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Sample records for cartesian geometric moment

  1. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  2. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  3. Direct determination of multipole moments of Cartesian Gaussian functions in spherical polar coordinates.

    PubMed

    Choi, Cheol Ho

    2004-02-22

    A new way of generating the multipole moments of Cartesian Gaussian functions in spherical polar coordinates has been established, bypassing the intermediary of Cartesian moment tensors. A new set of recurrence relations have also been derived for the resulting analytic integral values. The new method furnishes a conceptually simple and numerically efficient evaluation procedure for the multipole moments. The advantages over existing methods are documented. The results are relevant for the linear scaling quantum theories based on the fast multipole method.

  4. Moment Closures on Two-Dimensional Cartesian Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Charles K.

    2015-07-31

    Some moment methods for kinetic equations are complicated and take time to develop. Over the course of a couple years, this software was developed to test different closures on standard test problems in the literature. With this software, researchers in the field of moment closures will be able to rapidly test new methods.

  5. Moment-of-fluid analytic reconstruction on 2D Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Antoine; Glockner, Stéphane; Breil, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Moment-of-Fluid (MoF) is a piecewise linear interface reconstruction method that tracks fluid through its volume fraction and centroid, which are deduced from the zeroth and first moments. We present a method that replaces the original minimization stage by an analytic reconstruction algorithm on bi-dimensional Cartesian grids. This algorithm provides accurate results for a lower computational cost than the original minimization algorithm. When more than two fluids are involved, this algorithm can be used coupled with the minimization algorithm. Although this paper deals with Cartesian grids, everything remains valid for any meshes that are made of rectangular cells.

  6. Geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations in Cartesian coordinates: accurate reduction in zero-point energy.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2005-08-22

    An approach for the inclusion of geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations is introduced. An important aspect of the approach is that Cartesian coordinates are used throughout. We devised an algorithm for the constrained sampling of initial conditions through the use of multivariate Gaussian distribution based on a projected Hessian. We also propose an approach for the constrained evaluation of the so-called Herman-Kluk prefactor in its exact log-derivative form. Sample calculations are performed for free and constrained rare-gas trimers. The results show that the proposed approach provides an accurate evaluation of the reduction in zero-point energy. Exact basis set calculations are used to assess the accuracy of the semiclassical results. Since Cartesian coordinates are used, the approach is general and applicable to a variety of molecular and atomic systems.

  7. Internal-to-Cartesian back transformation of molecular geometry steps using high-order geometric derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rybkin, Vladimir V; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve

    2013-08-05

    In geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics calculations, it is often necessary to transform a geometry step that has been determined in internal coordinates to Cartesian coordinates. A new method for performing such transformations, the high-order path-expansion (HOPE) method, is here presented. The new method treats the nonlinear relation between internal and Cartesian coordinates by means of automatic differentiation. The method is reliable, applicable to any system of internal coordinates, and computationally more efficient than the traditional method of iterative back transformations. As a bonus, the HOPE method determines not just the Cartesian step vector but also a continuous step path expressed in the form of a polynomial, which is useful for determining reaction coordinates, for integrating trajectories, and for visualization.

  8. Analysis of geometric moments as features for firearm identification.

    PubMed

    Md Ghani, Nor Azura; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Jemain, Abdul Aziz

    2010-05-20

    The task of identifying firearms from forensic ballistics specimens is exacting in crime investigation since the last two decades. Every firearm, regardless of its size, make and model, has its own unique 'fingerprint'. These fingerprints transfer when a firearm is fired to the fired bullet and cartridge case. The components that are involved in producing these unique characteristics are the firing chamber, breech face, firing pin, ejector, extractor and the rifling of the barrel. These unique characteristics are the critical features in identifying firearms. It allows investigators to decide on which particular firearm that has fired the bullet. Traditionally the comparison of ballistic evidence has been a tedious and time-consuming process requiring highly skilled examiners. Therefore, the main objective of this study is the extraction and identification of suitable features from firing pin impression of cartridge case images for firearm recognition. Some previous studies have shown that firing pin impression of cartridge case is one of the most important characteristics used for identifying an individual firearm. In this study, data are gathered using 747 cartridge case images captured from five different pistols of type 9mm Parabellum Vektor SP1, made in South Africa. All the images of the cartridge cases are then segmented into three regions, forming three different set of images, i.e. firing pin impression image, centre of firing pin impression image and ring of firing pin impression image. Then geometric moments up to the sixth order were generated from each part of the images to form a set of numerical features. These 48 features were found to be significantly different using the MANOVA test. This high dimension of features is then reduced into only 11 significant features using correlation analysis. Classification results using cross-validation under discriminant analysis show that 96.7% of the images were classified correctly. These results demonstrate

  9. Geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations in Cartesian coordinates: excited states.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2007-01-14

    The authors show that a recently proposed approach [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 084103 (2005)] for the inclusion of geometric constraints in semiclassical initial value representation calculations can be used to obtain excited states of weakly bound complexes. Sample calculations are performed for free and constrained rare gas clusters. The results show that the proposed approach allows the evaluation of excited states with reasonable accuracy when compared to exact basis set calculations.

  10. Affine Legendre moment invariants for image watermarking robust to geometric distortions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Shu, Huazhong; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Jonathan Q. M.; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Hongqing; Luo, Limin

    2011-01-01

    Geometric distortions are generally simple and effective attacks for many watermarking methods. They can make detection and extraction of the embedded watermark difficult or even impossible by destroying the synchronization between the watermark reader and the embedded watermark. In this paper, we propose a new watermarking approach which allows watermark detection and extraction under affine transformation attacks. The novelty of our approach stands on a set of affine invariants we derived from Legendre moments. Watermark embedding and detection are directly performed on this set of invariants. We also show how these moments can be exploited for estimating the geometric distortion parameters in order to permit watermark extraction. Experimental results show that the proposed watermarking scheme is robust to a wide range of attacks: geometric distortion, filtering, compression, and additive noise. PMID:21342852

  11. Skeletal octahedral nanoframe with Cartesian coordinates via geometrically precise nanoscale phase segregation in a Pt@Ni core-shell nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Oh, Aram; Baik, Hionsuck; Choi, Dong Shin; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Byeongyoon; Kim, Heejin; Kwon, Seong Jung; Joo, Sang Hoon; Jung, Yousung; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2015-03-24

    Catalytic properties of nanoparticles can be significantly enhanced by controlling nanoscale alloying and its structure. In this work, by using a facet-controlled Pt@Ni core-shell octahedron nanoparticle, we show that the nanoscale phase segregation can have directionality and be geometrically controlled to produce a Ni octahedron that is penetrated by Pt atoms along three orthogonal Cartesian axes and is coated by Pt atoms along its edges. This peculiar anisotropic diffusion of Pt core atoms along the ⟨100⟩ vertex, and then toward the ⟨110⟩ edges, is explained via the minimum strain energy for Ni-Ni pair interactions. The selective removal of the Ni-rich phase by etching then results in structurally fortified Pt-rich skeletal PtNi alloy framework nanostructures. Electrochemical evaluation of this hollow nanoframe suggests that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is greatly improved compared to conventional Pt catalysts.

  12. Cartesian beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2007-12-01

    A new and very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in Cartesian coordinates is presented. We call such a field a Cartesian beam. The complex amplitude of the Cartesian beams is described by either the parabolic cylinder functions or the confluent hypergeometric functions, and the beams are characterized by three parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integration are studied in detail. Applying the general expression of the Cartesian beams, we also derive two new and meaningful beam structures that, to our knowledge, have not yet been reported in the literature. Special cases of the Cartesian beams are the standard, elegant, and generalized Hermite-Gauss beams, the cosine-Gauss beams, the Lorentz beams, and the fractional order beams.

  13. Geometric Moments Based Ellipsoid Model for Defining Spatio-Temporal Characteristics of Extreme Rainfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.

    2011-12-01

    The impact of climate variation on monsoon seasonal rainfall has been generally well documented in the climate literature. However, rather limited efforts have been done to understand moisture transport and their impact on extreme rainfall in the hydrology field. This study developed a new model for extracting moisture tracks associated with extreme events as a way to characterize large scale climate system. Main interests are to derive location, size and direction of the rainfall field and this study developed an algorithm to extract the above characteristics from global climate data set. In order to facilitate characterization of synoptic patterns, geometric moment based ellipsoid models are introduced. Local weather station data in Korea and NCEP reanalysis data are mainly utilized to identify synoptic patterns. The proposed geometric moments based ellipsoid model works equally well with regularly and irregularly distributed synthetic grid data. Finally, the proposed model was applied to space-time real moisture transport. We extracted daily wind patterns and specific humidity on top 20 extreme rainfall events and apply a 90% threshold to isolate high magnitude of moisture transport associated with extreme rainfall in South Korea. It was found that location, size and direction of the rainfall field was successfully extracted. Our analyses of daily synoptic moisture transport patterns defined by geometric moments suggest can be possibly clustered given their intensity, direction and position properties. Acknowledgement : This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (NRF-2010-220-D00083)

  14. Moment map and gauge geometric aspects of the Schrödinger and Pauli equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we discuss various geometric aspects related to the Schrödinger and the Pauli equations. First we resume the Madelung-Bohm hydrodynamical approach to quantum mechanics and recall the Hamiltonian structure of the Schrödinger equation. The probability current provides an equivariant moment map for the group G = sDiff(R3) of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms of R3 (rapidly approaching the identity at infinity) and leads to a current algebra of Rasetti-Regge type. The moment map picture is then extended, mutatis mutandis, to the Pauli equation and to generalized Schrödinger equations of the Pauli-Thomas type. A gauge theoretical reinterpretation of all equations is obtained via the introduction of suitable Maurer-Cartan gauge fields and it is then related to Weyl geometric and pilot wave ideas. A general framework accommodating Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher effects is presented within the gauge approach. Furthermore, a kind of holomorphic geometric quantization can be performed and yields natural “coherent state” representations of G. The relationship with the covariant phase space and density manifold approaches is then outlined. Comments on possible extensions to nonlinear Schrödinger equations, on Fisher-information theoretic aspects and on stochastic mechanics are finally made.

  15. Spin-orbit coupled jeff=1/2 iridium moments on the geometrically frustrated fcc lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Cook, A. M.; Matern, S.; Hickey, C.; ...

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by experiments on La2ZnIrO6 and La2MgIrO6, we study the magnetism of spin-orbit coupled jeff = 1/2 iridium moments on the three-dimensional geometrically-frustrated face-centered cubic lattice. The symmetry-allowed nearest-neighbor interaction includes Heisenberg, Kitaev, and symmetric off-diagonal exchange. Using Luttinger-Tisza and Monte Carlo simulations, we find a rich variety of orders, including collinear A-type antiferromagnetism, collinear stripe order with moments along the {111}-direction, and incommensurate non-coplanar spirals, and determine their magnetic ordering transition temperatures. We argue that thermodynamic data on these iridates underscore the presence of a dominant Kitaev exchange, and suggest a possible resolution to the puzzle of why La2ZnIrO6,more » but not La2MgIrO6, exhibits 'weak' ferromagnetism.« less

  16. Spin-orbit coupled jeff=1 /2 iridium moments on the geometrically frustrated fcc lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. M.; Matern, S.; Hickey, C.; Aczel, A. A.; Paramekanti, A.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by experiments on the double perovskites La2ZnIrO6 and La2MgIrO6 , we study the magnetism of spin-orbit coupled jeff=1 /2 iridium moments on the three-dimensional, geometrically frustrated, face-centered cubic lattice. The symmetry-allowed nearest-neighbor interaction includes Heisenberg, Kitaev, and symmetric off-diagonal exchange. A Luttinger-Tisza analysis shows a rich variety of orders, including collinear A -type antiferromagnetism, stripe order with moments along the {111 } direction, and incommensurate noncoplanar spirals, and we use Monte Carlo simulations to determine their magnetic ordering temperatures. We argue that existing thermodynamic data on these iridates underscores the presence of a dominant Kitaev exchange, and also suggest a resolution to the puzzle of why La2ZnIrO6 , but not La2MgIrO6 , exhibits "weak" ferromagnetism.

  17. Geometric Aspects of the Full Moment Tensors in the Gulf of California and the Mexican East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Roberto; Quintanar, Luis; Huesca-Pérez, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    The East Pacific Rise (EPR) and the Gulf of California (GC) have different tectonic histories. While the EPR has been present for 75 Ma, the GC started only 12.5 Myr. The region that links both systems is the Tamayo Fracture Zone, where a diffuse triple junction is located. A key question to be solved is whether the source mechanisms in this region reflect important variations from the GC to the EPR. Therefore, we analyzed the seismic moment tensors of the GC and the EPR using a full moment tensor inversion. This source model is useful in extensional regimes where isotropic components or complex faults are present. The full moment tensor is the best representation of the fault and slip direction in a rifting process because it resolves for six free parameters, including complex sources of pure shear dislocations. The analysis is similar to the deviatoric case, but the interpretation is different, because physical characteristics in the model allow for choosing a realistic style of rupture. Our results show that there are similarities between focal mechanisms determined by full moment tensors computed for the southern part of the GC and the EPR. We suggest that the EPR is tectonically linked to the GC not only at the diffuse triple junction region but also along the entire province. The rupture patterns of the GC and the EPR are slightly different: whereas the GC is partitioned by means of NW-SE faults, the EPR ruptures through a faulting system NE-SW. The geometrical relations of the extensional province of the GC and the EPR were present since the crustal thinning of the rifting process. Strain partitioning of faults explains easily the nature of the oblique divergence of the GC and the EPR. In addition, in our analysis, we observe clockwise rotation in the structures of the southern part of the GC, suggesting that there is a change in the spatial partitioning of this region.

  18. Accurate computation of Zernike moments in polar coordinates.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yongqing; Pawlak, Miroslaw; Liao, Simon

    2007-02-01

    An algorithm for high-precision numerical computation of Zernike moments is presented. The algorithm, based on the introduced polar pixel tiling scheme, does not exhibit the geometric error and numerical integration error which are inherent in conventional methods based on Cartesian coordinates. This yields a dramatic improvement of the Zernike moments accuracy in terms of their reconstruction and invariance properties. The introduced image tiling requires an interpolation algorithm which turns out to be of the second order importance compared to the discretization error. Various comparisons are made between the accuracy of the proposed method and that of commonly used techniques. The results reveal the great advantage of our approach.

  19. An E-plane analysis of aperture-matched horn antennas using the moment method and the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heedy, D. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The moment method and the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction are utilized to obtain two separate solutions for the E-plane field pattern of an aperture-matched horn antenna. This particular horn antenna consists of a standard pyramidal horn with the following modifications: a rolled edge section attached to the aperture edges and a curved throat section. The resulting geometry provides significantly better performance in terms of the pattern, impedance, and frequency characteristics than normally obtainable. The moment method is used to calculate the E-plane pattern and BSWR of the antenna. However, at higher frequencies, large amounts of computation time are required. The uniform geometrical theory of diffraction provides a quick and efficient high frequency solution for the E-plane field pattern. In fact, the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction may be used to initially design the antenna; then, the moment method may be applied to fine tune the design. This procedure has been successfully applied to a compact range feed design.

  20. Activities: Geometric Transformations. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddins, Susan K.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents a lesson that connects basic transformational concepts with transformations on a Cartesian-coordinate system, culminating with the application of matrix operations to perform geometric transformations. Includes reproducible student worksheets and assessment activities. (MKR)

  1. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  2. Geometric, electronic, and magnetic structure of Co{sub 2}FeSi: Curie temperature and magnetic moment measurements and calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wurmehl, Sabine; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Kandpal, Hem C.; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Felser, Claudia; Lin Hongji; Morais, Jonder

    2005-11-01

    In this work a simple concept was used for a systematic search for materials with high spin polarization. It is based on two semiempirical models. First, the Slater-Pauling rule was used for estimation of the magnetic moment. This model is well supported by electronic structure calculations. The second model was found particularly for Co{sub 2} based Heusler compounds when comparing their magnetic properties. It turned out that these compounds exhibit seemingly a linear dependence of the Curie temperature as function of the magnetic moment. Stimulated by these models, Co{sub 2}FeSi was revisited. The compound was investigated in detail concerning its geometrical and magnetic structure by means of x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption, and Moessbauer spectroscopies as well as high and low temperature magnetometry. The measurements revealed that it is, currently, the material with the highest magnetic moment (6{mu}{sub B}) and Curie temperature (1100 K) in the classes of Heusler compounds as well as half-metallic ferromagnets. The experimental findings are supported by detailed electronic structure calculations.

  3. Cartesian-Grid Simulations of a Canard-Controlled Missile with a Free-Spinning Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The proposed paper presents a series of simulations of a geometrically complex, canard-controlled, supersonic missile with free-spinning tail fins. Time-dependent simulations were performed using an inviscid Cartesian-grid-based method with results compared to both experimental data and high-resolution Navier-Stokes computations. At fixed free stream conditions and canard deflections, the tail spin rate was iteratively determined such that the net rolling moment on the empennage is zero. This rate corresponds to the time-asymptotic rate of the free-to-spin fin system. After obtaining spin-averaged aerodynamic coefficients for the missile, the investigation seeks a fixed-tail approximation to the spin-averaged aerodynamic coefficients, and examines the validity of this approximation over a variety of freestream conditions.

  4. Software for Automated Generation of Cartesian Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J.; Melton, John E.; Berger, Marshal J.

    2006-01-01

    Cart3D is a collection of computer programs for generating Cartesian meshes [for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other applications] in volumes bounded by solid objects. Aspects of Cart3D at earlier stages of development were reported in "Robust and Efficient Generation of Cartesian Meshes for CFD" (ARC-14275), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 8 (August 1999), page 30. The geometric input to Cart3D comprises surface triangulations like those commonly generated by computer-aided-design programs. Complexly shaped objects can be represented as assemblies of simpler ones. Cart3D deletes all portions of such an assembled object that are not on the exterior surface. Intersections between components are preserved in the resulting triangulation. A tie-breaking routine unambiguously resolves geometric degeneracies. Then taking the intersected surface triangulation as input, the volume mesh is generated through division of cells of an initially coarse hexahedral grid. Cells are subdivided to refine the grid in regions of increased surface curvature and/or increased flow gradients. Cells that become split into multiple unconnected regions by thin pieces of surface are identified.

  5. Analysis of three-dimensional-cavity-backed aperture antennas using a Combined Finite Element Method/Method of Moments/Geometrical Theory of Diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1995-01-01

    A combined finite element method (FEM) and method of moments (MoM) technique is presented to analyze the radiation characteristics of a cavity-fed aperture in three dimensions. Generalized feed modeling has been done using the modal expansion of fields in the feed structure. Numerical results for some feeding structures such as a rectangular waveguide, circular waveguide, and coaxial line are presented. The method also uses the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) to predict the effect of a finite ground plane on radiation characteristics. Input admittance calculations for open radiating structures such as a rectangular waveguide, a circular waveguide, and a coaxial line are shown. Numerical data for a coaxial-fed cavity with finite ground plane are verified with experimental data.

  6. Nursing research methodology: transcending Cartesianism.

    PubMed

    Walters, A J

    1996-06-01

    Nurses involved in research are concerned with methodological issues. This paper explores the Cartesian debate that has polarized the discourse on nursing research methodology. It is argued that methodologies exclusively based on objectivism, one pole of the Cartesian debate, or subjectivism, the other, do not provide nurses with adequate research foundations to understand the complexity of the lifeworld of nursing practice. This paper provides nurse researchers with an alternative methodological perspective, Gadamerian hermeneutics, which is in harmony with the clinical world of nursing practice.

  7. Triangle Geometry Processing for Surface Modeling and Cartesian Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J. (Inventor); Melton, John E. (Inventor); Berger, Marsha J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Cartesian mesh generation is accomplished for component based geometries, by intersecting components subject to mesh generation to extract wetted surfaces with a geometry engine using adaptive precision arithmetic in a system which automatically breaks ties with respect to geometric degeneracies. During volume mesh generation, intersected surface triangulations are received to enable mesh generation with cell division of an initially coarse grid. The hexagonal cells are resolved, preserving the ability to directionally divide cells which are locally well aligned.

  8. Triangle geometry processing for surface modeling and cartesian grid generation

    DOEpatents

    Aftosmis, Michael J [San Mateo, CA; Melton, John E [Hollister, CA; Berger, Marsha J [New York, NY

    2002-09-03

    Cartesian mesh generation is accomplished for component based geometries, by intersecting components subject to mesh generation to extract wetted surfaces with a geometry engine using adaptive precision arithmetic in a system which automatically breaks ties with respect to geometric degeneracies. During volume mesh generation, intersected surface triangulations are received to enable mesh generation with cell division of an initially coarse grid. The hexagonal cells are resolved, preserving the ability to directionally divide cells which are locally well aligned.

  9. Two-Liquid Cartesian Diver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, G.; Kos, M.; Jerman, R.

    2004-01-01

    It is quite easy to make a version of the well known Cartesian diver experiment that uses two immiscible liquids. This allows students to test their knowledge of density and pressure in explaining the diver's behaviour. Construction details are presented here together with a mathematical model to explain the observations.

  10. Short characteristics method for two dimensional heterogeneous Cartesian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Masiello, E.; Zmijarevic, I.

    2006-07-01

    The short characteristics method for two-dimensional xy-geometry is extended to heterogeneous Cartesian cells. The new method is intended for realistic neutron transport calculation, as for pressurized water reactor assemblies and bundles, without pin cells homogenization. The pin cell is chosen as the basic element for geometrical mapping. Thus, the heterogeneous cells are modeled by a rectangular element with an arbitrary number of concentric rings. Test problems show that the use of this kind of cells allows a minimal geometrical modeling without a significant lost in precision. (authors)

  11. The structure of integral dimensions: contrasting topological and Cartesian representations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matt; Goldstone, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Diverse evidence shows that perceptually integral dimensions, such as those composing color, are represented holistically. However, the nature of these holistic representations is poorly understood. Extant theories, such as those founded on multidimensional scaling or general recognition theory, model integral stimulus spaces using a Cartesian coordinate system, just as with spaces defined by separable dimensions. This approach entails a rich geometrical structure that has never been questioned but may not be psychologically meaningful for integral dimensions. In particular, Cartesian models carry a notion of orthogonality of component dimensions, such that if 1 dimension is diagnostic for a classification or discrimination task, another can be selected as uniquely irrelevant. This article advances an alternative model in which integral dimensions are characterized as topological spaces. The Cartesian and topological models are tested in a series of experiments using the perceptual-learning phenomenon of dimension differentiation, whereby discrimination training with integral-dimension stimuli can induce an analytic representation of those stimuli. Under the present task design, the 2 models make contrasting predictions regarding the analytic representation that will be learned. Results consistently support the Cartesian model. These findings indicate that perceptual representations of integral dimensions are surprisingly structured, despite their holistic, unanalyzed nature.

  12. Sink or Swim: The Cartesian Diver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, K. David

    2001-01-01

    Presents the activity of Cartesian divers which demonstrates the relationship between pressure, temperature, volume, and buoyancy. Includes both instructor information and student activity sheet. (YDS)

  13. The Evolution of the "Cartesian Connection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gail M.

    2008-01-01

    Students often struggle with the connection between algebraic and graphical representations of functions. This overview of the history of the Cartesian coordinate system helps the classroom teacher consider new ways to aid students in making the "Cartesian connection." (Contains 7 figures.)

  14. Creation operators for Cartesian and circular beams.

    PubMed

    Siguenza-Torres, Anibal; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2016-05-01

    Creation operators of fractional order, to derive the general Cartesian beams and circular beams from the lowest-order Gaussian beam, are introduced and discussed. Finding the creation operator for these general cases is a way to find the creation operator of all the special cases of Cartesian and circular beams.

  15. SACR ADVance 3-D Cartesian Cloud Cover (SACR-ADV-3D3C) product

    DOE Data Explorer

    Meng Wang, Tami Toto, Eugene Clothiaux, Katia Lamer, Mariko Oue

    2017-03-08

    SACR-ADV-3D3C remaps the outputs of SACRCORR for cross-wind range-height indicator (CW-RHI) scans to a Cartesian grid and reports reflectivity CFAD and best estimate domain averaged cloud fraction. The final output is a single NetCDF file containing all aforementioned corrected radar moments remapped on a 3-D Cartesian grid, the SACR reflectivity CFAD, a profile of best estimate cloud fraction, a profile of maximum observable x-domain size (xmax), a profile time to horizontal distance estimate and a profile of minimum observable reflectivity (dBZmin).

  16. Cartesian-coordinate dimensioning for plumbing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buirgy, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    Nonprogressive dimensioning method specifies Cartesian coordinates for each critical point in detail drawings of precision plumbing and ducting components to avoid tolerance accumulation. Method permits direct fabrication of tubing shapes without necessitating generation of a preproduction tubing mockup.

  17. High Energy Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Mesh Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir; Murman, Scott; Aftosmis, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are common place in the world of flight. Yet, many aerodynamic simulation packages do not provide a method of modelling such high energy boundaries in the flow field. For the purposes of aerodynamic simulation, inlets and exhausts are often fared over and it is assumed that the flow differences resulting from this assumption are minimal. While this is an adequate assumption for the prediction of lift, the lack of a plume behind the aircraft creates an evacuated base region thus effecting both drag and pitching moment values. In addition, the flow in the base region is often mis-predicted resulting in incorrect base drag. In order to accurately predict these quantities, a method for specifying inlet and exhaust conditions needs to be available in aerodynamic simulation packages. A method for a first approximation of a plume without accounting for chemical reactions is added to the Cartesian mesh based aerodynamic simulation package CART3D. The method consists of 3 steps. In the first step, a components approach where each triangle is assigned a component number is used. Here, a method for marking the inlet or exhaust plane triangles as separate components is discussed. In step two, the flow solver is modified to accept a reference state for the components marked inlet or exhaust. In the third step, the flow solver uses these separated components and the reference state to compute the correct flow condition at that triangle. The present method is implemented in the CART3D package which consists of a set of tools for generating a Cartesian volume mesh from a set of component triangulations. The Euler equations are solved on the resulting unstructured Cartesian mesh. The present methods is implemented in this package and its usefulness is demonstrated with two validation cases. A generic missile body is also presented to show the usefulness of the method on a real world geometry.

  18. Spin-orbit coupled jeff=1/2 iridium moments on the geometrically frustrated fcc lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A. M.; Matern, S.; Hickey, C.; Aczel, A. A.; Paramekanti, A.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by experiments on La2ZnIrO6 and La2MgIrO6, we study the magnetism of spin-orbit coupled jeff = 1/2 iridium moments on the three-dimensional geometrically-frustrated face-centered cubic lattice. The symmetry-allowed nearest-neighbor interaction includes Heisenberg, Kitaev, and symmetric off-diagonal exchange. Using Luttinger-Tisza and Monte Carlo simulations, we find a rich variety of orders, including collinear A-type antiferromagnetism, collinear stripe order with moments along the {111}-direction, and incommensurate non-coplanar spirals, and determine their magnetic ordering transition temperatures. We argue that thermodynamic data on these iridates underscore the presence of a dominant Kitaev exchange, and suggest a possible resolution to the puzzle of why La2ZnIrO6, but not La2MgIrO6, exhibits 'weak' ferromagnetism.

  19. Adaptive Cartesian coordinate control of space based robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Michael W.; Wee, Liang-Boon

    1991-01-01

    A Cartesian coordinate robot controller is presented for use when the mass properties of a load are unknown. The mass, center of mass, and moments of inertia of the end-effector are assumed unknown. All other inertial properties of the robot are assumed known. This knowledge of the parameters allows the control of the end-effector in a way similar to the use of reaction wheels to control the orientation of a satellite. This is the primary result of the controller. The basic method of the controller is similar to that used for terrestrial-based robot manipulators. The controller is demonstrated using a new simulation algorithm which is based on Hamilton's form of the equations of motion.

  20. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks

    PubMed Central

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M.; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-01-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory. PMID:26245138

  1. Transonic airfoil flowfield analysis using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical technique for analyzing transonic airfoils is presented. The method employs the basic features of Jameson's iterative solution for the full potential equation, except that Cartesian coordinates are used rather than a grid which fits the airfoil, such as the conformal circle-plane or 'sheared parabolic' coordinates which were used previously. Comparison with previous results shows that it is not necessary to match the computational grid to the airfoil surface, and that accurate results can be obtained with a Cartesian grid for lifting supercritical airfoils.

  2. Euler calculations for wings using Cartesian grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, R. L., Jr.; Hassan, H. A.; Salas, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of transonic flows past wings using Cartesian grids. The calculations are based on a finite volume formulation of the Euler equations. Results are presented for a rectangular wing with a flat tip and the ONERA M6 wing. In general, the results are in good agreement with other computations and available experiment. However, Cartesian grids require a greater number of points than body fitted grids in order to resolve the flow properties near the leading edge of a swept wing.

  3. Stable boundary conditions for Cartesian grid calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, M. J.; Leveque, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The inviscid Euler equations in complicated geometries are solved using a Cartesian grid. This requires solid wall boundary conditions in the irregular grid cells near the boundary. Since these cells may be orders of magnitude smaller than the regular grid cells, stability is a primary concern. An approach to this problem is presented and its use is illustrated.

  4. The 3D Euler solutions using automated Cartesian grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Berger, Marsha J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on 3-dimensional Euler solutions using automated Cartesian grid generation are presented. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the design cycle; Cartesian grid strategy; structured body fit; grid generation; prolate spheroid; and ONERA M6 wing.

  5. Arbitrary order permanent Cartesian multipolar electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boateng, H. A.; Todorov, I. T.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a concerted effort to implement advanced classical potential energy surfaces by adding higher order multipoles to fixed point charge electrostatics in a bid to increase the accuracy of simulations of condensed phase systems. One major hurdle is the unwieldy nature of the expressions which in part has limited developers mostly to including only dipoles and quadrupoles. In this paper, we present a generalization of the Cartesian formulation of electrostatic multipolar interactions that enables the specification of an arbitrary order of multipoles. Specifically, we derive formulas for arbitrary order implementation of the particle mesh Ewald method and give a closed form formula for the stress tensor in the reciprocal space. In addition, we provide recurrence relations for common electrostatic potentials employed in molecular simulations, which allows for the generalization to arbitrary order and guarantees a computational cost that scales as O(p3) for Cartesian multipole interactions of order p.

  6. Surface Generation and Cartesian Mesh Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This document serves as the final report for the grant titled Surface Generation and Cartesian Mesh Support . This completed work was in algorithmic research into automatically generating surface triangulations from CAD geometries. NASA's OVERFLOW and Cart3D simulation packages use surface triangulations as an underlying geometry description and the ability to automatically generate these from CAD files (without translation) substantially reduces both the wall-clock time and expertise required to get geometry out of CAD and into mesh generation. This surface meshing was exercised greatly during the Shuttle investigation during the last year with success. The secondary efforts performed in this grant involve work on a visualization system cut-cell handling for Cartesian Meshes with embedded boundaries.

  7. Transonic airfoil design using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique for designing transonic airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution (the inverse problem) is presented. The method employs the basic features of Jameson's iterative solution for the full potential equation, except that inverse boundary conditions and Cartesian coordinates are used. The method is a direct-inverse approach that controls trailing-edge closure. Examples show the application of the method to design aft-cambered and other airfoils specifically for transonic flight.

  8. Cartesian Grid Methods for Moving Geometries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-27

    Technology transfer is facilitated by our Cart3D code, which is used by over 100 groups around the country. Introduction Cartesian grids have proven themselves...efforts are summarized below. Limiters for Finite Volume Schemes The Cart3D steady state flow solver has some stalling of convergence due to cut... Cart3D by my collaborator Scott Murman. One-dimensional Model Problem The simplest setting to study the accuracy and stability of flow with a moving

  9. Informatics Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kate

    2012-01-01

    The informatics moment is the moment when a person seeks help in using some digital technology that is new to him or her. This article examines the informatics moment in people's everyday lives as they sought help at a branch public library. Four types of literacy were involved: basic literacy (reading and writing), computer literacy (use of a…

  10. On the geometric analysis and adjustment of optical satellite observations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsimis, E.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite geodesy methods were catagorized into three divisions: geometric, dynamic, and mixed. These catagories furnish the basis for distinction between geometric and dynamic satellite geodesy. The dual adjustment, geometric analysis, and Cartesian coodinate determination are examined for two observing stations. Similar illustrations are given when more than two observing stations are used.

  11. Cartesian Methods for the Shallow Water Equations on a Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.B.

    2000-02-14

    The shallow water equations in a spherical geometry are solved using a 3-dimensional Cartesian method. Spatial discretization of the 2-dimensional, horizontal differential operators is based on the Cartesian form of the spherical harmonics and an icosahedral (spherical) grid. Computational velocities are expressed in Cartesian coordinates so that a problem with a singularity at the pole is avoided. Solution of auxiliary elliptic equations is also not necessary. A comparison is made between the standard form of the Cartesian equations and a rotational form using a standard set of test problems. Error measures and conservation properties of the method are reported for the test problems.

  12. Material translations in the Cartesian brain.

    PubMed

    Bassiri, Nima

    2012-03-01

    This article reexamines the controversial doctrine of the pineal gland in Cartesian psychophysiology. It argues initially that Descartes' combined metaphysics and natural philosophy yield a distinctly human subject who is rational, willful, but also a living and embodied being in the world, formed in the union and through the dynamics of the interaction between the soul and the body. However, Descartes only identified one site at which this union was staged: the brain, and more precisely, the pineal gland, the small bulb of nervous tissue at the brain's center. The pineal gland was charged with the incredible task of ensuring the interactive mutuality between the soul and body, while also maintaining the necessary ontological incommensurability between them. This article reconsiders the theoretical obligations placed on the pineal gland as the site of the soul-body union, and looks at how the gland was consequently forced to adopt a very precarious ontological status. The article ultimately questions how successfully the Cartesian human could be localized in the pineal gland, while briefly considering the broader historical consequences of the ensuing equivalence of the self and brain.

  13. NonCartesian MR image reconstruction with integrated gradient nonlinearity correction

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shengzhen; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Shu, Yunhong; Huston, John; Johnson, Kevin M.; Weavers, Paul T.; Gray, Erin M.; Bernstein, Matt A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To derive a noniterative gridding-type reconstruction framework for nonCartesian magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that prospectively accounts for gradient nonlinearity (GNL)-induced image geometrical distortion during MR image reconstruction, as opposed to the standard, image-domain based GNL correction that is applied after reconstruction; to demonstrate that such framework is able to reduce the image blurring introduced by the conventional GNL correction, while still offering effective correction of GNL-induced geometrical distortion and compatibility with off-resonance correction. Methods: After introducing the nonCartesian MRI signal model that explicitly accounts for the effects of GNL and off-resonance, a noniterative gridding-type reconstruction framework with integrated GNL correction based on the type-III nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) is derived. A novel type-III NUFFT implementation is then proposed as a numerically efficient solution to the proposed framework. The incorporation of simultaneous B0 off-resonance correction to the proposed framework is then discussed. Several phantom and in vivo data acquired via various 2D and 3D nonCartesian acquisitions, including 2D Archimedean spiral, 3D shells with integrated radial and spiral, and 3D radial sampling, are used to compare the results of the proposed and the standard GNL correction methods. Results: Various phantom and in vivo data demonstrate that both the proposed and the standard GNL correction methods are able to correct the coarse-scale geometric distortion and blurring induced by GNL and off-resonance. However, the standard GNL correction method also introduces blurring effects to corrected images, causing blurring of resolution inserts in the phantom images and loss of small vessel clarity in the angiography examples. On the other hand, the results after the proposed GNL correction show better depiction of resolution inserts and higher clarity of small vessel. Conclusions

  14. Moments of Inertia of Disks and Spheres without Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Seok-Cheol; Hong, Seok-In

    2013-01-01

    Calculation of moments of inertia is often challenging for introductory-level physics students due to the use of integration, especially in non-Cartesian coordinates. Methods that do not employ calculus have been described for finding the rotational inertia of thin rods and other simple bodies. In this paper we use the parallel axis theorem and…

  15. Solution-Adaptive Cartesian Cell Approach for Viscous and Inviscid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    A Cartesian cell-based approach for adaptively refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is presented. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by the recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal cut cells are created using modified polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary tree data structure that provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The results of a study comparing the accuracy and positivity of two classes of cell-centered, viscous gradient reconstruction procedures is briefly summarized. Adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are shown using the more robust of these gradient reconstruction procedures, where the results computed by the Cartesian approach are compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  16. Source integrals of multipole moments for static space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pastora, J. L.; Martín-Martín, J.; Ruiz, E.

