notably the effect of the endotoxin on the liver, was impaired in animals expressing NOS-2. This protection against inflammatory liver damage was dependent on NO synthesis and was caused by an inhibition of nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activity and an impairment of the synthesis of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor a and interleukin 1b. These data indicate that intrahepatic synthesis of NO protects liver by inhibiting the release of cascades of proinflammatory mediators and suggest a beneficial role for local delivery of NO in the control of liver injury.

  9. Limbic epilepsy in transgenic mice carrying a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II alpha-subunit mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, L S; Silva, A J; Abeliovich, A; Watanabe, Y; Tonegawa, S; McNamara, J O

    1995-01-01

    Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK) phosphorylates proteins pivotally involved in diverse neuronal processes and thereby coordinates cellular responses to external stimuli that regulate intracellular Ca2+ [Hanson, P. I. & Schulman, H. (1992) Annu. Rev. Biochem. 61, 559-664]. Despite extensive study, the impact of this enzyme on control of the excitability of neuron populations in the mammalian nervous system in situ is unknown. To address this question, we studied transgenic mice carrying a null mutation (-/-) for the alpha subunit of CaMK. In contrast to wild-type littermates, null mutants exhibit profound hyperexcitability, evident in epileptic seizures involving limbic structures including the hippocampus. No evidence of increased excitability was detected in mice carrying null mutations of the gamma isoform of protein kinase C, underscoring the specificity of the effect of CaMK. CaMK plays a powerful and previously underappreciated role in control of neuronal excitability in the mammalian nervous system. These insights have important implications for analyses of mechanisms of epilepsy and, perhaps, learning and memory. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7624331

  10. A Glimpse into the World of Integrative and Mobilizable Elements in Streptococci Reveals an Unexpected Diversity and Novel Families of Mobilization Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Charles; Guédon, Gérard; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ambroset, Chloé; Loux, Valentin; Lacroix, Thomas; Payot, Sophie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Recent analyses of bacterial genomes have shown that integrated elements that transfer by conjugation play an essential role in horizontal gene transfer. Among these elements, the integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) are known to encode their own excision and integration machinery, and to carry all the sequences or genes necessary to hijack the mating pore of a conjugative element for their own transfer. However, knowledge of their prevalence and diversity is still severely lacking. In this work, an extensive analysis of 124 genomes from 27 species of Streptococcus reveals 144 IMEs. These IMEs encode either tyrosine or serine integrases. The identification of IME boundaries shows that 141 are specifically integrated in 17 target sites. The IME-encoded relaxases belong to nine superfamilies, among which four are previously unknown in any mobilizable or conjugative element. A total of 118 IMEs are found to encode a non-canonical relaxase related to rolling circle replication initiators (belonging to the four novel families or to MobT). Surprisingly, among these, 83 encode a TcpA protein (i.e., a non-canonical coupling protein (CP) that is more closely related to FtsK than VirD4) that was not previously known to be encoded by mobilizable elements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal not only many integration/excision module replacements but also losses, acquisitions or replacements of TcpA genes between IMEs. This glimpse into the still poorly known world of IMEs reveals that mobilizable elements have a very high prevalence. Their diversity is even greater than expected, with most encoding a CP and/or a non-canonical relaxase. PMID:28373865

  11. A Glimpse into the World of Integrative and Mobilizable Elements in Streptococci Reveals an Unexpected Diversity and Novel Families of Mobilization Proteins.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, Charles; Guédon, Gérard; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ambroset, Chloé; Loux, Valentin; Lacroix, Thomas; Payot, Sophie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Recent analyses of bacterial genomes have shown that integrated elements that transfer by conjugation play an essential role in horizontal gene transfer. Among these elements, the integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) are known to encode their own excision and integration machinery, and to carry all the sequences or genes necessary to hijack the mating pore of a conjugative element for their own transfer. However, knowledge of their prevalence and diversity is still severely lacking. In this work, an extensive analysis of 124 genomes from 27 species of Streptococcus reveals 144 IMEs. These IMEs encode either tyrosine or serine integrases. The identification of IME boundaries shows that 141 are specifically integrated in 17 target sites. The IME-encoded relaxases belong to nine superfamilies, among which four are previously unknown in any mobilizable or conjugative element. A total of 118 IMEs are found to encode a non-canonical relaxase related to rolling circle replication initiators (belonging to the four novel families or to MobT). Surprisingly, among these, 83 encode a TcpA protein (i.e., a non-canonical coupling protein (CP) that is more closely related to FtsK than VirD4) that was not previously known to be encoded by mobilizable elements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal not only many integration/excision module replacements but also losses, acquisitions or replacements of TcpA genes between IMEs. This glimpse into the still poorly known world of IMEs reveals that mobilizable elements have a very high prevalence. Their diversity is even greater than expected, with most encoding a CP and/or a non-canonical relaxase.

  12. An edible vaccine for malaria using transgenic tomatoes of varying sizes, shapes and colors to carry different antigens.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Kamal; Bagasra, Omar

    2007-01-01

    different antigens as a single dose. Besides, if immunization schedules could be arranged, the stability of vaccines carrying different malarial antigens, their transport, and the logistics of vaccination would be an almost impossible task to achieve under the current fiscal constraints. We are proposing a unique way to circumvent these logistical difficulties to deliver the malaria vaccines to every susceptible home at a small fraction of a cost. We hypothesize that the anti-malaria edible vaccines in transgenic tomato plants where different transgenic plants expressing different antigenic type(s). Immunizing individuals against 2-3 antigens and against each stage of the life cycle of the multistage parasites would be an efficient, inexpensive and safe way of vaccination. Tomatoes with varying sizes, shapes and colors carrying different antigens would make the vaccines easily identifiable by lay individuals.

  13. Induction of parkinsonism-related proteins in the spinal motor neurons of transgenic mouse carrying a mutant SOD1 gene.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Nobutoshi; Nagai, Makiko; Miyazaki, Kazunori; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Kurata, Tomoko; Takehisa, Yasushi; Ikeda, Yoshio; Matsuura, Tohru; Asanuma, Masato; Abe, Koji

    2010-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive and fatal disease caused by selective death of motor neurons, and a number of these patients carry mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene involved in ameliorating oxidative stress. Recent studies indicate that oxidative stress and disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis is a common mechanism for motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the loss of midbrain dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, the present study investigated the presence and alterations of familial Parkinson's disease-related proteins, PINK1 and DJ-1, in spinal motor neurons of G93ASOD1 transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Following onset of disease, PINK1 and DJ-1 protein expression increased in the spinal motor neurons. The activated form of p53 also increased and translocated to the nuclei of spinal motor neurons, followed by increased expression of p53-activated gene 608 (PAG608). This is the first report demonstrating that increased expression of PAG608 correlates with activation of phosphorylated p53 in spinal motor neurons of an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model. These results provide further evidence of the profound correlations between spinal motor neurons of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-related proteins.

  14. Transgenic cattle produced by nuclear transfer of fetal fibroblasts carrying Ipr1 gene at a specific locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Sheng; He, Xiaoning; Du, Yue; Su, Jianmin; Gao, Mingqing; Ma, Yefei; Hua, Song; Quan, Fusheng; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of the intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) transgene on preventing infection of Mycobacterium bovis in cattle. A specific expression vector for the Ipr1 gene was constructed and inserted in the genome between surfactant protein A and methionine adenosyltransferase I of bovine fetal fibroblasts. After SCNT, cleavage (86.9% vs. 87.4%, P > 0.05) and blastocyst developmental rates (34.6% vs. 33.5%, P > 0.05) were similar between transgenic and nontransgenic bovine fetal fibroblasts. Four surviving and one dead Ipr1-transgenic female cattle were produced by transfer of the SCNT blastocysts. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analyses confirmed that the Ipr1 transgene of the cattle was located at the expected site. Inserting Ipr1 gene did not affect the expression of the surrounding genes. Main death modality of M bovis-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from Ipr1-transgenic cattle was apoptosis, whereas that of PBMCs from control cattle was necrosis. In addition, the number of colony-forming units in PBMCs of Ipr1-transgenic cattle was significantly lower than that of the control cattle (P < 0.05). The finding that expression of Ipr1 transgene in PBMCs significantly increased anti-M bovis activity suggested breeding anti-M bovis cattle population by the transgenic SCNT technique could be a feasible strategy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacteroides mobilizable and conjugative genetic elements: antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Gómez, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    The conjugation is one of the most important mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes, leading to genetic variation within a species and the acquisition of new traits, such as antibiotic resistance. Bacteroides is an obligate anaerobe of the colon and a significant opportunistic pathogen. Antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides spp. is rapidly increasing, largely due to the dissemination of DNA transfer factors (plasmids and transposons) harbored by members of this genus. Transfer factors can be divided into two classes, conjugative and mobilizable. Species of the intestinal Bacteroides have yielded different resistance plasmids, all of which have been intensely studied, the plasmids encode high-level MLS resistance conferred by a conserved erm gene. It has been reported an interesting observation associated with the transfer of several of these types of elements, all of which conferred Tcr and displayed greatly increased transfer efficiency following exposure to tetracycline. Many of the conjugative transposons (CTns) in Bacteroides are related to various genetic elements (such as CTnDOT, CTnERL, NBU and others). CTnDOT carries a tetracycline resistance gene, tetQ, and an erythromycin resistance gene, ermF. Resistance to drugs used to treat Bacteroides infections, such as clindamycin, has also been increasing. These conjugal elements have been found in Bacteroides clinical isolates. Thus, horizontal gene transfer could conceivably have played a role in the rising incidence of resistance in this bacterial group.

  16. Generation and Characterization of a Transgenic Mouse Carrying a Functional Human β-Globin Gene with the IVSI-6 Thalassemia Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Irene; Lampronti, Ilaria; Salvatori, Francesca; Fabbri, Enrica; Zuccato, Cristina; Cosenza, Lucia C.; Montagner, Giulia; Borgatti, Monica; Altruda, Fiorella; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Carandina, Gianni; Aiello, Vincenzo; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models that carry mutations causing thalassemia represent a suitable tool to test in vivo new mutation-specific therapeutic approaches. Transgenic mice carrying the β-globin IVSI-6 mutation (the most frequent in Middle-Eastern regions and recurrent in Italy and Greece) are, at present, not available. We report the production and characterization of a transgenic mouse line (TG-β-IVSI-6) carrying the IVSI-6 thalassemia point mutation within the human β-globin gene. In the TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse (a) the transgenic integration region is located in mouse chromosome 7; (b) the expression of the transgene is tissue specific; (c) as expected, normally spliced human β-globin mRNA is produced, giving rise to β-globin production and formation of a human-mouse tetrameric chimeric hemoglobin mu α-globin2/hu β-globin2 and, more importantly, (d) the aberrant β-globin-IVSI-6 RNAs are present in blood cells. The TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse reproduces the molecular features of IVSI-6 β-thalassemia and might be used as an in vivo model to characterize the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the cryptic sites responsible for the generation of aberrantly spliced β-globin RNA sequences, caused by the IVSI-6 mutation. These experiments are expected to be crucial for the development of a personalized therapy for β-thalassemia. PMID:26097845

  17. Spread and exchange of bla NDM-1 in hospitalized neonates: role of mobilizable genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Datta, S; Mitra, S; Chattopadhyay, P; Som, T; Mukherjee, S; Basu, S

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the mobilizable elements associated with bla NDM-1 in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from septicaemic neonates at a NICU in India, during December, 2008-2011. An attempt was also made to understand whether there was a pattern in the temporal acquisition of bla NDM-1 within the unit. Transferability of carbapenem resistance was tested by conjugation and transformation. Plasmid types and addiction systems were analysed. The genetic background of bla NDM-1 and association with class 1 integron were evaluated by PCR mapping. RFLP was carried out to discriminate plasmids of same incompatibility group. Transfer of carbapenem resistance was successful in 13/15 cases. bla NDM-1 was associated with different plasmid scaffolds (IncFII, IncL/M, IncN, IncR, IncHIB-M/FIB-M), IncF type being the prevalent one. Addiction systems ccdAB and hok/sok were associated with transferable plasmids. Genetic structures surrounding bla NDM-1 showed its association with at least a remnant of ISAba125 at its 5'-end. The spread of NDM-1 was not related to class 1 integron which possessed resistance determinants against trimethoprim (dfrA12, dfrA1, dfrA5), streptomycin (aadA2, aacA4), and rifampicin (arr-3). RFLP showed that three isolates possessed the same FII/FIIs plasmid; two of these three isolates were from a single neonate, implying interspecies transfer of bla NDM-1. The predominance of FII plasmids and ISAba125 along with bla NDM-1 was noted, but no specific pattern in the temporal acquisition of mobile genetic elements could be identified. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to inform the in-vivo interspecies plasmid transfer event of bla NDM-1 in a neonate.

  18. The mesenchymal stem cells derived from transgenic mice carrying human coagulation factor VIII can correct phenotype in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Gong, Xiuli; Gong, Zhijuan; Ren, Xiaoyie; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-12-20

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. Previous studies showed that introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified by FVIII-expressing retrovirus may result in phenotypic correction of HA animals. This study aimed at the investigation of an alternative gene therapy strategy that may lead to sustained FVIII transgene expression in HA mice. B-domain-deleted human FVIII (hFVIIIBD) vector was microinjected into single-cell embryos of wild-type mice to generate a transgenic mouse line, from which hFVIIIBD-MSCs were isolated, followed by transplantation into HA mice. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of hFVIIIBD in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of hFVIIIBD positive staining in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. ELISA indicated that plasma hFVIIIBD level in recipient mice reached its peak (77 ng/mL) at the 3rd week after implantation, and achieved sustained expression during the 5-week observation period. Plasma FVIII activities of recipient HA mice increased from 0% to 32% after hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplantation. APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) value decreased in hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplanted HA mice compared with untreated HA mice (45.5 s vs. 91.3 s). Our study demonstrated an effective phenotypic correction in HA mice using genetically modified MSCs from hFVIIIBD transgenic mice.

  19. Spontaneous destructive periodontitis and skeletal bone damage in transgenic mice carrying a human shared epitope-coding HLA-DRB1 allele

    PubMed Central

    Gehlot, Prashasnika; Volk, Sarah L; Rios, Hector F; Jepsen, Karl J; Holoshitz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Objective Shared epitope (SE)-coding DRB1 alleles are associated with bone erosion in several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD), but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We have recently identified the SE as an osteoclast-activating ligand. To better understand the biological effects of the SE in vivo, here we sought to determine whether it can facilitate spontaneous bone damage in naïve mice. Methods 3-month old naïve transgenic mice that carry the human SE-coding allele DRB1*04:01, or a SE-negative allele DRB1*04:02 were studied. Bone tissues were analysed by micro-CT, and the tooth-supporting tissues were studied by histology, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Serum biomarkers were determined by ELISA. Results Transgenic mice expressing the SE-coding DRB1*04:01 allele, but not mice carrying the SE-negative allele DRB1*04:02, showed spontaneous PD associated with interleukin (IL)-17 overabundance and periostin disruption. Mandibular bone volumetric and mineralisation parameters were significantly lower in SE-positive mice, and alveolar bone resorption was significantly increased in these mice. SE-positive mice also had more slender tibiae, and their marrow, cortical and total areas were lower than those of SE-negative mice. Additionally, significantly increased serum IL-17, tumour necrosis factor-α and osteoprotegrin levels were found in SE-positive mice, while their receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand levels were significantly lower. Conclusions A human SE-coding allele increases the propensity to spontaneous bone-destructive periodontal inflammation and skeletal bone damage in transgenic mice. These findings provide new insights into the previously documented but poorly understood association of the SE with accelerated bone erosion in RA and several other human diseases. PMID:27933212

  20. Overexpression of transforming growth factor-. beta. in transgenic mice carrying the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I tax gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongjin; Winokur, T.S.; Lee, Hyde; Danielpour, D.; Kim, Kyung Young; Geiser, A.G.; Sporn, M.B.; Roberts, A.B. ); Chen, Liansheng; Jay, G. )

    1991-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) has been associated with an adult form of T-cell leukemia as well as tropical spastic paraparesis, a neurodegenerative disease. Adult T-cell leukemia patients express high levels of the type 1 isoform of transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}1), which is mediated by the effects of the HTLV-I Tax transactivator protein on the TGF-{beta}1 promoter. To understand further the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 expression by Tax, the authors examined its expression in transgenic mice carrying the HTLV-I tax gene. They show that tumors from these mice and other tissues, such as submaxillary glands and skeletal muscle, which express high levels of tax mRNA selectively express high levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA and protein. Moreover, TGF-{beta}1 significantly stimulated the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into one of three cells lines derived from neurofibromas of tax-transgenic mice, which suggest that the excessive production of TGF-{beta}1 may play a role in tumorigenesis and that these mice may serve as a useful model for studying the biological effects of TGF-{beta} in vivo.

  1. Systemic administration of attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis carrying thrombospondin-1 gene leads to tumor-specific transgene expression, delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival in the murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2005-02-01

    Some anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria have been used experimentally as anticancer agents because of their selective growth in the hypoxia regions of solid tumors after systemic administration. We have previously shown the feasibility of using attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis as a gene delivery vector. In this study, we exploited S. choleraesuis carrying thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gene for treating primary melanoma and experimental pulmonary metastasis in the syngeneic murine B16F10 melanoma model. Systemic administration of S. choleraesuis allowed targeted gene delivery to tumors. The bacteria accumulated preferentially in tumors over livers and spleens at ratios ranging from 1000:1 to 10,000:1. The level of transgene expression via S. choleraesuis-mediated gene transfer in tumors could reach more than 1800-fold higher than in livers and spleens. Notably, bacterial accumulation was also observed in the lungs with metastatic nodules, but not in healthy lungs. When administered into mice bearing subcutaneous or pulmonary metastatic melanomas, S. choleraesuis carrying TSP-1 gene significantly inhibited tumor growth and enhanced survival of the mice. Immunohistochemical studies in the tumors from these mice displayed decreased intratumoral microvessel density. Taken together, these findings suggest that TSP-1 gene therapy delivered by S. choleraesuis may be effective for the treatment of primary as well as metastatic melanomas.

  2. Transgenic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jänne, J; Alhonen, L; Hyttinen, J M; Peura, T; Tolvanen, M; Korhonen, V P

    1998-01-01

    Since the generation of the first transgenic mice in 1980, transgene technology has also been successfully applied to large farm animals. Although this technology can be employed to improve certain production traits of livestock, this approach has not been very successful so far owing to unwanted effects encountered in the production animals. However, by using tissue-specific targeting of the transgene expression, it is possible to produce heterologous proteins in the extracellular space of large transgenic farm animals. Even though some recombinant proteins, such as human hemoglobin, have been produced in the blood of transgenic pigs, in the majority of the cases mammary gland targeted expression of the transgene has been employed. Using production genes driven by regulatory sequences of milk protein genes a number of valuable therapeutic proteins have been produced in the milk of transgenic bioreactors, ranging from rabbits to dairy cattle. Unlike bacterial fermentors, the mammary gland of transgenic bioreactors appear to carry out proper postsynthetic modifications of human proteins required for full biological activity. In comparison with mammalian cell bioreactors, transgenic livestock with mammary gland targeted expression seems to be able to produce valuable human therapeutic proteins at very low cost. Although not one transgenically produced therapeutic protein is yet on the market, the first such proteins have recently entered or even completed clinical trials required for their approval.

  3. Mobilizable Rolling-Circle Replicating Plasmids from Gram-Positive Bacteria: A Low-Cost Conjugative Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, Cris; Bravo, Alicia; Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Solano-Collado, Virtu; Garsin, Danielle A.; Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Espinosa, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chapter summary Conjugation is a key mechanism for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. Some plasmids are not self-transmissible but can be mobilized by functions encoded in trans provided by other auxiliary conjugative elements. Although the transfer efficiency of mobilizable plasmids is usually lower than that of conjugative elements, mobilizable plasmidsare more frequently found in nature. In this sense, replication and mobilization can be considered as important mechanisms influencing plasmid promiscuity. Here we review the present available information on two families of small mobilizable plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria that replicate via the rolling-circle mechanism. One of these families, represented by the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, is an interesting model since it contains a specific mobilization module (MOBV) that is widely distributed among mobilizable plasmids. We discuss a mechanism in which the promiscuity of the pMV158 replicon is based on the presence of two origins of lagging strand synthesis. The current strategies to assess plasmid transfer efficiency as well as to inhibit conjugative plasmid transfer are presented. Some applications of these plasmids as biotechnological tools are also reviewed. PMID:25606350

  4. Mobilizable Rolling-Circle Replicating Plasmids from Gram-Positive Bacteria: A Low-Cost Conjugative Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Cris; Bravo, Alicia; Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Solano-Collado, Virtu; Garsin, Danielle A; Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Espinosa, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Conjugation is a key mechanism for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. Some plasmids are not self-transmissible but can be mobilized by functions encoded in trans provided by other auxiliary conjugative elements. Although the transfer efficiency of mobilizable plasmids is usually lower than that of conjugative elements, mobilizable plasmids are more frequently found in nature. In this sense, replication and mobilization can be considered important mechanisms influencing plasmid promiscuity. Here we review the currently available information on two families of small mobilizable plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria that replicate via the rolling-circle mechanism. One of these families, represented by the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, is an interesting model since it contains a specific mobilization module (MOBV) that is widely distributed among mobilizable plasmids. We discuss a mechanism in which the promiscuity of the pMV158 replicon is based on the presence of two origins of lagging strand synthesis. The current strategies to assess plasmid transfer efficiency as well as to inhibit conjugative plasmid transfer are presented. Some applications of these plasmids as biotechnological tools are also reviewed.

  5. Analysis of the physiological mechanism of salt-tolerant transgenic rice carrying a vacuolar Na+/H + antiporter gene from Suaeda salsa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fengyun; Wang, Zenglan; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Yanxiu; Zhang, Hui

    2006-03-01

    Salt stress is one of the most serious factors limiting the productivity of agricultural crops. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporters play a crucial role in plant salt tolerance. In the present study, we expressed the Suaeda salsa vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter SsNHX1 in transgenic rice to investigate whether this can increase the salt tolerance of rice, and to study how overexpression of this gene affected other salt-tolerant mechanisms. It was found that transgenic rice plants showed markedly enhanced tolerance to salt stress and to water deprivation compared with non-transgenic controls upon salt stress imposition under outdoor conditions. Measurements of ion levels indicated that K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ contents were all higher in transgenic plants than in non-transformed controls. Furthermore, shoot V-ATPase hydrolytic activity was dramatically increased in transgenics compared to that of non-transformed controls under salt stress conditions. Physiological analysis also showed that the photosynthetic activity of the transformed plants was higher whereas the same plants had reduced reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, the soluble sugar content increased in the transgenics compared with that in non-transgenics. These results imply that up-regulation of a vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene in transgenic rice might cause pleiotropic up-regulation of other salt-resistance-related mechanisms to improve salt tolerance.

  6. Meclozine promotes longitudinal skeletal growth in transgenic mice with achondroplasia carrying a gain-of-function mutation in the FGFR3 gene.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masaki; Hasegawa, Satoru; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku; Ohkawara, Bisei; Yasoda, Akihiro; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2015-02-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH) is one of the most common skeletal dysplasias causing short stature owing to a gain-of-function mutation in the FGFR3 gene, which encodes the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. We found that meclozine, an over-the-counter drug for motion sickness, inhibited elevated FGFR3 signaling in chondrocytic cells. To examine the feasibility of meclozine administration in clinical settings, we investigated the effects of meclozine on ACH model mice carrying the heterozygous Fgfr3(ach) transgene. We quantified the effect of meclozine in bone explant cultures employing limb rudiments isolated from developing embryonic tibiae from Fgfr3(ach) mice. We found that meclozine significantly increased the full-length and cartilaginous primordia of embryonic tibiae isolated from Fgfr3(ach) mice. We next analyzed the skeletal phenotypes of growing Fgfr3(ach) mice and wild-type mice with or without meclozine treatment. In Fgfr3(ach) mice, meclozine significantly increased the body length after 2 weeks of administration. At skeletal maturity, the bone lengths including the cranium, radius, ulna, femur, tibia, and vertebrae were significantly longer in meclozine-treated Fgfr3(ach) mice than in untreated Fgfr3(ach) mice. Interestingly, meclozine also increased bone growth in wild-type mice. The plasma concentration of meclozine during treatment was within the range that has been used in clinical settings for motion sickness. Increased longitudinal bone growth in Fgfr3(ach) mice by oral administration of meclozine in a growth period suggests potential clinical feasibility of meclozine for the improvement of short stature in ACH.

  7. Reversal of learning deficits in hAPP transgenic mice carrying a mutation at Asp664: a role for early experience.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Tang, Huidong; Bredesen, Dale E; Galvan, Veronica

    2010-01-20

    In addition to the cleavages that generate amyloid-beta (Abeta), the Abeta-precursor protein (APP) is processed at Asp664, releasing a second toxic peptide (APP-C31). Transgenic mice otherwise identical to a well-characterized model of AD, PDAPP mice, but carrying a mutation that obliterates Asp664 show a reversal of AD-like deficits in memory and in non-cognitive components of behaviour in spite of accumulating high levels of Abeta. These results suggest that cleavage of APP at Asp664 plays a role in the generation of AD-like deficits, and that a major pathway of Abeta toxicity in vivo, or a pathway that crucially impinges on it, may depend on cleavage of APP at Asp664. Since young PDAPP(D664A) mice showed an akinetic phenotype when first required to swim, we trained a 3-month-old (mo) cohort to criterion (normal swimming), and briefly exposed it to the Morris water maze (MWM) environment prior to training at 7 mo, to avoid potentially confounding effects of the akinetic phenotype in MWM studies. Prior experience decreased floating in PDAPP(D664A) mice but not in PDAPP nor in non-Tg groups. While learning was restored in experienced PDAPP(D664A) mice, it was indistinguishable from both non-Tg as well as from PDAPP mice in naïve PDAPP(D664A) animals. Floating did not correlate with worse performance in naïve PDAPP(D664A) mice, suggesting that the contribution of prior experience to improved performance is related to its cognitive effects but not to non-cognitive components of behaviour. Our results suggest that early experience reduces the contribution of non-cognitive components of behaviour to performance, and may contribute to the restoration of learning at later ages in PDAPP(D664A) mice.

  8. Reversal of learning deficits in hAPP transgenic mice carrying a mutation at Asp664: A role for early experience

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junli; Gorostiza, Olivia F.; Tang, Huidong; Bredesen, Dale E.; Galvan, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the cleavages that generate amyloid-beta (Aϐ), the Aϐ-precursor protein (APP) is processed at Asp664, releasing a second toxic peptide (APP-C31). Transgenic mice otherwise identical to a well-characterized model of AD, PDAPP mice, but carrying a mutation that obliterates Asp664 show a reversal of AD-like deficits in memory and in non-cognitive components of behaviour in spite of accumulating high levels of Aϐ. These results suggest that cleavage of APP at Asp664 plays a role in the generation of AD-like deficits, and that a major pathway of Aϐ toxicity in vivo, or a pathway that crucially impinges on it, may depend on cleavage of APP at Asp664. Since young PDAPP(D664A) mice showed an akinetic phenotype when first required to swim, we trained a 3 month-old (mo) cohort to criterion (normal swimming), and briefly exposed it to the Morris water maze (MWM) environment prior to training at 7 mo, to avoid potentially confounding effects of the akinetic phenotype in MWM studies. Prior experience decreased floating in PDAPP(D664A) mice but not in PDAPP nor in non-Tg groups. While learning was restored in experienced PDAPP(D664A) mice, it was indistinguishable from both non-Tg as well as from PDAPP mice in naïve PDAPP(D664A) animals. Floating did not correlate with worse performance in naïve PDAPP(D664A) mice, suggesting that the contribution of prior experience to improved performance is related to its cognitive effects but not to non-cognitive components of behaviour. Our results suggest that early experience reduces the contribution of non-cognitive components of behaviour to performance, and may contribute to the restoration of learning at later ages in PDAPP(D664A) mice. PMID:19751769

  9. Do transgenesis and marker-assisted backcross breeding produce substantially equivalent plants? - A comparative study of transgenic and backcross rice carrying bacterial blight resistant gene Xa21

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The potential impact of genetically modified (GM) plants on human health has attracted much attention worldwide, and the issue remains controversial. This is in sharp contrast to the broad acceptance of plants produced by breeding through Marker Assisted Backcrossing (MAB). Results Focusing on transcriptome variation and perturbation to signaling pathways, we assessed the molecular and biological aspects of substantial equivalence, a general principle for food safety endorsed by the Food and Agricultural Organization and the World Health Organization, between a transgenic crop and a plant from MAB breeding. We compared a transgenic rice line (DXT) and a MAB rice line (DXB), both of which contain the gene Xa21 providing resistance to bacterial leaf blight. By using Next-Generation sequencing data of DXT, DXB and their parental line (D62B), we compared the transcriptome variation of DXT and DXB. Remarkably, DXT had 43% fewer differentially expressed genes (DEGs) than DXB. The genes exclusively expressed in DXT and in DXB have pathogen and stress defense functions. Functional categories of DEGs in DXT were comparable to that in DXB, and seven of the eleven pathways significantly affected by transgenesis were also perturbed by MAB breeding. Conclusions These results indicated that the transgenic rice and rice from MAB breeding are substantial equivalent at the transcriptome level, and paved a way for further study of transgenic rice, e.g., understanding the chemical and nutritional properties of the DEGs identified in the current study. PMID:24165682

  10. Ectopic bone formation and chondrodysplasia in transgenic mice carrying the rat C3(1)/T{sub AG} fusion gene

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.E.; Maroulakou, I.G.; Anver, M.

    1994-09-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the SV40 large T-antigen (T{sup AG}) under the regultory control of the hormone-responsive rat C3(1) prostatein promoter develop unusual bone and cartilage lesions, as well as ectopic bone and cartilage formation. Two lines of transgenic animals have been propagated in which the expression of the transgene in chondrocytes results in a mild to moderate generalized disorganization of cartilage growth which appears to affect multiple tissues, including the trachea, ear pinna and articular cartilage. The epiphyseal plates are also affected with normal architecture of the zones of proliferation and maturation, but marked elongation of the zone of hypertrophy. Immunocytochemistry demonstrates that expression of T{sup AG} is limited to the zone of hypertropny in the epiphyseal plates, suggesting that the chondrocytes become hormone-responsive at this particular stage of differentiation. Normal mineralization and trabecular formation in long bone appears to occur. Ectopic bone and cartilage formation occurs in the foot pads of the fore- and hind- feet over the course of several months. This is preceded by proliferation of sweat gland epithelial cells followed by the appearance of nodules of cartilage and bone. The nodules are closely associated with proliferating epithelium but are not contiguous with bony structures normally found in the feet. The roles of BMP`s, growth factors, oncogenes and hormones in the development of these lesions will be presented. These transgenic animals may provide new insights into hormone-responsiveness of chondrocytes, as well as factors involved in the processes of bone and cartilage differentiation and growth. These transgenic animals may serve as a useful model for human heterotopic bone formation.

  11. Streptococcal group B integrative and mobilizable element IMESag-rpsI encodes a functional relaxase involved in its transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Fernández-Lopez, Cris; Douarre, Pierre-Emmanuel; Baez-Ortega, Adrian; Flores, Carlos; Glaser, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are opportunistic bacteria that can cause lethal sepsis in children and immuno-compromised patients. Their genome is a reservoir of mobile genetic elements that can be horizontally transferred. Among them, integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) and the smaller integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) primarily reside in the bacterial chromosome, yet have the ability to be transferred between cells by conjugation. ICEs and IMEs are therefore a source of genetic variability that participates in the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although IMEs seem to be the most prevalent class of elements transferable by conjugation, they are poorly known. Here, we have studied a GBS-IME, termed IMESag-rpsI, which is widely distributed in GBS despite not carrying any apparent virulence trait. Analyses of 240 whole genomes showed that IMESag-rpsI is present in approximately 47% of the genomes, has a roughly constant size (approx. 9 kb) and is always integrated at a single location, the 3′-end of the gene encoding the ribosomal protein S9 (rpsI). Based on their genetic variation, several IMESag-rpsI types were defined (A–J) and classified in clonal complexes (CCs). CC1 was the most populated by IMESag-rpsI (more than 95%), mostly of type-A (71%). One CC1 strain (S. agalactiae HRC) was deep-sequenced to understand the rationale underlying type-A IMESag-rpsI enrichment in GBS. Thirteen open reading frames were identified, one of them encoding a protein (MobSag) belonging to the broadly distributed family of relaxases MOBV1. Protein MobSag was purified and, by a newly developed method, shown to cleave DNA at a specific dinucleotide. The S. agalactiae HRC-IMESag-rpsI is able to excise from the chromosome, as shown by the presence of circular intermediates, and it harbours a fully functional mobilization module. Further, the mobSag gene encoded by this mobile element is able to promote plasmid transfer among pneumococcal

  12. Streptococcal group B integrative and mobilizable element IMESag-rpsI encodes a functional relaxase involved in its transfer.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Fernández-Lopez, Cris; Douarre, Pierre-Emmanuel; Baez-Ortega, Adrian; Flores, Carlos; Glaser, Philippe; Espinosa, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are opportunistic bacteria that can cause lethal sepsis in children and immuno-compromised patients. Their genome is a reservoir of mobile genetic elements that can be horizontally transferred. Among them, integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) and the smaller integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) primarily reside in the bacterial chromosome, yet have the ability to be transferred between cells by conjugation. ICEs and IMEs are therefore a source of genetic variability that participates in the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although IMEs seem to be the most prevalent class of elements transferable by conjugation, they are poorly known. Here, we have studied a GBS-IME, termed IMESag-rpsI, which is widely distributed in GBS despite not carrying any apparent virulence trait. Analyses of 240 whole genomes showed that IMESag-rpsI is present in approximately 47% of the genomes, has a roughly constant size (approx. 9 kb) and is always integrated at a single location, the 3'-end of the gene encoding the ribosomal protein S9 (rpsI). Based on their genetic variation, several IMESag-rpsI types were defined (A-J) and classified in clonal complexes (CCs). CC1 was the most populated by IMESag-rpsI (more than 95%), mostly of type-A (71%). One CC1 strain (S. agalactiae HRC) was deep-sequenced to understand the rationale underlying type-A IMESag-rpsI enrichment in GBS. Thirteen open reading frames were identified, one of them encoding a protein (MobSag) belonging to the broadly distributed family of relaxases MOBV1 Protein MobSag was purified and, by a newly developed method, shown to cleave DNA at a specific dinucleotide. The S. agalactiae HRC-IMESag-rpsI is able to excise from the chromosome, as shown by the presence of circular intermediates, and it harbours a fully functional mobilization module. Further, the mobSag gene encoded by this mobile element is able to promote plasmid transfer among pneumococcal

  13. Assays of PCB congeners and organochlorine insecticides with the transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants carrying recombinant guinea pig AhR and GUS reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Gion, Keiko; Inui, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Hideaki; Utani, Yasushi; Kodama, Susumu; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Certain congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine insecticides are ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs) in animals. A recombinant guinea pig (g) AhR, XgDV, was constructed by fusing the ligand-binding domain of gAhR, the DNA-binding domain of LexA, and the transactivating domain of VP16. Then, the expression unit of β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene regulated by XgDV was introduced into Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. When the transgenic Arabidopsis XgDV plants were cultured on Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium containing PCB congeners, the GUS activity in the plants increased toxic equivalent (TEQ)-dependently. The GUS activity in the transgenic Arabidopsis XgDV plants cultured on MS medium containing the organochlorine insecticide dieldrin was also induced. On the other hand, in the case of DDT, the GUS activity induced by 3-methylcholanthere in the plants decreased. The transgenic Arabidopsis XgDV plants detected 1000 ng g(-1) PCB126 in 1 g of soils. Thus the XgDV plants seemed to be useful for convenient assays of PCB congeners and organochlorine insecticides, without any extraction and purification steps.

  14. Expression Analysis of Hairpin RNA Carrying Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) Derived Sequences and Transgenic Resistance Development in a Model Rice Plant

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Sehrish; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Developing transgenic resistance in monocotyledonous crops against pathogens remains a challenging area of research. Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is a serious pathogen of many monocotyledonous crops including sugarcane. The objective of present study was to analyze transgenic expression of hairpin RNA (hpRNA), targeting simultaneously CP (Coat Protein) and Hc-Pro (helper component-proteinase) genes of SCMV, in a model rice plant. Conserved nucleotide sequences, exclusive for DAG (Aspartic acid-Alanine-Glycine) and KITC (Lycine-Isoleucine-Threonine-Cysteine) motifs, derived from SCMV CP and Hc-Pro genes, respectively, were fused together and assembled into the hpRNA cassette under maize ubiquitin promoter to form Ubi-hpCP:Hc-Pro construct. The same CP:Hc-Pro sequence was fused with the β-glucuronidase gene (GUS) at the 3′ end under CaMV 35S promoter to develop 35S-GUS:CP:Hc-Pro served as a target reporter gene construct. When delivered into rice callus tissues by particle bombardment, the Ubi-hpCP:Hc-Pro construct induced strong silencing of 35S-GUS:CP:Hc-Pro. Transgenic rice plants, containing Ubi-hpCP:Hc-Pro construct, expressed high level of 21–24 nt small interfering RNAs, which induced specific suppression against GUS:CP:Hc-Pro delivered by particle bombardment and conferred strong resistance to mechanically inoculated SCMV. It is concluded that fusion hpRNA approach is an affordable method for developing resistance against SCMV in model rice plant and it could confer SCMV resistance when transformed into sugarcane. PMID:28255554

  15. Assays of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in actually contaminated soils using transgenic tobacco plants carrying a recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated β-glucuronidase reporter gene expression system.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hideyuki; Gion, Keiko; Utani, Yasushi; Wakai, Taketo; Kodama, Susumu; Eun, Heesoo; Kim, Yun-Seok; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 carrying the recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor XD4V-mediated β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system was used for assay of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds consisting of polychlorinated dibenzeno-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Co-PCBs) in actually contaminated soils. The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 showed a significant dose-dependent induced GUS activity when cultured on MS medium containing PCB126 [toxic equivalency factor (TEF) = 0.1]. In contrast, PCB169 and PCB180, which have 0.03 of TEF and unassigned TEF values, respectively, did not significantly induce GUS activity under the same conditions as with PCB126. When the tobacco plants were cultivated for up to 5 weeks on actually contaminated soils with dioxins and dioxin-like compounds collected from the periphery of an incinerator used for disposal of residential and industrial wastes, GUS activity in the leaves was dose-dependently increased. The plants clearly detected 360 pg-TEQ g(-1) of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in this assay. There was a positive correlation between GUS activity and TEQ value of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in the plants. This assay does not require any extraction and purification processes for the actually contaminated soil samples.

  16. Assays of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in actually contaminated soils using transgenic tobacco plants carrying a recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated β-glucuronidase reporter gene expression system

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Hideyuki; Gion, Keiko; Utani, Yasushi; Wakai, Taketo; Kodama, Susumu; Eun, Heesoo; Kim, Yun-Seok; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 carrying the recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor XD4V-mediated β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system was used for assay of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds consisting of polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Co-PCBs) in actually contaminated soils. The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 showed a significant dose-dependent induced GUS activity when cultured on MS medium containing PCB126 [toxic equivalency factor (TEF) = 0.1]. In contrast, PCB169 and PCB180, which have 0.03 of TEF and unassigned TEF values, respectively, did not significantly induce GUS activity under the same conditions as with PCB126. When the tobacco plants were cultivated for up to 5 weeks on actually contaminated soils with dioxins and dioxin-like compounds collected from the periphery of an incinerator used for disposal of life and industrial wastes, GUS activity in the leaves was dose-dependently increased. The plants clearly detected 360 pg-TEQ g−1 of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in this assay. There was a positive correlation between GUS activity and TEQ value of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in the plants. This assay does not require any extraction and purification processes for the actually contaminated soil samples. PMID:22428884

  17. Assays of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in actually contaminated soils using transgenic tobacco plants carrying a recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated β-glucuronidase reporter gene expression system.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hideyuki; Gion, Keiko; Utani, Yasushi; Wakai, Taketo; Kodama, Susumu; Eun, Heesoo; Kim, Yun-Seok; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 carrying the recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor XD4V-mediated β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system was used for assay of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds consisting of polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Co-PCBs) in actually contaminated soils. The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 showed a significant dose-dependent induced GUS activity when cultured on MS medium containing PCB126 [toxic equivalency factor (TEF) = 0.1]. In contrast, PCB169 and PCB180, which have 0.03 of TEF and unassigned TEF values, respectively, did not significantly induce GUS activity under the same conditions as with PCB126. When the tobacco plants were cultivated for up to 5 weeks on actually contaminated soils with dioxins and dioxin-like compounds collected from the periphery of an incinerator used for disposal of life and industrial wastes, GUS activity in the leaves was dose-dependently increased. The plants clearly detected 360 pg-TEQ g(-1) of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in this assay. There was a positive correlation between GUS activity and TEQ value of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in the plants. This assay does not require any extraction and purification processes for the actually contaminated soil samples.

  18. Transfer of mupirocin resistance from Staphylococcus haemolyticus clinical strains to Staphylococcus aureus through conjugative and mobilizable plasmids.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ciro C; Ferreira, Natália C; Coelho, Marcus L V; Schuenck, Ricardo P; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de F; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia

    2016-07-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci are thought to act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes that can be transferred to Staphylococcus aureus, thus hindering the combat of this bacterium. In this work, we analyzed the presence of plasmids conferring resistance to the antibiotic mupirocin-widely used to treat and prevent S. aureus infections in hospital environments-in nosocomial S. haemolyticus strains. About 12% of the 75 strains tested were resistant to mupirocin, and this phenotype was correlated with the presence of plasmids. These plasmids were shown to be diverse, being either conjugative or mobilizable, and capable of transferring mupirocin resistance to S. aureus Our findings reinforce that S. haemolyticus, historically and mistakenly considered as a less important pathogen, is a reservoir of resistance genes which can be transferred to other bacteria, such as S. aureus, emphasizing the necessity of more effective strategies to detect and combat this emergent opportunistic pathogen.

  19. Rapid growth of invasive metastatic melanoma in carcinogen-treated hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor-transgenic mice carrying an oncogenic CDK4 mutation.

    PubMed

    Tormo, Damia; Ferrer, Aleix; Gaffal, Evelyn; Wenzel, Jörg; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Steitz, Julia; Heukamp, Lukas C; Gütgemann, Ines; Buettner, Reinhard; Malumbres, Marcos; Barbacid, Mariano; Merlino, Glenn; Tüting, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Currently, novel mouse models of melanoma are being generated that recapitulate the histopathology and molecular pathogenesis observed in human disease. Impaired cell-cycle control, which is a hallmark of both familial and sporadic melanoma, promotes slowly growing carcinogen-induced melanomas in the skin of mice carrying a mutated cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4(R24C)). Deregulated receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, which is another important feature of human melanoma, leads to spontaneous development of metastatic melanoma after a long latency period in mice overexpressing hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF mice). Here we report that treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate induced metastatic melanomas in all HGF/SF mice on the C57BL/6 background, which histologically resemble human melanoma. Importantly, mutant CDK4 dramatically increased the number and the growth kinetics of carcinogen-induced primary melanomas in the skin and promoted the growth of spontaneous metastases in lymph nodes and lungs in all HGF/SF mice within the first 3 months of life. Apart from very few skin papillomas, we did not observe tumors of other histology in carcinogen-treated HGF/SF x CDK4(R24C) mice. This new experimental mouse model can now be exploited to study further the biology of melanoma and evaluate new treatment modalities.

  20. trans activation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the interleukin-2 receptor in transgenic mice carrying the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 tax gene.

    PubMed

    Green, J E; Begley, C G; Wagner, D K; Waldmann, T A; Jay, G

    1989-11-01

    Three lines of transgenic mice carrying the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 tax gene have previously been reported to develop neurofibromas composed of perineural fibroblasts (S. H. Hinrichs, M. Nerenberg, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1340-1343, 1987; M. Nerenberg, S. H. Hinrichs, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1324-1329, 1987). Tumors from these mice and tumor cell lines derived from them expressed high levels of tax RNA and protein. They also expressed high levels of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene as measured by proliferative responses of FD-CP1 target cells using conditioned media from tumor cells and by Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from tumors and tumor cell lines. Although other tissues, such as salivary glands and muscles, in the transgenic mice also expressed high levels of tax, they did not express the gene for GM-CSF. This indicates that tissue-specific cellular factors, in addition to tax, are required for GM-CSF gene expression. Systemic effects of excessive GM-CSF production were demonstrated by infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into tumor tissues which are not necrotic, by peripheral granulocytosis, and by splenomegaly resulting from myeloid hyperplasia. The interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor was also found to be expressed by the tumors and tumor cell lines as measured by IL-2-binding and cross-linking studies. This is the first demonstration that the IL-2 receptor can be activated by tax in a nonlymphoid cell type. These in vivo findings are consistent with other reports which have demonstrated in vitro cis-regulatory elements within the 5'-flanking regions of the genes for GM-CSF and the IL-2 receptor which are responsive to trans activation by the tax gene.

  1. Transgenic Mice Carrying the H258N Mutation in the Gene Encoding the β-Subunit of Phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6B) Provide a Model for Human Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Stephen H.; Woodruff, Michael L.; Jun, Lin; Mahajan, Vinit; Yamashita, Clyde K.; Pedersen, Robert; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Goff, Stephen P.; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael; Farber, Debora B.; Nusinowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the β-subunit of cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) can lead to either progressive retinal disease, such as human retinitis pigmentosa (RP), or stationary disease, such as congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB). Individuals with CSNB in the Rambusch pedigree were found to carry the H258N allele of PDE6B (MIM# 180072); a similar mutation was not found in RP patients. This report describes an individual carrying the H258N allele, who presented with generalized retinal dysfunction affecting the rod system and a locus of dysfunction at the rod-bipolar interface. Also described are preclinical studies in which transgenic mice with the H258N allele were generated to study the pathophysiological mechanisms of CSNB. While Pde6brd1/Pde6brd1 mice have severe photoreceptor degeneration, as in human RP, the H258N transgene rescued these cells. The cGMP-PDE6 activity of dark-adapted H258N mice showed an approximate three-fold increase in the rate of retinal cGMP hydrolysis: from 130.1 nmol × min−1 × nmol−1 rhodopsin in wild-type controls to 319.2 nmol × min−1 × nmol−1 rhodopsin in mutants, consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of the PDE6β activity by the regulatory PDE6γ subunit is blocked by this mutation. In the albino (B6CBA × FVB) F2 hybrid background, electroretinograms (ERG) from H258N mice were similar to those obtained from affected Rambusch family members, as well as humans with the most common form of CSNB (X-linked), demonstrating a selective loss of the b-wave with relatively normal a-waves. When the H258N allele was introduced into the DBA background, there was no evidence of selective reduction in b-wave amplitudes; rather a- and b-wave amplitudes were both reduced. Thus, factors other than the PDE6B mutation itself could contribute to the variance of an electrophysiological response. Therefore, caution is advisable when interpreting physiological phenotypes associated with the same allele on different genetic backgrounds

  2. A toxin antitoxin system promotes the maintenance of the IncA/C-mobilizable Salmonella Genomic Island 1.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Kevin T; Gonnet, Mathieu; Doublet, Benoît; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2016-08-31

    The multidrug resistance Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) is an integrative mobilizable element identified in several enterobacterial pathogens. This chromosomal island requires a conjugative IncA/C plasmid to be excised as a circular extrachromosomal form and conjugally mobilized in trans. Preliminary observations suggest stable maintenance of SGI1 in the host chromosome but paradoxically also incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids. Here, using a Salmonella enterica serovar Agona clonal bacterial population as model, we demonstrate that a Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) system encoded by SGI1 plays a critical role in its stable host maintenance when an IncA/C plasmid is concomitantly present. This system, designated sgiAT for Salmonella genomic island 1 Antitoxin and Toxin respectively, thus seems to play a stabilizing role in a situation where SGI1 is susceptible to be lost through plasmid IncA/C-mediated excision. Moreover and for the first time, the incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids was experimentally confirmed.

  3. Characterization of pNC1, a small and mobilizable plasmid for use in genetic manipulation of Desulfovibrio africanus.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Carrión, I Nydia; Whiteley, Marvin; Krumholz, Lee R

    2009-10-01

    To develop a vector system that facilitates genetic manipulation in Desulfovibrio species, we screened native sulfate-reducing bacteria for small plasmids. A self-replicating plasmid was discovered in Desulfovibrio africanus SR-1. Sequence analysis of this 8568-bp plasmid (pNC1) revealed a G+C content of 47.2% and nine open reading frames. This plasmid has a copy number of six. Compatible hosts include D. africanus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. Genetic characterization of pNC1 revealed that 53.6% of the plasmid contains genes associated with replication, mobilization, and partitioning. The 1123-bp replicon is composed of a rep gene and four 22-bp iterons. The mobilization operon is composed of three genes with a putative 144-bp oriT. The partitioning operon is composed of parA and parB with a downstream parS. We report the construction of a small pNC1-based cloning vector which transforms D. africanus at high frequencies (approximately 1.5 x 10(3) CFU/microg DNA), is mobilizable at high transfer frequency (4.8 x 10(-4) transconjugants/donor), and is stably maintained under non-selective pressure. This study provides a potential host-vector system for Desulfovibrio gene functional analyses.

  4. A toxin antitoxin system promotes the maintenance of the IncA/C-mobilizable Salmonella Genomic Island 1

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Kevin T.; Gonnet, Mathieu; Doublet, Benoît; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The multidrug resistance Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) is an integrative mobilizable element identified in several enterobacterial pathogens. This chromosomal island requires a conjugative IncA/C plasmid to be excised as a circular extrachromosomal form and conjugally mobilized in trans. Preliminary observations suggest stable maintenance of SGI1 in the host chromosome but paradoxically also incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids. Here, using a Salmonella enterica serovar Agona clonal bacterial population as model, we demonstrate that a Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) system encoded by SGI1 plays a critical role in its stable host maintenance when an IncA/C plasmid is concomitantly present. This system, designated sgiAT for Salmonella genomic island 1 Antitoxin and Toxin respectively, thus seems to play a stabilizing role in a situation where SGI1 is susceptible to be lost through plasmid IncA/C-mediated excision. Moreover and for the first time, the incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids was experimentally confirmed. PMID:27576575

  5. Engineered chromosomes in transgenics.

    PubMed

    Blazso, Peter; Sinko, Ildiko; Katona, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer or simply transgenic technology has evolved much since 1980. Gene delivery strategies, systems, and equipments have become more and more precise and efficient. It has also been shown that even chromosomes can be used besides traditional plasmid and viral vectors for zygote or embryonic stem cell transformation. Artificial chromosomes and their loadable variants have brought their advantages over traditional genetic information carriers into the field of transgenesis. Engineered chromosomes are appealing vectors for gene transfer since they have large transgene carrying capacity, they are non-integrating, and stably expressing in eukaryotic cells. Embryonic stem cell lines can be established that carry engineered chromosomes and ultimately used in transgenic mouse chimera creation. The demonstrated protocol describes all the steps necessary for the successful production of transgenic mouse chimeras with engineered chromosome bearer embryonic stem cells.

  6. Carrying Loom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazaron, Edna

    1976-01-01

    Whenever a young student wanted to weave, his loom was at school or at home. He solved the problem by designing a portable loom which he is able to carry with his school books and can even use on the school bus. (Author/RK)

  7. Transgenic Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  8. Transgenic Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  9. Analysis of pMA67, a predicted rolling-circle replicating, mobilizable, tetracycline-resistance plasmid from the honey bee pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae.

    PubMed

    Murray, K Daniel; Aronstein, Katherine A; de León, Jesse H

    2007-09-01

    This work characterizes a recently discovered natural tetracycline-resistance plasmid called pMA67 from Paenibacillus larvae--a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen of honey bees. We provide evidence that pMA67 replicates by the rolling-circle mechanism, and sequence comparisons place it in the pMV158 family of rolling-circle replicons. The plasmid contains predicted rep, cop, and rnaII genes for control of replication initiating at a predicted double-strand origin. The plasmid has an ssoT single-strand origin, which is efficient enough to allow only very small amounts of the single-stranded DNA intermediate to accumulate. The overall efficiency of replication is sufficient to render the plasmid segregationally stable without selection in P. larvae and in Bacillus megaterium, but not in Escherichia coli. The plasmid is expected to be mobilizable due to the presence of a mob gene and an oriT site. The plasmid contains a tetL gene, whose predicted amino acid sequence implies a relatively ancient divergence from all previously known plasmid-encoded tetL genes. We confirm that the tetL gene alone is sufficient for conferring resistance to tetracyclines. Sequence comparisons, mostly with the well-characterized pMV158, allow us to predict promoters, DNA and RNA secondary structures, DNA and protein motifs, and other elements.

  10. Transgenic animal bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Houdebine, L M

    2000-01-01

    The production of recombinant proteins is one of the major successes of biotechnology. Animal cells are required to synthesize proteins with the appropriate post-translational modifications. Transgenic animals are being used for this purpose. Milk, egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma and silk worm cocoon from transgenic animals are candidates to be the source of recombinant proteins at an industrial scale. Although the first recombinant protein produced by transgenic animals is expected to be in the market in 2000, a certain number of technical problems remain to be solved before the various systems are optimized. Although the generation of transgenic farm animals has become recently easier mainly with the technique of animal cloning using transfected somatic cells as nuclear donor, this point remains a limitation as far as cost is concerned. Numerous experiments carried out for the last 15 years have shown that the expression of the transgene is predictable only to a limited extent. This is clearly due to the fact that the expression vectors are not constructed in an appropriate manner. This undoubtedly comes from the fact that all the signals contained in genes have not yet been identified. Gene constructions thus result sometime in poorly functional expression vectors. One possibility consists in using long genomic DNA fragments contained in YAC or BAC vectors. The other relies on the identification of the major important elements required to obtain a satisfactory transgene expression. These elements include essentially gene insulators, chromatin openers, matrix attached regions, enhancers and introns. A certain number of proteins having complex structures (formed by several subunits, being glycosylated, cleaved, carboxylated...) have been obtained at levels sufficient for an industrial exploitation. In other cases, the mammary cellular machinery seems insufficient to promote all the post-translational modifications. The addition of genes coding for enzymes

  11. A NOT operation on Majorana qubits with mobilizable solitons in an extended Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ye; Tong, Peiqing

    2015-01-01

    Coupling Majorana qubits with other qubits is absolutely essential for storing, manipulating and transferring information for topological quantum computing. We theoretically propose a manner to couple Majorana qubits with solitons, another kind of topological impurity, which was first studied in the spinless Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. We present a NOT operation on the Majorana qubit by moving the soliton through a heterostructure adiabatically. Based on these two topological impurities, the operation is robust against local disorder. Furthermore, we find that the soliton may carry nonuniversal fractional electric charge instead of fractional charge 1/2, because of the breaking of gauge invariance induced by superconducting proximity.

  12. Transgenic mouse offspring generated by ROSI.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Laguna, Ricardo; Fernández-Gonzalez, Raúl; Sanjuanbenito, Belén Pintado; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The production of transgenic animals is an important tool for experimental and applied biology. Over the years, many approaches for the production of transgenic animals have been tried, including pronuclear microinjection, sperm-mediated gene transfer, transfection of male germ cells, somatic cell nuclear transfer and the use of lentiviral vectors. In the present study, we developed a new transgene delivery approach, and we report for the first time the production of transgenic animals by co-injection of DNA and round spermatid nuclei into non-fertilized mouse oocytes (ROSI). The transgene used was a construct containing the human CMV immediate early promoter and the enhanced GFP gene. With this procedure, 12% of the live offspring we obtained carried the transgene. This efficiency of transgenic production by ROSI was similar to the efficiency by pronuclear injection or intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei (ICSI). However, ICSI required fewer embryos to produce the same number of transgenic animals. The expression of Egfp mRNA and fluorescence of EGFP were found in the majority of the organs examined in 4 transgenic lines generated by ROSI. Tissue morphology and transgene expression were not distinguishable between transgenic animals produced by ROSI or pronuclear injection. Furthermore, our results are of particular interest because they indicate that the transgene incorporation mediated by intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei is not an exclusive property of mature sperm cell nuclei with compact chromatin but it can be accomplished with immature sperm cell nuclei with decondensed chromatin as well. The present study also provides alternative procedures for transgene delivery into embryos or reconstituted oocytes.

  13. Variegated transgene expression in mouse mammary gland is determined by the transgene integration locus.

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, K W; Lee, M; Fantes, J A; Graham, E; Clark, A J; Springbett, A; Lathe, R; McClenaghan, M

    1996-01-01

    Mice carrying an ovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) transgene secrete BLG protein into their milk. To explore transgene expression stability, we studied expression levels in three BLG transgenic mouse lines. Unexpectedly, two lines exhibited variable levels of transgene expression. Copy number within lines appeared to be stable and there was no evidence of transgene rearrangement. In the most variable line, BLG production levels were stable within individual mice in two successive lactations. Backcrossing demonstrated that genetic background did not contribute significantly to variable expression. Tissue in situ hybridization revealed mosaicism of transgene expression within individual mammary glands from the two variable lines; in low expressors, discrete patches of cells expressing the transgene were observed. Transgene protein concentrations in milk reflected the proportion of epithelial cells expressing BLG mRNA. Furthermore, chromosomal in situ hybridization revealed that transgene arrays in both lines are situated close to the centromere. We propose that mosaicism of transgene expression is a consequence of the chromosomal location and/or the nature of the primary transgene integration event. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692874

  14. [Transgenics and controlled evolution].