    2016-11-01

    The definition of Komar for the mass of a relativistic source is used as a starting point to introduce volume integrals for relativistic multipole moments. A certain generalisation of the classical Gauss theorem is used to rewrite these multipole moments as integrals over a surface at infinity. It is shown that this generalisation leads to asymptotic relativistic multipole moments, recovering the multipoles of Geroch or Thorne, when the integrals are evaluated in asympotically cartesian harmonic coordinates. Relationships between this result and the Thorne definition and the classical theory of moments are shown.

  17. Beamtracking in cylindrical and cartesian coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Schillinger, B.; Weiland, T.

    1997-02-01

    For the design of devices with circular optical axes, e.g. bending magnets or spectrometers, the use of cylindrical coordinates for field calculations could be favourable. Additionally, in case of applications like bending systems with nonorthogonal entry and exit faces, the coupling of cylindrical and cartesian coordinates improves the simulation of fringe fields. In this context we have implemented a consistent coupling between the two coordinate systems and have extended the tracking code of the electromagnetic simulator MAFIA to cylindrical coordinates. This extensions could be of interest for the calculation of transfer maps of ionoptical devices using the tracked particle orbit as reference trajectory and including fringe field effects in a more general manner. We will give a short introduction to the extensions and show some examples for bending systems with nonorthogonal entries.

  18. Generalized and efficient algorithm for computing multipole energies and gradients based on Cartesian tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dejun

    2015-09-01

    Accurate representation of intermolecular forces has been the central task of classical atomic simulations, known as molecular mechanics. Recent advancements in molecular mechanics models have put forward the explicit representation of permanent and/or induced electric multipole (EMP) moments. The formulas developed so far to calculate EMP interactions tend to have complicated expressions, especially in Cartesian coordinates, which can only be applied to a specific kernel potential function. For example, one needs to develop a new formula each time a new kernel function is encountered. The complication of these formalisms arises from an intriguing and yet obscured mathematical relation between the kernel functions and the gradient operators. Here, I uncover this relation via rigorous derivation and find that the formula to calculate EMP interactions is basically invariant to the potential kernel functions as long as they are of the form f(r), i.e., any Green's function that depends on inter-particle distance. I provide an algorithm for efficient evaluation of EMP interaction energies, forces, and torques for any kernel f(r) up to any arbitrary rank of EMP moments in Cartesian coordinates. The working equations of this algorithm are essentially the same for any kernel f(r). Recently, a few recursive algorithms were proposed to calculate EMP interactions. Depending on the kernel functions, the algorithm here is about 4-16 times faster than these algorithms in terms of the required number of floating point operations and is much more memory efficient. I show that it is even faster than a theoretically ideal recursion scheme, i.e., one that requires 1 floating point multiplication and 1 addition per recursion step. This algorithm has a compact vector-based expression that is optimal for computer programming. The Cartesian nature of this algorithm makes it fit easily into modern molecular simulation packages as compared with spherical coordinate-based algorithms. A

  19. Generalized and efficient algorithm for computing multipole energies and gradients based on Cartesian tensors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dejun

    2015-09-21

    Accurate representation of intermolecular forces has been the central task of classical atomic simulations, known as molecular mechanics. Recent advancements in molecular mechanics models have put forward the explicit representation of permanent and/or induced electric multipole (EMP) moments. The formulas developed so far to calculate EMP interactions tend to have complicated expressions, especially in Cartesian coordinates, which can only be applied to a specific kernel potential function. For example, one needs to develop a new formula each time a new kernel function is encountered. The complication of these formalisms arises from an intriguing and yet obscured mathematical relation between the kernel functions and the gradient operators. Here, I uncover this relation via rigorous derivation and find that the formula to calculate EMP interactions is basically invariant to the potential kernel functions as long as they are of the form f(r), i.e., any Green's function that depends on inter-particle distance. I provide an algorithm for efficient evaluation of EMP interaction energies, forces, and torques for any kernel f(r) up to any arbitrary rank of EMP moments in Cartesian coordinates. The working equations of this algorithm are essentially the same for any kernel f(r). Recently, a few recursive algorithms were proposed to calculate EMP interactions. Depending on the kernel functions, the algorithm here is about 4-16 times faster than these algorithms in terms of the required number of floating point operations and is much more memory efficient. I show that it is even faster than a theoretically ideal recursion scheme, i.e., one that requires 1 floating point multiplication and 1 addition per recursion step. This algorithm has a compact vector-based expression that is optimal for computer programming. The Cartesian nature of this algorithm makes it fit easily into modern molecular simulation packages as compared with spherical coordinate-based algorithms. A

  20. The adaptive, cut-cell Cartesian approach (warts and all)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-10-01

    Solution-adaptive methods based on cutting bodies out of Cartesian grids are gaining popularity now that the ways of circumventing the accuracy problems associated with small cut cells have been developed. Researchers are applying Cartesian-based schemes to a broad class of problems now, and, although there is still development work to be done, it is becoming clearer which problems are best suited to the approach (and which are not). The purpose of this paper is to give a candid assessment, based on applying Cartesian schemes to a variety of problems, of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach as it is currently implemented.

  1. The adaptive, cut-cell Cartesian approach (warts and all)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    Solution-adaptive methods based on cutting bodies out of Cartesian grids are gaining popularity now that the ways of circumventing the accuracy problems associated with small cut cells have been developed. Researchers are applying Cartesian-based schemes to a broad class of problems now, and, although there is still development work to be done, it is becoming clearer which problems are best suited to the approach (and which are not). The purpose of this paper is to give a candid assessment, based on applying Cartesian schemes to a variety of problems, of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach as it is currently implemented.

  2. Adjoint Algorithm for CAD-Based Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape optimization. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (geometric parameters that control the shape). More recently, emerging adjoint applications focus on the analysis problem, where the adjoint solution is used to drive mesh adaptation, as well as to provide estimates of functional error bounds and corrections. The attractive feature of this approach is that the mesh-adaptation procedure targets a specific functional, thereby localizing the mesh refinement and reducing computational cost. Our focus is on the development of adjoint-based optimization techniques for a Cartesian method with embedded boundaries.12 In contrast t o implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume mesh. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin et developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the Euler equations. In both approaches, a boundary condition is introduced to approximate the effects of the evolving surface shape that results in accurate gradient computation. Central to automated shape optimization algorithms is the issue of geometry modeling and control. The need to optimize complex, "real-life" geometry provides a strong incentive for the use of parametric-CAD systems within the optimization procedure. In previous work, we presented

  3. Cartesian-cell based grid generation and adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Cartesian-cell based grid generation and adaptive mesh refinement are presented. Topics covered include: grid generation; cell cutting; data structures; flow solver formulation; adaptive mesh refinement; and viscous flow.

  4. Blurred image recognition by legendre moment invariants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Shu, Huazhong; Han, Guo-Niu; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Processing blurred images is a key problem in many image applications. Existing methods to obtain blur invariants which are invariant with respect to centrally symmetric blur are based on geometric moments or complex moments. In this paper, we propose a new method to construct a set of blur invariants using the orthogonal Legendre moments. Some important properties of Legendre moments for the blurred image are presented and proved. The performance of the proposed descriptors is evaluated with various point-spread functions and different image noises. The comparison of the present approach with previous methods in terms of pattern recognition accuracy is also provided. The experimental results show that the proposed descriptors are more robust to noise and have better discriminative power than the methods based on geometric or complex moments. PMID:19933003

  5. Principal component analysis of molecular dynamics: on the use of Cartesian vs. internal coordinates.

    PubMed

    Sittel, Florian; Jain, Abhinav; Stock, Gerhard

    2014-07-07

    Principal component analysis of molecular dynamics simulations is a popular method to account for the essential dynamics of the system on a low-dimensional free energy landscape. Using Cartesian coordinates, first the translation and overall rotation need to be removed from the trajectory. Since the rotation depends via the moment of inertia on the molecule's structure, this separation is only straightforward for relatively rigid systems. Adopting millisecond molecular dynamics simulations of the folding of villin headpiece and the functional dynamics of BPTI provided by D. E. Shaw Research, it is demonstrated via a comparison of local and global rotational fitting that the structural dynamics of flexible molecules necessarily results in a mixing of overall and internal motion. Even for the small-amplitude functional motion of BPTI, the conformational distribution obtained from a Cartesian principal component analysis therefore reflects to some extend the dominant overall motion rather than the much smaller internal motion of the protein. Internal coordinates such as backbone dihedral angles, on the other hand, are found to yield correct and well-resolved energy landscapes for both examples. The virtues and shortcomings of the choice of various fitting schemes and coordinate sets as well as the generality of these results are discussed in some detail.

  6. Euler Technology Assessment program for preliminary aircraft design employing SPLITFLOW code with Cartesian unstructured grid method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Dennis B.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents results from the Euler Technology Assessment program. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of Euler computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for use in preliminary aircraft design. Both the accuracy of the predictions and the rapidity of calculations were to be assessed. This portion of the study was conducted by Lockheed Fort Worth Company, using a recently developed in-house Cartesian-grid code called SPLITFLOW. The Cartesian grid technique offers several advantages for this study, including ease of volume grid generation and reduced number of cells compared to other grid schemes. SPLITFLOW also includes grid adaptation of the volume grid during the solution convergence to resolve high-gradient flow regions. This proved beneficial in resolving the large vortical structures in the flow for several configurations examined in the present study. The SPLITFLOW code predictions of the configuration forces and moments are shown to be adequate for preliminary design analysis, including predictions of sideslip effects and the effects of geometry variations at low and high angles of attack. The time required to generate the results from initial surface definition is on the order of several hours, including grid generation, which is compatible with the needs of the design environment.

  7. Automated Parameter Studies Using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosimis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian

    2004-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is now routinely used to analyze isolated points in a design space by performing steady-state computations at fixed flight conditions (Mach number, angle of attack, sideslip), for a fixed geometric configuration of interest. This "point analysis" provides detailed information about the flowfield, which aides an engineer in understanding, or correcting, a design. A point analysis is typically performed using high fidelity methods at a handful of critical design points, e.g. a cruise or landing configuration, or a sample of points along a flight trajectory.

  8. Adaptively Refined Euler and Navier-Stokes Solutions with a Cartesian-Cell Based Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian-cell based scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions has been developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies were generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells were created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid was stored in a binary-tree data structure which provided a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations were solved on the resulting grids using an upwind, finite-volume formulation. The inviscid fluxes were found in an upwinded manner using a linear reconstruction of the cell primitives, providing the input states to an approximate Riemann solver. The viscous fluxes were formed using a Green-Gauss type of reconstruction upon a co-volume surrounding the cell interface. Data at the vertices of this co-volume were found in a linearly K-exact manner, which ensured linear K-exactness of the gradients. Adaptively-refined solutions for the inviscid flow about a four-element airfoil (test case 3) were compared to theory. Laminar, adaptively-refined solutions were compared to accepted computational, experimental and theoretical results.

  9. Development of a Cartesian-grid finite-volume characteristic flux model for marine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, C.; Le Touzé, D.; Alessandrini, B.

    2010-06-01

    A Finite Volume method based on Characteristic Fluxes for compressible fluids is developed. An explicit cell-centered resolution is adopted, where second-order accuracy is provided by using a MUSCL scheme with Sweby or Superbee limiters for the hyperbolic part. Resolution is performed on a generic unstructured Cartesian grid, where solid boundaries are handled by a Cut-Cell method. Interfaces are explicitely advected in a non-diffusive way, ensuring local mass conservation of each fluid. An improved cell cutting has been developed to handle boundaries of arbitrary geometrical complexity. The mesh density is locally adapted to provide accuracy along these boundaries, which can be fixed or move inside the mesh. Instead of using a polygon clipping algorithm, we use the Voxel traversal algorithm coupled with a local floodfill scanline to intersect 2D or 3D boundary surface meshes with the fixed Cartesian grid. Small cells stability problem near the boundaries is solved using a fully conservative merging method. Inflow and outflow conditions are also implemented in the model. The solver is validated on 2D academic test cases, such as the flow past a cylinder. The latter test cases are performed both in the frame of the body and in a fixed frame where the body is moving across the mesh. Extension to 3D is presently being implemented and first results will be presented at the conference.

  10. Geometric Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    1999-10-01

    Mechanics for the nonmathematician-a modern approach For physicists, mechanics is quite obviously geometric, yet the classical approach typically emphasizes abstract, mathematical formalism. Setting out to make mechanics both accessible and interesting for nonmathematicians, Richard Talman uses geometric methods to reveal qualitative aspects of the theory. He introduces concepts from differential geometry, differential forms, and tensor analysis, then applies them to areas of classical mechanics as well as other areas of physics, including optics, crystal diffraction, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. For easy reference, Dr. Talman treats separately Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and Newtonian mechanics-exploring their geometric structure through vector fields, symplectic geometry, and gauge invariance respectively. Practical perturbative methods of approximation are also developed. Geometric Mechanics features illustrative examples and assumes only basic knowledge of Lagrangian mechanics. Of related interest . . . APPLIED DYNAMICS With Applications to Multibody and Mechatronic Systems Francis C. Moon A contemporary look at dynamics at an intermediate level, including nonlinear and chaotic dynamics. 1998 (0-471-13828-2) 504 pp. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS Applied Mathematics for Scientists and Engineers Bruce Kusse and Erik Westwig A comprehensive treatment of the mathematical methods used to solve practical problems in physics and engineering. 1998 (0-471-15431-8) 680 pp.

  11. A Cartesian grid-based unified gas kinetic scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Songze; Xu, Kun

    2014-12-01

    A Cartesian grid-based unified gas kinetic scheme is developed. In this approach, any oriented boundary in a Cartesian grid is represented by many directional boundary points. The numerical flux is evaluated on each boundary point. Then, a boundary flux interpolation method (BFIM) is constructed to distribute the boundary effect to the flow evolution on regular Cartesian grid points. The BFIM provides a general strategy to implement any kind of boundary condition on Cartesian grid. The newly developed technique is implemented in the unified gas kinetic scheme, where the scheme is reformulated into a finite difference format. Several typical test cases are simulated with different geometries. For example, the thermophoresis phenomenon for a plate with infinitesimal thickness immersed in a rarefied flow environment is calculated under different orientations on the same Cartesian grid. These computational results validate the BFIM in the unified scheme for the capturing of different thermal boundary conditions. The BFIM can be extended to the moving boundary problems as well.

  12. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback Based on Polyphase Difference Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2010-01-01

    A modified Cartesian feedback method called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” and based on polyphase difference amplifiers is described that significantly reduces the problems associated with quadrature errors and DC-offsets in classic Cartesian feedback power amplifier control systems. In this method, the reference input and feedback signals are down-converted and compared at a low intermediate frequency (IF) instead of at DC. The polyphase difference amplifiers create a complex control bandwidth centered at this low IF, which is typically offset from DC by 200–1500 kHz. Consequently, the loop gain peak does not overlap DC where voltage offsets, drift, and local oscillator leakage create errors. Moreover, quadrature mismatch errors are significantly attenuated in the control bandwidth. Since the polyphase amplifiers selectively amplify the complex signals characterized by a +90° phase relationship representing positive frequency signals, the control system operates somewhat like single sideband (SSB) modulation. However, the approach still allows the same modulation bandwidth control as classic Cartesian feedback. In this paper, the behavior of the polyphase difference amplifier is described through both the results of simulations, based on a theoretical analysis of their architecture, and experiments. We then describe our first printed circuit board prototype of a frequency-offset Cartesian feedback transmitter and its performance in open and closed loop configuration. This approach should be especially useful in magnetic resonance imaging transmit array systems. PMID:20814450

  13. Numerical Simulation of Rolling-Airframes Using a Multi-Level Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A supersonic rolling missile with two synchronous canard control surfaces is analyzed using an automated, inviscid, Cartesian method. Sequential-static and time-dependent dynamic simulations of the complete motion are computed for canard dither schedules for level flight, pitch, and yaw maneuver. The dynamic simulations are compared directly against both high-resolution viscous simulations and relevant experimental data, and are also utilized to compute dynamic stability derivatives. The results show that both the body roll rate and canard dither motion influence the roll-averaged forces and moments on the body. At the relatively, low roll rates analyzed in the current work these dynamic effects are modest, however the dynamic computations are effective in predicting the dynamic stability derivatives which can be significant for highly-maneuverable missiles.

  14. ASAM v2.7: a compressible atmospheric model with a Cartesian cut cell approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Knoth, O.; König, M.; Vogelsberg, U.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, the fully compressible, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model ASAM is presented. A cut cell approach is used to include obstacles and orography into the Cartesian grid. Discretization is realized by a mixture of finite differences and finite volumes and a state limiting is applied. An implicit time integration scheme ensures numerical stability around small cells. To make the model applicable for atmospheric problems, physical parameterizations like a Smagorinsky subgrid scale model, a two-moment bulk microphysics scheme, precipitation and vertical surface fluxes by a constant flux layer or a more complex soil model are implemented. Results for three benchmark test cases from the literature are shown. A sensitivity study regarding the development of a convective boundary layer together with island effects at Barbados is carried out to show the capability to perform real case simulations with ASAM.

  15. Development and Applications of 3D Cartesian CFD Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Berger, Marsha J.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The urgent need for dramatic reductions in aircraft design cycle time is focusing scrutiny upon all aspects of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). These reductions will most likely come not from increased reliance upon user-interactive (and therefore time-expensive) methods, but instead from methods that can be fully automated and incorporated into 'black box' solutions. In comparison with tetrahedral methods, three-dimensional Cartesian grid approaches are in relative infancy, but initial experiences with automated Cartesian techniques are quite promising. Our research is targeted at furthering the development of Cartesian methods so that they can become key elements of a completely automatic grid generation/flow solution procedure applicable to the Euler analysis of complex aircraft geometries.

  16. A Cartesian parametrization for the numerical analysis of material instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, Alejandro; Chen, Qiushi; Foulk, III, James W.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Lai, Zhengshou

    2016-02-25

    We examine four parametrizations of the unit sphere in the context of material stability analysis by means of the singularity of the acoustic tensor. We then propose a Cartesian parametrization for vectors that lie a cube of side length two and use these vectors in lieu of unit normals to test for the loss of the ellipticity condition. This parametrization is then used to construct a tensor akin to the acoustic tensor. It is shown that both of these tensors become singular at the same time and in the same planes in the presence of a material instability. Furthermore, the performance of the Cartesian parametrization is compared against the other parametrizations, with the results of these comparisons showing that in general, the Cartesian parametrization is more robust and more numerically efficient than the others.

  17. A Cartesian parametrization for the numerical analysis of material instability

    DOE PAGES

    Mota, Alejandro; Chen, Qiushi; Foulk, III, James W.; ...

    2016-02-25

    We examine four parametrizations of the unit sphere in the context of material stability analysis by means of the singularity of the acoustic tensor. We then propose a Cartesian parametrization for vectors that lie a cube of side length two and use these vectors in lieu of unit normals to test for the loss of the ellipticity condition. This parametrization is then used to construct a tensor akin to the acoustic tensor. It is shown that both of these tensors become singular at the same time and in the same planes in the presence of a material instability. Furthermore, themore » performance of the Cartesian parametrization is compared against the other parametrizations, with the results of these comparisons showing that in general, the Cartesian parametrization is more robust and more numerically efficient than the others.« less

  18. A Cartesian grid approach with hierarchical refinement for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Many numerical studies of flows that involve complex geometries are limited by the difficulties in generating suitable grids. We present a Cartesian boundary scheme for two-dimensional, compressible flows that is unfettered by the need to generate a computational grid and so it may be used, routinely, even for the most awkward of geometries. In essence, an arbitrary-shaped body is allowed to blank out some region of a background Cartesian mesh and the resultant cut-cells are singled out for special treatment. This is done within a finite-volume framework and so, in principle, any explicit flux-based integration scheme can take advantage of this method for enforcing solid boundary conditions. For best effect, the present Cartesian boundary scheme has been combined with a sophisticated, local mesh refinement scheme, and a number of examples are shown in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the combined algorithm for simulations of shock interaction phenomena.

  19. Efficient Fluid Dynamic Design Optimization Using Cartesian Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, A.; Grossman, B.; Sellers, Bill (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This report is subdivided in three parts. The first one reviews a new approach to the computation of inviscid flows using Cartesian grid methods. The crux of the method is the curvature-corrected symmetry technique (CCST) developed by the present authors for body-fitted grids. The method introduces ghost cells near the boundaries whose values are developed from an assumed flow-field model in vicinity of the wall consisting of a vortex flow, which satisfies the normal momentum equation and the non-penetration condition. The CCST boundary condition was shown to be substantially more accurate than traditional boundary condition approaches. This improved boundary condition is adapted to a Cartesian mesh formulation, which we call the Ghost Body-Cell Method (GBCM). In this approach, all cell centers exterior to the body are computed with fluxes at the four surrounding cell edges. There is no need for special treatment corresponding to cut cells which complicate other Cartesian mesh methods.

  20. Transonic airfoil analysis and design using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    An inverse numerical technique for designing transonic airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution is presented. The method uses the full potential equation, inverse boundary conditions, and Cartesian coordinates. It includes simultaneous airfoil update and utilizes a direct-inverse approach that permits a logical method for controlling trailing edge closure. The method can also be used for the analysis of flowfields about specified airfoils. Comparison with previous results shows that accurate results can be obtained with a Cartesian grid. Examples show the application of the method to design aft-cambered and other airfoils specifically for transonic flight.

  1. A general time element using Cartesian coordinates: Eccentric orbit integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janin, G.

    1980-01-01

    A general time element, valid with any arbitrary independent variables, and used with Cartesian coordinates for the integration of the elliptic motion in orbits, is examined. The derivation of the time element from a set of canonical elements of the Delaunay type, developed in the extended phase space, is presented. The application of the method using an example of a transfer orbit for a geosynchronous mission is presented. The eccentric and elliptic anomaly are utilized as the independent variable. The reduction of the in track error resulting from using Cartesian coordinates with the time element is reported.

  2. On differential transformations between Cartesian and curvilinear (geodetic) coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soler, T.

    1976-01-01

    Differential transformations are developed between Cartesian and curvilinear orthogonal coordinates. Only matrix algebra is used for the presentation of the basic concepts. After defining the reference systems used the rotation (R), metric (H), and Jacobian (J) matrices of the transformations between cartesian and curvilinear coordinate systems are introduced. A value of R as a function of H and J is presented. Likewise an analytical expression for J(-1) as a function of H(-2) and R is obtained. Emphasis is placed on showing that differential equations are equivalent to conventional similarity transformations. Scaling methods are discussed along with ellipsoidal coordinates. Differential transformations between elipsoidal and geodetic coordinates are established.

  3. A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1994-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells are created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: a gradient-limited, linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The more robust of a series of viscous flux functions is used to provide the viscous fluxes at the cell interfaces. Adaptively-refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Cartesian, cell-based approach are obtained and compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  4. A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells are created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree data structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A gradient-limited, linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The more robust of a series of viscous flux functions is used to provide the viscous fluxes at the cell interfaces. Adaptively-refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Cartesian, cell-based approach are obtained and compared to theory, experiment and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  5. Generalized and efficient algorithm for computing multipole energies and gradients based on Cartesian tensors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dejun

    2015-01-01

    Accurate representation of intermolecular forces has been the central task of classical atomic simulations, known as molecular mechanics. Recent advancements in molecular mechanics models have put forward the explicit representation of permanent and/or induced electric multipole (EMP) moments. The formulas developed so far to calculate EMP interactions tend to have complicated expressions, especially in Cartesian coordinates, which can only be applied to a specific kernel potential function. For example, one needs to develop a new formula each time a new kernel function is encountered. The complication of these formalisms arises from an intriguing and yet obscured mathematical relation between the kernel functions and the gradient operators. Here, I uncover this relation via rigorous derivation and find that the formula to calculate EMP interactions is basically invariant to the potential kernel functions as long as they are of the form f(r), i.e., any Green’s function that depends on inter-particle distance. I provide an algorithm for efficient evaluation of EMP interaction energies, forces, and torques for any kernel f(r) up to any arbitrary rank of EMP moments in Cartesian coordinates. The working equations of this algorithm are essentially the same for any kernel f(r). Recently, a few recursive algorithms were proposed to calculate EMP interactions. Depending on the kernel functions, the algorithm here is about 4–16 times faster than these algorithms in terms of the required number of floating point operations and is much more memory efficient. I show that it is even faster than a theoretically ideal recursion scheme, i.e., one that requires 1 floating point multiplication and 1 addition per recursion step. This algorithm has a compact vector-based expression that is optimal for computer programming. The Cartesian nature of this algorithm makes it fit easily into modern molecular simulation packages as compared with spherical coordinate-based algorithms. A

  6. Generalized and efficient algorithm for computing multipole energies and gradients based on Cartesian tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Dejun

    2015-09-21

    Accurate representation of intermolecular forces has been the central task of classical atomic simulations, known as molecular mechanics. Recent advancements in molecular mechanics models have put forward the explicit representation of permanent and/or induced electric multipole (EMP) moments. The formulas developed so far to calculate EMP interactions tend to have complicated expressions, especially in Cartesian coordinates, which can only be applied to a specific kernel potential function. For example, one needs to develop a new formula each time a new kernel function is encountered. The complication of these formalisms arises from an intriguing and yet obscured mathematical relation between the kernel functions and the gradient operators. Here, I uncover this relation via rigorous derivation and find that the formula to calculate EMP interactions is basically invariant to the potential kernel functions as long as they are of the form f(r), i.e., any Green’s function that depends on inter-particle distance. I provide an algorithm for efficient evaluation of EMP interaction energies, forces, and torques for any kernel f(r) up to any arbitrary rank of EMP moments in Cartesian coordinates. The working equations of this algorithm are essentially the same for any kernel f(r). Recently, a few recursive algorithms were proposed to calculate EMP interactions. Depending on the kernel functions, the algorithm here is about 4–16 times faster than these algorithms in terms of the required number of floating point operations and is much more memory efficient. I show that it is even faster than a theoretically ideal recursion scheme, i.e., one that requires 1 floating point multiplication and 1 addition per recursion step. This algorithm has a compact vector-based expression that is optimal for computer programming. The Cartesian nature of this algorithm makes it fit easily into modern molecular simulation packages as compared with spherical coordinate-based algorithms. A

  7. SU-E-I-41: Non-Cartesian MR Image Reconstruction with Integrated Gradient Non-Linearity Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, S; Trzasko, JD; Polley, TW; Shu, Y; Bernstein, MA

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Nonlinearities in the spatial encoding gradients of MRI systems cause geometric distortion in images. Typically, this is retrospectively corrected via image-domain interpolation (a.k.a., “gradwarp”) albeit with a loss of spatial resolution. For non-Cartesian MRI, the latter problem is exaggerated by noise and undersampling artifact. In this study, we describe a novel correction strategy that accounts for gradient nonlinearities during — rather than after — non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction, and demonstrate that this approach mitigates the resolution loss that can occur with standard methods. Methods: To test the proposed method, the American College of Radiology (ACR) quality control phantom was scanned on at 1.5 T (General Electric, v16.0, “zoom” gradient) using a 1.6x undersampled 3D non- Cartesian Shells trajectory (GRE, FOV=24 cm3, 120 shells, 16552 shots, 512 readout, matrix=2403). Image reconstruction was first performed via standard k-space density-compensated gridding and retrospectively corrected via cubic spline interpolation. Image reconstruction was then separately performed using a k-space and image-domain densitycompensated type-3 non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT), which provides a direct mapping between non-Cartesian k-space samples and warped image space voxel locations. Thus, no separate distortion correction procedure is needed for the proposed approach. The gradient distortion field was determined using vendor provided calibration data. Results: Phantom scan results show that both processing approaches successfully correct geometric distortion. However, visual inspection of the ACR phantom spatial resolution inserts shows that the proposed strategy preserves the resolution of the nominal (uncorrected) reconstruction while “gradwarp” imparts marked spatial blurring (especially for the 1.0 and 1.1 mm inserts) and thus resolution loss. Conclusion: We've presented a novel reconstruction strategy for non-Cartesian MRI

  8. Moment domain representation of nonblind image deblurring.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ahlad; Paramesran, Raveendran; Shakibaei, Barmak Honarvar

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose the use of geometric moments to the field of nonblind image deblurring. Using the developed relationship of geometric moments for original and blurred images, a mathematical formulation based on the Euler-Lagrange identity and variational techniques is proposed. It uses an iterative procedure to deblur the image in moment domain. The theoretical framework is validated by a set of experiments. A comparative analysis of the results obtained using the spatial and moment domains are evaluated using a quality assessment method known as the Blind/Reference-less Image Spatial Quality Evaluator (BRISQUE). The results show that the proposed method yields a higher quality score when compared with the spatial domain method for the same number of iterations.

  9. A Lot of Good Physics in the Cartesian Diver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, Roberto; Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The Cartesian diver experiment certainly occupies a place of honour in old physics textbooks as a vivid demonstration of Archimedes' buoyancy. The original experiment, as described in old textbooks, shows Archimedes buoyancy qualitatively: when the increased weight of the diver is not counterbalanced by Archimedes' buoyancy, the diver sinks. When…

  10. Zernike expansion of separable functions of cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Campbell, Sam; Hirschhorn, Michael D

    2004-07-10

    A Zernike expansion over a circle is given for an arbitrary function of a single linear spatial coordinate. The example of a half-plane mask (Hilbert filter) is considered. The expansion can also be applied to cylindrical aberrations over a circular pupil. A product of two such series can thus be used to expand an arbitrary separable function of two Cartesian coordinates.

  11. The Cartesian Diver, Surface Tension and the Cheerios Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Tung; Lee, Wen-Tang; Kao, Sung-Kai

    2014-01-01

    A Cartesian diver can be used to measure the surface tension of a liquid to a certain extent. The surface tension measurement is related to the two critical pressures at which the diver is about to sink and about to emerge. After sinking because of increasing pressure, the diver is repulsed to the centre of the vessel. After the pressure is…

  12. Cartesian grid method for gas kinetic scheme on irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Songze; Xu, Kun; Li, Zhihui

    2016-12-01

    A Cartesian grid method combined with a simplified gas kinetic scheme is presented for subsonic and supersonic viscous flow simulation on complex geometries. Under the Cartesian mesh, the boundaries are represented by a set of direction-oriented boundary points, and the computational grid points are classified into four different categories, the fluid point, the solid point, the drop point, and the interpolation point. A constrained weighted least square method is employed to evaluate the physical quantities at the interpolation points. Different boundary conditions, including isothermal boundary, adiabatic boundary, and Euler slip boundary, are presented by different interpolation strategies. We adopt a simplified gas kinetic scheme as the flux solver for both subsonic and supersonic flow computations. The methodology of constructing a simplified kinetic flux function can be extended to other flow systems. A few numerical examples are used to validate the Cartesian grid method and the simplified flux solver. The reconstruction scheme for recovering the boundary conditions of compressible viscous and heat conducting flow with a Cartesian mesh can provide a smooth distribution of physical quantities at solid boundary, and present an accurate solution for the flow study with complex geometry.

  13. The Cartesian Diver as an Aid for Teaching Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Greg K.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism by which air enters the mammalian lung is difficult for many students of physiology. In particular, some students have trouble seeing how pressure can be transmitted through a fluid such as the intrapleural fluid and how the magnitude of that pressure can change. A Cartesian diver, an old-time child's toy, may be used as a visual aid…

  14. Explicit Krawtchouk moment invariants for invariant image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bin; Zhang, Yanhong; Li, Linping; Li, Weisheng; Wang, Guoyin

    2016-03-01

    The existing Krawtchouk moment invariants are derived by a linear combination of geometric moment invariants. This indirect method cannot achieve perfect performance in rotation, scale, and translation (RST) invariant image recognition since the derivation of these invariants are not built on Krawtchouk polynomials. A direct method to derive RST invariants from Krawtchouk moments, named explicit Krawtchouk moment invariants, is proposed. The proposed method drives Krawtchouk moment invariants by algebraically eliminating the distorted (i.e., rotated, scaled, and translated) factor contained in the Krawtchouk moments of distorted image. Experimental results show that, compared with the indirect methods, the proposed approach can significantly improve the performance in terms of recognition accuracy and noise robustness.

  15. Time-varying Geometric Orbital Elements of Saturn's Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): The orbital elements of Saturn's moons are a moving target. Not only do they change with time due to gravitational interactions among the moons, but the familiar osculating elements are often not physically meaningful because of Saturn's large oblateness. Starting with numerical orbit integrations constrained by ground-based and spacecraft observations (e.g., Jacobson et al. 2008, AJ), we express the orbits of Saturn's moons in terms of the physically meaningful "epicyclic elements" derived in several papers by Borderies (Rappaport) and Longaretti, obtaining them from the Cartesian position and velocity at each moment in time via the algorithm of Renner and Sicardy (2006, CeMDA). Our purpose is twofold: Firstly, Saturn's rings respond to myriad resonances with the moons, and the location and phase of those resonances depend on each moon's mean motion, argument of pericenter, etc. By obtaining time series for these quantities in forms that directly reflect the motion of the perturbers as seen by the rings, we enable more precise study of ring resonances. Resonances due to Mimas, Janus, and Epimetheus, and perhaps also Prometheus and Pandora, change with time in such a way as to result in observable effects in spiral waves and edge locations (e.g., Tiscareno et al. 2006, ApJL; Spitale and Porco 2009, AJ). Secondly, by means of Fourier analysis and wavelet analysis, we investigate the frequencies that govern the evolution of the geometric orbital elements, and even how those frequencies themselves may change with time, thus casting light on the interactions among moons, as well as on the relation between orbital and rotational motion.

  16. Time-varying Geometric Orbital Elements of Saturn's Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    2014-11-01

    The orbital elements of Saturn's moons are a moving target. Not only do they change with time due to gravitational interactions among the moons, but the familiar osculating elements are often not physically meaningful because of Saturn's large oblateness. Starting with numerical orbit integrations constrained by ground-based and spacecraft observations (e.g., Jacobson et al. 2008, AJ), we express the orbits of Saturn's moons in terms of the physically meaningful "epicyclic elements" derived in several papers by Borderies (Rappaport) and Longaretti, obtaining them from the Cartesian position and velocity at each moment in time via the algorithm of Renner and Sicardy (2006, CeMDA). Our purpose is twofold: Firstly, Saturn's rings respond to myriad resonances with the moons, and the location and phase of those resonances depend on each moon's mean motion, argument of pericenter, etc. By obtaining time series for these quantities in forms that directly reflect the motion of the perturbers as seen by the rings, we enable more precise study of ring resonances. Resonances due to Mimas, Janus, and Epimetheus, and perhaps also Prometheus and Pandora, change with time in such a way as to result in observable effects in spiral waves and edge locations (e.g., Tiscareno et al. 2006, ApJL; Spitale and Porco 2009, AJ). Secondly, by means of Fourier analysis and wavelet analysis, we investigate the frequencies that govern the evolution of the geometric orbital elements, and even how those frequencies themselves may change with time, thus casting light on the interactions among moons, as well as on the relation between orbital and rotational motion.

  17. Unstructured Cartesian refinement with sharp interface immersed boundary method for 3D unsteady incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Chawdhary, Saurabh; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    A novel numerical method is developed for solving the 3D, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined fully unstructured Cartesian grids in domains with arbitrarily complex immersed boundaries. Owing to the utilization of the fractional step method on an unstructured Cartesian hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout, flux mismatch and pressure discontinuity issues are avoided and the divergence free constraint is inherently satisfied to machine zero. Auxiliary/hanging nodes are used to facilitate the discretization of the governing equations. The second-order accuracy of the solver is ensured by using multi-dimension Lagrange interpolation operators and appropriate differencing schemes at the interface of regions with different levels of refinement. The sharp interface immersed boundary method is augmented with local near-boundary refinement to handle arbitrarily complex boundaries. The discrete momentum equation is solved with the matrix free Newton-Krylov method and the Krylov-subspace method is employed to solve the Poisson equation. The second-order accuracy of the proposed method on unstructured Cartesian grids is demonstrated by solving the Poisson equation with a known analytical solution. A number of three-dimensional laminar flow simulations of increasing complexity illustrate the ability of the method to handle flows across a range of Reynolds numbers and flow regimes. Laminar steady and unsteady flows past a sphere and the oblique vortex shedding from a circular cylinder mounted between two end walls demonstrate the accuracy, the efficiency and the smooth transition of scales and coherent structures across refinement levels. Large-eddy simulation (LES) past a miniature wind turbine rotor, parameterized using the actuator line approach, indicates the ability of the fully unstructured solver to simulate complex turbulent flows. Finally, a geometry resolving LES of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine illustrates

  18. Hamiltonian formalism for semiflexible molecules in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Kneller, G R

    2006-09-21

    The article gives a concise description of Hamiltonian dynamics and thermal averages of semiflexible molecules in Cartesian coordinates. Using the concept of constrained inverse matrices introduced by Bott and Duffin [Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 74, 99 (1953)] explicit expressions are derived for the constrained Hamiltonian, the corresponding equations of motion, and the momentum partition function. In this context Fixman-type corrections of constrained configurational averages are derived for different forms of the constraints. It is shown that the use of mass-weighted coordinates leads to a nonbiased sampling of constrained configurational averages in Cartesian coordinates. The formalism allows moreover to define and to calculate effective masses arising in thermal velocity averages of atoms in semiflexible molecules. These effective masses are identical to the corresponding Sachs-Teller recoil masses, which are here generalized to the case of only partially rigid molecules.

  19. Averaged initial Cartesian coordinates for long lifetime satellite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of initial Cartesian coordinates, which are free of ambiguities and resonance singularities, is developed to study satellite mission requirements and dispersions over long lifetimes. The method outlined herein possesses two distinct advantages over most other averaging procedures. First, the averaging is carried out numerically using Gaussian quadratures, thus avoiding tedious expansions and the resulting resonances for critical inclinations, etc. Secondly, by using the initial rectangular Cartesian coordinates, conventional, existing acceleration perturbation routines can be absorbed into the program without further modifications, thus making the method easily adaptable to the addition of new perturbation effects. The averaged nonlinear differential equations are integrated by means of a Runge Kutta method. A typical step size of several orbits permits rapid integration of long lifetime orbits in a short computing time.

  20. Simulations of 6-DOF Motion with a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Coupled 6-DOF/CFD trajectory predictions using an automated Cartesian method are demonstrated by simulating a GBU-32/JDAM store separating from an F-18C aircraft. Numerical simulations are performed at two Mach numbers near the sonic speed, and compared with flight-test telemetry and photographic-derived data. Simulation results obtained with a sequential-static series of flow solutions are contrasted with results using a time-dependent flow solver. Both numerical methods show good agreement with the flight-test data through the first half of the simulations. The sequential-static and time-dependent methods diverge over the last half of the trajectory prediction. after the store produces peak angular rates. A cost comparison for the Cartesian method is included, in terms of absolute cost and relative to computing uncoupled 6-DOF trajectories. A detailed description of the 6-DOF method, as well as a verification of its accuracy, is provided in an appendix.

  1. The approach to steady state using homogeneous and Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Gochberg, D F; Ding, Z

    2013-01-01

    Repeating an arbitrary sequence of RF pulses and magnetic field gradients will eventually lead to a steady-state condition in any magnetic resonance system. While numerical methods can quantify this trajectory, analytic analysis provides significantly more insight and a means for faster calculation. Recently, an analytic analysis using homogeneous coordinates was published. The current work further develops this line of thought and compares the relative merits of using a homogeneous or a Cartesian coordinate system.

  2. 3D automatic Cartesian grid generation for Euler flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Berger, Marsha J.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a Cartesian grid strategy for the study of three dimensional inviscid flows about arbitrary geometries that uses both conventional and CAD/CAM surface geometry databases. Initial applications of the technique are presented. The elimination of the body-fitted constraint allows the grid generation process to be automated, significantly reducing the time and effort required to develop suitable computational grids for inviscid flowfield simulations.

  3. Irreducible Cartesian tensors of highest weight, for arbitrary order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mane, S. R.

    2016-03-01

    A closed form expression is presented for the irreducible Cartesian tensor of highest weight, for arbitrary order. Two proofs are offered, one employing bookkeeping of indices and, after establishing the connection with the so-called natural tensors and their projection operators, the other one employing purely coordinate-free tensor manipulations. Some theorems and formulas in the published literature are generalized from SO(3) to SO(n), for dimensions n ≥ 3.

  4. Interconversion between truncated Cartesian and polar expansions of images.

    PubMed

    Park, Wooram; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for lossless conversion of data between Cartesian and polar coordinates, when the data is sampled from a 2-D real-valued function (a mapping: R2 --> R) expressed as a particular kind of truncated expansion. We use Laguerre functions and the Fourier basis for the polar coordinate expression. Hermite functions are used for the Cartesian coordinate expression. A finite number of coefficients for the truncated expansion specifies the function in each coordinate system. We derive the relationship between the coefficients for the two coordinate systems. Based on this relationship, we propose an algorithm for lossless conversion between the two coordinate systems. Resampling can be used to evaluate a truncated expansion on the complementary coordinate system without computing a new set of coefficients. The resampled data is used to compute the new set of coefficients to avoid the numerical instability associated with direct conversion of the coefficients. In order to apply our algorithm to discrete image data, we propose a method to optimally fit a truncated expression to a given image. We also quantify the error that this filtering process can produce. Finally the algorithm is applied to solve the polar-Cartesian interpolation problem.

  5. Kalman filter techniques for accelerated Cartesian dynamic cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Salerno, Michael; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic MRI, spatial and temporal parallel imaging can be exploited to reduce scan time. Real-time reconstruction enables immediate visualization during the scan. Commonly used view-sharing techniques suffer from limited temporal resolution, and many of the more advanced reconstruction methods are either retrospective, time-consuming, or both. A Kalman filter model capable of real-time reconstruction can be used to increase the spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic MRI reconstruction. The original study describing the use of the Kalman filter in dynamic MRI was limited to non-Cartesian trajectories because of a limitation intrinsic to the dynamic model used in that study. Here the limitation is overcome, and the model is applied to the more commonly used Cartesian trajectory with fast reconstruction. Furthermore, a combination of the Kalman filter model with Cartesian parallel imaging is presented to further increase the spatial and temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations and experiments were conducted to demonstrate that the Kalman filter model can increase the temporal resolution of the image series compared with view-sharing techniques and decrease the spatial aliasing compared with TGRAPPA. The method requires relatively little computation, and thus is suitable for real-time reconstruction.

  6. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback for MRI Power Amplifier Linearization

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta Gaia; Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John Mark; Scott, Greig Cameron

    2011-01-01

    High-quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires precise control of the transmit radio-frequency field. In parallel excitation applications such as transmit SENSE, high RF power linearity is essential to cancel aliased excitations. In widely-employed class AB power amplifiers, gain compression, cross-over distortion, memory effects, and thermal drift all distort the RF field modulation and can degrade image quality. Cartesian feedback (CF) linearization can mitigate these effects in MRI, if the quadrature mismatch and DC offset imperfections inherent in the architecture can be minimized. In this paper, we present a modified Cartesian feedback technique called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” (FOCF) that significantly reduces these problems. In the FOCF architecture, the feedback control is performed at a low intermediate frequency rather than DC, so that quadrature ghosts and DC errors are shifted outside the control bandwidth. FOCF linearization is demonstrated with a variety of typical MRI pulses. Simulation of the magnetization obtained with the Bloch equation demonstrates that high-fidelity RF reproduction can be obtained even with inexpensive class AB amplifiers. Finally, the enhanced RF fidelity of FOCF over CF is demonstrated with actual images obtained in a 1.5 T MRI system. PMID:20959264

  7. Moments of catchment storm area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Wang, Q.

    1985-01-01

    The portion of a catchment covered by a stationary rainstorm is modeled by the common area of two overlapping circles. Given that rain occurs within the catchment and conditioned by fixed storm and catchment sizes, the first two moments of the distribution of the common area are derived from purely geometrical considerations. The variance of the wetted fraction is shown to peak when the catchment size is equal to the size of the predominant storm. The conditioning on storm size is removed by assuming a probability distribution based upon the observed fractal behavior of cloud and rainstorm areas.

  8. Moment-to-Moment Emotions during Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.; D'Mello, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Moment-to-moment emotions are affective states that dynamically change during reading and potentially influence comprehension. Researchers have recently identified these emotions and the emotion trajectories in reading, tutoring, and problem solving. The primary learning-centered emotions are boredom, frustration, confusion, flow (engagement),…

  9. An adaptive three-dimensional Cartesian approach for the parallel computation of inviscid flow about static and dynamic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jason Daniel

    An adaptive three-dimensional Cartesian approach for the parallel computation of compressible flow about static and dynamic configurations has been developed and validated. This is a further step towards a goal that remains elusive for CFD codes: the ability to model complex dynamic-geometry problems in a quick and automated manner. The underlying flow-solution method solves the three-dimensional Euler equations using a MUSCL-type finite-volume approach to achieve higher-order spatial accuracy. The flow solution, either steady or unsteady, is advanced in time via a two-stage time-stepping scheme. This basic solution method has been incorporated into a parallel block-adaptive Cartesian framework, using a block-octtree data structure to represent varying spatial resolution, and to compute flow solutions in parallel. The ability to represent static geometric configurations has been introduced by cutting a geometric configuration out of a background block-adaptive Cartesian grid, then solving for the flow on the resulting volume grid. This approach has been extended for dynamic geometric configurations: components of a given configuration were permitted to independently move, according to prescribed rigid-body motion. Two flow-solver difficulties arise as a result of introducing static and dynamic configurations: small time steps; and the disappearance/appearance of cell volume during a time integration step. Both of these problems have been remedied through cell merging. The concept of cell merging and its implementation within the parallel block-adaptive method is described. While the parallelization of certain grid-generation and cell-cutting routines resulted from this work, the most significant contribution was developing the novel cell-merging paradigm that was incorporated into the parallel block-adaptive framework. Lastly, example simulations both to validate the developed method and to demonstrate its full capabilities have been carried out. A simple, steady

  10. A Cartesian embedded boundary method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Petersson, N A

    2006-12-04

    The authors develop an embedded boundary finite difference technique for solving the compressible two- or three-dimensional Euler equations in complex geometries on a Cartesian grid. The method is second order accurate with an explicit time step determined by the grid size away from the boundary. Slope limiters are used on the embedded boundary to avoid non-physical oscillations near shock waves. They show computed examples of supersonic flow past a cylinder and compare with results computed on a body fitted grid. Furthermore, they discuss the implementation of the method for thin geometries, and show computed examples of transonic flow past an airfoil.

  11. Claes Hellerström and Cartesian diver microrespirometry

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cartesian diver microrespirometry was introduced by Claes Hellerström at the Department of Histology/Medical Cell Biology at Uppsala University, Sweden, to determine rates of oxygen consumption in islets of Langerhans. The theory behind this method is touched upon and the main findings described. Glucose-stimulated beta cell respiration significantly contributes to increased ATP generation, which is a prerequisite for stimulated insulin secretion and synthesis. This has had major implications for understanding the beta cell stimulus–secretion coupling. PMID:27181825

  12. Unstructured Cartesian/prismatic grid generation for complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The generation of a hybrid grid system for discretizing complex three dimensional (3D) geometries is described. The primary grid system is an unstructured Cartesian grid automatically generated using recursive cell subdivision. This grid system is sufficient for computing Euler solutions about extremely complex 3D geometries. A secondary grid system, using triangular-prismatic elements, may be added for resolving the boundary layer region of viscous flows near surfaces of solid bodies. This paper describes the grid generation processes used to generate each grid type. Several example grids are shown, demonstrating the ability of the method to discretize complex geometries, with very little pre-processing required by the user.

  13. Euler Technology Assessment for Preliminary Aircraft Design: Compressibility Predictions by Employing the Cartesian Unstructured Grid SPLITFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Dennis B.; Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the second phase of the Euler Technology Assessment program was to evaluate the ability of Euler computational fluid dynamics codes to predict compressible flow effects over a generic fighter wind tunnel model. This portion of the study was conducted by Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems, using an in-house Cartesian-grid code called SPLITFLOW. The Cartesian grid technique offers several advantages, including ease of volume grid generation and reduced number of cells compared to other grid schemes. SPLITFLOW also includes grid adaption of the volume grid during the solution to resolve high-gradient regions. The SPLITFLOW code predictions of configuration forces and moments are shown to be adequate for preliminary design, including predictions of sideslip effects and the effects of geometry variations at low and high angles-of-attack. The transonic pressure prediction capabilities of SPLITFLOW are shown to be improved over subsonic comparisons. The time required to generate the results from initial surface data is on the order of several hours, including grid generation, which is compatible with the needs of the design environment.

  14. Numerical modeling of conjugate heat transfer on complex geometries with diagonal Cartesian method. Part 1: Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.L.; Carlson, K.D.; Chen, C.J. |

    1999-05-01

    In this study, a diagonal Cartesian method for thermal analysis is developed for simulation of conjugate heat transfer over complex boundaries. This method uses diagonal line segments in addition to Cartesian coordinates. The velocity fields are also modeled using the diagonal Cartesian method. The transport equations are discretized with the finite analytic (FA) method. The current work is validated by simulating a rotated lid-driven cavity flow with conjugate heat transfer, and accurate results are obtained.

  15. PREFACE: Geometrically frustrated magnetism Geometrically frustrated magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2011-04-01

    Frustrated magnetism is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics that has grown tremendously over the past 20 years. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement in the field of geometrically frustrated magnets and is inspired by the 2010 Highly Frustrated Magnetism (HFM 2010) meeting in Baltimore, MD, USA. Geometric frustration is a broad phenomenon that results from an intrinsic incompatibility between some fundamental interactions and the underlying lattice geometry based on triangles and tetrahedra. Most studies have centred around the kagomé and pyrochlore based magnets but recent work has looked at other structures including the delafossite, langasites, hyper-kagomé, garnets and Laves phase materials to name a few. Personally, I hope this issue serves as a great reference to scientist both new and old to this field, and that we all continue to have fun in this very frustrated playground. Finally, I want to thank the HFM 2010 organizers and all the sponsors whose contributions were an essential part of the success of the meeting in Baltimore. Geometrically frustrated magnetism contents Spangolite: an s = 1/2 maple leaf lattice antiferromagnet? T Fennell, J O Piatek, R A Stephenson, G J Nilsen and H M Rønnow Two-dimensional magnetism and spin-size effect in the S = 1 triangular antiferromagnet NiGa2S4 Yusuke Nambu and Satoru Nakatsuji Short range ordering in the modified honeycomb lattice compound SrHo2O4 S Ghosh, H D Zhou, L Balicas, S Hill, J S Gardner, Y Qi and C R Wiebe Heavy fermion compounds on the geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice M S Kim and M C Aronson A neutron polarization analysis study of moment correlations in (Dy0.4Y0.6)T2 (T = Mn, Al) J R Stewart, J M Hillier, P Manuel and R Cywinski Elemental analysis and magnetism of hydronium jarosites—model kagome antiferromagnets and topological spin glasses A S Wills and W G Bisson The Herbertsmithite Hamiltonian: μSR measurements on single crystals

  16. GSRP/David Marshall: Fully Automated Cartesian Grid CFD Application for MDO in High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    With the renewed interest in Cartesian gridding methodologies for the ease and speed of gridding complex geometries in addition to the simplicity of the control volumes used in the computations, it has become important to investigate ways of extending the existing Cartesian grid solver functionalities. This includes developing methods of modeling the viscous effects in order to utilize Cartesian grids solvers for accurate drag predictions and addressing the issues related to the distributed memory parallelization of Cartesian solvers. This research presents advances in two areas of interest in Cartesian grid solvers, viscous effects modeling and MPI parallelization. The development of viscous effects modeling using solely Cartesian grids has been hampered by the widely varying control volume sizes associated with the mesh refinement and the cut cells associated with the solid surface. This problem is being addressed by using physically based modeling techniques to update the state vectors of the cut cells and removing them from the finite volume integration scheme. This work is performed on a new Cartesian grid solver, NASCART-GT, with modifications to its cut cell functionality. The development of MPI parallelization addresses issues associated with utilizing Cartesian solvers on distributed memory parallel environments. This work is performed on an existing Cartesian grid solver, CART3D, with modifications to its parallelization methodology.

  17. Extending the functionalities of Cartesian grid solvers: Viscous effects modeling and MPI parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, David D.

    With the renewed interest in Cartesian gridding methodologies for the ease and speed of gridding complex geometries in addition to the simplicity of the control volumes used in the computations, it has become important to investigate ways of extending the existing Cartesian grid solver functionalities. This includes developing methods of modeling the viscous effects in order to utilize Cartesian grids solvers for accurate drag predictions and addressing the issues related to the distributed memory parallelization of Cartesian solvers. This research presents advances in two areas of interest in Cartesian grid solvers, viscous effects modeling and MPI parallelization. The development of viscous effects modeling using solely Cartesian grids has been hampered by the widely varying control volume sizes associated with the mesh refinement and the cut cells associated with the solid surface. This problem is being addressed by using physically based modeling techniques to update the state vectors of the cut cells and removing them from the finite volume integration scheme. This work is performed on a new Cartesian grid solver, NASCART-GT, with modifications to its cut cell functionality. The development of MPI parallelization addresses issues associated with utilizing Cartesian solvers on distributed memory parallel environments. This work is performed on an existing Cartesian grid solver, CART3D, with modifications to its parallelization methodology.

  18. ASAM v2.7: a compressible atmospheric model with a Cartesian cut cell approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Knoth, O.; König, M.; Vogelsberg, U.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the fully compressible, three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model called All Scale Atmospheric Model (ASAM) is presented. A cut cell approach is used to include obstacles and orography into the Cartesian grid. Discretization is realized by a mixture of finite differences and finite volumes and a state limiting is applied. Necessary shifting and interpolation techniques are outlined. The method can be generalized to any other orthogonal grids, e.g., a lat-long grid. A linear implicit Rosenbrock time integration scheme ensures numerical stability in the presence of fast sound waves and around small cells. Analyses of five two-dimensional benchmark test cases from the literature are carried out to show that the described method produces meaningful results with respect to conservation properties and model accuracy. The test cases are partly modified in a way that the flow field or scalars interact with cut cells. To make the model applicable for atmospheric problems, physical parameterizations like a Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model, a two-moment bulk microphysics scheme, and precipitation and surface fluxes using a sophisticated multi-layer soil model are implemented and described. Results of an idealized three-dimensional simulation are shown, where the flow field around an idealized mountain with subsequent gravity wave generation, latent heat release, orographic clouds and precipitation are modeled.

  19. X-ray phase-contrast imaging: transmission functions separable in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guohua; Hamilton, Theron J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2007-04-01

    In-line, x-ray phase-contrast imaging is responsive to both phase changes and absorption as the x radiation traverses a body. Expressions are derived for phase-contrast imaging of objects having transmission functions separable in Cartesian coordinates. Starting from the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral formula for image formation, an expression is found for the phase-contrast image produced by an x-ray source with nonvanishing dimensions. This expression is evaluated in limiting cases where the source-to-object distance is large, where the source acts as a point source, and where the weak phase approximation is valid. The integral expression for the image is evaluated for objects with simple geometrical shapes, showing the influence of the source dimensions on the visibility of phase-contrast features. The expressions derived here are evaluated for cases where the magnification is substantially greater than one as would be employed in biological imaging. Experiments are reported using the in-line phase-contrast imaging method with a microfocus x-ray source and a CCD camera.

  20. Maintain rigid structures in Verlet based cartesian molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R

    2012-10-07

    An algorithm is presented to maintain rigid structures in Verlet based cartesian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. After each unconstrained MD step, the coordinates of selected particles are corrected to maintain rigid structures through an iterative procedure of rotation matrix computation. This algorithm, named as SHAPE and implemented in CHARMM program suite, avoids the calculations of Lagrange multipliers, so that the complexity of computation does not increase with the number of particles in a rigid structure. The implementation of this algorithm does not require significant modification of propagation integrator, and can be plugged into any cartesian based MD integration scheme. A unique feature of the SHAPE method is that it is interchangeable with SHAKE for any object that can be constrained as a rigid structure using multiple SHAKE constraints. Unlike SHAKE, the SHAPE method can be applied to large linear (with three or more centers) and planar (with four or more centers) rigid bodies. Numerical tests with four model systems including two proteins demonstrate that the accuracy and reliability of the SHAPE method are comparable to the SHAKE method, but with much more applicability and efficiency.

  1. [Cartesian misunderstanding as a cause of therapeutic failure].

    PubMed

    Isler, H

    1986-01-01

    Headache patients disassociate themselves from their own automatic responses, relying on the traditional separation of body and mind. On the other hand, patients who obtain voluntary control of automatic functions by biofeedback training modify not only vegetative but also voluntary behaviour patterns, losing "neurotic" traits. The basic misconception of the separation of body and mind, Cartesian dualism, is now ingrained in our culture. In the 17th century Descartes asserted that concepts applied to the soul must be entirely different from those used for the body in order to improve comprehension of the immortality of the soul. This dualism also led to "enlightenment" and to many later social and philosophical developments. But his basic neurophysiology was obsolete when he wrote it down. Other models from mainstream natural philosophy were better compatible with observation and experiments. Gassendi assumed a "body soul" consisting of energy as the functional principle of the nervous system, and Willis accommodated a series of anticipations of 19th century discoveries within this model. No comparable progress resulted from Descartes' own medieval model. Cartesian dualism has become untenable in view of recent neuropsychology but it still obstructs our management of functional patients. Instead of reinforcing the delusion of separation of psyche and soma, we ought to encourage patients to understand that their malfunctioning organs are on-line with their emotions, and with their mind.

  2. Coil Compression for Accelerated Imaging with Cartesian Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Pauly, John M.; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.; Lustig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    MRI using receiver arrays with many coil elements can provide high signal-to-noise ratio and increase parallel imaging acceleration. At the same time, the growing number of elements results in larger datasets and more computation in the reconstruction. This is of particular concern in 3D acquisitions and in iterative reconstructions. Coil compression algorithms are effective in mitigating this problem by compressing data from many channels into fewer virtual coils. In Cartesian sampling there often are fully sampled k-space dimensions. In this work, a new coil compression technique for Cartesian sampling is presented that exploits the spatially varying coil sensitivities in these non-subsampled dimensions for better compression and computation reduction. Instead of directly compressing in k-space, coil compression is performed separately for each spatial location along the fully-sampled directions, followed by an additional alignment process that guarantees the smoothness of the virtual coil sensitivities. This important step provides compatibility with autocalibrating parallel imaging techniques. Its performance is not susceptible to artifacts caused by a tight imaging fieldof-view. High quality compression of in-vivo 3D data from a 32 channel pediatric coil into 6 virtual coils is demonstrated. PMID:22488589

  3. Parallel Cartesian grid refinement for 3D complex flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    A second order accurate method for discretizing the Navier-Stokes equations on 3D unstructured Cartesian grids is presented. Although the grid generator is based on the oct-tree hierarchical method, fully unstructured data-structure is adopted enabling robust calculations for incompressible flows, avoiding both the need of synchronization of the solution between different levels of refinement and usage of prolongation/restriction operators. The current solver implements a hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout, employing the implicit fractional step method to satisfy the continuity equation. The pressure-Poisson equation is discretized by using a novel second order fully implicit scheme for unstructured Cartesian grids and solved using an efficient Krylov subspace solver. The momentum equation is also discretized with second order accuracy and the high performance Newton-Krylov method is used for integrating them in time. Neumann and Dirichlet conditions are used to validate the Poisson solver against analytical functions and grid refinement results to a significant reduction of the solution error. The effectiveness of the fractional step method results in the stability of the overall algorithm and enables the performance of accurate multi-resolution real life simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0005482.

  4. A Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for solving the Poisson and heat equations with discontinuous coefficients in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Robert; Graves, Daniel; Colella, Phillip

    2009-10-23

    We present a method for solving Poisson and heat equations with discon- tinuous coefficients in two- and three-dimensions. It uses a Cartesian cut-cell/embedded boundary method to represent the interface between materi- als, as described in Johansen& Colella (1998). Matching conditions across the interface are enforced using an approximation to fluxes at the boundary. Overall second order accuracy is achieved, as indicated by an array of tests using non-trivial interface geometries. Both the elliptic and heat solvers are shown to remain stable and efficient for material coefficient contrasts up to 106, thanks in part to the use of geometric multigrid. A test of accuracy when adaptive mesh refinement capabilities are utilized is also performed. An example problem relevant to nuclear reactor core simulation is presented, demonstrating the ability of the method to solve problems with realistic physical parameters.

  5. A Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for solving the Poisson and heat equations with discontinuous coefficients in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, R.K.; Colella, P.; Graves, D.T.

    2011-04-01

    We present a method for solving Poisson and heat equations with discontinuous coefficients in two- and three-dimensions. It uses a Cartesian cut-cell/embedded boundary method to represent the interface between materials, as described in Johansen and Colella (1998). Matching conditions across the interface are enforced using an approximation to fluxes at the boundary. Overall second order accuracy is achieved, as indicated by an array of tests using non-trivial interface geometries. Both the elliptic and heat solvers are shown to remain stable and efficient for material coefficient contrasts up to 10{sup 6}, thanks in part to the use of geometric multigrid. A test of accuracy when adaptive mesh refinement capabilities are utilized is also performed. An example problem relevant to nuclear reactor core simulation is presented, demonstrating the ability of the method to solve problems with realistic physical parameters.

  6. Adjoint Formulation for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Many problems in aerodynamic design can be characterized by smooth and convex objective functions. This motivates the use of gradient-based algorithms, particularly for problems with a large number of design variables, to efficiently determine optimal shapes and configurations that maximize aerodynamic performance. Accurate and efficient computation of the gradient, however, remains a challenging task. In optimization problems where the number of design variables dominates the number of objectives and flow- dependent constraints, the cost of gradient computations can be significantly reduced by the use of the adjoint method. The problem of aerodynamic optimization using the adjoint method has been analyzed and validated for both structured and unstructured grids. The method has been applied to design problems governed by the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations and can be subdivided into the continuous and discrete formulations. Giles and Pierce provide a detailed review of both approaches. Most implementations rely on grid-perturbation or mapping procedures during the gradient computation that explicitly couple changes in the surface shape to the volume grid. The solution of the adjoint equation is usually accomplished using the same scheme that solves the governing flow equations. Examples of such code reuse include multistage Runge-Kutta schemes coupled with multigrid, approximate-factorization, line-implicit Gauss-Seidel, and also preconditioned GMRES. The development of the adjoint method for aerodynamic optimization problems on Cartesian grids has been limited. In contrast to implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian grid methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume grid. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin e t al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code

  7. Automatic off-body overset adaptive Cartesian mesh method based on an octree approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péron, Stéphanie; Benoit, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method for generating adaptive structured Cartesian grids within a near-body/off-body mesh partitioning framework for the flow simulation around complex geometries. The off-body Cartesian mesh generation derives from an octree structure, assuming each octree leaf node defines a structured Cartesian block. This enables one to take into account the large scale discrepancies in terms of resolution between the different bodies involved in the simulation, with minimum memory requirements. Two different conversions from the octree to Cartesian grids are proposed: the first one generates Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) type grid systems, and the second one generates abutting or minimally overlapping Cartesian grid set. We also introduce an algorithm to control the number of points at each adaptation, that automatically determines relevant values of the refinement indicator driving the grid refinement and coarsening. An application to a wing tip vortex computation assesses the capability of the method to capture accurately the flow features.

  8. A general time element for orbit integration in Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janin, G.; Bond, V. R.

    1981-01-01

    Two techniques are discussed for increasing the accuracy of the numerical integration of eccentric orbits in Cartesian coordinates. One involves the use of an independent variable different from time; this increases the efficiency of the numerical integration. The other uses a time element, which reduces the in-track error. A general expression is given of a time element valid for an arbitrary independent variable. It is pointed out that this time element makes it possible to switch the independent variable merely by applying a scaling factor; there is no need to change the differential equations of the motion. Eccentric, true, and elliptic anomalies are used as independent variables in the case of a transfer orbit for a geosynchronous orbit. The elliptic anomaly is shown to perform much better than the other classical anomalies.

  9. A cartesian grid embedded boundary method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Graves, Daniel T.; Keen, Benjamin J.; Modiano, David

    2004-10-03

    We present a second-order Godunov algorithm to solve time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on irregular domains. Our approach is based on a formally consistent discretization of the conservation laws on a finite-volume grid obtained from intersecting the domain with a Cartesian grid. We address the small-cell stability problem associated with such methods by hybridizing our conservative discretization with a stable, nonconservative discretization at irregular control volumes, and redistributing the difference in the mass increments to nearby cells in a way that preserves stability and local conservation. The resulting method is second-order accurate in L{sup 1} for smooth problems, and is robust in the presence of large-amplitude discontinuities intersecting the irregular boundary.

  10. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  11. Multiresolution moment filters: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Sühling, Michael; Arigovindan, Muthuvel; Hunziker, Patrick; Unser, Michael

    2004-04-01

    We introduce local weighted geometric moments that are computed from an image within a sliding window at multiple scales. When the window function satisfies a two-scale relation, we prove that lower order moments can be computed efficiently at dyadic scales by using a multiresolution wavelet-like algorithm. We show that B-splines are well-suited window functions because, in addition to being refinable, they are positive, symmetric, separable, and very nearly isotropic (Gaussian shape). We present three applications of these multiscale local moments. The first is a feature-extraction method for detecting and characterizing elongated structures in images. The second is a noise-reduction method which can be viewed as a multiscale extension of Savitzky-Golay filtering. The third is a multiscale optical-flow algorithm that uses a local affine model for the motion field, extending the Lucas-Kanade optical-flow method. The results obtained in all cases are promising.

  12. Nuclear Anapole Moments

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Wick Haxton; Ching-Pang Liu

    2002-03-29

    Nuclear anapole moments are parity-odd, time-reversal-even E1 moments of the electromagnetic current operator. Although the existence of this moment was recognized theoretically soon after the discovery of parity nonconservation (PNC), its experimental isolation was achieved only recently, when a new level of precision was reached in a measurement of the hyperfine dependence of atomic PNC in 133Cs. An important anapole moment bound in 205Tl also exists. In this paper, we present the details of the first calculation of these anapole moments in the framework commonly used in other studies of hadronic PNC, a meson exchange potential that includes long-range pion exchange and enough degrees of freedom to describe the five independent S-P amplitudes induced by short-range interactions. The resulting contributions of pi-, rho-, and omega-exchange to the single-nucleon anapole moment, to parity admixtures in the nuclear ground state, and to PNC exchange currents are evaluated, using configuration-mixed shell-model wave functions. The experimental anapole moment constraints on the PNC meson-nucleon coupling constants are derived and compared with those from other tests of the hadronic weak interaction. While the bounds obtained from the anapole moment results are consistent with the broad ''reasonable ranges'' defined by theory, they are not in good agreement with the constraints from the other experiments. We explore possible explanations for the discrepancy and comment on the potential importance of new experiments.

  13. Numerical modeling of conjugate heat transfer on complex geometries with diagonal Cartesian method. Part 2: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.D.; Lin, W.L.; Chen, C.J. |

    1999-05-01

    Part 1 of this study discusses the diagonal Cartesian method for temperature analysis. The application of this method to the analysis of flow and conjugate heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger is given in Part 2. In addition to a regular (i.e., Cartesian-oriented) fin arrangement, two complex fin arrangements are modeled using the diagonal Cartesian method. The pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of the different configurations are compared. It is found that enhanced heat transfer and reduced pressure drop can be obtained with the modified fin arrangements for this compact heat exchanger.

  14. Conversion of Cartesian coordinates from and to Generalized Balanced Ternary addresses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Roessel, Jan W.

    1988-01-01

    Hexagonal grids have several advantages over square grids, such as a greater angular resolution and unambiguous connectivity. The Generalized Balanced Ternary (GBT) system is a spatial addressing method for hexagonal grids in which the hexagons are arranged in hierarchical aggregates, and which accommodates vector operations in GBT space. Efficient algorithms for converting Cartesian coordinates from and to GBT addresses are based on the dual representation of the hexagonal tessellation. The GBT-to-Cartesian algorithm is an order of magnitude faster than the Cartesian-to-GBT algorithm, the latter requiring interpolation and GBT addition for each digit of the generated GBT address.

  15. Moment inference from tomograms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Chen, Y.; Singha, K.

    2007-01-01

    Time-lapse geophysical tomography can provide valuable qualitative insights into hydrologic transport phenomena associated with aquifer dynamics, tracer experiments, and engineered remediation. Increasingly, tomograms are used to infer the spatial and/or temporal moments of solute plumes; these moments provide quantitative information about transport processes (e.g., advection, dispersion, and rate-limited mass transfer) and controlling parameters (e.g., permeability, dispersivity, and rate coefficients). The reliability of moments calculated from tomograms is, however, poorly understood because classic approaches to image appraisal (e.g., the model resolution matrix) are not directly applicable to moment inference. Here, we present a semi-analytical approach to construct a moment resolution matrix based on (1) the classic model resolution matrix and (2) image reconstruction from orthogonal moments. Numerical results for radar and electrical-resistivity imaging of solute plumes demonstrate that moment values calculated from tomograms depend strongly on plume location within the tomogram, survey geometry, regularization criteria, and measurement error. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-offreedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves the complete system of aero-structural equations using a modular, loosely-coupled strategy which allows the lower-fidelity structural model to deform the highfidelity CFD model. The approach uses an open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. This extended abstract includes a brief description of the architecture, along with some preliminary validation of underlying assumptions and early results on a generic 3D transport model. The final paper will present more concrete cases and validation of the approach. Preliminary results demonstrate convergence of the complete aero-structural system and investigate the accuracy of the approximations used in the formulation of the structural model.

  17. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary, Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-of-freedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves a nonlinear, aerostructural system of equations using a loosely-coupled strategy. An open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine is utilized to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The coupling interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. After verifying the structural model with comparisons to Euler beam theory, two applications of the analysis method are presented as validation. The first is a relatively stiff, transport wing model which was a subject of a recent workshop on aeroelasticity. The second is a very flexible model recently tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Both cases show that the aeroelastic analysis method produces results in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  18. An immersed boundary method for non-uniform Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Juwon; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-11-01

    Many kinds of immersed boundary method have been developed, but most of them have been used in uniform grids with discrete Dirac delta functions. Therefore, the distribution of Lagrangian points over the immersed surface is usually made uniformly. However, when any immersed boundary method is to be applied to non-uniform grids, uniform distribution might not be optimum for good performance. Recently, Akiki and Balachandar (2016) proposed a method to distribute the Lagrangian points nonuniformly over the surface of a sphere near the wall, but it cannot not be extended to more general shape of immersed surface. We propose a method that is capable for properly distributing the Lagrangian points over any kind of surface by considering the size of nearby Eulerian grids. Present method first finds intersection points between immersed surface and nonuniform Cartesian grids. Then, the centroid of the intersection points is projected on the immersed surface to be designated by Lagrangian point. This procedure guarantees one Lagrangian point per the Eulerian grid cell. This method is validated for various problems such as flows around a settling sphere, a moving sphere in the near-wall region and a tilted ellipsoid near the wall.