    PubMed

    Azevedo, J L; Fungaro, M H; Vieira, M L

    2000-01-01

    Mutation events are responsible for the generation of genetic variability in the populations enabling the occurrence of natural selection which favors the better-adapted types. The exploitation of this variability, though carried out empirically, dates from ten thousand years ago with the domestication of the first cultivated crops. With the advent of genetics, rational selection procedures were adopted with a view of the genetic breeding of plants, animals and microorganisms which might be of interest to men. Recently, new DNA manipulation techniques came up enabling the transference of genes between organisms, cutting across barriers which hindered crossing between the vegetable, animal, protist and fungus kingdoms. The generation of genetically modified organisms, or transgenics, has aroused a heated and controversial debate in various sectors of our society. Yet we must be cautious before generalizing the use of transgenics since each one should be analyzed at a time for its particular advantages and drawbacks, and for its contribution to the improvement of life quality. This paper also considers recent methods of mutation and in vitro genic recombination.

  15. Neuroanatomy and transgenic technologies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is a short review that introduces recent advances of neuroanatomy and transgenic technologies. The anatomical complexity of the nervous system remains a subject of tremendous fascination among neuroscientists. In order to tackle this extraordinary complexity, powerful transgenic technologies a...

  16. Relative fitness of transgenic vs. non-transgenic maize x teosinte hybrids: a field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guadagnuolo, R; Clegg, J; Ellstrand, N C

    2006-10-01

    Concern has been often expressed regarding the impact and persistence of transgenes that enter wild populations via gene flow. The impact of a transgene and its persistence are largely determined by the relative fitness of transgenic hybrids and hybrid derivatives compared to non-transgenic plants. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed this question experimentally in the field. Despite the economic importance of maize, and the fact that it naturally hybridizes with the teosinte taxon Zea mays ssp. mexicana, sometimes known as "chalco teosinte," the question has received little experimental attention in this system. Using a glyphosate-tolerant maize cultivar and chalco teosinte as parental lines, we carried out a field experiment testing (1) the relative fitness of maize x teosinte hybrids, compared to their parental taxa, as well as (2) the relative fitness of transgenic hybrids compared to non-transgenic hybrids created from the same parental stock. In order to evaluate the influence of the transgenic construct in different genetic backgrounds, our study included transgenic and non-transgenic pure maize progeny from the cultivar as well. We measured both vegetative and reproductive parameters. Our results demonstrated that hybrids have greater vigor and produced more seeds than the wild parent. However, in the absence of selective pressure from glyphosate herbicide, we did not observe any direct positive or negative impact of the transgene on the fitness or vigor of either the hybrids or pure maize progeny. We discuss our results in terms of the potential for spontaneous transgene flow and introgression from transgenic maize into sympatric teosinte.

  17. Evaluation of haematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters of transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jurcik, R; Suvegova, K; Hanusova, E; Massanyi, P; Ryban, L; Chrenek, P

    2007-11-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the hFVIII mRNA expression in different organs, pathological changes and selected haematological and biochemical blood parameters between transgenic and non-transgenic rabbits from F3 generation. Selected physiological parameters of 3- to 4-month-old transgenic rabbits from F3 generation carrying human factor VIII gene (hFVIII) were analysed and compared with those of non-transgenic ones. Before slaughtering, the blood for haematological and biochemical analysis was taken from the central ear artery. Pathological and histological examination of vital organs and RT-PCR analysis of several tissue organs of transgenic and non-transgenic animals were performed after slaughtering. Except for the mammary gland tissue, slight hfVIII mRNA expression in the spleen, lung and brain and none expression in the liver, kidney, skeletal muscle and heart of rabbits were recorded. pathological examination of vital organs showed some pathological changes in both transgenic and non-transgenic rabbits which were confirmed by histological qualitative evaluations. Statistically significant lower values of blood haemoglobin in blood of transgenic (11.86+/-0.86) animals compared with non-transgenic (12.41+/-1.02, P<0.05) ones and lower parameters of HCT (39.22+/-2.44 versus 40.89+/-2.26, P<0.01) in blood of transgenic rabbits were observed. Parameters of WBC, RBC and PLT showed no significant differences between the analysed groups. All biochemical serum parameters of transgenic rabbits were higher in comparison with non-transgenic ones. Significant differences were found in the concentration of the urea, AST and GMT between transgenic and non-transgenic animals (P<0.001) and in the total protein content, the difference was significant at P<0.05. In conclusion, our results showed that no considerable impact on the general health was found in transgenic rabbits.

  18. Improved production of genetically modified fetuses with homogeneous transgene expression after transgene integration site analysis and recloning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Fabiana Fernandes; Dos Santos Miranda, Moyses; Perecin, Felipe; De Bem, Tiago Henrique; Pereira, Flavia Thomaz Verechia; Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria; Alves, Daiani; Strauss, Bryan; Bajgelman, Marcio; Krieger, José Eduardo; Binelli, Mario; Meirelles, Flavio Vieira

    2011-02-01

    Animal cloning by nuclear transfer (NT) has made the production of transgenic animals using genetically modified donor cells possible and ensures the presence of the gene construct in the offspring. The identification of transgene insertion sites in donor cells before cloning may avoid the production of animals that carry undesirable characteristics due to positional effects. This article compares blastocyst development and competence to establish pregnancies of bovine cloned embryos reconstructed with lentivirus-mediated transgenic fibroblasts containing either random integration of a transgene (random integration group) or nuclear transfer derived transgenic fibroblasts with known transgene insertion sites submitted to recloning (recloned group). In the random integration group, eGFP-expressing bovine fetal fibroblasts were selected by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and used as nuclei donor cells for NT. In the recloned group, a fibroblast cell line derived from a transgenic cloned fetus was characterized regarding transgene insertion and submitted to recloning. The recloned group had higher blastocyst production (25.38 vs. 14.42%) and higher percentage of 30-day pregnancies (14.29 vs. 2.56%) when compared to the random integration group. Relative eGFP expression analysis in fibroblasts derived from each cloned embryo revealed more homogeneous expression in the recloned group. In conclusion, the use of cell lines recovered from transgenic fetuses after identification of the transgene integration site allowed for the production of cells and fetuses with stable transgene expression, and recloning may improve transgenic animal yields.

  19. [Transgenic animals bioreactors].

    PubMed

    Gou, Ke-Mian; An, Xiao-Rong; Tian, Jian-Hui; Chen, Yong-Fu

    2002-01-01

    The production of human recombinant proteins in milk of transgenic farm animals offers a safe, very cost-effective source of commercially important proteins that cannot be produced as efficiently in adequate quantities by other methods. This review has summarized the current status of gene selection, vector construct, transgenic methods, economics, and obvious potential in transgenic animals bioreactors. Recently, a more powerful approach was adopted in the transgenic animals founded on the application of nuclear transfer. As we will illustrate, this strategy presents a breakthrough in the overall efficiency of generating transgenic farm animals, product consistency, and time of product development. The successful adaptation of Cre-/lox P-mediated site-specific DNA recombination systems in farm animals will offer unprecedented possibilities for generating transgenic animals.

  20. Carrying Backpacks: Physical Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    It is estimated that more than 40 million U.S. youth carry school materials in backs, routinely carrying books, laptop computers, personal and other items used on a daily basis. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that 7,277 emergency visits each year result from injuries related to backpacks. Injury can occur when a child…

  1. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  2. [Transposition of the maize transposable element dSpm in transgenic sugar beets].

    PubMed

    Kishchenko, E M; Komarnitskiĭ, I K; Kuchuk, N V

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic sugar beet plants carrying maize Spmn/dSpm transposable elements system have been constructed. Heterologous system of maize transposable elements Spm/dSpm was active in transgenic sugar beets that permits transposon-based gene tagging and obtaining of marker-free transgenic sugar beet.

  3. Construction of improved temperature-sensitive and mobilizable vectors and their use for constructing mutations in the adhesin-encoding acm gene of poorly transformable clinical Enterococcus faecium strains.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Singh, Kavindra V; Murray, Barbara E

    2006-01-01

    Inactivation by allelic exchange in clinical isolates of the emerging nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium has been hindered by lack of efficient tools, and, in this study, transformation of clinical isolates was found to be particularly problematic. For this reason, a vector for allelic replacement (pTEX5500ts) was constructed that includes (i) the pWV01-based gram-positive repAts replication region, which is known to confer a high degree of temperature intolerance, (ii) Escherichia coli oriR from pUC18, (iii) two extended multiple-cloning sites located upstream and downstream of one of the marker genes for efficient cloning of flanking regions for double-crossover mutagenesis, (iv) transcriptional terminator sites to terminate undesired readthrough, and (v) a synthetic extended promoter region containing the cat gene for allelic exchange and a high-level gentamicin resistance gene, aph(2'')-Id, to distinguish double-crossover recombination, both of which are functional in gram-positive and gram-negative backgrounds. To demonstrate the functionality of this vector, the vector was used to construct an acm (encoding an adhesin to collagen from E. faecium) deletion mutant of a poorly transformable multidrug-resistant E. faecium endocarditis isolate, TX0082. The acm-deleted strain, TX6051 (TX0082Deltaacm), was shown to lack Acm on its surface, which resulted in the abolishment of the collagen adherence phenotype observed in TX0082. A mobilizable derivative (pTEX5501ts) that contains oriT of Tn916 to facilitate conjugative transfer from the transformable E. faecalis strain JH2Sm::Tn916 to E. faecium was also constructed. Using this vector, the acm gene of a nonelectroporable E. faecium wound isolate was successfully interrupted. Thus, pTEX5500ts and its mobilizable derivative demonstrated their roles as important tools by helping to create the first reported allelic replacement in E. faecium; the constructed this acm deletion mutant will be useful for assessing the

  4. Unstable expression of transgene is associated with the methylation of CAG promoter in the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Teng; Zhang, Qin-Kai; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Deng-Gao; Zhang, Min; Shen, Wei; Pan, Qing-Jie

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic animals have been established for studying gene function, improving animals' production traits, and providing organ models for the exploration of human diseases. However, the stability of inheritance and transgene expression in transgenic animals has gained extensive attention. The unstable expression of transgene through DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) targeting to the methylation of transgenic DNA such as CAG promoter and Egfp coding region in homozygous transgenic animals is still unknown. In the present study, the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice carrying ubiquitously expressed enhanced green fluorescence protein driven by CMV early enhancer/chicken β-actin (CAG) promoter was observed to have unstable expression of transgene Egfp, quantitative PCR, western blot and bisulfite sequencing were conducted to quantify the expressional characteristics and methylation levels in various tissues. The correlation between transgene expression and methylation was analyzed. We have found that transgene expression is dependent on the methylation of CAG promoter, but not Egfp coding region. We have also characterized the correlation between the methylation of CAG promoter and DNMT, and found that only Dnmt3b expression is correlated with the methylation of CAG promoter. In conclusion, Dnmt3b-related methylation of CAG promoter can inhibit the transgene expression and may result in the unstable expression of transgene in the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice.

  5. Weeding with transgenes.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2003-05-01

    Transgenes promise to reduce insecticide and fungicide use but relatively little has been done to significantly reduce herbicide use through genetic engineering. Recently, three strategies for transgene utilization have been developed that have the potential to change this. These are the improvement of weed-specific biocontrol agents, enhancement of crop competition or allelopathic traits, and production of cover crops that will self-destruct near the time of planting. Failsafe risk mitigation technologies are needed for most of these strategies.

  6. Wife carrying for health.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Min; Titze, Sylvia; Oja, Pekka

    2011-12-19

    To highlight a fun activity--the sport of wife carrying--and to investigate factors associated with better performance. Cross-sectional study based in Sonkajärvi, Finland (venue of the annual Wife Carrying World Championship race), of 172 couples participating in wife-carrying races, 1992-2010. Race finishing time. The mean age for male participants was 32.6 (SD, 8.7) years and for female participants, 30.5 (SD, 9.2) years. The mean finishing time was 98 s. Finish times tended to be somewhat slower as the age of the male partner increased (P = 0.06), but not as the female partner's age increased (P = 0.89). Race experience was not associated with faster times (P = 0.88). Estonians were almost 12 s faster than other nationalities, although this was not statistically significant (P = 0.25), probably due to the small number of Estonians. Men who engaged in endurance-type physical activities as hobbies (P = 0.003), or in both endurance- and strength-building activities (P = 0.001), were significantly faster than those who did neither. Among women, strength-building (P = 0.03) but not endurance-type (P = 0.36) physical activities were significantly associated with faster race times. Wife carrying can be a novel option for increasing physical activity levels, which improve health. Although some key data were unavailable, such as wife's body weight, and injury rates, this study identified several factors associated with better performance in this sport.

  7. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats.

  8. [Inheritance and expression stability of transgene in transgenic animals].

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing-Ran; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2011-05-01

    Transgenic technology is one of the most hotspots in biology. In the past decade, the progress in animal cloning has provided an alternative method to improve transgenic efficiency. Many kinds of transgenic animals have been successfully produced via the combination of transfection and nuclear transfer. However, the ultimate aim of transgenesis is not to produce several transgenic animals, but to service for the needs of human. In animal production, transgenic technology has been used to breed new livestock, which has received a lot of attention in China. It has been evidenced that inheritance and expression instability of transgene in transgenic animals is still the major limitation, which is attributed to position effect, epigenetic modification, and hereditary efficiency of transgene. In this review, we discussed the three points for promoting the industrialization of animal transgenic breeding.

  9. Transgenic Spartina alterniflora for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Czakó, Mihály; Feng, Xianzhong; He, Yuke; Liang, Dali; Márton, László

    2006-01-01

    Perennial monoculture forming grasses are very important natural remediators of pollutants. Their genetic improvement is an important task because introduction of key transgenes can dramatically improve their remediation potential. Transfer of key genes for mercury phytoremediation into the salt marsh cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) is reported here. S. alterniflora plays an important role in the salt marsh by cycling of elements, both nutrients and pollutants, protects the coastline from erosion, is a keystone species in the salt marsh supporting a large food web, which in turn supports a significant segment of economy, including tourism, has an impact on cloud formation and consequently on global weather, and is thus an ecologically important species relevant for our life-support systems. Embryogenic callus of S. alterniflora was co-inoculated with a pair of Agrobacterium strains LBA4404 carrying the organomercurial lyase (merB) and mercuric reductase (merA) genes, respectively, in order to co-introduce both the merA and the merB genes. Seven stable geneticin resistant lines were recovered. The presence of merA and merB genes was verified by PCR and Southern blotting. All but one transgenic lines contained both the merA and the merB sequences proving that co-introduction into Spartina of two genes from separate Agrobacterium strains is feasible and frequent, although the overall frequency of transformation is low. Northern blotting showed differences in relative expression of the two transgenes among individual transformants. The steady-state RNA levels appeared to correlate with the phenotype. Line #7 showed the highest resistance to HgCl(2) (up to 500 microM), whereas line #3 was the most resistant to phenylmercuric acetate (PMA). Wild-type (WT) callus is sensitive to PMA at 50 microM and to HgCl(2) at 225 microM.

  10. Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had m...

  11. [Progress on transgenic mosquitoes].

    PubMed

    Yang, Pin

    2011-04-30

    The genetically modified mosquitoes have been developed aiming to control mosquito-borne diseases by either reducing population sizes or replacing existing populations with vectors unable to transmit the disease. introduces some progress on the generation of transgenic mosquitoes and their fitness in wild population. This paper

  12. Transgenic mammals and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Westphal, H

    1989-02-01

    Biotechnology has begun to realize the enormous potential of transgenic technology: mice with human genes that produce human proteins of therapeutic value in their milk, pigs that express bovine genes that help them gain weight and lose backfat, animals with engineered gene defects that mimic human genetic diseases.

  13. Transgenic Farm Animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of recombinant DNA technology has enabled scientists to isolate single genes, analyze and modify their nucleotide structure(s), make copies of these isolated genes, and insert copies of these genes into the genome of plants and animals. The transgenic technology of adding genes to li...

  14. Inheritance and expression of transgenes through anther culture of transgenic hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Soon; Kuk, Yong In; Kim, Kyung-Moon

    2007-01-01

    Anther cultures have been developed from transgenic donor peppers carrying HPT/J1-1. Eight out of sixteen plants produced from an anther culture set pepper fruits. Southern blot analysis of donors revealed two independent plants with a single copy of the integrated transgene. PCR and RT-PCR results showed the inheritance of HPT/J1-1 and expression of J1-1 in A1. All A1 progeny derived from transgenic anthers had resistance to hygromycin. They grew normally and showed similar phenotypes to the wild-type. Therefore, the use of an anther culture system coupled with genetic transformation in breeding programs will greatly facilitate the genetic improvement of pepper plants.

  15. Simple and rapid determination of homozygous transgenic mice via in vivo fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaolin; Jia, Junshuang; Qin, Yujuan; Lin, Xia; Li, Wei; Xiao, Gaofang; Li, Yanqing; Xie, Raoying; Huang, Hailu; Zhong, Lin; Wu, Qinghong; Wang, Wanshan; Huang, Wenhua; Yao, Kaitai; Xiao, Dong; Sun, Yan

    2015-11-17

    Setting up breeding programs for transgenic mouse strains require to distinguish homozygous from the heterozygous transgenic animals. The combinational use of the fluorescence reporter transgene and small animal in-vivo imaging system might allow us to rapidly and visually determine the transgenic mice homozygous for transgene(s) by the in vivo fluorescence imaging. RLG, RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice ubiquitously express red fluorescent protein (RFP). To identify homozygous RLG transgenic mice, whole-body fluorescence imaging for all of newborn F2-generation littermates produced by mating of RFP-positive heterozygous transgenic mice (F1-generation) derived from the same transgenic founder was performed. Subsequently, the immediate data analysis of the in vivo fluorescence imaging was carried out, which greatly facilitated us to rapidly and readily distinguish RLG transgenic individual(s) with strong fluorescence from the rest of F2-generation littermates, followed by further determining this/these RLG individual(s) showing strong fluorescence to be homozygous, as strongly confirmed by mouse mating. Additionally, homozygous RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice were also rapidly and precisely distinguished by the above-mentioned optical approach. This approach allowed us within the shortest time period to obtain 10, 8 and 2 transgenic mice homozygous for RLG, RCLG and Rm17LG transgene, respectively, as verified by mouse mating, indicating the practicality and reliability of this optical method. Taken together, our findings fully demonstrate that the in vivo fluorescence imaging offers a visual, rapid and reliable alternative method to the traditional approaches (i.e., mouse mating and real-time quantitative PCR) in identifying homozygous transgenic mice harboring fluorescence reporter transgene under the control of a ubiquitous promoter in the situation mentioned in this study.

  16. Highly Efficient Generation of Transgenic Sheep by Lentivirus Accompanying the Alteration of Methylation Status

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenxi; Wang, Liqin; Li, Wenrong; Zhang, Xuemei; Tian, Yongzhi; Zhang, Ning; He, Sangang; Chen, Tong; Huang, Juncheng; Liu, Mingjun

    2013-01-01

    Background Low efficiency of gene transfer and silence of transgene expression are the critical factors hampering the development of transgenic livestock. Recently, transfer of recombinant lentivirus has been demonstrated to be an efficient transgene delivery method in various animals. However, the lentiviral transgenesis and the methylation status of transgene in sheep have not been well addressed. Methodology/Principle Findings EGFP transgenic sheep were generated by injecting recombinant lentivirus into zygotes. Of the 13 lambs born, 8 carried the EGFP transgene, and its chromosomal integration was identified in all tested tissues. Western blotting showed that GFP was expressed in all transgenic founders and their various tissues. Analysis of CpG methylation status of CMV promoter by bisulfate sequencing unraveled remarkable variation of methylation levels in transgenic sheep. The average methylation levels ranged from 37.6% to 79.1% in the transgenic individuals and 34.7% to 83% in the tested tissues. Correlative analysis of methylation status with GFP expression revealed that the GFP expression level was inversely correlated with methylation density. The similar phenomenon was also observed in tested tissues. Transgene integration determined by Southern blotting presented multiple integrants ranging from 2 to 6 copies in the genome of transgenic sheep. Conclusions/Significance Injection of lentiviral transgene into zygotes could be a promising efficient gene delivery system to generate transgenic sheep and achieved widespread transgene expression. The promoter of integrants transferred by lentiviral vector was subjected to dramatic alteration of methylation status and the transgene expression level was inversely correlative with promoter methylation density. Our work illustrated for the first time that generation of transgenic sheep by injecting recombinant lentivirus into zygote could be an efficient tool to improve sheep performance by genetic modification

  17. Simple and rapid determination of homozygous transgenic mice via in vivo fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Xiao, Gaofang; Li, Yanqing; Xie, Raoying; Huang, Hailu; Zhong, Lin; Wu, Qinghong; Wang, Wanshan; Huang, Wenhua; Yao, Kaitai; Xiao, Dong; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Setting up breeding programs for transgenic mouse strains require to distinguish homozygous from the heterozygous transgenic animals. The combinational use of the fluorescence reporter transgene and small animal in-vivo imaging system might allow us to rapidly and visually determine the transgenic mice homozygous for transgene(s) by the in vivo fluorescence imaging. RLG, RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice ubiquitously express red fluorescent protein (RFP). To identify homozygous RLG transgenic mice, whole-body fluorescence imaging for all of newborn F2-generation littermates produced by mating of RFP-positive heterozygous transgenic mice (F1-generation) derived from the same transgenic founder was performed. Subsequently, the immediate data analysis of the in vivo fluorescence imaging was carried out, which greatly facilitated us to rapidly and readily distinguish RLG transgenic individual(s) with strong fluorescence from the rest of F2-generation littermates, followed by further determining this/these RLG individual(s) showing strong fluorescence to be homozygous, as strongly confirmed by mouse mating. Additionally, homozygous RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice were also rapidly and precisely distinguished by the above-mentioned optical approach. This approach allowed us within the shortest time period to obtain 10, 8 and 2 transgenic mice homozygous for RLG, RCLG and Rm17LG transgene, respectively, as verified by mouse mating, indicating the practicality and reliability of this optical method. Taken together, our findings fully demonstrate that the in vivo fluorescence imaging offers a visual, rapid and reliable alternative method to the traditional approaches (i.e., mouse mating and real-time quantitative PCR) in identifying homozygous transgenic mice harboring fluorescence reporter transgene under the control of a ubiquitous promoter in the situation mentioned in this study. PMID:26472024

  18. Illegal gene flow from transgenic creeping bentgrass: the saga continues.

    PubMed

    Snow, Allison A

    2012-10-01

    Ecologists have paid close attention to environmental effects that fitness-enhancing transgenes might have following crop-to-wild gene flow (e.g. Snow et al. 2003). For some crops, gene flow also can lead to legal problems,especially when government agencies have not approved transgenic events for unrestricted environmental release.Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), a common turf grass used in golf courses, is the focus of both areas of concern. In 2002, prior to expected deregulation (still pending), The Scotts Company planted creeping bentgrass with transgenic resistance to the herbicide glyphosate,also known as RoundUp, on 162 ha in a designated control area in central Oregon (Fig. 1).Despite efforts to restrict gene flow, wind-dispersed pollen carried transgenes to florets of local A. stolonifera and A. gigantea as far as 14 km away, and to sentinel plants placed as far as 21 km away (Watrud et al. 2004).Then, in August 2003, a strong wind event moved transgenic seeds from wind rows of cut bentgrass into nearby areas. The company’s efforts to kill all transgenic survivors in the area failed: feral glyphosate-resistant populations of A. stolonifera were found by Reichman et al.(2006), and 62% of 585 bentgrass plants had the telltale CP4 EPSPS transgene in 2006 (Zapiola et al. 2008; Fig. 2).Now, in this issue, the story gets even more interesting as Zapiola & Mallory-Smith (2012) describe a transgenic,intergeneric hybrid produced on a feral, transgenic creeping bentgrass plant that received pollen from Polypogon monspeliensis (rabbitfoot grass). Their finding raises a host of new questions about the prevalence and fitness of intergeneric hybrids, as well as how to evaluate the full extent of gene flow from transgenic crops.

  19. Novel mobilizable prokaryotic two-hybrid system vectors for high-throughput protein interaction mapping in Escherichia coli by bacterial conjugation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Paul; Cuív, Páraic O; O'Connell, Michael

    2005-02-01

    Since its initial description, the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system has been widely used for the detection and analysis of protein-protein interactions. Mating-based strategies have been developed permitting its application for automated proteomic interaction mapping projects using both exhaustive and high-throughput strategies. More recently, a number of prokaryotic two-hybrid (P2H) systems have been developed but, despite the many advantages such Escherichia coli-based systems have over the Y2H system, they have not yet been widely implemented for proteomic interaction mapping. This may be largely due to the fact that high-throughput strategies employing bacterial transformation are not as amenable to automation as Y2H mating-based strategies. Here, we describe the construction of novel conjugative P2H system vectors. These vectors carry a mobilization element of the IncPalpha group plasmid RP4 and can therefore be mobilized with high efficiency from an E.coli donor strain encoding all of the required transport functions in trans. We demonstrate how these vectors permit the exploitation of bacterial conjugation for technically simplified and automated proteomic interaction mapping strategies in E.coli, analogous to the mating-based strategies developed for the Y2H system.

  20. Relative transgene expression frequencies in homozygous versus hemizygous transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Ping; Opsahl, Margaret L; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Morley, Steven D; West, John D

    2013-12-01

    We have used a simple binomial model of stochastic transgene inactivation at the level of the chromosome or transgene, rather than the cellular level, for the analysis of two mouse transgenic lines that show variegated patterns of expression. This predicts the percentages of cells that express one, both or neither alleles of the transgene in homozygotes from the observed percentages of cells, which express the transgene in hemizygotes. It adequately explained the relationship between the numbers of cells expressing the transgene in hemizygous and homozygous mosaic 21OH/LacZ mouse adrenals and mosaic BLG/7 mouse mammary glands. The binomial model also predicted that a small proportion of cells in mosaic mammary glands of BLG/7 homozygotes would express both BLG/7 alleles but published data indicated that all cells expressing the transgene showed monoallelic expression. Although it didn't fit all of the BLG/7 data as precisely as a more complex model, which used several ad hoc assumptions to explain these results, the simple binomial model was able to explain the relationship in observed transgene expression frequencies between hemizygous and homozygous mosaic tissues for both 21OH/LacZ and BLG/7 mice. It may prove to be a useful general model for analysing other transgenic animals showing mosaic transgene expression.

  1. Interspecies Dissemination of a Mobilizable Plasmid Harboring blaIMP-19 and the Possibility of Horizontal Gene Transfer in a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gomi, Ryota; Matsuda, Tomonari; Tanaka, Michio; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Uemoto, Shinji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli have been a global concern over the past 2 decades because these organisms can cause severe infections with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase genes are often carried by mobile genetic elements, and resistance plasmids can be transferred through conjugation. We conducted whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to demonstrate that the same plasmid harboring a metallo-β-lactamase gene was detected in two different species isolated from a single patient. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing Achromobacter xylosoxidans (KUN4507), non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KUN4843), and metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae (KUN5033) were sequentially isolated from a single patient and then analyzed in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing), and conjugation analyses were performed by conventional methods. Phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis of K. pneumoniae isolates were performed with WGS, and the nucleotide sequences of plasmids detected from these isolates were determined using WGS. Conventional molecular typing revealed that KUN4843 and KUN5033 were identical, whereas the phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a slight difference. These two isolates were separated from the most recent common ancestor 0.74 years before they were isolated. The same resistance plasmid harboring blaIMP-19 was detected in metallo-β-lactamase-producing A. xylosoxidans and K. pneumoniae. Although this plasmid was not self-transferable, the conjugation of this plasmid from A. xylosoxidans to non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae was successfully performed. The susceptibility patterns for metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and the transconjugant were similar. These findings supported the possibility of the horizontal transfer of plasmid-borne blaIMP-19 from A. xylosoxidans to K. pneumoniae in a single patient. PMID

  2. Design and Management of Field Trials of Transgenic Cereals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedő, Zoltán; Rakszegi, Mariann; Láng, László

    The development of gene transformation systems has allowed the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. The design and the management of field trials vary according to the purpose for which transgenic cereals are developed. Breeders study the phenotypic and genotypic stability of transgenic plants, monitor the increase in homozygosity of transgenic genotypes under field conditions, and develop backcross generations to transfer the introduced genes into secondary transgenic cereal genotypes. For practical purposes, they may also multiply seed of the transgenic lines to produce sufficient amounts of grain for the detailed analysis of trait(s) of interest, to determine the field performance of transgenic lines, and to compare them with the non-transformed parental genotypes. Prior to variety registration, the Distinctness, Uniformity and Stability (DUS) tests and Value for Cultivation and Use (VCU) experiments are carried out in field trials. Field testing includes specific requirements for transgenic cereals to assess potential environmental risks. The capacity of the pollen to survive, establish and disseminate in the field test environment, the potential for gene transfer, the effects of products expressed by the introduced sequences and phenotypic and genotypic instability that might cause deleterious effects must all be specifically monitored, as required by EU Directives 2003/701/EC (1) on the release of genetically modified higher plants in the environment.

  3. Transgenes for tea?

    PubMed

    Heritage, John

    2005-01-01

    So far, no compelling scientific evidence has been found to suggest that the consumption of transgenic or genetically modified (GM) plants by animals or humans is more likely to cause harm than is the consumption of their conventional counterparts. Despite this lack of scientific evidence, the economic prospects for GM plants are probably limited in the short term and there is public opposition to the technology. Now is a good time to address several issues concerning GM plants, including the potential for transgenes to migrate from GM plants to gut microbes or to animal or human tissues, the consequences of consuming GM crops, either as fresh plants or as silage, and the problems caused by current legislation on GM labelling and beyond.

  4. Transgenics in crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y.; Wu, Y. H.; McAvoy, R.; Duan, H.

    2001-01-01

    With rapid world population growth and declining availability of fresh water and arable land, a new technology is urgently needed to enhance agricultural productivity. Recent discoveries in the field of crop transgenics clearly demonstrate the great potential of this technology for increasing food production and improving food quality while preserving the environment for future generations. In this review, we briefly discuss some of the recent achievements in crop improvement that have been made using gene transfer technology.

  5. Transgenics in crops.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wu, Y H; McAvoy, R; Duan, H

    2001-01-01

    With rapid world population growth and declining availability of fresh water and arable land, a new technology is urgently needed to enhance agricultural productivity. Recent discoveries in the field of crop transgenics clearly demonstrate the great potential of this technology for increasing food production and improving food quality while preserving the environment for future generations. In this review, we briefly discuss some of the recent achievements in crop improvement that have been made using gene transfer technology.

  6. Efficient and Rapid Development of Transgenic Hamster Models of TSEs Using a Radical New Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    high scrapie susceptibility genotype VVRRQQ. All three lines of the mouse transgenics carrying sheep, human, and elk PrP have been now re-derived. We...have observed the first transmission of the disease from our standard scrapie -infected sheep brain inoculum to the transgenic mice with sheep PrP and...already been distributed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Transgenic, Mouse, Hamster, TSE, Sheep Scrapie , TOSK, transposon 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  7. 35. CARRIE FURNACE No. 6 AND CAST HOUSE. THE CARRIE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. CARRIE FURNACE No. 6 AND CAST HOUSE. THE CARRIE BOILER SHOP IS ON THE RIGHT, IN FRONT OF HOT BLAST STOVES. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  8. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  9. Allergenicity assessment of the Papaya ringspot virus coat protein expressed in transgenic Rainbow papaya

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The virus-resistant, transgenic commercial papaya cultivars Rainbow and SunUp (Carica papaya L.) have been consumed locally in Hawaii and elsewhere in the mainland US and Canada since their release to planters in Hawaii in 1998. These cultivars are derived from transgenic papaya line 55-1 and carry ...

  10. On fast carry select adders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamanna, M.; Whitaker, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for a high-speed carry select adder with very long bit lengths utilizing a conflict-free bypass scheme. The proposed scheme has almost half the number of transistors and is faster than a conventional carry select adder. A comparative study is also made between the proposed adder and a Manchester carry chain adder which shows that the proposed scheme has the same transistor count, without suffering any performance degradation, compared to the Manchester carry chain adder.

  11. On fast carry select adders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanna, M.; Whitaker, S.

    This paper presents an architecture for a high-speed carry select adder with very long bit lengths utilizing a conflict-free bypass scheme. The proposed scheme has almost half the number of transistors and is faster than a conventional carry select adder. A comparative study is also made between the proposed adder and a Manchester carry chain adder which shows that the proposed scheme has the same transistor count, without suffering any performance degradation, compared to the Manchester carry chain adder.

  12. Plant biotechnology: transgenic crops.

    PubMed

    Shewry, Peter R; Jones, Huw D; Halford, Nigel G

    2008-01-01

    Transgenesis is an important adjunct to classical plant breeding, in that it allows the targeted manipulation of specific characters using genes from a range of sources. The current status of crop transformation is reviewed, including methods of gene transfer, the selection of transformed plants and control of transgene expression. The application of genetic modification technology to specific traits is then discussed, including input traits relating to crop production (herbicide tolerance and resistance to insects, pathogens and abiotic stresses) and output traits relating to the composition and quality of the harvested organs. The latter include improving the nutritional quality for consumers as well as the improvement of functional properties for food processing.

  13. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xingling; Lv, Jinhui; Jia, Huixia; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2017-01-01

    To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar) and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0%) compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture) after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations.

  14. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingling; Lv, Jinhui; Jia, Huixia; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2017-01-01

    To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar) and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0%) compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture) after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations. PMID:28085955

  15. Consistent production of transgenic chickens using replication-deficient retroviral vectors and high-throughput screening procedures.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A J; Speksnijder, G; Baugh, L R; Morris, J A; Ivarie, R

    2002-02-01

    We have developed a novel method of DNA extraction combined with a high-throughput method of gene detection allowing thousands of potentially transgenic chicks to be screened quickly and reliably. By using this method and a replication-deficient retroviral vector based on avian leukosis virus (ALV), we have demonstrated germline transmission of three different transgenes. Several generations of chickens carrying intact transgenes were produced, validating the use of the ALV retroviral vectors for large-scale production of transgenic flocks. Fourth-generation chicks that were nontransgenic, hemizygous, or homozygous for the transgene were identified with the combined genetic screening methods.

  16. [Progress in transgenics on Toxoplasma gondii].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Hou-Shuang; Zhou, Jin-Lin

    2011-12-01

    The application of transgenes in Toxoplasma gondii research facilitates its genetic analysis. This article reviews the progress in construction of transgenes vector, transgenics in the research of T. gondii.

  17. Epigenetic silencing in transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    Rajeevkumar, Sarma; Anunanthini, Pushpanathan; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing is a natural phenomenon in which the expression of genes is regulated through modifications of DNA, RNA, or histone proteins. It is a mechanism for defending host genomes against the effects of transposable elements and viral infection, and acts as a modulator of expression of duplicated gene family members and as a silencer of transgenes. A major breakthrough in understanding the mechanism of epigenetic silencing was the discovery of silencing in transgenic tobacco plants due to the interaction between two homologous promoters. The molecular mechanism of epigenetic mechanism is highly complicated and it is not completely understood yet. Two different molecular routes have been proposed for this, that is, transcriptional gene silencing, which is associated with heavy methylation of promoter regions and blocks the transcription of transgenes, and post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), the basic mechanism is degradation of the cytosolic mRNA of transgenes or endogenous genes. Undesired transgene silencing is of major concern in the transgenic technologies used in crop improvement. A complete understanding of this phenomenon will be very useful for transgenic applications, where silencing of specific genes is required. The current status of epigenetic silencing in transgenic technology is discussed and summarized in this mini-review. PMID:26442010

  18. Transgenic horticultural crops in Asia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modern biotechnology applications, including genetic engineering, are a powerful tool to complement the conventional methods of crop improvement. Asia currently has three countries cultivating biotech/transgenic crops – China, India, and the Philippines, but only China commercially grows a transgen...

  19. Transcriptionally Silenced Transgenes in Maize Are Activated by Three Mutations Defective in Paramutation

    PubMed Central

    McGinnis, Karen M.; Springer, Catherine; Lin, Yan; Carey, Charles C.; Chandler, Vicki

    2006-01-01

    Plants with mutations in one of three maize genes, mop1, rmr1, and rmr2, are defective in paramutation, an allele-specific interaction that leads to meiotically heritable chromatin changes. Experiments reported here demonstrate that these genes are required to maintain the transcriptional silencing of two different transgenes, suggesting that paramutation and transcriptional silencing of transgenes share mechanisms. We hypothesize that the transgenes are silenced through an RNA-directed chromatin mechanism, because mop1 encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In all the mutants, DNA methylation was reduced in the active transgenes relative to the silent transgenes at all of the CNG sites monitored within the transgene promoter. However, asymmetrical methylation persisted at one site within the reactivated transgene in the rmr1-1 mutant. With that one mutant, rmr1-1, the transgene was efficiently resilenced upon outcrossing to reintroduce the wild-type protein. In contrast, with the mop1-1 and rmr2-1 mutants, the transgene remained active in a subset of progeny even after the wild-type proteins were reintroduced by outcrossing. Interestingly, this immunity to silencing increased as the generations progressed, consistent with a heritable chromatin state being formed at the transgene in plants carrying the mop1-1 and rmr2-1 mutations that becomes more resistant to silencing in subsequent generations. PMID:16702420

  20. Transgenic Mice Secreting Coronavirus Neutralizing Antibodies into the Milk

    PubMed Central

    Sola, Isabel; Castilla, Joaquín; Pintado, Belén; Sánchez-Morgado, José M.; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.; Clark, A. John; Enjuanes, Luis

    1998-01-01

    Ten lines of transgenic mice secreting transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) neutralizing recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rMAbs) into the milk were generated. The rMAb light- and heavy-chain genes were assembled by fusing the genes encoding the variable modules of the murine MAb 6A.C3, which binds an interspecies conserved coronavirus epitope essential for virus infectivity, and a constant module from a porcine myeloma with the immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype. The chimeric antibody led to dimer formation in the presence of J chain. The neutralization specific activity of the recombinant antibody produced in transiently or stably transformed cells was 50-fold higher than that of a monomeric rMAb with the IgG1 isotype and an identical binding site. This rMAb had titers of up to 104 by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and neutralized virus infectivity up to 104-fold. Of 23 transgenic mice, 17 integrated both light and heavy chains, and at least 10 of them transmitted both genes to the progeny, leading to 100% of animals secreting functional TGEV neutralizing antibody during lactation. Selected mice produced milk with TGEV-specific antibody titers higher than 106 as determined by RIA, neutralized virus infectivity by 106-fold, and produced up to 6 mg of antibody per ml. Antibody expression levels were transgene copy number independent and integration site dependent. Comicroinjection of the genomic β-lactoglobulin gene with rMAb light- and heavy-chain genes led to the generation of transgenic mice carrying the three transgenes. The highest antibody titers were produced by transgenic mice that had integrated the antibody and β-lactoglobulin genes, although the number of transgenic animals generated does not allow a definitive conclusion on the enhancing effect of β-lactoglobulin cointegration. This approach may lead to the generation of transgenic animals providing lactogenic immunity to their progeny against enteric pathogens. PMID:9557658

  1. Multi-Locus Assortment (MLA) for Transgene Dispersal and Elimination in Mosquito Populations

    PubMed Central

    Rasgon, Jason L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Replacement of wild-type mosquito populations with genetically modified versions is being explored as a potential strategy to control vector-borne diseases. Due to lower expected relative fitness of transgenic individuals, transgenes must be driven into populations for these scenarios to be successful. Several gene drive mechanisms exist in a theoretical sense but none are currently workable in mosquitoes. Even if strategies were workable, it would be very difficult to recall released transgenes in the event of unforeseen consequences. What is needed is a way to test transgenes in the field for feasibility, efficacy and safety prior to releasing an active drive mechanism. Methodology/Principal Findings We outline a method, termed Multi-locus assortment (MLA), to spread transgenes into vector populations by the release of genetically-modified mosquitoes carrying multiple stable transgene inserts. Simulations indicate that [1] insects do not have to carry transgenes at more than 4 loci, [2] transgenes can be maintained at high levels by sequential small releases, the frequency of which depends on the construct fitness cost, and [3] in the case of unforeseen negative non-target effects, transgenes can be eliminated from the population by halting transgenic releases and/or mass releases of wild-type insects. We also discuss potential methods to create MLA mosquito strains in the laboratory. Conclusions/Significance While not as efficient as active drive mechanisms, MLA has other advantages: [1] MLA strains can be constructed for some mosquito species with currently-available technology, [2] MLA will allow the ecological components of transgenic mosquito releases to be tested before actual gene drive mechanisms are ready to be deployed, [3] since MLA is not self-propagating, the risk of an accidental premature release into nature is minimized, and [4] in the case that active gene drive mechanisms prove impossible to develop, the MLA approach can be used as a

  2. [Transgenics without Manichaeism].

    PubMed

    Valle, S

    2000-01-01

    We live in an era characterized by the hegemony of science and technology, an era fraught with questions awaiting answers which would enable a safe and sustainable future for humankind. The development of agro-industrial processes - food products in particular - through recombinant DNA technology has enhanced the profit prospects of the few big biotechnology companies and of large-scale farmers who have access to the latest technological developments. We thus oppose a moratorium on recombinant DNA technology. Moreover, hasty statements about risk-free transgenics may be misleading in the absence of extensive safety tests. There is a pressing need for the establishment of biosafety policy in this country involving the organized civil society and every government agency responsible for monitoring such matters. There is also the need to put in place a bio-surveillance and a code of ethics regarding genetic manipulation.

  3. Lactogenic immunity in transgenic mice producing recombinant antibodies neutralizing coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Castilla, J; Sola, I; Pintado, B; Sánchez-Morgado, J M; Enjuanes, L

    1998-01-01

    Protection against coronavirus infections can be provided by the oral administration of virus neutralizing antibodies. To provide lactogenic immunity, eighteen lines of transgenic mice secreting a recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody (rIgG1) and ten lines of transgenic mice secreting recombinant IgA monoclonal antibodies (rIgA) neutralizing transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) into the milk were generated. Genes encoding the light and heavy chains of monoclonal antibody (MAb) 6A.C3 were expressed under the control of regulatory sequences derived from the mouse genomic DNA encoding the whey acidic protein (WAP) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), which are highly abundant milk proteins. The MAb 6A.C3 binds to a highly conserved epitope present in coronaviruses of several species. This MAb does not allow the selection of neutralization escaping virus mutants. The antibody was expressed in the milk of transgenic mice with titers of one million as determined by RIA, and neutralized TGEV infectivity by one million fold corresponding to immunoglobulin concentrations of 5 to 6 mg per ml. Matrix attachment regions (MAR) sequences were not essential for rIgG1 transgene expression, but co-microinjection of MAR and antibody genes led to a twenty to ten thousand-fold increase in the antibody titer in 50% of the rIgG1 transgenic animals generated. Co-microinjection of the genomic BLG gene with rIgA light and heavy chain genes led to the generation of transgenic mice carrying the three transgenes. The highest antibody titers were produced by transgenic mice that had integrated the antibody and BLG genes, although the number of transgenic animals generated does not allow a definitive conclusion on the enhancing effect of BLG co-integration. Antibody expression levels were transgene copy number independent and integration site dependent. The generation of transgenic animals producing virus neutralizing antibodies in the milk could be a general approach to provide protection

  4. Superoxide dismutase transgenes in sugarbeets confer resistance to oxidative agents and the fungus C. beticola.

    PubMed

    Tertivanidis, Konstantinos; Goudoula, Catherine; Vasilikiotis, Christos; Hassiotou, Efthymia; Perl-Treves, Rafael; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2004-06-01

    Sugarbeets carrying superoxide dismutase transgenes were developed in order to investigate the possibility of enhancing their resistance to oxidative stress. Binary T-DNA vectors carrying the chloroplastic and cytosolic superoxide dismutase genes from tomato, were used for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of sugarbeet petioles. The transgenic plants were subjected to treatments known to cause oxidative stress, such as the herbicide methyl viologen and a natural photosensitizer toxin produced by the fungus Cercospora beticola, namely cercosporin. The transgenic plants exhibited increased tolerance to methyl viologen, to pure cercosporin, as well as to leaf infection with the fungus C. beticola.

  5. Male-specific insecticide resistance and mosquito transgene dispersal.

    PubMed

    Sinkins, Steven P; Hastings, Ian M

    2004-09-01

    There is a need to develop methods to spread disease-blocking transgenes through mosquito populations. This article discusses the possibility of linking transgenes to insecticide-resistant alleles engineered to be expressed only in males. The resulting increase in mean longevity of males carrying the construct under insecticide treatment could easily outweigh any fitness costs in females, so that the construct would spread rapidly. It should be possible to produce constructs where any potential risk of loss of male-specific expression would be negligible.

  6. Transgene integration in hair follicles and peripheral blood cells measured by in vitro DNA amplification and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Amendola, R; Haendel, S; Weier, H U; Pallavicini, M G

    1991-05-01

    Screening of animals to detect the presence of integrated DNA sequences is an essential component of transgenic mouse generation. Rapid and sensitive detection techniques to facilitate identification of transgenic animals for biological studies or subsequent breeding programs are desirable. Most transgenics are generated on F1 backgrounds, thus determination of the histocompatibility status of neonates provides important diagnostic information for establishing congenic colonies. We describe the application of two assays, in vitro DNA amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization with biotinylated DNA probes, to facilitate rapid detection of transgenes and their chromosomal integration patterns in young mice. A noninvasive PCR-based assay to detect the transgene in DNA contained in detergent-extracted hair follicles was developed for rapid screening. A total of 147 mice derived from F2, F3, and F4 generations of C57BL x F1 (globin transgenics) were assayed to determine whether they carried a globin transgene. Characterization of animals by PCR-based amplification of the transgene was compared with that obtained using standard Southern analysis of DNA extracted from tails. Categorization of animals as positive (carrying the transgene) or negative using PCR was performed successfully in the initial assay with 95% of the animals. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a DNA probe showing homology with a portion of the transgene was performed on metaphase and interphase cells to determine the integration pattern of the transgene. Our data showed that the transgene was integrated in a single chromosome. These techniques should facilitate rapid identification of transgenic animals and characterization of the genomic transgene integration patterns.

  7. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  8. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-12-31

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  9. Creation of transgenic rice plants producing small interfering RNA of Rice tungro spherical virus.

    PubMed

    Le, Dung Tien; Chu, Ha Duc; Sasaya, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV), also known as Rice waika virus, does not cause visible symptoms in infected rice plants. However, the virus plays a critical role in spreading Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV), which is the major cause of severe symptoms of rice tungro disease. Recent studies showed that RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop virus-resistance transgenic rice plants. In this report, we presented simple procedures and protocols needed for the creation of transgenic rice plants capable of producing small interfering RNA specific against RTSV sequences. Notably, our study showed that 60 out of 64 individual hygromycin-resistant lines (putative transgenic lines) obtained through transformation carried transgenes designed for producing hairpin double-stranded RNA. Northern blot analyses revealed the presence of small interfering RNA of 21- to 24-mer in 46 out of 56 confirmed transgenic lines. Taken together, our study indicated that transgenic rice plants carrying an inverted repeat of 500-bp fragments encoding various proteins of RTSV can produce small interfering RNA from the hairpin RNA transcribed from that transgene. In light of recent studies with other viruses, it is possible that some of these transgenic rice lines might be resistant to RTSV.

  10. Generation of domestic transgenic cloned kittens using lentivirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, Charles Earle; Kutner, Robert H; Ricks, David M; Lyons, Leslie A; Ruhe, Mark T; Dumas, Cherie; Lyons, Justine; Dresser, Betsy L; Reiser, Jakob

    2009-03-01

    The efficient use of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), in conjunction with genetic modification of donor cells provides a general means to add or inactivate genes in mammals. This strategy has substantially improved the efficacy of producing genetically identical animals carrying mutant genes corresponding to specific human disorders. Lentiviral (LV) vectors have been shown to be well suited for introducing transgenes into cells to be used as donor nuclei for SCNT. In the present study, we established an LV vector-based transgene delivery approach for producing live transgenic domestic cats by SCNT. We have demonstrated that cat fetal fibroblasts can be transduced with EGFP-encoding LV vectors bearing various promoters including the human cytomegalovirus immediate early (hCMV-IE) promoter, the human translation elongation factor 1alpha (hEF-1alpha) promoter and the human ubiquitin C (hUbC) promoter. Among the promoters tested, embryos reconstructed with donor cells transduced with a LV-vector bearing the hUbC promoter displayed sustained transgene expression at the blastocyst stage while embryos reconstructed with LV vector-transduced cells containing hCMV-IE-EGFP or hEF-1alpha-EGFP cassettes did not. After transfer of 291 transgenic cloned embryos into the oviducts of eight recipient domestic cats (mean =36.5 +/- 10.1), three (37.5%) were diagnosed to be pregnant, and a total of six embryos (2.1%) implanted. One live male offspring was delivered by Cesarean section on day 64 of gestation, and two kittens were born dead after premature delivery on day 55. In summary, we report the birth of transgenic cloned kittens produced by LV vector-mediated transduction of donor cells and confirm that cloned kittens express the EGFP reporter transgene in all body tissues.

  11. Transgenic, inducible RNAi in megakaryocytes and platelets in mice

    PubMed Central

    TAKIGUCHI, M.; JAMES, C.; JOSEFSSON, E. C.; CARMICHAEL, C. L.; PREMSRIRUT, P. K.; LOWE, S. W.; HAMILTON, J. R.; HUANG, D. C. S.; KILE, B. T.; DICKINS, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene function. The tetracycline (tet)-regulated expression system has recently been adapted to allow inducible RNAi in mice, however its efficiency in a particular cell type in vivo depends on a transgenic tet transactivator expression pattern and is often highly variable. Objective We aimed to establish a transgenic strategy that allows efficient and inducible gene knockdown in particular hematopoietic lineages in mice. Methods and results Using a tet-regulated reporter gene strategy, we found that transgenic mice expressing the rtTA (tet-on) transactivator under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (CMV-rtTA mice) display inducible reporter gene expression with unusual and near-complete efficiency in megakaryocytes and platelets. To test whether the CMV-rtTA transgene can drive inducible and efficient gene knockdown within this lineage, we generated a novel mouse strain harboring a tet-regulated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting Bcl-xL, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member known to be essential for maintaining platelet survival. Doxycycline treatment of adult mice carrying both transgenes induces shRNA expression, depletes Bcl-xL in megakaryocytes and triggers severe thrombocytopenia, whereas doxycycline withdrawal shuts off shRNA expression, normalizes Bcl-xL levels and restores platelet numbers. These effects are akin to those observed with drugs that target Bcl-xL, clearly demonstrating that this transgenic system allows efficient and inducible inhibition of genes in megakaryocytes and platelets. Conclusions We have established a novel transgenic strategy for inducible gene knockdown inmegakaryocytes and platelets that will be useful for characterizing genes involved in platelet production and function in adult mice. PMID:21138522

  12. Competitive Performance of Transgenic Wheat Resistant to Powdery Mildew

    PubMed Central

    Kalinina, Olena; Zeller, Simon L.; Schmid, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) plants offer an ideal model system to study the influence of single genes that confer constitutive resistance to pathogens on the ecological behaviour of plants. We used phytometers to study competitive interactions between GM lines of spring wheat Triticum aestivum carrying such genes and control lines. We hypothesized that competitive performance of GM lines would be reduced due to enhanced transgene expression under pathogen levels typically encountered in the field. The transgenes pm3b from wheat (resistance against powdery mildew Blumeria graminis) or chitinase and glucanase genes from barley (resistance against fungi in general) were introduced with the ubiquitin promoter from maize (pm3b and chitinase genes) or the actin promoter from rice (glucanase gene). Phytometers of 15 transgenic and non-transgenic wheat lines were transplanted as seedlings into plots sown with the same 15 lines as competitive environments and subject to two soil nutrient levels. Pm3b lines had reduced mildew incidence compared with control lines. Chitinase and chitinase/glucanase lines showed the same high resistance to mildew as their control in low-nutrient treatment and slightly lower mildew rates than the control in high-nutrient environment. Pm3b lines were weaker competitors than control lines. This resulted in reduced yield and seed number. The Pm3b line with the highest transgene expression had 53.2% lower yield than the control whereas the Pm3b line which segregated in resistance and had higher mildew rates showed only minor costs under competition. The line expressing both chitinase and glucanase genes also showed reduced yield and seed number under competition compared with its control. Our results suggest that single transgenes conferring constitutive resistance to pathogens can have ecological costs and can weaken plant competitiveness even in the presence of the pathogen. The magnitude of these costs appears related to the degree of expression

  13. Containment and competition: transgenic animals in the One Health agenda.

    PubMed

    Lezaun, Javier; Porter, Natalie

    2015-03-01

    The development of the One World, One Health agenda coincides in time with the appearance of a different model for the management of human-animal relations: the genetic manipulation of animal species in order to curtail their ability as carriers of human pathogens. In this paper we examine two examples of this emergent transgenic approach to disease control: the development of transgenic chickens incapable of shedding avian flu viruses, and the creation of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to dengue or malaria infection. Our analysis elaborates three distinctions between the One World, One Health agenda and its transgenic counterpoint. The first concerns the conceptualization of outbreaks and the forms of surveillance that support disease control efforts. The second addresses the nature of the interspecies interface, and the relative role of humans and animals in preventing pathogen transmission. The third axis of comparison considers the proprietary dimensions of transgenic animals and their implications for the assumed public health ethos of One Health programs. We argue that the fundamental difference between these two approaches to infectious disease control can be summarized as one between strategies of containment and strategies of competition. While One World, One Health programs seek to establish an equilibrium in the human-animal interface in order to contain the circulation of pathogens across species, transgenic strategies deliberately trigger a new ecological dynamic by introducing novel animal varieties designed to out-compete pathogen-carrying hosts and vectors. In other words, while One World, One Health policies focus on introducing measures of inter-species containment, transgenic approaches derive their prophylactic benefit from provoking new cycles of intra-species competition between GM animals and their wild-type counterparts. The coexistence of these divergent health protection strategies, we suggest, helps to elucidate enduring tensions and

  14. Transgenic plants for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a green, sustainable and promising solution to problems of environmental contamination. It entails the use of plants for uptake, sequestration, detoxification or volatilization of inorganic and organic pollutants from soils, water, sediments and possibly air. Phytoremediation was born from the observation that plants possessed physiological properties useful for environmental remediation. This was shortly followed by the application of breeding techniques and artificial selection to genetically improve some of the more promising and interesting species. Now, after nearly 20 years of research, transgenic plants for phytoremediation have been produced, but none have reached commercial existence. Three main approaches have been developed: (1) transformation with genes from other organisms (mammals, bacteria, etc.); (2) transformation with genes from other plant species; and (3) overexpression of genes from the same plant species. Many encouraging results have been reported, even though in some instances results have been contrary to expectations. This review will illustrate the main examples with a critical discussion of what we have learnt from them.

  15. Oat Phytochrome Is Biologically Active in Transgenic Tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Boylan, M. T.; Quail, P. H.

    1989-08-01

    To determine the functional homology between phytochromes from evolutionarily divergent species, we used the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter to express a monocot (oat) phytochrome cDNA in a dicot plant (tomato). Immunoblot analysis shows that more than 50% of the transgenic tomato plants synthesize the full-length oat phytochrome polypeptide. Moreover, leaves of light-grown transgenic plants contain appreciably less oat phytochrome than leaves from dark-adapted plants, and etiolated R1 transgenic seedlings have higher levels of spectrally active phytochrome than wild-type tomato seedlings in direct proportion to the level of immunochemically detectable oat polypeptide present. These data suggest that the heterologous oat polypeptide carries a functional chromophore, allowing reversible photoconversion between the two forms of the molecule, and that the far-red absorbing form (Pfr) is recognized and selectively degraded by the Pfr-specific degradative machinery in the dicot cell. The overexpression of oat phytochrome has pleiotropic, phenotypic consequences at all major phases of the life cycle. Adult transgenic tomato plants expressing high levels of the oat protein tend to be dwarfed, with dark green foliage and fruits. R1 transgenic seedlings have short hypocotyls with elevated anthocyanin contents. We conclude that a monocot phytochrome can be synthesized and correctly processed to a biologically active form in a dicot cell, and that the transduction pathway components that interact with the photoreceptor are evolutionarily conserved.

  16. Aroma evaluation of transgenic, thaumatin II-producing cucumber fruits.

    PubMed

    Zawirska-Wojtasiak, R; Gośliński, M; Szwacka, M; Gajc-Wolska, J; Mildner-Szkudlarz, S

    2009-04-01

    Fruits of transgenic cucumber lines expressing preprothaumatin II gene were evaluated concerning their aroma. Four homozygous lines, that is, 210 06, 212 01, 224 09, and 225 03 with different levels of transgene expression were selected. Recipient line cv. Borszczagowski, which was formed by inbred line of Cucumis sativus L., was used as a control. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse and an outdoor experimental plot. The aroma of cucumber fruits was evaluated by GC/MS, as well as GC/MS/TOF in the distillates and by SPME. Irrespective of the isolation/separation technique used, the differences between aroma compounds in transgenic cucumbers and the control were quantitative, and not qualitative. Modified samples showed higher concentrations of volatiles, particularly of the main cucumber fruits odorant (E, Z)-2,6 nonadienal. Transgenic expression of the thaumatin II gene resulted not only in a sweeter taste of fruits in comparison with the control, but also higher aroma acceptability. This was shown by sensory profile analysis. Also electronic nose measurements differentiated between transgenic lines and the control.