  19. Shared Memory Parallelism for 3D Cartesian Discrete Ordinates Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Salli; Dutka-Malen, Ivan; Plagne, Laurent; Ponçot, Angélique; Ramet, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of DOMINO, a 3D Cartesian SN solver that implements two nested levels of parallelism (multicore+SIMD) on shared memory computation nodes. DOMINO is written in C++, a multi-paradigm programming language that enables the use of powerful and generic parallel programming tools such as Intel TBB and Eigen. These two libraries allow us to combine multi-thread parallelism with vector operations in an efficient and yet portable way. As a result, DOMINO can exploit the full power of modern multi-core processors and is able to tackle very large simulations, that usually require large HPC clusters, using a single computing node. For example, DOMINO solves a 3D full core PWR eigenvalue problem involving 26 energy groups, 288 angular directions (S16), 46 × 106 spatial cells and 1 × 1012 DoFs within 11 hours on a single 32-core SMP node. This represents a sustained performance of 235 GFlops and 40:74% of the SMP node peak performance for the DOMINO sweep implementation. The very high Flops/Watt ratio of DOMINO makes it a very interesting building block for a future many-nodes nuclear simulation tool.

  20. Computational Methods for Configurational Entropy Using Internal and Cartesian Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Hikiri, Simon; Yoshidome, Takashi; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2016-12-13

    The configurational entropy of solute molecules is a crucially important quantity to study various biophysical processes. Consequently, it is necessary to establish an efficient quantitative computational method to calculate configurational entropy as accurately as possible. In the present paper, we investigate the quantitative performance of the quasi-harmonic and related computational methods, including widely used methods implemented in popular molecular dynamics (MD) software packages, compared with the Clausius method, which is capable of accurately computing the change of the configurational entropy upon temperature change. Notably, we focused on the choice of the coordinate systems (i.e., internal or Cartesian coordinates). The Boltzmann-quasi-harmonic (BQH) method using internal coordinates outperformed all the six methods examined here. The introduction of improper torsions in the BQH method improves its performance, and anharmonicity of proper torsions in proteins is identified to be the origin of the superior performance of the BQH method. In contrast, widely used methods implemented in MD packages show rather poor performance. In addition, the enhanced sampling of replica-exchange MD simulations was found to be efficient for the convergent behavior of entropy calculations. Also in folding/unfolding transitions of a small protein, Chignolin, the BQH method was reasonably accurate. However, the independent term without the correlation term in the BQH method was most accurate for the folding entropy among the methods considered in this study, because the QH approximation of the correlation term in the BQH method was no longer valid for the divergent unfolded structures.

  1. An adaptive Cartesian grid generation method for Dirty geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. J.; Srinivasan, Kumar

    2002-07-01

    Traditional structured and unstructured grid generation methods need a water-tight boundary surface grid to start. Therefore, these methods are named boundary to interior (B2I) approaches. Although these methods have achieved great success in fluid flow simulations, the grid generation process can still be very time consuming if non-water-tight geometries are given. Significant user time can be taken to repair or clean a dirty geometry with cracks, overlaps or invalid manifolds before grid generation can take place. In this paper, we advocate a different approach in grid generation, namely the interior to boundary (I2B) approach. With an I2B approach, the computational grid is first generated inside the computational domain. Then this grid is intelligently connected to the boundary, and the boundary grid is a result of this connection. A significant advantage of the I2B approach is that dirty geometries can be handled without cleaning or repairing, dramatically reducing grid generation time. An I2B adaptive Cartesian grid generation method is developed in this paper to handle dirty geometries without geometry repair. Comparing with a B2I approach, the grid generation time with the I2B approach for a complex automotive engine can be reduced by three orders of magnitude. Copyright

  2. Polarization ellipse and Stokes parameters in geometric algebra.

    PubMed

    Santos, Adler G; Sugon, Quirino M; McNamara, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use geometric algebra to describe the polarization ellipse and Stokes parameters. We show that a solution to Maxwell's equation is a product of a complex basis vector in Jackson and a linear combination of plane wave functions. We convert both the amplitudes and the wave function arguments from complex scalars to complex vectors. This conversion allows us to separate the electric field vector and the imaginary magnetic field vector, because exponentials of imaginary scalars convert vectors to imaginary vectors and vice versa, while exponentials of imaginary vectors only rotate the vector or imaginary vector they are multiplied to. We convert this expression for polarized light into two other representations: the Cartesian representation and the rotated ellipse representation. We compute the conversion relations among the representation parameters and their corresponding Stokes parameters. And finally, we propose a set of geometric relations between the electric and magnetic fields that satisfy an equation similar to the Poincaré sphere equation.

  3. Transient molecular electro-optics Cartesian rotation vector versus Eulerian angles.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Tom Richard; Elgsaeter, Arnljot; Naess, Stine Nalum

    2007-04-15

    Comparing the Euler angles, the classical choice of generalized coordinates describing the three rotational degrees of freedom of a rigid body, and the Cartesian rotation vector, we show that they both have their advantages and disadvantages in kinetic theory and Brownian dynamics analysis of molecular electro-optics. The Eulerian angles often yield relatively simple, yet singular, equations of motion, while their counterparts expressed in terms of Cartesian rotation vector are non-singular but more complex. In a special case, we show that the generalized force associated with the Cartesian rotation vector equals the torque. In addition, we introduce a new graphical approach to qualitatively track how changes in the Eulerian angles affect the Cartesian rotation vector.

  4. An improved method for rebinning kernels from cylindrical to Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Rathee, S; McClean, B A; Field, C

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the errors in rebinning photon dose point spread functions and pencil beam kernels (PBKs) from cylindrical to Cartesian coordinates. An area overlap method, which assumes that the fractional energy deposited per unit volume remains constant within cylindrical voxels, provides large deviations (up to 20%) in rebinned Cartesian voxels while conserving the total energy. A modified area overlap method is presented that allows the fractional energy deposited per unit volume within cylindrical voxels to vary according to an interpolating function. This method rebins the kernels accurately in each Cartesian voxel while conserving the total energy. The dose distributions were computed for a partially blocked beam of uniform fluence using the Cartesian coordinate kernel and the kernels rebinned by both methods. The kernel rebinned by the modified area overlap method provided errors less than 1.7%, while the kernel rebinned by the area overlap method gave errors up to 4.4%.

  5. Neutrino magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL ); Senjanovic, G. . Dept. of Theoretical Physics)

    1990-01-01

    We review attempts to achieve a large neutrino magnetic moment ({mu}{sub {nu}} {le} 10{sup {minus}11}{mu}{sub B}), while keeping neutrino light or massless. The application to the solar neutrino puzzle is discussed. 24 refs.

  6. A Parallel Code for Solving the Molecular Time Dependent Schroedinger Equation in Cartesian Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, J.; Stamatiadis, S.; Farantos, S. C.; Lathouwers, L.

    2009-08-13

    Reproducing molecular dynamics is at the root of the basic principles of chemical change and physical properties of the matter. New insight on molecular encounters can be gained by solving the Schroedinger equation in cartesian coordinates, provided one can overcome the massive calculations that it implies. We have developed a parallel code for solving the molecular Time Dependent Schroedinger Equation (TDSE) in cartesian coordinates. Variable order Finite Difference methods result in sparse Hamiltonian matrices which can make the large scale problem solving feasible.

  7. Ghost-Cell Method for Inviscid Three-Dimensional Flows with Moving Body on Cartesian Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianming; Zhao, Ning; Hu, Ou

    This paper depicts a ghost cell method to solve the three dimensional compressible time-dependent Euler equations using Cartesian grids for static or moving bodies. In this method, there is no need for special treatment corresponding to cut cells, which complicate other Cartesian mesh methods, and the method avoids the small cell problem. As an application, we present some numerical results for a special moving body using this method, which demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed method.

  8. Transforming geocentric cartesian coordinates to geodetic coordinates by using differential search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civicioglu, Pinar

    2012-09-01

    In order to solve numerous practical navigational, geodetic and astro-geodetic problems, it is necessary to transform geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates or vice versa. It is very easy to solve the problem of transforming geodetic coordinates into geocentric cartesian coordinates. On the other hand, it is rather difficult to solve the problem of transforming geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates as it is very hard to define a mathematical relationship between the geodetic latitude (φ) and the geocentric cartesian coordinates (X, Y, Z). In this paper, a new algorithm, the Differential Search Algorithm (DS), is presented to solve the problem of transforming the geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates and its performance is compared with the performances of the classical methods (i.e., Borkowski, 1989; Bowring, 1976; Fukushima, 2006; Heikkinen, 1982; Jones, 2002; Zhang, 2005; Borkowski, 1987; Shu, 2010 and Lin, 1995) and Computational-Intelligence algorithms (i.e., ABC, JDE, JADE, SADE, EPSDE, GSA, PSO2011, and CMA-ES). The statistical tests realized for the comparison of performances indicate that the problem-solving success of DS algorithm in transforming the geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates is higher than those of all classical methods and Computational-Intelligence algorithms used in this paper.

  9. Exploring New Geometric Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nirode, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    When students work with a non-Euclidean distance formula, geometric objects such as circles and segment bisectors can look very different from their Euclidean counterparts. Students and even teachers can experience the thrill of creative discovery when investigating these differences among geometric worlds. In this article, the author describes a…

  10. Analysis of Crustal Magnetisation in Cartesian Vector Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbins, D.; Ivers, D.; Williams, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of functions, Vector Cartesian Harmonics (VCH), analogous to the Vector Spherical Harmonics that we have applied recently to global models of crustal and lithospheric magnetisation. Like their spherical counterpart, the VCH form a complete, orthogonal set: planar models of magnetisation can be expanded in them. There are 3 distinct types of VCH, one representing that part of the magnetisation which generates the potential magnetic field above the surface, another the potential magnetic field below the surface, and a toroidal function that generates only a non-potential field. One function therefore describes the magnetisation detected by observations of the magnetic anomaly while the other two describe the null space of an inversion of magnetic observations for magnetisation. The formalism is therefore ideal for analysing the results of inversions for magnetic structures in plane layers such as local or regional surveys where Earth's curvature can be ignored. The null space is in general very large, being an arbitrary combination of a doubly-infinite set of vector functions. However, in the absence of remanence and when the inducing field is uniform the null space reduces to only 2 types of structure, uniform susceptibility (Runcorn's Theorem) and a pattern of susceptibility induced by a uniform field, the null space is restricted to uniform magnetisation and 1D patterns of susceptibility aligned with a horizontal inducing field. Both these cases are already well known, but this analysis shows them to be the ONLY members of the null space. We also give results for familiar text-book structures to show the nature of the null space in each case. Curiously, inversion of the magnetic field from a buried dipole returns exactly half the correct magnitude plus a spurious distributed magnetisation. A more complex application is the topographic structure based on the Bishop formation in California (Fairhead and Williams, SEG exp. abstr. 25, 845, 2006

  11. The Teachable Moment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrow, Mary Ellen

    2000-01-01

    Details how an unplanned activity involving spinning wool presented a teachable moment for children in a family child care setting. Notes how activities related to farming, spinning wool, and using wool cloth resulted from following the children's lead. Concludes that everyday activities provide opportunities to listen to children, learn about…

  12. Moments with Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child & Youth Services, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents additional stories and interpretations by John Korsmo, Molly Weingrod, Joseph Stanley, Quinn Wilder, Amy Evans, Rick Flowers, Arcelia Martinez, and Pam Ramsey. The stories and interpretations are presented as teachable moments that are examples of how people are learning to understand youthwork and, as such, are open to…

  13. The Humanist Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In "The Humanist Moment," Chris Higgins sets out to recover a tenable, living humanism, rejecting both the version vilified by the anti-humanists and the one sentimentalized by the reactionary nostalgists. Rescuing humanism from such polemics is only the first step, as we find at least nine rival, contemporary definitions of humanism.…

  14. Finding Pivotal Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Educators can have a powerful influence on the future of low-income and minority students whose paths might appear uncertain. By developing trusting relationships, acting as mentors, and sharing information about the education system, teachers, counselors, and other adults can create pivotal moments that transform students' lives. Espinoza shares…

  15. Improved genetic algorithm for the protein folding problem by use of a Cartesian combination operator.

    PubMed

    Rabow, A A; Scheraga, H A

    1996-09-01

    We have devised a Cartesian combination operator and coding scheme for improving the performance of genetic algorithms applied to the protein folding problem. The genetic coding consists of the C alpha Cartesian coordinates of the protein chain. The recombination of the genes of the parents is accomplished by: (1) a rigid superposition of one parent chain on the other, to make the relation of Cartesian coordinates meaningful, then, (2) the chains of the children are formed through a linear combination of the coordinates of their parents. The children produced with this Cartesian combination operator scheme have similar topology and retain the long-range contacts of their parents. The new scheme is significantly more efficient than the standard genetic algorithm methods for locating low-energy conformations of proteins. The considerable superiority of genetic algorithms over Monte Carlo optimization methods is also demonstrated. We have also devised a new dynamic programming lattice fitting procedure for use with the Cartesian combination operator method. The procedure finds excellent fits of real-space chains to the lattice while satisfying bond-length, bond-angle, and overlap constraints.

  16. Comparison of Cartesian and Non-Cartesian Real-Time MRI Sequences at 1.5T to Assess Velar Motion and Velopharyngeal Closure during Speech

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Andreia C.; Wylezinska, Marzena; Birch, Malcolm J.; Petersen, Steffen E.; Miquel, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic imaging of the vocal tract using real-time MRI has been an active and growing area of research, having demonstrated great potential to become routinely performed in the clinical evaluation of speech and swallowing disorders. Although many technical advances have been made in regards to acquisition and reconstruction methodologies, there is still no consensus in best practice protocols. This study aims to compare Cartesian and non-Cartesian real-time MRI sequences, regarding image quality and temporal resolution trade-off, for dynamic speech imaging. Five subjects were imaged at 1.5T, while performing normal phonation, in order to assess velar motion and velopharyngeal closure. Data was acquired using both Cartesian and non-Cartesian (spiral and radial) real-time sequences at five different spatial-temporal resolution sets, between 10 fps (1.7×1.7×10 mm3) and 25 fps (1.5×1.5×10 mm3). Only standard scanning resources provided by the MRI scanner manufacturer were used to ensure easy applicability to clinical evaluation and reproducibility. Data sets were evaluated by comparing measurements of the velar structure, dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio and image quality visual scoring. Results showed that for all proposed sequences, FLASH spiral acquisitions provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio, up to a 170.34% increase at 20 fps, than equivalent bSSFP Cartesian acquisitions for the same spatial-temporal resolution. At higher frame rates (22 and 25 fps), spiral protocols were optimal and provided higher CNR and visual scoring than equivalent radial protocols. Comparison of dynamic imaging at 10 and 22 fps for radial and spiral acquisitions revealed no significant difference in CNR performance, thus indicating that temporal resolution can be doubled without compromising spatial resolution (1.9×1.9 mm2) or CNR. In summary, this study suggests that the use of FLASH spiral protocols should be preferred over bSSFP Cartesian for the dynamic imaging of velopharyngeal

  17. Improving the performance of image classification by Hahn moment invariants.

    PubMed

    Sayyouri, Mhamed; Hmimid, Abdeslam; Qjidaa, Hassan

    2013-11-01

    The discrete orthogonal moments are powerful descriptors for image analysis and pattern recognition. However, the computation of these moments is a time consuming procedure. To solve this problem, a new approach that permits the fast computation of Hahn's discrete orthogonal moments is presented in this paper. The proposed method is based, on the one hand, on the computation of Hahn's discrete orthogonal polynomials using the recurrence relation with respect to the variable x instead of the order n and the symmetry property of Hahn's polynomials and, on the other hand, on the application of an innovative image representation where the image is described by a number of homogenous rectangular blocks instead of individual pixels. The paper also proposes a new set of Hahn's invariant moments under the translation, the scaling, and the rotation of the image. This set of invariant moments is computed as a linear combination of invariant geometric moments from a finite number of image intensity slices. Several experiments are performed to validate the effectiveness of our descriptors in terms of the acceleration of time computation, the reconstruction of the image, the invariability, and the classification. The performance of Hahn's moment invariants used as pattern features for a pattern classification application is compared with Hu [IRE Trans. Inform. Theory 8, 179 (1962)] and Krawchouk [IEEE Trans. Image Process.12, 1367 (2003)] moment invariants.

  18. Time-Dependent Lattice Methods for Ion-Atom Collisions in Cartesian and Cylindrical Coordinate Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pindzola, Michael S; Schultz, David Robert

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent lattice methods in both Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates are applied to calculate excitation cross sections for p+H collisions at 40 keV incident energy. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved using a previously formulated Cartesian coordinate single-channel method on a full 3D lattice and a newly formulated cylindrical coordinate multichannel method on a set of coupled 2D lattices. Cartesian coordinate single-channel and cylindrical coordinate five-channel calculations are found to be in reasonable agreement for excitation cross sections from the 1s ground state to the 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, and 3d excited states. For extension of the time-dependent lattice method to handle the two electron dynamics found in p+He collisions, the cylindrical coordinate multichannel method appears promising due to the reduced dimensionality of its lattice.

  19. An accuracy assessment of Cartesian-mesh approaches for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A critical assessment of the accuracy of Cartesian-mesh approaches for steady, transonic solutions of the Euler equations of gas dynamics is made. An exact solution of the Euler equations (Ringleb's flow) is used not only to infer the order of the truncation error of the Cartesian-mesh approaches, but also to compare the magnitude of the discrete error directly to that obtained with a structured mesh approach. Uniformly and adaptively refined solutions using a Cartesian-mesh approach are obtained and compared to each other and to uniformly refined structured mesh results. The effect of cell merging is investigated as well as the use of two different K-exact reconstruction procedures. The solution methodology of the schemes is explained and tabulated results are presented to compare the solution accuracies.

  20. Rms characterization of Bessel Gauss beams: Correspondence between polar and Cartesian representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Gay, David; Piché, Michel

    2006-09-01

    A recent analysis [G. Rousseau, D. Gay and M. Piché, One-dimensional description of cylindrically symmetric laser beams: application to Bessel-type nondiffracting beams, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 22 (2005) 1274] has shown that any cylindrically symmetric laser beam can be synthesized from a single wave called a constituent wave. This representation allows the introduction of one-dimensional Cartesian root-mean-square (rms) parameters to describe the conical structure of cylindrically symmetric laser beams. In this paper, we compare the rms characterization of Bessel-Gauss beams in polar coordinates with that of their respective constituent waves in Cartesian coordinates. Numerical results reveal an asymptotic correspondence between polar and Cartesian rms parameters of Bessel-Gauss beams propagating in a nondiffracting regime. Such a correspondence eliminates misleading interpretations about the propagation factor and the Rayleigh range of nondiffracting Bessel-type beams characterized in terms of polar rms parameters.

  1. SCF and CI calculations of the dipole moment function of ozone. [Self-Consistent Field and Configuration-Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, L. A.; Langhoff, S. R.; Carney, G. D.

    1979-01-01

    The constant and linear terms in a Taylor series expansion of the dipole moment function of the ground state of ozone are calculated with Cartesian Gaussian basis sets ranging in quality from minimal to double zeta plus polarization. Results are presented at both the self-consistent field and configuration-interaction levels. Although the algebraic signs of the linear dipole moment derivatives are all established to be positive, the absolute magnitudes of these quantities, as well as the infrared intensities calculated from them, vary considerably with the level of theory.

  2. First experimental comparison between the cartesian and the lissajous trajectory for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Werner, Franziska; Gdaniec, Nadine; Knopp, Tobias

    2017-02-20

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative imaging modality that allows to determine the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Sampling is achieved by moving a field-free point (FFP) along a specific trajectory through the volume of interest. The magnetic material that lies along the path or in the close vicinity of the FFP changes its magnetization and induces a voltage in surrounding receive coils. Various trajectories for the FFP are conceivable, but most experimental MPI scanners either use a Cartesian or a Lissajous sampling trajectory. This study for the first time compares both sampling methods experimentally using an MPI scanner that allows to implement both sampling patterns. By default the scanner is capable of scanning 2D and 3D field of views using a Lissajous trajectory. But since it also has a 1D mode, it is possible to perform Cartesian measurements by shifting the 1D scan line in perpendicular direction to the FFP movement using the focus field. These line scans are jointly reconstructed to obtain a 2D image. In a further step, the unidirectional Cartesian trajectory is improved by interchanging the excitation and the focus-field direction leading to a bidirectional Cartesian trajectory. Our findings reveal similar results for the bidirectional Cartesian and the Lissajous trajectory concerning the overall image quality and the sensitivity. In a more detailed view, the bidirectional Cartesian trejectory achieves a slightly higher spatial center resolution, whereas the Lissajous trajectory is more efficient regarding the temporal resolution since less acquisition time is needed to reach an adequate image quality.

  3. Dynamical calculation of crystal truncation rods for surfaces and interfaces using a Cartesian coordinate transformation technique.

    PubMed

    Chien; Gau; Chang; Stetsko

    1999-07-01

    A dynamical calculation scheme that employs Cartesian coordinates with a z axis normal to the crystal surface to define polarization unit vectors and wavefields is applied to interpret the intensity distribution of crystal truncation rods for surfaces and interfaces. A comparison between this calculation scheme and the asymptotic iteration approach using the conventional presentation of the polarization components of the wavefields, with the sigma and pi components perpendicular to the wavevectors, is presented. It is found that the use of Cartesian coordinate systems can provide correct boundary conditions in determining the wavefield amplitudes, thus leading to a rigorous and general calculation scheme for dynamical diffraction from surfaces and interfaces.

  4. Index integral representations for connection between cartesian, cylindrical, and spheroidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Passian, Ali; Koucheckian, Sherwin; Yakubovich, Semyon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present two new index integral representations for connection between cartesian, cylindrical, and spheroidal coordinate systems in terms of Bessel, MacDonald, and conical functions. Our result is mainly motivated by solution of the boundary value problems in domains composed of both cartesian and hyperboloidal boundaries, and the need for new integral representations that facilitate the transformation between these coordinates. As a by-product, the special cases of our results will produce new proofs to known index integrals and provide some new integral identities.

  5. Transformation from angle-action variables to Cartesian coordinates for polyatomic reactions.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, M L; Bonnet, L; Larrégaray, P; Rayez, J-C; Rubayo-Soneira, J

    2009-03-21

    The transformation from angle-action variables to Cartesian coordinates is an important step of the semiclassical description of bimolecular collisions and photofragmentations. The basic reason is that dynamical conditions corresponding to molecular beam experiments are ideally generated in angle-action variables, whereas the classical equations of motion are ideally solved in Cartesian coordinates by standard numerical approaches. To our knowledge, this transformation is available in the literature only for atom-diatom arrangements. The goal of the present work is to derive it for diatom-polyatom ones. The analogous transformation for any type of arrangement may then be straightforwardly deduced from that presented here.

  6. Random subspaces for encryption based on a private shared Cartesian frame

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Stephen D.; Hayden, Patrick; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2005-11-15

    A private shared Cartesian frame is a novel form of private shared correlation that allows for both private classical and quantum communication. Cryptography using a private shared Cartesian frame has the remarkable property that asymptotically, if perfect privacy is demanded, the private classical capacity is three times the private quantum capacity. We demonstrate that if the requirement for perfect privacy is relaxed, then it is possible to use the properties of random subspaces to nearly triple the private quantum capacity, almost closing the gap between the private classical and quantum capacities.

  7. A Cartesian cut cell method for rarefied flow simulations around moving obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Dechristé, G.; Mieussens, L.

    2016-06-01

    For accurate simulations of rarefied gas flows around moving obstacles, we propose a cut cell method on Cartesian grids: it allows exact conservation and accurate treatment of boundary conditions. Our approach is designed to treat Cartesian cells and various kinds of cut cells by the same algorithm, with no need to identify the specific shape of each cut cell. This makes the implementation quite simple, and allows a direct extension to 3D problems. Such simulations are also made possible by using an adaptive mesh refinement technique and a hybrid parallel implementation. This is illustrated by several test cases, including a 3D unsteady simulation of the Crookes radiometer.

  8. TURBULENT DYNAMOS IN SPHERICAL SHELL SEGMENTS OF VARYING GEOMETRICAL EXTENT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Tavakol, Reza; Brandenburg, Axel; Moss, David E-mail: brandenb@nordita.org

    2009-05-20

    We use three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of the helically forced magnetohydrodynamic equations in spherical shell segments in order to study the effects of changes in the geometrical shape and size of the domain on the growth and saturation of large-scale magnetic fields. We inject kinetic energy along with kinetic helicity in spherical domains via helical forcing using Chandrasekhar-Kendall functions. We take perfect conductor boundary conditions for the magnetic field to ensure that no magnetic helicity escapes the domain boundaries. We find dynamo action giving rise to magnetic fields at scales larger than the characteristic scale of the forcing. The magnetic energy exceeds the kinetic energy over dissipative timescales, similar to that seen earlier in Cartesian simulations in periodic boxes. As we increase the size of the domain in the azimuthal direction, we find that the nonlinearly saturated magnetic field organizes itself in long-lived cellular structures with aspect ratios close to unity. These structures tile the domain along the azimuthal direction, thus resulting in very small longitudinally averaged magnetic fields for large domain sizes. The scales of these structures are determined by the smallest scales of the domain, which in our simulations is usually the radial scale. We also find that increasing the meridional extent of the domains produces little qualitative change, except a marginal increase in the large-scale field. We obtain qualitatively similar results in Cartesian domains with similar aspect ratios.

  9. An Adaptively-Refined, Cartesian, Cell-Based Scheme for the Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations. Ph.D. Thesis - Michigan Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William John

    1994-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based scheme for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal 'cut' cells are created. The geometry of the cut cells is computed using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree data structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded, with a limited linear reconstruction of the primitive variables used to provide input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. A multi-stage time-stepping scheme is used to reach a steady-state solution. Validation of the Euler solver with benchmark numerical and exact solutions is presented. An assessment of the accuracy of the approach is made by uniform and adaptive grid refinements for a steady, transonic, exact solution to the Euler equations. The error of the approach is directly compared to a structured solver formulation. A non smooth flow is also assessed for grid convergence, comparing uniform and adaptively refined results. Several formulations of the viscous terms are assessed analytically, both for accuracy and positivity. The two best formulations are used to compute adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions are compared to each other, to experimental results and/or theory for a series of low and moderate Reynolds numbers flow fields. The most suitable viscous discretization is demonstrated for geometrically-complicated internal flows. For flows at high Reynolds numbers, both an altered grid-generation procedure and a

  10. Inflation from geometrical tachyons

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Steven; Ward, John

    2005-10-15

    We propose an alternative formulation of tachyon inflation using the geometrical tachyon arising from the time dependent motion of a BPS D3-brane in the background geometry due to k parallel NS5-branes arranged around a ring of radius R. Because of the fact that the mass of this geometrical tachyon field is {radical}(2/k) times smaller than the corresponding open-string tachyon mass, we find that the slow-roll conditions for inflation and the number of e-foldings can be satisfied in a manner that is consistent with an effective 4-dimensional model and with a perturbative string coupling. We also show that the metric perturbations produced at the end of inflation can be sufficiently small and do not lead to the inconsistencies that plague the open-string tachyon models. Finally we argue for the existence of a minimum of the geometrical tachyon potential which could give rise to a traditional reheating mechanism.

  11. Chiral models: Geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, A. M.

    1987-02-01

    Two-dimensional classical chiral models of field theory are considered, the main attention being paid on geometrical aspects of such theories. A characteristic feature of these models is that the interaction is inserted not by adding the interaction Lagrangian to the free field Lagrangian, but has a purely geometrical origin and is related to the inner curvature of the manifold. These models are in many respects analogous to non-Abelian gauge theories and as became clear recently, they are also important for the superstring theory which nowadays is the most probable candidate for a truly unified theory of all interactions including gravitation.

  12. Contrast sensitivity functions to stimuli defined in Cartesian, polar and hyperbolic coordinates.

    PubMed

    Zana, Y; Cavalcanti, A C G T

    2005-01-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies indicate that cells in the LGN, V1, V2, and V4 areas in monkeys are specifically sensitive to Cartesian, polar and hyperbolic stimuli. We have characterized the contrast sensitivity functions (CSF) to stimuli defined in these coordinates with the two-alternatives forced-choice paradigm. CSFs to Cartesian, concentric, and hyperbolic stimuli have had similar shapes, with peak sensitivity at approximately 3 c/deg. However, the Cartesian CSF peak sensitivity has been at least 0.1 log units higher than that to stimuli in any other coordinate system. The concentric-Bessel CSF has a low-pass shape, peaking at 1.5 c/deg or below. The radial CSF has a bell shape with maximum sensitivity at 8 c/360 degrees. Only the concentric-Bessel CSF could be explained in terms of the components of maximum amplitude of the Fourier transform. Neural models, which in previous studies predicted the responses to Cartesian and polar Glass patterns, failed to account for the full CSFs data.

  13. Real-time cartesian force feedback control of a teleoperated robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Perry

    1989-01-01

    Active cartesian force control of a teleoperated robot is investigated. An economical microcomputer based control method was tested. Limitations are discussed and methods of performance improvement suggested. To demonstrate the performance of this technique, a preliminary test was performed with success. A general purpose bilateral force reflecting hand controller is currently being constructed based on this control method.

  14. Quantum integrable systems in three-dimensional magnetic fields: the Cartesian case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhalij, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we construct integrable three-dimensional quantum-mechanical systems with magnetic fields, admitting pairs of commuting second-order integrals of motion. The case of Cartesian coordinates is considered. Most of the systems obtained are new and not related to the separation of variables in the corresponding Schrödinger equation.

  15. [Odontology and the beginning of cartesianism (1673--1650) (Rene Descartes)].

    PubMed

    Gysel, C

    1979-01-01

    In the seventeenth century the universities of the Netherlands underwent the influence of Descartes in all the faculties. In medicine three periods can be distinguished: in the first, pathology and therapy are still galenic; the second, by the application of the cartesian method, triumphs in physiology; and the third, corrected by the views of Newton is integrated in a moderate biomechanism.

  16. Embodying Learning: Post-Cartesian Pedagogy and the Academic Study of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelwica, Michelle Mary

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the concept and practice of "embodied pedagogy" as an alternative to the Cartesian approach to knowledge that is tacitly embedded in traditional modes of teaching and learning about religion. My analysis highlights a class I co-teach that combines the study of Aikido (a Japanese martial art) with seminar-style discussions of…

  17. D Image Based Geometric Documentation of the Tower of Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryfona, M. S.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes and investigates the implementation of almost entirely image based contemporary techniques for the three dimensional geometric documentation of the Tower of the Winds in Athens, which is a unique and very special monument of the Roman era. These techniques and related algorithms were implemented using a well-known piece of commercial software with extreme caution in the selection of the various parameters. Problems related to data acquisition and processing, but also to the algorithms and to the software implementation are identified and discussed. The resulting point cloud has been georeferenced, i.e. referenced to a local Cartesian coordinate system through minimum geodetic measurements, and subsequently the surface, i.e. the mesh was created and finally the three dimensional textured model was produced. In this way, the geometric documentation drawings, i.e. the horizontal section plans, the vertical section plans and the elevations, which include orthophotos of the monument, can be produced at will from that 3D model, for the complete geometric documentation. Finally, a 3D tour of the Tower of the Winds has also been created for a more integrated view of the monument. The results are presented and are evaluated for their completeness, efficiency, accuracy and ease of production.

  18. Geometric Series via Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Infinite series is a challenging topic in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum for many students. In fact, there is a vast literature in mathematics education research on convergence issues. One of the most important types of infinite series is the geometric series. Their beauty lies in the fact that they can be evaluated explicitly and that…

  19. A Geometric Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Julie; Marshall, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Children possess a genuine curiosity for exploring the natural world around them. One third grade teacher capitalized on this inherent trait by leading her students on "A Geometric Scavenger Hunt." The four-lesson inquiry investigation described in this article integrates mathematics and science. Among the students' discoveries was the fact that…

  20. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  1. Untangling Geometric Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Claudia R.

    2014-01-01

    Designed for a broad audience, including educators, camp directors, afterschool coordinators, and preservice teachers, this investigation aims to help individuals experience mathematics in unconventional and exciting ways by engaging them in the physical activity of building geometric shapes using ropes. Through this engagement, the author…

  2. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  3. Moments in Time

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that perception and action can be understood as evolving in temporal epochs or sequential processing units. Successive events are fused into units forming a unitary experience or “psychological present.” Studies have identified several temporal integration levels on different time scales which are fundamental for our understanding of behavior and subjective experience. In recent literature concerning the philosophy and neuroscience of consciousness these separate temporal processing levels are not always precisely distinguished. Therefore, empirical evidence from psychophysics and neuropsychology on these distinct temporal processing levels is presented and discussed within philosophical conceptualizations of time experience. On an elementary level, one can identify a functional moment, a basic temporal building block of perception in the range of milliseconds that defines simultaneity and succession. Below a certain threshold temporal order is not perceived, individual events are processed as co-temporal. On a second level, an experienced moment, which is based on temporal integration of up to a few seconds, has been reported in many qualitatively different experiments in perception and action. It has been suggested that this segmental processing mechanism creates temporal windows that provide a logistical basis for conscious representation and the experience of nowness. On a third level of integration, continuity of experience is enabled by working memory in the range of multiple seconds allowing the maintenance of cognitive operations and emotional feelings, leading to mental presence, a temporal window of an individual’s experienced presence. PMID:22022310

  4. Design and validation of a novel Cartesian biomechanical testing system with coordinated 6DOF real-time load control: application to the lumbar spine (L1-S, L4-L5).

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brian P; Bennett, Charles R

    2013-07-26

    Robotic methods applied to in-vitro biomechanical testing potentially offer more comprehensive evaluations however, standard position control algorithms make real-time load control problematic. This paper describes and evaluates a novel custom developed Cartesian force controlled biomechanical testing system with coordinated 6 degree of freedom (DOF) real-time load control. A custom developed 6-DOF serial manipulator with cascaded force over position control algorithms was designed, assembled, and programmed. Dial gauge tests assessed accuracy of custom linear axes. Standard test input and tuning procedures refined control performance. Two single motion segment units (L4-L5) and lumbar (L1-S) spine segments were tested under continuous pure moment application in flexion-extension, left-right lateral bending and axial rotation to 8Nm under full 6-DOF load control. Mean load control tracking errors between commanded and experimental loads were computed. Global spinal ranges of motion were compared to previously published values for standard non-robotic protocols. Individual linear and rotational axis position control accuracies were equal to or less than 6.35μm and 0.0167° respectively. Pilot pure bending tests demonstrated stable load control performance, as well as load rates, rotational velocities, and ranges of motion comparable to those for standard non-robotic in-vitro tests. Tracking errors for zero commanded forces and all moment controlled axes were less than 0.81±0.68N and 0.18±0.19Nm over all tests, respectively. The Cartesian based system simplified control application and demonstrated robust position and load control that was not limited to single axis or zero commanded loads. In addition to emulating standard biomechanical tests, the novel Cartesian force controlled testing system developed is a promising tool for biomechanical assessments with coordinated dynamic load application and coupled motion response in 6DOF.

  5. CAM - Geometric systems integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, G. C.

    The integration of geometric and nongeometric information for efficient use of CAM is examined. Requirements for engineering drawings requested by management are noted to involve large volumes of nongeometric data to define the materials and quantity variables which impinge on the required design, so that the actual design may be the last and smaller step in the CAM process. Geometric classification and coding are noted to offer an alpha/numeric identifier for integrating the engineering design, manufacturing, and quality assurance functions. An example is provided of a turbine gear part coding in terms of polycode and monocode displays, showing a possible covering of more than 10 trillion features. Software is stressed as the key to integration of company-wide data.

  6. Geometrical measures of non-Gaussianity generated from single field inflationary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junaid, M.; Pogosyan, D.

    2015-08-01

    We calculate the third-order moments of scalar curvature perturbations in configuration space for different inflationary models. We develop a robust numerical technique to compute the bispectrum for different models that have some features in the inflationary potential. From the bispectrum we evaluate moments analytically in the slow-roll regime while we devise a numerical mechanism to calculate these moments for non-slow-roll single-field inflationary models with a standard kinetic term that are minimally coupled to gravity. With the help of these third-order moments one can directly predict many non-Gaussian and geometrical measures of cosmic microwave background distributions in the configuration space. Thus, we devise a framework to calculate different third-order moments and geometrical measures, e.g. Minkowski functionals or the skeleton statistic, generated by different single-field models of inflation.

  7. Geometric measures of entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Uyanik, K.; Turgut, S.

    2010-03-15

    The geometric measure of entanglement, which expresses the minimum distance to product states, has been generalized to distances to sets that remain invariant under the stochastic reducibility relation. For each such set, an associated entanglement monotone can be defined. The explicit analytical forms of these measures are obtained for bipartite entangled states. Moreover, the three-qubit case is discussed and it is argued that the distance to the W states is a new monotone.

  8. Geometrical deuteron stripping revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Neoh, Y. S.; Yap, S. L.

    2014-03-05

    We investigate the reality of the idea of geometrical deuteron stripping originally envisioned by Serber. By taking into account of realistic deuteron wavefunction, nuclear density, and nucleon stopping mean free path, we are able to estimate inclusive deuteron stripping cross section for deuteron energy up to before pion production. Our semiclassical model contains only one global parameter constant for all nuclei which can be approximated by Woods-Saxon or any other spherically symmetric density distribution.

  9. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  10. Quantum computation using geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzke, Douglas James

    This dissertation reports that arbitrary Boolean logic equations and operators can be represented in geometric algebra as linear equations composed entirely of orthonormal vectors using only addition and multiplication Geometric algebra is a topologically based algebraic system that naturally incorporates the inner and anticommutative outer products into a real valued geometric product, yet does not rely on complex numbers or matrices. A series of custom tools was designed and built to simplify geometric algebra expressions into a standard sum of products form, and automate the anticommutative geometric product and operations. Using this infrastructure, quantum bits (qubits), quantum registers and EPR-bits (ebits) are expressed symmetrically as geometric algebra expressions. Many known quantum computing gates, measurement operators, and especially the Bell/magic operators are also expressed as geometric products. These results demonstrate that geometric algebra can naturally and faithfully represent the central concepts, objects, and operators necessary for quantum computing, and can facilitate the design and construction of quantum computing tools.

  11. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov–Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects. PMID:26178745

  12. A high-order adaptive Cartesian cut-cell method for simulation of compressible viscous flow over immersed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Balaji; Menon, Suresh

    2016-09-01

    A new adaptive finite volume conservative cut-cell method that is third-order accurate for simulation of compressible viscous flows is presented. A high-order reconstruction approach using cell centered piecewise polynomial approximation of flow quantities, developed in the past for body-fitted grids, is now extended to the Cartesian based cut-cell method. It is shown that the presence of cut-cells of very low volume results in numerical oscillations in the flow solution near the embedded boundaries when standard small cell treatment techniques are employed. A novel cell clustering approach for polynomial reconstruction in the vicinity of the small cells is proposed and is shown to achieve smooth representation of flow field quantities and their derivatives on immersed interfaces. It is further shown through numerical examples that the proposed clustering method achieves the design order of accuracy and is fairly insensitive to the cluster size. Results are presented for canonical flow past a single cylinder and a sphere at different flow Reynolds numbers to verify the accuracy of the scheme. Investigations are then performed for flow over two staggered cylinders and the results are compared with prior data for the same configuration. All the simulations are carried out with both quadratic and cubic reconstruction, and the results indicate a clear improvement with the cubic reconstruction. The new cut-cell approach with cell clustering is able to predict accurate results even at relatively low resolutions. The ability of the high-order cut-cell method in handling sharp geometrical corners and narrow gaps is also demonstrated using various examples. Finally, three-dimensional flow interactions between a pair of spheres in cross flow is investigated using the proposed cut-cell scheme. The results are shown to be in excellent agreement with past studies, which employed body-fitted grids for studying this complex case.

  13. Inquiry-Based Science: Turning Teachable Moments into Learnable Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Berit S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how an inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning creates teachable moments that can foster conceptual understanding in students, and how teachers capitalize upon these moments. Six elementary school teachers were videotaped as they implemented an integrated inquiry-based science and literacy curriculum in their…

  14. Mean square optimal NUFFT approximation for efficient non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhili; Jacob, Mathews

    2014-05-01

    The fast evaluation of the discrete Fourier transform of an image at non-uniform sampling locations is key to efficient iterative non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction algorithms. Current non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) approximations rely on the interpolation of oversampled uniform Fourier samples. The main challenge is high memory demand due to oversampling, especially when multidimensional datasets are involved. The main focus of this work is to design an NUFFT algorithm with minimal memory demands. Specifically, we introduce an analytical expression for the expected mean square error in the NUFFT approximation based on our earlier work. We then introduce an iterative algorithm to design the interpolator and scale factors. Experimental comparisons show that the proposed optimized NUFFT scheme provides considerably lower approximation errors than the previous designs [1] that rely on worst case error metrics. The improved approximations are also seen to considerably reduce the errors and artifacts in non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction.

  15. Aligning Spinoza with Descartes: An informed Cartesian account of the truth bias.

    PubMed

    Street, Chris N H; Kingstone, Alan

    2016-08-11

    There is a bias towards believing information is true rather than false. The Spinozan account claims there is an early, automatic bias towards believing. Only afterwards can people engage in an effortful re-evaluation and disbelieve the information. Supporting this account, there is a greater bias towards believing information is true when under cognitive load. However, developing on the Adaptive Lie Detector (ALIED) theory, the informed Cartesian can equally explain this data. The account claims the bias under load is not evidence of automatic belief; rather, people are undecided, but if forced to guess they can rely on context information to make an informed judgement. The account predicts, and we found, that if people can explicitly indicate their uncertainty, there should be no bias towards believing because they are no longer required to guess. Thus, we conclude that belief formation can be better explained by an informed Cartesian account - an attempt to make an informed judgment under uncertainty.

  16. A Two-dimensional Cartesian and Axisymmetric Study of Combustion-acoustic Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a study of a lean premixed (LP) methane-air combustion wave in a two-dimensional Cartesian and axisymmetric coordinate system. Lean premixed combustors provide low emission and high efficiency; however, they are susceptible to combustion instabilities. The present study focuses on the behavior of the flame as it interacts with an external acoustic disturbance. It was found that the flame oscillations increase as the disturbance amplitude is increased. Furthermore, when the frequency of the disturbance is at resonance with a chamber frequency, the instabilities increase. For the axisymmetric geometry, the flame is found to be more unstable compared to the Cartesian case. In some cases, these instabilities were severe and led to flame extinction. In the axisymmetric case, several passive control devices were tested to assess their effectiveness. It is found that an acoustic cavity is better able at controlling the pressure fluctuations in the chamber.

  17. Geometry optimization for peptides and proteins: comparison of Cartesian and internal coordinates.

    PubMed

    Koslover, Elena F; Wales, David J

    2007-12-21

    We present the results of several benchmarks comparing the relative efficiency of different coordinate systems in optimizing polypeptide geometries. Cartesian, natural internal, and primitive internal coordinates are employed in quasi-Newton minimization for a variety of biomolecules. The peptides and proteins used in these benchmarks range in size from 16 to 999 residues. They vary in complexity from polyalanine helices to a beta-barrel enzyme. We find that the relative performance of the different coordinate systems depends on the parameters of the optimization method, the starting point for the optimization, and the size of the system studied. In general, internal coordinates were found to be advantageous for small peptides. For larger structures, Cartesians appear to be more efficient for empirical potentials where the energy and gradient can be evaluated relatively quickly compared to the cost of the coordinate transformations.

  18. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  19. On the new analytical solution for a well in Cartesian coordinates with MODFLOW comparisons.

    PubMed

    Batu, Vedat

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the comparison process of Batu (2012) generalized three-dimensional well hydraulics solution for confined aquifers in Cartesian coordinates with MODFLOW is presented. First, a brief description of Batu (2012) solution along with the governing equations and some of its key features are described. The final average drawdown expression in an observation well is given with the conversion expressions from Cartesian to radial coordinates. A generalized comparison using Batu (2012), Hantush (1964), and MODFLOW (Harbaugh et al. 2000), for vertical wells in horizontally isotropic aquifers, that is, ayx  = Ky /Kx  = 1, is presented. Comparisons are also presented with Batu (2012) and MODFLOW for horizontally anisotropic aquifers, that is, ayx  ≠ 1. After that comparisons are presented for horizontal wells between Batu (2012) and MODFLOW.

  20. CUDA accelerated uniform re-sampling for non-Cartesian MR reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chaolu; Zhao, Dazhe

    2015-01-01

    A grid-driven gridding (GDG) method is proposed to uniformly re-sample non-Cartesian raw data acquired in PROPELLER, in which a trajectory window for each Cartesian grid is first computed. The intensity of the reconstructed image at this grid is the weighted average of raw data in this window. Taking consider of the single instruction multiple data (SIMD) property of the proposed GDG, a CUDA accelerated method is then proposed to improve the performance of the proposed GDG. Two groups of raw data sampled by PROPELLER in two resolutions are reconstructed by the proposed method. To balance computation resources of the GPU and obtain the best performance improvement, four thread-block strategies are adopted. Experimental results demonstrate that although the proposed GDG is more time consuming than traditional DDG, the CUDA accelerated GDG is almost 10 times faster than traditional DDG.

  1. An Investigation of Two-Dimensional CAD Generated Models with Body Decoupled Cartesian Grids for DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    OTAHAL,THOMAS J.; GALLIS,MICHAIL A.; BARTEL,TIMOTHY J.

    2000-06-27

    This paper presents an investigation of a technique for using two-dimensional bodies composed of simple polygons with a body decoupled uniform Cmtesian grid in the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The method employs an automated grid pre-processing scheme beginning form a CAD geometry definition file, and is based on polygon triangulation using a trapezoid algorithm. A particle-body intersection time comparison is presented between the Icarus DSMC code using a body-fitted structured grid and using a structured body-decoupled Cartesian grid with both linear and logarithmic search techniques. A comparison of neutral flow over a cylinder is presented using the structured body fitted grid and the Cartesian body de-coupled grid.

  2. A Cartesian Adaptive Level Set Method for Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, F.; Young, Y.-N.

    2003-01-01

    In the present contribution we develop a level set method based on local anisotropic Cartesian adaptation as described in Ham et al. (2002). Such an approach should allow for the smallest possible Cartesian grid capable of resolving a given flow. The remainder of the paper is organized as follows. In section 2 the level set formulation for free surface calculations is presented and its strengths and weaknesses relative to the other free surface methods reviewed. In section 3 the collocated numerical method is described. In section 4 the method is validated by solving the 2D and 3D drop oscilation problem. In section 5 we present some results from more complex cases including the 3D drop breakup in an impulsively accelerated free stream, and the 3D immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Conclusions are given in section 6.

  3. Euler calculations with embedded Cartesian grids and small-perturbation boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.; Koh, E. P. C.; Tsai, H. M.; Liu, F.

    2010-05-01

    This study examines the use of stationary Cartesian mesh for steady and unsteady flow computations. The surface boundary conditions are imposed by reflected points. A cloud of nodes in the vicinity of the surface is used to get a weighted average of the flow properties via a gridless least-squares technique. If the displacement of the moving surface from the original position is typically small, a small-perturbation boundary condition method can be used. To ensure computational efficiency, multigrid solution is made via a framework of embedded grids for local grid refinement. Computations of airfoil wing and wing-body test cases show the practical usefulness of the embedded Cartesian grids with the small-perturbation boundary conditions approach.

  4. Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations Using Cartesian Methods and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for the Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package of Aftosmis et al. We evaluate and characterize the following modules within the new optimization framework: (1) A component-based geometry parameterization approach using a CAD solid representation and the CAPRI interface. (2) The use of Cartesian methods in the development Optimization techniques using a genetic algorithm. The discussion and investigations focus on several real world problems of the optimization process. We examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute nodes. In addition, we study the influence of noise on the performance of optimization techniques, and the overall efficiency of the optimization process for aerodynamic design of complex three-dimensional configurations. of automated optimization tools. rithm and a gradient-based algorithm.

  5. On the Use of Parmetric-CAD Systems and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Automated, high-fidelity tools for aerodynamic design face critical issues in attempting to optimize real-life geometry arid in permitting radical design changes. Success in these areas promises not only significantly shorter design- cycle times, but also superior and unconventional designs. To address these issues, we investigate the use of a parmetric-CAD system in conjunction with an embedded-boundary Cartesian method. Our goal is to combine the modeling capabilities of feature-based CAD with the robustness and flexibility of component-based Cartesian volume-mesh generation for complex geometry problems. We present the development of an automated optimization frame-work with a focus on the deployment of such a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment.

  6. Representing geometrical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J A

    1997-08-29

    This paper introduces perspex algebra which is being developed as a common representation of geometrical knowledge. A perspex can currently be interpreted in one of four ways. First, the algebraic perspex is a generalization of matrices, it provides the most general representation for all of the interpretations of a perspex. The algebraic perspex can be used to describe arbitrary sets of coordinates. The remaining three interpretations of the perspex are all related to square matrices and operate in a Euclidean model of projective space-time, called perspex space. Perspex space differs from the usual Euclidean model of projective space in that it contains the point at nullity. It is argued that the point at nullity is necessary for a consistent account of perspective in top-down vision. Second, the geometric perspex is a simplex in perspex space. It can be used as a primitive building block for shapes, or as a way of recording landmarks on shapes. Third, the transformational perspex describes linear transformations in perspex space that provide the affine and perspective transformations in space-time. It can be used to match a prototype shape to an image, even in so called 'accidental' views where the depth of an object disappears from view, or an object stays in the same place across time. Fourth, the parametric perspex describes the geometric and transformational perspexes in terms of parameters that are related to everyday English descriptions. The parametric perspex can be used to obtain both continuous and categorical perception of objects. The paper ends with a discussion of issues related to using a perspex to describe logic.

  7. Representing geometrical knowledge.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J A

    1997-01-01

    This paper introduces perspex algebra which is being developed as a common representation of geometrical knowledge. A perspex can currently be interpreted in one of four ways. First, the algebraic perspex is a generalization of matrices, it provides the most general representation for all of the interpretations of a perspex. The algebraic perspex can be used to describe arbitrary sets of coordinates. The remaining three interpretations of the perspex are all related to square matrices and operate in a Euclidean model of projective space-time, called perspex space. Perspex space differs from the usual Euclidean model of projective space in that it contains the point at nullity. It is argued that the point at nullity is necessary for a consistent account of perspective in top-down vision. Second, the geometric perspex is a simplex in perspex space. It can be used as a primitive building block for shapes, or as a way of recording landmarks on shapes. Third, the transformational perspex describes linear transformations in perspex space that provide the affine and perspective transformations in space-time. It can be used to match a prototype shape to an image, even in so called 'accidental' views where the depth of an object disappears from view, or an object stays in the same place across time. Fourth, the parametric perspex describes the geometric and transformational perspexes in terms of parameters that are related to everyday English descriptions. The parametric perspex can be used to obtain both continuous and categorical perception of objects. The paper ends with a discussion of issues related to using a perspex to describe logic. PMID:9304680

  8. Parallel Unsteady Overset Mesh Methodology for a Multi-Solver Paradigm with Adaptive Cartesian Grids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-21

    a multi-stage Runge - Kutta time-stepping framework and is capable of up to fifth-order accurate spatial discretizations. Further, the Cartesian grids...cutting methodology such that no user inter- vention or explicit hole-map specification is necessary. The capabilities and performance of the package are...application to rotorcraft aerodynamics. Several Domain-Connectivity approaches have been investigated in the past by various research groups . The

  9. Phase space tomography reconstruction of the Wigner distribution for optical beams separable in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Alejandro; Alieva, Tatiana; Rodrigo, José A; Calvo, María L

    2009-06-01

    We propose a simple approach for the phase space tomography reconstruction of the Wigner distribution of paraxial optical beams separable in Cartesian coordinates. It is based on the measurements of the antisymmetric fractional Fourier transform power spectra, which can be taken using a flexible optical setup consisting of four cylindrical lenses. The numerical simulations and the experimental results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  10. A parallel performance study of the Cartesian method for partial differential equations on a sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.B.; Coddington, M.P.

    1997-04-01

    A 3-D Cartesian method for integration of partial differential equations on a spherical surface is developed for parallel computation. The target computer architectures are distributed memory, message passing computers such as the Intel Paragon. The parallel algorithms are described along with mesh partitioning strategies. Performance of the algorithms is considered for a standard test case of the shallow water equations on the sphere. The authors find the computation time scale well with increasing numbers of processors.

  11. Development and application of a 3D Cartesian grid Euler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Wong, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes recent progress in the development and application of 3D Cartesian grid generation and Euler flow solution techniques. Improvements to flow field grid generation algorithms, geometry representations, and geometry refinement criteria are presented, including details of a procedure for correctly identifying and resolving extremely thin surface features. An initial implementation of automatic flow field refinement is also presented. Results for several 3D multi-component configurations are provided and discussed.

  12. Cartesian path control of a two-degree-of-freedom robot manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Pooran, Farhad J.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of cartesian trajectory control of a closed-kinematic chain mechanism robot manipulator with possible space station applications is considered. The study was performed by both computer simulation and experimentation for tracking of three different paths: a straight line, a sinusoid and a circle. Linearization and pole placement methods are employed to design controller gains. Results show that the controllers are robust and there are good agreements between simulation and experimentation. Excellent tracking quality and small overshoots are also evident.

  13. Density- and wavefunction-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20

    DOE PAGES

    Michael, J. Robert; Volkov, Anatoliy

    2015-03-01

    The widely used pseudoatom formalism in experimental X-ray charge-density studies makes use of real spherical harmonics when describing the angular component of aspherical deformations of the atomic electron density in molecules and crystals. The analytical form of the density-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonic functions for up to l ≤ 7 and the corresponding normalization coefficients were reported previously by Paturle & Coppens. It was shown that the analytical form for normalization coefficients is available primarily forl ≤ 4. Only in very special cases it is possible to derive an analytical representation of the normalization coefficients for 4 < l ≤ 7.more » In most cases for l > 4 the density normalization coefficients were calculated numerically to within seven significant figures. In this study we review the literature on the density-normalized spherical harmonics, clarify the existing notations, use the Paturle–Coppens method in the Wolfram Mathematicasoftware to derive the Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20 and determine the density normalization coefficients to 35 significant figures, and computer-generate a Fortran90 code. The article primarily targets researchers who work in the field of experimental X-ray electron density, but may be of some use to all who are interested in Cartesian spherical harmonics.« less

  14. Density- and wavefunction-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J. Robert; Volkov, Anatoliy

    2015-03-01

    The widely used pseudoatom formalism in experimental X-ray charge-density studies makes use of real spherical harmonics when describing the angular component of aspherical deformations of the atomic electron density in molecules and crystals. The analytical form of the density-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonic functions for up to l ≤ 7 and the corresponding normalization coefficients were reported previously by Paturle & Coppens. It was shown that the analytical form for normalization coefficients is available primarily forl ≤ 4. Only in very special cases it is possible to derive an analytical representation of the normalization coefficients for 4 < l ≤ 7. In most cases for l > 4 the density normalization coefficients were calculated numerically to within seven significant figures. In this study we review the literature on the density-normalized spherical harmonics, clarify the existing notations, use the Paturle–Coppens method in the Wolfram Mathematicasoftware to derive the Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20 and determine the density normalization coefficients to 35 significant figures, and computer-generate a Fortran90 code. The article primarily targets researchers who work in the field of experimental X-ray electron density, but may be of some use to all who are interested in Cartesian spherical harmonics.

  15. Extensions of the Zwart-Powell box spline for volumetric data reconstruction on the cartesian lattice.

    PubMed

    Entezari, Alireza; Möller, Torsten

    2006-01-01

    In this article we propose a box spline and its variants for reconstructing volumetric data sampled on the Cartesian lattice. In particular we present a tri-variate box spline reconstruction kernel that is superior to tensor product reconstruction schemes in terms of recovering the proper Cartesian spectrum of the underlying function. This box spline produces a C2 reconstruction that can be considered as a three dimensional extension of the well known Zwart-Powell element in 2D. While its smoothness and approximation power are equivalent to those of the tri-cubic B-spline, we illustrate the superiority of this reconstruction on functions sampled on the Cartesian lattice and contrast it to tensor product B-splines. Our construction is validated through a Fourier domain analysis of the reconstruction behavior of this box spline. Moreover, we present a stable method for evaluation of this box spline by means of a decomposition. Through a convolution, this decomposition reduces the problem to evaluation of a four directional box spline that we previously published in its explicit closed form.

  16. A Hybrid Advection Scheme for Conserving Angular Momentum on a Refined Cartesian Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byerly, Zachary D.; Adelstein-Lelbach, Bryce; Tohline, Joel E.; Marcello, Dominic C.

    2014-06-01

    We test a new "hybrid" scheme for simulating dynamical fluid flows in which cylindrical components of the momentum are advected across a rotating Cartesian coordinate mesh. This hybrid scheme allows us to conserve angular momentum to machine precision while capitalizing on the advantages offered by a Cartesian mesh, such as a straightforward implementation of mesh refinement. Our test focuses on measuring the real and imaginary parts of the eigenfrequency of unstable nonaxisymmetric modes that naturally arise in massless polytropic tori having a range of different aspect ratios and on quantifying the uncertainty in these measurements. Our measured eigenfrequencies show good agreement with the results obtained from the linear stability analysis of Kojima and from nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations performed on a cylindrical coordinate mesh by Woodward et al. When compared against results conducted with a traditional Cartesian advection scheme, the hybrid scheme achieves qualitative convergence at the same or, in some cases, much lower grid resolutions and conserves angular momentum to a much higher degree of precision. As a result, this hybrid scheme is much better suited for simulating astrophysical fluid flows such as accretion disks and mass-transferring binary systems.

  17. Augmented Lagrangian with variable splitting for faster non-Cartesian L1-SPIRiT MR image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Weller, Daniel S; Ramani, Sathish; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2014-02-01

    SPIRiT (iterative self-consistent parallel imaging reconstruction), and its sparsity-regularized variant L1-SPIRiT, are compatible with both Cartesian and non-Cartesian magnetic resonance imaging sampling trajectories. However, the non-Cartesian framework is more expensive computationally, involving a nonuniform Fourier transform with a nontrivial Gram matrix. We propose a novel implementation of the regularized reconstruction problem using variable splitting, alternating minimization of the augmented Lagrangian, and careful preconditioning. Our new method based on the alternating direction method of multipliers converges much faster than existing methods because of the preconditioners' heightened effectiveness. We demonstrate such rapid convergence substantially improves image quality for a fixed computation time. Our framework is a step forward towards rapid non-Cartesian L1-SPIRiT reconstructions.

  18. Some Geometric Aspects of the Ternary Diagram.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, G. M.; Watson, D. F.

    1989-01-01

    Uses the process of normalization in the Cartesian coordinate system which entails radial projection onto a transect to compare different compositions of minerals. Warns that the ternary diagram should not be used as a framework for calculations. (MVL)

  19. Geometric phase in Bohmian mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2010-10-15

    Using the quantum kinematic approach of Mukunda and Simon, we propose a geometric phase in Bohmian mechanics. A reparametrization and gauge invariant geometric phase is derived along an arbitrary path in configuration space. The single valuedness of the wave function implies that the geometric phase along a path must be equal to an integer multiple of 2{pi}. The nonzero geometric phase indicates that we go through the branch cut of the action function from one Riemann sheet to another when we locally travel along the path. For stationary states, quantum vortices exhibiting the quantized circulation integral can be regarded as a manifestation of the geometric phase. The bound-state Aharonov-Bohm effect demonstrates that the geometric phase along a closed path contains not only the circulation integral term but also an additional term associated with the magnetic flux. In addition, it is shown that the geometric phase proposed previously from the ensemble theory is not gauge invariant.

  20. Random geometric graphs with general connection functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Carl P.; Georgiou, Orestis

    2016-03-01

    In the original (1961) Gilbert model of random geometric graphs, nodes are placed according to a Poisson point process, and links formed between those within a fixed range. Motivated by wireless ad hoc networks "soft" or "probabilistic" connection models have recently been introduced, involving a "connection function" H (r ) that gives the probability that two nodes at distance r are linked (directly connect). In many applications (not only wireless networks), it is desirable that the graph is connected; that is, every node is linked to every other node in a multihop fashion. Here the connection probability of a dense network in a convex domain in two or three dimensions is expressed in terms of contributions from boundary components for a very general class of connection functions. It turns out that only a few quantities such as moments of the connection function appear. Good agreement is found with special cases from previous studies and with numerical simulations.

  1. Rational and efficient geometric definition of pharmacophores is essential for the patent process.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Georges-Alexandre; Pratuangdejkul, Jaturong; Alemany, Monica; Launay, Jean-Marie; Manivet, Philippe

    2006-11-01

    The geometric description of pharmacophores suffers from approximations. No consensus has been clearly established, despite the increasing interest in using pharmacophores in drug design and in patent applications. We therefore propose an original definition of a pharmacophore using spherical coordinates. These coordinates give a precise description of each point using three parameters: distance to a geometric origin and two angles. If necessary, these parameters can be easily and rapidly converted to cartesian coordinates. Our method can guarantee, to the patent applicant, the safe protection of his intellectual property by both improving markedly the readability of a pharmacophore definition and bringing, to the person who is skilled in the art, enough information to understand easily the essence of the invention.

  2. VLSI architectures for geometrical mapping problems in high-definition image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper explores a VLSI architecture for geometrical mapping address computation. The geometric transformation is discussed in the context of plane projective geometry, which invokes a set of basic transformations to be implemented for the general image processing. The homogeneous and 2-dimensional cartesian coordinates are employed to represent the transformations, each of which is implemented via an augmented CORDIC as a processing element. A specific scheme for a processor, which utilizes full-pipelining at the macro-level and parallel constant-factor-redundant arithmetic and full-pipelining at the micro-level, is assessed to produce a single VLSI chip for HDTV applications using state-of-art MOS technology.

  3. Mathematical model of a moment-less arch.

    PubMed

    Lewis, W J

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting the geometrical shapes of rigid, two-pin, moment-less arches of constant cross section. The advancement of this work lies in the inclusion of arch self-weight and the ability to produce moment-less arch forms for any span/rise ratio, and any ratio of uniformly distributed load per unit span, w, to uniformly distributed arch weight per unit arch length, q. The model is used to derive the shapes of two classical 'moment-less' arch forms: parabolic and catenary, prior to demonstrating a general case, not restricted by the unrealistic load assumptions (absence of q, in the case of a parabolic form, or no w, in the case of a catenary arch). Using the same value of span/rise ratio, and w/q>1, the behaviour of the moment-less and parabolic arches under permanent loading, (w+q), is analysed. Results show the former to be developing much lower stresses than its parabolic rival, even when there are relatively small differences in the two geometries; for a medium span/rise ratio of 4 and w/q=2, differences in the parabolic and moment-less arch geometries would, in practical terms, be viewed as insignificant, but the stresses in them are different.

  4. Mathematical model of a moment-less arch

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting the geometrical shapes of rigid, two-pin, moment-less arches of constant cross section. The advancement of this work lies in the inclusion of arch self-weight and the ability to produce moment-less arch forms for any span/rise ratio, and any ratio of uniformly distributed load per unit span, w, to uniformly distributed arch weight per unit arch length, q. The model is used to derive the shapes of two classical ‘moment-less’ arch forms: parabolic and catenary, prior to demonstrating a general case, not restricted by the unrealistic load assumptions (absence of q, in the case of a parabolic form, or no w, in the case of a catenary arch). Using the same value of span/rise ratio, and w/q>1, the behaviour of the moment-less and parabolic arches under permanent loading, (w+q), is analysed. Results show the former to be developing much lower stresses than its parabolic rival, even when there are relatively small differences in the two geometries; for a medium span/rise ratio of 4 and w/q=2, differences in the parabolic and moment-less arch geometries would, in practical terms, be viewed as insignificant, but the stresses in them are different. PMID:27436970

  5. Geometrical pattern learning

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, P.W.

    1993-04-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of learning the positions of spheres in metric spaces, given as data randomly drawn points classified according to whether they are internal or external to an unknown sphere. The particular metrics under consideration are geometrical shape metrics, and the results are intended to be applicable to the problem of learning to identify a shape from related shapes classified according to whether they resemble it visually. While it is typically NP-hard to locate a central point for a hypothesis sphere, we find that it is however often possible to obtain a non-spherical hypothesis which can accurately predict whether further random points lie within the unknown sphere. We exhibit algorithms which achieve this, and in the process indicate useful general techniques for computational learning. Finally we exhibit a natural shape metric and show that it defines a class of spheres not predictable in this sense, subject to standard cryptographic assumptions.

  6. Robust Reconstruction and Generalized Dual Hahn Moments Invariants Extraction for 3D Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Abderrahim; Zouhri, Amal; El Mallahi, Mostafa; Zenkouar, Khalid; Qjidaa, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new set of 3D weighed dual Hahn moments which are orthogonal on a non-uniform lattice and their polynomials are numerically stable to scale, consequent, producing a set of weighted orthonormal polynomials. The dual Hahn is the general case of Tchebichef and Krawtchouk, and the orthogonality of dual Hahn moments eliminates the numerical approximations. The computational aspects and symmetry property of 3D weighed dual Hahn moments are discussed in details. To solve their inability to invariability of large 3D images, which cause to overflow issues, a generalized version of these moments noted 3D generalized weighed dual Hahn moment invariants are presented where whose as linear combination of regular geometric moments. For 3D pattern recognition, a generalized expression of 3D weighted dual Hahn moment invariants, under translation, scaling and rotation transformations, have been proposed where a new set of 3D-GWDHMIs have been provided. In experimental studies, the local and global capability of free and noisy 3D image reconstruction of the 3D-WDHMs has been compared with other orthogonal moments such as 3D Tchebichef and 3D Krawtchouk moments using Princeton Shape Benchmark database. On pattern recognition using the 3D-GWDHMIs like 3D object descriptors, the experimental results confirm that the proposed algorithm is more robust than other orthogonal moments for pattern classification of 3D images with and without noise.

  7. Point estimates for probability moments

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblueth, Emilio

    1975-01-01

    Given a well-behaved real function Y of a real random variable X and the first two or three moments of X, expressions are derived for the moments of Y as linear combinations of powers of the point estimates y(x+) and y(x-), where x+ and x- are specific values of X. Higher-order approximations and approximations for discontinuous Y using more point estimates are also given. Second-moment approximations are generalized to the case when Y is a function of several variables. PMID:16578731

  8. Spectral moments of fullerene cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxing; Balasubramanian, K.

    Based on the symmetric method, analytical expression or recursive relations for the spectral moments of the C20, C24, C26, C28, C30, C32, C36, C38, C40, C42, C44, C50 and C60 fullerene cage clusters are obtained by factoring the original graphs and the corresponding characteristic polynomials into their smaller subgraphs and subpolynomials. We also give numerical results for the spectral moments. It is demonstrated that the symmetric method is feasible in enumerating the moments as well as factoring the characteristic polynomials for fullerene cages.

  9. Cartesian contrivances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Martin

    1998-08-01

    If matter fills the Universe, making everything happen by its interactions, what does it all look like? René Descartes may have been over-mechanistic in his view, but his efforts to visualize the invisible created striking images.

  10. Cartesian visions.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2008-12-01

    Few original portraits exist of René Descartes, yet his theories of vision were central to Enlightenment thought. French philosophers combined his emphasis on sight with the English approach of insisting that ideas are not innate, but must be built up from experience. In particular, Denis Diderot criticised Descartes's views by describing how Nicholas Saunderson--a blind physics professor at Cambridge--relied on touch. Diderot also made Saunderson the mouthpiece for some heretical arguments against the existence of God.

  11. Geometric correction methods for Timepix based large area detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlicka, J.; Dudak, J.; Karch, J.; Krejci, F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray micro radiography with the hybrid pixel detectors provides versatile tool for the object inspection in various fields of science. It has proven itself especially suitable for the samples with low intrinsic attenuation contrast (e.g. soft tissue in biology, plastics in material sciences, thin paint layers in cultural heritage, etc.). The limited size of single Medipix type detector (1.96 cm2) was recently overcome by the construction of large area detectors WidePIX assembled of Timepix chips equipped with edgeless silicon sensors. The largest already built device consists of 100 chips and provides fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 14.3 cm2 without any physical gaps between sensors. The pixel resolution of this device is 2560 × 2560 pixels (6.5 Mpix). The unique modular detector layout requires special processing of acquired data to avoid occurring image distortions. It is necessary to use several geometric compensations after standard corrections methods typical for this type of pixel detectors (i.e. flat-field, beam hardening correction). The proposed geometric compensations cover both concept features and particular detector assembly misalignment of individual chip rows of large area detectors based on Timepix assemblies. The former deals with larger border pixels in individual edgeless sensors and their behaviour while the latter grapple with shifts, tilts and steps between detector rows. The real position of all pixels is defined in Cartesian coordinate system and together with non-binary reliability mask it is used for the final image interpolation. The results of geometric corrections for test wire phantoms and paleo botanic material are presented in this article.

  12. Characterization of cerebral aneurysms using 3D moment invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, Raul D.; Hernandez, Monica; Gallardo, Daniel; Cebral, Juan R.; Putman, Christopher; Dempere-Marco, Laura; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2005-04-01

    The rupture mechanism of intracranial aneurysms is still not fully understood. Although the size of the aneurysm is the shape index most commonly used to predict rupture, some controversy still exists about its adequateness as an aneurysm rupture predictor. In this work, an automatic method to geometrically characterize the shape of cerebral saccular aneurysms using 3D moment invariants is proposed. Geometric moments are efficiently computed via application of the Divergence Theorem over the aneurysm surface using a non-structured mesh. 3D models of the aneurysm and its connected parent vessels have been reconstructed from segmentations of both 3DRA and CTA images. Two alternative approaches have been used for segmentation, the first one based on isosurface deformable models, and the second one based on the level set method. Several experiments were also conducted to both assess the influence of pre-processing steps in the stability of the aneurysm shape descriptors, and to know the robustness of the proposed method. Moment invariants have proved to be a robust technique while providing a reliable way to discriminate between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms (Sensitivity=0.83, Specificity=0.74) on a data set containing 55 aneurysms. Further investigation over larger databases is necessary to establish their adequateness as reliable predictors of rupture risk.

  13. Consistent properties reconstruction on adaptive Cartesian meshes for complex fluids computations

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Guoping . E-mail: xiag@purdue.edu; Li, Ding; Merkle, Charles L.