  17. Fitness of anopheline mosquitoes expressing transgenes that inhibit Plasmodium development.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luciano A; Wang, Jing; Collins, Frank H; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2004-03-01

    One potential strategy for the control of malaria and other vector-borne diseases is the introduction into wild vector populations of genetic constructs that reduce vectorial capacity. An important caveat of this approach is that the genetic construct should have minimal fitness cost to the transformed vector. Previously, we produced transgenic Anopheles stephensi expressing either of two effector genes, a tetramer of the SM1 dodecapeptide or the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2) from honeybee venom. Mosquitoes carrying either of these transgenes were impaired for Plasmodium berghei transmission. We have investigated the role of two effector genes for malaria parasite blockage in terms of the fitness imposed to the mosquito vector that expresses either molecule. By measuring mosquito survival, fecundity, fertility, and by running population cage experiments, we found that mosquitoes transformed with the SM1 construct showed no significant reduction in these fitness parameters relative to nontransgenic controls. The PLA2 transgenics, however, had reduced fitness that seemed to be independent of the insertion site of the transgene. We conclude that the fitness load imposed by refractory gene(s)-expressing mosquitoes depends on the effect of the transgenic protein produced in that mosquito. These results have important implications for implementation of malaria control via genetic modification of mosquitoes.

  18. Transgenic Gladiolus plants transformed with the bean yellow mosaic virus coat-protein gene in either sense or antisense orientation.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Kathryn; Gera, Abed; Cohen, Jacob; Hammond, John; Blowers, Alan; Smith, Franzine; Van Eck, Joyce

    2005-02-01

    Transgenic Gladiolus plants transformed with the bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) coat-protein (CP) gene in either sense or antisense (AS) orientation were developed using biolistics. Four of the plants were confirmed to carry the CP gene in the sense orientation of the gene and seven plants in the AS orientation. Two of the CP plant lines and all of the AS lines showed DNA rearrangements of the transgene in addition to an intact copy of the transgene. The copy number ranged from one to nine. Of the 11 lines, eight had only one to four copies of the transgene. Transcription of the transgene occurred for three of the CP lines and five of the AS lines as determined by Northern hybridization. All 11 plant lines were challenged with BYMV using controlled aphid transmission. One month following aphid transmission, the transgenic plants were examined by immunoelectron microscopy for presence of the virus. Several transgenic plant lines containing either antiviral transgene showed a lower incidence of infection (percentage of plants infected as detected by immunoelectron microscopy) than the non-transformed plants. Most of the CP- and AS-transgenic plants that did not contain BYMV 1 month after challenge were found to contain BYMV the next season. It appeared that BYMV infection was delayed in the CP- and AS-transgenic lines but that the transgenes did not prevent eventual infection of BYMV. This is the first report of developing a floral bulb crop with antiviral genes to BYMV.

  19. Assessment of the diversity and dynamics of Plum pox virus and aphid populations in transgenic European plums under Mediterranean conditions.

    PubMed

    Capote, Nieves; Pérez-Panadés, Jordi; Monzó, César; Carbonell, Emilio; Urbaneja, Alberto; Scorza, Ralph; Ravelonandro, Michel; Cambra, Mariano

    2008-06-01

    The molecular variability of Plum pox virus (PPV) populations was compared in transgenic European plums (Prunus domestica L.) carrying the coat protein (CP) gene of PPV and non-transgenic plums in an experimental orchard in Valencia, Spain. A major objective of this study was to detect recombination between PPV CP transgene transcripts and infecting PPV RNA. Additionally, we assessed the number and species of PPV aphid vectors that visited transgenic and non-transgenic plum trees. Test trees consisted of five different P. domestica transgenic lines, i.e. the PPV-resistant C5 'HoneySweet' line and the PPV-susceptible C4, C6, PT6 and PT23 lines, and non-transgenic P. domestica and P. salicina Lind trees. No significant difference in the genetic diversity of PPV populations infecting transgenic and conventional plums was detected, in particular no recombinant between transgene transcripts and incoming viral RNA was found at detectable levels. Also, no significant difference was detected in aphid populations, including viruliferous individuals, that visited transgenic and conventional plums. Our data indicate that PPV-CP transgenic European plums exposed to natural PPV infection over an 8 year period caused limited, if any, risk beyond the cultivation of conventional plums under Mediterranean conditions in terms of the emergence of recombinant PPV and diversity of PPV and aphid populations.

  20. The IncP-6 Plasmid p10265-KPC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carries a Novel ΔISEc33-Associated blaKPC-2 Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaotian; Zhou, Dongsheng; Xiong, Wei; Feng, Jiao; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Guangming; Wang, Haijing; Sun, Fengjun; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 10265 was recovered from a patient with pneumonia in a Chinese public hospital, and it displays the carbapenem resistance phenotype due to the acquisition of a non-conjugative but mobilizable IncP-6-type plasmid p10265-KPC. p10265-KPC carries a Tn5563-borne defective mer locus, and a novel ΔISEc33-associated blaKPC-2 gene cluster without paired inverted repeats and paired direct repeats at both ends. Mobilization of this ΔISEc33-associated element in p10265-KPC would be attributed to homologous recombination-based insertion of a foreign structure Tn3-ISApu1-orf7-ISApu2- ISKpn27-ΔblaTEM-1-blaKPC-2-ΔISKpn6- korC-orf6-klcA-ΔrepB into a pre-existent intact ISEc33, making ISEc33 truncated at the 3′ end. The previously reported pCOL-1 represents the first sequenced KPC-producing IncP-6 plasmid, while p10265-KPC is the second one. These two plasmids carry two distinct blaKPC-2 gene clusters, which are inserted into the different sites of the IncP-6 backbone and have different evolutionary histories of assembly and mobilization. This is the first report of identification of the IncP-6-type resistance plasmid in China. PMID:27014233

  1. The IncP-6 Plasmid p10265-KPC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carries a Novel ΔISEc33-Associated bla KPC-2 Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaotian; Zhou, Dongsheng; Xiong, Wei; Feng, Jiao; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Guangming; Wang, Haijing; Sun, Fengjun; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 10265 was recovered from a patient with pneumonia in a Chinese public hospital, and it displays the carbapenem resistance phenotype due to the acquisition of a non-conjugative but mobilizable IncP-6-type plasmid p10265-KPC. p10265-KPC carries a Tn5563-borne defective mer locus, and a novel ΔISEc33-associated bla KPC-2 gene cluster without paired inverted repeats and paired direct repeats at both ends. Mobilization of this ΔISEc33-associated element in p10265-KPC would be attributed to homologous recombination-based insertion of a foreign structure Tn3-ISApu1-orf7-ISApu2- ISKpn27-Δbla TEM-1 -bla KPC-2 -ΔISKpn6- korC-orf6-klcA-ΔrepB into a pre-existent intact ISEc33, making ISEc33 truncated at the 3' end. The previously reported pCOL-1 represents the first sequenced KPC-producing IncP-6 plasmid, while p10265-KPC is the second one. These two plasmids carry two distinct bla KPC-2 gene clusters, which are inserted into the different sites of the IncP-6 backbone and have different evolutionary histories of assembly and mobilization. This is the first report of identification of the IncP-6-type resistance plasmid in China.

  2. Carry Groups: Abstract Algebra Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Cheryl Chute; Madore, Blair F.

    2004-01-01

    Carry Groups are a wonderful collection of groups to introduce in an undergraduate Abstract Algebra course. These groups are straightforward to define but have interesting structures for students to discover. We describe these groups and give examples of in-class group projects that were developed and used by Miller.

  3. Carry Groups: Abstract Algebra Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Cheryl Chute; Madore, Blair F.

    2004-01-01

    Carry Groups are a wonderful collection of groups to introduce in an undergraduate Abstract Algebra course. These groups are straightforward to define but have interesting structures for students to discover. We describe these groups and give examples of in-class group projects that were developed and used by Miller.

  4. Generation of transgenic energy cane plants with integration of minimal transgene expression cassette.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Walid M; Hao, Wu; Xiong, Yuan; Steeves, Cody; Sandhu, Surinder K; Altpeter, Fredy

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to serve as feedstock and direct replacement for petrochemicals in the fuel, chemical, pharmaceutical and material industries. Energy cane has been identified by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as prime lignocellulosic feedstock as it produces record biomass yields and is able to grow on low-value land with reduced inputs. Molecular improvement of energy cane is an essential step toward the development of a high-value crop and may contribute to improved biomass conversion to value added products. Such improvements require a development of an efficient regeneration and transformation system for the vegetatively propagated energy cane varieties. In this report, an efficient biolistic gene delivery protocol for energy canes (genotype L 79-1002 and Ho 00-961) has been established with immature leaf rolls as explants. Embryonic calli, developed approximately 6 weeks after culture initiation and was used as target for biolistic transfer of a minimum expression cassette of P-ubi::nptII::35S polyA derived from plasmid pJFNPTII. Putative transgenic clones of callus were obtained after selection on callus induction medium supplemented with 30 mg l(-1) geneticin. Regeneration was carried out on NB medium, which is modified from MS supplemented with 1.86 mg l(-1) naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 0.1mg l(-1), 6- benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 20mg l(-1) paromomycin. Shoots growing on selection media were transferred to hormone free medium with 20 mg l(-1) paromomycin. Putative transgenic lines were first analyzed by PCR. Transgene integration was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) and Immunochromathography assays confirmed transgene expression.

  5. Generation of Transgenic Energy Cane Plants with Integration of Minimal Transgene Expression Cassette.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Walid M; Hao, W U; Xiong, Yuan; Steeves, Cody; Sandhu, Surinder K; Altpeter, Fredy

    2015-03-03

    Lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to serve as feedstock and direct replacement for petrochemicals in the fuel, chemical, pharmaceutical and material industries. Energy cane has been identified by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as prime lignocellulosic feedstock as it produces record biomass yields and is able to grow on low-value land with reduced inputs. Molecular improvement of energy cane is an essential step toward the development of a high-value crop and may contribute to improved biomass conversion to value added products. Such improvements require a development of an efficient regeneration and transformation system for the vegetatively propagated energy cane varieties. In this report, an efficient biolistic gene delivery protocol for energy canes (genotype L 79-1002 and Ho 00-961) has been established with immature leaf rolls as explants. Embryonic calli, developed approximately 6 weeks after culture initiation and was used as target for biolistic transfer of a minimum expression cassette of P-ubi::nptII::35S polyA derived from plasmid pJFNPTII. Putative transgenic clones of callus were obtained after selection on callus induction medium supplemented with 30 mg l-1 geneticin. Regeneration was carried out on NB medium, which is modified from MS supplemented with 1.86 mg l-1 naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 0.1mg l-1, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 20mg l-1 paromomycin. Shoots growing on selection media were transferred to hormone free medium with 20 mg l-1 paromomycin. Putative transgenic lines were first analyzed by PCR. Transgene integration was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) and Immunochromathography assays confirmed transgene expression.

  6. Suppression of intestinal immunity through silencing of TCTP by RNAi in transgenic silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Hu, Cuimei; Wang, Fei; Ma, Sanyuan; Li, Xianyang; Song, Liang; Hua, Xiaoting; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-12-10

    Intestinal immune response is a front line of host defense. The host factors that participate in intestinal immunity response remain largely unknown. We recently reported that Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (BmTCTP) was obtained by constructing a phage display cDNA library of the silkworm midgut and carrying out high throughput screening of pathogen binding molecules. To further address the function of BmTCTP in silkworm intestinal immunity, transgenic RNAi silkworms were constructed by microinjection piggBac plasmid to Dazao embryos. The antimicrobial capacity of transgenic silkworm decreased since the expression of gut antimicrobial peptide from transgenic silkworm was not sufficiently induced during oral microbial challenge. Moreover, dynamic ERK phosphorylation from transgenic silkworm midgut was disrupted. Taken together, the innate immunity of intestinal was suppressed through disruption of dynamic ERK phosphorylation after oral microbial infection as a result of RNAi-mediated knockdown of midgut TCTP in transgenic silkworm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) harboring a maize (Zea mays L.) gene for plastid EF-Tu: segregation pattern, expression and effects of the transgene.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianming; Ristic, Zoran

    2010-06-01

    We previously reported that transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) carrying a maize (Zea mays L.) gene (Zmeftu1) for chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, displays reduced thermal aggregation of leaf proteins, reduced injury to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids), and enhanced rate of CO(2) fixation following exposure to heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C) [Fu et al. in Plant Mol Biol 68:277-288, 2008]. In the current study, we investigated the segregation pattern and expression of the transgene Zmeftu1 and determined the grain yield of transgenic plants after exposure to a brief heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C). We also assessed thermal aggregation of soluble leaf proteins in transgenic plants, testing the hypothesis that increased levels of EF-Tu will lead to a non-specific protection of leaf proteins against thermal aggregation. The transgenic wheat displayed a single-gene pattern of segregation of Zmeftu1. Zmeftu1 was expressed, and the transgenic plants synthesized and accumulated three anti-EF-Tu cross-reacting polypeptides of similar molecular mass but different pI, suggesting the possibility of posttranslational modification of this protein. The transgenic plants also showed better grain yield after exposure to heat stress compared with their non-transgenic counterparts. Soluble leaf proteins of various molecular masses displayed lower thermal aggregation in transgenic than in non-transgenic wheat. The results suggest that overexpression of chloroplast EF-Tu can be beneficial to wheat tolerance to heat stress. Moreover, the results also support the hypothesis that EF-Tu contributes to heat tolerance by acting as a molecular chaperone and protecting heat-labile proteins from thermal aggregation in a non-specific manner.

  8. Phenotypic performance of transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants with pyramided rice cystatin genes (OCI and OCII)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The evaluation of transgenic plants commonly carried out under controlled conditions in culture rooms and greenhouses can give valuable information about the influence of introduced genes on transgenic plant phenotype. However, an overall assessment of plant performance can only be made by testing t...

  9. Phospholamban Overexpression in Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, J. Scott; Waggoner, Jason R.; James, Jeanne; Martin, Lisa; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Klevitsky, Raisa; Kranias, Evangelia G.; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in pursuing phospholamban as a putative therapeutic target for overcoming depressed calcium handling in human heart failure. Studies predominantly done in mice have shown that phospholamban is a key regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium cycling and cardiac function. However, mice differ significantly from humans in how they regulate calcium, whereas rabbits better recapitulate human cardiac function and calcium handling. To investigate phospholamban’s role in the rabbit heart, transgenic rabbits that overexpressed wild-type phospholamban in the ventricular cardiomyocytes and slow-twitch skeletal muscles were generated. Rabbits expressing high levels of phospholamban were not viable due to severe skeletal muscle wasting, the onset of cardiac pathology and early death. A viable transgenic line exhibited a 30% increase in PLN protein levels in the heart. These animals showed isolated foci of cardiac pathology, but cardiac function as well as the response to β-adrenergic stimulation were normal. SR-calcium uptake measurements showed that the transgenic hearts had the expected reduced affinity for calcium. The data show that phospholamban-overexpressing transgenic rabbits differ markedly in phenotype from analogous transgenic mice in that rabbits are quite sensitive to alterations in phospholamban levels. Exceeding a relatively narrow window of phospholamban expression results in significant morbidity and early death. PMID:17882530

  10. Metabolite fingerprinting in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Lee C; Linforth, Robert; Taylor, Andrew J; Lowe, Kenneth C; Power, J Brian; Davey, Michael R

    2005-03-01

    Metabolite fingerprinting has been achieved using direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) and linked gas chromatography (GC-APCI/EI-MS) for transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Evola) plants expressing an IPT gene under the control of the senescence-specific SAG12 promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana (P(SAG12)-IPT). Mature heads of transgenic lettuce and their azygous controls were maintained under defined conditions to assess their shelf life. Transgenic lettuce plants exhibited delayed senescence and significant increases (up to a maximum of threefold) in the concentrations of three volatile organic compounds (VOCs), corresponding to molecular masses of 45, 47 and 63, when compared with heads from azygous plants. These VOCs were identified as acetaldehyde (45), ethanol (47) and dimethyl sulphide (63). The increase in dimethyl sulphide was paralleled by an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the heads of transgenic plants. These results demonstrate the applicability of metabolic fingerprinting techniques to elucidate the underlying pleiotropic responses of plants to transgene expression.

  11. High-level Genomic Integration, Epigenetic Changes, and Expression of Sleeping Beauty Transgene

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianhui; Park, Chang Won; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Kren, Betsy T.; Steer, Clifford J.

    2010-01-01

    Sleeping Beauty transposon (SB-Tn) has emerged as an important nonviral vector for integrating transgenes into mammalian genomes. We report here a novel dual fluorescent reporter cis SB-Tn system that permitted nonselective fluorescent-activated cell sorting for SB-Tn-transduced K562 erythroid cells. Using an internal ribosome entry site element, the green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was linked to the SB10 transposase gene as an indirect marker for the robust expression of SB10 transposase. Flourescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) by eGFP resulted in significant enrichment (> 60%) of cells exhibiting SB-Tn-mediated genomic insertions and long-term expression of a DsRed transgene. The hybrid erythroid-specific promoter of DsRed transgene was verified in erythroid or megakaryocyte differentiation of K562 cells. Bisulfite-mediated genomic analyses identified different DNA methylation patterns between DsRed+ and DsRed− cell clones, suggesting a critical role in transgene expression. Moreover, although the host genomic copy of the promoter element showed no CpG methylation, the same sequence carried by the transgene was markedly hypermethylated. Additional evidence also suggested a role for histone deacetylation in the regulation of DsRed transgene. The presence of SB transgene affected the expression of neighboring host genes at distances > 45 kb. Our data suggested that fluorescent reporter cis SB-Tn system can be used to enrich mammalian cells harboring SB-mediated transgene insertions. The epigenetic modification detected on the DsRed transgene demonstrated that transgenes inserted by SB could also be selectively modified by host cellular epigenetic systems. In addition, long-range activation of host genes must now be recognized as a potential consequence of an inserted transgene cassette containing enhancer elements. PMID:20041635

  12. Constitutive expression of a fungus-inducible carboxylesterase improves disease resistance in transgenic pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Ko, Moonkyung; Cho, Jung Hyun; Seo, Hyo-Hyoun; Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Kang, Ha-Young; Nguyen, Thai Son; Soh, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Young Soon; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-08-01

    Resistance against anthracnose fungi was enhanced in transgenic pepper plants that accumulated high levels of a carboxylesterase, PepEST in anthracnose-susceptible fruits, with a concurrent induction of antioxidant enzymes and SA-dependent PR proteins. A pepper esterase gene (PepEST) is highly expressed during the incompatible interaction between ripe fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and a hemibiotrophic anthracnose fungus (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides). In this study, we found that exogenous application of recombinant PepEST protein on the surface of the unripe pepper fruits led to a potentiated state for disease resistance in the fruits, including generation of hydrogen peroxide and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes that encode mostly small proteins with antimicrobial activity. To elucidate the role of PepEST in plant defense, we further developed transgenic pepper plants overexpressing PepEST under the control of CaMV 35S promoter. Molecular analysis confirmed the establishment of three independent transgenic lines carrying single copy of transgenes. The level of PepEST protein was estimated to be approximately 0.002 % of total soluble protein in transgenic fruits. In response to the anthracnose fungus, the transgenic fruits displayed higher expression of PR genes, PR3, PR5, PR10, and PepThi, than non-transgenic control fruits did. Moreover, immunolocalization results showed concurrent localization of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and PR3 proteins, along with the PepEST protein, in the infected region of transgenic fruits. Disease rate analysis revealed significantly low occurrence of anthracnose disease in the transgenic fruits, approximately 30 % of that in non-transgenic fruits. Furthermore, the transgenic plants also exhibited resistance against C. acutatum and C. coccodes. Collectively, our results suggest that overexpression of PepEST in pepper confers enhanced resistance against the anthracnose fungi by activating the defense signaling

  13. Size matters: use of YACs, BACs and PACs in transgenic animals.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, P; Montoliu, L

    2001-04-01

    In 1993, several groups, working independently, reported the successful generation of transgenic mice with yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using standard techniques. The transfer of these large fragments of cloned genomic DNA correlated with optimal expression levels of the transgenes, irrespective of their location in the host genome. Thereafter, other groups confirmed the advantages of YAC transgenesis and position-independent and copy number-dependent transgene expression were demonstrated in most cases. The transfer of YACs to the germ line of mice has become popular in many transgenic facilities to guarantee faithful expression of transgenes. This technique was rapidly exported to livestock and soon transgenic rabbits, pigs and other mammals were produced with YACs. Transgenic animals were also produced with bacterial or P1-derived artificial chromosomes (BACs/PACs) with similar success. The use of YACs, BACs and PACs in transgenesis has allowed the discovery of new genes by complementation of mutations, the identification of key regulatory sequences within genomic loci that are crucial for the proper expression of genes and the design of improved animal models of human genetic diseases. Transgenesis with artificial chromosomes has proven useful in a variety of biological, medical and biotechnological applications and is considered a major breakthrough in the generation of transgenic animals. In this report, we will review the recent history of YAC/BAC/PAC-transgenic animals indicating their benefits and the potential problems associated with them. In this new era of genomics, the generation and analysis of transgenic animals carrying artificial chromosome-type transgenes will be fundamental to functionally identify and understand the role of new genes, included within large pieces of genomes, by direct complementation of mutations or by observation of their phenotypic consequences.

  14. Expression specificity of GFAP transgenes.

    PubMed

    Su, Mu; Hu, Huimin; Lee, Youngjin; d'Azzo, Alessandra; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate filament protein found predominantly in astrocytes. This specificity has recommended the GFAP gene promoter for targeting transgene expression to astrocytes. Although both we [Brenner et al. J. Neurosci. 14:1030-1037, (1994)] and others [Mucke et al. New Biol. 3:465-474, (1991)] have reported astrocyte specificity for GFAP promoters, we demonstrate here that these DNA sequences can also direct activity in neurons. The pattern of neuronal activity varied with both the nature of the expressed sequence and the transgene insertion site. Specifically, neuronal expression was very high for a protective protein/cathepsin A minigene, moderate for lacZ and undetectable for GFP. These findings, coupled with a survey of the literature, recommend that investigators using GFAP-driven transgenes verify specificity for each line studied, using a detection system whose sensitivity is sufficient to detect a compromising level of misexpression.

  15. [Escape of transgenes and its ecological risks].

    PubMed

    Lu, Baorong; Zhang, Wenju; Li, Bo

    2003-06-01

    The rapid development of biotechnology, particularly the transgenic technology, has brought us with tremendous opportunities to solve the world's starvation problems that have been caused by the continued expanding of the global population. However, the application of transgenic biotechnology and the environmental release of transgenic organisms have evoked a series of extraordinary debates on biosafety issues related to the prosperity and the future of transgenic technology. The public and scientific communities are desperately interested in knowing whether the transgenic products would pose negative influences on plants and animals, human life and health, as well as on genetic resources and environment. These concerns have become universal hot topics over the last decade. Among the most debated biosafety issues caused potentially by transgenic products, transgene escape to the environment and its consequent ecological risks become one of the appealing focal points. In this review, a series of biosafety issues concerned by public, including the possibility of transgene escape and its various paths, as well as the potential ecological risks caused by such escape were discussed, and various approaches for controlling for transgene escape and the factors to consider when designing safety isolation distance between transgenic varieties and other concerned plants were also examined. The objective of this review is to allow readers to understand the potential biosafety problems caused by environmental release of transgenic crops and by the escape of foreign transgenes in particular, and to use the effective tools to control and avoid transgene escape.

  16. Comparative persistence of thiacloprid in Bt-transgenic cabbage (Brassica oleracea cv. capitata) vis-à-vis non-transgenic crop and its decontamination.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis; Niwas, Ram; Gopal, Madhuban

    2012-11-01

    Thiacloprid is a systemic neonicotinoid. The study hypothesized that difference may be seen in the rate of dissipation of thiacloprid when applied on non-transgenic and transgenic cabbage. Thiacloprid was estimated by HPLC. Half life of thiacloprid in transgenic as well as in normal cabbage ranged between 12.3-13.1 days in two doses of application. Under field condition, after 15 days, 59.2% and 54.3% dissipation was recorded at lower and higher rates of application in transgenic cabbage, where as the insecticide dissipated 57.5% and 59.1% for single dose and double dose application, respectively in non-transgenic cabbage. The study establishes that there is no significant difference in dissipation of a systemic pesticide in transgenic versus non-transgenic cabbage. Decontamination of thiacloprid contaminated cabbage was carried out by different chemical treatments. The application of 0.5% NaHCO(3) (an edible alkali) may be recommended for decontamination. Thiacloprid residues in the day-3 field samples of cabbage could be reduced below Japanese MRL (1.0 mg kg(-1)) by treating with 0.5% NaHCO(3) solution for 1 h.

  17. Fructan biosynthesis in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    Data from plants transformed to accumulate fructan are assessed in the context of natural concentrations of reserve carbohydrates and natural fluxes of carbon in primary metabolism: Transgenic fructan accumulation is universally reported as an instantaneous endpoint concentration. In exceptional cases, concentrations of 60-160 mg g(-1) fresh mass were reported and compare favourably with naturally occurring maximal starch and fructan content in leaves and storage organs. Generally, values were less than 20 mg g(-1) for plants transformed with bacterial genes and <9 mg g(-1) for plant-plant transformants. Superficially, the results indicate a marked modification of carbon partitioning. However, transgenic fructan accumulation was generally constitutive and involved accumulation over time-scales of weeks or months. When calculated as a function of accumulation period, fluxes into the transgenic product were low, in the range 0.00002-0.03 nkat g(-1). By comparison with an estimated minimum daily carbohydrate flux in leaves for a natural fructan-accumulating plant in field conditions (37 nkat g(-1)), transgenic fructan accumulation was only 0.00005-0.08% of primary carbohydrate flux and does not indicate radical modification of carbon partitioning, but rather, a quantitatively minor leakage into transgenic fructan. Possible mechanisms for this low fructan accumulation in the transformants are considered and include: (i) rare codon usage in bacterial genes compared with eukaryotes, (ii) low transgene mRNA concentrations caused by low expression and/or high turnover, (iii) resultant low expression of enzyme protein, (iv) resultant low total enzyme activity, (v) inappropriate kinetic properties of the gene products with respect to substrate concentrations in the host, (vi) in situ product hydrolysis, and (vii) levan toxicity. Transformants expressing bacterial fructan synthesis exhibited a number of aberrant phenotypes such as stunting, leaf bleaching, necrosis, reduced

  18. Molecular control of transgene escape from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, V; Koivu, K; Kanerva, A; Pehu, E

    2001-02-05

    Potential risks of gene escape from transgenic crops through pollen and seed dispersal are being actively discussed and have slowed down full utilization of gene technology in crop improvement. To ban the transgene flow, barren zones and 'terminator' technology were developed as GMO risk management technologies in transgenic crops. Unfortunately, the technologies have not protected reliably the transgene migration to wild relatives. The present study offers a novel molecular technique to eliminate gene flow from transgenic plants to wild relatives by recoverable block of function (RBF). The RBF consists of a blocking sequence linked to the gene of interest and a recovering sequence, all in one transformable construct. The blocking sequence blocks a certain molecular or physiological function of the host plant. Action of the blocking sequence leads to the death of the host plant or to an alteration in its phenotype resulting in inability for sexual reproduction in nature. The recovering construct recovers the blocked function of the host plant. The recovering construct is regulated externally by a specific chemical or physical treatment of the plants and does not act under natural conditions. In nature, hybrids of the transgenic plants with its wild relatives carrying the RBF will die or be unable to reproduce because of the blocking construct action. A working model of RBF is described in this report as one example of the RBF concept. This RBF example is based on barnase (the blocking construct) and barstar (the recovering construct) gene expression in tobacco under sulfhydryl endopeptidase (SH-EP) and a heat shock (HS) promoter, respectively.

  19. [The exploration and practice of production of transgenic zebrafish into undergraduate student gene engineering experimental teaching].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wu-Zhou; Deng, Yun

    2013-11-01

    The preparation of transgenic animals is one of the core technology and critical achievement of gene engineering. However, it has not been reported that the gene engineering experimental course of undergraduate students in universities of mainland China has carried out the preparation of transgenic animals. In this paper, the authors took the advantage of scientific research platform, introduced the transgenic zebrafish technology to gene engineering experimental course of undergraduate students, and explored and practiced related teaching model, which had achieved good results and had great value to popularize.

  20. Why do dolphins carry sponges?

    PubMed

    Mann, Janet; Sargeant, Brooke L; Watson-Capps, Jana J; Gibson, Quincy A; Heithaus, Michael R; Connor, Richard C; Patterson, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Tool use is rare in wild animals, but of widespread interest because of its relationship to animal cognition, social learning and culture. Despite such attention, quantifying the costs and benefits of tool use has been difficult, largely because if tool use occurs, all population members typically exhibit the behavior. In Shark Bay, Australia, only a subset of the bottlenose dolphin population uses marine sponges as tools, providing an opportunity to assess both proximate and ultimate costs and benefits and document patterns of transmission. We compared sponge-carrying (sponger) females to non-sponge-carrying (non-sponger) females and show that spongers were more solitary, spent more time in deep water channel habitats, dived for longer durations, and devoted more time to foraging than non-spongers; and, even with these potential proximate costs, calving success of sponger females was not significantly different from non-spongers. We also show a clear female-bias in the ontogeny of sponging. With a solitary lifestyle, specialization, and high foraging demands, spongers used tools more than any non-human animal. We suggest that the ecological, social, and developmental mechanisms involved likely (1) help explain the high intrapopulation variation in female behaviour, (2) indicate tradeoffs (e.g., time allocation) between ecological and social factors and, (3) constrain the spread of this innovation to primarily vertical transmission.

  1. How To Produce and Characterize Transgenic Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savka, Michael A.; Wang, Shu-Yi; Wilson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Explains the process of establishing transgenic plants which is a very important tool in plant biology and modern agriculture. Produces transgenic plants with the ability to synthesize opines. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  2. How To Produce and Characterize Transgenic Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savka, Michael A.; Wang, Shu-Yi; Wilson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Explains the process of establishing transgenic plants which is a very important tool in plant biology and modern agriculture. Produces transgenic plants with the ability to synthesize opines. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  3. Human health and transgenic crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Under the joint auspices of the Agrochemical and the Agricultural and Food Chemistry Divisions of the American Chemical Society, we organized a short symposium on “Human Health and Transgenic Crops” at the 244th ACS national meeting, held August 19-23, 2012 in Philadelphia, PA, to examine an array o...

  4. Human health and transgenic crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Under the joint auspices of the Agrochemical and the Agricultural and Food Chemistry Divisions of the American Chemical Society, we organized a short symposium on “Human Health and Transgenic Crops” at the 244th ACS national meeting, held August 19-23, 2012 in Philadelphia, PA, to examine an array o...

  5. [Features of development and reproduction of transgenic flax].

    PubMed

    Lemesh, V A; Samatadze, T E; Guzenko, E V; Zhelezniakova, E V; Amosova, A V; Zelenin, A V; Muravenko, O V

    2014-01-01

    Primary transformants carrying a genetic construct with the chimeric gfp-tua6 gene were obtained using biolistic transformation of hypocotyl explants of flax variety Vasilek. Viable modified plants were used as a basis for the production of inbred lines with confirmed inheritance of introduced genetic construct in three generations. The characteristics of phenological growth stages, plant height, number of bolls and meiosis were studied for transgenic plants. A comparison of transformed lines based on reproduction years revealed a significant decrease of seed production in one line. Meiotic analysis of this line at metaphase I and anaphase I stages was conducted. The percentage of cells with impaired meiosis was highest in transgenic plants of the line with the lowest seed production. Thus, the nonspecific incorporation of genetic construct into the flax genome using biolistic transformation impairs meiosis to a different extent and it is the main reason for unequal reproducibility of transgenic flax. The production of stably reproducing transgenic lines requires systematic analysis of meiosis.

  6. Novelties that change carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Douglas H

    2012-09-01

    Comparative developmental studies have revealed a rich array of details about the patterns and processes of morphological change in animals and increasingly in plants. But, applying these insights to the study of major episodes of evolutionary innovation requires understanding how these novel morphologies become established and sufficiently abundant (either as individuals within a species or as a clade of species) to be preserved in the fossil record, and, in many cases, to influence ecological processes. Evolutionary novelties may: (1) disappear without changing the species; (2) be associated with the generation (through selection or drift) of a new species; and if the latter (3) may or may not become ecologically significant. Only the latter are commonly preserved in the fossil record. These alternatives mirror the distinction among historians of technology between innovation and invention. Here, I argue that specific sorts of evolutionary inventions drive ecological transformation, essentially constructing an environment for themselves and ancillary organisms through ecological spillover effects, increasing the "carrying capacity" of an ecosystem.

  7. Carrying our founders' mission overseas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Patricia A

    2006-01-01

    Catholic' health care providers have a calling to care for people in need, and that mission does not stop at geographical boundaries. In fact, U.S. health facilities in many cases were founded by overseas religious communities with a mission. Providing aid internationally enables U.S. sites to carry on that legacy. Although Americans traveling overseas to provide aid usually expect to be "teachers", they often find themselves becoming "students" instead. They learn to provide care without the advanced technology that is available in developed countries. They often experience cultures in which people can only hope for care access and in which patients are deeply appreciative of the services they receive. This type of education can change U.S. health care providers' perspective of their role and of the services they deliver. While gaining this wisdom-and imparting their own knowledge-providers also affect the quality of life of people in developing countries. In the end, global aid can create a better world for everyone, benefiting not only the recipients but also the worldwide community. When developing countries become more stable, develop stronger infrastructures, and have healthier citizens, other countries benefit from this progress.

  8. Intracorneal positioning of the lens in Pax6-GAL4/VP16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Venkatesh; Harrison, Wilbur R; Xiao, Ningna; Liang, Dongcai; Overbeek, Paul A

    2005-10-26

    The purpose of this study was to establish a GAL4/VP16-based binary transactivation system that was active in the lens and corneal epithelium of transgenic mice. We generated transgenic mice with the transcriptional transactivator GAL4/VP16 driven by a modified Pax6 promoter that is active in lens and corneal epithelial cells. We also generated and tested UAS-lacZ reporter mice. Wild type and transgenic mice were analyzed by histological, in situ, and Southern hybridization techniques. Five families (OVE1931, OVE1934, OVE1935, OVE1936, and OVE1937) that carry the Pax6-GAL4/VP16 transgene were generated. Unexpectedly, mice from three of the transgenic lines showed ocular abnormalities. In the family OVE1936, cataracts were seen in the heterozygous mice at the time of eyelid opening and homozygotes showed microphthalmia. Transgenic mice in families OVE1931 and OVE1937 appeared normal. Histological analysis of ocular sections of OVE1934, OVE1935, and OVE1936 homozygous transgenic mice showed intracorneal positioning of the lens. The corneal stromal cells were disorganized and there was no distinctive corneal endothelial layer. In situ hybridizations showed robust expression of the GALVP16 transgene in the lens and corneal epithelial cells of the OVE1934, OVE1935, and OVE1936, but not in OVE1931 or OVE1937 families. Bigenic embryos generated by mating the Pax6-GAL4/VP16 mice to the UAS-lacZ mice showed that the GAL4/VP16 transgenic protein is functional and can induce eye-specific expression of a UAS-lacZ reporter gene. Our data suggest that (1) expression the GAL4/VP16 transgene induces changes in gene expression in lens cells, (2) that developmentally important genes are affected, and (3) that bigenic phenotypes will need to be interpreted with caution.

  9. Detecting and quantifying the adventitious presence of transgenic seeds in safflower, Carthamus tinctorius L.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Jed; McPherson, Marc; Topinka, Deborah; Hall, Linda; Good, Allen G

    2008-07-23

    Safflower ( Carthamus tinctorius L.) is currently being developed as a platform for the production of novel proteins. Methods for detecting and quantifying transgenic safflower are needed to ensure seed quality and to monitor for its adventitious presence. We developed and compared three methods of assaying for transgenic safflower presence in conventional seedlots: field bioassays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Limits for reliable quantification for both ELISA and Q-PCR are approximately 0.1%, although levels at least as low as 0.02% can be detected by Q-PCR. Levels of quantification for the field bioassay are limited only by space and resources available. Multiple sampling methods to detect and quantify transgenic safflower presence at levels lower than 0.1% were used on field collected samples from a pollen outcrossing experiment to quantify the adventitious presence of transgenic safflower. Taking into account the potential utility and relative advantages or disadvantages of each detection method, it is recommended that the initial testing for the adventitious presence of transgenic seed be carried out using an antibody-based test if available and that Q-PCR-based assays to quantify transgenic proportion be used when it is necessary to identify specific transgenic constructs or if antibody-based assays are not readily available.

  10. Breeding of transgenic cattle for human coagulation factor IX by a combination of lentiviral system and cloning.

    PubMed

    Monzani, P S; Sangalli, J R; De Bem, T H C; Bressan, F F; Fantinato-Neto, P; Pimentel, J R V; Birgel-Junior, E H; Fontes, A M; Covas, D T; Meirelles, F V

    2013-02-28

    Recombinant coagulation factor IX must be produced in mammalian cells because FIX synthesis involves translational modifications. Human cell culture-based expression of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) is expensive, and large-scale production capacity is limited. Transgenic animals may greatly increase the yield of therapeutic proteins and reduce costs. In this study, we used a lentiviral system to obtain transgenic cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic animals. Lentiviral vectors carrying hFIX driven by 3 bovine β-casein promoters were constructed. Bovine epithelial mammary cells were transduced by lentivirus, selected with blasticidin, plated on extracellular matrix, and induced by lactogenic hormones; promoter activity was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Transcriptional activity of the 5.335-kb promoter was 6-fold higher than the 3.392- and 4.279-kb promoters, which did not significantly differ. Transgenic bovine fibroblasts were transduced with lentivirus carrying the 5.335-kb promoter and used as donor cells for SCNT. Cloned transgenic embryo production yielded development rates of 28.4%, similar to previous reports on cloned non-transgenic embryos. The embryos were transferred to recipient cows (N = 21) and 2 births of cloned transgenic cattle were obtained. These results suggest combination of the lentiviral system and cloning may be a good strategy for production of transgenic cattle.

  11. Sequence homology requirements for transcriptional silencing of 35S transgenes and post-transcriptional silencing of nitrite reductase (trans)genes by the tobacco 271 locus.

    PubMed

    Thierry, D; Vaucheret, H

    1996-12-01

    The transgene locus of the tobacco plant 271 (271 locus) is located on a telomere and consists of multiple copies of a plasmid carrying an NptII marker gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 19S promoter and the leaf-specific nitrite reductase Nii1 cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Previous analysis of gene expression in leaves has shown that this locus triggers both post-transcriptional silencing of the host leaf-specific Nii genes and transcriptional silencing of transgenes driven by the 19S or 35S promoter irrespective of their coding sequence and of their location in the genome. In this paper we show that silencing of transgenes carrying Nii1 sequences occurs irrespective of the promoter driving their expression and of their location within the genome. This phenomenon occurs in roots as well as in leaves although root Nii genes share only 84% identity with leaf-specific Nii1 sequences carried by the 271 locus. Conversely, transgenes carrying the bean Nii gene (which shares 76% identity with the tobacco Nii1 gene) escape silencing by the 271 locus. We also show that transgenes driven by the figwort mosaic virus 34S promoter (which shares 63% identity with the 35S promoter) also escape silencing by the 271 locus. Taken together, these results indicate that a high degree of sequence similarity is required between the sequences of the silencing locus and of the target (trans)genes for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing.

  12. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  13. Using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans in soil toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Graves, Amber L; Boyd, Windy A; Williams, Phillip L

    2005-05-01

    Soil bioassays are important tools for evaluating toxicological effects within the terrestrial environment. The American Society for Testing and Materials E2172-01 Standard Guide outlines a method for conducting laboratory soil toxicity tests using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This method is an efficient tool for extracting C. elegans from soil samples and can be carried out after a 24-h exposure period using relatively small amounts of soil. Drawbacks of this method include problems with (1) recovery of nematodes from soils containing a high percentage of organic matter, and (2) distinguishing indigenous nematode species from nematodes added for the laboratory test. Due in part to these issues, C. elegans has not been extensively accepted for use in soil testing. To address these concerns and improve upon the American Society for Testing and Materials method, this project focused on using transgenic strains of C. elegans carrying a GFP-expressing element. Lethality and behavior tests revealed that the transgenic nematodes respond similarly to the wild-type N2 strain, indicating that they can be used in the same manner in soil testing. The GFP marker is easily identifiable not only within soils containing a large amount of organic matter, but also in field-collected soils containing indigenous nematodes. These results support the use of transgenic GFP C. elegans in soil bioassays as a tool to further the reliability of laboratory toxicity tests.

  14. Expression of a Synthetic Gene of CTDM by Transgenic Animals.

    PubMed

    Sakai, R; Maeda, A; Matsuura, R; Eguchi, H; Lo, P; Hasuwa, H; Ikawa, M; Nakahata, K; Zenitani, M; Yamamichi, T; Umeda, S; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce molecules that can precisely regulate the complement and coagulation system and to assess the expression of such molecules in transgenic animals. The CTDM gene, which is composed of the delta-1-99 amino acid (aa) C1-INH, EGF domain 4-6 of thrombomoduline (TM), short consensus repeat (SCR) 2-4 of DAF(CD55), and SCR 2-4 of MCP(CD46) was established. The codon usage for expression in mammals was adopted. The cDNA of CTDM was subcloned into the pCPI site (the human insulin promoter and a cytomegalovirus enhancer). pCPI-CTDM was transfected into pig endothelial cells (PEC). The expression of the molecule was clearly assessed by means of flow cytometry. BD3F1 female mice were induced to superovulate and were then crossed with BD3F1 males. Micro-injection and embryo transfer were performed by standard methods, thus generating transgenic mice that express CTDM. The mice carried the CTDM plasmid, as verified by PCR. Tissue expression levels in transgenic mouse lines generated with the constructs were follows: pancreas, 1.0; brain, 5.4; thymus, 0.3; heart, 0.2; lung, 1.2; liver, 0.1; kidney, 0.1; intestine, 0.4; and spleen, 1.6. A naive control mouse was also analyzed in the exact manner as for the transgenic mice. A synthetic CTDM gene with codon usage optimized to the mammalian system represents a critical factor in the development of transgenic animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The genetics of Drosophila transgenics.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gregg

    2004-11-01

    In Drosophila, the genetic approach is still the method of choice for answering fundamental questions on cell biology, signal transduction, development, physiology and behavior. In this approach, a gene's function is ascertained by altering either the amount or quality of the gene product, and then observing the consequences. The genetic approach is itself polymorphous, encompassing new and more complex techniques that typically employ the growing collections of transgenes. The keystone of these modern Drosophila transgenic techniques has been the Gal4 binary system. Recently, several new techniques have modified this binary system to offer greater control over the timing, tissue specificity and magnitude of gene expression. Additionally, the advances in post-transcriptional gene silencing, or RNAi, have greatly expanded the ability to knockdown almost any gene's function. Regardless of the growing experimental intricacy, the application of these advances to modify gene activity still obeys the fundamental principles of genetic analysis. Several of these transgenic techniques, which offer more precise control over a gene's activity, will be reviewed here with a discussion on how they may be used for determining a gene's function.

  16. Differential regulation of laminin b1 transgene expression in the neonatal and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Baker, H; Gudas, L J

    2004-01-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in basement membrane, a type of extracellular matrix. We showed that the LAMB1 gene, which encodes the laminin beta1 subunit, is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid in embryonic stem cells. However, little information is available concerning LAMB1 developmental regulation and spatial expression in the adult mouse brain. In this study we used transgenic mice expressing different lengths of LAMB1 promoter driving beta-galactosidase to investigate developmental and adult transcriptional regulation in the regions of the brain in which the laminin beta1 protein is expressed. CNS expression was not observed in transgenic mice carrying a 1.4LAMB1betagal construct. Mice carrying a 2.5LAMB1betagal construct expressed the LAMB1 transgene, as assayed by X-gal staining, only in the molecular layer of the neonatal cerebellum. In contrast, a 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene showed broad regional expression in the adult mouse brain, including the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, colliculi, striatum, and substantia nigra. Similar expression patterns were observed for the endogenous laminin beta1 protein and for the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene, analyzed with an antibody against the beta-galactosidase protein. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene expression in the hippocampal tri-synaptic circuit suggests a role for the LAMB1 gene in learning and memory.

  17. Strategies for designing transgenic DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengyu

    2013-01-01

    Generation and characterization of transgenic mice are important elements of biomedical research. In recent years, transgenic technology has become more versatile and sophisticated, mainly because of the incorporation of recombinase-mediated conditional expression and targeted insertion, site-specific endonuclease-mediated genome editing, siRNA-mediated gene knockdown, various inducible gene expression systems, and fluorescent protein marking and tracking techniques. Site-specific recombinases (such as PhiC31) and engineered endonucleases (such as ZFN and Talen) have significantly enhanced our ability to target transgenes into specific genomic loci, but currently a great majority of transgenic mouse lines are continuingly being created using the conventional random insertion method. A major challenge for using this conventional method is that the genomic environment at the integration site has a substantial influence on the expression of the transgene. Although our understanding of such chromosomal position effects and our means to combat them are still primitive, adhering to some general guidelines can significantly increase the odds of successful transgene expression. This chapter first discusses the major problems associated with transgene expression, and then describes some of the principles for using plasmid and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) for generating transgenic constructs. Finally, the strategies for conducting each of the major types of transgenic research are discussed, including gene overexpression, promoter characterization, cell-lineage tracing, mutant complementation, expression of double or multiple transgenes, siRNA knockdown, and conditional and inducible systems.

  18. Transgene expression systems in the Triticeae cereals.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Götz; Himmelbach, Axel; Chen, Wanxin; Douchkov, Dimitar K; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The control of transgene expression is vital both for the elucidation of gene function and for the engineering of transgenic crops. Given the dominance of the Triticeae cereals in the agricultural economy of the temperate world, the development of well-performing transgene expression systems of known functionality is of primary importance. Transgenes can be expressed either transiently or stably. Transient expression systems based on direct or virus-mediated gene transfer are particularly useful in situations where the need is to rapidly screen large numbers of genes. However, an unequivocal understanding of gene function generally requires that a transgene functions throughout the plant's life and is transmitted through the sexual cycle, since this alone allows its effect to be decoupled from the plant's response to the generally stressful gene transfer event. Temporal, spatial and quantitative control of a transgene's expression depends on its regulatory environment, which includes both its promoter and certain associated untranslated region sequences. While many transgenic approaches aim to manipulate plant phenotype via ectopic gene expression, a transgene sequence can be also configured to down-regulate the expression of its endogenous counterpart, a strategy which exploits the natural gene silencing machinery of plants. In this review, current technical opportunities for controlling transgene expression in the Triticeae species are described. Apart from protocols for transient and stable gene transfer, the choice of promoters and other untranslated regulatory elements, we also consider signal peptides, as they too govern the abundance and particularly the sub-cellular localization of transgene products.

  19. Gene editing activity on extrachromosomal arrays in C. elegans transgenics.

    PubMed

    Falgowski, Kerry A; Kmiec, Eric B

    2011-04-15

    Gene editing by modified single-stranded oligonucleotides is a strategy aimed at inducing single base changes into the genome, generating a permanent genetic change. The work presented here explores gene editing capabilities in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Current approaches to gene mutagenesis in C. elegans have been plagued by non-specificity and thus the ability to induce precise, directed alterations within the genome of C. elegans would offer a platform upon which structure/function analyses can be carried out. As such, several in vivo assay systems were developed to evaluate gene editing capabilities in C. elegans. Fluorescence was chosen as the selectable endpoint as fluorescence can be easily detected through the transparent worm body even from minimal expression. Two tissue specific fluorescent expression vectors containing either a GFP or mCherry transgene were mutagenized to create a single nonsense mutation within the open reading frame of each respective fluorescent gene. These served as the target site to evaluate the frequency of gene editing on extrachromosomal array transgenic lines. Extrachromosomal arrays can carry hundreds of copies of the transgene, therefore low frequency events (like those in the gene editing reaction) may be detected. Delivery of the oligonucleotide was accomplished by microinjection into the gonads of young adult worms in an effort to induce repair of the mutated fluorescent gene in the F1 progeny. Despite many microinjections on the transgenic strains with varying concentrations of ODNs, no gene editing events were detected. This result is consistent with the previous research, demonstrating the difficulties encountered in targeting embryonic stem cells and the pronuclei of single-celled embryos. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transgene flow: facts, speculations and possible countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Ryffel, Gerhart U

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence has accumulated that unintended transgene escape occurs in oilseed rape, maize, cotton and creeping bentgrass. The escaped transgenes are found in variant cultivars, in wild type plants as well as in hybrids of sexually compatible species. The fact that in some cases stacked events are present that have not been planted commercially, implies unintended recombination of transgenic traits. As the consequences of this continuous transgene escape for the ecosystem cannot be reliably predicted, I propose to use more sophisticated approaches of gene technology in future. If possible GM plants should be constructed using either site-directed mutagenesis or cisgenic strategies to avoid the problem of transgene escape. In cases where a transgenic trait is needed, efficient containment should be the standard approach. Various strategies available or in development are discussed. Such a cautious approach in developing novel types of GM crops will enhance the sustainable potential of GM crops and thus increase the public trust in green gene technology.

  1. Inducible Transgenic Models of BRCA1 Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    the pMMTV-rtTA transgene was injected into fertilized oocytes harvested from superovulated FVB female mice. Two founder mice, designated MTA and MTB... superovulated FVB female mice. Two founder mice, designated HTA and HTB, were identified that harbored the transgene in tail-derived DNA and that passed...manner, purified DNA containing the pTetO.rtTA transgene was injected into fertilized oocytes harvested from superovulated FVB female mice. Two

  2. Transfer of stem cells carrying engineered chromosomes with XY clone laser system.

    PubMed

    Sinko, Ildiko; Katona, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Current transgenic technologies for gene transfer into the germline of mammals cause a random integration of exogenous naked DNA into the host genome that can generate undesirable position effects as well as insertional mutations. The vectors used to generate transgenic animals are limited by the amount of foreign DNA they can carry. Mammalian artificial chromosomes have large DNA-carrying capacity and ability to replicate in parallel with, but without integration into, the host genome. Hence they are attractive vectors for transgenesis, cellular protein production, and gene therapy applications as well. ES cells mediated chromosome transfer by conventional blastocyst injection has a limitation in unpredictable germline transmission. The demonstrated protocol of laser-assisted microinjection of artificial chromosome containing ES cells into eight-cell mouse embryos protocol described here can solve the problem for faster production of germline transchromosomic mice.

  3. A Brief Analysis of Sister Carrie's Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hanying

    2010-01-01

    Carrie is always dreaming while the rocking chair is rocking again and again, this is the deep impression on us after we read "Sister Carrie" which is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser. In this novel the protagonist Sister Carrie is a controversial person. This paper tries to analyze the character of Sister Carrie in order to find out…

  4. Selection of in vitro produced, transgenic embryos by nested PCR for efficient production of transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Huang, S Z; Huang, Y; Chen, M J; Zeng, F Y; Ren, Z R; Zeng, Y T

    2001-09-01

    The production of valuable pharmaceutical proteins using transgenic animals as bioreactors has become one of the goals of biotechnology. However, the efficiency of producing transgenic animals by means of pronuclear microinjection is low. This may be attributed in part to the low integration rate of foreign DNA. Therefore, a large number of recipients are required to produce transgenic animals. We recently developed a transgenic procedure that combined the techniques of goat oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM), in vitro fertilization (IVF), microinjection, preimplantation selection of the transgenic embryos with nested PCR and transferring the transgenic embryos into the recipient goat uterus to produce transgenic goats. Thirty-seven transgenic embryos determined by nested PCR were transferred to thirty-two recipient goats. In the end, four live-born kids were produced. As predicted, all the live kids were transgenic as identified by PCR as well as Southern blot hybridization, The integration rate was 100% (4/4) which was completely in accordance with the results of embryo preimplantation detection. The results showed a significant decrease in the number of recipients required as only 8 recipients (32/4) were needed to obtain one live transgenic goat. We suggest that the transgenic system described herein may provide an improved way to efficiently produce transgenic goats on a large scale.

  5. A built-in strategy for containment of transgenic plants: creation of selectively terminable transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chaoyang; Fang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Te; Cheng, Jiaan; Tu, Juming; Ye, Gongyin; Shen, Zhicheng

    2008-03-19

    Plant transgenic technology has been widely utilized for engineering crops for trait improvements and for production of high value proteins such as pharmaceuticals. However, the unintended spreading of commercial transgenic crops by pollination and seed dispersal is a major concern for environmental and food safety. Simple and reliable containment strategies for transgenes are highly desirable. Here we report a novel method for creating selectively terminable transgenic rice. In this method, the gene(s) of interest is tagged with a RNA interference cassette, which specifically suppresses the expression of the bentazon detoxification enzyme CYP81A6 and thus renders transgenic rice to be sensitive to bentazon, a herbicide used for rice weed control. We generated transgenic rice plants by this method using a new glyphosate resistant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene from Pesudomonas putida as the gene of interest, and demonstrated that these transgenic rice plants were highly sensitive to bentazon but tolerant to glyphosate, which is exactly the opposite of conventional rice. Field trial of these transgenic rice plants further confirmed that they can be selectively killed at 100% by one spray of bentazon at a regular dose used for conventional rice weed control. Furthermore, we found that the terminable transgenic rice created in this study shows no difference in growth, development and yield compared to its non-transgenic control. Therefore, this method of creating transgenic rice constitutes a novel strategy of transgene containment, which appears simple, reliable and inexpensive for implementation.

  6. Xenopus transgenics: methods using transposons.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Clair M; Yergeau, Donald A; Zhu, Haiqing; Kuliyev, Emin; Mead, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    The generation of transgenic animals is an essential tool for many genetic strategies. DNA "cut-and-paste" transposon systems can be used to efficiently modify the Xenopus genome. The DNA transposon substrate, harbored on a circularized plasmid, is co-injected into fertilized Xenopus embryos at the one-cell stage together with mRNA encoding the cognate transposase enzyme. The cellular machinery rapidly translates the exogenous mRNA to produce active transposase enzyme that catalyzes excision of the transposon substrate from the plasmid and stable integration into the genomic DNA.

  7. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2017-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars. PMID:28241060

  8. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Neil D; Wilson, Leonie; Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G; Dalzell, Johnathan J

    2017-02-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars.

  9. Virus-derived transgenes expressing hairpin RNA give immunity to Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An effective method for obtaining resistant transgenic plants is to induce RNA silencing by expressing virus-derived dsRNA in plants and this method has been successfully implemented for the generation of different plant lines resistant to many plant viruses. Results Inverted repeats of the partial Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) gene and the partial Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) replication protein (Rep) gene were introduced into the plant expression vector and the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was carried out and three transgenic tobacco lines (MP16-17-3, MP16-17-29 and MP16-17-58) immune to TMV infection and three transgenic tobacco lines (Rep15-1-1, Rep15-1-7 and Rep15-1-32) immune to CMV infection were obtained. Virus inoculation assays showed that the resistance of these transgenic plants could inherit and keep stable in T4 progeny. The low temperature (15℃) did not influence the resistance of transgenic plants. There was no significant correlation between the resistance and the copy number of the transgene. CMV infection could not break the resistance to TMV in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing TMV hairpin MP RNA. Conclusions We have demonstrated that transgenic tobacco plants expressed partial TMV movement gene and partial CMV replicase gene in the form of an intermolecular intron-hairpin RNA exhibited complete resistance to TMV or CMV infection. PMID:21269519

  10. Molecular Characterization of Transgenic Events Using Next Generation Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mammadov, Jafar; Ye, Liang; Soe, Khaing; Richey, Kimberly; Cruse, James; Zhuang, Meibao; Gao, Zhifang; Evans, Clive; Rounsley, Steve; Kumpatla, Siva P.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for the commercial use of genetically modified (GM) crops has been increasing in light of the projected growth of world population to nine billion by 2050. A prerequisite of paramount importance for regulatory submissions is the rigorous safety assessment of GM crops. One of the components of safety assessment is molecular characterization at DNA level which helps to determine the copy number, integrity and stability of a transgene; characterize the integration site within a host genome; and confirm the absence of vector DNA. Historically, molecular characterization has been carried out using Southern blot analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing. While this is a robust approach to characterize the transgenic crops, it is both time- and resource-consuming. The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has provided highly sensitive and cost- and labor-effective alternative for molecular characterization compared to traditional Southern blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated the successful application of both whole genome sequencing and target capture sequencing approaches for the characterization of single and stacked transgenic events and compared the results and inferences with traditional method with respect to key criteria required for regulatory submissions. PMID:26908260

  11. Elucidation of Factors Effecting Enzymatic Saccharification using Transgenic Hardwoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Douyong

    Three groups of transgenic wood samples were used as starting materials to elucidate the recalcitrance of enzymatic saccharification with/without pretreatments. The first group of transgenic wood samples is low lignin P. trichocarpa. The second group is low xylan P. trichocarpa. The third one is 12 hybrid poplars which have different levels of S/V ratio and lignin content. Four pretreatments were carried out in this research including dilute sulfuric acid, green liquor, auto hydrolysis and ozone delignification. The behavior among pretreatments as a function of removal of lignin appears to be different. Lignin is the major factor of recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic material to ethanol conversion process. Xylan also plays key role in this process. In addition, the crude milled wood lignin was isolated from these three groups of transgenic samples. Lignin carbohydrate complexes was characterized by 1H-13C HMQC and 13C NMR. Thus the effect of LCCs on enzymatic saccharification was elucidated. High S/V ratio propels the lignin removal during pretreatments however; high S/V ratio retards the enzymatic saccharification on the lignocellulosic material without pretreatments. The level of LCCs linkages accounts for additional recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic material to ethanol conversion process. The amount of LCCs linkages is affected by xylan content, lignin content and S/V ratio.