    2007-07-01

    An efficient reconstruction procedure for evaluating the constitutive properties of a complex fluid from general or specialized thermodynamic databases is presented. Properties and their pertinent derivatives are evaluated by means of an adaptive Cartesian mesh in the thermodynamic plane that provides user-specified accuracy over any selected domain. The Cartesian grid produces a binary tree data structure whose search efficiency is competitive with that for an equally spaced table or with simple equations of state such as a perfect gas. Reconstruction is accomplished on a triangular subdivision of the 2D Cartesian mesh that ensures function continuity across cell boundaries in equally and unequally spaced portions of the table to C {sup 0}, C {sup 1} or C {sup 2} levels. The C {sup 0} and C {sup 1} reconstructions fit the equation of state and enthalpy relations separately, while the C {sup 2} reconstruction fits the Helmholtz or Gibbs function enabling EOS/enthalpy consistency also. All three reconstruction levels appear effective for CFD solutions obtained to date. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated through storage and data retrieval examples for air, water and carbon dioxide. The time required for property evaluations is approximately two orders of magnitude faster with the reconstruction procedure than with the complete thermodynamic equations resulting in estimated 3D CFD savings of from 30 to 60. Storage requirements are modest for today's computers, with the C {sup 1} method requiring slightly less storage than those for the C {sup 0} and C {sup 2} reconstructions when the same accuracy is specified. Sample fluid dynamic calculations based upon the procedure show that the C {sup 1} and C {sup 2} methods are approximately a factor of two slower than the C {sup 0} method but that the reconstruction procedure enables arbitrary fluid CFD calculations that are as efficient as those for a perfect gas or an incompressible fluid for all three accuracy

  14. An adaptive discretization of compressible flow using a multitude of moving Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Linhai; Lu, Wenlong; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method for simulating compressible flow on a multitude of Cartesian grids that can rotate and translate. Following previous work, we split the time integration into an explicit step for advection followed by an implicit solve for the pressure. A second order accurate flux based scheme is devised to handle advection on each moving Cartesian grid using an effective characteristic velocity that accounts for the grid motion. In order to avoid the stringent time step restriction imposed by very fine grids, we propose strategies that allow for a fluid velocity CFL number larger than 1. The stringent time step restriction related to the sound speed is alleviated by formulating an implicit linear system in order to find a pressure consistent with the equation of state. This implicit linear system crosses overlapping Cartesian grid boundaries by utilizing local Voronoi meshes to connect the various degrees of freedom obtaining a symmetric positive-definite system. Since a straightforward application of this technique contains an inherent central differencing which can result in spurious oscillations, we introduce a new high order diffusion term similar in spirit to ENO-LLF but solved for implicitly in order to avoid any associated time step restrictions. The method is conservative on each grid, as well as globally conservative on the background grid that contains all other grids. Moreover, a conservative interpolation operator is devised for conservatively remapping values in order to keep them consistent across different overlapping grids. Additionally, the method is extended to handle two-way solid fluid coupling in a monolithic fashion including cases (in the appendix) where solids in close proximity do not properly allow for grid based degrees of freedom in between them.

  15. System Wide Joint Position Sensor Fault Tolerance in Robot Systems Using Cartesian Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Joint position sensors are necessary for most robot control systems. A single position sensor failure in a normal robot system can greatly degrade performance. This paper presents a method to obtain position information from Cartesian accelerometers without integration. Depending on the number and location of the accelerometers. the proposed system can tolerate the loss of multiple position sensors. A solution technique suitable for real-time implementation is presented. Simulations were conducted using 5 triaxial accelerometers to recover from the loss of up to 4 joint position sensors on a 7 degree of freedom robot moving in general three dimensional space. The simulations show good estimation performance using non-ideal accelerometer measurements.

  16. CAD-Based Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    A modular framework for aerodynamic optimization of complex geometries is developed. By working directly with a parametric CAD system, complex-geometry models are modified nnd tessellated in an automatic fashion. The use of a component-based Cartesian method significantly reduces the demands on the CAD system, and also provides for robust and efficient flowfield analysis. The optimization is controlled using either a genetic or quasi-Newton algorithm. Parallel efficiency of the framework is maintained even when subject to limited CAD resources by dynamically re-allocating the processors of the flow solver. Overall, the resulting framework can explore designs incorporating large shape modifications and changes in topology.

  17. The von Neumann basis in non-Cartesian coordinates: application to floppy triatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Shimshovitz, Asaf; Bačić, Zlatko; Tannor, David J

    2014-12-21

    We extend the periodic von Neumann basis to non-Cartesian coordinates. The bound states of two isomerizing triatomic molecules, LiCN/LiNC and HCN/HNC, are calculated using the vibrational Hamiltonian in Jacobi coordinates. The phase space localization of the basis functions leads to a flexible and accurate representation of the Hamiltonian. This results in significant savings compared to a basis localized just in coordinate space. The favorable scaling of the method with dimensionality makes it promising for applications to larger systems.

  18. Linear transformation of anharmonic molecular force constants between normal and Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Cameron J; Candian, Alessandra; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2015-06-28

    A full derivation of the analytic transformation of the quadratic, cubic, and quartic force constants from normal coordinates to Cartesian coordinates is given. Previous attempts at this transformation have resulted in non-linear transformations; however, for the first time, a simple linear transformation is presented here. Two different approaches have been formulated and implemented, one of which does not require prior knowledge of the translation-rotation eigenvectors from diagonalization of the Hessian matrix. The validity of this method is tested using two molecules H2O and c-C3H2D(+).

  19. Efficient and Robust Cartesian Mesh Generation for Building-Cube Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Takashi; Takahashi, Shun; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    In this study, an efficient and robust Cartesian mesh generation method for Building-Cube Method (BCM) is proposed. It can handle “dirty” geometry data whose surface has cracks, overlaps, and reverse of triangle. BCM mesh generation is implemented by two procedures; cube generation and cell generation in each cube. The cell generation procedure in this study is managed in each cube individually, and parallelized by OpenMP. Efficiency of the parallelized BCM mesh generation is demonstrated for several three-dimensional test cases using a multi-core PC.

  20. Parallel adaptive Cartesian upwind methods for shock-driven multiphysics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The multiphysics fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded thin-walled structures requires the dynamic coupling of a shock-capturing flow solver to a solid mechanics solver for large deformations. By combining a Cartesian embedded boundary approach with dynamic mesh adaptation a generic software framework for such flow solvers has been constructed that allows easy exchange of the specific hydrodynamic finite volume upwind scheme and coupling to various explicit finite element solid dynamics solvers. The paper gives an overview of the computational approach and presents first simulations that couple the software to the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D.

  1. Linear transformation of anharmonic molecular force constants between normal and Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Cameron J.; Candian, Alessandra; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2015-06-01

    A full derivation of the analytic transformation of the quadratic, cubic, and quartic force constants from normal coordinates to Cartesian coordinates is given. Previous attempts at this transformation have resulted in non-linear transformations; however, for the first time, a simple linear transformation is presented here. Two different approaches have been formulated and implemented, one of which does not require prior knowledge of the translation-rotation eigenvectors from diagonalization of the Hessian matrix. The validity of this method is tested using two molecules H2O and c-C3H2D+.

  2. Adjoint Sensitivity Computations for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Mesh Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis,Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Cartesian-mesh methods are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. Our goal is to combine the automation capabilities of Cartesian methods with an eficient computation of design sensitivities. We address this issue using the adjoint method, where the computational cost of the design sensitivities, or objective function gradients, is esseutially indepeudent of the number of design variables. In previous work, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm included the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The objective of the present work is to extend our adjoint formulation to problems involving general shape changes. Central to this development is the computation of volume-mesh sensitivities to obtain a reliable approximation of the objective finction gradient. Motivated by the success of mesh-perturbation schemes commonly used in body-fitted unstructured formulations, we propose an approach based on a local linearization of a mesh-perturbation scheme similar to the spring analogy. This approach circumvents most of the difficulties that arise due to non-smooth changes in the cut-cell layer as the boundary shape evolves and provides a consistent approximation tot he exact gradient of the discretized abjective function. A detailed gradient accurace study is presented to verify our approach

  3. Second Moments (planar Moments) and Their Application in Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Robert K.; Montgomery, John A., Jr.; Michels, H. Harvey; Byrd, Jason N.

    2013-06-01

    Second moments, also called planar moments (P_{ii} = Σ m_{i}^{} x_{i}^{2}), are the spectroscopic parameters used to determine substitution structures (r_{s}) ) by Kraitchman''s method from spectra of a molecule and its isotopologs. They are also useful for discussing other molecular structural properties. Just as bond lengths and angles are considered transferable among similar molecules, second moments of many common groups are also transferable. This paper discusses applications of second moments of methylene/methyl groups, singly or multiply, isopropyl/tert-butyl groups, phenyl groups, per{f}{l}uoro methylene/methyl groups, combinations of any of them, and planarity of molecules, the historically most common application of second moments. The inertial defect is Δ = (I_{c} - I_{a} - I_{b}) or -2P_{cc}. Some authors err by assuming each isotopolog provides three independent rotational constants, but in some cases they are not all independent. J. Kraitchman, Am. J. Phys. {21 (17), 1953.}

  4. Inquiry-Based Science: Turning Teachable Moments into Learnable Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, Berit S.

    2014-02-01

    This study examines how an inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning creates teachable moments that can foster conceptual understanding in students, and how teachers capitalize upon these moments. Six elementary school teachers were videotaped as they implemented an integrated inquiry-based science and literacy curriculum in their classrooms. In this curriculum, science inquiry implies that students search for evidence in order to make and revise explanations based on the evidence found and through critical and logical thinking. Furthermore, the curriculum material is designed to address science key concepts multiple times through multiple modalities (do it, say it, read it, write it). Two types of teachable moments were identified: planned and spontaneous. Results suggest that the consolidation phases of inquiry, when students reinforce new knowledge and connect their empirical findings to theory, can be considered as planned teachable moments. These are phases of inquiry during which the teacher should expect, and be prepared for, student utterances that create opportunities to further student learning. Spontaneous teachable moments are instances when the teacher must choose to either follow the pace of the curriculum or adapt to the students' need. One implication of the study is that more teacher support is required in terms of how to plan for and effectively utilize the consolidation phases of inquiry.

  5. Introduction of an atmospheric moment combining Eulerian and Lagrangian aspects of vortices: Application to tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schielicke, Lisa; Névir, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Various definitions of the intensity of atmospheric vortices exist. These definitions are often based on local parameters in a field. Otherwise, atmospheric vortices are analyzed concerning their geometric properties. A combination of both is rarely used. The aim of this publication is an expansion from a local, mass-specific view to a mass-related strength parameter, called atmospheric moment. The atmospheric moment is characterized by a combination of Eulerian parameters of intensity and Lagrangian aspects like track length and area of atmospheric vortices. The atmospheric moment is designed analogous to the seismic moment that describes the strength of earthquakes. Probability density distributions of tornadoes concerning their atmospheric moment show power law behavior. Compared with earthquakes, the scaling exponent is slightly smaller but of comparable order. In principle, this theoretical concept can also be applied to other atmospheric vortices like cyclones and hurricanes.

  6. Protostellar hydrodynamics: Constructing and testing a spacially and temporally second-order accurate method. 2: Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhill, Elizabeth A.; Boss, Alan P.

    1993-01-01

    In Boss & Myhill (1992) we described the derivation and testing of a spherical coordinate-based scheme for solving the hydrodynamic equations governing the gravitational collapse of nonisothermal, nonmagnetic, inviscid, radiative, three-dimensional protostellar clouds. Here we discuss a Cartesian coordinate-based scheme based on the same set of hydrodynamic equations. As with the spherical coorrdinate-based code, the Cartesian coordinate-based scheme employs explicit Eulerian methods which are both spatially and temporally second-order accurate. We begin by describing the hydrodynamic equations in Cartesian coordinates and the numerical methods used in this particular code. Following Finn & Hawley (1989), we pay special attention to the proper implementations of high-order accuracy, finite difference methods. We evaluate the ability of the Cartesian scheme to handle shock propagation problems, and through convergence testing, we show that the code is indeed second-order accurate. To compare the Cartesian scheme discussed here with the spherical coordinate-based scheme discussed in Boss & Myhill (1992), the two codes are used to calculate the standard isothermal collapse test case described by Bodenheimer & Boss (1981). We find that with the improved codes, the intermediate bar-configuration found previously disappears, and the cloud fragments directly into a binary protostellar system. Finally, we present the results from both codes of a new test for nonisothermal protostellar collapse.

  7. Free geometric adjustment of the OSU/NGSP global network /solution WN-4/. [coordinates of satellite tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I.

    1974-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the OSU WN 4 geometric adjustment for the coordinates of 152 satellite tracking stations. The results, when referred to the WN 4 ellipsoid of a = 6,378,127.8 m and 1/f = 298.25 produce geoid undulations consistent with dynamically determined ones. The average standard deviation in a Cartesian coordinate is plus or minus 4.0 m; in height, plus or minus 2.7 m. Comparisons with coordinates obtained from dynamic solutions show significant inconsistencies in the orientation of the coordinate systems.

  8. Calculation of rigid-body conformational changes using restraint-driven Cartesian transformations.

    PubMed Central

    Sompornpisut, P; Liu, Y S; Perozo, E

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach for calculating conformational changes in membrane proteins using limited distance information. The method, named restraint-driven Cartesian transformations, involves 1) the use of relative distance changes; 2) the systematic sampling of rigid body movements in Cartesian space; 3) a penalty evaluation; and 4) model refinement using energy minimization. As a test case, we have analyzed the structural basis of activation gating in the Streptomyces lividans potassium channel (KcsA). A total of 10 pairs of distance restraints derived from site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR) spectra were used to calculate the open conformation of the second transmembrane domains of KcsA (TM2). The SDSL-EPR based structure reveals a gating mechanism consistent with a scissoring-type motion of the TM2 segments that includes a pivot point near middle of the helix. The present approach considerably reduces the amount of time and effort required to establish the overall nature of conformational changes in membrane proteins. It is expected that this approach can be implemented into restrained molecular dynamics protocol to calculate the structure and conformational changes in a variety of membrane protein systems. PMID:11606268

  9. Large-eddy simulation of wind turbine wake interactions on locally refined Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    Performing high-fidelity numerical simulations of turbulent flow in wind farms remains a challenging issue mainly because of the large computational resources required to accurately simulate the turbine wakes and turbine/turbine interactions. The discretization of the governing equations on structured grids for mesoscale calculations may not be the most efficient approach for resolving the large disparity of spatial scales. A 3D Cartesian grid refinement method enabling the efficient coupling of the Actuator Line Model (ALM) with locally refined unstructured Cartesian grids adapted to accurately resolve tip vortices and multi-turbine interactions, is presented. Second order schemes are employed for the discretization of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a hybrid staggered/non-staggered formulation coupled with a fractional step method that ensures the satisfaction of local mass conservation to machine zero. The current approach enables multi-resolution LES of turbulent flow in multi-turbine wind farms. The numerical simulations are in good agreement with experimental measurements and are able to resolve the rich dynamics of turbine wakes on grids containing only a small fraction of the grid nodes that would be required in simulations without local mesh refinement. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0005482 and the National Science Foundation under Award number NSF PFI:BIC 1318201.

  10. Darwin's evolution theory, brain oscillations, and complex brain function in a new "Cartesian view".

    PubMed

    Başar, Erol; Güntekin, Bahar

    2009-01-01

    Comparatively analyses of electrophysiological correlates across species during evolution, alpha activity during brain maturation, and alpha activity in complex cognitive processes are presented to illustrate a new multidimensional "Cartesian System" brain function. The main features are: (1) The growth of the alpha activity during evolution, increase of alpha during cognitive processes, and decrease of the alpha entropy during evolution provide an indicator for evolution of brain cognitive performance. (2) Human children younger than 3 years are unable to produce higher cognitive processes and do not show alpha activity till the age of 3 years. The mature brain can perform higher cognitive processes and demonstrates regular alpha activity. (3) Alpha activity also is significantly associated with highly complex cognitive processes, such as the recognition of facial expressions. The neural activity reflected by these brain oscillations can be considered as constituent "building blocks" for a great number of functions. An overarching statement on the alpha function is presented by extended analyzes with multiple dimensions that constitute a "Cartesian Hyperspace" as the basis for oscillatory function. Theoretical implications are considered.

  11. Multilevel Error Estimation and Adaptive h-Refinement for Cartesian Meshes with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a mesh adaptation module for a multilevel Cartesian solver. While the module allows mesh refinement to be driven by a variety of different refinement parameters, a central feature in its design is the incorporation of a multilevel error estimator based upon direct estimates of the local truncation error using tau-extrapolation. This error indicator exploits the fact that in regions of uniform Cartesian mesh, the spatial operator is exactly the same on the fine and coarse grids, and local truncation error estimates can be constructed by evaluating the residual on the coarse grid of the restricted solution from the fine grid. A new strategy for adaptive h-refinement is also developed to prevent errors in smooth regions of the flow from being masked by shocks and other discontinuous features. For certain classes of error histograms, this strategy is optimal for achieving equidistribution of the refinement parameters on hierarchical meshes, and therefore ensures grid converged solutions will be achieved for appropriately chosen refinement parameters. The robustness and accuracy of the adaptation module is demonstrated using both simple model problems and complex three dimensional examples using meshes with from 10(exp 6), to 10(exp 7) cells.

  12. Applications of Space-Filling-Curves to Cartesian Methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Murman, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed paper presents a variety novel uses of Space-Filling-Curves (SFCs) for Cartesian mesh methods in 0. While these techniques will be demonstrated using non-body-fitted Cartesian meshes, most are applicable on general body-fitted meshes -both structured and unstructured. We demonstrate the use of single O(N log N) SFC-based reordering to produce single-pass (O(N)) algorithms for mesh partitioning, multigrid coarsening, and inter-mesh interpolation. The intermesh interpolation operator has many practical applications including warm starts on modified geometry, or as an inter-grid transfer operator on remeshed regions in moving-body simulations. Exploiting the compact construction of these operators, we further show that these algorithms are highly amenable to parallelization. Examples using the SFC-based mesh partitioner show nearly linear speedup to 512 CPUs even when using multigrid as a smoother. Partition statistics are presented showing that the SFC partitions are, on-average, within 10% of ideal even with only around 50,000 cells in each subdomain. The inter-mesh interpolation operator also has linear asymptotic complexity and can be used to map a solution with N unknowns to another mesh with M unknowns with O(max(M,N)) operations. This capability is demonstrated both on moving-body simulations and in mapping solutions to perturbed meshes for finite-difference-based gradient design methods.

  13. Applications of Space-Filling-Curves to Cartesian Methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Murman, S. M.; Berger, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a variety of novel uses of space-filling-curves (SFCs) for Cartesian mesh methods in CFD. While these techniques will be demonstrated using non-body-fitted Cartesian meshes, many are applicable on general body-fitted meshes-both structured and unstructured. We demonstrate the use of single theta(N log N) SFC-based reordering to produce single-pass (theta(N)) algorithms for mesh partitioning, multigrid coarsening, and inter-mesh interpolation. The intermesh interpolation operator has many practical applications including warm starts on modified geometry, or as an inter-grid transfer operator on remeshed regions in moving-body simulations Exploiting the compact construction of these operators, we further show that these algorithms are highly amenable to parallelization. Examples using the SFC-based mesh partitioner show nearly linear speedup to 640 CPUs even when using multigrid as a smoother. Partition statistics are presented showing that the SFC partitions are, on-average, within 15% of ideal even with only around 50,000 cells in each sub-domain. The inter-mesh interpolation operator also has linear asymptotic complexity and can be used to map a solution with N unknowns to another mesh with M unknowns with theta(M + N) operations. This capability is demonstrated both on moving-body simulations and in mapping solutions to perturbed meshes for control surface deflection or finite-difference-based gradient design methods.

  14. Moment of inertia of liquid in a tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyeong Joong

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the inertial properties of fully filled liquid in a tank were studied based on the potential theory. The analytic solution was obtained for the rectangular tank, and the numerical solutions using Green's 2nd identity were obtained for other shapes. The inertia of liquid behaves like solid in recti-linear acceleration. But under rotational acceleration, the moment of inertia of liquid becomes small compared to that of solid. The shapes of tank investigated in this study were ellipse, rectangle, hexagon, and octagon with various aspect ratios. The numerical solu¬tions were compared with analytic solution, and an ad hoc semi-analytical approximate formula is proposed herein and this formula gives very good predictions for the moment of inertia of the liquid in a tank of several different geometrical shapes. The results of this study will be useful in analyzing of the motion of LNG/LPG tanker, liquid cargo ship, and damaged ship.

  15. Variable density sampling and non-Cartesian super-resolved reconstruction for spatiotemporally encoded single-shot MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Huang, Jianpan; Zhang, Ting; Li, Jing; Cai, Congbo; Cai, Shuhui

    2016-11-01

    Spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) single-shot MRI is an emerging ultrafast technique, which is capable of spatially selective acquisition and reduced field-of-view imaging. Compared to uniform sampling, variable density sampling has great potential in reducing aliasing artifacts and improving sampling efficiency. In this study, variable density spiral trajectory and non-Cartesian super-resolved (SR) reconstruction method are developed for SPEN MRI. The gradient waveforms design of spiral trajectory is mathematically described as an optimization problem subjected to the limitations of hardware. Non-Cartesian SR reconstruction with specific gridding method is developed to retrieve a resolution enhanced image from raw SPEN data. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed methods are demonstrated by numerical simulation and various experiments. The results indicate that variable density SPEN MRI can provide better spatial resolution and fewer aliasing artifacts compared to Cartesian counterpart. The proposed methods will facilitate the development of variable density SPEN MRI.

  16. A conservative finite volume method for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined nested Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifounakis, Adamandios; Lee, Sangseung; You, Donghyun

    2016-12-01

    A second-order-accurate finite-volume method is developed for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined nested Cartesian grids. Numerical accuracy and stability on locally refined nested Cartesian grids are achieved using a finite-volume discretization of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations based on higher-order conservation principles - i.e., in addition to mass and momentum conservation, kinetic energy conservation in the inviscid limit is used to guide the selection of the discrete operators and solution algorithms. Hanging nodes at the interface are virtually slanted to improve the pressure-velocity projection, while the other parts of the grid maintain an orthogonal Cartesian grid topology. The present method is straight-forward to implement and shows superior conservation of mass, momentum, and kinetic energy compared to the conventional methods employing interpolation at the interface between coarse and fine grids.

  17. Variable density sampling and non-Cartesian super-resolved reconstruction for spatiotemporally encoded single-shot MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Huang, Jianpan; Zhang, Ting; Li, Jing; Cai, Congbo; Cai, Shuhui

    2016-11-01

    Spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) single-shot MRI is an emerging ultrafast technique, which is capable of spatially selective acquisition and reduced field-of-view imaging. Compared to uniform sampling, variable density sampling has great potential in reducing aliasing artifacts and improving sampling efficiency. In this study, variable density spiral trajectory and non-Cartesian super-resolved (SR) reconstruction method are developed for SPEN MRI. The gradient waveforms design of spiral trajectory is mathematically described as an optimization problem subjected to the limitations of hardware. Non-Cartesian SR reconstruction with specific gridding method is developed to retrieve a resolution enhanced image from raw SPEN data. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed methods are demonstrated by numerical simulation and various experiments. The results indicate that variable density SPEN MRI can provide better spatial resolution and fewer aliasing artifacts compared to Cartesian counterpart. The proposed methods will facilitate the development of variable density SPEN MRI.

  18. Geometric phase shifting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Narayanamurthy, C S; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2016-06-01

    A new phase shifting digital holographic technique using a purely geometric phase in Michelson interferometric geometry is proposed. The geometric phase in the system does not depend upon either optical path length or wavelength, unlike dynamic phase. The amount of geometric phase generated is controllable through a rotating wave plate. The new approach has unique features and major advantages in holographic measurement of transparent and reflecting three-dimensional (3D) objects. Experimental results on surface shape measurement and imaging of 3D objects are presented using the proposed method.

  19. Geometric Effects on Electron Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L

    2007-07-06

    The development of an electron cloud in the vacuum chambers of high intensity positron and proton storage rings may limit the machine performances by inducing beam instabilities, beam emittance increase, beam loss, vacuum pressure increases and increased heat load on the vacuum chamber wall. The electron multipacting is a kind of geometric resonance phenomenon and thus is sensitive to the geometric parameters such as the aperture of the beam pipe, beam shape and beam bunch fill pattern, etc. This paper discusses the geometric effects on the electron cloud build-up in a beam chamber and examples are given for different beams and accelerators.

  20. Decompositions of the polyhedral product functor with applications to moment-angle complexes and related spaces

    PubMed Central

    Bahri, A.; Bendersky, M.; Cohen, F. R.; Gitler, S.

    2009-01-01

    This article gives a natural decomposition of the suspension of a generalized moment-angle complex or partial product space which arises as the polyhedral product functor described below. The introduction and application of the smash product moment-angle complex provides a precise identification of the stable homotopy type of the values of the polyhedral product functor. One direct consequence is an analysis of the associated cohomology. For the special case of the complements of certain subspace arrangements, the geometrical decomposition implies the homological decomposition in earlier work of others as described below. Because the splitting is geometric, an analogous homological decomposition for a generalized moment-angle complex applies for any homology theory. Implied, therefore, is a decomposition for the Stanley–Reisner ring of a finite simplicial complex, and natural generalizations. PMID:19620727

  1. Guitars, Violins, and Geometric Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita; Haehl, Martha

    2007-01-01

    This article describes middle school mathematics activities that relate measurement, ratios, and geometric sequences to finger positions or the placement of frets on stringed musical instruments. (Contains 2 figures and 2 tables.)

  2. Moment tensor mechanisms from Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, D.; Morales, J.

    2003-12-01

    New moment tensor solutions are presented for small and moderate earthquakes in Spain, Portugal and the westernmost Mediterranean Sea for the period from 2002 to present. Moment tensor inversion, to estimate focal mechanism, depth and magnitude, is applied at the Instituto Andaluz de Geof¡sica (IAG) in a routine manner to regional earthquakes with local magnitude larger then or equal 3.5. Recent improvements of broadband network coverage contribute to relatively high rates of success: Since beginning of 2002, we could obtain valuable solutions, in the sense that moment tensor synthetic waveforms fit adequately the main characteristics of the observed seismograms, for about 50% of all events of the initial selection. Results are available on-line at http://www.ugr.es/~iag/tensor/. To date, the IAG moment tensor catalogue contains 90 solutions since 1984 and gives a relatively detailed picture of seismotectonics in the Ibero-maghrebian region, covering also low seismicity areas like intraplate Iberia. Solutions are concentrated in southern Spain and the Alboran Sea along the diffuse African-Eurasian plate boundary. These solutions reveal characteristics of the transition between the reverse faulting regime in Algeria and predominately normal faulting on the Iberian Peninsula. Further we discuss the available mechanisms for intermediate deep events, related to subcrustal tectonic processes at the plate contact.

  3. Unteachable Moments and Pedagogical Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Julia Kristeva's theory can inform our understanding of unteachable moments. It proposes a pedagogical relationship that can contain breakdowns of meanings and work toward breakthroughs to new awareness, particularly related to social justice pedagogy in teacher education. First, one example from the author's own teaching…

  4. Moment generation in wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-Yuen; Zhao, K D; Su, Fong-Chin; An, Kai-Nan

    2003-01-01

    Wheelchair propulsion is a man machine interaction in which chair design and fit affect the relative positions and orientations of the upper extremity relative to the handrim and wheel axle. To understand these relationships better, experimental data were collected in five hand positions from five subjects exerting maximal effort to propel an instrumented wheelchair with its wheel in a locked position. The results of experiments revealed that the progression moment was greater at both initial and terminal propulsion positions and smaller in the mid-propulsion position. The vertical and horizontal force components were directed radially away from the wheel axle posterior to the dead centre position and radially towards the wheel axle anterior to top dead centre. Subsequently, a subject-specific quasi-static model of the upper extremity which maximized wheel progression moment was developed to augment our understanding of experimental measures. Model-predicted trends in progression moments and hand force direction were similar to experiment. Model predictions revealed that the optimal progression moment generation could potentially be affected by an individual's anthropometric parameters, joint strengths and also the direction of force applied by the hand on the handrim. Through wheelchair fitting and training of wheelchair users, it may be possible to improve propulsion technique.

  5. What Happens in a Moment

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Mark A.; Giersch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    There has been evidence for the very brief, temporal quantization of perceptual experience at regular intervals below 100 ms for several decades. We briefly describe how earlier studies led to the concept of “psychological moment” of between 50 and 60 ms duration. According to historical theories, within the psychological moment all events would be processed as co-temporal. More recently, a link with physiological mechanisms has been proposed, according to which the 50–60 ms psychological moment would be defined by the upper limit required by neural mechanisms to synchronize and thereby represent a snapshot of current perceptual event structure. However, our own experimental developments also identify a more fine-scaled, serialized process structure within the psychological moment. Our data suggests that not all events are processed as co-temporal within the psychological moment and instead, some are processed successively. This evidence questions the analog relationship between synchronized process and simultaneous experience and opens debate on the ontology and function of “moments” in psychological experience. PMID:26779059

  6. Eureka moments or hard graft?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Arthur I.; Williams, Paul; Palmer, Tim; O'Shea, Michael; Neale, Ron; Reed, Cameron

    2016-11-01

    In October Philip Ball reported on the “Physics Imagination Retreat” workshop held in June at the University of Cambridge in the UK, at which a number of prominent scientists recounted their moments of sudden insight that led to scientific discoveries.

  7. Measuring the Moment of Inertia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmberg, George L.

    1978-01-01

    Two physics experiments are described, One, involving a laboratory cart accelerated along a level surface, examines the concept of inertial mass in translation and the other, using a solid cylinder, measures the moment of inertia of a wheel. Equations and illustrations are included. (MA)

  8. Moment of Inertia by Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizcallah, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of the moment of inertia of an extended body, as presented in standard introductory-level textbooks, involves the evaluation of a definite integral--an operation often not fully mastered by beginners, let alone the conceptual difficulties it presents, even to the advanced student, in understanding and setting up the integral in the…

  9. Antenna with Dielectric Having Geometric Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A. (Inventor); Cravey, Robin L. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An antenna includes a ground plane, a dielectric disposed on the ground plane, and an electrically-conductive radiator disposed on the dielectric. The dielectric includes at least one layer of a first dielectric material and a second dielectric material that collectively define a dielectric geometric pattern, which may comprise a fractal geometry. The radiator defines a radiator geometric pattern, and the dielectric geometric pattern is geometrically identical, or substantially geometrically identical, to the radiator geometric pattern.

  10. Muscle moment arms of the gibbon hind limb: implications for hylobatid locomotion.

    PubMed

    Channon, Anthony J; Crompton, Robin H; Günther, Michael M; Vereecke, Evie E

    2010-04-01

    Muscles facilitate skeletal movement via the production of a torque or moment about a joint. The magnitude of the moment produced depends on both the force of muscular contraction and the size of the moment arm used to rotate the joint. Hence, larger muscle moment arms generate larger joint torques and forces at the point of application. The moment arms of a number of gibbon hind limb muscles were measured on four cadaveric specimens (one Hylobates lar, one H. moloch and two H. syndactylus). The tendon travel technique was used, utilizing an electro-goniometer and a linear voltage displacement transducer. The data were analysed using a technique based on a differentiated cubic spline and normalized to remove the effect of body size. The data demonstrated a functional differentiation between voluminous muscles with short fascicles having small muscle moment arms and muscles with longer fascicles and comparatively smaller physiological cross-sectional area having longer muscle moment arms. The functional implications of these particular configurations were simulated using a simple geometric fascicle strain model that predicts that the rectus femoris and gastrocnemius muscles are more likely to act primarily at their distal joints (knee and ankle, respectively) because they have short fascicles. The data also show that the main hip and knee extensors maintain a very small moment arm throughout the range of joint angles seen in the locomotion of gibbons, which (coupled to voluminous, short-fascicled muscles) might help facilitate rapid joint rotation during powerful movements.

  11. On the dynamical and geometrical symmetries of Keplerian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfman, Carl E.

    2009-05-01

    The dynamical symmetries of classical, relativistic and quantum-mechanical Kepler systems are considered to arise from geometric symmetries in PQET phase space. To establish their interconnection, the symmetries are related with the aid of a Lie-algebraic extension of Dirac's correspondence principle, a canonical transformation containing a Cunningham-Bateman inversion, and a classical limit involving a preliminary canonical transformation in ET space. The Lie-algebraic extension establishes the conditions under which the uncertainty principle allows the local dynamical symmetry of a quantum-mechanical system to be the same as the geometrical phase-space symmetry of its classical counterpart. The canonical transformation converts Poincaré-invariant free-particle systems into ISO(3,1) invariant relativistic systems whose classical limit produces Keplerian systems. Locally Cartesian relativistic PQET coordinates are converted into a set of eight conjugate position and momentum coordinates whose classical limit contains Fock projective momentum coordinates and the components of Runge-Lenz vectors. The coordinate systems developed via the transformations are those in which the evolution and degeneracy groups of the classical system are generated by Poisson-bracket operators that produce ordinary rotation, translation and hyperbolic motions in phase space. The way in which these define classical Keplerian symmetries and symmetry coordinates is detailed. It is shown that for each value of the energy of a Keplerian system, the Poisson-bracket operators determine two invariant functions of positions and momenta, which together with its regularized Hamiltonian, define the manifold in six-dimensional phase space upon which motions evolve.

  12. Geometric quantum phase in the spacetime of topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.; Furtado, C.; Nascimento, J. R.

    2011-07-01

    In this contribution, we study the quantum dynamics of a neutral particle in the presence of a topological defect. We investigate the appearance of a geometric phase in the relativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle which possesses permanent magnetic and electric dipole moments in the presence of an electromagnetic field in this curved background. We also study the influence of noninertial effects of a rotating frame and and obtain several contributions to the relativistic geometric phase due to the noninertial effects and the topology of spacetime. The analogous Aharonov-Casher and He-Mckellar-Wilkens effects are investigated in the nonrelativistic dynamics with the presence of a topological defect and under the influence of noninertial effects. We also obtain effects analogous to the Sagnac effect and Mashhoon effect due to the presence of the topological defect.

  13. A Cartesian quasi-classical model to nonequilibrium quantum transport: the Anderson impurity model.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Levy, Tal J; Swenson, David W H; Rabani, Eran; Miller, William H

    2013-03-14

    We apply the recently proposed quasi-classical approach for a second quantized many-electron Hamiltonian in Cartesian coordinates [B. Li and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 154107 (2012)] to correlated nonequilibrium quantum transport. The approach provides accurate results for the resonant level model for a wide range of temperatures, bias, and gate voltages, correcting the flaws of our recently proposed mapping using action-angle variables. When electron-electron interactions are included, a Gaussian function scheme is required to map the two-electron integrals, leading to quantitative results for the Anderson impurity model. In particular, we show that the current mapping is capable of capturing quantitatively the Coulomb blockade effect and the temperature dependence of the current below and above the blockade.

  14. Accelerated Cartesian expansions for the rapid solution of periodic multiscale problems

    DOE PAGES

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Dault, Daniel L.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-07-03

    We present an algorithm for the fast and efficient solution of integral equations that arise in the analysis of scattering from periodic arrays of PEC objects, such as multiband frequency selective surfaces (FSS) or metamaterial structures. Our approach relies upon the method of Accelerated Cartesian Expansions (ACE) to rapidly evaluate the requisite potential integrals. ACE is analogous to FMM in that it can be used to accelerate the matrix vector product used in the solution of systems discretized using MoM. Here, ACE provides linear scaling in both CPU time and memory. Details regarding the implementation of this method within themore » context of periodic systems are provided, as well as results that establish error convergence and scalability. In addition, we also demonstrate the applicability of this algorithm by studying several exemplary electrically dense systems.« less

  15. A Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for Poisson`s equation on irregular domains

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, H.; Colella, P.

    1997-01-31

    The authors present a numerical method for solving Poisson`s equation, with variable coefficients and Dirichlet boundary conditions, on two-dimensional regions. The approach uses a finite-volume discretization, which embeds the domain in a regular Cartesian grid. They treat the solution as a cell-centered quantity, even when those centers are outside the domain. Cells that contain a portion of the domain boundary use conservation differencing of second-order accurate fluxes, on each cell volume. The calculation of the boundary flux ensures that the conditioning of the matrix is relatively unaffected by small cell volumes. This allows them to use multi-grid iterations with a simple point relaxation strategy. They have combined this with an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) procedure. They provide evidence that the algorithm is second-order accurate on various exact solutions, and compare the adaptive and non-adaptive calculations.

  16. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-03-22

    Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectric structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.

  17. Investigation of Radar Propagation in Buildings: A 10 Billion Element Cartesian-Mesh FETD Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M L; Fasenfest, B J; White, D A

    2008-01-14

    In this paper large scale full-wave simulations are performed to investigate radar wave propagation inside buildings. In principle, a radar system combined with sophisticated numerical methods for inverse problems can be used to determine the internal structure of a building. The composition of the walls (cinder block, re-bar) may effect the propagation of the radar waves in a complicated manner. In order to provide a benchmark solution of radar propagation in buildings, including the effects of typical cinder block and re-bar, we performed large scale full wave simulations using a Finite Element Time Domain (FETD) method. This particular FETD implementation is tuned for the special case of an orthogonal Cartesian mesh and hence resembles FDTD in accuracy and efficiency. The method was implemented on a general-purpose massively parallel computer. In this paper we briefly describe the radar propagation problem, the FETD implementation, and we present results of simulations that used over 10 billion elements.

  18. Construction of freeforms in illumination systems via generalized Cartesian oval representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, D.; Schreiber, P.; Li, Chen; Bräuer, A.

    2011-10-01

    Freeforms in illumination systems are directly constructed by adapting some ideas of Oliker and co-workers [1]. The freeform is created by a set of primitive surface elements which are generalized Cartesian ovals including the optical response of the residual system. Hamiltonian theory of ray optics can be used to determine the family of primitives which is in particular a simple task if the freeform is the exit surface of the illumination system. For simple optical systems an analytical description of the primitives is possible. Contrarily, for more complex optics a conventional raytracer is additionally utilized to determine the required system's information, like the optical path lengths or mixed characteristics. To this end a discrete set of rays is traced through the residual systems and the required relations are interpolated to obtain a quasi-analytic representation of the primitives. The potential of this approach is demonstrated by some examples, e.g. freeform optics including collimating or deflection elements.

  19. Accelerated Cartesian expansions for the rapid solution of periodic multiscale problems

    SciTech Connect

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Dault, Daniel L.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-07-03

    We present an algorithm for the fast and efficient solution of integral equations that arise in the analysis of scattering from periodic arrays of PEC objects, such as multiband frequency selective surfaces (FSS) or metamaterial structures. Our approach relies upon the method of Accelerated Cartesian Expansions (ACE) to rapidly evaluate the requisite potential integrals. ACE is analogous to FMM in that it can be used to accelerate the matrix vector product used in the solution of systems discretized using MoM. Here, ACE provides linear scaling in both CPU time and memory. Details regarding the implementation of this method within the context of periodic systems are provided, as well as results that establish error convergence and scalability. In addition, we also demonstrate the applicability of this algorithm by studying several exemplary electrically dense systems.

  20. A Higher-Order Boundary Treatment for Cartesian-Grid Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrer, Hans; Jeltsch, Rolf

    1998-03-01

    The Euler equations describe the flow phenomena of compressible inviscid gas dynamics. We simulate such flows using a higher-order Cartesian-grid method, together with a special treatment for the cells cut by the boundary of an object. A new method for the treatment of the boundary is described where these cut boundary cells are maintained as whole cells rather than as cut cells, thus avoiding stability problems. The method is second-order accurate in one dimension and higher-order accurate in two dimensions but not strictly conservative; however, we show that this error in the conservation does not lead to spurious phenomena on some representative test calculations. The advantages of the new boundary treatment are that it is higher-order accurate, that it is independent of the applied method, and that it is simple.

  1. Validation of Inlet and Exhaust Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are often omitted in aerodynamic simulations of aircraft due to the complexities involved in the modeling of engine details and flow physics. However, the omission is often improper since inlet or plume flows may have a substantial effect on vehicle aerodynamics. A method for modeling the effect of inlets and exhaust plumes using boundary conditions within an inviscid Cartesian flow solver is presented. This approach couples with both CAD systems and legacy geometry to provide an automated tool suitable for parameter studies. The method is validated using two and three-dimensional test problems which are compared with both theoretical and experimental results. The numerical results demonstrate excellent agreement with theory and available data, even for extremely strong jets and very sensitive inlets.

  2. Augmented weighted diamond form of the linear nodal scheme for Cartesian coordinate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The equations of the high order linear nodal numerical scheme are cast in an augmented weighted difference form for three-dimensional Cartesian nodes. The coupling exhibited by these equations indicate that this new algorithm is simpler and hence faster than previous nodal schemes of this degree of accuracy. A well-logging problem and a fast reactor problem are examined. The new scheme developed here is compared with the classical linear-linear nodal scheme and the diamond difference scheme. For the well-logging problem, it is found that the new scheme is both faster and simpler than the classical linear-linear nodal scheme while sacrificing little in accuracy. Even though the new scheme is more accurate than the diamond difference scheme for the reactor problem, the results indicate that state of the art acceleration methods are needed for nodal schemes.

  3. Implicit Approaches for Moving Boundaries in a 3-D Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    This work considers numerical simulation of three-dimensional flows with time-evolving boundaries. Such problems pose a variety of challenges for numerical schemes, and have received a substantial amount of attention in the recent literature. Since such simulations are unsteady, time-accurate solution of the governing equations is required. In special cases, the body motion can be treated by a uniform rigid motion of the computational domain. For the more general situation of relative-body motion, however, this simplification is unavailable and the simulations require a mechanism for ensuring that the mesh evolves with the moving boundaries. This involves a "remeshing" of the computational domain (either localized or global) at each physical timestep, and places a premium on both the speed and robustness of the remeshing algorithms. This work presents a method which includes unsteady flow simulation, rigid domain motion, and relative body motion using a time-evolving Cartesian grid system in three dimensions.

  4. Why physical medicine, physical disability and physical rehabilitation? We should abandon Cartesian dualism.

    PubMed

    Wade, Derick

    2006-03-01

    Adjectives are supposed to describe the associated noun more fully or definitively, and the adjective physical is sometimes added to words such as medicine, rehabilitation and disability. What increase in description does its use allow? The adjective was probably added when rehabilitation started to develop for several reasons: it contrasted the mode of treatment with pharmacology and surgery; it contrasted the nature of the supposed aetiology with emotionally generated disorders, especially shell-shock; and it justified the presence of rehabilitation within the profession of medicine. Its continued use, however, perpetuates a Cartesian, dualist philosophy. This editorial uses the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning (WHO ICF) model of illness to analyse its continued use, and concludes that its continued use may disadvantage both patients and the practice of rehabilitation.

  5. Polar versus Cartesian velocity models for maneuvering target tracking with IMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laneuville, Dann

    This paper compares various model sets in different IMM filters for the maneuvering target tracking problem. The aim is to see whether we can improve the tracking performance of what is certainly the most widely used model set in the literature for the maneuvering target tracking problem: a Nearly Constant Velocity model and a Nearly Coordinated Turn model. Our new challenger set consists of a mixed Cartesian position and polar velocity state vector to describe the uniform motion segments and is augmented with the turn rate to obtain the second model for the maneuvering segments. This paper also gives a general procedure to discretize up to second order any non-linear continuous time model with linear diffusion. Comparative simulations on an air defence scenario with a 2D radar, show that this new approach improves significantly the tracking performance in this case.

  6. Target recognition of log-polar ladar range images using moment invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenze; Han, Shaokun; Cao, Jie; Yu, Haoyong

    2017-01-01

    The ladar range image has received considerable attentions in the automatic target recognition field. However, previous research does not cover target recognition using log-polar ladar range images. Therefore, we construct a target recognition system based on log-polar ladar range images in this paper. In this system combined moment invariants and backpropagation neural network are selected as shape descriptor and shape classifier, respectively. In order to fully analyze the effect of log-polar sampling pattern on recognition result, several comparative experiments based on simulated and real range images are carried out. Eventually, several important conclusions are drawn: (i) if combined moments are computed directly by log-polar range images, translation, rotation and scaling invariant properties of combined moments will be invalid (ii) when object is located in the center of field of view, recognition rate of log-polar range images is less sensitive to the changing of field of view (iii) as object position changes from center to edge of field of view, recognition performance of log-polar range images will decline dramatically (iv) log-polar range images has a better noise robustness than Cartesian range images. Finally, we give a suggestion that it is better to divide field of view into recognition area and searching area in the real application.

  7. Electric transition dipole moment in pre-Born-Oppenheimer molecular structure theory.

    PubMed

    Simmen, Benjamin; Mátyus, Edit; Reiher, Markus

    2014-10-21

    This paper presents the calculation of the electric transition dipole moment in a pre-Born-Oppenheimer framework. Electrons and nuclei are treated equally in terms of the parametrization of the non-relativistic total wave function, which is written as a linear combination of basis functions constructed from explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and the global vector representation. The integrals of the electric transition dipole moment are derived corresponding to these basis functions in both the length and the velocity representation. The calculations are performed in laboratory-fixed Cartesian coordinates without relying on coordinates which separate the center of mass from the translationally invariant degrees of freedom. The effect of the overall motion is eliminated through translationally invariant integral expressions. The electric transition dipole moment is calculated between two rovibronic levels of the H2 molecule assignable to the lowest rovibrational states of the X (1)Σ(g)(+) and B (1)Σ(u)(+) electronic states in the clamped-nuclei framework. This is the first evaluation of this quantity in a full quantum mechanical treatment without relying on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  8. A Parallel Cartesian Approach for External Aerodynamics of Vehicles with Complex Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.

    2001-01-01

    This workshop paper presents the current status in the development of a new approach for the solution of the Euler equations on Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries in three dimensions on distributed and shared memory architectures. The approach uses adaptively refined Cartesian hexahedra to fill the computational domain. Where these cells intersect the geometry, they are cut by the boundary into arbitrarily shaped polyhedra which receive special treatment by the solver. The presentation documents a newly developed multilevel upwind solver based on a flexible domain-decomposition strategy. One novel aspect of the work is its use of space-filling curves (SFC) for memory efficient on-the-fly parallelization, dynamic re-partitioning and automatic coarse mesh generation. Within each subdomain the approach employs a variety reordering techniques so that relevant data are on the same page in memory permitting high-performance on cache-based processors. Details of the on-the-fly SFC based partitioning are presented as are construction rules for the automatic coarse mesh generation. After describing the approach, the paper uses model problems and 3- D configurations to both verify and validate the solver. The model problems demonstrate that second-order accuracy is maintained despite the presence of the irregular cut-cells in the mesh. In addition, it examines both parallel efficiency and convergence behavior. These investigations demonstrate a parallel speed-up in excess of 28 on 32 processors of an SGI Origin 2000 system and confirm that mesh partitioning has no effect on convergence behavior.

  9. Accelerating functional MRI using fixed‐rank approximations and radial‐cartesian sampling

    PubMed Central

    Graedel, Nadine N.; McNab, Jennifer A.; Smith, Stephen M.; Miller, Karla L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recently, k‐t FASTER (fMRI Accelerated in Space‐time by means of Truncation of Effective Rank) was introduced for rank‐constrained acceleration of fMRI data acquisition. Here we demonstrate improvements achieved through a hybrid three‐dimensional radial‐Cartesian sampling approach that allows posthoc selection of acceleration factors, as well as incorporation of coil sensitivity encoding in the reconstruction. Methods The multicoil rank‐constrained reconstruction used hard thresholding and shrinkage on matrix singular values of the space‐time data matrix, using sensitivity encoding and the nonuniform Fast Fourier Transform to enforce data consistency in the multicoil non‐Cartesian k‐t domain. Variable acceleration factors were made possible using a radial increment based on the golden ratio. Both retrospective and prospectively under‐sampled data were used to assess the fidelity of the enhancements to the k‐t FASTER technique in resting and task‐fMRI data. Results The improved k‐t FASTER is capable of tailoring acceleration factors for recovery of different signal components, achieving up to R = 12.5 acceleration in visual‐motor task data. The enhancements reduce data matrix reconstruction errors even at much higher acceleration factors when compared directly with the original k‐t FASTER approach. Conclusion We have shown that k‐t FASTER can be used to significantly accelerate fMRI data acquisition with little penalty to data quality. Magn Reson Med 76:1825–1836, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26777798

  10. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number— in an inertialess environment—is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the “belly phase,” peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing. PMID:26154384

  11. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing.

  12. A Computer Program To Increase Comprehension of the Cartesian Rectangular Coordinate System in High School Pre-Algebra Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exley, I. Sheck

    The high percentage of high school pre-algebra students having difficulty learning the abstract concept of graphing ordered pairs on the Cartesian rectangular coordinate system was addressed by the creation and implementation of a computer-managed instructional program. Modules consisted of a pretest, instruction, two practice sessions, and a…

  13. Simulating hydrodynamics in a spring-fed estuary using a three-dimensional unstructured Cartesian grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, XinJian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an application of a three-dimensional unstructured Cartesian grid model (Chen, 2011) to a real-world case, namely the Crystal River/Kings Bay system located on the Gulf coast of the Florida peninsula of the United States. Crystal River/Kings Bay is a spring-fed estuarine system which is believed to be the largest natural refuge in the United States for manatees during the coldest days in winter because of the existence of a large amount of discharge out of numerous spring vents at the bottom of Kings Bay. The unstructured Cartesian grid model was used to simulate hydrodynamics, including salinity transport processes and thermodynamics, in the estuary during a 34-month period from April 2007 to February 2010. Although there are some unidentified uncertainties in quantifying flow rates from the spring vents and salinity variations in spring flows, simulated water elevations, salinities, temperatures, and cross-sectional flux all match well or very well with measured real-time field data. This suggests that the unstructured Cartesian grid model can adequately simulate hydrodynamics in a complex shallow water system such as Crystal River/Kings Bay and the numerical theory for the unstructured Cartesian grid model works properly. The successful simulation of hydrodynamics in the estuarine system also suggests that an empirical formula that relates the spring discharge with the water level in Kings Bay and the groundwater level measured in a nearby well is reasonable.

  14. Superconductivity from Emerging Magnetic Moments.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Shintaro; Werner, Philipp

    2015-12-11

    Multiorbital Hubbard models are shown to exhibit a spatially isotropic spin-triplet superconducting phase, where equal-spin electrons in different local orbitals are paired. This superconducting state is stabilized in the spin-freezing crossover regime, where local moments emerge in the metal phase, and the pairing is substantially assisted by spin anisotropy. The phase diagram features a superconducting dome below a non-Fermi-liquid metallic region and next to a magnetically ordered phase. We suggest that this type of fluctuating-moment-induced superconductivity, which is not originating from fluctuations near a quantum critical point, may be realized in spin-triplet superconductors such as strontium ruthenates and uranium compounds.

  15. Guiding light via geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slussarenko, Sergei; Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Piccirillo, Bruno; Santamato, Enrico; Assanto, Gaetano; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    All known methods for transverse confinement and guidance of light rely on modification of the refractive index, that is, on the scalar properties of electromagnetic radiation. Here, we disclose the concept of a dielectric waveguide that exploits vectorial spin-orbit interactions of light and the resulting geometric phases. The approach relies on the use of anisotropic media with an optic axis that lies orthogonal to the propagation direction but is spatially modulated, so that the refractive index remains constant everywhere. A spin-controlled cumulative phase distortion is imposed on the beam, balancing diffraction for a specific polarization. As well as theoretical analysis, we present an experimental demonstration of the guidance using a series of discrete geometric-phase lenses made from liquid crystal. Our findings show that geometric phases may determine the optical guiding behaviour well beyond a Rayleigh length, paving the way to a new class of photonic devices. The concept is applicable to the whole electromagnetic spectrum.

  16. Geometric scalar theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Novello, M.; Bittencourt, E.; Goulart, E.; Salim, J.M.; Toniato, J.D.; Moschella, U. E-mail: eduhsb@cbpf.br E-mail: egoulart@cbpf.br E-mail: toniato@cbpf.br

    2013-06-01

    We present a geometric scalar theory of gravity. Our proposal will be described using the ''background field method'' introduced by Gupta, Feynman, Deser and others as a field theory formulation of general relativity. We analyze previous criticisms against scalar gravity and show how the present proposal avoids these difficulties. This concerns not only the theoretical complaints but also those related to observations. In particular, we show that the widespread belief of the conjecture that the source of scalar gravity must be the trace of the energy-momentum tensor — which is one of the main difficulties to couple gravity with electromagnetic phenomenon in previous models — does not apply to our geometric scalar theory. From the very beginning this is not a special relativistic scalar gravity. The adjective ''geometric'' pinpoints its similarity with general relativity: this is a metric theory of gravity. Some consequences of this new scalar theory are explored.

  17. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained with the material. Thus to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made form highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressability. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical prediction models are demonstrated. Although more costly than its predecessors, the present analysis is based on the detailed architecture developed by one of the authors and his colleagues and accounts for many of the geometric complexities that other analyses ignore.

  18. Geometric scaling as traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Munier, S; Peschanski, R

    2003-12-05

    We show the relevance of the nonlinear Fisher and Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov (KPP) equation to the problem of high energy evolution of the QCD amplitudes. We explain how the traveling wave solutions of this equation are related to geometric scaling, a phenomenon observed in deep-inelastic scattering experiments. Geometric scaling is for the first time shown to result from an exact solution of nonlinear QCD evolution equations. Using general results on the KPP equation, we compute the velocity of the wave front, which gives the full high energy dependence of the saturation scale.

  19. Supersymmetric chiral models: Geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, A. M.

    1989-03-01

    We consider classical supersymmetric chiral models of field theory and focus our attention on the geometrical aspects of such theories. A characteristic feature of such models is that the interaction is not introduced by adding the interaction Lagrangian to the free field Lagrangian, but has a purely geometrical origin and is related to the inner curvature of the target manifold. In many aspects these models are analogous to gauge theories and, as became clear recently, they are also important for superstring theory, which nowadays is the most probable candidate for a truly unified theory of all interactions including gravitation.

  20. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  1. Aharonov–Anandan quantum phases and Landau quantization associated with a magnetic quadrupole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, I.C.; Bakke, K.

    2015-12-15

    The arising of geometric quantum phases in the wave function of a moving particle possessing a magnetic quadrupole moment is investigated. It is shown that an Aharonov–Anandan quantum phase (Aharonov and Anandan, 1987) can be obtained in the quantum dynamics of a moving particle with a magnetic quadrupole moment. In particular, it is obtained as an analogue of the scalar Aharonov–Bohm effect for a neutral particle (Anandan, 1989). Besides, by confining the quantum particle to a hard-wall confining potential, the dependence of the energy levels on the geometric quantum phase is discussed and, as a consequence, persistent currents can arise from this dependence. Finally, an analogue of the Landau quantization is discussed. -- Highlights: •Scalar Aharonov–Bohm effect for a particle possessing a magnetic quadrupole moment. •Aharonov–Anandan quantum phase for a particle with a magnetic quadrupole moment. •Dependence of the energy levels on the Aharonov–Anandan quantum phase. •Landau quantization associated with a particle possessing a magnetic quadrupole moment.

  2. Defining moments in leadership character development.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Critical moments in life define one's character and clarify true values. Reflective leadership is espoused as an important practice for transformational leaders. Professional development educators can help surface and explore defining moments, strengthen leadership behavior with defining moments as a catalyst for change, and create safe spaces for leaders to expand their leadership capacity.

  3. Platonic Symmetry and Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cubic symmetry is used to build the other four Platonic solids and some formalism from classical geometry is introduced. Initially, the approach is via geometric construction, e.g., the "golden ratio" is necessary to construct an icosahedron with pentagonal faces. Then conventional elementary vector algebra is used to extract quantitative…

  4. The geometric oblateness of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Avis, C. C.; Colombo, G.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers photographs of Uranus obtained by the Stratoscope II balloon-borne telescope in 1970. These data have been redigitized and reanalyzed, and the geometric oblateness of Uranus was determined from the isophotes near the limb using an expression in terms of the equatorial and polar radii.

  5. Geometric Quantum Noise of Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnirman, Alexander; Gefen, Yuval; Saha, Arijit; Burmistrov, Igor S.; Kiselev, Mikhail N.; Altland, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    The presence of geometric phases is known to affect the dynamics of the systems involved. Here, we consider a quantum degree of freedom, moving in a dissipative environment, whose dynamics is described by a Langevin equation with quantum noise. We show that geometric phases enter the stochastic noise terms. Specifically, we consider small ferromagnetic particles (nanomagnets) or quantum dots close to Stoner instability, and investigate the dynamics of the total magnetization in the presence of tunneling coupling to the metallic leads. We generalize the Ambegaokar-Eckern-Schön effective action and the corresponding semiclassical equations of motion from the U(1) case of the charge degree of freedom to the SU(2) case of the magnetization. The Langevin forces (torques) in these equations are strongly influenced by the geometric phase. As a first but nontrivial application, we predict low temperature quantum diffusion of the magnetization on the Bloch sphere, which is governed by the geometric phase. We propose a protocol for experimental observation of this phenomenon.

  6. Celestial mechanics with geometric algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.

    1983-01-01

    Geometric algebra is introduced as a general tool for Celestial Mechanics. A general method for handling finite rotations and rotational kinematics is presented. The constants of Kepler motion are derived and manipulated in a new way. A new spinor formulation of perturbation theory is developed.

  7. Failure of geometric electromagnetism in the adiabatic vector Kepler problem

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, J.R.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2004-02-01

    The magnetic moment of a particle orbiting a straight current-carrying wire may precess rapidly enough in the wire's magnetic field to justify an adiabatic approximation, eliminating the rapid time dependence of the magnetic moment and leaving only the particle position as a slow degree of freedom. To zeroth order in the adiabatic expansion, the orbits of the particle in the plane perpendicular to the wire are Keplerian ellipses. Higher-order postadiabatic corrections make the orbits precess, but recent analysis of this 'vector Kepler problem' has shown that the effective Hamiltonian incorporating a postadiabatic scalar potential ('geometric electromagnetism') fails to predict the precession correctly, while a heuristic alternative succeeds. In this paper we resolve the apparent failure of the postadiabatic approximation, by pointing out that the correct second-order analysis produces a third Hamiltonian, in which geometric electromagnetism is supplemented by a tensor potential. The heuristic Hamiltonian of Schmiedmayer and Scrinzi is then shown to be a canonical transformation of the correct adiabatic Hamiltonian, to second order. The transformation has the important advantage of removing a 1/r{sup 3} singularity which is an artifact of the adiabatic approximation.

  8. Fermion dipole moment and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaxizi, Manuela; Rahman, Rakibur

    2015-12-01

    In the background of a charged AdS black hole, we consider a Dirac particle endowed with an arbitrary magnetic dipole moment. For non-zero charge and dipole coupling of the bulk fermion, we find that the dual boundary theory can be plagued with superluminal modes. Requiring consistency of the dual CFT amounts to constraining the strength of the dipole coupling by an upper bound. We briefly discuss the implications of our results for the physics of holographic non-Fermi liquids.

  9. Revisiting Vertical Models To Simulate the Line Shape of Electronic Spectra Adopting Cartesian and Internal Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2016-10-11

    Vertical models for the simulation of spectroscopic line shapes expand the potential energy surface (PES) of the final state around the equilibrium geometry of the initial state. These models provide, in principle, a better approximation of the region of the band maximum. At variance, adiabatic models expand each PES around its own minimum. In the harmonic approximation, when the minimum energy structures of the two electronic states are connected by large structural displacements, adiabatic models can breakdown and are outperformed by vertical models. However, the practical application of vertical models faces the issues related to the necessity to perform a frequency analysis at a nonstationary point. In this contribution we revisit vertical models in harmonic approximation adopting both Cartesian (x) and valence internal curvilinear coordinates (s). We show that when x coordinates are used, the vibrational analysis at nonstationary points leads to a deficient description of low-frequency modes, for which spurious imaginary frequencies may even appear. This issue is solved when s coordinates are adopted. It is however necessary to account for the second derivative of s with respect to x, which here we compute analytically. We compare the performance of the vertical model in the s-frame with respect to adiabatic models and previously proposed vertical models in x- or Q1-frame, where Q1 are the normal coordinates of the initial state computed as combination of Cartesian coordinates. We show that for rigid molecules the vertical approach in the s-frame provides a description of the final state very close to the adiabatic picture. For sizable displacements it is a solid alternative to adiabatic models, and it is not affected by the issues of vertical models in x- and Q1-frames, which mainly arise when temperature effects are included. In principle the G matrix depends on s, and this creates nonorthogonality problems of the Duschinsky matrix connecting the normal

  10. Perception and Haptic Rendering of Friction Moments.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, H; Ohtuka, Y; Koide, S; Mouri, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers moments due to friction forces on the human fingertip. A computational technique called the friction moment arc method is presented. The method computes the static and/or dynamic friction moment independent of a friction force calculation. In addition, a new finger holder to display friction moment is presented. This device incorporates a small brushless motor and disk, and connects the human's finger to an interface finger of the five-fingered haptic interface robot HIRO II. Subjects' perception of friction moment while wearing the finger holder, as well as perceptions during object manipulation in a virtual reality environment, were evaluated experimentally.

  11. Predicting Robust Learning with the Visual Form of the Moment-by-Moment Learning Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ryan S.; Hershkovitz, Arnon; Rossi, Lisa M.; Goldstein, Adam B.; Gowda, Sujith M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for analyzing a student's learning over time for a specific skill: analysis of the graph of the student's moment-by-moment learning over time. Moment-by-moment learning is calculated using a data-mined model that assesses the probability that a student learned a skill or concept at a specific time during learning (Baker,…

  12. Moment calculations by digital filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrikis, Z. L.; Hatamian, M.

    1984-02-01

    A simple recursive algorithm is presented for computing moments of two-dimensional integer arrays. It uses only additions, and can be implemented for high speed and real time computation at video rates. The Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), Very Large-Scale Integrated (VLSI) implementation of the algorithm in a single chip that can calculate the 16 moments on a 512 x 512 array of 8-bit integers in real time (at video rate) is described. Such a chip can have potential applications in image processing, graphics, and robotics. The basic building block of the system is a single-pole digital filter that is implemented by recursive addition. The complexities involved in designing the chip, as well as its area, are significantly reduced by taking advantage of the fact that the column samples of the data array can be processed at a much slower rate than the row samples. An estimate of the chip area obtained from the layout design of the individual cells is given.

  13. Geometrical Phases in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Joy Julius

    In quantum mechanics, the path-dependent geometrical phase associated with a physical system, over and above the familiar dynamical phase, was initially discovered in the context of adiabatically changing environments. Subsequently, Aharonov and Anandan liberated this phase from the original formulation of Berry, which used Hamiltonians, dependent on curves in a classical parameter space, to represent the cyclic variations of the environments. Their purely quantum mechanical treatment, independent of Hamiltonians, instead used the non-trivial topological structure of the projective space of one-dimensional subspaces of an appropriate Hilbert space. The geometrical phase, in their treatment, results from a parallel transport of the time-dependent pure quantum states along a curve in this space, which is endowed with an abelian connection. Unlike Berry, they were able to achieve this without resort to an adiabatic approximation or to a time-independent eigenvalue equation. Prima facie, these two approaches are conceptually quite different. After a review of both approaches, an exposition bridging this apparent conceptual gap is given; by rigorously analyzing a model composite system, it is shown that, in an appropriate correspondence limit, the Berry phase can be recovered as a special case from the Aharonov-Anandan phase. Moreover, the model composite system is used to show that Berry's correction to the traditional Born-Oppenheimer energy spectra indeed brings the spectra closer to the exact results. Then, an experimental arrangement to measure geometrical phases associated with cyclic and non-cyclic variations of quantum states of an entangled composite system is proposed, utilizing the fundamental ideas of the recently opened field of two-particle interferometry. This arrangement not only resolves the controversy regarding the true nature of the phases associated with photon states, but also unequivocally predicts experimentally accessible geometrical phases in a

  14. Incorporating Hydrologic Insight into Geophysical Inversion: Resolution Limitations and Direct Estimation of Solute Plume Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2005-12-01

    inversion (MBTI) and object-based tomographic inversion (OBTI). With these approaches, we seek to estimate directly the geometric parameters describing the plume distribution in space and/or time. MBTI is appealing in that the inversion parameters, i.e., the orthogonal moments of the image, are related to the geometric moments commonly used to characterize plume structure and identify controlling transport processes, such as dispersion and rate-limited mass transfer. Simple plumes can be described adequately by moments up to order 3 or 4, whereas complex plumes that are strongly affected by aquifer heterogeneity may require higher-order moments. Under OBTI, the target is parameterized by one or more shapes based on a conceptual model of flow and aquifer structure. Compared to conventional pixel-based parameterization, MBTI and OBTI may reduce the number of inversion parameters by a factor of 100 or more, producing more reliable estimates of plume moments while reducing or precluding common artifacts such as streaking.

  15. A Domain-Decomposed Multilevel Method for Adaptively Refined Cartesian Grids with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary verification and validation of an efficient Euler solver for adaptively refined Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries is presented. The parallel, multilevel method makes use of a new on-the-fly parallel domain decomposition strategy based upon the use of space-filling curves, and automatically generates a sequence of coarse meshes for processing by the multigrid smoother. The coarse mesh generation algorithm produces grids which completely cover the computational domain at every level in the mesh hierarchy. A series of examples on realistically complex three-dimensional configurations demonstrate that this new coarsening algorithm reliably achieves mesh coarsening ratios in excess of 7 on adaptively refined meshes. Numerical investigations of the scheme's local truncation error demonstrate an achieved order of accuracy between 1.82 and 1.88. Convergence results for the multigrid scheme are presented for both subsonic and transonic test cases and demonstrate W-cycle multigrid convergence rates between 0.84 and 0.94. Preliminary parallel scalability tests on both simple wing and complex complete aircraft geometries shows a computational speedup of 52 on 64 processors using the run-time mesh partitioner.

  16. Progress Towards a Cartesian Cut-Cell Method for Viscous Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary development of an approach for simulating high Reynolds number steady compressible flow in two space dimensions using a Cartesian cut-cell finite volume method. We consider both laminar and turbulent flow with both low and high cell Reynolds numbers near the wall. The approach solves the full Navier-Stokes equations in all cells, and uses a wall model to address the resolution requirements near boundaries and to mitigate mesh irregularities in cut cells. We present a quadratic wall model for low cell Reynolds numbers. At high cell Reynolds numbers, the quadratic is replaced with a newly developed analytic wall model stemming from solution of a limiting form of the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model which features a forward evaluation for flow velocity and exactly matches characteristics of the SA turbulence model in the field. We develop multigrid operators which attain convergence rates similar to inviscid multigrid. Investigations focus on preliminary verification and validation of the method. Flows over flat plates and compressible airfoils show good agreement with both theoretical results and experimental data. Mesh convergence studies on sub- and transonic airfoil flows show convergence of surface pressures with wall spacings as large as approx.0.1% chord. With the current analytic wall model, one or two additional refinements near the wall are required to obtain mesh converged values of skin friction.

  17. The Cartesian doctor, François Bayle (1622-1709), on psychosomatic explanation.

    PubMed

    Easton, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    There are two standing, incompatible accounts of Descartes' contributions to the study of psychosomatic phenomena that pervade histories of medicine, psychology, and psychiatry. The first views Descartes as the father of "rational psychology" a tradition that defines the soul as a thinking, unextended substance. The second account views Descartes as the father of materialism and the machine metaphor. The consensus is that Descartes' studies of optics and motor reflexes and his conception of the body-machine metaphor made early and important contributions to physiology and neuroscience but otherwise his impact was minimal. These predominately negative assessments of Descartes' contributions give a false impression of the role his philosophy played in the development of medicine and psychiatry in seventeenth-century France and beyond. I explore Descartes' influence in the little-known writings of a doctor from Toulouse, François Bayle (1622-1709). A study of Bayle gives us occasion to rethink the nature and role of psychosomatic explanation in Descartes' philosophy. The portrait I present is of a Cartesian science that had an actual and lasting effect on medical science and practice, and may offer something of value to practitioners today.

  18. Cartesian positioning system for localization of blast and ballistic fragments: a phantom-based pilot study.

    PubMed

    Folio, Les; Fischer, Tatjana; Shogan, Paul J; Frew, Michael; Bunger, Rolf; Provenzale, James M

    2011-11-01

    Our purpose was to demonstrate the consistency of radiologists' three-dimensional measurements of simulated blast fragment locations in vitro in an effort to objectively localize retained fragments and wound paths. We designed a phantom consisting of 10 nail heads (simulating blast fragments) glued to wooden pegs that were randomly situated at distances from a reference point within a plastic tub. The x, y, and z coordinates of simulated fragments were recorded in Cartesian 3-space relative to the reference point. Computed tomography images of the phantom were acquired. Differences in x, y, and z positions as determined by three observers were summed for each fragment. Agreement between recordings of coordinates across readers was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Summed differences in coordinate positions as determined by readers ranged between 0.00 and 1.204 cm (mean: 0.732 cm). Across readers, the intraclass correlation coefficient for each dimension was >0.99. We found excellent agreement among readers with minimal discrepancy of measured locations of simulated fragments. Our results provide a foundation for trajectory analysis necessary to lead to automated organ damage reporting for immediate assessment in the emergency department and for forensic investigation and long-term epidemiological analysis.

  19. Practical conversion from torsion space to Cartesian space for in silico protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jerod; Holmes, J Bradley; Rojas, J Maurice; Tsai, Jerry; Strauss, Charlie E M

    2005-07-30

    Many applications require a method for translating a large list of bond angles and bond lengths to precise atomic Cartesian coordinates. This simple but computationally consuming task occurs ubiquitously in modeling proteins, DNA, and other polymers as well as in many other fields such as robotics. To find an optimal method, algorithms can be compared by a number of operations, speed, intrinsic numerical stability, and parallelization. We discuss five established methods for growing a protein backbone by serial chain extension from bond angles and bond lengths. We introduce the Natural Extension Reference Frame (NeRF) method developed for Rosetta's chain extension subroutine, as well as an improved implementation. In comparison to traditional two-step rotations, vector algebra, or Quaternion product algorithms, the NeRF algorithm is superior for this application: it requires 47% fewer floating point operations, demonstrates the best intrinsic numerical stability, and offers prospects for parallel processor acceleration. The NeRF formalism factors the mathematical operations of chain extension into two independent terms with orthogonal subsets of the dependent variables; the apparent irreducibility of these factors hint that the minimal operation set may have been identified. Benchmarks are made on Intel Pentium and Motorola PowerPC CPUs.

  20. On the Use of CAD and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, M.; Aftosmis, M. J.; Pulliam, T. H.

    2004-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for Curt3D, a Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package. We present the construction of a new optimization framework and we focus on the following issues: 1) Component-based geometry parameterization approach using parametric-CAD models and CAPRI. A novel geometry server is introduced that addresses the issue of parallel efficiency while only sparingly consuming CAD resources; 2) The use of genetic and gradient-based algorithms for three-dimensional aerodynamic design problems. The influence of noise on the optimization methods is studied. Our goal is to create a responsive and automated framework that efficiently identifies design modifications that result in substantial performance improvements. In addition, we examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute engines. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the framework for a design problem that features topology changes and complex geometry.

  1. Progress Towards a Cartesian Cut-Cell Method for Viscous Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The proposed paper reports advances in developing a method for high Reynolds number compressible viscous flow simulations using a Cartesian cut-cell method with embedded boundaries. This preliminary work focuses on accuracy of the discretization near solid wall boundaries. A model problem is used to investigate the accuracy of various difference stencils for second derivatives and to guide development of the discretization of the viscous terms in the Navier-Stokes equations. Near walls, quadratic reconstruction in the wall-normal direction is used to mitigate mesh irregularity and yields smooth skin friction distributions along the body. Multigrid performance is demonstrated using second-order coarse grid operators combined with second-order restriction and prolongation operators. Preliminary verification and validation for the method is demonstrated using flat-plate and airfoil examples at compressible Mach numbers. Simulations of flow on laminar and turbulent flat plates show skin friction and velocity profiles compared with those from boundary-layer theory. Airfoil simulations are performed at laminar and turbulent Reynolds numbers with results compared to both other simulations and experimental data

  2. Radially dependent large-scale dynamos in global cylindrical shear flows and the local cartesian limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Blackman, E. G.

    2016-06-01

    For cylindrical differentially rotating plasmas, we study large-scale magnetic field generation from finite amplitude non-axisymmetric perturbations by comparing numerical simulations with quasi-linear analytic theory. When initiated with a vertical magnetic field of either zero or finite net flux, our global cylindrical simulations exhibit the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and large-scale dynamo growth of radially alternating mean fields, averaged over height and azimuth. This dynamo growth is explained by our analytic calculations of a non-axisymmetric fluctuation-induced electromotive force that is sustained by azimuthal shear of the fluctuating fields. The standard `Ω effect' (shear of the mean field by differential rotation) is unimportant. For the MRI case, we express the large-scale dynamo field as a function of differential rotation. The resulting radially alternating large-scale fields may have implications for angular momentum transport in discs and corona. To connect with previous work on large-scale dynamos with local linear shear and identify the minimum conditions needed for large-scale field growth, we also solve our equations in local Cartesian coordinates. We find that large-scale dynamo growth in a linear shear flow without rotation can be sustained by shear plus non-axisymmetric fluctuations - even if not helical, a seemingly previously unidentified distinction. The linear shear flow dynamo emerges as a more restricted version of our more general new global cylindrical calculations.