  12. Cutaneous lymphoproliferation and lymphomas in interleukin 7 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the role of interleukin 7 (IL-7) in the development of the lymphoid system, we have generated two lines of transgenic mice carrying an IL-7 cDNA fused to an immunoglobulin heavy chain promoter and enhancer. This transgene is expressed in the bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, and skin provoking a perturbation of T cell development characterized by a marked reduction of CD4+ CD8+ (double- positive) thymocytes. Quite unexpectedly, however, both lines also develop a progressive cutaneous disorder involving a dermal lymphoid infiltrate that results in progressive alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and exfoliation. Although the infiltrate is primarily composed of T lineage cells, its development is not impeded in the athymic nu/nu background. Furthermore, the phenotype can be transmitted horizontally by transplanting lymphoid tissues or skin to syngeneic wild-type mice. Thus, the phenotype is conveyed by skin-homing, mobile cells (presumably the infiltrating lymphocytes) in a cell-autonomous fashion. In addition to the skin phenotype, this transgene also provokes the development of a lymphoproliferative disorder that induces B and T cell lymphomas within the first 4 mo of life. These findings suggest potential physiologic actions of IL-7 in T cell development and in cutaneous immunity. They also demonstrate that IL-7 can act as an oncogene in the living organism. PMID:7678850

  13. Introduction of Wx transgene into rice wx mutants leads to both high- and low-amylose rice.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kimiko; Ozaki, Hiroko; Okada, Kyoko; Hori, Hidetaka; Takeda, Yasuhito; Mitsui, Toshiaki

    2003-05-01

    The Waxy (Wx) gene encodes a granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) that plays a key role in the amylose synthesis of rice and other plant species. Two functional Wx alleles of rice exist: Wx(a), which produces a large amount of amylose, and Wx(b), which produces a smaller amount of amylose because of the mutation at the 5' splice site of intron 1. Wx(b) is largely distributed in Japonica cultivars, and high amylose cultivars do not exist in Japonica cultivars. We introduced the cloned Wx(a) cDNA into null-mutant Japonica rice (wx). The amylose contents of these transgenic plants were 6-11% higher than that of the original cultivar, Labelle, which carries the Wx(a) allele, although the levels of the Wx protein in the transgenic rice were equal to those of cv. Labelle. We also observed a gene-dosage effect of the Wx(a) transgene on Wx protein expression, but a smaller dosage effect was observed in amylose production with over 40% of amylose content in transgenic rice. Moreover, one transgenic line carrying eleven copies of the transgene showed low levels of Wx expression and amylose in the endosperm. This suggested that the integration of excessive copies of the transgene might lead to gene silencing.

  14. Transgenic mouse model of hemifacial microsomia: Cloning and characterization of insertional mutation region on chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Osamu

    1994-10-01

    The 643 transgenic mouse line carries an autosomal dominant insertional mutation that results in hemifacial microsomia (HFM), including microtia and/or abnormal biting. In this paper, we characterize the transgene integration site in transgenic mice and preintegration site of wildtype mice. The locus, designated Hfm (hemifacial microsomia-associated locus), was mapped to chromosome 10, B1-3, by chromosome in situ hybridization. We cloned the transgene insertion site from the transgenic DNA library. By using the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences, the preintegration region was isolated. The analysis of these regions showed that a deletion of at least 23 kb DNA occurred in association with the transgene integration. Evolutionarily conserved regions were detected within and beside the deleted region. The result of mating between hemizygotes suggests that the phenotype of the homozygote is lethality in the prenatal period. These results suggests that the Hfm locus is necessary for prenatal development and that this strain is a useful animal model for investigating the genetic predisposition to HFM in humans.

  15. Gene flow from transgenic to nontransgenic soybean plants in the Cerrado region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Abud, S; de Souza, P I M; Vianna, G R; Leonardecz, E; Moreira, C T; Faleiro, F G; Júnior, J N; Monteiro, P M F O; Rech, E L; Aragão, F J L

    2007-06-30

    Evaluation of transgenic crops under field conditions is a fundamental step for the production of genetically engineered varieties. In order to determine if there is pollen dispersal from transgenic to nontransgenic soybean plants, a field release experiment was conducted in the Cerrado region of Brazil. Nontransgenic plants were cultivated in plots surrounding Roundup Ready transgenic plants carrying the cp4 epsps gene, which confers herbicide tolerance against glyphosate herbicide, and pollen dispersal was evaluated by checking for the dominant gene. The percentage of cross-pollination was calculated as a fraction of herbicide-tolerant and -nontolerant plants. The greatest amount of transgenic pollen dispersion was observed in the first row, located at one meter from the central (transgenic) plot, with a 0.52% average frequency. The frequency of pollen dispersion decreased to 0.12% in row 2, reaching 0% when the plants were up to 10 m distance from the central plot. Under these conditions pollen flow was higher for a short distance. This fact suggests that the management necessary to avoid cross-pollination from transgenic to nontransgenic plants in the seed production fields should be similar to the procedures currently utilized to produce commercial seeds.

  16. Tol2-Mediated Generation of a Transgenic Haplochromine Cichlid, Astatotilapia burtoni

    PubMed Central

    Fernald, Russell D.

    2013-01-01

    Cichlid fishes represent one of the most species-rich and rapid radiations of a vertebrate family. These ∼2200 species, predominantly found in the East African Great Lakes, exhibit dramatic differences in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. However, the genetic bases for this radiation, and for the control of their divergent traits, are unknown. A flood of genomic and transcriptomic data promises to suggest mechanisms underlying the diversity, but transgenic technology will be needed to rigorously test the hypotheses generated. Here we demonstrate the successful use of the Tol2 transposon system to generate transgenic Astatotilapia burtoni, a haplochromine cichlid from Lake Tanganyika, carrying the GFP transgene under the control of the ubiquitous EF1α promoter. The transgene integrates into the genome, is successfully passed through the germline, and the widespread GFP expression pattern is stable across siblings and multiple generations. The stable inheritance and expression patterns indicate that the Tol2 system can be applied to generate A. burtoni transgenic lines. Transgenesis has proven to be a powerful technology for manipulating genes and cells in other model organisms and we anticipate that transgenic A. burtoni and other cichlids will be used to test the mechanisms underlying behavior and speciation. PMID:24204902

  17. Transgenic Rat Models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Carreira, João Casaca; Jahanshahi, Ali; Zeef, Dagmar; Kocabicak, Ersoy; Vlamings, Rinske; von Hörsten, Stephan; Temel, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Several animal models for Huntington's disease (HD) have been created in order to investigate mechanisms of disease, and to evaluate the potency of novel therapies. Here, we describe the characteristics of the two transgenic rat models: transgenic rat model of HD (fragment model) and the Bacterial Artificial Chromosome HD model (full-length model). We discuss their genetic, behavioural, neuropathological and neurophysiological features.

  18. Transgenic Biofuel Feedstocks and Strategies for Biocontainment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are several reasons to believe that transgenic plant feedstocks will be required to realize the full economic and environmental benefits of cellulosic and other biofuels. Much of the commercialization potential for the use of transgenic plant cellulosic feedstocks may be impacted by regulatio...

  19. Transgenic animals: current and alternative strategies.

    PubMed

    Chan, A W

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic animal technology is one of the most fascinating technologies developed in the last two decades. It allows us to address questions in life sciences that no other methods have achieved. The impact on biomedical and biological research, as well as commercial interests are overwhelming. The questions accompanying this fast growing technology and its diversified applications attract the attention from a variety of entities. Still, one of the most fundamental problems remaining is the search for an efficient and reliable gene delivery system for creating transgenic animals. The traditional method of pronuclear microinjection has displayed great variability in success among species. While an acceptable efficiency in the production of transgenic mice has been attained, the relative low efficiency (<1%) in creating transgenic livestock has become one of the barriers for its application. In the past decades, improvements in producing transgenic livestock have made a slow progression, however, the recent advancement in cloning technology and the ability to create transgenic livestock in a highly efficient manner, have opened the gate to a new era in transgenic technology. Discoveries of new gene delivery systems have created an enthusiastic atmosphere that has made this technology so unique. This review focuses on gene delivery strategies as well as various approaches that may assist the advancement of transgenic efficiency in large animals.

  20. [Progress in transgenic fish techniques and application].

    PubMed

    Ye, Xing; Tian, Yuan-Yuan; Gao, Feng-Ying

    2011-05-01

    Transgenic technique provides a new way for fish breeding. Stable lines of growth hormone gene transfer carps, salmon and tilapia, as well as fluorescence protein gene transfer zebra fish and white cloud mountain minnow have been produced. The fast growth characteristic of GH gene transgenic fish will be of great importance to promote aquaculture production and economic efficiency. This paper summarized the progress in transgenic fish research and ecological assessments. Microinjection is still the most common used method, but often resulted in multi-site and multi-copies integration. Co-injection of transposon or meganuclease will greatly improve the efficiency of gene transfer and integration. "All fish" gene or "auto gene" should be considered to produce transgenic fish in order to eliminate misgiving on food safety and to benefit expression of the transferred gene. Environmental risk is the biggest obstacle for transgenic fish to be commercially applied. Data indicates that transgenic fish have inferior fitness compared with the traditional domestic fish. However, be-cause of the genotype-by-environment effects, it is difficult to extrapolate simple phenotypes to the complex ecological interactions that occur in nature based on the ecological consequences of the transgenic fish determined in the laboratory. It is critical to establish highly naturalized environments for acquiring reliable data that can be used to evaluate the environ-mental risk. Efficacious physical and biological containment strategies remain to be crucial approaches to ensure the safe application of transgenic fish technology.

  1. An affinity-based genome walking method to find transgene integration loci in transgenic genome.

    PubMed

    Thirulogachandar, V; Pandey, Prachi; Vaishnavi, C S; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2011-09-15

    Identifying a good transgenic event from the pool of putative transgenics is crucial for further characterization. In transgenic plants, the transgene can integrate in either single or multiple locations by disrupting the endogenes and/or in heterochromatin regions causing the positional effect. Apart from this, to protect the unauthorized use of transgenic plants, the signature of transgene integration for every commercial transgenic event needs to be characterized. Here we show an affinity-based genome walking method, named locus-finding (LF) PCR (polymerase chain reaction), to determine the transgene flanking sequences of rice plants transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. LF PCR includes a primary PCR by a degenerated primer and transfer DNA (T-DNA)-specific primer, a nested PCR, and a method of enriching the desired amplicons by using a biotin-tagged primer that is complementary to the T-DNA. This enrichment technique separates the single strands of desired amplicons from the off-target amplicons, reducing the template complexity by several orders of magnitude. We analyzed eight transgenic rice plants and found the transgene integration loci in three different chromosomes. The characteristic illegitimate recombination of the Agrobacterium sp. was also observed from the sequenced integration loci. We believe that the LF PCR should be an indispensable technique in transgenic analysis.

  2. Perspective on the combined use of an independent transgenic sexing and a multifactorial reproductive sterility system to avoid resistance development against transgenic Sterile Insect Technique approaches

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is an accepted species-specific genetic control approach that acts as an insect birth control measure, which can be improved by biotechnological engineering to facilitate its use and widen its applicability. First transgenic insects carrying a single killing system have already been released in small scale trials. However, to evade resistance development to such transgenic approaches, completely independent ways of transgenic killing should be established and combined. Perspective Most established transgenic sexing and reproductive sterility systems are based on the binary tTA expression system that can be suppressed by adding tetracycline to the food. However, to create 'redundant killing' an additional independent conditional expression system is required. Here we present a perspective on the use of a second food-controllable binary expression system - the inducible Q system - that could be used in combination with site-specific recombinases to generate independent transgenic killing systems. We propose the combination of an already established transgenic embryonic sexing system to meet the SIT requirement of male-only releases based on the repressible tTA system together with a redundant male-specific reproductive sterility system, which is activated by Q-system controlled site-specific recombination and is based on a spermatogenesis-specifically expressed endonuclease acting on several species-specific target sites leading to chromosome shredding. Conclusion A combination of a completely independent transgenic sexing and a redundant reproductive male sterility system, which do not share any active components and mediate the induced lethality by completely independent processes, would meet the 'redundant killing' criteria for suppression of resistance development and could therefore be employed in large scale long-term suppression programs using biotechnologically enhanced SIT. PMID:25471733

  3. Accumulation of nickel in transgenic tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidik, Nik Marzuki; Othman, Noor Farhan

    2013-11-01

    The accumulation of heavy metal Ni in the roots and leaves of four T1 transgenic lines of tobacco (T(1)20E, T(1)24C, T(1)18B1 and T(1)20B) expressing eiMT1 from E.indica was assessed. The aim of the study was to investigate the level of Ni accumulation in the leaves and roots of each transgenic lines and to evaluate the eligibility of the plants to be classified as a phytoremediation agent. All of the transgenic lines showed different ability in accumulating different metals and has translocation factor (TF) less than 1 (TF<1) at all levels of metal treatment. Among the 4 transgenic lines, transgenic line T(1)24C showed the highest accumulation of Ni (251.9 ± 0.014 mg/kg) and the lowest TF value (TFT(1)24C=0.0875) at 60 ppm Ni.

  4. Field Performance of Transgenic Sugarcane Lines Resistant to Sugarcane Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wei; Ruan, Miaohong; Qin, Lifang; Yang, Chuanyu; Chen, Rukai; Chen, Baoshan; Zhang, Muqing

    2017-01-01

    Sugarcane mosaic disease is mainly caused by the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), which can significantly reduce stalk yield and sucrose content of sugarcane in the field. Coat protein mediated protection (CPMP) is an effective strategy to improve virus resistance. A 2-year field study was conducted to compare five independent transgenic sugarcane lines carrying the SCMV-CP gene (i.e., B2, B36, B38, B48, and B51) with the wild-type parental clone Badila (WT). Agronomic performance, resistance to SCMV infection, and transgene stability were evaluated and compared with the wild-type parental clone Badila (WT) at four experimental locations in China across two successive seasons, i.e., plant cane (PC) and 1st ratoon cane (1R). All transgenic lines derived from Badila had significantly greater tons of cane per hectare (TCH) and tons of sucrose per hectare (TSH) as well as lower SCMV disease incidence than those from Badila in the PC and 1R crops. The transgenic line B48 was highly resistant to SCMV with less than 3% incidence of infection. The recovery phenotype of transgenic line B36 was infected soon after virus inoculation, but the subsequent leaves showed no symptoms of infection. Most control plants developed symptoms that persisted and spread throughout the plant with more than 50% incidence. B48 recorded an average of 102.72 t/ha, which was 67.2% more than that for Badila. The expression of the transgene was stable over many generations with vegetative propagation. These results show that SCMV-resistant transgenic lines derived from Badila can provide resistant germplasm for sugarcane breeding and can also be used to study virus resistance mechanisms. This is the first report on the development and field performance of transgenic sugarcane plants that are resistant to SCMV infection in China. PMID:28228765

  5. Different Mechanisms of Four Aluminum (Al)-Resistant Transgenes for Al Toxicity in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Ezaki, Bunichi; Katsuhara, Maki; Kawamura, Masako; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized the mechanism of action of four transgenes (AtBCB [Arabidopsis blue copper-binding protein], parB [tobacco {Nicotiana tabacum} glutathione S-transferase], NtPox [tobacco peroxidase], and NtGDI1 [tobacco GDP dissociation inhibitor]) that independently Al resistance on transgenic Arabidopsis. All four transgenic lines showed lower deposition of callose after Al treatment than the Landsberg erecta ecotype of Arabidopsis, confirming that the four genes function to ameliorate Al toxicity. Influx and efflux experiments of Al ions suggested that the AtBCB gene may suppress Al absorption, whereas expression of the NtGDI1 gene promotes a release of Al in the root tip region of Arabidopsis. The total enzyme activities of glutathione S-transferases or peroxidases in transgenic lines carrying either the parB or NtPox genes were significantly higher than in the Landsberg erecta ecotype of Arabidopsis, and these enzyme activities were maintained at higher levels during Al stress. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation caused by Al stress was repressed in these two transgenic lines, suggesting that overexpression of these two genes diminishes oxidative damage caused by Al stress. Al-treated roots of transgenic plants were also stained by 4′,6-diamino-2-phenylindole to monitor cell death caused by Al toxicity. The result suggested that cell death is repressed in the NtPox line. Analysis of F1 hybrids between the four transgenic lines suggests that more resistant transgenic plants can be constructed by combinations of these four genes. PMID:11706174

  6. A Transgenic Durum Wheat Line that is Free of Marker Genes and Expresses 1dy10

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We used a combination of “clean gene” technology and positive selection to generate transgenic durum wheat lines free of herbicide and antibiotic resistance marker genes. Biolistic transformation experiments were carried out using three “minimal gene cassettes” consisting of linear DNA fragments exc...

  7. Transgene expression in pear (Pyrus communis L.) driven by a phloem-specific promoter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A gene expression cassette carrying ß-glucuronidase (uidA) reporter gene under the control of the promoter of the Arabidopsis sucrose-H+ symporter gene (AtSUC2) was introduced to pear plants via an Agrobacterium-mediated leaf-explant transformation procedure. Transgenic shoots were regenerated from...

  8. Genomic evaluation of oxalate-degrading transgenic soybean in response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxalate oxidases catalyze the degradation of oxalic acid (OA). Highly resistant transgenic soybean carrying an oxalate oxidase (OxO) gene and its susceptible parent soybean line, AC Colibri, were tested for genome-wide gene expression in response to the necrotrophic, OA producing pathogen Sclerotini...

  9. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson

    NASA Image and Video Library

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  10. Mouse opsin promoter-directed Cre recombinase expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Le, Yun-Zheng; Zheng, Lixin; Zheng, Wei; Ash, John D; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Zhu, Meili; Anderson, Robert E

    2006-04-18

    Gene inactivation with homologous recombination in mice is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, many proteins play essential roles in a number of tissues and germline gene inactivation often results in embryonic lethality. To overcome this limitation and to dissect the functions of essential genes beyond embryonic development, we generated mouse rod opsin promoter-controlled cre transgenic mice with a goal of obtaining transgenic lines with a range of Cre activity in rod photoreceptors. Transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase directed by a long or short mouse opsin promoter were generated. Candidate Cre-expressing lines were identified with RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Potentially useful Cre-expressing lines were characterized further with immunohistochemistry, PCR, and functional analysis using a Cre-activatable lacZ reporter mouse strain (R26R) to determine temporal and spatial patterns of Cre expression. Retinal function and morphology in these mouse lines were analyzed with electroretinography (ERG) and light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin stained retinal sections. Transgenic mice expressing Cre in rod photoreceptors were generated. Characterization of candidate photoreceptor-specific Cre mice using immunohistochemistry and functional assays demonstrated that an efficient Cre-mediated recombination occurred in rod photoreceptor cells in one mouse line and a mosaic Cre-mediated recombination occurred in rod photoreceptors and rod bipolar cells in another mouse line. Further analysis of these mice with ERG and morphological examination suggested that the retinas of eight-month-old adults were normal. We have generated transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase in rod photoreceptors. One transgenic mouse line was capable of carrying out efficient Cre-mediated recombination in rod photoreceptors. Another transgenic mouse line was capable of carrying out mosaic Cre-mediated recombination in rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells across the

  11. Assessment of the salt tolerance and environmental biosafety of Eucalyptus camaldulensis harboring a mangrin transgene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Kikuchi, Akira; Shimazaki, Takayoshi; Yamada, Akiyo; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Watanabe, Kazuo N

    2013-01-01

    Increasing soil salinization of arable land has a major impact on the global ecosystem. One approach to increase the usable global forest area is to develop transgenic trees with higher tolerance to conditions of salt stress. An allene oxide cyclase homolog, mangrin, contains a core protein domain that enhances the salt tolerance of its host. We utilized this feature to develop improved salt-tolerant eucalyptus trees, by using transgenic Eucalyptus camaldulensis carrying the mangrin gene as a model. Since the Japanese government requires an environmental biosafety assessment for the surrounding biosphere, we performed experiments on trees grown in a special netted-house. This study examined the transgenic E. camaldulensis carrying the mangrin gene to assess the feasibility of using these transformants, and assessed their salt tolerance and environmental biosafety. We found that seven of 36 transgenic genotypes had significantly higher salt tolerance than non-transformants, and more importantly, that these plants had no significant impact on environmental biosafety. These results suggest that introduction of the mangrin gene may be one approach to safely enhance salt tolerance in genetically modified Eucalyptus species, and that the transformants have no apparent risks in terms of environmental biosafety. Thus, this study provides valuable information regarding the use of transgenic trees in situ.

  12. The beta 1 integrin distal promoter is developmentally regulated in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, E; Balzac, F; Pastore, C; Tarone, G; Silengo, L; Altruda, F

    1993-12-01

    Transgenic mice harbouring 5' flanking sequences of the human beta 1 integrin gene linked to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene have been generated to examine spatial and temporal distribution of the promoter activity during development. Our previous data showed that this regulatory region is composed by two promoters, called distal and proximal, located closely on the human genome. To determine the role of each promoter region during development we generated transgenic mice using these two sequences linked to the lacZ reporter gene. Their analysis shows that these two sequences, as determined by in vitro studies, have different efficiencies in promoting transcription. Actually mice carrying the proximal promoter region exhibit a weak lacZ expression resulting in an undetectable beta-galactosidase activity in both embryonic and adult tissues. On the other hand, transgenic mice carrying the distal promoter express beta-galactosidase at high efficiency during embryonic development. The pattern of transgene expression is consistent with the localization of beta 1 protein on mouse embryos evidenced by immunohistochemistry. Moreover the distal promoter is subjected to a temporal modulation since in adult transgenic mice lacZ expression decreases to a level detected only by RT-PCR analysis. We have determined a similar down-regulation analysing by Northern blot beta 1 mRNA in adult and embryonic organs such as heart and gut.

  13. Efficient Production of Fluorescent Transgenic Rats using the piggyBac Transposon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianda; Shuai, Ling; Mao, Junjie; Wang, Xuepeng; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Leyun; Li, Yanni; Li, Wei; Zhou, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Rats with fluorescent markers are of great value for studies that trace lineage-specific development, particularly those assessing the differentiation potential of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The piggyBac (PB) transposon is widely used for the efficient introduction of genetic modifications into genomes, and has already been successfully used to produce transgenic mice and rats. Here, we generated transgenic rats carrying either the desRed fluorescent protein (RFP) gene or the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene by injecting pronuclei with PB plasmids. We showed that the transgenic rats expressed the RFP or eGFP gene in many organs and had the capability to transmit the marker gene to the next generation through germline integration. In addition, rat embryonic stem cells (ESCs) carrying an RFP reporter gene can be derived from the blastocysts of the transgenic rats. Moreover, the RFP gene can be detected in chimeras derived from RFP ESCs via blastocyst injection. This work suggests that PB-mediated transgenesis is a powerful tool to generate transgenic rats expressing fluorescent proteins with high efficiency, and this technique can be used to derive rat ESCs expressing a reporter protein. PMID:27624004

  14. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU... Carrying capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying capacity for each land management district of the Navajo Reservation. (b) Recommended adjustments...

  15. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU... Carrying capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying capacity for each land management district of the Navajo Reservation. (b) Recommended adjustments...

  16. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU OF... capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying... carrying capacities shall be referred by the Superintendent to District Grazing Committee, Central...

  17. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carrying capacities. 167.6 Section 167.6 Indians BUREAU... Carrying capacities. (a) The Commissioner of Indian Affairs on June 26, 1943, promulgated the authorized carrying capacity for each land management district of the Navajo Reservation. (b) Recommended...

  18. Colored medaka and zebrafish: transgenics with ubiquitous and strong transgene expression driven by the medaka β-actin promoter.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Nozomi; Ando, Kazunori; Kudo, Akira; Kinoshita, Masato; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2012-12-01

    Conditional cell labeling, cell tracing, and genetic manipulation approaches are becoming increasingly important in developmental and regenerative biology. Such approaches in zebrafish research are hampered by the lack of an ubiquitous transgene driver element that is active at all developmental stages. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) β-actin (Olactb) promoter, which drives constitutive transgene expression during all developmental stages, and the analysis of adult organs except blood cell types. Taking advantage of the compact medaka promoter, we succeeded in generating a zebrafish transgenic (Tg) line with unprecedentedly strong and widespread transgene expression from embryonic to adult stages. Moreover, the Tg carries a pair of loxP sites, which enables the reporter fluorophore to switch from DsRed2 to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). We induced Cre/loxP recombination with Tg(hsp70l: mCherry-t2a-Cre(ERt2) ) in the double Tg embryo and generated a Tg line that constitutively expresses EGFP. We further demonstrate the powerful application of Olactb-driven Tgs for cell lineage tracing using transplantation experiments with embryonic cells at the shield stage and adult cells of regenerating fin. Thus, the use of promoter elements from medaka is an alternative approach to generate Tgs with stronger and even novel expression patterns in zebrafish. The Olactb promoter and the Tg lines presented here represent an important advancement for the broader use of Cre/loxP-based Tg applications in zebrafish. © 2012 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2012 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  19. Fertility comparison between wild type and transgenic mice by in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Kuzhalini; Raber, James; Sztein, Jorge

    2010-08-01

    Transgenic mice are increasingly used as animal models for studies of gene function and regulation of mammalian genes. Although there has been continuous and remarkable progress in the development of transgenic technology over several decades, many aspects of the resulting transgenic model's phenotype cannot be completely predicted. For example, it is well known that as a consequence of the random insertion of the injected DNA construct, several founder mice of the new line need to be analyzed for possible differences in phenotype secondary to different insertion sites. The Knock out technique for transgenic production disrupts a specific gene by insertion or homologous recombination creating a null expression or replacement of the gene with a marker to localize it expression. This modification could result in pleiotropic phenotype if the gene is also expressed in tissues other than the target organs. Although the future breeding performance of the newly created model is critical to many studies, it is rarely anticipated that the new integrations could modify the reproductive profile of the new transgenic line. To date, few studies have demonstrated the difference between the parent strain's reproductive performance and the newly developed transgenic model. This study was designed to determine whether a genetic modification, knock out (KO) or transgenics, not anticipated to affect reproductive performance could affect the resulting reproductive profile of the newly developed transgenic mouse. More specifically, this study is designed to study the impact of the genetic modification on the ability of gametes to be fertilized in vitro. We analyzed the reproductive performance of mice with different background strains: FVB/N, C57BL/6 (129Sv/J x C57Bl/6)F1 and outbred CD1((R)) and compared them to mice of the same strain carrying a transgene or KO which was not anticipated to affect fertility. In vitro Fertilization was used to analyze the fertility of the mice. Oocytes

  20. Production of transgenic canine embryos using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Koo, Ok Jae; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2012-02-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has emerged as an important tool for producing transgenic animals and deriving transgenic embryonic stem cells. The process of SCNT involves fusion of in vitro matured oocytes with somatic cells to make embryos that are transgenic when the nuclear donor somatic cells carry 'foreign' DNA and are clones when all the donor cells are genetically identical. However, in canines, it is difficult to obtain enough mature oocytes for successful SCNT due to the very low efficiency of in vitro oocyte maturation in this species that hinders canine transgenic cloning. One solution is to use oocytes from a different species or even a different genus, such as bovine oocytes, that can be matured easily in vitro. Accordingly, the aim of this study was: (1) to establish a canine fetal fibroblast line transfected with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene; and (2) to investigate in vitro embryonic development of canine cloned embryos derived from transgenic and non-transgenic cell lines using bovine in vitro matured oocytes. Canine fetal fibroblasts were transfected with constructs containing the GFP and puromycin resistance genes using FuGENE 6®. Viability levels of these cells were determined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay. Interspecies SCNT (iSCNT) embryos from normal or transfected cells were produced and cultured in vitro. The MTT measurement of GFP-transfected fetal fibroblasts (mean OD = 0.25) was not significantly different from non-transfected fetal fibroblasts (mean OD = 0.35). There was no difference between transgenic iSCNT versus non-transgenic iSCNT embryos in terms of fusion rates (73.1% and 75.7%, respectively), cleavage rates (69.7% vs. 73.8%) and development to the 8-16-cell stage (40.1% vs. 42.7%). Embryos derived from the transfected cells completely expressed GFP at the 2-cell, 4-cell, and 8-16-cell stages without mosaicism. In summary, our results demonstrated that

  1. [Research progress on environmental carrying capacity].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Sun, Tieheng; Li, Peijun; Li, Fayun

    2005-04-01

    To study the theories and quantification methods of environmental carrying capacity is of significance in reality for directing human beings economic behaviors and harmonizing the relationships between social development and environment. In this paper, the definition of environmental carrying capacity was introduced from the aspects of "capacity", "threshold" and "capability", with the main characteristics of objective and subjective, regional and temporal, and dynamic and adjustable, and its research progress was reviewed. On the basis of these, the quantification methods of environmental carrying capacity, including exponential assessment, carrying rate assessment, system dynamics, and multi-objective optimization, were analyzed, and the research perspectives of environmental carrying capacity were discussed.

  2. Generation of transgenic Hydra by embryo microinjection.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Celina E; Lin, Haifan; Steele, Robert E

    2014-09-11

    As a member of the phylum Cnidaria, the sister group to all bilaterians, Hydra can shed light on fundamental biological processes shared among multicellular animals. Hydra is used as a model for the study of regeneration, pattern formation, and stem cells. However, research efforts have been hampered by lack of a reliable method for gene perturbations to study molecular function. The development of transgenic methods has revitalized the study of Hydra biology(1). Transgenic Hydra allow for the tracking of live cells, sorting to yield pure cell populations for biochemical analysis, manipulation of gene function by knockdown and over-expression, and analysis of promoter function. Plasmid DNA injected into early stage embryos randomly integrates into the genome early in development. This results in hatchlings that express transgenes in patches of tissue in one or more of the three lineages (ectodermal epithelial, endodermal epithelial, or interstitial). The success rate of obtaining a hatchling with transgenic tissue is between 10% and 20%. Asexual propagation of the transgenic hatchling is used to establish a uniformly transgenic line in a particular lineage. Generating transgenic Hydra is surprisingly simple and robust, and here we describe a protocol that can be easily implemented at low cost.

  3. Generation of Transgenic Hydra by Embryo Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Celina E.; Lin, Haifan; Steele, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    As a member of the phylum Cnidaria, the sister group to all bilaterians, Hydra can shed light on fundamental biological processes shared among multicellular animals. Hydra is used as a model for the study of regeneration, pattern formation, and stem cells. However, research efforts have been hampered by lack of a reliable method for gene perturbations to study molecular function. The development of transgenic methods has revitalized the study of Hydra biology1. Transgenic Hydra allow for the tracking of live cells, sorting to yield pure cell populations for biochemical analysis, manipulation of gene function by knockdown and over-expression, and analysis of promoter function. Plasmid DNA injected into early stage embryos randomly integrates into the genome early in development. This results in hatchlings that express transgenes in patches of tissue in one or more of the three lineages (ectodermal epithelial, endodermal epithelial, or interstitial). The success rate of obtaining a hatchling with transgenic tissue is between 10% and 20%. Asexual propagation of the transgenic hatchling is used to establish a uniformly transgenic line in a particular lineage. Generating transgenic Hydra is surprisingly simple and robust, and here we describe a protocol that can be easily implemented at low cost. PMID:25285460

  4. Promoter methylation and histone modifications affect the expression of the exogenous DsRed gene in transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Nuo, M T; Yuan, J L; Yang, W L; Gao, X Y; He, N; Liang, H; Cang, M; Liu, D J

    2016-08-29

    Transgene silencing, which is common in transgenic plants and animals, limits the generation and application of genetically modified organisms, and is associated with the exogenous gene copy number, the methylation status of its promoters, and histone modification abnormalities. Here, we analyzed the expression of the exogenous gene DsRed and the methylation status of its cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter in six healthy transgenic cashmere goats and transgenic nuclear donor cells. The CMV promoter exhibited high methylation levels (74.4-88.2%) in four of the goats, a moderate methylation level (58.7%) in one, and a low methylation level (21.2%) in one, while the methylation level of the transgenic nuclear donor cells was comparatively low (14.3%). DsRed expression was negatively correlated with promoter methylation status. Transgenic cashmere goats carried one to three copies of the CMV promoter fragment and one to six copies of the DsRed fragment, but copy number showed no obvious correlation with DsRed expression. After treatment with the methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, DsRed expression in transgenic goat cells significantly increased and CMV promoter methylation significantly decreased; this indicated an inverse correlation between promoter methylation status and DsRed expression. After treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, DsRed expression increased, indicating that an abnormal histone modification in transgenic goats is also involved in exogenous gene silencing. These findings indicate the potential of trichostatin A and 5-azacytidine to rescue the biological activity of silenced exogenous transgenes in adult-derived transgenic cells under culture conditions.

  5. Risk assessment of transgenic apomictic tetraploid bahiagrass, cytogenetics, breeding behavior and performance of intra-specific hybrids.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Sukhpreet; James, Victoria A; Quesenberry, Kenneth H; Altpeter, Fredy

    2009-11-01

    Pollen-mediated gene transfer from stress tolerant or herbicide-resistant transgenic plants may cause environmental or agronomic problems. Apomictic seed production found in some bahiagrass cultivars may serve as a natural transgene containment system. Under greenhouse conditions, the average gene transfer frequency from an herbicide-resistant apomictic tetraploid to a population of sexual diploid bahiagrass genotypes or apomictic tetraploid bahiagrass was 0.16% when the transgenic pollen donor was placed at 0.5-1.5 m distance from the non-transgenic pollen receptors. The herbicide-resistant hybrids were characterized for transgene integration, expression and ploidy, by Southern blot analysis, immuno-chromatography and flow cytometry, respectively. Hybrids resulting from open pollination of non-transgenic diploid female plants with transgenic tetraploid male plants were triploids or near-triploids, with 2n = 26-34. These hybrids displayed a wide range of phenotypic variability, including some non-persistent or non-flowering dwarf-type hybrids with good vigor, or hybrids with vegetative growth similar to non-transgenic plants, but with significantly reduced seed set. Non-flowering aneu-triploids with good vigor/field performance will provide the highest level of transgene containment. Embryo sac analysis of pollinated spikelets confirmed a high proportion of aborted ovules. An apospory-linked RFLP marker was detected in 13 of the 15 near-triploid hybrids. All flowering aneuploid hybrids displayed significantly reduced seed set, and none of the sexual near-triploid hybrids produced any seeds. All tetraploid gene transfer events carried the apospory-linked RFLP marker, suggesting that despite the presence of the aposporus locus, a low degree of sexuality co-exists in apomictic tetraploid cultivars. Thus, tetraploid apomictic bahiagrass does not provide complete transgene containment, although intra-specific gene transfer is drastically reduced compared to sexually

  6. Generation and Characterization of a genetic zebrafish model of SMA carrying the human SMN2 gene.

    PubMed

    Hao, Le T; Burghes, Arthur Hm; Beattie, Christine E

    2011-03-28

    Animal models of human diseases are essential as they allow analysis of the disease process at the cellular level and can advance therapeutics by serving as a tool for drug screening and target validation. Here we report the development of a complete genetic model of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in the vertebrate zebrafish to complement existing zebrafish, mouse, and invertebrate models and show its utility for testing compounds that alter SMN2 splicing. The human motoneuron disease SMA is caused by low levels, as opposed to a complete absence, of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN). To generate a true model of SMA in zebrafish, we have generated a transgenic zebrafish expressing the human SMN2 gene (hSMN2), which produces only a low amount of full-length SMN, and crossed this onto the smn-/- background. We show that human SMN2 is spliced in zebrafish as it is in humans and makes low levels of SMN protein. Moreover, we show that an antisense oligonucleotide that enhances correct hSMN2 splicing increases full-length hSMN RNA in this model. When we placed this transgene on the smn mutant background it rescued the neuromuscular presynaptic SV2 defect that occurs in smn mutants and increased their survival. We have generated a transgenic fish carrying the human hSMN2 gene. This gene is spliced in fish as it is in humans and mice suggesting a conserved splicing mechanism in these vertebrates. Moreover, antisense targeting of an intronic splicing silencer site increased the amount of full length SMN generated from this transgene. Having this transgene on the smn mutant fish rescued the presynaptic defect and increased survival. This model of zebrafish SMA has all of the components of human SMA and can thus be used to understand motoneuron dysfunction in SMA, can be used as an vivo test for drugs or antisense approaches that increase full-length SMN, and can be developed for drug screening.

  7. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  8. Generation of red fluorescent protein transgenic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Teoan; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Ra, Jeong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-05-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) share many common genetic diseases with humans and development of disease models using a transgenic approach has long been awaited. However, due to the technical difficulty in obtaining fertilizable eggs and the unavailability of embryonic stem cells, no transgenic dog has been generated. Canine fetal fibroblasts were stably transfected with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene-expressing construct using retrovirus gene delivery method. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was then employed to replace the nucleus of an oocyte with the nucleus of the RFP-fibroblasts. Using this approach, we produced the first generation of transgenic dogs with four female and two male expressing RFP.

  9. Development of Cotton leaf curl virus resistant transgenic cotton using antisense ßC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Kamal, Mohammad A; Ilah, Abdul; Husen, Azamal; Bhattacharya, P S; Rana, D

    2016-05-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a serious pathogen causing leaf curl disease and affecting the cotton production in major growing areas. The transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. Coker 310) plants were developed by using βC1 gene in antisense orientation gene driven by Cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter and nos (nopaline synthase) terminator and mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and somatic embryogenesis system. Molecular confirmation of the transformants was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. The developed transgenic and inoculated plants remained symptomless till their growth period. In conclusion, the plants were observed as resistant to CLCuV.

  10. Glyphostate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus L.) to non-transgenic B. napus and B. rapa

    EPA Science Inventory

    While transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, the escape of transgenes out of crop fields is a major environmental concern. Escape of transgenic herbicide resistance has occurred between transgenic Brassica napus (canola) and weedy species in numerous locations. In t...

  11. Glyphostate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus L.) to non-transgenic B. napus and B. rapa

    EPA Science Inventory

    While transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, the escape of transgenes out of crop fields is a major environmental concern. Escape of transgenic herbicide resistance has occurred between transgenic Brassica napus (canola) and weedy species in numerous locations. In t...

  12. Transgene integration and chromosome alterations in two transgenic lines of tritordeum.

    PubMed

    Barro, F; Martín, A; Cabrera, A

    2003-01-01

    Plants from two transgenic lines of tritordeum (an amphiploid between Triticum turgidum cv. durum and Hordeumn chilense) have been analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to characterize the transgene integration sites and chromosome rearrangements. Transgenic lines were transformed in two different events with the genes encoding for the high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), 1Ax1 and/or 1Dx5. Three integration sites and four translocations were detected. All three integration sites were located on chromosome segments of Hordeum chilense translocated into wheat chromosomes. No translocations from wheat into H. chilense chromosomes were observed. Both HMW-GS transgenes were expressed at high levels in the endosperm of transgenic plants. The analysis by FISH of transgenic plants allowed the early detection of homozygous and heterozygous plants. The consequences and implications of translocations on breeding are discussed.

  13. Generation of marker-free Bt transgenic indica rice and evaluation of its yellow stem borer resistance.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Arul, L; Talwar, D

    2010-01-01

    We report on generation of marker-free (‘clean DNA’) transgenic rice (Oryza sativa), carrying minimal gene-expression-cassettes of the genes of interest, and evaluation of its resistance to yellow stem borer Scirpophaga incertulas (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). The transgenic indica rice harbours a translational fusion of 2 different Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes, namely cry1B-1Aa, driven by the green-tissue-specific phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) promoter. Mature seed-derived calli of an elite indica rice cultivar Pusa Basmati-1 were co-bombarded with gene-expression-cassettes (clean DNA fragments) of the Bt gene and the marker hpt gene, to generate marker-free transgenic rice plants. The clean DNA fragments for bombardment were obtained by restriction digestion and gel extraction. Through biolistic transformation, 67 independent transformants were generated. Transformation frequency reached 3.3%, and 81% of the transgenic plants were co-transformants. Stable integration of the Bt gene was confirmed, and the insert copy number was determined by Southern analysis. Western analysis and ELISA revealed a high level of Bt protein expression in transgenic plants. Progeny analysis confirmed stable inheritance of the Bt gene according to the Mendelian (3:1) ratio. Insect bioassays revealed complete protection of transgenic plants from yellow stem borer infestation. PCR analysis of T2 progeny plants resulted in the recovery of up to 4% marker-free transgenic rice plants.

  14. Phenotyping transgenic wheat for drought resistance.

    PubMed

    Saint Pierre, Carolina; Crossa, José L; Bonnett, David; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Reynolds, Matthew P

    2012-03-01

    Realistic experimental protocols to screen for drought adaptation in controlled conditions are crucial if high throughput phenotyping is to be used for the identification of high performance lines, and is especially important in the evaluation of transgenes where stringent biosecurity measures restrict the frequency of open field trials. Transgenic DREB1A-wheat events were selected under greenhouse conditions by evaluating survival and recovery under severe drought (SURV) as well as for water use efficiency (WUE). Greenhouse experiments confirmed the advantages of transgenic events in recovery after severe water stress. Under field conditions, the group of transgenic lines did not generally outperform the controls in terms of grain yield under water deficit. However, the events selected for WUE were identified as lines that combine an acceptable yield-even higher yield (WUE-11) under well irrigated conditions-and stable performance across the different environments generated by the experimental treatments.

  15. Transgenic induction in Salmonid and Tilapia fish.

    PubMed

    Maclean, N

    1993-01-01

    Why produce transgenic fish? There are two chief reasons for introducing novel genes into animals. The first is as a means of increasing knowledge of gene regulation in that particular group of organisms. The second is that transgenic induction may involve some economic benefit from the modified organism in terms of its increased growth potential, disease resistance, or other desirable genetic trait. Both reasons are of importance in the context of transgenic fish. Fish are good candidates for transgenic induction for several reasons. They lay large numbers of eggs, and both fertilization and development are external to the body of the female (except in a few species of mouth-brooding fish and ovoviviparous species, such as the guppy [Poecilia]). Also, the eggs are usually quite large and may be readily pierced by a suitable glass needle.

  16. AN APPROACH TO TRANSGENIC CROP MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing by aerial or satellite images may provide a method of identifying transgenic pesticidal crop distribution in the landscape. Genetically engineered crops containing bacterial gene(s) that express an insecticidal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are regulated...

  17. Transgenic plants with enhanced growth characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-09-06

    The invention relates to transgenic plants exhibiting dramatically enhanced growth rates, greater seed and fruit/pod yields, earlier and more productive flowering, more efficient nitrogen utilization, increased tolerance to high salt conditions, and increased biomass yields. In one embodiment, transgenic plants engineered to over-express both glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) are provided. The GPT+GS double-transgenic plants of the invention consistently exhibit enhanced growth characteristics, with T0 generation lines showing an increase in biomass over wild type counterparts of between 50% and 300%. Generations that result from sexual crosses and/or selfing typically perform even better, with some of the double-transgenic plants achieving an astounding four-fold biomass increase over wild type plants.

  18. AN APPROACH TO TRANSGENIC CROP MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing by aerial or satellite images may provide a method of identifying transgenic pesticidal crop distribution in the landscape. Genetically engineered crops containing bacterial gene(s) that express an insecticidal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are regulated...

  19. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated transduction of male germ line stem cells results in transgene transmission after germ cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Honaramooz, Ali; Megee, Susan; Zeng, Wenxian; Destrempes, Margret M; Overton, Susan A; Luo, Jinping; Galantino-Homer, Hannah; Modelski, Mark; Chen, Fangping; Blash, Stephen; Melican, David T; Gavin, William G; Ayres, Sandra; Yang, Fang; Wang, P Jeremy; Echelard, Yann; Dobrinski, Ina

    2008-02-01

    We explored whether exposure of mammalian germ line stem cells to adeno-associated virus (AAV), a gene therapy vector, would lead to stable transduction and transgene transmission. Mouse germ cells harvested from experimentally induced cryptorchid donor testes were exposed in vitro to AAV vectors carrying a GFP transgene and transplanted to germ cell-depleted syngeneic recipient testes, resulting in colonization of the recipient testes by transgenic donor cells. Mating of recipient males to wild-type females yielded 10% transgenic offspring. To broaden the approach to nonrodent species, AAV-transduced germ cells from goats were transplanted to recipient males in which endogenous germ cells had been depleted by fractionated testicular irradiation. Transgenic germ cells colonized recipient testes and produced transgenic sperm. When semen was used for in vitro fertilization (IVF), 10% of embryos were transgenic. Here, we report for the first time that AAV-mediated transduction of mammalian germ cells leads to transmission of the transgene through the male germ line. Equally important, this is also the first report of transgenesis via germ cell transplantation in a nonrodent species, a promising approach to generate transgenic large animal models for biomedical research.

  20. Carrie Chapman Catt and Woman Suffrage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the material for this issue of the "Goldfinch," which explores the life of Carrie Chapman Catt, came from the archives of the State Historical Society of Iowa. Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was an Iowan who advocated woman suffrage and spent 26 years actively working for that cause. The issue contains a biography of Catt, and…

  1. Carrie Chapman Catt and Woman Suffrage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the material for this issue of the "Goldfinch," which explores the life of Carrie Chapman Catt, came from the archives of the State Historical Society of Iowa. Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was an Iowan who advocated woman suffrage and spent 26 years actively working for that cause. The issue contains a biography of Catt, and…

  2. [Detection of transgenic crop with gene chip].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Chun; Sun, Chun-Yun; Feng, Hong; Hu, Xiao-Dong; Yin, Hai-Bin

    2003-05-01

    Some selected available sequences of reporter genes,resistant genes, promoters and terminators are amplified by PCR for the probes of transgenic crop detection gene chip. These probes are arrayed at definite density and printed on the surface of amino-slides by bioRobot MicroGrid II. Results showed that gene chip worked quickly and correctly, when transgenic rice, pawpaw,maize and soybean were applied.

  3. Transgenic Wheat, Barley and Oats: Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunwell, Jim M.

    Following the success of transgenic maize and rice, methods have now been developed for the efficient introduction of genes into wheat, barley and oats. This review summarizes the present position in relation to these three species, and also uses information from field trial databases and the patent literature to assess the future trends in the exploitation of transgenic material. This analysis includes agronomic traits and also discusses opportunities in expanding areas such as biofuels and biopharming.

  4. Transgenic animals resistant to infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Tiley, L

    2016-04-01

    The list of transgenic animals developed to test ways of producing livestock resistant to infectious disease continues to grow. Although the basic techniques for generating transgenic animals have not changed very much in the ten years since they were last reviewed for the World Organisation for Animal Health, one recent fundamental technological advance stands to revolutionise genome engineering. The advent of technically simple and efficient site-specific gene targeting has profound implications for genetically modifying livestock species.

  5. Safety assessment of meat from transgenic cattle by 90-day feeding study in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Li, Chen-Xi; Feng, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Hai-Bo; Zhi, Yuan; Geng, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Hai-Bin

    2013-07-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of meat derived from human lactoferrin gene-modified cattle in male and female Wistar rats. Rats were fed 5% or 10% transgenic meat diet, 5% or 10% conventional meat diet, or AIN93G diet for 90 days. During the study, body weight and food consumption were weighed weekly and clinical observations were conducted daily. At the end of the study, urinary examination, hematology and blood biochemistry examination, macroscopic and microscopic examinations were performed. There were no biologically significant differences in these factors between the rat groups fed transgenic meat diet and conventional meat diet. Therefore, the present 90-day rodent feeding study suggests that meat derived from the transgenic cattle is equivalent to meat from conventional cattle in use as dietary supplements.

  6. Engineering the Caenorhabditis elegans genome by Mos1-induced transgene-instructed gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Robert, Valérie J P

    2012-01-01

    Mos1-induced transgene-instructed gene conversion (MosTIC) is a technique of choice to engineer the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. MosTIC is initiated by the excision of Mos1, a DNA transposon of the Tc1/Mariner super family that can be mobilized in the germ line of C. elegans. Mos1 excision creates a DNA double-strand break that is repaired by several cellular mechanisms, including transgene-instructed gene conversion. For MosTIC, the transgenic repair template used by the gene conversion machinery is made of sequences that share DNA homologies with the genomic region to engineer and carries the modifications to be introduced in the genome. In this chapter, we present two MosTIC protocols routinely used.

  7. Stress-induced synthesis of proline confers tolerance to water deficit in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Eliane Cristina Gruszka; Schuster, Ivan; Pileggi, Marcos; Scapim, Carlos Alberto; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; Marur, Celso Jamil; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves

    2007-10-01

    Water deficit is one of the main abiotic factors that affect spring wheat planted in subtropical regions. Accumulation of proline appears to be a promising approach to maintain the productivity of plants under stress condition. However, morphological alterations and growth reduction are observed in transgenic plants carrying genes coding for osmoprotectants controlled by constitutive promoters. We report here the effects of water deficit on wheat plants transformed with the Vigna aconitifolia Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) cDNA that encodes the key regulatory enzyme in proline biosynthesis, under the control of a stress-induced promoter complex-AIPC. Transgenic wheat plants submitted to 15 days of water shortage presented a distinct response. We have found that drought resulted in the accumulation of proline. The tolerance to water deficit observed in transgenic plants was mainly due to protection mechanisms against oxidative stress and not caused by osmotic adjustment.

  8. Health Considerations Regarding Horizontal Transfer of Microbial Transgenes Present in Genetically Modified Crops

    PubMed Central

    Kleter, Gijs A.

    2005-01-01

    The potential effects of horizontal gene transfer on human health are an important item in the safety assessment of genetically modified organisms. Horizontal gene transfer from genetically modified crops to gut microflora most likely occurs with transgenes of microbial origin. The characteristics of microbial transgenes other than antibiotic-resistance genes in market-approved genetically modified crops are reviewed. These characteristics include the microbial source, natural function, function in genetically modified crops, natural prevalence, geographical distribution, similarity to other microbial genes, known horizontal transfer activity, selective conditions and environments for horizontally transferred genes, and potential contribution to pathogenicity and virulence in humans and animals. The assessment of this set of data for each of the microbial genes reviewed does not give rise to health concerns. We recommend including the above-mentioned items into the premarket safety assessment of genetically modified crops carrying transgenes other than those reviewed in the present study. PMID:16489267

  9. Assessing the Feasibility of Controlling Aedes aegypti with Transgenic Methods: A Model-Based Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Mathieu; Xu, Chonggang; Okamoto, Kenichi; Scott, Thomas W.; Morrison, Amy C.; Lloyd, Alun L.; Gould, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of dengue and malaria through releases of genetically engineered mosquitoes might soon become feasible. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes carrying a conditionally lethal transgene have recently been used to suppress local vector populations in small-scale field releases. Prior to releases of transgenic insects on a wider scale, however, most regulatory authorities will require additional evidence that suppression will be effective in natural heterogeneous habitats. We use a spatially explicit stochastic model of an Ae. aegypti population in Iquitos, Peru, along with an uncertainty analysis of its predictions, to quantitatively assess the outcome of varied operational approaches for releases of transgenic strains with conditional death of females. We show that population elimination might be an unrealistic objective in heterogeneous populations. We demonstrate that substantial suppression can nonetheless be achieved if releases are deployed in a uniform spatial pattern using strains combining multiple lethal elements, illustrating the importance of detailed spatial models for guiding genetic mosquito control strategies. PMID:23284949

  10. The absence of detectable fetal microchimerism in nontransgenic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus) bearing transgenic offspring.

    PubMed

    Steinkraus, H B; Rothfuss, H; Jones, J A; Dissen, E; Shefferly, E; Lewis, R V

    2012-02-01

    Regulations for the disposal of genetically engineered animals are strict due to concern for their inappropriate introduction into the food chain, and of the possible public health and environmental impacts of these organisms. Nontransgenic animals that give birth to transgenic offspring are treated as if they are transgenic due to concern of fetal cells crossing the placental barrier and residing in the mother (fetal-maternal microchimerism). Determining whether or not fetal-fetal or fetal-maternal transfer of DNA or cells occurs during caprine gestation is critical to effectively protect the public without culling animals that pose no risk. Additionally, fetal-maternal transfer, should it exist in the goat, could contraindicate the rebreeding of nontransgenic dams due to the possible transfer of fetal cells from 1 pregnancy to the fetus of subsequent pregnancies. Fetal-maternal transfer in Capra hircus has not been reported in the literature, although it has been reported in another ruminant, Bos taurus. We examined blood from nontransgenic dams that carried transgenic offspring using a PCR method sensitive enough to detect the presence of a spider silk transgene to a 1:100,000 dilution. At this sensitivity, we did not detect the occurrence of fetal-maternal transfer in 5 nontransgenic dams. Likewise, fetal-fetal transfer was not observed from a transgenic to a nontransgenic twin in utero. To test tissue-specific expression of the silk transgene, proteins purified from standard necropsy tissue from a lactating transgenic dam were examined by Western blot analysis. Silk protein expression was only observed in mammary tissue consistent with the tissue specificity of the β-casein promoter used in the transgenic construct. We report evidence collected from a limited caprine breeding pool against transfer of transgenes in utero from fetus to dam and fetus to fetus. In addition, we show evidence that the β-casein promoter in our expression construct is not expressed

  11. Production of transgenic dairy goat expressing human α-lactalbumin by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiujing; Cao, Shaoxian; Wang, Huili; Meng, Chunhua; Li, Jingxin; Jiang, Jin; Qian, Yong; Su, Lei; He, Qiang; Zhang, Qingxiao

    2015-02-01

    Production of human α-lactalbumin (hα-LA) transgenic cloned dairy goats has great potential in improving the nutritional value and perhaps increasing the yield of dairy goat milk. Here, a mammary-specific expression vector 5A, harboring goat β-lactoglobulin (βLG) promoter, the hα-LA gene, neo(r) and EGFP dual markers, was constructed. Then, it was effectively transfected into goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) and the expression of hα-LA was investigated. Both the hα-LA transcript and protein were detected in the transfected GMECs after the induction of hormonal signals. In addition, the 5A vector was introduced into dairy goat fetal fibroblasts (transfection efficiency ≈60-70%) to prepare competent transgenic donor cells. A total of 121 transgenic fibroblast clones were isolated by 96-well cell culture plates and screened with nested-PCR amplification and EGFP fluorescence. After being frozen for 8 months, the transgenic cells still showed high viabilities, verifying their ability as donor cells. Dairy goat cloned embryos were produced from these hα-LA transgenic donor cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and the rates of fusion, cleavage, and the development to blastocyst stages were 81.8, 84.4, and 20.0%, respectively. A total of 726 reconstructed embryos derived from the transgenic cells were transferred to 74 recipients and pregnancy was confirmed at 90 days in 12 goats. Of six female kids born, two carried hα-LA and the hα-LA protein was detected in their milk. This study provides an effective system to prepare SCNT donor cells and transgenic animals for human recombinant proteins.

  12. Development of transgenic strains for the biological control of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens.

    PubMed

    Meza, J Salvador; Nirmala, Xavier; Zimowska, Grazyna J; Zepeda-Cisneros, C Silvia; Handler, Alfred M

    2011-01-01

    The Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens, is a highly significant agricultural pest species that has been genetically transformed with a piggyBac-based transposon vector system using independent vector and transposase helper plasmids. Minimum estimated germ-line transformation frequencies were approximately 13-21% per fertile G(0) individual, similar to previously reported frequencies using single vector-helper plasmids. Two vector constructs were tested with potential importance to transgenic strain development for mexfly biological control. The first allows post-integration stabilization of a transposon-vector by deletion of a terminal sequence necessary for mobilization. The complete pB[L1-EGFP-L2-DsRed-R1] vector was integrated into the Chiapas wild type strain with subsequent deletion of the L2-DsRed-R1 sub-vector carrying the piggyBac 3' terminal sequence. Quality control tests for three of the stabilization vector lines (previous to stabilization) assessed viability at all life stages, fertility, adult flight ability, and adult male sexual competitiveness. All three transgenic lines were less fit compared to the wild strain by approximately 5-10% in most tests, however, there was no significant difference in sexual competitiveness which is the major prerequisite for optimal strain release. The second vector, pB[XL-EGFP, Asß2-tub-DsRed.T3], has the DsRed.T3 fluorescent protein reporter gene regulated by the A. suspensa Asß2-tubulin promoter, that resulted in testis and sperm-specific DsRed fluorescence in transgenic male mexflies. Fluorescent sperm bundles were unambiguously observed in the spermathecae of non-transgenic females mated to transgenic males. One transgenic line apparently had a male-specific Y-chromosome insertion, having potential use for sexing by fluorescent-embryo sorting. All transgenic lines expressed easily detectable and stable fluorescence in adults allowing their identification after trapping in the field.

  13. Transgenic technologies to induce sterility.

    PubMed

    Catteruccia, Flaminia; Crisanti, Andrea; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2009-11-16

    The last few years have witnessed a considerable expansion in the number of tools available to perform molecular and genetic studies on the genome of Anopheles mosquitoes, the vectors of human malaria. As a consequence, knowledge of aspects of the biology of mosquitoes, such as immunity, reproduction and behaviour, that are relevant to their ability to transmit disease is rapidly increasing, and could be translated into concrete benefits for malaria control strategies. Amongst the most important scientific advances, the development of transgenic technologies for Anopheles mosquitoes provides a crucial opportunity to improve current vector control measures or design novel ones. In particular, the use of genetic modification of the mosquito genome could provide for a more effective deployment of the sterile insect technique (SIT) against vector populations in the field. Currently, SIT relies on the release of radiation sterilized males, which compete with wild males for mating with wild females. The induction of sterility in males through the genetic manipulation of the mosquito genome, already achieved in a number of other insect species, could eliminate the need for radiation and increase the efficiency of SIT-based strategies. This paper provides an overview of the mechanisms already in use for inducing sterility by transgenesis in Drosophila and other insects, and speculates on possible ways to apply similar approaches to Anopheles mosquitoes.

  14. Transgene flow: Facts, speculations and possible countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Ryffel, Gerhart U

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence has accumulated that unintended transgene escape occurs in oilseed rape, maize, cotton and creeping bentgrass. The escaped transgenes are found in variant cultivars, in wild type plants as well as in hybrids of sexually compatible species. The fact that in some cases stacked events are present that have not been planted commercially, implies unintended recombination of transgenic traits. As the consequences of this continuous transgene escape for the ecosystem cannot be reliably predicted, I propose to use more sophisticated approaches of gene technology in future. If possible GM plants should be constructed using either site-directed mutagenesis or cisgenic strategies to avoid the problem of transgene escape. In cases where a transgenic trait is needed, efficient containment should be the standard approach. Various strategies available or in development are discussed. Such a cautious approach in developing novel types of GM crops will enhance the sustainable potential of GM crops and thus increase the public trust in green gene technology. PMID:25523171

  15. The TGV transgenic vectors for single-copy gene expression from the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gumbiner-Russo, L M; Lombardo, M J; Ponder, R G; Rosenberg, S M

    2001-07-25

    Plasmid-based cloning and expression of genes in Escherichia coli can have several problems: plasmid destabilization; toxicity of gene products; inability to achieve complete repression of gene expression; non-physiological overexpression of the cloned gene; titration of regulatory proteins; and the requirement for antibiotic selection. We describe a simple system for cloning and expression of genes in single copy in the E. coli chromosome, using a non-antibiotic selection for transgene insertion. The transgene is inserted into a vector containing homology to the chromosomal region flanking the attachment site for phage lambda. This vector is then linearized and introduced into a recombination-proficient E. coli strain carrying a temperature-sensitive lambda prophage. Selection for replacement of the prophage with the transgene is performed at high temperature. Once in the chromosome, transgenes can be moved into other lysogenic E. coli strains using standard phage-mediated transduction techniques, selecting against a resident prophage. Additional vector constructs provide an arabinose-inducible promoter (P(BAD)), P(BAD) plus a translation-initiation sequence, and optional chloramphenicol-, tetracycline-, or kanamycin-resistance cassettes. These Transgenic E. coli Vectors (TGV) allow drug-free, single-copy expression of genes from the E. coli chromosome, and are useful for genetic studies of gene function.

  16. Cre/ lox site-specific recombination controls the excision of a transgene from the rice genome.

    PubMed

    Hoa, T. T. C.; Bong, B. B.; Huq, E.; Hodges, T. K.

    2002-03-01

    The Cre/ lox site-specific recombination controls the excision of a target DNA segment by recombination between two loxsites flanking it, mediated by the Cre recombinase. We have studied the functional expression of the Cre/ lox system to excise a transgene from the rice genome. We developed transgenic plants carrying the target gene, hygromycin phosphotransferase ( hpt) flanked by two lox sites and transgenic plants harboring the Cre gene. Each lox plant was crossed with each Cre plant reciprocally. In the Cre /lox hybrid plants, the Cre recombinase mediates recombination between two lox sites, resulting in excision of the hpt gene. The recombination event could be detected because it places the CaMV 35S promoter of the hpt gene adjacent to a promoterless gusA gene; as a result the gusA gene is activated and its expression could be visualized. In 73 Cre /lox hybrid plants from various crosses of T0 transgenic plants, 19 expressed GUS, and in 132 Cre /lox hybrid plants from crosses of T2 transgenic plants, 77 showed GUS expression. Molecular data proved the excision event occurred in all the GUS(+) plants. Recombination occurred with high efficiency at the early germinal stage, or randomly during somatic development stages.

  17. Passenger transgenes reveal intrinsic specificity of the antibody hypermutation mechanism: clustering, polarity, and specific hot spots.

    PubMed Central

    Betz, A G; Rada, C; Pannell, R; Milstein, C; Neuberger, M S

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed somatic hypermutation in mice carrying an immunoglobulin kappa transgene in order to discriminate mutations that reflect the intrinsic specificity of the hypermutation mechanism from those highlighted by antigenic selection. We have immunized animals with three different immunogens. With one immunogen, the antigen-specific B cells express a transgenic kappa chain, which does not form part of the antibody; the transgene is a passenger free to accumulate unselected mutations. With the other two immunogens, the transgenic kappa chain constitutes the light chain of the expressed antibody. A comparison of the transgene mutations obtained under these different circumstances allows us to identify common features that we attribute to the intrinsic specificity of the hypermutation process. In particular, it yields only base substitutions and leads to hot spots occurring in individual positions (e.g., the second base of the Ser-31 codon). The mutations preferentially accumulate around the first complementarity-determining region. The process exhibits specific base substitution preferences with transitions being favored over transversions. We propose that these substitution preferences can be used to discriminate intrinsic from antigen-selected hot spots. We also note that hypermutation distinguishes between the coding and noncoding strands since pyrimidines (particularly thymidines) mutate less frequently than purines. PMID:8460148

  18. Stacking of antimicrobial genes in potato transgenic plants confers increased resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Mercedes; Furman, Nicolás; Mencacci, Nicolás; Picca, Pablo; Toum, Laila; Lentz, Ezequiel; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Mentaberry, Alejandro

    2012-01-20

    Solanum tuberosum plants were transformed with three genetic constructions expressing the Nicotiana tabacum AP24 osmotine, Phyllomedusa sauvagii dermaseptin and Gallus gallus lysozyme, and with a double-transgene construction expressing the AP24 and lysozyme sequences. Re-transformation of dermaseptin-transformed plants with the AP24/lysozyme construction allowed selection of plants simultaneously expressing the three transgenes. Potato lines expressing individual transgenes or double- and triple-transgene combinations were assayed for resistance to Erwinia carotovora using whole-plant and tuber infection assays. Resistance levels for both infection tests compared consistently for most potato lines and allowed selection of highly resistant phenotypes. Higher resistance levels were found in lines carrying the dermaseptin and lysozyme sequences, indicating that theses proteins are the major contributors to antibacterial activity. Similar results were obtained in tuber infection tests conducted with Streptomyces scabies. Plant lines showing the higher resistance to bacterial infections were challenged with Phytophthora infestans, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani. Considerable levels of resistance to each of these pathogens were evidenced employing semi-quantitative tests based in detached-leaf inoculation, fungal growth inhibition and in vitro plant inoculation. On the basis of these results, we propose that stacking of these transgenes is a promising approach to achieve resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens.

  19. Islet neogenesis associated protein transgenic mice are resistant to hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Fishwick, David A; Bowman, Angela; Hamblet, Natasha; Bernard, Paul; Harlan, David M; Vinik, Aaron I

    2006-09-01

    Islet neogenesis associated protein (INGAP) is a protein factor that can stimulate new islet mass from adult pancreatic progenitor cells. In models of islet neogenesis, INGAP expression is elevated in pancreatic acinar cells. Using a transgenic model to drive a sustained expression of INGAP in pancreatic acinar cells, we have identified a protection to chemical-induced hyperglycemia. A sustained expression of INGAP during development did not perturb islet development or basal blood glucose homeostasis, although beta-cell mass and pancreatic insulin content were significantly increased in the INGAP transgenic mice. When challenged with a diabetogenic dose of streptozotocin (STZ), mice carrying the INGAP transgene did not become hyperglycemic. In contrast, wild-type mice became and remained hyperglycemic, blood glucose > 550 mg/dl. The serum insulin levels and islet morphology were preserved in the transgenic mice after STZ treatment. These data suggest that the sustained expression of INGAP in the acinar pancreas confers resistance to a diabetogenic insult. The INGAP transgenic mouse provides a new model to uncover factors that are protective to diabetes onset and biomarkers to track beta-cell pathology.

  20. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  1. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  2. Population growth and earth's human carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J E

    1995-07-21

    Earth's capacity to support people is determined both by natural constraints and by human choices concerning economics, environment, culture (including values and politics), and demography. Human carrying capacity is therefore dynamic and uncertain. Human choice is not captured by ecological notions of carrying capacity that are appropriate for nonhuman populations. Simple mathematical models of the relation between human population growth and human carrying capacity can account for faster-than-exponential population growth followed by a slowing population growth rate, as observed in recent human history.

  3. Carry on: spontaneous object carrying in 13-month-old crawling and walking infants.

    PubMed

    Karasik, Lana B; Adolph, Karen E; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S; Zuckerman, Alyssa L

    2012-03-01

    Carrying objects requires coordination of manual action and locomotion. This study investigated spontaneous carrying in 24 walkers who were 13 months old and 26 crawlers who were 13 months old during 1-hr, naturalistic observations in the infants' homes. Carrying was more common in walkers, but crawlers also carried objects. Typically, walkers carried objects in their hands, whereas crawlers multitasked by using their hands simultaneously for holding objects and supporting their bodies. Locomotor experience predicted frequency of carrying in both groups, suggesting that experienced crawlers and walkers perceive their increased abilities to handle objects while in motion. Despite additional biomechanical constraints imposed by holding an object, carrying may actually improve upright balance: Crawlers rarely fell while carrying an object, and walkers were more likely to fall without an object in hand than while carrying. Thus, without incurring an additional risk of falling, spontaneous carrying may provide infants with new avenues for combining locomotor and manual skills and for interacting with their environments.

  4. Carry on: Spontaneous object carrying in 13-month-old crawling and walking infants

    PubMed Central

    Karasik, Lana B.; Adolph, Karen E.; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S.; Zuckerman, Alyssa L.

    2013-01-01

    Carrying objects requires coordination of manual action and locomotion. This study investigated spontaneous carrying in 24 13-month-old walkers and 26 13-month-old crawlers during 1-hour, naturalistic observations in infants’ homes. Carrying was more common in walkers, but crawlers also carried objects. Typically, walkers carried objects in their hands whereas crawlers multitasked by using their hands simultaneously for holding objects and supporting their bodies. Locomotor experience predicted frequency of carrying in both groups, suggesting that experienced crawlers and walkers perceive their increased abilities to handle objects while in motion. Despite additional biomechanical constraints imposed by holding an object, carrying may actually improve upright balance: Crawlers rarely fell while carrying an object and walkers were more likely to fall without an object in hand than while carrying. Thus, without incurring additional risk of falling, spontaneous carrying may provide infants with new avenues for combining locomotor and manual skills and for interacting with their environments. PMID:22081880

  5. Effects of carrying methods and box handles on two-person team carrying capacity for females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Swei-Pi; Chang, Shu-Yu

    2010-07-01

    This study used a psychophysical approach to examine the effects of carrying methods and the presence or absence of box handles on the maximum acceptable weight carried and resulting responses (heart rate and rating of perceived exertion) in a two-person carrying task. After training, 16 female subjects performed a two-person carrying task at knuckle height for an 8-h work period. Each subject performed 4 different carrying combinations two times. The independent variables were carrying methods (parallel and tandem walking) and box handles (with and without handles). For comparison with two-person carrying, the subjects also performed one-person carrying. The results showed that the maximum acceptable weight carried (MAWC), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were significantly affected by the presence of box handles. However, the subjects' MAWC, HR, and RPE values were not significantly influenced by the carrying methods. The test-retest reliability of the psychophysical approach was 0.945. The carrying efficiency of two-person carrying was 96.2% of the one-person carrying method. In general, the use of box with handles allows the subjects to carry a higher MAWC (with lower HR and RPE) compared to carrying boxes without handles.

  6. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will... management and maintenance practices are improvements over those practices generally associated with...

  7. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids with eczema should probably avoid aquariums. continue Dogs and Cats Dogs and cats are popular pets but can carry ... may be in the intestinal tract of infected dogs, cats, hamsters, birds, and certain farm animals. A ...

  8. CCP: Sierra Nevada Captive-Carry Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) Space System's Dream Chaser design passed one of its most complex tests to date with a successful captive-carry test conducted near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan A...

  9. qPCR for quantification of transgene expression and determination of transgene copy number.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is a mature technology that can be used to accurately quantify the number of copies of a target nucleic acid in a sample. Here, we describe a method for using this technology to determine the copy number of a transgene stably integrated into a plant's genome and to ascertain the level of transgene expression.

  10. Technology evaluation: transgenic antithrombin III (rhAT-III), Genzyme Transgenics.

    PubMed

    Yeung, P K

    2000-06-01

    AT-III LLC, a joint venture between Genzyme Transgenics (GTC) and Genzyme General, is developing transgenic recombinant human antithrombin III (rhAT-III) as a potential treatment for sepsis and other disorders involving thrombosis. It is in phase III clinical trials in the US and Europe as an anticoagulant in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery such as cardiopulmonary bypass.

  11. Recreation Carrying Capacity Design and Management Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    overcrowding, functional interference, noise, safety , and other reasons. Overcrowding and user con- flicts can reach a point where the recreation...following reasons: a. Hunting. Hunting is not a summer activity and there is a safety hazard involved with interviewing hunters. Further, hunting was not...Part VII " are used to affect carrying capacity, con- trol use, and ensure visitor safety . b. Generally, carrying capacity control tech- niques can be

  12. Mechanical analysis of infant carrying in hominoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Lia Q.

    2008-04-01

    In all higher nonhuman primates, species survival depends upon safe carrying of infants clinging to body hair of adults. In this work, measurements of mechanical properties of ape hair (gibbon, orangutan, and gorilla) are presented, focusing on constraints for safe infant carrying. Results of hair tensile properties are shown to be species-dependent. Analysis of the mechanics of the mounting position, typical of heavier infant carrying among African apes, shows that both clinging and friction are necessary to carry heavy infants. As a consequence, a required relationship between infant weight, hair-hair friction coefficient, and body angle exists. The hair-hair friction coefficient is measured using natural ape skin samples, and dependence on load and humidity is analyzed. Numerical evaluation of the equilibrium constraint is in agreement with the knuckle-walking quadruped position of African apes. Bipedality is clearly incompatible with the usual clinging and mounting pattern of infant carrying, requiring a revision of models of hominization in relation to the divergence between apes and hominins. These results suggest that safe carrying of heavy infants justify the emergence of biped form of locomotion. Ways to test this possibility are foreseen here.

  13. Mechanical analysis of infant carrying in hominoids

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    In all higher nonhuman primates, species survival depends upon safe carrying of infants clinging to body hair of adults. In this work, measurements of mechanical properties of ape hair (gibbon, orangutan, and gorilla) are presented, focusing on constraints for safe infant carrying. Results of hair tensile properties are shown to be species-dependent. Analysis of the mechanics of the mounting position, typical of heavier infant carrying among African apes, shows that both clinging and friction are necessary to carry heavy infants. As a consequence, a required relationship between infant weight, hair–hair friction coefficient, and body angle exists. The hair–hair friction coefficient is measured using natural ape skin samples, and dependence on load and humidity is analyzed. Numerical evaluation of the equilibrium constraint is in agreement with the knuckle-walking quadruped position of African apes. Bipedality is clearly incompatible with the usual clinging and mounting pattern of infant carrying, requiring a revision of models of hominization in relation to the divergence between apes and hominins. These results suggest that safe carrying of heavy infants justify the emergence of biped form of locomotion. Ways to test this possibility are foreseen here. PMID:18030438

  14. Mechanical analysis of infant carrying in hominoids.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Lia Q

    2008-04-01

    In all higher nonhuman primates, species survival depends upon safe carrying of infants clinging to body hair of adults. In this work, measurements of mechanical properties of ape hair (gibbon, orangutan, and gorilla) are presented, focusing on constraints for safe infant carrying. Results of hair tensile properties are shown to be species-dependent. Analysis of the mechanics of the mounting position, typical of heavier infant carrying among African apes, shows that both clinging and friction are necessary to carry heavy infants. As a consequence, a required relationship between infant weight, hair-hair friction coefficient, and body angle exists. The hair-hair friction coefficient is measured using natural ape skin samples, and dependence on load and humidity is analyzed. Numerical evaluation of the equilibrium constraint is in agreement with the knuckle-walking quadruped position of African apes. Bipedality is clearly incompatible with the usual clinging and mounting pattern of infant carrying, requiring a revision of models of hominization in relation to the divergence between apes and hominins. These results suggest that safe carrying of heavy infants justify the emergence of biped form of locomotion. Ways to test this possibility are foreseen here.

  15. Transgenic farm animals: applications in agriculture and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Tian, X C; Dai, Y; Wang, B

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, tremendous progress has been made in the area of transgenic farm animals. While there are many important transgenic farm animal applications in agriculture, funding has been very limited and progress has been rather slow in this area. Encouragingly, the potential applications of transgenic farm animals as bioreactors for producing human therapeutic proteins and as organ donors for transplantations in humans have attracted vast funding from the private sectors. Several transgenic animal products are already in various phases of clinical trials. Estimates are, that in the near future, the worlds demands on human pharmaceutical proteins may largely be met by transgenic farm animals. While there are still major challenges ahead in the area of xenotransplantation using transgenic animal organs, transgenic tissues or cells have demonstrated promising results as a potential tool for gene therapy. Recent development on cloning, embryonic stem cells and alternative transgenic methods may further expand the transgenic applications in both agriculture and biomedicine.

  16. A Primer for Using Transgenic Insecticidal Cotton in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Ann M.; Heuberger, Shannon; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Carrière, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Many developing countries face the decision of whether to approve the testing and commercial use of insecticidal transgenic cotton and the task of developing adequate regulations for its use. In this review, we outline concepts and provide information to assist farmers, regulators and scientists in making decisions concerning this technology. We address seven critical topics: 1) molecular and breeding techniques used for the development of transgenic cotton cultivars, 2) properties of transgenic cotton cultivars and their efficacy against major insect pests, 3) agronomic performance of transgenic cotton in developing countries, 4) factors affecting transgene expression, 5) impact of gene flow between transgenic and non-transgenic cotton, 6) non-target effects of transgenic cotton, and 7) management of pest resistance to transgenic cotton. PMID:19613464

  17. Transgene and mitochondrial DNA are indicators of efficient composting of transgenic pig carcasses.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dave; Meidinger, Roy G; Golovan, Serguei P; Phillips, John P; O'Halloran, Ivan P; Fan, Ming Z; Hacker, Roger R; Forsberg, Cecil W

    2007-07-01

    Composting is an environmentally sound method for the disposal of on-farm livestock mortalities that generates material suitable for use as fertilizer; however, this method is not generally permitted for disposal of transgenic livestock mortalities during the research and development phase. This study has explored the application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a method for assessing the persistence of transgene and mitochondrial DNA markers during the composting of euthanized transgenic pig. There was at least a 10(7) fold reduction of genetic material to a level that not either transgene or mitochondrion markers were detectable. At the end of the composting period, only bone fragments that were completely demineralised and chalky were detected. Chemically the compost was similar to that from pig litter and poultry mortalities, except the copper content was lower. Based on these data, composting appears to be an appropriate method for the disposal of transgenic animals.

  18. Stability of transgenes in long-term micropropagation of plants of transgenic birch (Betula platyphylla).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fansuo; Qian, Jingjing; Luo, Wei; Zhan, Yaguang; Xin, Ying; Yang, Chuanping

    2010-01-01

    The stability of integration and expression level of transgenes in long-term micropropagation clones of transgenic birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.) was examined. Multiplexed PCR and reverse primer PCR demonstrated stable integration of transgenes into regenerated plants. Expression levels of the bgt and gus genes among shoot plantlets, subcultured 4, 7, 9 and 15 times, were significantly different. The transcriptional expression level of extraneous genes in regenerated plants decreased with increasing subculture number. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) occured in regenerated transgenic lines. The silencing rate of GUS in the 5th subculture plants was 22-65%. TGS in regenerated plants could be reactivated with 5-azacytidine (Azac) at 50-200 microM. GUS and BGT protein expression was reactivated in the micropropagated transgenic birch plants when treated with Azac. A decrease in expression level with increasing number of subcultures is thus associated with DNA methylation.

  19. Generation of stable Xenopus laevis transgenic lines expressing a transgene controlled by weak promoters.

    PubMed

    L'hostis-Guidet, Anne; Recher, Gaëlle; Guillet, Brigitte; Al-Mohammad, Abdulrahim; Coumailleau, Pascal; Tiaho, François; Boujard, Daniel; Madigou, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    Combining two existing protocols of trangenesis, namely the REMI and the I-SceI meganuclease methods, we generated Xenopus leavis expressing a transgene under the control of a promoter that presented a restricted pattern of activity and a low level of expression. This was realized by co-incubating sperm nuclei, the I-SceI enzyme and the transgene prior to transplantation into unfertilized eggs. The addition of the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element in our constructs further enhanced the expression of the transgene without affecting the tissue-specificity of the promoter activity. Using this combination of methods we produced high rates of fully transgenic animals that stably transmitted the transgene to the next generations with a transmission rate of 50% indicating a single integration event.

  20. Gun carrying by high school students in Boston, MA: does overestimation of peer gun carrying matter?

    PubMed

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1,700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a gun, 9% of boys and 2% of girls. Students substantially overestimated the percentage of their peers who carried guns; the likelihood that a respondent carried a gun was strongly associated with their perception of the level of peer gun carrying. Most respondents believed it was easier for other youth to obtain guns than it was for them. Social marketing campaigns designed to lower young people's perceptions about the prevalence of peer gun carrying may be a promising strategy for reducing actual gun carrying among youth. Copyright © 2010 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of box handle position and carrying range on bi-manual carrying capacity for females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Swei-Pi; Loiu, Yi; Chien, Te Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a psychophysical approach to examine the effects on carrying capacity for bi-manual carrying tasks involving different handle positions and carrying ranges. A total of 16 female subjects participated in the experiment in groups of two people, and each group of subjects performed the tasks in a random order with 12 different combinations of carrying task. The independent variables are handle position (upper, middle, lower) and carrying range (F-F: floor height carried to floor height, F-W: floor height carried to waist height, W-W: waist height carried to waist height, W-F: waist height carried to floor height), the dependent variable is the maximum acceptable carried weight (MAWC), heart rate (HR), and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE). The results show that the handle position has a significant effect on MAWC and overall RPE but no significant effect on HR. Carrying range has a significant effect on the MAWC and HR, but no significant effect on overall HR. The handle position and carrying range have a significant interaction on the MAWC and HR. The RPE for different body parts shows significant differences, and the hands feel the most tired. Overall, this study confirms that the lower handle position with the W-W carrying range is the best combination for a two-person carrying task.

  2. Muscle Fiber Type-Predominant Promoter Activity in Lentiviral-Mediated Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Tomohiro; Kimura, En; Morioka, Yuka; Ikawa, Masahito; Li, Sheng; Uchino, Katsuhisa; Uchida, Yuji; Yamashita, Satoshi; Maeda, Yasushi; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Uchino, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Variations in gene promoter/enhancer activity in different muscle fiber types after gene transduction was noticed previously, but poorly analyzed. The murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter drives strong, stable gene expression in hematopoietic stem cells and several other cells, including cerebellar Purkinje cells, but it has not been studied in muscle. We injected a lentiviral vector carrying an MSCV-EGFP cassette (LvMSCV-EGFP) into tibialis anterior muscles and observed strong EGFP expression in muscle fibers, primary cultured myoblasts, and myotubes isolated from injected muscles. We also generated lentiviral-mediated transgenic mice carrying the MSCV-EGFP cassette and detected transgene expression in striated muscles. LvMSCV-EGFP transgenic mice showed fiber type-dependent variations in expression: highest in types I and IIA, intermediate in type IID/X, and lowest in type IIB fibers. The soleus and diaphragm muscles, consisting mainly of types I and IIA, are most severely affected in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. Further analysis of this promoter may have the potential to achieve certain gene expression in severely affected muscles of mdx mice. The Lv-mediated transgenic mouse may prove a useful tool for assessing the enhancer/promoter activities of a variety of different regulatory cassettes. PMID:21445245

  3. Transgenic mice with a mutated collagen promoter display normal response during bleomycin-induced fibrosis and possess neurological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, J H; Ladd, D; Bronson, R T; Harmon, M; Jaworski, J; Pritzker, C; Lausen, N; Smith, B D

    2000-02-01

    We have previously identified a potential TGF-beta activation element (TAE) in the rat collagen alpha1(I) promoter at -1624 upstream of the transcriptional start site [Ritzenthaler et al., 1991, 1993]. To determine the importance of the TAE in vivo, we produced transgenic mice carrying 3.6 kb of the rat collagen alpha1(I) promoter linked to the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase with and without site-directed mutations that eliminate DNA-protein binding at the TAE site. Tissue-specific expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice with the mutated collagen promoter was similar to that of transgenic mice with the normal promoter in two genetic backgrounds as judged by in situ hybridization, reporter assays, and immunochemistry. Endotracheal instillation of bleomycin induces lung fibrosis, mediated in part by TGF-beta. Earlier studies indicated that expression of wild-type collagen-reporter gene was upregulated in transgenic mice lungs in response to endotracheal instillation of bleomycin. A similar level of reporter gene upregulation was observed in transgenic mice carrying the mutation in the TAE. Two lines of transgenic mice carrying the mutated promoter construct displayed unexpected neurological abnormalities. In the FVB genetic background, there was a higher than normal incidence of mortality, spontaneous seizures, and an inability to nurture offspring. Histological evidence demonstrated clear abnormalities, including disorderly arrangement of neurons in the hippocampus and significant laminar cortical necrosis in the cerebrum in animals after seizures. In the C57Bl/6 background, there was a high incidence of severe communicating hydrocephalus, early runting, and increased mortality similar to that in transgenic animals with astroglial overexpression of TGF-beta. These animals provide an interesting model system to investigate molecular mechanisms responsible for seizures and hydrocephalus. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Effects of transgenic rootstocks on growth and development of non-transgenic scion cultivars in apple.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Anders; Li, Xue-Yuan; Heikelt, Catrin; Welander, Margareta; Zhu, Li-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Although cultivation of genetic modified (GM) annual crops has been steadily increasing in the recent 10 years, the commercial cultivation of GM fruit tree is still very limited and reports of field trials on GM fruit trees are rare. This is probably because development and evaluation of GM fruit trees require a long period of time due to long life cycles of trees. In this study, we report results from a field trial on three rolB transgenic dwarfing apple rootstocks of M26 and M9 together with non-transgenic controls grafted with five non-transgenic scion cultivars. We intended to investigate the effects of transgenic rootstock on non-transgenic scion cultivars under natural conditions as well as to evaluate the potential value of using the rolB gene to modify difficult-to-root rootstocks of fruit trees. The results showed that all rolB transgenic rootstocks significantly reduced vegetative growth including tree height regardless of scion cultivar, compared with the non-transgenic rootstocks. Flowering and fruiting were also decreased for cultivars grown on the transgenic rootstocks in most cases, but the fruit quality was not clearly affected by the transgenic rootstocks. Cutting experiment and RT-PCR analysis showed that the rolB gene was stably expressed under field conditions. PCR and RT-PCR analyses displayed that the rolB gene or its mRNA were not detectable in the scion cultivars, indicating no translocation of the transgene or its mRNA from rootstock to scion. Our results suggest that rolB modified rootstocks should be used in combination with vigorous scion cultivars in order to obtain sufficient vegetative growth and good yield. Alternatively, the rolB gene could be used to dwarf vigorous rootstocks of fruit trees or produce bonzai plants as it can significantly reduce the vegetative growth of plants.

  5. Effect of the cauliflower Or transgene on carotenoid accumulation and chromoplast formation in transgenic potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alex B; Van Eck, Joyce; Conlin, Brian J; Paolillo, Dominick J; O'Neill, Jennifer; Li, Li

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic plants have facilitated our understanding of the functional roles of genes and the metabolic processes affected in plants. Recently, the Or gene was isolated from an orange cauliflower mutant and it was shown that the Or gene could serve as a novel genetic tool to enrich carotenoid content in transgenic potato tubers. An in-depth characterization of these Or transgenic lines is presented here. It was found that the Or transgene may facilitate the identification of potential rate-limiting step(s) of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. The Or transgenic tubers accumulated not only increased levels of carotenoids that normally are present in the controls, but also three additional metabolite intermediates of phytoene, phytofluene, and zeta-carotene, indicating that the desaturation steps became limiting following the expression of the Or transgene. Moreover, we observed that long-term cold storage greatly enhanced carotenoid content in the Or transgenic tubers to a level of 10-fold over controls. Expression of the Or transgene in the transgenic plants caused no dramatic changes in the transcript levels of the endogenous carotenoid biosynthetic genes, which is in agreement with the Or gene not directly controlling carotenoid biosynthesis. Microscope analysis revealed that the Or transgene conferred the formation of chromoplasts containing carotenoid sequestering structures in a heterologous system. Such structures were not observed in tubers of potato cultivars that accumulate high levels of carotenoids. Collectively, these results provide direct evidence demonstrating that the Or gene indeed controls chromoplast differentiation and that regulation of chromoplast formation can have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  6. Research advances on transgenic plant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei; Su, Tao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; An, Zhi-Gang

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of genetics molecular biology and plant biotechnology, the vaccination (e.g. genetic engineering subunit vaccine, living vector vaccine, nucleic acid vaccine) programs are taking on a prosperous evolvement. In particular, the technology of the use of transgenic plants to produce human or animal therapeutic vaccines receives increasing attention. Expressing vaccine candidates in vegetables and fruits open up a new avenue for producing oral/edible vaccines. Transgenic plant vaccine disquisitions exhibit a tempting latent exploiting foreground. There are a lot of advantages for transgenic plant vaccines, such as low cost, easiness of storage, and convenient immune-inoculation. Some productions converged in edible tissues, so they can be consumed directly without isolation and purification. Up to now, many transgenic plant vaccine productions have been investigated and developed. In this review, recent advances on plant-derived recombinant protein expression systems, infectious targets, and delivery systems are presented. Some issues of high concern such as biosafety and public health are also discussed. Special attention is given to the prospects and limitations on transgenic plant vaccines.

  7. Transgenic bovine as bioreactors: Challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Monzani, Paulo S; Adona, Paulo R; Ohashi, Otávio M; Meirelles, Flávio V; Wheeler, Matthew B

    2016-04-01

    The use of recombinant proteins has increased in diverse commercial sectors. Various systems for protein production have been used for the optimization of production and functional protein expression. The mammary gland is considered to be a very interesting system for the production of recombinant proteins due to its high level of expression and its ability to perform post-translational modifications. Cows produce large quantities of milk over a long period of lactation, and therefore this species is an important candidate for recombinant protein expression in milk. However, transgenic cows are more difficult to generate due to the inefficiency of transgenic methodologies, the long periods for transgene detection, recombinant protein expression and the fact that only a single calf is obtained at the end of each pregnancy. An increase in efficiency for transgenic methodologies for cattle is a big challenge to overcome. Promising methodologies have been proposed that can help to overcome this obstacle, enabling the use of transgenic cattle as bioreactors for protein production in milk for industry.

  8. Transgenic bovine as bioreactors: Challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Monzani, Paulo S.; Adona, Paulo R.; Ohashi, Otávio M.; Meirelles, Flávio V.; Wheeler, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of recombinant proteins has increased in diverse commercial sectors. Various systems for protein production have been used for the optimization of production and functional protein expression. The mammary gland is considered to be a very interesting system for the production of recombinant proteins due to its high level of expression and its ability to perform post-translational modifications. Cows produce large quantities of milk over a long period of lactation, and therefore this species is an important candidate for recombinant protein expression in milk. However, transgenic cows are more difficult to generate due to the inefficiency of transgenic methodologies, the long periods for transgene detection, recombinant protein expression and the fact that only a single calf is obtained at the end of each pregnancy. An increase in efficiency for transgenic methodologies for cattle is a big challenge to overcome. Promising methodologies have been proposed that can help to overcome this obstacle, enabling the use of transgenic cattle as bioreactors for protein production in milk for industry. PMID:27166649

  9. The transgenic animal platform for biopharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, L R; Meade, H; Lazzarotto, C R; Martins, L T; Tavares, K C; Bertolini, M; Murray, J D

    2016-06-01

    The recombinant production of therapeutic proteins for human diseases is currently the largest source of innovation in the pharmaceutical industry. The market growth has been the driving force on efforts for the development of new therapeutic proteins, in which transgenesis emerges as key component. The use of the transgenic animal platform offers attractive possibilities, residing on the low production costs allied to high productivity and quality of the recombinant proteins. Although many strategies have evolved over the past decades for the generation of transgenic founders, transgenesis in livestock animals generally faces some challenges, mainly due to random transgene integration and control over transgene copy number. But new developments in gene editing with CRISPR/Cas system promises to revolutionize the field for its simplicity and high efficiency. In addition, for the final approval of any given recombinant protein for animal or human use, the production and characterization of bioreactor founders and expression patterns and functionality of the proteins are technical part of the process, which also requires regulatory and administrative decisions, with a large emphasis on biosafety. The approval of two mammary gland-derived recombinant proteins for commercial and clinical use has boosted the interest for more efficient, safer and economic ways to generate transgenic founders to meet the increasing demand for biomedical proteins worldwide.

  10. Possible ecological risks of transgenic organism release when transgenes affect mating success: Sexual selection and the Trojan gene hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Muir, William M.; Howard, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Widespread interest in producing transgenic organisms is balanced by concern over ecological hazards, such as species extinction if such organisms were to be released into nature. An ecological risk associated with the introduction of a transgenic organism is that the transgene, though rare, can spread in a natural population. An increase in transgene frequency is often assumed to be unlikely because transgenic organisms typically have some viability disadvantage. Reduced viability is assumed to be common because transgenic individuals are best viewed as macromutants that lack any history of selection that could reduce negative fitness effects. However, these arguments ignore the potential advantageous effects of transgenes on some aspect of fitness such as mating success. Here, we examine the risk to a natural population after release of a few transgenic individuals when the transgene trait simultaneously increases transgenic male mating success and lowers the viability of transgenic offspring. We obtained relevant life history data by using the small cyprinodont fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model. Our deterministic equations predict that a transgene introduced into a natural population by a small number of transgenic fish will spread as a result of enhanced mating advantage, but the reduced viability of offspring will cause eventual local extinction of both populations. Such risks should be evaluated with each new transgenic animal before release. PMID:10570162

  11. Development of Transgenic Papaya through Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Rabbani, Md. Golam; Amin, Latifah; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic papaya plants were regenerated from hypocotyls and immature zygotic embryo after cocultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA-4404 carrying a binary plasmid vector system containing neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) gene as the selectable marker and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as the reporter gene. The explants were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens on regeneration medium containing 500 mg/L carbenicillin + 200 mg/L cefotaxime for one week. The cocultivated explants were transferred into the final selection medium containing 500 mg/L carbenicillin + 200 mg/L cefotaxime + 50 mg/L kanamycin for callus induction as well as plant regeneration. The callus derived from the hypocotyls of Carica papaya cv. Shahi showed the highest positive GUS activities compared to Carica papaya cv. Ranchi. The transformed callus grew vigorously and formed embryos followed by transgenic plantlets successfully. The result of this study showed that the hypocotyls of C. papaya cv. Shahi and C. papaya cv. Ranchi are better explants for genetic transformation compared to immature embryos. The transformed C. papaya cv. Shahi also showed the maximum number of plant regeneration compared to that of C. papaya cv. Ranchi. PMID:24066284

  12. Transgenic wheat carrying a barley UDP-glucosyltransferase exhibit high levels of Fusarium head blight resistance by detoxifying trichothecenes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a worldwide disease of wheat and barley, mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum. During infection, the fungal pathogen produces trichothecene mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) that increase fungal virulence. Moreover, grains contaminated with t...

  13. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravelli, F.; Sindoni, L.; Caccioli, F.; Ududec, C.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  14. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, F; Sindoni, L; Caccioli, F; Ududec, C

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  15. Assured load carrying capability and capacity credit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, H.

    1981-04-01

    The determination of assured load carrying capability and the capacity credit for use in planning windpowered electric generation facilities is considered. Calculation of the available capacity of thermal power plants is described and compared with calculation of available capacity for wind turbines, taking into account outages caused by the unavailability of the primary energy, wind. The assured load carrying capability of power plants is defined. An operational definition of the capacity credit of wind turbines as related to a fixed time t Epsilon T is presented and extended to the period T.

  16. Transgenic plants for phytoremediation of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki

    2009-04-01

    Herbicides are economically important, but the non-point pollution that they cause may disrupt the surrounding environment. Phytoremediation of herbicides has been well studied using conventional plants. Transgenic plants produced for metabolizing herbicides and long-persisting pollutants can be used for phytoremediation of foreign chemicals in contaminated soil and water. The genes involved in the metabolism of chemical compounds can be isolated from various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, and these genes are then introduced into candidate plants. Transgenic plants expressing mammalian P450s and the other enzymes showed tolerance and phytoremediation activity toward target herbicides. Transgenic plants can also enhance the absorption and detoxification of pollutants, thereby aiding the phytoremediation of contaminated environments.

  17. Toxins for Transgenic Resistance to Hemipteran Pests

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Nanasaheb P.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2012-01-01

    The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera), which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests. PMID:22822455

  18. Toxins for transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Nanasaheb P; Bonning, Bryony C

    2012-06-01

    The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera), which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

  19. Expression of Gal4-dependent transgenes in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system labeled with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein using Csf1r-Gal4VP16/UAS-ECFP double-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; van Zuylen, Wendy J M; DeBats, Claire E E; Alexander, Kylie A; Kellie, Stuart; Hume, David A

    2008-02-01

    We generated double-transgenic mice carrying cointegrated tissue-specific Gal4 and Gal4 reporter transgenes to direct transgene overexpression in the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). A modified promoter of the Csf1r (c-fms) gene, containing a deletion of the trophoblast-specific promoter, was used to drive the expression of Gal4VP16 transcriptional activator specifically in macrophages. This module was cointegrated with a fluorescent reporter, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), driven by a Gal4-dependent promoter. ECFP fluorescence was first detected in forming blood islands of the yolk sac at 8 dpc, then in macrophages in the yolk sac and the embryo proper. In adult mice ECFP was detected primarily in monocytes, tissue macrophages, microglia, and dendritic cells, including Langerhans cells of the skin. Crossing of these mice to transgenics containing tagged protein under control of a Gal4-dependent promoter directed expression of that protein in mononuclear phagocytes of double-transgenic animals. The new mouse line provides a useful tool for overexpression of transgenes in cells of the myeloid lineage, while simultaneously labeling them by ECFP expression.

  20. A myelin proteolipid protein-LacZ fusion protein is developmentally regulated and targeted to the myelin membrane in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated with a fusion gene carrying a portion of the murine myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, including the first intron, fused to the E. coli LacZ gene. Three transgenic lines were derived and all lines expressed the transgene in central nervous system white matter as measured by a histochemical assay for the detection of beta-galactosidase activity. PLP-LacZ transgene expression was regulated in both a spatial and temporal manner, consistent with endogenous PLP expression. Moreover, the transgene was expressed specifically in oligodendrocytes from primary mixed glial cultures prepared from transgenic mouse brains and appeared to be developmentally regulated in vitro as well. Transgene expression occurred in embryos, presumably in pre- or nonmyelinating cells, rather extensively throughout the peripheral nervous system and within very discrete regions of the central nervous system. Surprisingly, beta- galactosidase activity was localized predominantly in the myelin in these transgenic animals, suggesting that the NH2-terminal 13 amino acids of PLP, which were present in the PLP-LacZ gene product, were sufficient to target the protein to the myelin membrane. Thus, the first half of the PLP gene contains sequences sufficient to direct both spatial and temporal gene regulation and to encode amino acids important in targeting the protein to the myelin membrane. PMID:8408224

  1. Resistance of αAI-1 transgenic chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) dry grains to bruchid beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Lüthi, Christoph; Alvarez-Alfageme, Fernando; Ehlers, Jeffrey D; Higgins, Thomas J V; Romeis, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Dry grain legume seeds possessing αAI-1, an α-amylase inhibitor from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), under the control of a cotyledon-specific promoter have been shown to be highly resistant to several important bruchid pest species. One transgenic chickpea and four cowpea lines expressing αAI-1, their respective controls, as well as nine conventional chickpea cultivars were assessed for their resistance to the bruchids Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say), Callosobruchus chinensis L. and Callosobruchus maculatus F. All transgenic lines were highly resistant to both Callosobruchus species. A. obtectus, known to be tolerant to αAI-1, was able to develop in all transgenic lines. While the cotyledons of all non-transgenic cultivars were highly susceptible to all bruchids, C. chinensis and C. maculatus larvae suffered from significantly increased mortality rates inside transgenic seeds. The main factor responsible for the partial resistance in the non-transgenic cultivars was deduced to reside in the seed coat. The αAI-1 present in seeds of transgenic chickpea and cowpea lines significantly increases their resistance to two important bruchid pest species (C. chinensis and C. maculatus) essentially to immunity. To control αAI-1 tolerant bruchid species such as A. obtectus and to avoid the development of resistance to αAI-1, varieties carrying this transgene should be protected with additional control measures.

  2. Carrying capacity: maintaining outdoor recreation quality

    Treesearch

    David W. Lime; George H. Stankey

    1971-01-01

    A discussion of (1) what is meant by the concept of recreational carrying capacity; (2) what is known about capacities in terms of both how resources and experience of visitors are affected by recreational use; and (3) what alternative procedures the administrator can use to manage both resources and visitors for capacity.

  3. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS NONINSURED CROP DISASTER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will... records, as determined by CCC, of higher forage production or an increase in animal units supported on the...

  4. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS NONINSURED CROP DISASTER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will... records, as determined by CCC, of higher forage production or an increase in animal units supported on the...

  5. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS NONINSURED CROP DISASTER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will... records, as determined by CCC, of higher forage production or an increase in animal units supported on the...

  6. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS NONINSURED CROP DISASTER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will... records, as determined by CCC, of higher forage production or an increase in animal units supported on the...

  7. Lorentz Contraction and Current-Carrying Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kampen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The force between two parallel current-carrying wires is investigated in the rest frames of the ions and the electrons. A straightforward Lorentz transformation shows that what appears as a purely magnetostatic force in the ion frame appears as a combined magnetostatic and electrostatic force in the electron frame. The derivation makes use of a…

  8. Carry Hard ICBM basing: A technical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.R.; Schaffer, A.B.; Speed, R.; Todaro, A.F.

    1989-11-15

    Carry Hard is a deceptive, multiple-aimpoint ICBM basing concept in which hardened, encapsulated missiles are shuttled among several thousand, low-cost, water-filled vertical shelters. Since most of the essential launch and operational support equipment is carried with the missile (not provided with each shelter), the overall system costs are reduced. High system hardness permits relatively close shelter spacing, which in turn allows Carry Hard to be deployed on a comparatively small piece of land (a few hundred square miles) that could be removed from public access. Controlled access to the deployment area helps in maintaining concealment of the missiles among the shelters. If concealment is successfully maintained, the system is believed to be survivable against plausible Soviet threats, regardless of whether attack-warning information is received or acted upon. Thus, Carry Hard holds high promise as a feasible, affordable, and survivable means of ICBM deployment, and a high priority should be given to developing the concept to the point that an informed decision on full-scale engineering development can be made. 33 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Estimating carrying capacity with simultaneous nutritional constraints.

    Treesearch

    Thomas A. Hanley; James J. Rogers

    1989-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for estimating carrying capacity (the number of animals of a given species that can be supported per unit area of habitat) on the basis of two simultaneous nutritional constraints. It requires specifying the quantity (bio-mass) and quality (chemical composition or digestibility) of available food and the nutritional requirements of the...

  10. Must-Carry and Public Broadcasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Elizabeth K.

    Because of the United States Court of Appeal's ruling ("Quincy Cable TV vs. Federal Communications Commission") that government regulation of what cable television stations can broadcast violates their First Amendment rights, a number of consequences have arisen concerning what cable stations are required to broadcast (must-carry rules),…

  11. Increased carrying capacity with perennial forage kochia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carrying capacity can be increased on grass-dominated rangeland pastures by including perennial forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) as one of the plant components. The objectives of the study reported here were to compare the differences of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochi...

  12. Lorentz Contraction and Current-Carrying Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kampen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The force between two parallel current-carrying wires is investigated in the rest frames of the ions and the electrons. A straightforward Lorentz transformation shows that what appears as a purely magnetostatic force in the ion frame appears as a combined magnetostatic and electrostatic force in the electron frame. The derivation makes use of a…

  13. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  14. Developments in transgenic technology: applications for medicine.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Cheryl V; Tiley, Laurence S; Sang, Helen M

    2005-06-01

    Recent advances in the efficiency of transgenic technology have important implications for medicine. The production of therapeutic proteins from animal bioreactors is well established and the first products are close to market. The genetic modification of pigs to improve their suitability as organ donors for xenotransplantation has been initiated, but many challenges remain. The use of transgenesis, in combination with the method of RNA interference to knock down gene expression, has been proposed as a method for making animals resistant to viral diseases, which could reduce the likelihood of transmission to humans. Here, the latest developments in transgenic technology and their applications relevant to medicine and human health will be discussed.

  15. Edible transgenic plant vaccines for different diseases.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aakanchha; Saini, Vinay; Kohli, Dharm Veer

    2013-01-01

    Edible plant vaccines are immunogenic preparations containing antigenic proteins rather than pathogens, therefore, they sanctify situation where there is a possibility of resurgence of disease when the antigenic preparation contains the organism in any form whatsoever. Expression of antigens as vaccines and of antibodies against antigens of pathogens in transgenic plants is a convenient and inexpensive source for various bacterial, viral, helminths, protozoan and autoimmune diseases with lower capital costs. This review describes various diseases along with the production of edible transgenic plant vaccines/proteins for the same. Thus, substituting and improvising conventional immunization methods.

  16. A brief overview of transgenic farm animals.

    PubMed

    Bacci, M L

    2007-08-01

    Transgenesis offers new possibilities to rapidly modify the genome of living organisms. The application of transgenesis to farm animals faces many problems, more than those observed in the transgenesis of laboratory animals, as there are currently many different techniques available to obtain transgenic animals, which all have problems regarding low efficiency and high costs. When these techniques are applied to farm animals the problems concerning transgenesis are multiplied. Two main techniques, male pronuclear microinjection and sperm mediated gene transfer, utilised in farm animal transgenesis, are briefly presented. The improvement of these techniques and the employment of other biotechnologies such as cloning, could expand the uses of transgenic farm animals for human health.

  17. Generation of BAC transgenic epithelial organoids.

    PubMed

    Schwank, Gerald; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Sasaki, Nobuo; Clevers, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Under previously developed culture conditions, mouse and human intestinal epithelia can be cultured and expanded over long periods. These so-called organoids recapitulate the three-dimensional architecture of the gut epithelium, and consist of all major intestinal cell types. One key advantage of these ex vivo cultures is their accessibility to live imaging. So far the establishment of transgenic fluorescent reporter organoids has required the generation of transgenic mice, a laborious and time-consuming process, which cannot be extended to human cultures. Here we present a transfection protocol that enables the generation of recombinant mouse and human reporter organoids using BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) technology.

  18. Germ Cell-Specific Excision of loxP-Flanked Transgenes in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Naoto; Kume, Sachi; Hattori-Ihara, Shoko; Sadaie, Sakiko; Hayashi, Makoto; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2016-04-01

    Cre/loxP-mediated DNA excision in germ cell lineages could contribute substantially to the study of germ cell biology in salmonids, which are emerging as a model species in this field. However, a cell type-specific Cre/loxPsystem has not been successfully developed for any salmonid species. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of Cre/loxP-mediated, germ cell-specific gene excision and transgene activation in rainbow trout. Double-transgenic (wTg) progeny were obtained by mating a transgenic male carryingcrewith a transgenic female carrying thehsc-LRLGgene;crewas driven by rainbow troutvasaregulatory regions and thehsc-LRLGgene was made up of the rainbow troutheat-shock-cognate71promoter, theDsRedgene flanked by twoloxPsites, and theEgfpgene. PCR analysis, fluorescence imaging, and histological analysis revealed that excision of theloxP-flanked sequence and activation ofEgfpoccurred only in germ cells of wTg fish. However, progeny tests revealed that the excision efficiency ofloxP-flanked sequence in germ cells was low (≤3.27%). In contrast, the other wTg fish derived from two differentcre-transgenic males frequently excised theloxP-flanked sequence in germ cells (≤89.25%). Thus, we showed for the first time successful germ cell-specific transgene manipulation via the Cre/loxPsystem in rainbow trout. We anticipate that this technology will be suitable for studies of cell function through cell targeting, cell-linage tracing, and generating cell type-specific conditional gene knockouts and separately for developing sterile rainbow trout in aquaculture. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  19. Paucity and preferential suppression of transgenes in late replication domains of the D. melanogaster genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic genomes are organized in extended domains with distinct features intimately linking genome structure, replication pattern and chromatin state. Recently we identified a set of long late replicating euchromatic regions that are underreplicated in salivary gland polytene chromosomes of D. melanogaster. Results Here we demonstrate that these underreplicated regions (URs) have a low density of P-element and piggyBac insertions compared to the genome average or neighboring regions. In contrast, Minos-based transposons show no paucity in URs but have a strong bias to testis-specific genes. We estimated the suppression level in 2,852 stocks carrying a single P-element by analysis of eye color determined by the mini-white marker gene and demonstrate that the proportion of suppressed transgenes in URs is more than three times higher than in the flanking regions or the genomic average. The suppressed transgenes reside in intergenic, genic or promoter regions of the annotated genes. We speculate that the low insertion frequency of P-elements and piggyBacs in URs partially results from suppression of transgenes that potentially could prevent identification of transgenes due to complete suppression of the marker gene. In a similar manner, the proportion of suppressed transgenes is higher in loci replicating late or very late in Kc cells and these loci have a lower density of P-elements and piggyBac insertions. In transgenes with two marker genes suppression of mini-white gene in eye coincides with suppression of yellow gene in bristles. Conclusions Our results suggest that the late replication domains have a high inactivation potential apparently linked to the silenced or closed chromatin state in these regions, and that such inactivation potential is largely maintained in different tissues. PMID:20492674

  20. Gene-Splitting Technology: A Novel Approach for the Containment of Transgene Flow in Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ning; Jia, Shi-Rong; Tang, Qiao-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of transgene escape on the environment and food safety is a major concern to the scientists and public. This work aimed to assess the effect of intein-mediated gene splitting on containment of transgene flow. Two fusion genes, EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc, were constructed and integrated into N. tabacum, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. EPSPSn-In encodes the first 295 aa of the herbicide resistance gene 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) fused with the first 123 aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (In), whereas Ic-EPSPSc encodes the 36 C-terminal aa of the Ssp DnaE intein (Ic) fused to the rest of EPSPS C terminus peptide sequences. Both EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc constructs were introduced into the same N. tabacum genome by genetic crossing. Hybrids displayed resistance to the herbicide N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine (glyphosate). Western blot analysis of protein extracts from hybrid plants identified full-length EPSPS. Furthermore, all hybrid seeds germinated and grew normally on glyphosate selective medium. The 6-8 leaf hybrid plants showed tolerance of 2000 ppm glyphosate in field spraying. These results indicated that functional EPSPS protein was reassembled in vivo by intein-mediated trans-splicing in 100% of plants. In order to evaluate the effect of the gene splitting technique for containment of transgene flow, backcrossing experiments were carried out between hybrids, in which the foreign genes EPSPSn-In and Ic-EPSPSc were inserted into different chromosomes, and non-transgenic plants NC89. Among the 2812 backcrossing progeny, about 25% (664 plantlets) displayed glyphosate resistance. These data indicated that transgene flow could be reduced by 75%. Overall, our findings provide a new and highly effective approach for biological containment of transgene flow. PMID:24915192

  1. Blocking of Plasmodium transmission by cooperative action of Cecropin A and Defensin A in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kokoza, Vladimir; Ahmed, Abdouelaziz; Woon Shin, Sang; Okafor, Nwando; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2010-05-04

    To overcome burden of mosquito-borne diseases, multiple control strategies are needed. Population replacement with genetically modified mosquitoes carrying antipathogen effector genes is one of the possible approaches for controlling disease transmission. However, transgenic mosquitoes with antipathogen phenotypes based on overexpression of a single type effector molecule are not efficient in interrupting pathogen transmission. Here, we show that co-overexpression of two antimicrobial peptides (AMP), Cecropin A, and Defensin A, in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes results in the cooperative antibacterial and antiPlasmodium action of these AMPs. The transgenic hybrid mosquitoes that overexpressed both Cecropin A and Defensin A under the control of the vitellogenin promoter exhibited an elevated resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, indicating that these AMPs acted cooperatively against this pathogenic bacterium. In these mosquitoes infected with P. gallinaceum, the number of oocysts was dramatically reduced in midguts, and no sporozoites were found in their salivary glands when the mosquitoes were fed twice to reactivate transgenic AMP production. Infection experiments using the transgenic hybrid mosquitoes, followed by sequential feeding on naive chicken, and then naive wild-type mosquitoes showed that the Plasmodium transmission was completely blocked. This study suggests an approach in generating transgenic mosquitoes with antiPlasmodium refractory phenotype, which is coexpression of two or more effector molecules with cooperative action on the parasite.

  2. Transgenic expression in citrus of single-chain antibody fragments specific to Citrus tristeza virus confers virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Magdalena; Esteban, Olga; Gil, Maite; Gorris, M Teresa; Martínez, M Carmen; Peña, Leandro; Cambra, Mariano

    2010-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most destructive viral diseases of citrus worldwide. Generation of resistant citrus genotypes through genetic engineering could be a good alternative to control CTV. To study whether production of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies in citrus could interfere and immunomodulate CTV infection, transgenic Mexican lime plants expressing two different scFv constructs, separately and simultaneously, were generated. These constructs derived from the well-referenced monoclonal antibodies 3DF1 and 3CA5, specific against CTV p25 major coat protein, whose mixture is able to detect all CTV isolates characterized so far. ScFv accumulation levels were low and could be readily detected just in four transgenic lines. Twelve homogeneous and vigorous lines were propagated and CTV-challenged by graft inoculation with an aggressive CTV strain. A clear protective effect was observed in most transgenic lines, which showed resistance in up to 40-60% of propagations. Besides, both a delay in symptom appearance and attenuation of symptom intensity were observed in infected transgenic plants compared with control plants. This effect was more evident in lines carrying the 3DF1scFv transgene, being probably related to the biological functions of the epitope recognized by this antibody. This is the first report describing successful protection against a pathogen in woody transgenic plants by ectopic expression of scFv recombinant antibodies.

  3. Transgenic expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and severe dermal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, P L; Gimenez-Conti, I B; LaCava, M; Martinez, L A; Conti, C J; Rodriguez-Puebla, M L

    2001-07-01

    In a previous report we have described the effects of expression of D-type cyclins in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of the D-type cyclin partner cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in epithelial growth and differentiation, transgenic mice were generated carrying the CDK4 gene under the control of a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, transgenic mice showed expression of CDK4 in the epidermal basal-cell layer. Epidermal proliferation increased dramatically and basal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy were observed. The hyperproliferative phenotype of these transgenic mice was independent of D-type cyclin expression because no overexpression of these proteins was detected. CDK4 and CDK2 kinase activities increased in transgenic animals and were associated with elevated binding of p27(Kip1) to CDK4. Expression of CDK4 in the epidermis results in an increased spinous layer compared with normal epidermis, and a mild hyperkeratosis in the cornified layer. In addition to epidermal changes, severe dermal fibrosis was observed and part of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was replaced by connective tissue. Also, abnormal expression of keratin 6 associated with the hyperproliferative phenotype was observed in transgenic epidermis. This model provides in vivo evidence for the role of CDK4 as a mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells independent of D-type cyclin expression.

  4. Partial Hepatectomy and Castration of HBV Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongjun; Ou, Jing-Hsiung James

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus. Its infection can cause liver injury and regeneration, and its replication is affected by the gender. Transgenic mice that carry a 1.3-mer overlength HBV DNA genome productively replicate HBV in hepatocytes and have been very useful for studying the replication and pathogenesis of HBV in vivo. By using this mouse model, the relationship between HBV and liver injury and regeneration as well as the effect of the gender on HBV gene expression and replication has been studied. In this chapter, we describe the surgical procedures of partial hepatectomy and castration and provide examples to demonstrate how these surgical procedures may be used to study the effect of HBV on liver regeneration and the effect of androgen on HBV replication.

  5. Production of homozygous transgenic rainbow trout with enhanced disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous studies conducted in our laboratory showed that transgenic medaka expressing cecropin B transgenes exhibited resistant characteristic to fish bacterial pathogens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Vibrio anguillarum. To confirm whether antimicrobial peptide gene will also exhibit antibacterial an...

  6. Aberrant gene expression in deceased transgenic cloned calves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wang, S H; Dai, Y P; Li, N

    2009-05-01

    Several transgenic cloned species have been obtained; however, the efficiency of transgenic cloning remains very low, even lower than cloning. Many experiments have demonstrated abnormal growth and development, and inappropriate gene expression in cloned animals. In this study, we examined the expression of 19 development-related genes in lungs of three normal controls and three aberrant transgenic cloned calves. Results showed in transgenic cloned calves, 84.2% genes had decreased expression levels, however, 5.3% genes had increased levels. This study suggests transgenic cloning and the aberrant expression would cause abnormal growth and development in transgenic cloned calves. To our knowledge, this is the first time that gene expression was examined in transgenic cloned cattle. These findings may have some implications in understanding the low efficiency of the transgenic cloning.

  7. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  8. Efficient and Rapid Development of Transgenic Hamster Models of TSEs Using a Radical New Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    We are breeding a flock of 50 genotyped sheep to select for the high scrapie susceptibility genotype VVRRQQ. All three lines of the mouse...transgenics carrying sheep, human, and elk PrP have been now re-derived. We have observed the first transmission of the disease from our standard scrapie ...Sheep Scrapie , TOSK, transposon 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b

  9. Transformation of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 by transgenic sugar beet DNA.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, F; Smalla, K

    1998-04-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413(pFG4 delta nptII) to take up and integrate transgenic plant DNA based on homologous recombination was studied under optimized laboratory conditions. Restoration of nptII, resulting in kanamycin-resistant transformants, was observed with plasmid DNA, plant DNA, and homogenates carrying the gene nptII. Molecular analysis showed that some transformants not only restored the 317-bp deletion but also obtained additional DNA.

  10. High incidence of lung, bone, and lymphoid tumors in transgenic mice overexpressing mutant alleles of the p53 oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Lavigueur, A; Maltby, V; Mock, D; Rossant, J; Pawson, T; Bernstein, A

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the p53 gene in oncogenesis in vivo by generating transgenic mice carrying murine p53 genomic fragments isolated from a mouse Friend erythroleukemia cell line or BALB/c mouse liver DNA. Elevated levels of p53 mRNA were detected in several tissues of two transgenic lines tested. Increased levels of p53 protein were also detected in most of the tissues analyzed by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Because both transgenes encoded p53 proteins that were antigenically distinct from wild-type p53, it was possible to demonstrate that overexpression of the p53 protein was mostly, if not entirely, due to the expression of the transgenes. Neoplasms developed in 20% of the transgenic mice, with a high incidence of lung adenocarcinomas, osteosarcomas, and lymphomas. Tissues such as ovaries that expressed the transgene at high levels were not at higher risk of malignant transformation than tissues expressing p53 protein at much lower levels. The long latent period and low penetrance suggest that overexpression of p53 alone is not sufficient to induce malignancies and that additional events are required. These observations provide direct evidence that mutant alleles of the p53 oncogene have oncogenic potential in vivo and that different cell types show intrinsic differences in susceptibility to malignant transformation by p53. Since recent data suggest that p53 may be a recessive oncogene, it is possible that the elevated tumor incidence results from functional inactivation of endogenous p53 by overexpression of the mutant transgene. The high incidence of lung and bone tumors suggests that p53 transgenic mice may provide a useful model to investigate the molecular events that underlie these malignancies in humans. Images PMID:2476668

  11. Germ-line transmission of lentiviral PGK-EGFP integrants in transgenic cattle: new perspectives for experimental embryology.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Myriam; Lim, Tiongti; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Guengoer, Tuna; Habermann, Felix A; Matthiesen, Marieke; Hofmann, Andreas; Weber, Frank; Zerbe, Holm; Grupp, Thomas; Sinowatz, Fred; Pfeifer, Alexander; Wolf, Eckhard

    2010-08-01

    Lentiviral vectors are a powerful tool for the genetic modification of livestock species. We previously generated transgenic founder cattle with lentiviral integrants carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter. In this study, we investigated the transmission of LV-PGK-EGFP integrants through the female and male germ line in cattle. A transgenic founder heifer (#562, Kiki) was subjected to superovulation treatment and inseminated with semen from a non-transgenic bull. Embryos were recovered and transferred to synchronized recipient heifers, resulting in the birth of a healthy male transgenic calf expressing EGFP as detected by in vivo imaging. Semen from a transgenic founder bull (#561, Jojo) was used for in vitro fertilization (IVF) of in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes from non-transgenic cows. The rates of cleavage and development to blastocyst in vitro corresponded to 52.0 +/- 4.1 and 24.5 +/- 4.4%, respectively. Expression of EGFP was observed at blastocyst stage (day 7 after IVF) and was seen in 93.0% (281/302) of the embryos. 24 EGFP-expressing embryos were transferred to 9 synchronized recipients. Analysis of 2 embryos, flushed from the uterus on day 15, two fetuses recovered on day 45, and a healthy male transgenic calf revealed consistent high-level expression of EGFP in all tissues investigated. Our study shows for the first time transmission of lentiviral integrants through the germ line of female and male transgenic founder cattle. The pattern of inheritance was consistent with Mendelian rules. Importantly, high fidelity expression of EGFP in embryos, fetuses, and offspring of founder #561 provides interesting tools for developmental studies in cattle, including interactions of gametes, embryos and fetuses with their maternal environment.

  12. Virus-induced gene silencing in transgenic plants: transgene silencing and reactivation associate with two patterns of transgene body methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingmin; San León, David; Delgadillo, Ma Otilia; García, Juan Antonio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    We used bisulfite sequencing to study the methylation of a viral transgene whose expression was silenced upon plum pox virus infection of the transgenic plant and its subsequent recovery as a consequence of so-called virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). VIGS was associated with a general increase in the accumulation of small RNAs corresponding to the coding region of the viral transgene. After VIGS, the transgene promoter was not methylated and the coding region showed uneven methylation, with the 5' end being mostly unmethylated in the recovered tissue or mainly methylated at CG sites in regenerated silenced plants. The methylation increased towards the 3' end, which showed dense methylation in all three contexts (CG, CHG and CHH). This methylation pattern and the corresponding silenced status were maintained after plant regeneration from recovered silenced tissue and did not spread into the promoter region, but were not inherited in the sexual offspring. Instead, a new pattern of methylation was observed in the progeny plants consisting of disappearance of the CHH methylation, similar CHG methylation at the 3' end, and an overall increase in CG methylation in the 5' end. The latter epigenetic state was inherited over several generations and did not correlate with transgene silencing and hence virus resistance. These results suggest that the widespread CG methylation pattern found in body gene bodies located in euchromatic regions of plant genomes may reflect an older silencing event, and most likely these genes are no longer silenced. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A novel transgenic mouse model produced from lentiviral germline integration for the study of beta-thalassemia gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xie, Shuyang; Guo, Xinbing; Gong, Xiuli; Wang, Shu; Lin, Dan; Zhang, Jingzhi; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Fanyi; Zeng, Yitao

    2008-03-01

    beta-thalassemia is one of the most common genetic diseases in the world and requires extensive therapy. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy has been successfully exploited in the treatment of beta-thalassemia and showed promise in clinical application. Using a human beta-globin transgenic mouse line in a beta-thalassemia diseased model generated with a lentiviral-mediated approach, we investigate the stable therapeutic effect on a common thalassemia syndrome. Human beta-globin gene lentiviral vector was constr ucted, followed by subzonal microinjection into single-cell embryos of beta(IVS-2-654)-thalassemia mice to generate a transgenic line. Human beta-globin gene expression was examined with RT-PCR, Western-blotting and ELISA. The hematologic parameters and tissue pathology were investigated over time in founder mice and their off-spring. Transgenic mice with stable expression of the lentivirus carrying human beta-globin gene were obtained. A marked improvement in red blood cell indices and a dramatic reduction in red blood cell anisocytosis, poikilocytosis and target cells were observed. Nucleated cell proportion was greatly decreased in bone marrow, and splenomegaly with extramedullary hematopoiesis was ameliorated. Iron deposition in liver was also reduced. There was a two-fold increase in the survival rate of the beta(IVS-2-654) mice carrying human beta-globin transgene. Significantly, the germline integration of the lentiviral construct was obtained and stable hematologic phenotype correction was observed over the next two generations of the transgenic mice. The generation of human beta-globin transgenic mice in a beta(IVS-2-654)-thalassemia mouse mediated with lentiviral vectors provides a useful model and offers an attractive means to investigate the transgenic stable therapeutic effect in beta-thalassemia.

  14. Proof-Carrying Code with Correct Compilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, Andrew W.

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1990s, proof-carrying code was able to produce machine-checkable safety proofs for machine-language programs even though (1) it was impractical to prove correctness properties of source programs and (2) it was impractical to prove correctness of compilers. But now it is practical to prove some correctness properties of source programs, and it is practical to prove correctness of optimizing compilers. We can produce more expressive proof-carrying code, that can guarantee correctness properties for machine code and not just safety. We will construct program logics for source languages, prove them sound w.r.t. the operational semantics of the input language for a proved-correct compiler, and then use these logics as a basis for proving the soundness of static analyses.

  15. A decimal carry-free adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikmehr, Hooman; Phillips, Braden; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2005-02-01

    Recently, decimal arithmetic has become attractive in the financial and commercial world including banking, tax calculation, currency conversion, insurance and accounting. Although computers are still carrying out decimal calculation using software libraries and binary floating-point numbers, it is likely that in the near future, all processors will be equipped with units performing decimal operations directly on decimal operands. One critical building block for some complex decimal operations is the decimal carry-free adder. This paper discusses the mathematical framework of the addition, introduces a new signed-digit format for representing decimal numbers and presents an efficient architectural implementation. Delay estimation analysis shows that the adder offers improved performance over earlier designs.

  16. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-01

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  17. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Ferrante, Todd A.

    1998-01-01

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface.

  18. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-17

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  19. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Ferrante, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface. 8 figs.

  20. Carry-over coarticulation in joint angles.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eva; Grimme, Britta; Reimann, Hendrik; Schöner, Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Coarticulation indicates a dependence of a movement segment on a preceding segment (carry-over coarticulation) or on the segment that follows (anticipatory coarticulation). Here we study coarticulation in multidegrees of freedom human arm movements. We asked participants to transport a cylinder from a starting position to a center target and on to a final target. In this naturalistic setting, the human arm has ten degrees of freedom and is thus comfortably redundant for the task. We studied coarticulation by comparing movements between the same spatial locations that were either preceded by different end-effector paths (carry-over coarticulation) or followed by different end-effector paths (anticipatory coarticulation). We found no evidence for coarticulation at the level of the end-effector. We found very clear evidence, however, for carry-over, not for anticipatory coarticulation at the joint level. We used the concept of the uncontrolled manifold to systematically establish coarticulation as a form of motor equivalence, in which most of the difference between different movement contexts lies within the uncontrolled manifold that leaves the end-effector invariant. The findings are consistent with movement planning occurring at the level of the end-effector, and those movement plans being transformed to the joint level by a form of inverse kinematics. The observation of massive self-motion excludes an account that is solely based on a kinematic pseudo-inverse.

  1. The past, present and future of transgenic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Drohan, W N

    1997-07-01

    Hybrid genes can control the tissue-specific synthesis of human proteins in transgenic animals. Thus, it is now possible to produce proteins of biomedical value in the body fluids or cells of transgenic livestock. In fact, the first transgenically produced protein, antithrombin III, is now in clinical trials and others will soon follow.

  2. Maize transgenes containing zein promoters are regulated by opaque2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenes have great potential in crop improvement, but relatively little is known about the epistatic interaction of transgenes with the native genes in the genome. Understanding these interactions is critical for predicting the response of transgenes to different genetic backgrounds and environm...

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF ESCAPED TRANSGENIC CREEPING BENTGRASS IN OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    When transgenic plants are cultivated near wild species that are sexually compatible with the crop, gene flow between the crop and wild plants is possible. A resultant concern is that transgene flow and transgene introgression within wild populations could have unintended ecologi...

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF ESCAPED TRANSGENIC CREEPING BENTGRASS IN OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    When transgenic plants are cultivated near wild species that are sexually compatible with the crop, gene flow between the crop and wild plants is possible. A resultant concern is that transgene flow and transgene introgression within wild populations could have unintended ecologi...

  5. Benefits of transgenic insect resistance in Brassica hybrids under selection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field trials of transgenic crops have occasionally resulted in unintentional transgene flow to closely related species. Hybridization between transgenic cultivars and close relatives may create novel forms with potential negative outcomes for wild and weedy plant populations. We report here the outc...

  6. Transgenic mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    PubMed

    Katsuno, M; Adachi, H; Inukai, A; Sobue, G

    2003-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by proximal muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. Only males develop symptoms, while female carriers usually are asymptomatic. A specific treatment for SBMA has not been established. The molecular basis of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic hallmark is nuclear inclusions (NIs) containing the mutant and truncated AR with expanded polyQ in the residual motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord as well as in some other visceral organs. Several transgenic (Tg) mouse models have been created for studying the pathogenesis of SBMA. The Tg mouse model carrying pure 239 CAGs under human AR promoter and another model carrying truncated AR with expanded CAGs show motor impairment and nuclear NIs in spinal motor neurons. Interestingly, Tg mice carrying full-length human AR with expanded polyQ demonstrate progressive motor impairment and neurogenic pathology as well as sexual difference of phenotypes. These models recapitulate the phenotypic expression observed in SBMA. The ligand-dependent nuclear localization of the mutant AR is found to be involved in the disease mechanism, and hormonal therapy is suggested to be a therapeutic approach applicable to SBMA.

  7. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  8. Transgenic plants protected from insect attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaeck, Mark; Reynaerts, Arlette; Höfte, Herman; Jansens, Stefan; de Beuckeleer, Marc; Dean, Caroline; Zabeau, Marc; Montagu, Marc Van; Leemans, Jan

    1987-07-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produces proteins which are specifically toxic to a variety of insect species. Modified genes have been derived from bt2, a toxin gene cloned from one Bacillus strain. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing these genes synthesize insecticidal proteins which protect them from feeding damage by larvae of the tobacco hornworm.

  9. Viable transgenic goats derived from skin cells.

    PubMed

    Behboodi, Esmail; Memili, Erdogan; Melican, David T; Destrempes, Margaret M; Overton, Susan A; Williams, Jennifer L; Flanagan, Peter A; Butler, Robin E; Liem, Hetty; Chen, Li How; Meade, Harry M; Gavin, William G; Echelard, Yann

    2004-06-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the possibility of expanding transgenic goat herds by means of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) using transgenic goat cells as nucleus donors. Skin cells from adult, transgenic goats were first synchronized at quiescent stage (G0) by serum starvation and then induced to exit G0 and proceed into G1. Oocytes collected from superovulated donors were enucleated, karyoplast-cytoplast couplets were constructed, and then fused and activated simultaneously by a single electrical pulse. Fused couplets were either co-cultured with oviductal cells in TCM-199 medium (in vitro culture) or transferred to intermediate recipient goat oviducts (in vivo culture) until final transfer. The resulting morulae and blastocysts were transferred to the final recipients. Pregnancies were confirmed by ultrasonography 25-30 days after embryo transfer. In vitro cultured NT embryos developed to morulae and blastocyst stages but did not produce any pregnancies while 30% (6/20) of the in vivo derived morulae and blastocysts produced pregnancies. Two of these pregnancies were resorbed early in gestation. Of the four recipients that maintained pregnancies to term, two delivered dead fetuses 2-3 days after their due dates, and two recipients gave birth to healthy kids at term. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed that both kids were transgenic and had integration sites consistent with those observed in the adult cell line.

  10. Monitoring transgenic plants using in vivo markers

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.N. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The gene coding for green fluorecent protein (GFP), isolated and cloned from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, is an ideal transgene for the monitoring of any plant species. It has the ability to fluoresce without added substrate, enzyme, or cofactor; it does not introduce morphological or sexual aberrations when expressed. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  12. Assessing the value of transgenic crops.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Hugh

    2002-10-01

    In the current controversy about the value of transgenic crops, matters open to empirical inquiry are centrally at issue. One such matter is a key premise in a common argument (that I summarize) that transgenic crops should be considered to have universal value. The premise is that there are no alternative forms of agriculture available to enable the production of sufficient food to feed the world. The proponents of agroecology challenge it, claiming that agroecology provides an alternative, and they deny the claim that it is well founded on empirical evidence. It is, therefore, a matter of both social and scientific importance that this premise and the criticisms of it be investigated rigorously and empirically, so that the benefits and disadvantages of transgenic-intensive agriculture and agroecology can be compared in a reliable way. Conducting adequate investigation about the potential contribution of agroecology requires that the cultural conditions of its practice (and, thus, of the practices and movements of small-scale farmers in the "third world") be strengthened--and this puts the interests of investigation into tension with the socio-economic interests driving the development of transgenics. General issues about relationship between ethical argument and empirical (scientific) investigation are raised throughout the article.

  13. Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard Brian; Summers, Anne O.; Rugh, Clayton L.

    1999-10-12

    The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

  14. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The substantive equivalence of transgenic (Bt and Chi) and non-transgenic cotton based on metabolite profiles.

    PubMed

    Modirroosta, Bentol Hoda; Tohidfar, Masoud; Saba, Jalal; Moradi, Foad

    2014-03-01

    Compositional studies comparing transgenic with non-transgenic counterpart plants are almost universally required by governmental regulatory bodies. In the present study, two T(2) transgenic cotton lines containing chitinase (Line 11/57) and Bt lines (Line 61) were compared with non-transgenic counterpart. To do this, biochemical characteristics of leaves and seeds, including amino acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, anions, and cations contents of the studied lines were analyzed using GC/MS, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and ion chromatography (IC) analyzers, respectively. polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analyses confirmed the presence and expression of Chi and Bt genes in the studied transgenic lines. Although, compositional analysis of leaves contents confirmed no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic counterpart lines, but it was shown that glucose content of chitinase lines, fructose content of transgenic lines (Bt and chitinase) and asparagine and glutamine of chitinase lines were significantly higher than the non-transgenic counterpart plants. Both the transgenic lines (Bt and chitinase) showed significant decrease in the amounts of sodium in comparison to the non-transgenic counterpart plants. The experiments on the seeds showed that histidine, isoleucine, leucine, and phenylalanine contents of all transgenic and non-transgenic lines were the same, whereas other amino acids were significantly increased in the transgenic lines. Surprisingly, it was observed that the concentrations of stearic acid, myristic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid in the chitinase line were significantly different than those of non-transgenic counterpart plants, but these components were the same in both Bt line and its non-transgenic counterpart. It seems that more changes observed in the seed contents than leaves is via this point that seeds are known as metabolites storage organs, so they show greater changes in the

  16. Growth and endocrine effects of recombinant bovine growth hormone treatment in non-transgenic and growth hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Raven, P A; Sakhrani, D; Beckman, B; Neregård, L; Sundström, L F; Björnsson, B Th; Devlin, R H

    2012-05-15

    To examine the relative growth, endocrine, and gene expression effects of growth hormone (GH) transgenesis vs. GH protein treatment, wild-type non-transgenic and GH transgenic coho salmon were treated with a sustained-release formulation of recombinant bovine GH (bGH; Posilac). Fish size, specific growth rate (SGR), and condition factor (CF) were monitored for 14 weeks, after which endocrine parameters were measured. Transgenic fish had much higher growth, SGR and CF than non-transgenic fish, and bGH injection significantly increased weight and SGR in non-transgenic but not transgenic fish. Plasma salmon GH concentrations decreased with bGH treatment in non-transgenic but not in transgenic fish where levels were similar to controls. Higher GH mRNA levels were detected in transgenic muscle and liver but no differences were observed in GH receptor (GHR) mRNA levels. In non-transgenic pituitary, GH and GHR mRNA levels per mg pituitary decreased with bGH dose to levels seen in transgenic salmon. Plasma IGF-I was elevated with bGH dose only in non-transgenic fish, while transgenic fish maintained an elevated level of IGF-I with or without bGH treatment. A similar trend was seen for liver IGF-I mRNA levels. Thus, bGH treatment increased fish growth and influenced feedback on endocrine parameters in non-transgenic but not in transgenic fish. A lack of further growth stimulation of GH transgenic fish suggests that these fish are experiencing maximal growth stimulation via GH pathways.

  17. Can Transgenic Maize Affect Soil Microbial Communities?

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Christian; Wouterse, Marja; Raubuch, Markus; Roelofs, Willem; Rutgers, Michiel

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the experiment was to determine if temporal variations of belowground activity reflect the influence of the Cry1Ab protein from transgenic maize on soil bacteria and, hence, on a regulatory change of the microbial community (ability to metabolize sources belonging to different chemical guilds) and/or a change in numerical abundance of their cells. Litter placement is known for its strong influence on the soil decomposer communities. The effects of the addition of crop residues on respiration and catabolic activities of the bacterial community were examined in microcosm experiments. Four cultivars of Zea mays L. of two different isolines (each one including the conventional crop and its Bacillus thuringiensis cultivar) and one control of bulk soil were included in the experimental design. The growth models suggest a dichotomy between soils amended with either conventional or transgenic maize residues. The Cry1Ab protein appeared to influence the composition of the microbial community. The highly enhanced soil respiration observed during the first 72 h after the addition of Bt-maize residues can be interpreted as being related to the presence of the transgenic crop residues. This result was confirmed by agar plate counting, as the averages of the colony-forming units of soils in conventional treatments were about one-third of those treated with transgenic straw. Furthermore, the addition of Bt-maize appeared to induce increased microbial consumption of carbohydrates in BIOLOG EcoPlates. Three weeks after the addition of maize residues to the soils, no differences between the consumption rate of specific chemical guilds by bacteria in soils amended with transgenic maize and bacteria in soils amended with conventional maize were detectable. Reaped crop residues, comparable to post-harvest maize straw (a common practice in current agriculture), rapidly influence the soil bacterial cells at a functional level. Overall, these data support the existence of short

  18. Cross-contamination with tamoxifen induces transgene expression in non-exposed inducible transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Brake, Rachael L; Simmons, Paul J; Begley, C Glenn

    2004-12-30

    Inducible transgenic mouse models that impose a constraint on both temporal and spatial expression of a given transgene are invaluable. These animals facilitate experiments that can address the role of a specific cell or group of cells within an animal or in a particular window of time. A common approach to achieve inducibility involves the site-specific recombinase 'Cre', which is linked to a modified version of one of various steroid hormone-binding domains. Thus, the expression of Cre is regulated such that a functional nuclear transgene product can only be generated with the addition of an exogenous ligand. However, critical requirements of this system are that the nuclear localization of the transgene product be tightly regulated, that the dosage of the inducing agent remains consistent among experimental animals and that the transgene cassette cannot express in the absence of the inducing agent. We used the Cre ER(T2) cassette, which is regulated by the addition of the estrogen antagonist tamoxifen to determine whether cross-contamination of tamoxifen between animals housed together can be a significant source of spurious results. We found that cross-contamination of exogenous tamoxifen does occur. It occurred in all animals tested. We suggest that the mechanism of contamination is through exposure to tamoxifen in the general environment and/or to coprophagous behavior. These results have important implications for the interpretation and design of experiments that use 'inducible' transgenic animals.

  19. Transgenic studies on homeobox genes in nervous system development: spina bifida in Isl1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Kappen, Claudia; Yaworsky, Paul J; Muller, Yunhua L; Salbaum, J Michael

    2013-04-01

    To develop in vivo assays for homeobox gene function in neural development, we generated transgenic mice in which the expression of a homeobox gene is altered only within the nervous system, in neurons or neuronal precursor cells. Transgenic expression of Hoxc8 did not result in gross abnormalities, while a Hoxd4 transgene caused death shortly after birth. In neural progenitor cells, the motorneuron-specific homeodomain transcription factor Isl1 induced early developmental defects, including absence of anterior neural structures, profound defects in the neuroepithelium and defective neural tube closure. A fraction of Isl1 transgenic mice exhibited spina bifida. Isl1 transgene expression was also associated with decreased proliferation and increased Pbx1 expression in the ventral neural tube. Our results suggest a function for some homeobox genes in development of the nervous system, and that cell-type- and region-specific transgenic models will be useful to identify the cellular and molecular targets of homeobox transcription factors in nervous system development.

  20. Diversity of arthropod community in transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D J; Lu, Z Y; Liu, J X; Li, C L; Yang, M S

    2015-12-02

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of plain cotton fields in China. Here, we performed a systematic survey of the diversity and population of arthropod communities in four different combination of poplar-cotton eco-systems, including I) non-transgenic poplar and non-transgenic cotton fields; II) non-transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields [Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton]; III) Bt transgenic poplar (high insect resistant strain Pb29) and non-transgenic cotton; and IV) transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields, over a period of 3 years. Based on the statistical methods used to investigate community ecology, the effects of transgenic ecosystems on the whole structure of the arthropod community, on the structure of arthropods in the nutritive layer, and on the similarity of arthropod communities were evaluated. The main results were as follows: the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem has a stronger inhibitory effect on insect pests and has no impact on the structure of the arthropod community, and therefore, maintains the diversity of the arthropod community. The character index of the community indicated that the structure of the arthropod community of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was better than that of the poplar-cotton ecosystem, and that system IV had the best structure. As for the abundance of nutritional classes, the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was also better than that of the non-transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem. The cluster analysis and similarity of arthropod communities between the four different transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems illustrated that the structure of the arthropod community excelled in the small sample of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

  1. Further molecular characterisation of the OVT73 transgenic sheep model of Huntington's disease identifies cortical aggregates.

    PubMed

    Reid, Suzanne J; Patassini, Stefano; Handley, Renée R; Rudiger, Skye R; McLaughlan, Clive J; Osmand, Alex; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Morton, A Jennifer; Weiss, Andreas; Waldvogel, Henry J; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F; Bawden, C Simon; Faull, Richard L M; Snell, Russell G

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, typically with clinical manifestations in adult years, caused by an expanded polyglutamine-coding repeat in HTT. There are no treatments that delay or prevent the onset or progression of this devastating disease. In order to study its pre-symptomatic molecular progression and provide a large mammalian model for determining natural history of the disease and for therapeutic testing, we generated and previously reported on lines of transgenic sheep carrying a full length human HTT cDNA transgene, with expression driven by a minimal HTT promoter. We report here further characterization of our preferred line, OVT73. This line reliably expresses the expanded human huntingtin protein at modest, but readily detectable levels throughout the brain, including the striatum and cortex. Transmission of the 73 unit glutamine coding repeat was relatively stable over three generations. At the first time-point of a longitudinal study, animals sacrificed at 6 months (7 transgenic, 7 control) showed reduced striatum GABAA α1 receptor, and globus pallidus leu-enkephalin immunoreactivity. Two of three 18 month old animals sacrificed revealed cortical neuropil aggregates. Furthermore, neuronal intranuclear inclusions were identified in the piriform cortex of a single 36 month old animal in addition to cortical neuropil aggregates. Taken together, these data indicate that the OVT73 transgenic sheep line will progressively reveal early HD pathology and allow therapeutic testing over a period of time relevant to human patients.

  2. Axonal localization of transgene mRNA in mature PNS and CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Dianna E.; Xu, Mei; Donnelly, Christopher J.; Tep, Chhavy; Kendall, Marvin; Erenstheyn, Marina; English, Arthur; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Kirn-Safran, Catherine B.; Yoon, Sung Ok; Bassell, Gary J.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal mRNA transport is robust in cultured neurons but there has been limited evidence for this in vivo. We have used a genetic approach to test for in vivo axonal transport of reporter mRNAs. We show that β-actin’s 3’UTR can drive axonal localization of GFP mRNA in mature DRG neurons, but mice with γ-actin’s 3’UTR show no axonal GFP mRNA. Peripheral axotomy triggers transport of the β-actin 3’UTR containing transgene mRNA into axons. This GFP-3’β-actin mRNA accumulates in injured PNS axons before activation of the transgene promoter peaks in the DRG. Spinal cord injury also increases axonal GFP signals in mice carrying this transgene without any increase in transgene expression in the DRGs. These data show for the first time that the β-actin 3’UTR is sufficient for axonal localization in both PNS and CNS neurons in vivo. PMID:21994364

  3. Technical advance: stringent control of transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana using the Top10 promoter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J.; Scott, A. C.; Thompson, W. F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We show that the tightly regulated tetracycline-sensitive Top10 promoter system (Weinmann et al. Plant J. 1994, 5, 559-569) is functional in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pure breeding A. thaliana line (JL-tTA/8) was generated which expressed a chimeric fusion of the tetracycline repressor and the activation domain of Herpes simplex virus (tTA), from a single transgenic locus. Plants from this line were crossed with transgenics carrying the ER-targeted green fluorescent protein coding sequence (mGFP5) under control of the Top10 promoter sequence. Progeny from this cross displayed ER-targeted GFP fluorescence throughout the plant, indicating that the tTA-Top10 promoter interaction was functional in A. thaliana. GFP expression was repressed by 100 ng ml-1 tetracycline, an order of magnitude lower than the concentration used previously to repress expression in Nicotiana tabacum. Moreover, the level of GFP expression was controlled by varying the concentration of tetracycline in the medium, allowing a titred regulation of transgenic activity that was previously unavailable in A. thaliana. The kinetics of GFP activity were determined following de-repression of the Top10:mGFP5 transgene, with a visible ER-targeted GFP signal appearing from 24 to 48 h after de-repression.

  4. Measuring gene flow from two birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) field trials using transgenes as tracer markers.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, F; Bellucci, M; Arcioni, S

    2003-06-01

    Genetic engineering is becoming a useful tool in the improvement of plants but concern has been expressed about the potential environmental risks of releasing genetically modified (GM) organisms into the environment. Attention has focused on pollen dispersal as a major issue in the risk assessment of transgenic crop plants. In this study, pollen-mediated dispersal of transgenes via cross-fertilization was examined. Plants of Lotus corniculatus L. transformed with either the Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase gene asnA or the beta-glucuronidase gene uidA, were used as the pollen donor. Nontransgenic plants belonging to the species L. corniculatus L., L. tenuis Waldst. and Kit. ex Willd, and L. pedunculatus Cav., were utilized as recipients. Two experimental fields were established in two areas of central Italy. Plants carrying the uidA gene were partially sterile, therefore only the asnA gene was used as a tracer marker. No transgene flow between L. corniculatus transformants and the nontransgenic L. tenuis and L. pedunculatus plants was detected. As regards nontransgenic L. corniculatus plants, in one location flow of asnA transgene was detected up to 18 m from the 1.8 m2 donor plot. In the other location, pollen dispersal occurred up to 120 m from the 14 m2 pollinating plot.

  5. Meganuclease-assisted generation of stable transgenics in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Renfer, Eduard; Technau, Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a model system used by a rapidly growing research community for comparative genomics, developmental biology and ecology. Here, we describe a microinjection procedure for creating stable transgenic lines in Nematostella based on meganuclease (I-SceI)-assisted integration of a transgenic cassette into the genome. The procedure describes the preparation of the reagents, microinjection of the transgenesis vector and the husbandry of transgenic animals. The microinjection setup differs from those of previously published protocols by the use of a holding capillary mounted on an inverted fluorescence microscope. In one session of injections, a single researcher can microinject up to 1,300 zygotes with a reporter construct digested with the meganuclease I-SceI. Under optimal conditions, fully transgenic heterozygous F1 animals can be obtained within 4-5 months of the injections, with a germ-line transmission efficiency of ∼3%. The method is versatile and, after a short training phase, can be carried out by any researcher with basic training in molecular biology. Flexibility of construct design enables this method to be used for numerous applications, including the functional dissection of cis-regulatory elements, subcellular localization of proteins, detection of protein-binding partners, ectopic expression of genes of interest, lineage tracing and cell-type-specific reporter gene expression.

  6. A two-generation reproduction study with transgenic Bt rice TT51 in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Er Hui; Yu, Zhou; Hu, Jing; Jia, Xu Dong; Xu, Hai Bin

    2014-03-01

    TT51 is a transgenic Bt rice created by fusion a synthetic CryAb/CryAc gene into rice MingHui63. A significant number of animal feeding studies with transgenic crops have been carried out with the rapid development of transgenic crops. However, the evidence is far from identifying whether certain novel transgenic crops possess potential danger for human or animal health after long-term consumption. Rice-based diets, containing 60% ordinary grocery rice, MingHui63 rice or TT51 rice by weight, were fed to two generations of male and female rats in order to determine the potential reproductive effects of TT51. In this study, both clinical performance variables and histopathological responses were examined and compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups on body weights, food consumption, reproductive data and relative organ/body weights. There were some statistically significant differences in hematology and serum chemistry parameters, but no histological abnormalities were seen in the brain, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, stomach, small intestine, thymus, ovaries, uterus, testes and epididymides. Based on the results, under the circumstance of this study TT51 show no significant differences on reproduction performance of rats compared with MingHui63 and the control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transgenic Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Modulates a Developing Cerebellar Inhibitory Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Shaowen; Chen, Lu; Qiao, Xiaoxi; Thompson, Richard F.

    1999-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to promote synapse formation and maturation in neurons of many brain regions, including inhibitory synapses. In the cerebellum, the Golgi cell-granule cell GABAergic synaptic responses undergo developmental transition from slow-decaying to fast-decaying kinetics, which parallels a developmental increase of GABAA receptor α6 subunit expression in the cerebellar granule cells. In culture, BDNF accelerates the expression of GABAA receptor α6 subunit expression in granule cells. Here we examined synaptic GABAA response kinetics in BDNF transgenic mice. The mutant mouse, which carries a BDNF transgene driven by a β-actin promoter, overexpresses BDNF (two- to fivefold increase compared with wild types) in all brain regions. Recordings of the spontaneous GABAA responses indicate that the decay time constant of the GABAergic responses decreases during early postnatal development; this transition is accelerated in the BDNF transgenic mouse. The amplitude of the spontaneous GABAA responses was also larger in the transgenic mouse than in the wild-type mouse. However, the frequency of the spontaneous GABAA responses were not different between the two groups. Our results suggest that BDNF may modulate GABAergic synapse maturation in the cerebellum. PMID:10492009

  8. Technical advance: stringent control of transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana using the Top10 promoter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J.; Scott, A. C.; Thompson, W. F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We show that the tightly regulated tetracycline-sensitive Top10 promoter system (Weinmann et al. Plant J. 1994, 5, 559-569) is functional in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pure breeding A. thaliana line (JL-tTA/8) was generated which expressed a chimeric fusion of the tetracycline repressor and the activation domain of Herpes simplex virus (tTA), from a single transgenic locus. Plants from this line were crossed with transgenics carrying the ER-targeted green fluorescent protein coding sequence (mGFP5) under control of the Top10 promoter sequence. Progeny from this cross displayed ER-targeted GFP fluorescence throughout the plant, indicating that the tTA-Top10 promoter interaction was functional in A. thaliana. GFP expression was repressed by 100 ng ml-1 tetracycline, an order of magnitude lower than the concentration used previously to repress expression in Nicotiana tabacum. Moreover, the level of GFP expression was controlled by varying the concentration of tetracycline in the medium, allowing a titred regulation of transgenic activity that was previously unavailable in A. thaliana. The kinetics of GFP activity were determined following de-repression of the Top10:mGFP5 transgene, with a visible ER-targeted GFP signal appearing from 24 to 48 h after de-repression.

  9. [Detection of the exogenous gene copy number of the transgenic tomato anti-caries vaccine].

    PubMed

    Bai, Guo-hui; Liu, Jian-guo; Tian, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Bai, Peng-yuan; Han, Qi; Gu, Yu; Guan, Xiao-yan; Wang, Hai-hui

    2013-12-01

    To detect the exogenous gene copy number of the transgenic tomato anti-caries vaccine by using the SYBR Green real-time PCR. Recombinant plasmid pEAC10 and pEPC10 were used as standard to detect genome samples of exogenous gene pacA-ctxB and pacP-ctxB by SYBR green fluorescent quantitation, then the average value was calculated as gene copy number. The copy number of the transgenic tomato carrying pacA-ctxB was 1.3 and the pacP-ctxB was 3.2. The transgenic tomato plants which have high stability are low-copy transgenic plants. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (30160086, 81260164), Science and Technical Fund of Guizhou Province (LKZ[2011]41), Project of Technology Innovation Team in Guizhou Province, Leading Academic Discipline Construction Project in Guizhou Province and Excellent Scientific Research Team Cultivation Project in Zunyi Medical College ([2012]12).

  10. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  11. Use of transgenic Aedes aegypti in Brazil: risk perception and assessment.

    PubMed

    Paes de Andrade, Paulo; Aragão, Francisco José Lima; Colli, Walter; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; Finardi-Filho, Flávio; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Lira-Neto, Amaro de Castro; Almeida de Melo, Marcia; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Gorgônio da Nóbrega, Francisco; Delfino de Sousa, Gutemberg; Valicente, Fernando Hercos; Zanettini, Maria Helena Bodanese

    2016-10-01

    The OX513A strain of Aedes aegypti, which was developed by the British company Oxitec, expresses a self-limiting transgene that prevents larvae from developing to adulthood. In April 2014, the Brazilian National Technical Commission on Biosafety completed a risk assessment of OX513A and concluded that the strain did not present new biological risks to humans or the environment and could be released in Brazil. At that point, Brazil became the first country to approve the unconstrained release of a genetically modified mosquito. During the assessment, the commission produced a comprehensive list of - and systematically analysed - the perceived hazards. Such hazards included the potential survival to adulthood of immature stages carrying the transgene - should the transgene fail to be expressed or be turned off by exposure to sufficient environmental tetracycline. Other perceived hazards included the potential allergenicity and/or toxicity of the proteins expressed by the gene, the potential for gene flow or increased transmission of human pathogens and the occupation of vacant breeding sites by other vector species. The Zika epidemic both elevated the perceived importance of Ae. aegypti as a vector - among policy-makers and regulators as well as the general public - and increased concerns over the release of males of the OX513A strain. We have therefore reassessed the potential hazards. We found that release of the transgenic mosquitoes would still be both safe and of great potential value in the control of diseases spread by Ae. aegypti, such as chikungunya, dengue and Zika.

  12. Horticultural characteristics of transgenic tobacco expressing the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, R.; Zimmerman, T.W.; Cordts, J.M.; Footen, K.J. ); Ravelonandro, M. . Station de Pathologie Vegetale)

    1994-09-01

    Wisconsin 38 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf discs were transformed with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101 carrying the rolC gene from A. rhizogenes and NPT II and GUS genes. Shoots that regenerated on kanamycin-containing medium were confirmed as transgenic through GUS assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analyses, and transmission of the foreign genes through the sexual cycle. Transgenic plants were as short as half the height of control plants; were earlier flowering by up to 35 days; and had smaller leaves, shorter internodes, smaller seed capsules, fewer seeds, smaller flowers, and reduced pollen viability. The number of seed capsules, leaf number, and specific root length were similar between transgenic and control plants. Transgenic clones varied in the expression of the rolC-induced growth alterations as did the first generation of seedlings from these clones. Such differences suggested the potential for selecting for different levels of expression. Transformation with the rolC gene presents a potentially useful method of genetically modifying horticultural crops, particularly for flowering date, height, and leaf and flower size. Chemical names used: neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS).

  13. Prototypic chromatin insulator cHS4 protects retroviral transgene from silencing in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J

    2012-06-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) pseudotyped murine leukemia virus (MLV) virions can transduce schistosomes, leading to chromosomal integration of reporter transgenes. To develop VSVG-MLV for functional genomics in schistosomes, the influence of the chicken β-globin cHS4 element, a prototypic chromatin insulator, on transgene expression was examined. Plasmid pLNHX encoding the MLV 5'- and 3'-Long Terminal Repeats flanking the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) was modified to include, within the U3 region of the 3'-LTR, active components of cHS4 insulator, the 250 bp core fused to the 400 bp 3'-region. Cultured larvae of Schistosoma mansoni were transduced with virions from producer cells transfected with control or cHS4-bearing plasmids. Schistosomules transduced with cHS4 virions expressed 2-20 times higher levels of neo than controls, while carrying comparable numbers of integrated proviral transgenes. The findings not only demonstrated that cHS4 was active in schistosomes but also they represent the first report of activity of cHS4 in any Lophotrochozoan species, which has significant implications for evolutionary conservation of heterochromatin regulation. The findings advance prospects for transgenesis in functional genomics of the schistosome genome to discover intervention targets because they provide the means to enhance and extend transgene activity including for vector based RNA interference.

  14. Collective navigation of cargo-carrying swarms

    PubMed Central

    Shklarsh, Adi; Finkelshtein, Alin; Ariel, Gil; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of swarming and collective navigation of micro-organisms, insects, fish, birds and other organisms, as well as multi-agent simulations and to the study of real robots. It is well known that insect swarms can carry cargo. The studies here are motivated by a less well-known phenomenon: cargo transport by bacteria swarms. We begin with a concise review of how bacteria swarms carry natural, micrometre-scale objects larger than the bacteria (e.g. fungal spores) as well as man-made beads and capsules (for drug delivery). A comparison of the trajectories of virtual beads in simulations (using different putative coupling between the virtual beads and the bacteria) with the observed trajectories of transported fungal spores implies the existence of adaptable coupling. Motivated by these observations, we devised new, multi-agent-based studies of cargo transport by agent swarms. As a first step, we extended previous modelling of collective navigation of simple bacteria-inspired agents in complex terrain, using three putative models of agent–cargo coupling. We found that cargo-carrying swarms can navigate efficiently in a complex landscape. We further investigated how the stability, elasticity and other features of agent–cargo bonds influence the collective motion and the transport of the cargo, and found sharp phase shifts and dual successful strategies for cargo delivery. Further understanding of such mechanisms may provide valuable clues to understand cargo-transport by smart swarms of other organisms as well as by man-made swarming robots. PMID:24312731

  15. Carrying Synchronous Voice Data On Asynchronous Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1990-01-01

    Buffers restore synchronism for internal use and permit asynchronism in external transmission. Proposed asynchronous local-area digital communication network (LAN) carries synchronous voice, data, or video signals, or non-real-time asynchronous data signals. Network uses double buffering scheme that reestablishes phase and frequency references at each node in network. Concept demonstrated in token-ring network operating at 80 Mb/s, pending development of equipment operating at planned data rate of 200 Mb/s. Technique generic and used with any LAN as long as protocol offers deterministic (or bonded) access delays and sufficient capacity.

  16. Cost of carrying out clinical diagnostic tests.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, D J; Bingle, J P; Garratt, C J

    1978-01-01

    The total cost of performing diagnostic tests in a hospital laboratory during one year was assessed. The largest single item of expenditure was the cost of the salaries of the technical staff, while the cost of reagents (including radiopharmaceuticals) was relatively small. The total costs of carrying out diagnostic tests are much higher than is often recognised by those who request them. The use of relatively expensive, commercially available assay kits saves time and gives good value for money. It may be worth taking this into account when planning hospital budgets. PMID:647338

  17. Information carrying capacity of a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simidzija, Petar; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the exchange of information in different cosmological backgrounds when sender and receiver are timelike separated and communicate through massless fields (without the exchange of light signals). Remarkably, we show that the dominance of a cosmological constant makes the amount of recoverable information imprinted in the field by the sender extremely resilient: it does not decay in time or with the spatial separation of the sender and receiver, and it actually increases with the rate of expansion of the Universe. This is in stark contrast with the information carried by conventional light signals and with previous results on timelike communication through massless fields in matter-dominated cosmologies.

  18. Co-integration, co-expression and inheritance of unlinked minimal transgene expression cassettes in an apomictic turf and forage grass (Paspalum notatum Flugge).

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Sukhpreet; Altpeter, Fredy

    2008-11-01

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) is an important turf and forage grass in the southeastern United States and other subtropical regions. Biolistic co-transfer of two unlinked, minimal, linear transgene expression cassettes (MCs) into the apomictic bahiagrass cv. Argentine was carried out to evaluate co-integration, quantify co-expression and analyze inheritance to apomictic seed progeny. Gold projectiles were coated with minimal unlinked nptII and bar expression cassettes in a 1:2 molar ratio. Complexity of transgene loci correlated with the amount of DNA used during gene transfer. Transgenic plants displayed a simple nptII integration pattern with 1-4 hybridization signals compared to the non-selected bar gene with 2 to more than 5 hybridization signals per transgenic line. Co-expression of unlinked nptII and bar genes occurred in 19 of the 20 co-transformed lines (95% co-expression frequency). Protein quantification revealed that several lines with complex integration patterns displayed a higher transgene expression than lines with simple transgene integration patterns. Several transgenic lines displayed hybridization signals indicative of concatemerization. Concatemers were confirmed following PCR amplification and sequence analysis of transgene loci. The obligate apomictic bahiagrass cv. Argentine produced uniform seed progeny without segregation of simple or complex transgene loci. NPTII- and PAT-ELISA, as well as herbicide application, confirmed stable expression of the nptII and bar gene at levels similar to the primary transformants. These results demonstrate that biolistic transfer of MCs support stable and high level co-expression of transgenes in bahiagrass.

  19. Metabolic rate of carrying added mass: a function of walking speed, carried mass and mass location.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2014-11-01

    The effort of carrying additional mass at different body locations is important in ergonomics and in designing wearable robotics. We investigate the metabolic rate of carrying a load as a function of its mass, its location on the body and the subject's walking speed. Novel metabolic rate prediction equations for walking while carrying loads at the ankle, knees and back were developed based on experiments where subjects walked on a treadmill at 4, 5 or 6km/h bearing different amounts of added mass (up to 2kg per leg and 22kg for back). Compared to previously reported equations, ours are 7-69% more accurate. Results also show that relative cost for carrying a mass at a distal versus a proximal location changes with speed and mass. Contrary to mass carried on the back, mass attached to the leg cannot be modeled as an increase in body mass.

  20. Stringent and reproducible tetracycline-regulated transgene expression by site-specific insertion at chromosomal loci with pre-characterised induction characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Brough, Rachel; Papanastasiou, Antigoni M; Porter, Andrew CG

    2007-01-01

    Background The ability to regulate transgene expression has many applications, mostly concerning the analysis of gene function. Desirable induction characteristics, such as low un-induced expression, high induced expression and limited cellular heterogeneity, can be seriously impaired by chromosomal position effects at the site of transgene integration. Many clones may therefore need to be screened before one with optimal induction characteristics is identified. Furthermore, such screens must be repeated for each new transgene investigated, and comparisons between clones with different transgenes is complicated by their different integration sites. Results To circumvent these problems we have developed a "screen and insert" strategy in which clones carrying a transgene for a fluorescent reporter are first screened for those with optimal induction characteristics. Site-specific recombination (SSR) is then be used repeatedly to insert any new transgene at the reporter transgene locus of such clones so that optimal induction characteristics are conferred upon it. Here we have tested in a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080) two of many possible implementations of this approach. Clones (e.g. Rht14-10) in which a GFP reporter gene is very stringently regulated by the tetracycline (tet) transactivator (tTA) protein were first identified flow-cytometrically. Transgenes encoding luciferase, I-SceI endonuclease or Rad52 were then inserted by SSR at a LoxP site adjacent to the GFP gene resulting stringent tet-regulated transgene expression. In clone Rht14-10, increases in expression from essentially background levels (+tet) to more than 104-fold above background (-tet) were reproducibly detected after Cre-mediated insertion of either the luciferase or the I-SceI transgenes. Conclusion Although previous methods have made use of SSR to integrate transgenes at defined sites, none has effectively combined this with a pre-selection step to identify integration sites that support

  1. Glucose metabolic gene expression in growth hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Panserat, Stéphane; Kamalam, Biju Sam; Fournier, Jeanne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Woodward, Krista; Devlin, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    Salmonids are generally known to be glucose intolerant. However, previous studies have shown that growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon display modified nutritional regulation of glycolysis and lipogenesis compared to non-transgenic fish, suggesting the potential for better use of glucose in GH transgenic fish. To examine this in detail, GH transgenic and non-transgenic coho salmon were subjected to glucose tolerance test and subsequent metabolic assessments. After intra-peritoneal injection of 250mg/kg glucose, we analysed post-injection kinetics of glycaemia and expression of several key target genes highly involved in glucose homeostasis in muscle and liver tissues. Our data show no significant differences in plasma glucose levels during peak hyperglycaemia (3-6h after injection), demonstrating a similar glucose tolerance between transgenic and non transgenic. However, and unrelated to the hyperglycaemic episode, GH transgenic fish return to a slightly lower basal glycaemia values 24h after injection. Correspondingly, GH transgenic fish exhibited higher mRNA levels of glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in liver, and glucose transporter (GLUT4) in muscle. These data suggest that these metabolic actors may be involved in different glucose use in GH transgenic fish, which would be expected to influence the glucose challenge response. Overall, our data demonstrate that GH transgenic coho salmon may be a pertinent animal model for further study of glucose metabolism in carnivorous fish.

  2. Efficient Generation of Mice with Consistent Transgene Expression by FEEST

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Jiang, Yonghua; Mu, Libing; Liu, Yanbin; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Aiqun; Tang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Luo, Minmin; Yu, Lei; Gao, Shaorong; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models are widely used in biomedical research; however, current techniques for producing transgenic mice are limited due to the unpredictable nature of transgene expression. Here, we report a novel, highly efficient technique for the generation of transgenic mice with single-copy integration of the transgene and guaranteed expression of the gene-of-interest (GOI). We refer to this technique as functionally enriched ES cell transgenics, or FEEST. ES cells harboring an inducible Cre gene enabled the efficient selection of transgenic ES cell clones using hygromycin before Cre-mediated recombination. Expression of the GOI was confirmed by assaying for the GFP after Cre recombination. As a proof-of-principle, we produced a transgenic mouse line containing Cre-activatable tTA (cl-tTA6). This tTA mouse model was able to induce tumor formation when crossed with a transgenic mouse line containing a doxycycline-inducible oncogene. We also showed that the cl-tTA6 mouse is a valuable tool for faithfully recapitulating the clinical course of tumor development. We showed that FEEST can be easily adapted for other genes by preparing a transgenic mouse model of conditionally activatable EGFR L858R. Thus, FEEST is a technique with the potential to generate transgenic mouse models at a genome-wide scale. PMID:26573149

  3. Trait stacking in transgenic crops: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Que, Qiudeng; Chilton, Mary-Dell M; de Fontes, Cheryl M; He, Chengkun; Nuccio, Michael; Zhu, Tong; Wu, Yuexuan; Chen, Jeng S; Shi, Liang

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid increase in the planting of transgenic crops with stacked traits. Most of these products have been formed by conventional breeding, i.e. the crossing of transgenic plant (event) containing individual transgenes with other event(s) containing single or double transgenic traits. Many biotech companies are developing stacked trait products with increasing numbers of insect and herbicide tolerance genes for controlling a broad range of insect pests and weeds. There has also been an increase in development of technologies for molecular stacking of multiple traits in a single transgene locus. In this review we look at the status of stacked trait products, crop trait stacking technologies and the technical challenges we are facing. We also review recent progress in developing technology for assembling large transgene arrays in vitro (molecular stacks), their delivery to crop plants and issues they pose for transgene expression.

  4. Transgene manipulation in zebrafish by using recombinases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Stuart, Gary W

    2004-01-01

    Although much remains to be done, our results to date suggest that efficient and precise genome engineering in zebrafish will be possible in the future by using Cre recombinase and SB transposase in combination with their respective target sites. In this study, we provide the first evidence that Cre recombinase can mediate effective site-specific deletion of transgenes in zebrafish. We found that the efficiency of target site utilization could approach 100%, independent of whether the target site was provided transiently by injection or stably within an integrated transgene. Microinjection of Cre mRNA appeared to be slightly more effective for this purpose than microinjection of Cre-expressing plasmid DNA. Our work has not yet progressed to the point where SB-mediated mobilization of our transgene constructs would be observed. However, a recent report has demonstrated that SB can enhance transgenesis rates sixfold over conventional methods by efficiently mediating multiple single-copy insertion of transgenes into the zebrafish genome (Davidson et al., 2003). Therefore, it seems likely that a combined system should eventually allow both SB-mediated transgene mobilization and Cre-mediated transgene modification. Our goal is to validate methods for the precise reengineering of the zebrafish genome by using a combination of Cre-loxP and SB transposon systems. These methods can be used to delete, replace, or mobilize large pieces of DNA or to modify the genome only when and where required by the investigator. For example, it should be possible to deliver particular RNAi genes to well-expressed chromosomal loci and then exchange them easily with alternative RNAi genes for the specific suppression of alternative targets. As a nonviral vector for gene therapy, the transposon component allows for the possibility of highly efficient integration, whereas the Cre-loxP component can target the integration and/or exchange of foreign DNA into specific sites within the genome. The

  5. Adverse drug reaction cards carried by patients.

    PubMed

    Hannaford, P C

    1986-04-26

    Five hundred patients were asked whether they were allergic to any medicines. The description given of any stated reaction was assessed to see whether an important adverse drug reaction was likely to have occurred. The patients' records were also examined for collaborative evidence. Poor documentation often made it difficult to confirm the patient's claim of drug sensitivity. A total of 89 patients may have suffered from important adverse reactions to 113 drugs. Full documentation of adverse reactions is important, but only eight patients carried any information to warn others of their sensitivities. Patients should be asked about any drug sensitivities and, if appropriate, given written confirmation of them. A quick, simple method of doing this would be to provide patients' with a plastic card, similar to a credit card, with instructions and details of the reaction written on it with an indelible pen.

  6. Economic growth, carrying capacity, and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Arrow, K.; Bolin, B.; Costanza, R.; Dasgupta, P.; Folke, C.; Maeler, K.G.; Holling, C.S.; Jansson, B.O.; Levin, S.; Perrings, C.

    1995-04-28

    National and international economic policy has usually ignored the environment. In areas where the environment is beginning to impinge on policy, as in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), it remains a tangential concern, and the presumption is often made that economic growth and economic liberalization (including the liberalization of international trade) are, in some sense, good for the environment. This notion has meant that economy-wide policy reforms designed to promote growth and liberalization have been encouraged with little regard to their environmental consequences, presumably on the assumption that these consequences would either take care of themselves or could be dealt with separately. In this article, we discuss the relation between economic growth and environmental quality, and the link between economic activity and the carrying capacity and resilience of the environment.

  7. Assessment of peanut quality and compositional characteristics among transgenic sclerotinia blight-resistant and non-transgenic susceptible cultivars.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiahuai; Telenko, Darcy E P; Phipps, Patrick M; Grabau, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-06

    This study presents the results of a comparison that includes an analysis of variance and a canonical discriminant analysis to determine compositional equivalence and similarity between transgenic, sclerotinia blight-resistant and non-transgenic, susceptible cultivars of peanut in 3 years of field trials. Three Virginia-type cultivars (NC 7, Wilson, and Perry) and their corresponding transgenic lines (N70, W73, and P39) with a barley oxalate oxidase gene were analyzed for differences in key mineral nutrients, fatty acid components, hay constituents, and grade characteristics. Results from both analyses demonstrated that transgenic lines were compositionally similar to their non-transgenic parent cultivar in all factors as well as market-grade characteristics and nutritional value. Transgenic lines expressing oxalate oxidase for resistance to sclerotinia blight were substantially equivalent to their non-transgenic parent cultivar in quality and compositional characteristics.

  8. Co-transforming bar and CsLEA enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress in transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiyu; Duan, Zhen; Zhang, Daiyu; Zhang, Jianquan; Di, Hongyan; Wu, Fan; Wang, Yanrong

    2016-03-25

    Drought and high salinity are two major abiotic factors that restrict alfalfa productivity. A dehydrin protein, CsLEA, from the desert grass Cleistogenes songorica was transformed into alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using the bar gene as a selectable marker, and the drought and salt stress tolerances of the transgenic plants were assessed. Thirty-nine of 119 transformants were positive, as screened by Basta, and further molecularly authenticated using PCR and RT-PCR. Phenotype observations revealed that the transgenic plants grew better than the wild-type (WT) plants after 15d of drought stress and 10d of salt stress: the leaves of WT alfalfa turned yellow, whereas the transgenic alfalfa leaves only wilted; after rewatering, the transgenic plants returned to a normal state, though the WT plants could not be restored. Evaluation of physiologic and biochemical indices during drought and salt stresses showed a relatively lower Na(+) content in the leaves of the transgenic plants, which would reduce toxic ion effects. In addition, the transgenic plants were able to maintain a higher relative water content (RWC), higher shoot biomass, fewer photosystem changes, decreased membrane injury, and a lower level of osmotic stress injury. These results demonstrate that overexpression of the CsLEA gene can enhance the drought and salt tolerance of transgenic alfalfa; in addition, carrying the bar gene in the genome may increase herbicide resistance.

  9. [Transgenic plants as medicine production systems].

    PubMed

    Okada, Y

    1997-10-01

    Transgenic plants are emerging as an important system for the expression of many recombinant proteins, especially those intended for therapeutic purpose. The production of foreign proteins in plants has several advantages. In terms of required equipment and cost, mass production in plants is far easier to achieve than techniques involving animal cells. Successful production of several proteins in plants, including human serum albumin, haemoglobin, monoclonal antibodies, viral antigens (vaccines), enkephalin, and trichosanthin, has been reported. Particularly, the demonstration that vaccine antigens can be produced in plants in their native, immunogenic forms opens exciting possibilities for the "bio-farming" of vaccines. If the antigens are orally active, food-based "edible vaccines" could allow economical production. In this review, I will discuss the progress that has been made by several groups in what is now an expanding area of medicine research that utilizes transgenic plants.

  10. Ambroxol effects in glucocerebrosidase and α-synuclein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Migdalska-Richards, Anna; Daly, Liam; Bezard, Erwan; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2016-11-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase 1 gene that result in deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Both homozygous and heterozygous glucocerebrosidase 1 mutations confer an increased risk for developing Parkinson disease. Current estimates indicate that 10 to 25% of Parkinson patients carry glucocerebrosidase 1 mutations. Ambroxol is a small molecule chaperone that has been shown to increase glucocerebrosidase activity in vitro. This study investigated the effect of ambroxol treatment on glucocerebrosidase activity and on α-synuclein and phosphorylated α-synuclein protein levels in mice. Mice were treated with ambroxol for 12 days. After the treatment, glucocerebrosidase activity was measured in the mouse brain lysates. The brain lysates were also analyzed for α-synuclein and phosphorylated α-synuclein protein levels. Ambroxol treatment resulted in increased brain glucocerebrosidase activity in (1) wild-type mice, (2) transgenic mice expressing the heterozygous L444P mutation in the murine glucocerebrosidase 1 gene, and (3) transgenic mice overexpressing human α-synuclein. Furthermore, in the mice overexpressing human α-synuclein, ambroxol treatment decreased both α-synuclein and phosphorylated α-synuclein protein levels. Our work supports the proposition that ambroxol should be further investigated as a potential novel disease-modifying therapy for treatment of Parkinson disease and neuronopathic Gaucher disease to increase glucocerebrosidase activity and decrease α-synuclein and phosphorylated α-synuclein protein levels. Ann Neurol 2016;80:766-775. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  11. Optimization of Biofuel Production From Transgenic Microalgae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-27

    photosynthesis by up to 80%. We have also completed the proteome analysis for the diatom Cyclotella when induced to accumulate oil after silicon...identification of several proteins when over-expressed in transgenic algae enhance photosynthesis by up to 80%. We have also completed the proteome...respiration Photosynthesis /Calvin Cycle Figure 1. Proteins that change most in abundance following glucose-induced oil production. Many of

  12. An ovine transgenic Huntington's disease model

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Bawden, C. Simon; Rudiger, Skye R.; McLaughlan, Clive J.; Reid, Suzanne J.; Waldvogel, Henry J.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.; Walker, Simon K.; Kelly, Jennifer M.; Webb, Graham C.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Rees, Mark I.; Snell, Russell G.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin (HTT) gene [Huntington's Disease Collaborative Research Group (1993) A novel gene containing a trinucleotide repeat that is expanded and unstable on Huntington's disease chromosomes. The Huntington's Disease Collaborative Research Group. Cell, 72, 971–983]. Despite identification of the gene in 1993, the underlying life-long disease process and effective treatments to prevent or delay it remain elusive. In an effort to fast-track treatment strategies for HD into clinical trials, we have developed a new large-animal HD transgenic ovine model. Sheep, Ovis aries L., were selected because the developmental pattern of the ovine basal ganglia and cortex (the regions primarily affected in HD) is similar to the analogous regions of the human brain. Microinjection of a full-length human HTT cDNA containing 73 polyglutamine repeats under the control of the human promotor resulted in six transgenic founders varying in copy number of the transgene. Analysis of offspring (at 1 and 7 months of age) from one of the founders showed robust expression of the full-length human HTT protein in both CNS and non-CNS tissue. Further, preliminary immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the organization of the caudate nucleus and putamen and revealed decreased expression of medium size spiny neuron marker DARPP-32 at 7 months of age. It is anticipated that this novel transgenic animal will represent a practical model for drug/clinical trials and surgical interventions especially aimed at delaying or preventing HD initiation. New sequence accession number for ovine HTT mRNA: FJ457100. PMID:20154343

  13. Transgenic Animal Models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chan, Anthony W S

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that currently has no cure. In order to develop effective treatment, an understanding of HD pathogenesis and the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of novel medications with the aid of animal models are critical steps. Transgenic animals sharing similar genetic defects that lead to HD have provided important discoveries in HD mechanisms that cell models are not able to replicate, which include psychiatric impairment, cognitive behavioral impact, and motor functions. Although transgenic HD rodent models have been widely used in HD research, it is clear that an animal model with comparable physiology to man, similar genetic defects that lead to HD, and the ability to develop similar cognitive and behavioral impairments is critical for explaining HD pathogenesis and the development of cures. Compared to HD rodents, HD transgenic nonhuman primates have not only developed comparable neuropathology but also present HD clinical features such as rigidity, seizure, dystonia, bradykinesia, and chorea that no other animal model has been able to replicate. Distinctive degenerating neurons and the accumulation of neuropil aggregates observed in HD monkey brain strongly support the hypothesis that the unique neuropathogenic events seen in HD monkey brain recapitulate HD in man. The latest development of transgenic HD primates has opened a new era of animal modeling that better represents human genetic disorders such as HD, which will accelerate the development of diagnostic tools and identifying novel biomarkers through longitudinal studies including gene expression and metabolite profiling, and noninvasive imaging. Furthermore, novel treatments with predictable efficacy in human patients can be developed using HD monkeys because of comparable neuropathology and clinical features.

  14. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur.

    PubMed

    Klebig, M L; Wilkinson, J E; Geisler, J G; Woychik, R P

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (Ay) or viable yellow (Avy) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant "obese yellow" a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants.

  15. Expression of rice thaumatin-like protein gene in transgenic banana plants enhances resistance to fusarium wilt.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, F; Sariah, M; Maziah, M

    2012-02-01

    The possibility of controlling Fusarium wilt--caused by Fusarium oxysporum sp. cubensec (race 4)--was investigated by genetic engineering of banana plants for constitutive expression of rice thaumatin-like protein (tlp) gene. Transgene was introduced to cauliflower-like bodies' cluster, induced from meristemic parts of male inflorescences, using particle bombardment with plasmid carrying a rice tlp gene driving by the CaMV 35S promoter. Hygromycin B was used as the selection reagent. The presence and integration of rice tlp gene in genomic DNA confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. RT-PCR revealed the expression of transgene in leaf and root tissues in transformants. Bioassay of transgenic banana plants challenged with Fusarium wilt pathogen showed that expression of TLP enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum sp. cubensec (race 4) compared to control plants.

  16. Germline transmission of a novel rat embryonic stem cell line derived from transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Men, Hongsheng; Bauer, Beth A; Bryda, Elizabeth C

    2012-09-20

    Germline-competent rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines are important resources for the creation of mutant rat models using ES-cell-based gene targeting technology. The ability to isolate germline-competent ES cell lines from any rat strain, including genetically modified strains, would allow for more sophisticated genetic manipulations without extensive breeding. Sprague Dawley (SD) males carrying an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene were used as the founder animals for the derivation of ES cell lines. A number of ES cell lines were established and subjected to rigorous quality control testing that included assessment of pluripotency factor expression, karyotype analysis, and pathogen/sterility testing. Two male ES cell lines, SD-Tg.EC1/Rrrc and SD-Tg.EC8/Rrrc, were injected into blastocysts recovered from a cross of Dark Agouti (DA) males with SD females. Resulting chimeric animals were bred with wild-type SD mates to verify the germline transmissibility of the ES cell lines by identifying pups carrying the ES cell line-derived EGFP transgene. While both ES cell lines gave rise to chimeric animals, only SD-Tg.EC1 was germline competent. This confirms the feasibility of deriving germline-competent ES cell lines from transgenic rat strains and provides a novel ES cell line with a stable green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter for future genetic manipulations to create new rat models.

  17. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is attenuated in male glutamate-cysteine ligase transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Botta, Dianne; Shi, Shengli; White, Collin C; Dabrowski, Michael J; Keener, Cassie L; Srinouanprachanh, Sengkeo L; Farin, Federico M; Ware, Carol B; Ladiges, Warren C; Pierce, Robert H; Fausto, Nelson; Kavanagh, Terrance J

    2006-09-29

    Acetaminophen overdose is a leading cause of drug-related acute liver failure in the United States. Glutathione, a tripeptide antioxidant protects cells against oxidative damage from reactive oxygen species and plays a crucial role in the detoxification of xenobiotics, including acetaminophen. Glutathione is synthesized in a two-step enzymatic reaction. Glutamate-cysteine ligase carries out the rate-limiting and first step in glutathione synthesis. We have generated C57Bl/6 mice that conditionally overexpress glutamate-cysteine ligase, and report here their resistance to acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Indices of liver injury included histopathology and serum alanine aminotransferase activity. Male transgenic mice induced to overexpress glutamate-cysteine ligase exhibited resistance to acetaminophen-induced liver injury when compared with acetaminophen-treated male mice carrying, but not expressing glutamate-cysteine ligase transgenes, or to female glutamate-cysteine ligase transgenic mice. We conclude that glutamate-cysteine ligase activity is an important factor in determining acetaminophen-induced liver injury in C57Bl/6 male mice. Because people are known to vary in their glutamate-cysteine ligase activity, this enzyme may also be an important determinant of sensitivity to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in humans.

  18. Transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase-9 augments monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in mice

    PubMed Central

    George, Joseph; D’Armiento, Jeanine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by intimal lesions, right ventricular hypertrophy, and adventitial thickening of pulmonary arteries with progressive pulmonary hypertension. This investigation was aimed to examine the effects of transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the pathogenesis of PAH. Methods PAH was induced using serial subcutaneous administration of monocrotaline (MCT). Right ventricular pressure was measured through the right jugular vein using a 1.4F Millar Mikro-tip catheter-transducer. Zymography, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) were carried out for MMP-9. Immunohistochemistry was performed for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Mac-3 antigen. Results Measurement of right ventricular pressure demonstrated 2.5-fold and 3.7-fold elevation after the administration of MCT in wild-type and MMP-9 transgenic mice, respectively. Zymography, western blotting, and qRT-PCR depicted increased activity and expression of MMP-9 after treatment with MCT, which were augmented in transgenic mice. There was marked pulmonary inflammation with extensive infiltration of mononuclear cells, which was more intense in MMP-9 transgenic mice. SMA and Mac-3 staining demonstrated hypertrophy of pulmonary arteries with occlusion of precapillary vessels and extensive infiltration of macrophages, respectively. All these changes were aggravated in MCT-treated MMP-9 transgenic mice when compared to normal littermates. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the MCT-induced PAH in mouse is a reproducible and potentially valuable animal model for the human disease. Our results further demonstrated that MMP-9 plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of PAH and effective blocking of MMP-9 could provide an option in the therapeutic intervention of human PAH. PMID:21063214

  19. Transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase-9 augments monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    George, Joseph; D'Armiento, Jeanine

    2011-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by intimal lesions, right ventricular hypertrophy, and adventitial thickening of pulmonary arteries with progressive pulmonary hypertension. This investigation was aimed to examine the effects of transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the pathogenesis of PAH. PAH was induced using serial subcutaneous administration of monocrotaline (MCT). Right ventricular pressure was measured through the right jugular vein using a 1.4F Millar Mikro-tip catheter-transducer. Zymography, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) were carried out for MMP-9. Immunohistochemistry was performed for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Mac-3 antigen. Measurement of right ventricular pressure demonstrated 2.5-fold and 3.7-fold elevation after the administration of MCT in wild-type and MMP-9 transgenic mice, respectively. Zymography, western blotting, and qRT-PCR depicted increased activity and expression of MMP-9 after treatment with MCT, which were augmented in transgenic mice. There was marked pulmonary inflammation with extensive infiltration of mononuclear cells, which was more intense in MMP-9 transgenic mice. SMA and Mac-3 staining demonstrated hypertrophy of pulmonary arteries with occlusion of precapillary vessels and extensive infiltration of macrophages, respectively. All these changes were aggravated in MCT-treated MMP-9 transgenic mice when compared to normal littermates. Our study demonstrated that the MCT-induced PAH in mouse is a reproducible and potentially valuable animal model for the human disease. Our results further demonstrated that MMP-9 plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of PAH and effective blocking of MMP-9 could provide an option in the therapeutic intervention of human PAH.

  20. Overexpression of defense response genes in transgenic wheat enhances resistance to Fusarium head blight

    PubMed Central

    Mackintosh, Caroline A.; Lewis, Janet; Radmer, Lorien E.; Shin, Sanghyun; Heinen, Shane J.; Smith, Lisa A.; Wyckoff, Meagen N.; Dill-Macky, Ruth; Evans, Conrad K.; Kravchenko, Sasha; Baldridge, Gerald D.; Zeyen, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat, caused by Fusarium graminearum and other Fusarium species, is a major disease problem for wheat production worldwide. To combat this problem, large-scale breeding efforts have been established. Although progress has been made through standard breeding approaches, the level of resistance attained is insufficient to withstand epidemic conditions. Genetic engineering provides an alternative approach to enhance the level of resistance. Many defense response genes are induced in wheat during F. graminearum infection and may play a role in reducing FHB. The objectives of this study were (1) to develop transgenic wheat overexpressing the defense response genes α-1-purothionin, thaumatin-like protein 1 (tlp-1), and β-1,3-glucanase; and (2) to test the resultant transgenic wheat lines against F. graminearum infection under greenhouse and field conditions. Using the wheat cultivar Bobwhite, we developed one, two, and four lines carrying the α-1-purothionin, tlp-1, and β-1,3-glucanase transgenes, respectively, that had statistically significant reductions in FHB severity in greenhouse evaluations. We tested these seven transgenic lines under field conditions for percent FHB disease severity, deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin accumulation, and percent visually scabby kernels (VSK). Six of the seven lines differed from the nontransgenic parental Bobwhite line for at least one of the disease traits. A β-1,3-glucanase transgenic line had enhanced resistance, showing lower FHB severity, DON concentration, and percent VSK compared to Bobwhite. Taken together, the results showed that overexpression of defense response genes in wheat could enhance the FHB resistance in both greenhouse and field conditions. PMID:17103001

  1. Comparison of acetaminophen toxicity in primary hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice with different appolipoprotein E alleles.

    PubMed

    Mezera, V; Kucera, O; Moravcova, A; Peterova, E; Rousar, T; Rychtrmoc, D; Sobotka, O; Cervinkova, Z

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor, important for combating electrophilic and oxidative stress in the liver and other organs. This encompasses detoxification of hepatotoxic drugs, including acetaminophen (APAP). Recently, an association between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype and Nrf2 expression was described. We compared the toxicity of APAP on primary culture hepatocytes isolated from transgenic mice carrying two different human ApoE alleles and wild-type controls. The cells were exposed to APAP in concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mM for up to 24 hours. APAP led to a dose-dependent hepatotoxicity from 1 mM after 16 h exposure in all mice tested. The toxicity was higher in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls and most pronounced in ApoE3 mice. Concurrently, there was a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, especially in ApoE3 hepatocytes. The formation of reactive oxygen species was increased after 24 hours with 2.5 mM APAP in hepatocytes of all strains tested, with the highest increase being in the ApoE3 genotype. The activity of caspases 3 and 7 did not differ among groups and was minimal after 24 hour incubation with 4 mM APAP. We observed higher lipid accumulation in hepatocytes isolated from both transgenic strains than in wild-type controls. The expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was higher in ApoE3 than in ApoE4 hepatocytes and some of these genes were induced by APAP treatment. In conclusion, transgenic mice with ApoE4 and ApoE3 alleles displayed higher susceptibility to acute APAP toxicity in vitro than wild-type mice. Of the two transgenic genotypes tested, ApoE3 allele carriers were more prone to injury.

  2. Impact of the ahas transgene and of herbicides associated with the soybean crop on soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rosinei Aparecida; Babujia, Letícia Carlos; Silva, Adriana Pereira; de Fátima Guimarães, Maria; Arias, Carlos Arrabal; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-10-01

    Although Brazil has recently reached the position as the second largest producer of genetically modified soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], there are few reports on the effects of transgenic crops and the associated use of specific herbicides on soil microbial communities, both under the edaphoclimatic conditions in Brazil, and in other producer regions in the southern hemisphere. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of transgenic soybean containing the ahas gene conferring resistance to herbicides of the imidazolinone group, and of the herbicides associated with transgenic soybeans on the soil microbial community. Twenty field experiments were carried out during three growing seasons (summer of 2006/2007, short-season of 2007 and summer of 2007/2008), in nine municipalities located in six Brazilian states and in the Federal District. The experiments were conducted using a completely randomized block design with four replicates and three treatments: (1) conventional (non-transgenic) soybean cultivar Conquista with conventional herbicides (bentazone + acifluorfen-sodium and other herbicides, depending on the level of infestation in each region); (2) near-isogenic transgenic Cultivance (CV127) containing the ahas gene, with conventional herbicides; (3) transgenic Cultivance with specific herbicide of the imidazolinone group (imazapyr). As the objective of the study was to verify impacts of the transgene and herbicides on the soil microbial community of the whole area and not only a punctual rhizospheric effects, samples were taken at the 0-10 cm layer prior to cropping and at R2 soybean growth stage, between plant rows. Quantitative (microbial biomass C and N, MB-C and MB-N) and qualitative (DGGE of the 16S rDNA region) parameters of soil microbial community were evaluated. No qualitative or quantitative differences were found that could be attributed to the transgene ahas. A comparison of Cultivance soybean with conventional and imidazolinone

  3. Transgene mobilization and regulatory uncertainty for non-GE fruit products of transgenic rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Haroldsen, Victor M; Chi-Ham, Cecilia L; Bennett, Alan B

    2012-10-31

    Genetically engineered (GE) rootstocks may offer some advantages for biotechnology applications especially in woody perennial crops such as grape or walnut. Transgrafting combines horticultural grafting practices with modern GE methods for crop improvement. Here, a non-GE conventional scion (upper stem portion) is grafted onto a transgenic GE rootstock. Thus, the scion does not contain the genetic modification present in the rootstock genome. We examined transgene presence in walnut and tomato GE rootstocks and non-GE fruit-bearing scions. Mobilization of transgene DNA, protein, and mRNA across the graft was not detected. Though transgenic siRNA mobilization was not observed in grafted tomatoes or walnut scions, transgenic siRNA signal was detected in walnut kernels. Prospective benefits from transgrafted plants include minimized risk of GE pollen flow (Lev-Yadun and Sederoff, 2001), possible use of more than one scion per approved GE rootstock which could help curb the estimated US$136 million (CropLife International, 2011) cost to bring a GE crop to international markets, as well as potential for improved consumer and market acceptance since the consumable product is not itself GE. Thus, transgrafting provides an alternative option for agricultural industries wishing to expand their biotechnology portfolio.

  4. Characterization of a Staphylococcal Plasmid Related to pUB110 and Carrying Two Novel Genes, vatC and vgbB, Encoding Resistance to Streptogramins A and B and Similar Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Allignet, Jeanine; Liassine, Nadia; El Solh, Névine

    1998-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced a plasmid, named pIP1714 (4,978 bp), which specifies resistance to streptogramins A and B and the mixture of these compounds. pIP1714 was isolated from a Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. cohnii strain found in the environment of a hospital where pristinamycin was extensively used. Resistance to both compounds and related antibiotics is encoded by two novel, probably cotranscribed genes, (i) vatC, encoding a 212-amino-acid (aa) acetyltransferase that inactivates streptogramin A and that exhibits 58.2 to 69.8% aa identity with the Vat, VatB, and SatA proteins, and (ii) vgbB, encoding a 295-aa lactonase that inactivates streptogramin B and that shows 67% aa identity with the Vgb lactonase. pIP1714 includes a 2,985-bp fragment also found in two rolling-circle replication and mobilizable plasmids, pUB110 and pBC16, from gram-positive bacteria. In all three plasmids, the common fragment was delimited by two direct repeats of four nucleotides (GGGC) and included (i) putative genes closely related to repB, which encodes a replication protein, and to pre(mob), which encodes a protein required for conjugative mobilization and site-specific recombination, and (ii) sequences very similar to the double- and single-strand origins (dso, ssoU) and the recombination site, RSA. The antibiotic resistance genes repB and pre(mob) carried by each of these plasmids were found in the same transcriptional orientation. PMID:9661023

  5. The expression of intact and mutant human apoAI/CIII/AIV/AV gene cluster in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Wei, Yusheng; Huang, Yue; Liu, Depei; Liu, Guang; Wu, Min; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Qingjun; Zhang, Zhuqin; Zhang, Ran; Liang, Chihchuan

    2005-04-01

    The apoAI/CIII/AIV gene cluster is involved in lipid metabolism and has a complex pattern of gene expression modulated by a common regulatory element, the apoCIII enhancer. A new member of this cluster, apolipoprotein (apo) AV, has recently been discovered as a novel modifier in triglyceride metabolism. To determine the expression of all four apo genes in combination and, most importantly, whether the transcription of apoAV is coregulated by the apoCIII enhancer in the cluster, we generated an intact transgenic line carrying the 116-kb human apoAI/CIII/AIV/AV gene cluster and a mutant transgenic line in which the apoCIII enhancer was deleted from the 116-kb structure. We demonstrated that the apoCIII enhancer regulated hepatic and intestinal apoAI, apoCIII, and apoAIV expression; however, it did not direct the newly identified apoAV in the cluster. Furthermore, human apo genes displayed integrated position-independent expression and a closer approximation of copy number-dependent expression in the intact transgenic mice. Because apoCIII and apoAV play opposite roles in triglyceride homeostasis, we analyzed the lipid profiles in our transgenic mice to assess the effects of human apoAI gene cluster expression on lipid metabolism. The triglyceride level was elevated in intact transgenic mice but decreased in mutant ones compared with nontransgenic mice. In addition, the expression of human apoAI and apoAIV elevated high density lipoprotein cholesterol in transgenic mice fed an atherogenic diet. In conclusion, our studies with human apoAI/CIII/AIV/AV gene cluster transgenic models showed that the apoCIII enhancer regulated expression of apoAI, apo-CIII, and apoAIV but not apoAV in vivo and showed the influences of expression of the entire cluster on lipid metabolism.

  6. Arsenic biotransformation and volatilization in transgenic rice

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiang-Yan; Qin, Jie; Wang, Li-Hong; Duan, Gui-Lan; Sun, Guo-Xin; Wu, Hui-Lan; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Ling, Hong-Qing; Rosen, Barry P.; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Biotransformation of arsenic includes oxidation, reduction, methylation and conversion to more complex organic arsenicals. Members of the class of arsenite [As(III)] S-adenosylmethyltransferase enzymes catalyze As(III) methylation to a variety of mono-, di- and trimethylated species, some of which are less toxic than As(III) itself. However, no methyltransferase gene has been identified in plants. Here, an arsM gene from the soil bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris was expressed in Japonica rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar Nipponbare, and the transgenic rice produced methylated arsenic species, which were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Both monomethylarsenate [MAs(V)] and dimethylarsenate [DMAs(V)] were detected in the root and shoot of transgenic rice. After 12-d exposure to As(III), the transgenic rice gave off 10-fold more volatile arsenicals. The present study demonstrates that expression of an arsM gene in rice induces arsenic methylation and volatilization, providing a potential stratagem for phytoremediation theoretically. PMID:21517874

  7. Using empirical data to model transgene dispersal.

    PubMed Central

    Meagher, T R; Belanger, F C; Day, P R

    2003-01-01

    One element of the current public debate about genetically modified crops is that gene flow from transgenic cultivars into surrounding weed populations will lead to more problematic weeds, particularly for traits such as herbicide resistance. Evolutionary biologists can inform this debate by providing accurate estimates of gene flow potential and subsequent ecological performance of resulting hybrids. We develop a model for gene flow incorporating exponential distance and directional effects to be applied to windpollinated species. This model is applied to previously published data on gene flow in experimental plots of Agrostis stolonifera L. (creeping bentgrass), which assessed gene flow from transgenic plants resistant to the herbicide glufosinate to surrounding non-transgenic plants. Our results show that although pollen dispersal can be limited in some sites, it may be extensive in others, depending on local conditions such as exposure to wind. Thus, hybridization under field conditions is likely to occur. Given the nature of the herbicide resistance trait, we regard this trait as unlikely to persist in the absence of herbicide, and suggest that the ecological consequences of such gene flow are likely to be minimal. PMID:12831482

  8. Using empirical data to model transgene dispersal.

    PubMed

    Meagher, T R; Belanger, F C; Day, P R

    2003-06-29

    One element of the current public debate about genetically modified crops is that gene flow from transgenic cultivars into surrounding weed populations will lead to more problematic weeds, particularly for traits such as herbicide resistance. Evolutionary biologists can inform this debate by providing accurate estimates of gene flow potential and subsequent ecological performance of resulting hybrids. We develop a model for gene flow incorporating exponential distance and directional effects to be applied to windpollinated species. This model is applied to previously published data on gene flow in experimental plots of Agrostis stolonifera L. (creeping bentgrass), which assessed gene flow from transgenic plants resistant to the herbicide glufosinate to surrounding non-transgenic plants. Our results show that although pollen dispersal can be limited in some sites, it may be extensive in others, depending on local conditions such as exposure to wind. Thus, hybridization under field conditions is likely to occur. Given the nature of the herbicide resistance trait, we regard this trait as unlikely to persist in the absence of herbicide, and suggest that the ecological consequences of such gene flow are likely to be minimal.

  9. Transgenic sorghum plants via microprojectile bombardment.

    PubMed

    Casas, A M; Kononowicz, A K; Zehr, U B; Tomes, D T; Axtell, J D; Butler, L G; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M

    1993-12-01

    Transgenic sorghum plants have been obtained after microprojectile bombardment of immature zygotic embryos of a drought-resistant sorghum cultivar, P898012. DNA delivery parameters were optimized based on transient expression of R and C1 maize anthocyanin regulatory elements in scutellar cells. The protocol for obtaining transgenic plants consists of the delivery of the bar gene to immature zygotic embryos and the imposition of bialaphos selection pressure at various stages during culture, from induction of somatic embryogenesis to rooting of regenerated plantlets. One in about every 350 embryos produced embryogenic tissues that survived bialaphos treatment; six transformed callus lines were obtained from three of the eight sorghum cultivars used in this research. Transgenic (T0) plants were obtained from cultivar P898012 (two independent transformation events). The presence of the bar and uidA genes in the T0 plants was confirmed by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase activity was detected in extracts of the T0 plants. These plants were resistant to local application of the herbicide Ignite/Basta, and the resistance was inherited in T1 plants as a single dominant locus.

  10. Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a MAR element in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Burkov, I A; Serova, I A; Battulin, N R; Smirnov, A V; Babkin, I V; Andreeva, L E; Dvoryanchikov, G A; Serov, O L

    2013-10-01

    Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under the control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a matrix attachment region (MAR) element from the Drosophila histone 1 gene was studied in four and eight transgenic mouse lines, respectively. Of the four transgenic lines carrying the transgene without MAR, three had correct tissues-specific expression of the hGM-CSF gene in the mammary gland only and no signs of cell mosaicism. The concentration of hGM-CSF in the milk of transgenic females varied from 1.9 to 14 μg/ml. One line presented hGM-CSF in the blood serum, indicating ectopic expression. The values of secretion of hGM-CSF in milk of 6 transgenic lines carrying the transgene with MAR varied from 0.05 to 0.7 μg/ml, and two of these did not express hGM-CSF. Three of the four examined animals from lines of this group showed ectopic expression of the hGM-CSF gene, as determined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses, as well as the presence of hGM-CSF in the blood serum. Mosaic expression of the hGM-CSF gene in mammary epithelial cells was specific to all examined transgenic mice carrying the transgene with MAR but was never observed in the transgenic mice without MAR. The mosaic expression was not dependent on transgene copy number. Thus, the expected "protective or enhancer effect" from the MAR element on the hGM-CSF gene expression was not observed.

  11. Safety Evaluation of Transgenic Tilapia with Accelerated Growth.

    PubMed

    Guillén; Berlanga; Valenzuela; Morales; Toledo; Estrada; Puentes; Hayes; de la Fuente J

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in modern marine biotechnology have permitted the generation of new strains of economically important fish species through the transfer of growth hormone genes. These transgenic fish strains show improved growth performance and therefore constitute a better alternative for aquaculture programs. Recently, we have obtained a transgenic tilapia line with accelerated growth. However, before introducing this line into Cuban aquaculture, environmental and food safety assessment was required by national authorities. Experiments were performed to evaluate the behavior of transgenic tilapia in comparison to wild tilapia as a way to assess the environmental impact of introducing transgenic tilapia into Cuban aquaculture. Studies were also conducted to evaluate, according to the principle of substantial equivalence, the safety of consuming transgenic tilapia as food. Behavior studies showed that transgenic tilapia had a lower feeding motivation and dominance status than controls. Food safety assessment indicated that tilapia growth hormone has no biological activity when administered to nonhuman primates. Furthermore, no effects were detected in human healthy volunteers after the consumption of transgenic tilapia. These results showed, at least under the conditions found in Cuba, no environmental implications for the introduction of this transgenic tilapia line and the safety in the consumption of tiGH-transgenic tilapia as an alternative feeding source for humans. These results support the culture and consumption of these transgenic tilapia.

  12. Transgenics and vertebrate cloning as tools for species conservation.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, David

    2006-06-01

    It has been suggested that transgenics and vertebrate cloning have a role to play in conservation. Now is the time to evaluate their risks and benefits, before these technologies are widely implemented in our field. Direct risks of transgenics include escape and introgression of transgenes into wild populations; weedy invasion by transgenic organisms; toxicity or pathogenicity of engineered organisms and their products; and human error in the field testing and tracking of transgenic organisms. Indirect risks include environmental effects of increased herbicide use; the danger that engineered organisms may aid the development of bioweapons; the likelihood that gene patenting will lead to the privatization of natural resources; and the diversion of support from less glamorous forms of conservation. Formal risk assessments are commonly used to evaluate transgenic procedures, but our incomplete understanding of both ecosystem processes and the action of transgenes renders most of these assessments scientifically and socially unjustified. Nevertheless, a few, low-risk applications of transgenics may be possible: for example, "super-sterile" ornamental cultivars. Vertebrate cloning poses little risk to the environment, but it can consume scarce conservation resources, and its chances of success in preserving species seem poor To date, the conservation benefits of transgenics and vertebrate cloning remain entirely theoretical, but many of the risks are known and documented. Conservation biologists should devote their research and energies to the established methods of conservation, none of which require transgenics or vertebrate cloning.

  13. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Hishiro T.; Yamaura, Jun-Ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-02-01

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics.

  14. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Hishiro T.; Yamaura, Jun-ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-01-01

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics. PMID:28195565

  15. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Hishiro T; Yamaura, Jun-Ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-02-14

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics.

  16. Nucleotide sequence-homology-independent breakdown of transgenic resistance by more virulent virus strains and a potential solution.

    PubMed

    Kung, Yi-Jung; You, Bang-Jau; Raja, Joseph A J; Chen, Kuan-Chun; Huang, Chiung-Huei; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Yang, Ching-Fu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chang, Chung-Ping; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2015-04-27

    Controlling plant viruses by genetic engineering, including the globally important Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), mainly involves coat protein (CP) gene mediated resistance via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). However, the breakdown of single- or double-virus resistance in CP-gene-transgenic papaya by more virulent PRSV strains has been noted in repeated field trials. Recombination analysis revealed that the gene silencing suppressor HC-Pro or CP of the virulent PRSV strain 5-19 is responsible for overcoming CP-transgenic resistance in a sequence-homology-independent manner. Transient expression assays using agro-infiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana plants indicated that 5-19 HC-Pro exhibits stronger PTGS suppression than the transgene donor strain. To disarm the suppressor from the virulent strain, transgenic papaya lines were generated carrying untranslatable 5-19 HC-Pro, which conferred complete resistance to 5-19 and other geographic PRSV strains. Our study suggested the potential risk of the emergence of more virulent virus strains, spurred by the deployment of CP-gene-transgenic crops, and provides a strategy to combat such strains.

  17. Nucleotide Sequence-Homology-Independent Breakdown of Transgenic Resistance by More Virulent Virus Strains and a Potential Solution

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Yi-Jung; You, Bang-Jau; Raja, Joseph A. J.; Chen, Kuan-Chun; Huang, Chiung-Huei; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Yang, Ching-Fu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chang, Chung-Ping; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Controlling plant viruses by genetic engineering, including the globally important Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), mainly involves coat protein (CP) gene mediated resistance via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). However, the breakdown of single- or double-virus resistance in CP-gene-transgenic papaya by more virulent PRSV strains has been noted in repeated field trials. Recombination analysis revealed that the gene silencing suppressor HC-Pro or CP of the virulent PRSV strain 5-19 is responsible for overcoming CP-transgenic resistance in a sequence-homology-independent manner. Transient expression assays using agro-infiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana plants indicated that 5-19 HC-Pro exhibits stronger PTGS suppression than the transgene donor strain. To disarm the suppressor from the virulent strain, transgenic papaya lines were generated carrying untranslatable 5-19 HC-Pro, which conferred complete resistance to 5-19 and other geographic PRSV strains. Our study suggested the potential risk of the emergence of more virulent virus strains, spurred by the deployment of CP-gene-transgenic crops, and provides a strategy to combat such strains. PMID:25913508

  18. Two-toxin strategies for management of insecticidal transgenic crops: can pyramiding succeed where pesticide mixtures have not?

    PubMed Central

    Roush, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic insect-resistant crops that express toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) offer significant advantages to pest management, but are at risk of losing these advantages to the evolution of resistance in the targeted insect pests. All commercially available cultivars of these crops carry only a single Bt gene, and are particularly at risk where the targeted insect pests are not highly sensitive to the Bt toxin used. Under such circumstances, the most prudent method of avoiding resistance is to ensure that a large proportion of the pest population develops on non-transgenic 'refuge' hosts, generally of the crop itself. This has generated recommendations that 20% or more of the cotton and maize in any given area should be non-transgenic. This may be costly in terms of yields and may encourage further reliance on and resistance to pesticides. The use of two or more toxins in the same variety (pyramiding) can reduce the amount of refuge required to delay resistance for an extended period. Cross-resistance among the toxins appears to have been overestimated as a potential risk to the use of pyramids (and pesticide mixtures) because cross-resistance is at least as important when toxicants are used independently. Far more critical is that there should be nearly 100% mortality of susceptible insects on the transgenic crops. The past failures of pesticide mixtures to manage resistance provide important lessons for the most efficacious deployment of multiple toxins in transgenic crops.

  19. Efficient production of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (sFat-1)-transgenic pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Pan, DengKe; Zhang, Li; Zhou, YanRong; Feng, Chong; Long, Chuan; Liu, Xiao; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Jian; Lin, AiXing; Dong, EnQiu; Wang, ShuChen; Xu, HouGang; Chen, HongXing

    2010-04-01

    Omega-3(omega-3) fatty acid desaturase transgenic pigs may improve carcass fatty acid composition. The use of transgenic pigs is also an excellent large animal model for studying the role of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease and cancer. Transgenic pigs carrying synthesized fatty acid desaturase-1 gene (sFat-1) from Caenorhabditis briggsae by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were produced for the first time in China. Porcine fetal fibroblast cells were transfected with a sFat-1 expression cassette by the liposome-mediated method. Transgenic embryos were reconstructed by nuclear transfer of positive cells into enucleated in vitro matured oocytes. A total of 1889 reconstructed embryos were transferred into 10 naturally cycling gilts. Nine early pregnancies were established, 7 of which went to term. Twenty-one piglets were born. The cloning efficiency was 1.1% (born piglets/transferred embryos). The integration of the sFat-1 gene was confirmed in 15 live cloned piglets by PCR and Southern blot except for 2 piglets. Expression of the sFat-1 gene in 12 of 13 piglets was detected with RT-PCR. The data demonstrates that an efficient system for sFat-1 transgenic cloned pigs was developed, which led to the successful production of piglets expressing the sFat-1 gene.

  20. The rice Osmyb4 gene enhances tolerance to frost and improves germination under unfavourable conditions in transgenic barley plants.

    PubMed

    Soltész, Alexandra; Vágújfalvi, Attila; Rizza, Fulvia; Kerepesi, Ildikó; Galiba, Gábor; Cattivelli, Luigi; Coraggio, Immacolata; Crosatti, Cristina

    2012-05-01

    The Osmyb4 rice gene, coding for a transcription factor, proved to be efficient against different abiotic stresses as a trans(cis)gene in several plant species, although the effectiveness was dependent on the host genomic background. Eight barley transgenic lines carrying the rice Osmyb4 gene under the control of the Arabidopsis cold inducible promoter cor15a were produced to test the efficiency of this gene in barley. After a preliminary test, the best performing lines were subjected to freezing at -11°C and -12°C. Frost tolerance was assessed measured the F(v)/F(m) parameter widely used to indicate the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry in the dark adapted state. Three transgenic lines showed significantly increased tolerance. These selected lines were further studied under a complex stress applying cold and hypoxia at germinating stage. In these conditions the three selected transgenic lines outperformed the wild type barley in terms of germination vigour. The transgenic plants also showed a significant modification of their metabolism under cold/hypoxia conditions as demonstrated through the assessment of the activity of key enzymes involved in anoxic stress response. None of the transgenic lines showed dwarfism, just a slight retarded growth. These results provide evidence that the cold dependent expression of Osmyb4 can efficiently improved frost tolerance and germination vigour at low temperature without deleterious effect on plant growth.

  1. Field trials and tribulations--making sense of the regulations for experimental field trials of transgenic crops in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Galera, Sonia; Twyman, Richard M; Sparrow, Penelope A C; Van Droogenbroeck, Bart; Custers, René; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic plants that are being developed for commercial cultivation must be tested under field conditions to monitor their effects on surrounding wildlife and conventional crops. Developers also use this opportunity to evaluate the performance of transgenic crops in a typical environment, although this is a matter of commercial necessity rather than regulatory compliance. Most countries have adapted existing regulations or developed new ones to deal specifically with transgenic crops and their commodities. The European Union (EU) is renowned, or perhaps notorious, for having the broadest and most stringent regulations governing such field trials in the world. This reflects its nominal adherence to the precautionary approach, which assumes all transgenic crops carry an inherent risk. Therefore, field trials in the EU need to demonstrate that the risk associated with deploying a transgenic crop has been reduced to the level where it is regarded as acceptable within the narrowly defined limits of the regulations developed and enforced (albeit inconsistently) by national and regional governments, that is, that there is no greater risk than growing an equivalent conventional crop. The involvement of national and regional competent authorities in the decision-making process can add multiple layers of bureaucracy to an already-intricate process. In this review, we use country-based case studies to show how the EU, national and regional regulations are implemented, and we propose strategies that could increase the efficiency of regulation without burdening developers with further unnecessary bureaucracy.

  2. Does lignin modification affect feeding preference or growth performance of insect herbivores in transgenic silver birch (Betula pendula Roth)?

    PubMed

    Tiimonen, Heidi; Aronen, Tuija; Laakso, Tapio; Saranpää, Pekka; Chiang, Vincent; Ylioja, Tiina; Roininen, Heikki; Häggman, Hely

    2005-11-01

    Transgenic silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) lines were produced in order to modify lignin biosynthesis. These lines carry COMT (caffeate/5-hydroxyferulate O-methyltransferase) gene from Populus tremuloides driven by constitutive promoter 35S CaMV (cauliflower mosaic virus) or UbB1 (ubiquitin promoter from sunflower). The decreased syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) ratio was found in stem and leaf lignin of 35S CaMV-PtCOMT transgenic silver birch lines when compared to non-transformed control or UbB1-PtCOMT lines. In controlled feeding experiments the leaves of transgenic birch lines as well as controls were fed to insect herbivores common in boreal environment, i.e., larvae of Aethalura punctulata, Cleora cinctaria and Trichopteryx carpinata (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) as well as the adults of birch leaf-feeding beetles Agelastica alni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Phyllobius spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The feeding preferences of these herbivores differed in some cases among the tested birch lines, but these differences could not be directly associated to lignin modification. They could as well be explained by other characteristics of leaves, either natural or caused by transgene site effects. Growth performance of lepidopteran larvae fed on transgenic or control leaves did not differ significantly.

  3. Application of lipid extracts from Solidago canadensis to phytomonitoring of PCB126 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Sayuri; Ohta, Masaya; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of lipid extracts from Solidago canadensis for phytomonitoring of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 in the transgenic Arabidopsis plant XgD2V11-6 carrying the recombinant guinea pig (g) aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system. A lipid extract was prepared from S. canadensis and separated into simple lipid, glycolipid, and phospholipid fractions by silica gel column chromatography. Sterylglucoside (SG), monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and glucosyl ceramide were found in the glycolipid fraction. When the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were treated with the glycolipid fraction together with PCB126, PCB126-induced GUS activity significantly increased in the whole plant. Moreover, S. canadensis-derived SG, MGDG, and DGDG also significantly increased PCB126-induced GUS activity. These results indicated that glycolipids in S. canadensis enhanced the sensitivity of this monitoring assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of Active Fluorophore Proteins in the Milk of Transgenic Pigs Bypassing the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ayan; Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R.; Tiedemann, Daniela; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins in the milk of two lines of transgenic pigs generated by Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated genetic engineering. The Sleeping Beauty transposon consisted of an ubiquitously active CAGGS promoter driving a fluorophore cDNA, encoding either Venus or mCherry. Importantly, the fluorophore cDNAs did not encode for a signal peptide for the secretory pathway, and in previous studies of the transgenic animals a cytoplasmic localization of the fluorophore proteins was found. Unexpectedly, milk samples from lactating sows contained high levels of bioactive Venus or mCherry fluorophores. A detailed analysis suggested that exfoliated cells of the mammary epithelium carried the recombinant proteins passively into the milk. This is the first description of reporter fluorophore expression in the milk of livestock, and the findings may contribute to the development of an alternative concept for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins in the udder. PMID:27086548

  5. Transgenic rescue of phenotypic deficits in a mouse model of alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Kirshenbaum, Greer S; Dachtler, James; Roder, John C; Clapcote, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATP1A3 encoding Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 are the primary cause of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC). Most ATP1A3 mutations in AHC lie within a cluster in or near transmembrane α-helix TM6, including I810N that is also found in the Myshkin mouse model of AHC. These mutations all substantially reduce Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 activity. Herein, we show that Myshkin mice carrying a wild-type Atp1a3 transgene that confers a 16 % increase in brain-specific total Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity show significant phenotypic improvements compared with non-transgenic Myshkin mice. Interventions to increase the activity of wild-type Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 in AHC patients should be investigated further.

  6. BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EVOLUTION FROM NON-CARRYING TO OXYGEN AND GAS CARRYING FLUIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The development of oxygen (O2) carrying blood substitutes has evolved from the goal of replicating blood O2 transports properties to that of preserving microvascular and organ function, reducing the inherent or potential toxicity of the material used to carry O2, and treating pathologies initiated by anemia and hypoxia. Furthermore, the emphasis has shifted from blood replacement fluid to “O2 therapeutics” that restore tissue oxygenation to specific tissues regions. This review covers the different alternatives, potential and limitations of hemoglobin based O2 carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon based O2 carriers (PFCOCs), with emphasis on the physiological conditions disturbed in the situation that they will be used. It describes how concepts learned from plasma expanders without O2 carrying capacity can be applied to maintain O2 delivery and summarizes the microvascular responses due to HBOCs and PFCOCs. This review also presents alternative applications of HBOCs and PFCOCs namely: 1) How HBOC O2 affinity can be engineered to target O2 delivery to hypoxic tissues; and 2) How the high gas solubility of PFCOCs provides new opportunities for carrying, dissolving and delivering gases with biological activity. It is concluded that current blood substitutes development has amplified their applications horizon by devising therapeutic functions for oxygen carriers requiring limited O2 delivery capacity restoration. Conversely, full, blood-like O2 carrying capacity re-establishment awaits control of O2 carrier toxicity. PMID:23820271

  7. Density and composition of an insect population in a field trial of chitinase transgenic and wild-type silver birch (Betula pendula) clones.

    PubMed

    Vihervuori, Liisa; Pasonen, Hanna-Leena; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, Päivi

    2008-12-01

    Fifteen silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) lines carrying a sugar beet chitinase IV gene and eight wild-type birch clones were grown in a field trial. The composition and density of the insect population and the leaf damage caused by insects were monitored and compared between transgenic and wild-type trees. The most abundant insect group in all trees was aphids, and the variation in total insect densities was mainly explained by the variation in aphid densities. Insect densities were generally higher in the transgenic than in the control trees, indicating that the expression of the sugar beet chitinase IV gene had an influence on the suitability of birch leaves to aphids. The level of leaf damage was higher among transgenic than among control trees. Chewing damage was the most common type of leaf damage in all trees. The number of different damage types was higher among the wild-type clones than among the transgenic lines or their controls. The results indicate that the chitinase transgenic trees are more susceptible to aphids and suffer higher levels of leaf damage than the control trees. In the composition of the damage types, the control trees were more similar to the transgenic than to other wild-type trees, indicating that the composition was mostly linked to the genotype of the tree and not to the expression of the transgene. This study provides important information on the ecological interactions of chitinase transgenic trees in the field trial. No clear harmful effects of transgenic chitinase on the biodiversity of insect population were detected.

  8. [Effect of transgenic plants on biodiversity of agroecosystem].

    PubMed

    Nie, Chengrong; Wang, Jianwu; Luo, Shiming

    2003-08-01

    The effect of transgenic plants on the biodiversity of agroecosystem is an important environmental issue. There are many researches in this field at home and abroad recently. This paper reviewed the advances of the researches based on three levels of biodiversity as genetic diversity, species diversity and ecosystem diversity. They included following aspects: the effect of insect-resistant transgenic crops on target pest; the effect of herbicide-resistant transgenic crops on crops and wild weedy relatives; the effect of virus-resistant transgenic crops on virus; and the effect of transgenic crops on non-target organisms. This paper also discussed the effect of transgenic crops on soil ecosystem and crop genetic diversity. Their potential risks included uncontrolled flows of genes to wild relatives; development of herbicide, insect, and virus resistance in wild relatives; reduced crop genetic diversity; and adverse effects on organisms that were not pests, such as beneficial insects.

  9. Transgenic plants as vital components of integrated pest management.

    PubMed

    Kos, Martine; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel; Vet, Louise E M

    2009-11-01

    Although integrated pest management (IPM) strategies have been developed worldwide, further improvement of IPM effectiveness is required. The use of transgenic technology to create insect-resistant plants can offer a solution to the limited availability of highly insect-resistant cultivars. Commercially available insect-resistant transgenic crops show clear benefits for agriculture and there are many exciting new developments such as transgenic plants that enhance biological control. Effective evaluation tools are needed to ascertain that transgenic plants do not result in undesired non-target effects. If these conditions are met, there will be ample opportunities for transgenic plants to become key components of environmentally benign and durable pest management systems. Here we discuss the potential and challenges for incorporating transgenic plants in IPM.

  10. Global carrying capacity: how many people?

    PubMed

    1992-07-01

    During 1980-85 energy consumption in developing countries increased by 22%, of which 50% was used to maintain current levels of use and 50% pertained to real economic growth. Commercial energy consumption during 1970-89 tripled in developing countries. Population growth alone is expected to increase world energy consumption from the current 13.5 terawatts (13.5 trillion watts) to 18 terawatts by 2025 at the same level of use. The increased level of consumption (4.5 terawatts) is the equivalent of total current commercial energy consumption. One terawatt is equal to energy use from 5 billion barrels of oil yearly, 1 billion tons of coal, or 1.6 billion tons of wood. Economic development will require even greater levels of energy use. Since the oil price increases of the 1970s, developed countries increased their energy consumption by about 33%, even while becoming more fuel efficient. During 1990-2025, if developing countries double their per capita energy use and developed countries reduce their use by 50%, world energy consumption will still be almost 21 terawatts. If consumption remains constant at current levels without any population increase, the oil supply will be exhausted in 40 years. Coal consumption will last hundreds of years but air pollution will worsen, and global warming will be accelerated. Developed countries, which are wealthier, are having difficulty switching to non-fossil fuels, and the prospects for developing countries pose even greater challenges. Slowing growth buys time for technological development. World population is expected to reach 8 billion by 2020. Stabilization of growth at 8 billion would occur only if world fertility averages 1.7 children per woman by 2025. One opinion is that the carrying capacity has been reached with the present population of 5.4 billion. Others say that with changes in consumption and technological developments the earth can sustain 8 billion people. The physical limits are 1) the finite capacity of natural

  11. Transgenic analysis of the thyroid-responsive elements in the alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, A; Gulick, J; Neumann, J; Knotts, S; Robbins, J

    1993-02-25

    The role of two putative, cis-acting thyroid hormone-responsive elements, TRE1 and TRE2, located at -129 to -149 and -102 to -120, respectively, on the murine alpha-myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, has been investigated in transgenic mice. These motifs are present in a 4.5-kilobase fragment lying upstream of the transcriptional start site of the mouse alpha-MHC gene: this fragment directs appropriate expression of a reporter gene in transgenic mice (Subramaniam, A., Jones, W. K., Gulick, J., Wert, S., Neumann, J., and Robbins, J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 24613-24620). Here, we independently mutate the TRE1 and TRE2 elements by base substitution. The mice were analyzed for transgene expression in different muscle and non-muscle tissues including the atria and ventricles. Normal levels of transgene expression were observed in euthyroid mice carrying a mutation in TRE1. In contrast to these results, mice in which TRE2 was mutated showed reduced levels of CAT activity in both the atria and ventricles, suggesting a previously undefined role for this element in the constitutive up-regulation of the alpha-MHC gene. In hypothyroid mice carrying either of these mutations, the complete cessation of ventricular expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase transcripts that takes place in the alpha-5.5 (wild type) animals did not occur.

  12. Transgenic chickens as bioreactors for protein-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Lillico, Simon G; McGrew, Michael J; Sherman, Adrian; Sang, Helen M

    2005-02-01

    The potential of using transgenic animals for the synthesis of therapeutic proteins was suggested over twenty years ago. Considerable progress has been made in developing methods for the production of transgenic animals and specifically in the expression of therapeutic proteins in the mammary glands of cows, sheep and goats. Development of transgenic hens for protein production in eggs has lagged behind these systems. The positive features associated with the use of the chicken in terms of cost, speed of development of a production flock and potentially appropriate glycosylation of target proteins have led to significant advances in transgenic chicken models in the past few years.

  13. Generation of bovine transgenics using somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Craig A; Stice, Steven L

    2003-01-01

    The ability to produce transgenic animals through the introduction of exogenous DNA has existed for many years. However, past methods available to generate transgenic animals, such as pronuclear microinjection or the use of embryonic stem cells, have either been inefficient or not available in all animals, bovine included. More recently somatic cell nuclear transfer has provided a method to create transgenic animals that overcomes many deficiencies present in other methods. This review summarizes the benefits of using somatic cell nuclear transfer to create bovine transgenics as well as the possible opportunities this method creates for the future. PMID:14613543

  14. Generation of bovine transgenics using somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Craig A; Stice, Steven L

    2003-11-07

    The ability to produce transgenic animals through the introduction of exogenous DNA has existed for many years. However, past methods available to generate transgenic animals, such as pronuclear microinjection or the use of embryonic stem cells, have either been inefficient or not available in all animals, bovine included. More recently somatic cell nuclear transfer has provided a method to create transgenic animals that overcomes many deficiencies present in other methods. This review summarizes the benefits of using somatic cell nuclear transfer to create bovine transgenics as well as the possible opportunities this method creates for the future.

  15. [Effects of transgenic crops on soil microorganisms: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Xie, Ming; Peng, De-Liang

    2013-09-01

    The worldwide cultivation of transgenic crops not only provides tremendous economic benefits, but also induces the concern about the potential risks of transgenic crops on soil ecosystem in which microorganisms are involved. The potential effects of transgenic crops on soil microorganisms include the direct effects of the transgenic proteins on non-target soil microorganisms, and the indirect effects of the unintentional changes in the chemical compositions of root exudates induced by the introduction of the exogenous transgenic proteins. Most of the studies on transgenic crops suggested that transgenic crops could affect the quantity and structure of soil microbial populations. However, the perceivable effects on the soil microorganisms are inconsistent, with some in significant and others in non-significant, or some with persistent and others with non-persistent. This paper summarized the effects of different transgenic crops on soil microorganisms, and discussed the factors affecting the assessment reliability, including the species of transgenic crops and the experimental technologies and principles. Some issues needed to be paid special attention to in the future studies were put forward.

  16. Auto-reactive B cells in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry

    2007-12-01

    In order to understand how the natural occurrence of autoreactive B cells is controlled in normal individuals, and how self reactive B cells can escape this control during diverse clinical situations, many different transgenic mice have been generated expressing self reactive antibodies. In this review, we focus our attention on disease-associated self reactive transgenic models which show the variety of the tolerization mechanisms. The same transgenic lines are also used to analyse the effects of the autoimmune genetic background on the self reactive B cell fate, as well as to study the influence of infectious agents on the behaviour of the auto-reactive transgenic B cells.

  17. Osteogenic capacity of transgenic flax scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Dominiak, Marzena; Gedrange, Tomasz; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2012-01-19

    The modification of flax fibers to create biologically active dressings is of undoubted scientific and practical interest. Flax fibers, derived from transgenic flax expressing three bacterial genes for the synthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB), have better mechanical properties than unmodified flax fibers; do not show any inflammation response after subcutaneous insertion; and have a good in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to examine the applicability of composites containing flax fibers of genetically modified (M50) or non-modified (wt-Nike) flax within a polylactide (PLA) matrix for bone regeneration. For this, the mRNA expression of genes coding for growth factors (insulin-like growth factor IGF1, IGF2, vascular endothelial growth factor), for osteogenic differentiation (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, Runx2, Phex, type 1 and type 2 collagen), and for bone resorption markers [matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8), acid phosphatase type 5] were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found a significant elevated mRNA expression of IGF1 with PLA and PLA-wt-Nike composites. The mRNA amount of MMP8 and osteocalcin was significantly decreased in all biocomposite-treated cranial tissue samples compared to controls, whereas the expression of all other tested transcripts did not show any differences. It is assumed that both flax composites are able to stimulate bone regeneration, but composites from transgenic flax plants producing PHB showed faster bone regeneration than composites of non-transgenic flax plants. The application of these linen membranes for bone tissue engineering should be proved in further studies.

  18. Transgene detection by digital droplet PCR.

    PubMed

    Moser, Dirk A; Braga, Luca; Raso, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro; Simon, Perikles

    2014-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of severe diseases. Because of its abuse potential for performance enhancement in sports, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) included the term 'gene doping' in the official list of banned substances and methods in 2004. Several nested PCR or qPCR-based strategies have been proposed that aim at detecting long-term presence of transgene in blood, but these strategies are hampered by technical limitations. We developed a digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) protocol for Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) detection and demonstrated its applicability monitoring 6 mice injected into skeletal muscle with AAV9-IGF1 elements and 2 controls over a 33-day period. A duplex ddPCR protocol for simultaneous detection of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) and Erythropoietin (EPO) transgenic elements was created. A new DNA extraction procedure with target-orientated usage of restriction enzymes including on-column DNA-digestion was established. In vivo data revealed that IGF1 transgenic elements could be reliably detected for a 33-day period in DNA extracted from whole blood. In vitro data indicated feasibility of IGF1 and EPO detection by duplex ddPCR with high reliability and sensitivity. On-column DNA-digestion allowed for significantly improved target detection in downstream PCR-based approaches. As ddPCR provides absolute quantification, it ensures excellent day-to-day reproducibility. Therefore, we expect this technique to be used in diagnosing and monitoring of viral and bacterial infection, in detecting mutated DNA sequences as well as profiling for the presence of foreign genetic material in elite athletes in the future.

  19. Perspectives on the state of insect transgenics.

    PubMed

    O'Brochta, David A; Handler, Alfred M

    2008-01-01

    Genetic transformation is a critical component to the fundamental genetic analysis of insect species and holds great promise for establishing strains that improve population control and behavior for practical application. This is especially so for insects that are disease vectors, many of which are currently subject to genomic sequence analysis, and intensive population control measures that must be improved for better efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Transposon-mediated germ-line transformation has been the ultimate goal for most fundamental and practical studies, and impressive strides have been made in recent development of transgene vector and marker systems for several mosquito species. This has resulted in rapid advances in functional genomic sequence analysis and new strategies for biological control based on conditional lethality. Importantly, advances have also been made in our ability to use these systems more effectively in terms of enhanced stability and targeting to specific genomic loci. Nevertheless, not all insects are currently amenable to germ-line transformation techniques, and thus advances in transient somatic expression and paratransgenesis have also been critical, if not preferable for some applications. Of particular importance is how this technology will be used for practical application. Early ideas for population replacement of indigenous pests with innocuous transgenic siblings by transposon-vector spread, may require reevaluation in terms of our current knowledge of the behavior of transposons currently available for transformation. The effective implementation of any control program using released transgenics, will also benefit from broadening the perspective of these control measures as being more mainstream than exotic.

  20. Mice carrying a human GLUD2 gene recapitulate aspects of human transcriptome and metabolome development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Guo, Song; Jiang, Xi; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Naumann, Ronald; Enard, Wolfgang; Tomita, Masaru; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Khaitovich, Philipp; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    Whereas all mammals have one glutamate dehydrogenase gene (GLUD1), humans and apes carry an additional gene (GLUD2), which encodes an enzyme with distinct biochemical properties. We inserted a bacterial artificial chromosome containing the human GLUD2 gene into mice and analyzed the resulting changes in the transcriptome and metabolome during postnatal brain development. Effects were most pronounced early postnatally, and predominantly genes involved in neuronal development were affected. Remarkably, the effects in the transgenic mice partially parallel the transcriptome and metabolome differences seen between humans and macaques analyzed. Notably, the introduction of GLUD2 did not affect glutamate levels in mice, consistent with observations in the primates. Instead, the metabolic effects of GLUD2 center on the tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that GLUD2 affects carbon flux during early brain development, possibly supporting lipid biosynthesis. PMID:27118840

  1. Effect of the cauliflower Or transgene on carotenoid accumulation and chromoplast formation in transgenic potato tubers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plants have facilitated our understanding of the functional roles of genes and the metabolic processes affected in plants. Recently, we isolated the Or gene from an orange cauliflower mutant and showed that the Or gene could serve as a novel genetic tool to enrich carotenoid content in tr...

  2. Comparative Proteomics of Leaves from Phytase-Transgenic Maize and Its Non-transgenic Isogenic Variety

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yanhua; Yi, Xiaoping; Wang, Limin; Peng, Cunzhi; Sun, Yong; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Jiaming; Guo, Anping; Wang, Xuchu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate unintended effects in genetically modified crops (GMCs), a comparative proteomic analysis between the leaves of the phytase-transgenic maize and the non-transgenic plants was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 57 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were successfully identified, which represents 44 unique proteins. Functional classification of the identified proteins showed that these DEPs were predominantly involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism category, followed by post-translational modification. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that most of the DEPs participated in carbon fixation in photosynthesis. Among them, 15 proteins were found to show protein-protein interactions with each other, and these proteins were mainly participated in glycolysis and carbon fixation. Comparison of the changes in the protein and tanscript levels of the identified proteins showed that most proteins had a similar pattern of changes between proteins and transcripts. Our results suggested that although some significant differences were observed, the proteomic patterns were not substantially different between the leaves of the phytase-transgenic maize and the non-transgenic isogenic type. Moreover, none of the DEPs was identified as a new toxic protein or an allergenic protein. The differences between the leaf proteome might be attributed to both genetic modification and hybrid influence. PMID:27582747

  3. A preliminary exploration on DNA methylation of transgene across generations in transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiling; Xu, Wei; Cui, Ye; Ma, Li; Richards, Jendai; Li, Wenzhi; Ma, Yamin; Fu, Guoxing; Bythwood, Tameka; Wang, Yueling; Li, Xu; Song, Qing

    2015-02-06

    Epigenetic heritability is an important issue in the field of genetics and also in the development of many human diseases. In this study, we created a transgenic rat model and investigated the transgenerational methylation patterns in these animals. The transgene DNA fragment was unmethylated before it was injected into the pronucleus, so it is a good model to study the inheritance of DNA methylation patterns. We performed bisulfite sequencing on 23 CpG dinucleotides on the transgene across three generations in two tissues. We observed that the transgene was heavily methylated in the liver (87.53%) from the founder generation, whereas its methylation rate was much lower in the kidney (70.47%). Spearman correlation analysis showed that there was a strong correlation on the methylation status between different generations in the same tissue, which was observed in both liver and kidney, and among all individuals in this pedigree. This study provided some evidence that DNA methylation patterns acquired in the founder animal can be passed to the offspring.

  4. A Transgenic Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinrui; Ray, Pritha; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Tong, Ricky; Gong, Yongquan; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Wu, Joseph C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mouse with a stably integrated reporter gene(s) can be a valuable resource for obtaining uniformly labeled stem cells, tissues, and organs for various applications. We have generated a transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses a tri-fusion reporter gene (fluc2-tdTomato-ttk) driven by a constitutive chicken β-actin promoter. This “Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse” system allows one to isolate most cells from this donor mouse and image them for bioluminescent (fluc2), fluorescent (tdTomato), and positron emission tomography (PET) (ttk) modalities. Transgenic colonies with different levels of tri-fusion reporter gene expression showed a linear correlation between all three-reporter proteins (R2=0.89 for TdTomato vs Fluc, R2=0.94 for Fluc vs TTK, R2=0.89 for TdTomato vs TTK) in vitro from tissue lysates and in vivo by optical and PET imaging. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from this transgenics showed high level of reporter gene expression, which linearly correlated with the cell numbers (R2=0.99 for bioluminescence imaging (BLI)). Both BLI (R2=0.93) and micro-PET (R2=0.94) imaging of the subcutaneous implants of Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse derived MSCs in nude mice showed linear correlation with the cell numbers and across different imaging modalities (R2=0.97). Serial imaging of MSCs transplanted to mice with acute myocardial infarction (MI) by intramyocardial injection exhibited significantly higher signals in MI heart at days 2, 3, 4, and 7 (p<0.01). MSCs transplanted to the ischemic hindlimb of nude mice showed significantly higher BLI and PET signals in the first 2 weeks that dropped by 4th week due to poor cell survival. However, laser Doppler perfusion imaging revealed that blood circulation in the ischemic limb was significantly improved in the MSCs transplantation group compared with the control group. In summary, this mouse can be used as a source of donor cells and organs in various research areas such as stem cell research

  5. A transgenic tri-modality reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinrui; Ray, Pritha; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Tong, Ricky; Gong, Yongquan; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Wu, Joseph C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mouse with a stably integrated reporter gene(s) can be a valuable resource for obtaining uniformly labeled stem cells, tissues, and organs for various applications. We have generated a transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses a tri-fusion reporter gene (fluc2-tdTomato-ttk) driven by a constitutive chicken β-actin promoter. This "Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse" system allows one to isolate most cells from this donor mouse and image them for bioluminescent (fluc2), fluorescent (tdTomato), and positron emission tomography (PET) (ttk) modalities. Transgenic colonies with different levels of tri-fusion reporter gene expression showed a linear correlation between all three-reporter proteins (R(2)=0.89 for TdTomato vs Fluc, R(2)=0.94 for Fluc vs TTK, R(2)=0.89 for TdTomato vs TTK) in vitro from tissue lysates and in vivo by optical and PET imaging. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from this transgenics showed high level of reporter gene expression, which linearly correlated with the cell numbers (R(2)=0.99 for bioluminescence imaging (BLI)). Both BLI (R(2)=0.93) and micro-PET (R(2)=0.94) imaging of the subcutaneous implants of Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse derived MSCs in nude mice showed linear correlation with the cell numbers and across different imaging modalities (R(2)=0.97). Serial imaging of MSCs transplanted to mice with acute myocardial infarction (MI) by intramyocardial injection exhibited significantly higher signals in MI heart at days 2, 3, 4, and 7 (p<0.01). MSCs transplanted to the ischemic hindlimb of nude mice showed significantly higher BLI and PET signals in the first 2 weeks that dropped by 4(th) week due to poor cell survival. However, laser Doppler perfusion imaging revealed that blood circulation in the ischemic limb was significantly improved in the MSCs transplantation group compared with the control group. In summary, this mouse can be used as a source of donor cells and organs in various research areas such as stem cell

  6. Gene therapy: X-SCID transgene leukaemogenicity.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby; Baum, Christopher; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Candotti, Fabio; Otsu, Makoto; Sorrentino, Brian; Scobie, Linda; Cameron, Ewan; Blyth, Karen; Neil, Jim; Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain

    2006-09-21

    Gene therapy has been remarkably effective for the immunological reconstitution of patients with severe combined immune deficiency, but the occurrence of leukaemia in a few patients has stimulated debate about the safety of the procedure and the mechanisms of leukaemogenesis. Woods et al. forced high expression of the corrective therapeutic gene IL2RG, which encodes the gamma-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor, in a mouse model of the disease and found that tumours appeared in a proportion of cases. Here we show that transgenic IL2RG does not necessarily have potent intrinsic oncogenic properties, and argue that the interpretation of this observation with respect to human trials is overstated.

  7. Transgenic Phytoremediation Blasts onto the Scene

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Skeen, R S.

    1999-05-01

    The EPA National Priority List contains 22 ammunition production and processing sites that are laden with explosive and propellant wastes. With levels of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) contamination as high as 200 g/kg of solids, some of these sites are literally on the verge of exploding. They also present serious exposure risks to humans and wildlife, as many of these contaminants are also strong toxins and mutagens. In this issue, French et al. describe a new option for cleaning up this dangerous mixture: the use of transgenic plants. They engineered plants to express a bacterial enzyme that can completely denitrify TNT and trinitroglycerin (GTN) into harmless compounds.

  8. [Transferring the Suaeda salsa glutathione S-transferase and catalase genes enhances low temperature stress resistance in transgenic rice seedlings].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Yun; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Yan-Xiu; Zhang, Hui

    2006-04-01

    The GST (glutathione S-transferase) and GST+CAT1 (catalase 1) of Suaeda salsa were introduced into a low temperature-sensitive rice cultivar (Oryza sativa cv. Zhonghua No.11) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, and the transformed calli and plantlets were screened on Murashige and Skoog (1962) medium supplemented with hygromycin 25 microg/mL and cefotaxime 300 microg/mL. The putative primary transformants (T(0) generation) were acclimatized at 26 degrees C /22 degrees C in a greenhouse for 7 d, and then transplanted to the field, where they grew up to maturity under outdoor conditions. 25 and 14 independent transgenic lines of T(1) generation carrying the GST and GST+CAT1 genes, respectively, were identified by PCR amplification. Transgene expression was monitored by RNA-blot hybridization using total RNA samples from leaf tissues. To investigate whether expressing the Suaeda salsa GST and GST+CAT1 in transgenic rice increased low temperature stress tolerance, the T(4) 14-day-old transgenic and non-transgenic rice seedlings were transferred to a low temperature (day 7 degrees C/night 4 degrees C) growth chamber for 3-6 d. The experimental data showed that expressing the Suaeda salsa GST and GST+CAT1 enhanced low temperature stress resistance in transgenic rice seedlings. When treated with low temperature, both GST and CAT activity increased in the transformants with the time of temperature treatment. These transgenic rice plant seedlings exhibited a higher level of photosynthetic capacity than those of the non-transgenic control seedlings under low temperature treatment. Whereas, there were lower H(2)O(2) and MDA (malondialdehyde) content, and relative electrolyte leakage through the plasma membrane was also lower in transgenic rice seedlings than in the parent line under low temperature condition. The results also indicated that GST+CAT1 co-expression conferred greater level of low

  9. Potential of MuS1 Transgenic Tobacco for Phytoremediation of the Urban Soils Contaminated with Cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. N.; Kim, S. H.

    2010-05-01

    Urban soils are prone to contamination by trace elements such as Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Phytoremediation is one of the attractive remediation methods for soils contaminated with trace elements due to its non-destructive and environmentally-friendly characteristic. Scientists have tried to find hyper-accumulator plants in nature or to develop transgenic plant through genetic engineering. This study was carried out to identify a potential of MuS1 transgenic tobacco for phytoremediation of the urban soils contaminated with Cd. MuS1 is known as a multiple stress related gene with several lines. The previous study using RT-PCR showed that the expression of MuS1 gene in tobacco plant induced tolerance to Cd stress. For this study, MuS1 transgenic tobacco and wild-type tobacco (control) were cultivated in a hydroponic system treated with Cd (0, 50, 100 and 200μM Cd) for 3 weeks. At harvest, both tobacco and nutrient solution were collected and were analyzed for Cd. Effect of Cd treatment on morphological change of the tobacco leaves was also observed by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). The tolerance of MuS1 transgenic tobacco to Cd stress was better than that of wild-type tobacco at all Cd levels. Especially, wild-type tobacco showed chlorosis and withering with 200μM Cd treatment, whereas MuS1 transgenic tobacco gradually recovered from Cd damage. Wild-type tobacco accumulated more Cd (4.65mg per plant) than MuS1 transgenic tobacco (2.37mg per plant) with 200μM Cd treatment. Cd translocation rate from root to leaves was 81.8 % for wild-type tobacco compared to 37.1 % for MuS1 transgenic tobacco. Result of VP-SEM showed that the number of trichome in the leaves for wild-type tobacco increased in comparison with that for untreated samples after 3 weeks, while that for MuS1 transgenic tobacco was not changed by Cd treatment. Results showed that the mechanism of the recovery of the MuS1 tobacco plant was not by high level of Cd uptake and accumulation

  10. Characterization of a Maize Wip1 Promoter in Transgenic Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengxue; Lian, Yun; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yunjun; Wang, Guoying

    2013-01-01

    The Maize Wip1 gene encodes a wound-induced Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) protein which is a type of serine protease inhibitor, and its expression is induced by wounding or infection, conferring resistance against pathogens and pests. In this study, the maize Wip1 promoter was isolated and its function was analyzed. Different truncated Wip1 promoters were fused upstream of the GUS reporter gene and transformed into Arabidopsis, tobacco and rice plants. We found that (1) several truncated maize Wip1 promoters led to strong GUS activities in both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves, whereas low GUS activity was detected in transgenic rice leaves; (2) the Wip1 promoter was not wound-induced in transgenic tobacco leaves, but was induced by wounding in transgenic rice leaves; (3) the truncated Wip1 promoter had different activity in different organs of transgenic tobacco plants; (4) the transgenic plant leaves containing different truncated Wip1 promoters had low GUS transcripts, even though high GUS protein level and GUS activities were observed; (5) there was one transcription start site of Wip1 gene in maize and two transcription start sites of GUS in Wip1::GUS transgenic lines; (6) the adjacent 35S promoter which is present in the transformation vectors enhanced the activity of the truncated Wip1 promoters in transgenic tobacco leaves, but did not influence the disability of truncated Wip1231 promoter to respond to wounding signals. We speculate that an ACAAAA hexamer, several CAA trimers and several elements similar to ACAATTAC octamer in the 5′-untranslated region might contribute to the strong GUS activity in Wip1231 transgenic lines, meanwhile, compared to the 5′-untranslated region from Wip1231 transgenic lines, the additional upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5′-untranslated region from Wip1737 transgenic lines might contribute to the lower level of GUS transcript and GUS activity. PMID:24322445

  11. [Biofuels, food security and transgenic crops].

    PubMed

    Acosta, Orlando; Chaparro-Giraldo, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Soaring global food prices are threatening to push more poor people back below the poverty line; this will probably become aggravated by the serious challenge that increasing population and climate changes are posing for food security. There is growing evidence that human activities involving fossil fuel consumption and land use are contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and consequently changing the climate worldwide. The finite nature of fossil fuel reserves is causing concern about energy security and there is a growing interest in the use of renewable energy sources such as biofuels. There is growing concern regarding the fact that biofuels are currently produced from food crops, thereby leading to an undesirable competition for their use as food and feed. Nevertheless, biofuels can be produced from other feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose from perennial grasses, forestry and vegetable waste. Biofuel energy content should not be exceeded by that of the fossil fuel invested in its production to ensure that it is energetically sustainable; however, biofuels must also be economically competitive and environmentally acceptable. Climate change and biofuels are challenging FAO efforts aimed at eradicating hunger worldwide by the next decade. Given that current crops used in biofuel production have not been domesticated for this purpose, transgenic technology can offer an enormous contribution towards improving biofuel crops' environmental and economic performance. The present paper critically presents some relevant relationships between biofuels, food security and transgenic plant technology.

  12. Investigations into the hypothesis of transgenic cannabis.

    PubMed

    Cascini, Fidelia

    2012-05-01

    The unusual concentration of cannabinoids recently found in marijuana samples submitted to the forensic laboratory for chemical analysis prompted an investigation into whether genetic modifications have been made to the DNA of Cannabis sativa L. to increase its potency. Traditional methods for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) were used to analyze herbal cannabis preparations. Our analyses support the hypothesis that marijuana samples submitted to forensic laboratories and characterized by an abnormal level of Δ(9)-THC are the product of breeding selection rather than of transgenic modifications. Further, this research has shown a risk of false positive results associated with the poor quality of the seized samples and probably due to the contamination by other transgenic vegetable products. On the other hand, based on these data, a conclusive distinction between the hypothesis of GMO plant contamination and the other of genetic modification of cannabis cannot be made requiring further studies on comparative chemical and genetic analyses to find out an explanation for the recently detected increased potency of cannabis.

  13. Hypertension, kidney, and transgenics: a fresh perspective.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Linda J; Bailey, Matthew A; Mullins, John J

    2006-04-01

    In this review, we outline the application and contribution of transgenic technology to establishing the genetic basis of blood pressure regulation and its dysfunction. Apart from a small number of examples where high blood pressure is the result of single gene mutation, essential hypertension is the sum of interactions between multiple environmental and genetic factors. Candidate genes can be identified by a variety of means including linkage analysis, quantitative trait locus analysis, association studies, and genome-wide scans. To test the validity of candidate genes, it is valuable to model hypertension in laboratory animals. Animal models generated through selective breeding strategies are often complex, and the underlying mechanism of hypertension is not clear. A complementary strategy has been the use of transgenic technology. Here one gene can be selectively, tissue specifically, or developmentally overexpressed, knocked down, or knocked out. Although resulting phenotypes may still be complicated, the underlying genetic perturbation is a starting point for identifying interactions that lead to hypertension. We recognize that the development and maintenance of hypertension may involve many systems including the vascular, cardiac, and central nervous systems. However, given the central role of the kidney in normal and abnormal blood pressure regulation, we intend to limit our review to models with a broadly renal perspective.

  14. Life without white fat: a transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Jaideep; Mason, Mark M.; Olive, Michelle; Krylov, Dmitry; Gavrilova, Oksana; Marcus-Samuels, Bernice; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Lee, Eric; Aoyama, Toshifumi; Eckhaus, Michael; Reitman, Marc L.; Vinson, Charles

    1998-01-01

    We have generated a transgenic mouse with no white fat tissue throughout life. These mice express a dominant-negative protein, termed A-ZIP/F, under the control of the adipose-specific aP2 enhancer/promoter. This protein prevents the DNA binding of B-ZIP transcription factors of both the C/EBP and Jun families. The transgenic mice (named A-ZIP/F-1) have no white adipose tissue and dramatically reduced amounts of brown adipose tissue, which is inactive. They are initially growth delayed, but by week 12, surpass their littermates in weight. The mice eat, drink, and urinate copiously, have decreased fecundity, premature death, and frequently die after anesthesia. The physiological consequences of having no white fat tissue are profound. The liver is engorged with lipid, and the internal organs are enlarged. The mice are diabetic, with reduced leptin (20-fold) and elevated serum glucose (3-fold), insulin (50- to 400-fold), free fatty acids (2-fold), and triglycerides (3- to 5-fold). The A-ZIP/F-1 phenotype suggests a mouse model for the human disease lipoatrophic diabetes (Seip-Berardinelli syndrome), indicating that the lack of fat can cause diabetes. The myriad of consequences of having no fat throughout development can be addressed with this model. PMID:9784492

  15. Modeling Alzheimer's disease in transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Cuello, A Claudio

    2013-10-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. At the diagnostic stage, the AD brain is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss. Despite the large variety of therapeutic approaches, this condition remains incurable, since at the time of clinical diagnosis, the brain has already suffered irreversible and extensive damage. In recent years, it has become evident that AD starts decades prior to its clinical presentation. In this regard, transgenic animal models can shed much light on the mechanisms underlying this "pre-clinical" stage, enabling the identification and validation of new therapeutic targets. This paper summarizes the formidable efforts to create models mimicking the various aspects of AD pathology in the rat. Transgenic rat models offer distinctive advantages over mice. Rats are physiologically, genetically and morphologically closer to humans. More importantly, the rat has a well-characterized, rich behavioral display. Consequently, rat models of AD should allow a more sophisticated and accurate assessment of the impact of pathology and novel therapeutics on cognitive outcomes.

  16. Craniosynostosis in transgenic mice overexpressing Nell-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinli; Kuroda, Shun’ichi; Carpenter, Dale; Nishimura, Ichiro; Soo, Chia; Moats, Rex; Iida, Keisuke; Wisner, Eric; Hu, Fei-Ya; Miao, Steve; Beanes, Steve; Dang, Catherine; Vastardis, Heleni; Longaker, Michael; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kanayama, Norihiro; Saito, Naoaki; Ting, Kang

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we reported NELL-1 as a novel molecule overexpressed during premature cranial suture closure in patients with craniosynostosis (CS), one of the most common congenital craniofacial deformities. Here we describe the creation and analysis of transgenic mice overexpressing Nell-1. Nell-1 transgenic animals exhibited CS-like phenotypes that ranged from simple to compound synostoses. Histologically, the osteogenic fronts of abnormally closing/closed sutures in these animals revealed calvarial overgrowth and overlap along with increased osteoblast differentiation and reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, anomalies were restricted to calvarial bone, despite generalized, non-tissue-specific overexpression of Nell-1. In vitro, Nell-1 overexpression accelerated calvarial osteoblast differentiation and mineralization under normal culture conditions. Moreover, Nell-1 overexpression in osteoblasts was sufficient to promote alkaline phosphatase expression and micronodule formation. Conversely, downregulation of Nell-1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation in vitro. In summary, Nell-1 overexpression induced calvarial overgrowth resulting in premature suture closure in a rodent model. Nell-1, therefore, has a novel role in CS development, perhaps as part of a complex chain of events resulting in premature suture closure. On a cellular level, Nell-1 expression may modulate and be both sufficient and required for osteoblast differentiation. PMID:12235118

  17. Hydrogen fuel production by transgenic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios; Seibert, Michael; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2007-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the state-of-art in the field of green algal H2-production and examines physiological and genetic engineering approaches by which to improve the hydrogen metabolism characteristics of these microalgae. Included in this chapter are emerging topics pertaining to the application of sulfur-nutrient deprivation to attenuate O2-evolution and to promote H2-production, as well as the genetic engineering of sulfate uptake through manipulation of a newly reported sulfate permease in the chloroplast of the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Application of the green algal hydrogenase assembly genes is examined in efforts to confer H2-production capacity to other commercially significant unicellular green algae. Engineering a solution to the O2 sensitivity of the green algal hydrogenase is discussed as an alternative approach to sulfur nutrient deprivation, along with starch accumulation in microalgae for enhanced H2-production. Lastly, current efforts aiming to optimize light utilization in transgenic microalgae for enhanced H2-production under mass culture conditions are presented. It is evident that application of genetic engineering technologies and the use of transgenic green algae will improve prospects for commercial exploitation of these photosynthetic micro-organisms in the generation of H2, a clean and renewable fuel.

  18. Biolistic mediated production of transgenic oil palm.

    PubMed

    Kadir Ahmad Parveez, Ghulam

    2008-01-01

    Physical and biological parameters affecting DNA delivery into oil palm embryogenic calli using the biolistic device are optimized. Five different promoters are also evaluated to identify the most suitable promoter for use in oil palm transformation. Finally, the effectiveness of kanamycin, geneticin (G418), neomycin, hygromycin, and herbicide Basta as selection agents to inhibit growth of oil palm embryogenic calli is evaluated. Combination of optimized parameters, best promoter and selection agent is later used to transform oil palm embryogenic calli for producing transgenic oil palm plants. Bombarded embryogenic calli are exposed to 50 mg/l of Basta after 3 weeks. Basta-resistant embryogenic calli started to emerge five to six months in medium containing Basta. The Basta-resistant embryogenic calli are proliferated until they reach a specific size, and the Basta-resistant calli are later individually isolated and regenerated to produce complete plantlets. The complete regenerated plantlets are evaluated for the presence of transgenes by PCR, Southern and thin layer chromatography analyses.

  19. Embryonic fate map of first pharyngeal arch structures in the sox10: kaede zebrafish transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Max; Kamel, George; Shubinets, Valeriy; Hickey, Graham; Grimaldi, Michael; Liao, Eric C

    2012-09-01

    Cranial neural crest cells follow stereotypic patterns of migration to form craniofacial structures. The zebrafish is a powerful vertebrate genetic model where transgenics with reporter proteins under the transcriptional regulation of lineage-specific promoters can be generated. Numerous studies demonstrate that the zebrafish ethmoid plate is embryologically analogous to the mammalian palate. A fate map correlating embryonic cranial neural crest to defined jaw structures would provide a useful context for the morphogenetic analysis of craniofacial development. To that end, the sox10:kaede transgenic was generated, where sox10 provides lineage restriction to the neural crest. Specific regions of neural crest were labeled at the 10-somite stage by photoconversion of the kaede reporter protein. Lineage analysis was carried out during pharyngeal development in wild-type animals, after miR140 injection, and after estradiol treatment. At the 10-somite stage, cranial neural crest cells anterior of the eye contributed to the median ethmoid plate, whereas cells medial to the eye formed the lateral ethmoid plate and trabeculae and a posterior population formed the mandible. miR-140 overexpression and estradiol inhibition of Hedgehog signaling resulted in cleft development, with failed migration of the anterior cell population to form the median ethmoid plate. The sox10:kaede transgenic line provides a useful tool for neural crest lineage analysis. These studies illustrate the advantages of the zebrafish model for application in morphogenetic studies of vertebrate craniofacial development.

  20. Tissue-specific expression and promoter analyses of the human tissue kallikrein gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, W; Wang, J; Chao, L; Chao, J

    1997-01-01

    The expression of the tissue kallikrein gene is tissue-specific and exhibits a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-translational regulation. Information concerning the mechanism of its tissue-specific expression has been limited owing to the lack of suitable cell lines for the expression study. We approached this problem by introducing human tissue kallikrein gene constructs into mouse embryos, creating transgenic lines carrying its coding sequence with varying lengths of the promoter region. One construct (PHK) contained 801 bp in the 5'-flanking region and two deletion constructs contained either 302 bp (D300) or 202 bp (D200) of the promoter region. The expression of human tissue kallikrein in these transgenic mice was monitored by Northern blot, reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by Southern blot, and radioimmunoassay. In all three lines, human tissue kallikrein was expressed predominantly in the pancreas and at lower levels in other tissues, including salivary gland, kidney and spleen. This pattern was similar to that of tissue kallikrein expression in human tissues. The D300 line has higher levels of transgene expression than the D200 and PHK lines. The results indicate that the 202 bp segment immediately upstream of the translation starting site is sufficient to direct a tissue-specific expression pattern of the human tissue kallikrein gene, and that regulatory elements might exist between -801 and -202. PMID:9224635

  1. Effect of genes, social experience, and their interaction on the courtship behaviour of transgenic Drosophila males.

    PubMed

    Svetec, Nicolas; Houot, Benjamin; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2005-06-01

    Behaviour depends (a) on genes that specify the neural and non-neural elements involved in the perception of and responses to sensory stimuli and (b) on experience that can modulate the fine development of these elements. We exposed transgenic and control Drosophila melanogaster males, and their hybrids, to male siblings during adult development and measured the contribution of genes and of experience to their courtship behaviour. The transgene CheB42a specifically targets male gustatory sensillae and alters the perception of male inhibitory pheromones which leads to frequent male-male interactions. The age at which social experience occurred and the genotype of tester males induced a variable effect on the intensity of male homo- and heterosexual courtship. The strong interaction between the effects of genes and of social experience reveals the plasticity of the apparently stereotyped elements involved in male courtship behaviour. Finally, a high intensity of homosexual courtship was found only in males that simultaneously carried a mutation in their white gene and the CheB42a transgene.

  2. A mart-1::Cre transgenic line induces recombination in melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Iraz T; Beermann, Friedrich

    2011-05-01

    The number of transgenic mouse lines expressing Cre in either type of pigment cells (melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium, RPE) is limited, and the available lines do not always offer sufficient specificity. In this study, we addressed this issue and we report on the generation of a MART-1::Cre BAC transgenic mouse line, in which the expression of Cre recombinase is controlled by regulatory elements of the pigment cell-specific gene MART-1 (mlana). When MART-1::Cre BAC transgenic mice were bred with the ROSA26-R reporter line, ß-galactosidase expression was observed in RPE from E12.5 onwards, and in melanocyte precursors from E17.5, indicating that the MART-1::Cre line provides Cre recombinase activity in pigment-producing cells rather than in a particular lineage. In addition, breeding of this mouse line to mice carrying a conditional allele of RBP-Jκ corroborated the reported phenotypes in both pigment cell lineages, inducing hair greying and microphthalmia. Our results thus suggest, that the MART-1::Cre line may serve as a novel and useful tool for functional studies in melanocytes and the RPE.genesis 49:403-409, 2011.

  3. Analysis of somatic hypermutation in mouse Peyer's patches using immunoglobulin kappa light-chain transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, A; Milstein, C

    1993-01-01

    We have exploited mice transgenic for an immunoglobulin kappa light chain in order to show that immunoglobulin genes in the B cells of Peyer's patches in unimmunized mice carry a high level of somatic mutations. Most of the mutations are found in the subpopulation of B cells which, based on peanut agglutinin binding, derive from the germinal centers. The number of mutations per clone and their distribution along the variable gene segment (indicative of untemplated point mutations) are very similar to those found in antigen-specific splenic B cells of normal mice after secondary immunization. The mutations accumulate mainly in complementarity-determining region 1, in particular in some specific codons (Ser-26, Ser-31, and Ser-77) which have been previously recognized as intrinsic hypermutational hotspots. These results suggest that, as in the spleen, somatic mutation occurs in B cells which have migrated to the germinal centers, probably as a consequence of stimulation by antigens present in the gut environment. Transgenic animals are increasingly being used to define the signals involved in hypermutation. However, their subsequent study is very time-consuming because it is based on immunization and analysis of hybridomas or antigen-selected cells. We propose that the use of Peyer's patches of unimmunized adult mice offers a reliable and simple approach to analyze hypermutation of transgenes. PMID:8234326

  4. Comprehensive molecular characterization of a transgenic pig expressing hCD46 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Shi, Ningning; Shang, Ying; Liu, Xiaofei; Fu, Wei; Zhao, Yiqiang; Pan, Dengke; Xu, Wentao; Lin, Xiangmei

    2017-08-30

    Molecular characterization of transgenic animals is crucial for the phenotype analysis, unintended effects prediction, commercial and economic requirements. In this study, a comprehensive molecular characterization of a transgenic pig, which expressed hCD46 gene, was verified using next-generation sequencing (NGS). One complete and one incomplete sequence of pBSCD46-neo and multiple backbone fragments were inserted into the host genome. The whole insertion sequence was 28,243bp, and 12bp sequence on the genome was deleted during the transgene. The cost of NGS is higher than other molecular methods, in order to reduce the cost and to make the sequencing strategy more economically effective, we carried out a computer simulation to identify the smallest amount of data that could meet the requirements of the molecular characterization analysis. 15× depth of coverage was shown to be sufficient with good accuracy, while 3× might be effective, 20× was recommended. The obtained molecular characterization information would provide a stronger foundation for the safety evaluation of the GM animals. Meanwhile, the gene integrity of the porcine pathogen PERV was analyzed using the same procedure. No complete sequence of the PERV subtype was observed in the porcine genome, which was the same as the previous research. In consequence, NGS combined bioinformatics analysis is a reliable and accurate approach for the molecular characterization of GMOs, even for the safety evaluation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Oct4-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic pigs: a new large animal model for reprogramming studies.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Imialek, Monika; Kues, Wilfried A; Petersen, Bjoern; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Herrmann, Doris; Haridoss, Srividyameena; Oropeza, Marianne; Lemme, Erika; Schöler, Hans R; Carnwath, Joseph W; Niemann, Heiner

    2011-09-01

    The domesticated pig has emerged as an important tool for development of surgical techniques, advancement of xenotransplantation, creation of important disease models, and preclinical testing of novel cell therapies. However, germ line-competent pluripotent porcine stem cells have not yet been derived. This has been a major obstacle to genetic modification of pigs. The transcription factor Oct4 is essential for the maintenance of pluripotency and for reprogramming somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Here, we report the production of transgenic pigs carrying an 18 kb genomic sequence of the murine Oct4 gene fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) cDNA (OG2 construct) to allow identification of pluripotent cells by monitoring Oct4 expression by EGFP fluorescence. Eleven viable transgenic piglets were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Expression of the EGFP reporter construct was confined to germ line cells, the inner cell mass and trophectoderm of blastocysts, and testicular germ cells. Reprogramming of fibroblasts from these animals by fusion with pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells or viral transduction with human OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC cDNAs resulted in Oct4-EGFP reactivation. The OG2 pigs have thus proved useful for monitoring reprogramming and the induction and maintenance of pluripotency in porcine cells. In conclusion, the OG2 transgenic pigs are a new large animal model for studying the derivation and maintenance of pluripotent cells, and will be valuable for the development of cell therapy.

  6. Apoptosis of nur77/N10-transgenic thymocytes involves the Fas/Fas ligand pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Weih, F; Ryseck, R P; Chen, L; Bravo, R

    1996-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77/N10 has recently been demonstrated to be involved in apoptosis of T cell hybridomas. We report here that chronic expression of Nur77/N10 in thymocytes of transgenic mice results in a dramatic reduction of CD4+CD8+ double-positive as well as CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ single-positive cell populations due to an early onset of apoptosis. CD4-CD8- double-negative and CD25+ precursor cells, however, are unaffected. Moreover, nur77/N10-transgenic thymocytes show increased expression of Fas ligand (FasL), while the levels of the Fas receptor (Fas) are not increased. The mouse spontaneous mutant gld (generalized lymphoproliferative disease) carries a point mutation in the extracellular domain of the FasL gene that abolishes the ability of FasL to bind to Fas. Thymuses from nur77/N10-transgenic mice on a gld/gld background have increased cellularity and an almost normal profile of thymocyte subpopulations. Our results demonstrate that one pathway of apoptosis triggered by Nur77/N10 in double-positive thymocytes occurs through the upregulation of FasL expression resulting in increased signaling through Fas. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8643610

  7. Starch self-processing in transgenic sweet potato roots expressing a hyperthermophilic α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Monica C; Yencho, Craig G; Haigler, Candace H; Thompson, William F; Kelly, Robert M; Sosinski, Bryon

    2011-01-01

    Sweet potato is a major crop in the southeastern United States, which requires few inputs and grows well on marginal land. It accumulates large quantities of starch in the storage roots and has been shown to give comparable or superior ethanol yields to corn per cultivated acre in the southeast. Starch conversion to fermentable sugars (i.e., for ethanol production) is carried out at high temperatures and requires the action of thermostable and thermoactive amylolytic enzymes. These enzymes are added to the starch mixture impacting overall process economics. To address this shortcoming, the gene encoding a hyperthermophilic α-amylase from Thermotoga maritima was cloned and expressed in transgenic sweet potato, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, to create a plant with the ability to self-process starch. No significant enzyme activity could be detected below 40°C, but starch in the transgenic sweet potato storage roots was readily hydrolyzed at 80°C. The transgene did not affect normal storage root formation. The results presented here demonstrate that engineering plants with hyperthermophilic glycoside hydrolases can facilitate cost effective starch conversion to fermentable sugars. Furthermore, the use of sweet potato as an alternative near-term energy crop should be considered. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  8. Interlaboratory comparison: liver spontaneous mutant frequency from lambda/lacI transgenic mice (Big Blue) (II).

    PubMed

    Young, R R; Rogers, B J; Provost, G S; Short, J M; Putman, D L

    1995-03-01

    Spontaneous mutant frequency in livers of two transgenic mouse strains, each carrying identical lambda shuttle vectors with a lacI target gene, was evaluated by two laboratories. These studies investigated variability in spontaneous mutant frequency between animals and as a function of the number of phage screened. Liver DNA was independently isolated from 7-11 week old C57BL/6 and B6C3F1 Big Blue transgenic mice. At least 500,000 phage were screened for mutation at lacI for each animal using standardized assay procedures. In the two labs, the C57BL/6 liver spontaneous mutant frequency was 45 +/- 9 x 10(-6) and 41 +/- 7 x 10(-6). The B6C3F1 liver spontaneous mutant frequency was 42 +/- 10 x 10(-6) at one lab and 43 +/- 12 x 10(-6) and 41 +/- 8 x 10(-6) in two trials at the second lab. Mean mutant frequency data from both labs, calculated in increments of 100,000 plaque forming units (pfu) scored for each mouse strain, show stabilized mean mutant frequency and standard deviation after approximately 200,000-300,000 pfu screened. The frequency of spontaneous lacI mutants was reproducible both within and between labs and was comparable between the two transgenic mouse strains.

  9. Nucleic acid and protein elimination during the sugar manufacturing process of conventional and transgenic sugar beets.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Altenbuchner, J; Mattes, R

    1998-02-26

    The fate of cellular DNA during the standard purification steps of the sugar manufacturing process from conventional and transgenic sugar beets was determined. Indigenous nucleases of sugar beet cells were found to be active during the first extraction step (raw juice production) which was carried out at 70 degrees C. This and the consecutive steps of the manufacturing process were validated in terms of DNA degradation by competitive PCR of added external DNA. Each step of the process proved to be very efficient in the removal of nucleic acids. Taken together, the purification steps have the potential to reduce the amount of DNA by a factor of > 10(14), exceeding by far the total amount of DNA present in sugar beets. Furthermore, the gene products of the transgenes neomycin phosphotransferase and BNYVV (rhizomania virus) coat protein CP21 were shown to be removed during the purification steps, so that they could not be detected in the resulting white sugar. Thus, sugar obtained from conventional and transgenic beets is indistinguishable or substantially equivalent with respect to purity.

  10. Characterization of a large human transgene following invasin-mediated delivery in a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Austin E; Lucas, Catherine A; Haussecker, Pei Ling; Kosak, Steven T; Harris, Ann

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are widely used in transgenesis, particularly for the humanization of animal models. Moreover, due to their extensive capacity, BACs provide attractive tools to study distal regulatory elements associated with large gene loci. However, despite their widespread use, little is known about the integration dynamics of these large transgenes in mammalian cells. Here, we investigate the post-integration structure of a ~260 kb BAC carrying the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) locus following delivery by bacterial invasion and compare this to the outcome of a more routine lipid-based delivery method. We find substantial variability in integrated copy number and expression levels of the BAC CFTR transgene after bacterial invasion-mediated delivery. Furthermore, we frequently observed variation in the representation of different regions of the CFTR transgene within individual cell clones, indicative of BAC fragmentation. Finally, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we observed that the integrated BAC forms extended megabase-scale structures in some clones that are apparently stably maintained at cell division. These data demonstrate that the utility of large BACs to investigate cis-regulatory elements in the genomic context may be limited by recombination events that complicate their use.

  11. A plant mitochondrial sequence transcribed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts is not edited

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, C.A.; Hanson, M.R.; Zoubenko, O.V.; Maliga, P.

    1995-03-01

    RNA editing occurs in two higher-plant organelles, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Because chloroplasts and mitochondria exhibit some similarity in editing site selection, we investigated whether mitochondrial RNA sequences could be edited in chloroplasts. We produced transgenic tobacco plants that contained chimeric genes in which the second exon of a Petunia hybrida mitochondrial coxII gene was under the control of chloroplast gene regulatory sequences. coxII transcripts accumulated to low or high levels in transgenic chloroplasts containing chimeric genes with the plastid ribosomal protein gene rps16 or the rRNA operon promoter, respectively. Exon 2 of coxII was chosen because it carries seven editing sites and is edited in petunia mitochondria even when located in an abnormal context in an aberrant recombined gene. When editing of the coxII transcripts in transgenic chloroplasts was examined, no RNA editing at any of the usual sites was detected, nor was there any novel editing at any other sites. These results indicate that the RNA editing mechanisms of chloroplasts and mitochondria are not identical but must have at least some organelle-specific components. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Production of early flowering transgenic barley expressing the early flowering allele of Cryptochrome2 gene.

    PubMed

    El-Assal, Salah El-Din; Abd-Alla, Samir M; El-Tarras, Adel A; El-Awady, Mohamed A

    2011-01-01

    This work was carried out in order to develop early flowering barley lines. These lines will be useful to producers by enabling multiple crops within a single season and increasing production. Transgenic barley plants containing the natural early flowering time AtCRY2 allele from the Cape Verde Island (Cvi) ecotype of Arabidopsis have been generated using biolistic transformation. Immature embryo derived calli of two commercially important barley cultivars (El-Dwaser and El-Taif), were transformed using a pCAMBIA-2300 plasmid harboring a genomic fragment containing the AtCRY2-Cvi allele. Transformation was performed utilizing 600 immature embryos for each cultivar. Stable transformation was confirmed in T 0 and T 1 plants by using genomic PCR, RT-PCR and western blot analysis with AtCRY2 specific primers and antibodies, respectively. The transformation efficiency was 5.6% and 3.4% for El-Dwaser and El-Taif cultivars, respectively. Seeds from several T 1 lines were germinated on kanamycin plates and the lines that contained a single locus were selected for further evaluation. The transformed barley plants showed the specific AtCRY2-Cvi flowering phenotype, i.e. early flowering and day length insensitivity, compared to the non transgenic plants. The time to flowering in transgenic T 1 plants was assessed and two lines exhibited flowering more than 25 days earlier than the parental cultivars under short day conditions.

  13. Genotype-Independent Transmission of Transgenic Fluorophore Protein by Boar Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Garrels, Wiebke; Holler, Stephanie; Taylor, Ulrike; Herrmann, Doris; Struckmann, Christina; Klein, Sabine; Barg-Kues, Brigitte; Nowak-Imialek, Monika; Ehling, Christine; Rath, Detlef; Ivics, Zoltán; Niemann, Heiner; Kues, Wilfried A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we generated transposon-transgenic boars (Sus scrofa), which carry three monomeric copies of a fluorophore marker gene. Amazingly, a ubiquitous fluorophore expression in somatic, as well as in germ cells was found. Here, we characterized the prominent fluorophore load in mature spermatozoa of these animals. Sperm samples were analyzed for general fertility parameters, sorted according to X and Y chromosome-bearing sperm fractions, assessed for potential detrimental effects of the reporter, and used for inseminations into estrous sows. Independent of their genotype, all spermatozoa were uniformly fluorescent with a subcellular compartmentalization of the fluorophore protein in postacrosomal sheath, mid piece and tail. Transmission of the fluorophore protein to fertilized oocytes was shown by confocal microscopic analysis of zygotes. The monomeric copies of the transgene segregated during meiosis, rendering a certain fraction of the spermatozoa non-transgenic (about 10% based on analysis of 74 F1 offspring). The genotype-independent transmission of the fluorophore protein by spermatozoa to oocytes represents a non-genetic contribution to the mammalian embryo. PMID:22110672

  14. Infertility resulting from transgenic I-PpoI male Anopheles gambiae in large cage trials

    PubMed Central

    Klein, T A; Windbichler, N; Deredec, A; Burt, A; Benedict, M Q

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Anopheles gambiae is the primary vector of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and is a potential target of genetic control programs. We determined the capacity of male A. gambiae created by germline transformation to introduce infertility into stable age-distribution populations. We also determined effects of the transgenes on life history. Methods Stable age-distribution populations of A. gambiae mosquitoes were established in large indoor cages. Male mosquitoes carrying an I-PpoI homing endonuclease gene were introduced at ×5 and ×10 release rates where they competed with target male mosquitoes for matings. Similar trials were conducted in small cages with an additional ×1 release level. Results Infertility was successfully introduced into all target populations. In supporting experiments, complete female infertility was observed in all strains and species of the A. gambiae complex to which transgenic males were mated. Life history experiments demonstrated that reductions in I-PpoI male vigor exist in the form of reduced adult male emergence, longevity and competitiveness. Discussion A. gambiae I-PpoI males are capable of introducing high levels of infertility in target populations in indoor cage trials. This was accomplished despite losses of vigor resulting from the HEG transgene. These results motivate further trials of sexually I-PpoI A. gambiae in outdoor cage and field trials. PMID:22595271

  15. Overview of expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng-jun; Guo, Bin; Huo, Yan-lin; Guan, Zheng-ping; Wei, Ya-hui

    2010-10-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), a pathogen for chronic liver infection, afflicts more than 350 million people world-wide. The effective way to control the virus is to take HBV vaccine. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is an effective protective antigen suitable for vaccine development. At present, "edible" vaccine based on transgenic plants is one of the most promising directions in novel types of vaccines. HBsAg production from transgenic plants has been carried out, and the transgenic plant expression systems have developed from model plants (such as tobacco, potato and tomato) to other various plant platforms. Crude or purified extracts of transformed plants have been found to conduct immunological responses and clinical trials for hepatitis B, which gave the researches of plant-based HBsAg production a big boost. The aim of this review was to summarize the recent data about plant-based HBsAg development including molecular biology of HBsAg gene, selection of expression vector, the expression of HBsAg gene in plants, as well as corresponding immunological responses in animal models or human.

  16. Development of Transgenic Cotton Lines Expressing Allium sativum Agglutinin (ASAL) for Enhanced Resistance against Major Sap-Sucking Pests

    PubMed Central

    Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1–2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects. PMID:24023750

  17. Development of transgenic cotton lines expressing Allium sativum agglutinin (ASAL) for enhanced resistance against major sap-sucking pests.

    PubMed

    Vajhala, Chakravarthy S K; Sadumpati, Vijaya Kumar; Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1-2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects.

  18. L1 integration in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Babushok, Daria V.; Ostertag, Eric M.; Courtney, Christine E.; Choi, Janice M.; Kazazian, Haig H.

    2006-01-01

    To study integration of the human LINE-1 retrotransposon (L1) in vivo, we developed a transgenic mouse model of L1 retrotransposition that displays de novo somatic L1 insertions at a high frequency, occasionally several insertions per mouse. We mapped 3′ integration sites of 51 insertions by Thermal Asymmetric Interlaced PCR (TAIL–PCR). Analysis of integration locations revealed a broad genomic distribution with a modest preference for intergenic regions. We characterized the complete structures of 33 de novo retrotransposition events. Our results highlight the large number of highly truncated L1s, as over 52% (27/51) of total integrants were <1/3 the length of a full-length element. New integrants carry all structural characteristics typical of genomic L1s, including a number with inversions, deletions, and 5′-end microhomologies to the target DNA sequence. Notably, at least 13% (7/51) of all insertions contain a short stretch of extra nucleotides at their 5′ end, which we postulate result from template-jumping by the L1-encoded reverse transcriptase. We propose a unified model of L1 integration that explains all of the characteristic features of L1 retrotransposition, such as 5′ truncations, inversions, extra nucleotide additions, and 5′ boundary and inversion point microhomologies. PMID:16365384

  19. Production cost analysis and use of pesticides in the transgenic and conventional corn crop [Zea mays (L.)] in the valley of San Juan, Tolima.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Kelly Avila; Chaparro Giraldo, Alejandro; Moreno, Giovanni Reyes; Castro, Carlos Silva

    2011-01-01

    A survey of 10 producers of conventional corn (Hybrids PAC 105 and Maximus) and 10 producers of transgenic corn (Pioneer Hybrid 30T17) was carried out in the municipality of Valle de San Juan in the territorial division of Tolima (Colombia), in order to analyze the differences in production costs and environmental impacts of these two agricultural technologies.  The environmental impacts were determined by calculating the field "Environmental Index Quotient" (EIQ). In the production cost analysis, a difference of 15% was found in benefit of the transgenic technology. The structure of costs of the transgenic technology was benefited by the reduced use of pesticides (insecticides and herbicides). In regards to production, the transgenic technology showed a greater yield, 5.22 ton/ha in comparison to 4.25 ton/ha the conventional technology, thus a 22% difference in yield. Finally, the EIQ calculation showed quantitative differences of 196.12 for the conventional technology (EIQ insecticides 165.14 + EIQ herbicides 30.98), while the transgenic technology was of 4.24 (EIQ insecticides 0 + EIQ herbicides 4.24). These results show a minor environmental impact when using the transgenic technology in comparison to the conventional technology, in regards to the use of insecticides and herbicides in a temporal, spatial and genotypical context analysis. :

  20. Expression of a potato antimicrobial peptide SN1 increases resistance to take-all pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici in transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Rong, Wei; Qi, Lin; Wang, Jingfen; Du, Lipu; Xu, Huijun; Wang, Aiyun; Zhang, Zengyan

    2013-08-01

    Take-all, caused by soil-borne fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt), is a devastating root disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Breeding resistant wheat cultivars is the most promising and reliable approach to protect wheat from take-all. Currently, no resistant wheat germplasm is available to breed cultivars using traditional methods. In this study, gene transformation was carried out using Snakin-1 (SN1) gene isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) because the peptide shows broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in vitro. Purified SN1 peptide also inhibits in vitro the growth of Ggt mycelia. By bombardment-mediated method, the gene SN1 was transformed into Chinese wheat cultivar Yangmai 18 to generate SN1 transgenic wheat lines, which were used to assess the effectiveness of the SN1 peptide in protecting wheat from Ggt. Genomic PCR and Southern blot analyses indicated that the alien gene SN1 was integrated into the genomes of five transgenic wheat lines and heritable from T₀ to T₄ progeny. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that the introduced SN1 gene was transcribed and highly expressed in the five transgenic wheat lines. Following challenging with Ggt, disease test results showed that compared to segregants lacking the transgene and untransformed wheat plants, these five transgenic wheat lines expressing SN1 displayed significantly enhanced resistance to take-all. These results suggest that SN1 may be a potentially transgenic tool for improving the take-all resistance of wheat.

  1. Molecular analysis of transgenic melon plants showing virus resistance conferred by direct repeat of movement gene of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Emran Md; Emran, Ali; Tabei, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Kappei; Yamaoka, Naoto; Nishiguchi, Masamichi

    2012-08-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) is a major limiting factor in the production of melon plants worldwide. For effective control of this virus using the transgenic approach, the direct repeat of the movement protein gene of CGMMV was used for transforming melon plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR and Southern blot analyses of T₃ confirmed that they carried the transgene. Northern blot analysis with total RNA showed that transgene transcript RNA as well as siRNA was observed in all plants tested. Separate leaves or individual plants were inoculated with CGMMV and subjected to ELISA and RNA blot analysis using the coat protein gene probe of the virus. Compared to nontransgenic control, these plants were shown to have high virus resistance. Furthermore, cytosine of the transgene DNA in the plants was methylated. Thus, these results reveal that the transgenic lines were highly resistant to the virus through RNA silencing. Key message High virus resistance was obtained in transgenic melon plants with direct repeat of movement protein gene of Cucumber green mottle mosaic tobamovirus through RNA silencing.

  2. [Characteristics of steroid metabolism in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants bearing the CYP11A1 cDNA of cytochrome P450(SCC) from the bovine adrenal cortex].

    PubMed

    Spivak, S G; Berdichevets, I N; Litvinovskaia, R P; Drach, S V; Kartel', N A; Shpakovskiĭ, G V

    2010-01-01

    In the mitochondria of animal steroidogenic tissues, cytochrome P450(SCC), encoded by the CYP11A1 gene, catalyzes the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone - the general precursor of all steroid hormones. In this work, we study the steroid metabolism in transgenic tobacco plants carrying the CYP11A1 cDNA cytochrome P450(SCC)from the bovine adrenal cortex. The transgenic plants under investigation markedly surpass the control wild-type plants by size and are characterized by a shortened period of vegetative growth (by rapid flowering); their leaves contain pregnenolone - the product of a reaction catalyzed by cytochrome P450(SCC). The level of progesterone in transgenic tobacco leaves is higher than in the control plants of the wild type. The seeds of the transgenic plants contain less (24R)-brassinosteroids than the wild-type tobacco plants. The results obtained indicate that the synthesis of an active P450(SCC) cytochrome in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants has a profound effect on steroid metabolism and is responsible for the specific phenotypic features of transgenic plants bearing CYP11A1 cDNA.

  3. Expression Systems and Species Used for Transgenic Animal Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanli; Zhao, Sihai; Bai, Liang; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals) and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm cocoon), the mammary glands of transgenic animals have enormous potential. Compared with other mammalian species (pig, goat, sheep, and cow) that are currently being studied as bioreactors, rabbits offer many advantages: high fertility, easy generation of transgenic founders and offspring, insensitivity to prion diseases, relatively high milk production, and no transmission of severe diseases to humans. Noticeably, for a small- or medium-sized facility, the rabbit system is ideal to produce up to 50 kg of protein per year, considering both economical and hygienic aspects; rabbits are attractive candidates for the mammary-gland-specific expression of recombinant proteins. We also reviewed recombinant proteins that have been produced by targeted expression in the mammary glands of rabbits and discussed the limitations of transgenic animal bioreactors. PMID:23586046

  4. Expression systems and species used for transgenic animal bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Zhao, Sihai; Bai, Liang; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals) and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm cocoon), the mammary glands of transgenic animals have enormous potential. Compared with other mammalian species (pig, goat, sheep, and cow) that are currently being studied as bioreactors, rabbits offer many advantages: high fertility, easy generation of transgenic founders and offspring, insensitivity to prion diseases, relatively high milk production, and no transmission of severe diseases to humans. Noticeably, for a small- or medium-sized facility, the rabbit system is ideal to produce up to 50 kg of protein per year, considering both economical and hygienic aspects; rabbits are attractive candidates for the mammary-gland-specific expression of recombinant proteins. We also reviewed recombinant proteins that have been produced by targeted expression in the mammary glands of rabbits and discussed the limitations of transgenic animal bioreactors.

  5. Recent advances in the development of new transgenic animal technology.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiangyang

    2013-03-01

    Transgenic animal technology is one of the fastest growing biotechnology areas. It is used to integrate exogenous genes into the animal genome by genetic engineering technology so that these genes can be inherited and expressed by offspring. The transgenic efficiency and precise control of gene expression are the key limiting factors in the production of transgenic animals. A variety of transgenic technologies are available. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages and needs further study because of unresolved technical and safety issues. Further studies will allow transgenic technology to explore gene function, animal genetic improvement, bioreactors, animal disease models, and organ transplantation. This article reviews the recently developed animal transgenic technologies, including the germ line stem cell-mediated method to improve efficiency, gene targeting to improve accuracy, RNA interference-mediated gene silencing technology, zinc-finger nuclease gene targeting technology and induced pluripotent stem cell technology. These new transgenic techniques can provide a better platform to develop transgenic animals for breeding new animal varieties and promote the development of medical sciences, livestock production, and other fields.

  6. 2013 North Dakota Transgenic Barley Research and FHB Nursery Report

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research continues to develop and test new transgenic plants using genes provided by collaborators. As lines are developed in Golden Promise, they are crossed to Conlon for field testing. Transgenic lines developed in Conlon are being crossed to resistant lines developed by the breeding programs. ...

  7. Gene flow in genetically altered crops helps progress transgenic turfgrass.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous useful traits are being imparted into transgenic and non-transgenic plants. Gene flow as indicated in a recent publication from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST 2007) is the successful transfer of genetic information between different individuals, populations, and g...

  8. Principles and application of transgenic technology in marine organisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marine organisms into which a foreign gene or noncoding DNA fragment is artificially introduced and stably integrated in their genomes are termed transgenic marine organisms. Since the first report in 1985, a wide range of transgenic fish and marine bivalve mollusks have been produced by microinjec...

  9. Overview on the investigations of transgenic plums in Romania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, PT3 and PT5 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natu...

  10. Overview of the investigation of transgenic plums in Romania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6 and PT3 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natural i...

  11. Bioavailability of transgenic microRNAs in genetically modified plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic expression of small RNAs is a prevalent approach in agrobiotechnology for the global enhancement of plant foods. Meanwhile, emerging studies have, on the one hand, emphasized the potential of transgenic microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel dietary therapeutics and, on the other, suggested potentia...

  12. Effects of Transgenic Glyphosate-Resistant Crops on Water Quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) is a highly effective, non-selective herbicide. Herbicide-resistant crop (HRC) has been the most successful trait used in transgenic crops throughout the world. Transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops (GRCs) have been commercialized and grown extensively in the...

  13. Transgenic manipulation of the metabolism of polyamines in poplar cells

    Treesearch

    Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Bernadette M. Glasheen; Suneet K. Bains; Stephanie L. Long; Rakesh Minocha; Christian Walter; Subhash C. Minocha

    2001-01-01

    The metabolism of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) has become the target of genetic manipulation because of their significance in plant development and possibly stress tolerance. We studied the polyamine metabolism in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic cells of poplar (Populus nigra 3 maximowiczii) expressing a...

  14. Transgenic Crops and Sustainable Agriculture in the European Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponti, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    The rapid adoption of transgenic crops in the United States, Argentina, and Canada stands in strong contrast to the situation in the European Union (EU), where a de facto moratorium has been in place since 1998. This article reviews recent scientific literature relevant to the problematic introduction of transgenic crops in the EU to assess if…

  15. Transgenic Crops and Sustainable Agriculture in the European Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponti, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    The rapid adoption of transgenic crops in the United States, Argentina, and Canada stands in strong contrast to the situation in the European Union (EU), where a de facto moratorium has been in place since 1998. This article reviews recent scientific literature relevant to the problematic introduction of transgenic crops in the EU to assess if…

  16. Knock-out and Transgenic Strategies to Improve Neural Transplantation Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) are 1) poor survival of grafted fetal neurons and 2) insufficient axonal outgrowth and functional recovery. We carried out experiments aimed at by short-term inhibition by pre-treatment of fetal cells with pharmacological inhibitors of caspases. In our second objective of enhancing axonal growth leading to optimal functional recovery by neuronal transplants, we employed transgenic bcl-2 overexpressing donor cells and similar molecules influencing the growth of axons in the fetal and adult CNS. Use of such molecules could significantly improve

  17. [Application of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to the detection and identification of transgenic corn].

    PubMed

    Rui, Yu-kui; Luo, Yun-bo; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Zhang, Lu-da

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of the GMO, more and more GMO food has been pouring into the market. Much attention has been paid to GMO labeling under the controversy of GMO safety. Transgenic corns and their parents were scanned by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy range of 12000-4000 cm(-1); the resolution was 4 cm(-1); scanning was carried out for 64 times; BP algorithm was applied for data processing. The GMO food was easily resolved. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is unpolluted and inexpensive compared with PCR and ELISA, so it is a very promising detection method for GMO food.

  18. Advancing environmental risk assessment for transgenic biofeedstock crops

    PubMed Central

    Wolt, Jeffrey D

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic modification of plants is a key enabling technology for developing sustainable biofeedstocks for biofuels production. Regulatory decisions and the wider acceptance and development of transgenic biofeedstock crops are considered from the context of science-based risk assessment. The risk assessment paradigm for transgenic biofeedstock crops is fundamentally no different from that of current generation transgenic crops, except that the focus of the assessment must consider the unique attributes of a given biofeedstock crop and its environmental release. For currently envisioned biofeedstock crops, particular emphasis in risk assessment will be given to characterization of altered metabolic profiles and their implications relative to non-target environmental effects and food safety; weediness and invasiveness when plants are modified for abiotic stress tolerance or are domesticated; and aggregate risk when plants are platforms for multi-product production. Robust risk assessments for transgenic biofeedstock crops are case-specific, initiated through problem formulation, and use tiered approaches for risk characterization. PMID:19883509

  19. Spatial and Temporal Control of Transgene Expression in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stankunas, Kryn

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic zebrafish research has provided valuable insights into gene functions and cell behaviors directing vertebrate development, physiology, and disease models. Most approaches use constitutive transgene expression and therefore do not provide control over the timing or levels of transgene induction. We describe an inducible gene expression system that uses new tissue-specific zebrafish transgenic lines that express the Gal4 transcription factor fused to the estrogen-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor. We show these Gal4-ERT driver lines confer rapid, tissue-specific induction of UAS-controlled transgenes following tamoxifen exposure in both embryos and adult fish. We demonstrate how this technology can be used to define developmental windows of gene function by spatiotemporal-controlled expression of constitutively active Notch1 in embryos. Given the array of existing UAS lines, the modular nature of this system will enable many previously intractable zebrafish experiments. PMID:24643048

  20. Biodegradation of explosives by transgenic plants expressing pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    French, C E; Rosser, S J; Davies, G J; Nicklin, S; Bruce, N C

    1999-05-01

    Plants offer many advantages over bacteria as agents for bioremediation; however, they typically lack the degradative capabilities of specially selected bacterial strains. Transgenic plants expressing microbial degradative enzymes could combine the advantages of both systems. To investigate this possibility in the context of bioremediation of explosive residues, we generated transgenic tobacco plants expressing pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase, an enzyme derived from an explosive-degrading bacterium that enables degradation of nitrate ester and nitroaromatic explosives. Seeds from transgenic plants were able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mM glycerol trinitrate (GTN) or 0.05 mM trinitrotoluene, at concentrations that inhibited germination and growth of wild-type seeds. Transgenic seedlings grown in liquid medium with 1 mM GTN showed more rapid and complete denitration of GTN than wild-type seedlings. This example suggests that transgenic plants expressing microbial degradative genes may provide a generally applicable strategy for bioremediation of organic pollutants in soil.