  3. A Domain-Decomposed Multi-Level Method for Adaptively Refined Cartesian Grids with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The work presents a new method for on-the-fly domain decomposition technique for mapping grids and solution algorithms to parallel machines, and is applicable to both shared-memory and message-passing architectures. It will be demonstrated on the Cray T3E, HP Exemplar, and SGI Origin 2000. Computing time has been secured on all these platforms. The decomposition technique is an outgrowth of techniques used in computational physics for simulations of N-body problems and the event horizons of black holes, and has not been previously used by the CFD community. Since the technique offers on-the-fly partitioning, it offers a substantial increase in flexibility for computing in heterogeneous environments, where the number of available processors may not be known at the time of job submission. In addition, since it is dynamic it permits the job to be repartitioned without global communication in cases where additional processors become available after the simulation has begun, or in cases where dynamic mesh adaptation changes the mesh size during the course of a simulation. The platform for this partitioning strategy is a completely new Cartesian Euler solver tarcreted at parallel machines which may be used in conjunction with Ames' "Cart3D" arbitrary geometry simulation package.

  4. A Cartesian Grid Generation Method Considering a Complicated Cell Geometry at the Body Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahur, Paulus R.; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    A cell-splitting method for Cartesian grid generation that has the capability of taking into account the cases of thin body and sharp edge is proposed in this paper. Such cases are frequently found when solving the flow around a very thin wing, such as that of a supersonic transport (SST). The method has also been extended to treat the problem of multiple solid regions within a cell, which is sometimes encountered at a highly curved body surface. Validation of the method proposed here is carried out on a sharp, thin double wedge in a supersonic flow, where significant improvements in accuracy are achieved at the cost of a small increase in the number of cells. Furthermore, application of the present method to a model of SST shows its effectiveness on a three-dimensional, realistic geometry. As a result of making a pseudo-planar approximation for body surface elements, the total number of body surface elements was reduced by a factor of about 3.2 in this application. Local grid refinement by relocating grid cells to a curved surface is also proposed, so that a more accurate solution is obtained with a reasonable number of cells.

  5. A Cartesian grid method for simulation of the unsteady aerodynamics of microscale flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emblemsvag, Jo-Einar

    Recent improvements in MEMS technology is making it possible to develop microscale mechanical devices capable of operating in gases and liquids at low Reynolds number. In the current work a method has been developed to be able to simulate the operation of such devices computationally. The method imposes arbitrary solid/fluid boundaries on Cartesian grids, thus avoiding complexities with body-fitted grid methods. This thesis explains the numerical approximations used for solving the governing equations, the discretization of the equations, and the implementation of the immersed fluid/solid boundary conditions. The method is validated by comparing computed results of flows over an infinitely thin plate, a cylinder, and a sphere, and it is found that the method predicts both steady and unsteady flows with sufficient accuracy. The method performs similarly whether the solid objects translates through the grid or remains fixed in the grid with an imposed flow field. The method was then used to compute the fluid dynamics and force generation of a microscale flapping cantilever beam propulsion device. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow features were explored, and the investigation showed that the cantilever produces thrust and can therefore potentially be used as a simple propulsion mechanism. Finally, the method was used to simulate an idealized model of fruit fly wing in hovering flight. The computed flow fields and force dynamics compared well with an equivalent experimental model, although some discrepancies were found due to a thicker wing being used in the computations for numerical reasons.

  6. An image space approach to Cartesian based parallel MR imaging with total variation regularization.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Stephen L; Clason, Christian; Hintermüller, Michael; Knoll, Florian; Laurain, Antoine; von Winckel, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Cartesian parallel magnetic imaging problem is formulated variationally using a high-order penalty for coil sensitivities and a total variation like penalty for the reconstructed image. Then the optimality system is derived and numerically discretized. The objective function used is non-convex, but it possesses a bilinear structure that allows the ambiguity among solutions to be resolved technically by regularization and practically by normalizing a pre-estimated norm of the reconstructed image. Since the objective function is convex in each single argument, convex analysis is used to formulate the optimality condition for the image in terms of a primal-dual system. To solve the optimality system, a nonlinear Gauss-Seidel outer iteration is used in which the objective function is minimized with respect to one variable after the other using an inner generalized Newton iteration. Computational results for in vivo MR imaging data show that a significant improvement in reconstruction quality can be obtained by using the proposed regularization methods in relation to alternative approaches.

  7. Sadness as a passion of the soul: a psychopathological consideration of the Cartesian concept of melancholy.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Francisco; Rubio, Gabriel; Molina, Juan D; Alamo, Cecilio

    2011-04-25

    The relationship between the "passions" (emotions or feelings) and psychopathology has been a constant throughout the history of medicine. In this context, melancholy was considered a perversion of the soul (corruption of the passions). One of the most influential authors on this subject was René Descartes, who discussed it in his work The Treatise on the Passions of the Soul (1649). Descartes believed that "passions" were sensitive movements that the soul experienced due to its union with the body (res extensa). According to this theory, the soul was located in the pineal gland, where it was actively involved in overseeing the functions of the "human machine" and kept its dysfunctions under control, by circulating animal spirits. Descartes described sadness as one of "the six primitive passions of the soul", which leads to melancholy if not remedied. Cartesian theories had a great deal of influence on the way that mental pathologies were considered throughout the entire 17th century (Spinoza, Willis, Pitcairn) and during much of the 18th century (Le Cat, Tissot). From the 19th century onwards, emotional symptomatology finally began to be used in diagnostic criteria for mood disorders.

  8. Modelling rapid mass movements using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Robl, J.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new method to model rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates. These equations are the widely used standard approximation for the flow of water in rivers and shallow lakes, but the main prerequisite for their application - an almost horizontal fluid table - is in general not satisfied for avalanches and debris flows in steep terrain. Therefore, we have developed appropriate correction terms for large topographic gradients. In this study we present the mathematical formulation of these correction terms and their implementation in the open-source flow solver GERRIS. This novel approach is evaluated by simulating avalanches on synthetic and finally natural topographies and the widely used Voellmy flow resistance law. Testing the results against analytical solutions and the proprietary avalanche model RAMMS, we found a very good agreement. As the GERRIS flow solver is freely available and open source, it can be easily extended by additional fluid models or source areas, making this model suitable for simulating several types of rapid mass movements. It therefore provides a valuable tool for assisting regional-scale natural hazard studies.

  9. Viability of Bioprinted Cellular Constructs Using a Three Dispenser Cartesian Printer

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, SG.; Trusk, T.; Richards, D.; Jia, J.; Tan, Y.; Mei, Y.; Fann, S.; Markwald, R.; Yost, M.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering has centralized its focus on the construction of replacements for non-functional or damaged tissue. The utilization of three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering has generated new methods for the printing of cells and matrix to fabricate biomimetic tissue constructs. The solid freeform fabrication (SFF) method developed for three-dimensional bioprinting uses an additive manufacturing approach by depositing droplets of cells and hydrogels in a layer-by-layer fashion. Bioprinting fabrication is dependent on the specific placement of biological materials into three-dimensional architectures, and the printed constructs should closely mimic the complex organization of cells and extracellular matrices in native tissue. This paper highlights the use of the Palmetto Printer, a Cartesian bioprinter, as well as the process of producing spatially organized, viable constructs while simultaneously allowing control of environmental factors. This methodology utilizes computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing to produce these specific and complex geometries. Finally, this approach allows for the reproducible production of fabricated constructs optimized by controllable printing parameters. PMID:26436877

  10. Viability of Bioprinted Cellular Constructs Using a Three Dispenser Cartesian Printer.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Sarah Grace; Trusk, Thomas; Richards, Dylan; Jia, Jia; Tan, Yu; Mei, Ying; Fann, Stephen; Markwald, Roger; Yost, Michael

    2015-09-22

    Tissue engineering has centralized its focus on the construction of replacements for non-functional or damaged tissue. The utilization of three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering has generated new methods for the printing of cells and matrix to fabricate biomimetic tissue constructs. The solid freeform fabrication (SFF) method developed for three-dimensional bioprinting uses an additive manufacturing approach by depositing droplets of cells and hydrogels in a layer-by-layer fashion. Bioprinting fabrication is dependent on the specific placement of biological materials into three-dimensional architectures, and the printed constructs should closely mimic the complex organization of cells and extracellular matrices in native tissue. This paper highlights the use of the Palmetto Printer, a Cartesian bioprinter, as well as the process of producing spatially organized, viable constructs while simultaneously allowing control of environmental factors. This methodology utilizes computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing to produce these specific and complex geometries. Finally, this approach allows for the reproducible production of fabricated constructs optimized by controllable printing parameters.

  11. Features of CPB: a Poisson-Boltzmann solver that uses an adaptive Cartesian grid.

    PubMed

    Fenley, Marcia O; Harris, Robert C; Mackoy, Travis; Boschitsch, Alexander H

    2015-02-05

    The capabilities of an adaptive Cartesian grid (ACG)-based Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) solver (CPB) are demonstrated. CPB solves various PB equations with an ACG, built from a hierarchical octree decomposition of the computational domain. This procedure decreases the number of points required, thereby reducing computational demands. Inside the molecule, CPB solves for the reaction-field component (ϕrf ) of the electrostatic potential (ϕ), eliminating the charge-induced singularities in ϕ. CPB can also use a least-squares reconstruction method to improve estimates of ϕ at the molecular surface. All surfaces, which include solvent excluded, Gaussians, and others, are created analytically, eliminating errors associated with triangulated surfaces. These features allow CPB to produce detailed surface maps of ϕ and compute polar solvation and binding free energies for large biomolecular assemblies, such as ribosomes and viruses, with reduced computational demands compared to other Poisson-Boltzmann equation solvers. The reader is referred to http://www.continuum-dynamics.com/solution-mm.html for how to obtain the CPB software.

  12. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

    DOE PAGES

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-03-22

    Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectricmore » structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.« less

  13. Evolution of cartesian genetic programs for development of learning neural architecture.

    PubMed

    Khan, Gul Muhammad; Miller, Julian F; Halliday, David M

    2011-01-01

    Although artificial neural networks have taken their inspiration from natural neurological systems, they have largely ignored the genetic basis of neural functions. Indeed, evolutionary approaches have mainly assumed that neural learning is associated with the adjustment of synaptic weights. The goal of this paper is to use evolutionary approaches to find suitable computational functions that are analogous to natural sub-components of biological neurons and demonstrate that intelligent behavior can be produced as a result of this additional biological plausibility. Our model allows neurons, dendrites, and axon branches to grow or die so that synaptic morphology can change and affect information processing while solving a computational problem. The compartmental model of a neuron consists of a collection of seven chromosomes encoding distinct computational functions inside the neuron. Since the equivalent computational functions of neural components are very complex and in some cases unknown, we have used a form of genetic programming known as Cartesian genetic programming (CGP) to obtain these functions. We start with a small random network of soma, dendrites, and neurites that develops during problem solving by repeatedly executing the seven chromosomal programs that have been found by evolution. We have evaluated the learning potential of this system in the context of a well-known single agent learning problem, known as Wumpus World. We also examined the harder problem of learning in a competitive environment for two antagonistic agents, in which both agents are controlled by independent CGP computational networks (CGPCN). Our results show that the agents exhibit interesting learning capabilities.

  14. Development of a new two-dimensional Cartesian geometry nodal multigroup discrete-ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Pevey, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    The purpose of this work is the development and testing of a new family of methods for calculating the spatial dependence of the neutron density in nuclear systems described in two-dimensional Cartesian geometry. The energy and angular dependence of the neutron density is approximated using the multigroup and discrete ordinates techniques, respectively. The resulting FORTRAN computer code is designed to handle an arbitrary number of spatial, energy, and angle subdivisions. Any degree of scattering anisotropy can be handled by the code for either external source or fission systems. The basic approach is to (1) approximate the spatial variation of the neutron source across each spatial subdivision as an expansion in terms of a user-supplied set of exponential basis functions; (2) solve analytically for the resulting neutron density inside each region; and (3) approximate this density in the basis function space in order to calculate the next iteration flux-dependent source terms. In the general case the calculation is iterative due to neutron sources which depend on the neutron density itself, such as scattering interactions.

  15. Calculation of compressible flows about complex moving geometries using a three-dimensional Cartesian cut cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Causon, D. M.; Ingram, D. M.

    2000-08-01

    A three-dimensional Cartesian cut cell method is described for modelling compressible flows around complex geometries, which may be either static or in relative motion. A background Cartesian mesh is generated and any solid bodies cut out of it. Accurate representation of the geometry is achieved by employing different types of cut cell. A modified finite volume solver is used to deal with boundaries that are moving with respect to the stationary background mesh. The current flow solver is an unsplit MUSCL-Hancock method of the Godunov type, which is implemented in conjunction with a cell-merging technique to maintain numerical stability in the presence of arbitrarily small cut cells and to retain strict conservation at moving boundaries. The method is applied to some steady and unsteady compressible flows involving both static and moving bodies in three dimensions. Copyright

  16. A breakthrough in neuroscience needs a "Nebulous Cartesian System" Oscillations, quantum dynamics and chaos in the brain and vegetative system.

    PubMed

    Başar, Erol; Güntekin, Bahar

    2007-04-01

    The Cartesian System is a fundamental conceptual and analytical framework related and interwoven with the concept and applications of Newtonian Dynamics. In order to analyze quantum processes physicist moved to a Probabilistic Cartesian System in which the causality principle became a probabilistic one. This means the trajectories of particles (obeying quantum rules) can be described only with the concept of cloudy wave packets. The approach to the brain-body-mind problem requires more than the prerequisite of modern physics and quantum dynamics. In the analysis of the brain-body-mind construct we have to include uncertain causalities and consequently multiple uncertain causalities. These multiple causalities originate from (1) nonlinear properties of the vegetative system (e.g. irregularities in biochemical transmitters, cardiac output, turbulences in the vascular system, respiratory apnea, nonlinear oscillatory interactions in peristalsis); (2) nonlinear behavior of the neuronal electricity (e.g. chaotic behavior measured by EEG), (3) genetic modulations, and (4) additional to these physiological entities nonlinear properties of physical processes in the body. The brain shows deterministic chaos with a correlation dimension of approx. D(2)=6, the smooth muscles approx. D(2)=3. According to these facts we propose a hyper-probabilistic approach or a hyper-probabilistic Cartesian System to describe and analyze the processes in the brain-body-mind system. If we add aspects as our sentiments, emotions and creativity to this construct, better said to this already hyper-probabilistic construct, this "New Cartesian System" is more than hyper-probabilistic, it is a nebulous system, we can predict the future only in a nebulous way; however, despite this chain of reasoning we can still provide predictions on brain-body-mind incorporations. We tentatively assume that the processes or mechanisms of the brain-body-mind system can be analyzed and predicted similar to the

  17. Semi-Supervised Learning of Cartesian Factors: A Top-Down Model of the Entorhinal Hippocampal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lőrincz, András; Sárkány, András

    2017-01-01

    The existence of place cells (PCs), grid cells (GCs), border cells (BCs), and head direction cells (HCs) as well as the dependencies between them have been enigmatic. We make an effort to explain their nature by introducing the concept of Cartesian Factors. These factors have specific properties: (i) they assume and complement each other, like direction and position and (ii) they have localized discrete representations with predictive attractors enabling implicit metric-like computations. In our model, HCs make the distributed and local representation of direction. Predictive attractor dynamics on that network forms the Cartesian Factor “direction.” We embed these HCs and idiothetic visual information into a semi-supervised sparse autoencoding comparator structure that compresses its inputs and learns PCs, the distributed local and direction independent (allothetic) representation of the Cartesian Factor of global space. We use a supervised, information compressing predictive algorithm and form direction sensitive (oriented) GCs from the learned PCs by means of an attractor-like algorithm. Since the algorithm can continue the grid structure beyond the region of the PCs, i.e., beyond its learning domain, thus the GCs and the PCs together form our metric-like Cartesian Factors of space. We also stipulate that the same algorithm can produce BCs. Our algorithm applies (a) a bag representation that models the “what system” and (b) magnitude ordered place cell activities that model either the integrate-and-fire mechanism, or theta phase precession, or both. We relate the components of the algorithm to the entorhinal-hippocampal complex and to its working. The algorithm requires both spatial and lifetime sparsification that may gain support from the two-stage memory formation of this complex. PMID:28270783

  18. Semi-Supervised Learning of Cartesian Factors: A Top-Down Model of the Entorhinal Hippocampal Complex.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, András; Sárkány, András

    2017-01-01

    The existence of place cells (PCs), grid cells (GCs), border cells (BCs), and head direction cells (HCs) as well as the dependencies between them have been enigmatic. We make an effort to explain their nature by introducing the concept of Cartesian Factors. These factors have specific properties: (i) they assume and complement each other, like direction and position and (ii) they have localized discrete representations with predictive attractors enabling implicit metric-like computations. In our model, HCs make the distributed and local representation of direction. Predictive attractor dynamics on that network forms the Cartesian Factor "direction." We embed these HCs and idiothetic visual information into a semi-supervised sparse autoencoding comparator structure that compresses its inputs and learns PCs, the distributed local and direction independent (allothetic) representation of the Cartesian Factor of global space. We use a supervised, information compressing predictive algorithm and form direction sensitive (oriented) GCs from the learned PCs by means of an attractor-like algorithm. Since the algorithm can continue the grid structure beyond the region of the PCs, i.e., beyond its learning domain, thus the GCs and the PCs together form our metric-like Cartesian Factors of space. We also stipulate that the same algorithm can produce BCs. Our algorithm applies (a) a bag representation that models the "what system" and (b) magnitude ordered place cell activities that model either the integrate-and-fire mechanism, or theta phase precession, or both. We relate the components of the algorithm to the entorhinal-hippocampal complex and to its working. The algorithm requires both spatial and lifetime sparsification that may gain support from the two-stage memory formation of this complex.

  19. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained within the material. Thus, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made from highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressibility. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical property predictions models are demonstrated.

  20. The verdict geometric quality library.

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, Patrick Michael; Ernst, C.D. (Elemental Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT); Thompson, David C.; Stimpson, C.J.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Verdict is a collection of subroutines for evaluating the geometric qualities of triangles, quadrilaterals, tetrahedra, and hexahedra using a variety of metrics. A metric is a real number assigned to one of these shapes depending on its particular vertex coordinates. These metrics are used to evaluate the input to finite element, finite volume, boundary element, and other types of solvers that approximate the solution to partial differential equations defined over regions of space. The geometric qualities of these regions is usually strongly tied to the accuracy these solvers are able to obtain in their approximations. The subroutines are written in C++ and have a simple C interface. Each metric may be evaluated individually or in combination. When multiple metrics are evaluated at once, they share common calculations to lower the cost of the evaluation.

  1. Geometric Landau-Zener interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gasparinetti, S; Solinas, P; Pekola, J P

    2011-11-11

    We propose a new type of interferometry, based on geometric phases accumulated by a periodically driven two-level system undergoing multiple Landau-Zener transitions. As a specific example, we study its implementation in a superconducting charge pump. We find that interference patterns appear as a function of the pumping frequency and the phase bias, and clearly manifest themselves in the pumped charge. We also show that the effects described should persist in the presence of realistic decoherence.

  2. Geometrical interpretation of optical absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Monzon, J. J.; Barriuso, A. G.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Montesinos-Amilibia, J. M.

    2011-08-15

    We reinterpret the transfer matrix for an absorbing system in very simple geometrical terms. In appropriate variables, the system appears as performing a Lorentz transformation in a (1 + 3)-dimensional space. Using homogeneous coordinates, we map that action on the unit sphere, which is at the realm of the Klein model of hyperbolic geometry. The effects of absorption appear then as a loxodromic transformation, that is, a rhumb line crossing all the meridians at the same angle.

  3. Efficient generation of the cartesian coordinates of truncated icosahedron and related polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, H; Maruyama, Y

    2001-01-01

    Efficient algorithms for deriving the analytical expressions of the rectangular coordinates of the vertices of regular polyhedra and truncated icosahedron inscribed in a cube is described and the results are exposed. Various characteristic quantities of the geometrical structure of truncated icosahedron are obtained. Kaleidoscopes for projecting the truncated icosahedron are discussed.

  4. On the completeness and the linear dependence of the Cartesian multipole series in representing the solution to the Helmholtz equation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangfan; Bolton, J Stuart

    2016-08-01

    The (Cartesian) multipole series, i.e., the series comprising monopole, dipoles, quadrupoles, etc., can be used, as an alternative to the spherical or cylindrical wave series, in representing sound fields in a wide range of problems, such as source radiation, sound scattering, etc. The proofs of the completeness of the spherical and cylindrical wave series in these problems are classical results, and it is also generally agreed that the Cartesian multipole series spans the same space as the spherical waves: a rigorous mathematical proof of that statement has, however, not been presented. In the present work, such a proof of the completeness of the Cartesian multipole series, both in two and three dimensions, is given, and the linear dependence relations among different orders of multipoles are discussed, which then allows one to easily extract a basis from the multipole series. In particular, it is concluded that the multipoles comprising the two highest orders in the series form a basis of the whole series, since the multipoles of all the lower source orders can be expressed as a linear combination of that basis.

  5. Generalized k-space decomposition with chemical shift correction for non-Cartesian water-fat imaging.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Ethan K; Holmes, James H; Yu, Huanzhou; Reeder, Scott B

    2008-05-01

    Chemical-shift artifacts associated with non-Cartesian imaging are more complex to model and less clinically acceptable than the bulk fat shift that occurs with conventional spin-warp Cartesian imaging. A novel k-space based iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) approach is introduced that decomposes multiple species while simultaneously correcting distortion of off-resonant species. The new signal model accounts for the additional phase accumulated by off-resonant spins at each point in the k-space acquisition trajectory. This phase can then be corrected by adjusting the decomposition matrix for each k-space point during the final IDEAL processing step with little increase in reconstruction time. The technique is demonstrated with water-fat decomposition using projection reconstruction (PR)/radial, spiral, and Cartesian spin-warp imaging of phantoms and human subjects, in each case achieving substantial correction of chemical-shift artifacts. Simulations of the point-spread-function (PSF) for off-resonant spins are examined to show the nature of the chemical-shift distortion for each acquisition. Also introduced is an approach to improve the signal model for species which have multiple resonant peaks. Many chemical species, including fat, have multiple resonant peaks, although such species are often approximated as a single peak. The improved multipeak decomposition is demonstrated with water-fat imaging, showing a substantial improvement in water-fat separation.

  6. Calculation of Water Entry Problem for Free-falling Bodies Using a Developed Cartesian Cut Cell Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenhua, Wang; Yanying, Wang

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the development of free surface capturing method on Cartesian cut cell mesh to water entry problem for free-falling bodies with body-fluid interaction. The incompressible Euler equations for a variable density fluid system are presented as governing equations and the free surface is treated as a contact discontinuity by using free surface capturing method. In order to be convenient for dealing with the problem with moving body boundary, the Cartesian cut cell technique is adopted for generating the boundary-fitted mesh around body edge by cutting solid regions out of a background Cartesian mesh. Based on this mesh system, governing equations are discretized by finite volume method, and at each cell edge inviscid flux is evaluated by means of Roe's approximate Riemann solver. Furthermore, for unsteady calculation in time domain, a time accurate solution is achieved by a dual time-stepping technique with artificial compressibility method. For the body-fluid interaction, the projection method of momentum equations and exact Riemann solution are applied in the calculation of fluid pressure on the solid boundary. Finally, the method is validated by test case of water entry for free-falling bodies.

  7. Polar metals by geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. H.; Puggioni, D.; Yuan, Y.; Xie, L.; Zhou, H.; Campbell, N.; Ryan, P. J.; Choi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Patzner, J. R.; Ryu, S.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Irwin, J.; Ma, Y.; Fennie, C. J.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Pan, X. Q.; Gopalan, V.; Rondinelli, J. M.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Gauss’s law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals—it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedra—the structural signatures of perovskites—owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

  8. Polar Metals by Geometric Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. H.; Puggioni, D.; Yuan, Y.; Xie, L.; Zhou, H.; Campbell, N.; Ryan, P. J.; Choi, Y.; Kim, J. -W.; Patzner, J. R.; Ryu, S.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Irwin, J.; Ma, Y.; Fennie, C. J.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Pan, X. Q.; Gopalan, V.; Rondinelli, J. M.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-05-05

    Gauss's law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions(1). Quantum physics supports this view(2), demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals(3)-it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases(4). Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO(3) perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements(5). We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedra-the structural signatures of perovskites-owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported(6-10), non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

  9. Harmonic moment dynamics in Laplacian growth.

    PubMed

    Leshchiner, Alexander; Thrasher, Matthew; Mineev-Weinstein, Mark B; Swinney, Harry L

    2010-01-01

    Harmonic moments are integrals of integer powers of z=x+iy over a domain. Here, the domain is an exterior of a bubble of air growing in an oil layer between two horizontal closely spaced plates. Harmonic moments are a natural basis for such Laplacian growth phenomena because, unlike other representations, these moments linearize the zero surface tension problem [S. Richardson, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 609 (1972)], so that all moments except the lowest one (the area of the bubble) are conserved in time. In our experiments, we directly determine the harmonic moments and show that for nonzero surface tension, all moments (except the lowest one) decay in time rather than exhibiting the divergences of other representations. Further, we derive an expression that relates the derivative of the k(th) harmonic moment M(k) to measurable quantities (surface tension, viscosity, the distance between the plates, and a line integral over the contour encompassing the growing bubble). The laboratory observations are in good accord with the expression we derive for dM(k)/dt , which is proportional to the surface tension; thus in the zero surface tension limit, the moments (above k=0) are all conserved, in accord with Richardson's theory. In addition, from the measurements of the time evolution of the harmonic moments we obtain a value for the surface tension that is within 20% of the accepted value. In conclusion, our analysis and laboratory observations demonstrate that an interface dynamics description in terms of harmonic moments is physically realizable and robust.

  10. The classical model for moment tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, W.; Tape, C.

    2013-12-01

    A seismic moment tensor is a description of an earthquake source, but the description is indirect. The moment tensor describes seismic radiation rather than the actual physical process that initiates the radiation. A moment tensor 'model' then ties the physical process to the moment tensor. The model is not unique, and the physical process is therefore not unique. In the classical moment tensor model (Aki and Richards, 1980), an earthquake arises from slip along a planar fault, but with the slip not necessarily in the plane of the fault. The model specifies the resulting moment tensor in terms of the slip vector, the fault normal vector, and the Lame elastic parameters, assuming isotropy. We review the classical model in the context of the fundamental lune. The lune is closely related to the space of moment tensors, and it provides a setting that is conceptually natural as well as pictorial. In addition to the classical model, we consider a crack plus double couple model (CDC model) in which a moment tensor is regarded as the sum of a crack tensor and a double couple. A compilation of full moment tensors from the literature reveals large deviations in Poisson's ratio as implied by the classical model. Either the classical model is inadequate or the published full moment tensors have very large uncertainties. We question the common interpretation of the isotropic component as a volume change in the source region.

  11. Magnetic Moments of Excited Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metag, Volker

    2017-01-01

    In project A.3, the reaction γ p → π0γ'p has been studied using the TAPS photon spectrometer in the energy range √s= 1221-1331 MeV. Energy tagged photon beams have been produced with the Glasgow tagging spectrometer from electron beams provided by the MAMI-B accelerator. Angle and energy differential cross sections have been measured and compared to theoretical calculations. This comparison allows the magnetic moment of the Δ+ isobar to be extracted for the first time to μΔ+ = [2.7+1.3-1.0(stat)±1.5(syst)±3(theo)] μN. In an extension of the A3 project to the meson sector, the time-like transition form factor of the η meson has been measured with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detector system at MAMI-C.

  12. The human moment at work.

    PubMed

    Hallowell, E M

    1999-01-01

    In the last decade or so, technological changes--mainly voice mail and e-mail--have made a lot of face-to-face interaction unnecessary. Face-to-face contact has also fallen victim to "virtuality"--many people work at home or are otherwise off-site. Indeed, most people today can't imagine life without such technology and the freedom it grants. But Edward Hallowell, a noted psychiatrist who has been treating patients with anxiety disorders--many of them business executives--for more than 20 years, warns that we are in danger of losing what he calls the human moment: an authentic psychological encounter that can happen only when two people share the same physical space. And, he believes, we may be about to discover the destructive power of its absence. The author relates stories of business-people who have dealt firsthand with the misunderstandings caused by an overreliance on technology. An e-mail message is misconstrued. Someone forwards a voice-mail message to the wrong people. A person takes offense because he was not included on a certain circulation list. Was it an accident? Often the consequences of such misunderstandings, taken individually, are minor. Over time, however, they take a larger toll--both on individuals and on the organizations they work for. The problem, however, is not insoluble. The author cites examples of people who have worked successfully to restore face-to-face contact in their organizations. The bottom line is that the strategic use of the human moment adds color to our lives and helps us build confidence and trust at work. We ignore it at our peril.

  13. Semiclassical initial value representation treatment of a hydrogen bonded complex of rigid water molecules from a single trajectory in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2007-10-14

    A semiclassical initial value representation approach for molecular systems in Cartesian coordinates is combined with a recently proposed time averaging technique [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 7174 (2003)]. It is shown that a single trajectory can yield the zero-point energy of the water dimer with good accuracy for the model chosen when compared to fully constrained Cartesian semiclassical calculations. The convergence with respect to the number of averaging time origins is discussed.

  14. Geometric multigrid for an implicit-time immersed boundary method

    DOE PAGES

    Guy, Robert D.; Philip, Bobby; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2014-10-12

    The immersed boundary (IB) method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses Lagrangian variables to describe the deformations and resulting forces of the structure and Eulerian variables to describe the motion and forces of the fluid. Explicit time stepping schemes for the IB method require solvers only for Eulerian equations, for which fast Cartesian grid solution methods are available. Such methods are relatively straightforward to develop and are widely used in practice but often require very small time steps to maintain stability. Implicit-time IB methods permit the stable use of large time steps, but efficient implementations of such methodsmore » require significantly more complex solvers that effectively treat both Lagrangian and Eulerian variables simultaneously. Moreover, several different approaches to solving the coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian equations have been proposed, but a complete understanding of this problem is still emerging. This paper presents a geometric multigrid method for an implicit-time discretization of the IB equations. This multigrid scheme uses a generalization of box relaxation that is shown to handle problems in which the physical stiffness of the structure is very large. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the algorithms described herein. Finally, these tests show that using multigrid as a preconditioner for a Krylov method yields improvements in both robustness and efficiency as compared to using multigrid as a solver. They also demonstrate that with a time step 100–1000 times larger than that permitted by an explicit IB method, the multigrid-preconditioned implicit IB method is approximately 50–200 times more efficient than the explicit method.« less

  15. A geometric multigrid Poisson solver for domains containing solid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botto, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    A Cartesian grid method for the fast solution of the Poisson equation in three-dimensional domains with embedded solid inclusions is presented and its performance analyzed. The efficiency of the method, which assume Neumann conditions at the immersed boundaries, is comparable to that of a multigrid method for regular domains. The method is light in terms of memory usage, and easily adaptable to parallel architectures. Tests with random and ordered arrays of solid inclusions, including spheres and ellipsoids, demonstrate smooth convergence of the residual for small separation between the inclusion surfaces. This feature is important, for instance, in simulations of nearly-touching finite-size particles. The implementation of the method, “MG-Inc”, is available online. Catalogue identifier: AEOE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19068 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215118 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (fully tested with GNU GCC compiler). Computer: Any machine supporting standard C++ compiler. Operating system: Any OS supporting standard C++ compiler. RAM: About 150MB for 1283 resolution Classification: 4.3. Nature of problem: Poisson equation in domains containing inclusions; Neumann boundary conditions at immersed boundaries. Solution method: Geometric multigrid with finite-volume discretization. Restrictions: Stair-case representation of the immersed boundaries. Running time: Typically a fraction of a minute for 1283 resolution.

  16. Geometric multigrid for an implicit-time immersed boundary method

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Robert D.; Philip, Bobby; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2014-10-12

    The immersed boundary (IB) method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses Lagrangian variables to describe the deformations and resulting forces of the structure and Eulerian variables to describe the motion and forces of the fluid. Explicit time stepping schemes for the IB method require solvers only for Eulerian equations, for which fast Cartesian grid solution methods are available. Such methods are relatively straightforward to develop and are widely used in practice but often require very small time steps to maintain stability. Implicit-time IB methods permit the stable use of large time steps, but efficient implementations of such methods require significantly more complex solvers that effectively treat both Lagrangian and Eulerian variables simultaneously. Moreover, several different approaches to solving the coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian equations have been proposed, but a complete understanding of this problem is still emerging. This paper presents a geometric multigrid method for an implicit-time discretization of the IB equations. This multigrid scheme uses a generalization of box relaxation that is shown to handle problems in which the physical stiffness of the structure is very large. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the algorithms described herein. Finally, these tests show that using multigrid as a preconditioner for a Krylov method yields improvements in both robustness and efficiency as compared to using multigrid as a solver. They also demonstrate that with a time step 100–1000 times larger than that permitted by an explicit IB method, the multigrid-preconditioned implicit IB method is approximately 50–200 times more efficient than the explicit method.

  17. Development of a Geometric Spatial Visualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganesh, Bibi; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Sherrod, Sonya

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents the development of the Geometric Spatial Assessment. We detail the development of this instrument which was designed to identify middle school students' strategies and advancement in understanding of four geometric concept domains (geometric spatial visualization, spatial projection, cardinal directions, and periodic patterns)…

  18. A Fast Apparent-Horizon Finder for 3-Dimensional Cartesian Grids in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornburg, Jonathan

    2003-10-01

    In 3 + 1 numerical simulations of dynamic black hole spacetimes, it's useful to be able to find the apparent horizon(s) (AH) in each slice of a time evolution. A number of AH finders are available, but they often take many minutes to run, so they're too slow to be practically usable at each time step. Here I present a new AH finder, AHFINDERDIRECT, which is very fast and accurate, typically taking only a few seconds to find an AH to ~ 10-5m accuracy on a GHz-class processor. I assume that an AH to be searched for is a Strahlkörper (``star-shaped region'') with respect to some local origin, and so parameterize the AH shape by r = h(angle) for some single-valued function h: S2 --> R+. The AH equation then becomes a nonlinear elliptic PDE in h on S2, whose coefficients are algebraic functions of gij, Kij, and the Cartesian-coordinate spatial derivatives of gij. I discretize S2 using 6 angular patches (one each in the neighborhood of the +/-x, +/-y, and +/-z axes) to avoid coordinate singularities, and finite difference the AH equation in the angular coordinates using 4th order finite differencing. I solve the resulting system of nonlinear algebraic equations (for h at the angular grid points) by Newton's method, using a ``symbolic differentiation'' technique to compute the Jacobian matrix. AHFINDERDIRECT is implemented as a thorn in the CACTUS computational toolkit, and will be made freely available starting in fall 2003.

  19. Newton's "de Gravitatione" Argument: Cartesian Relationalist Dynamics and the Structure of Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, Edward Steven

    What properties must space, or the modern notion of space-time, possess to allow the development of a coherent description of the natural world? My dissertation explores various aspects of this problem, both as they developed historically in a famous dispute between Descartes and Newton, and as they appear in more modern approaches to mechanics. In an early paper, De gravitatione, Newton presented an argument against Descartes' theory of space and time that has generated much controversy. Descartes had postulated a theory that regards space and time as formed merely from the relations among material bodies; yet, on the other hand, he had appealed to a particle's velocity in his theory of motion. Newton objected, claiming that, in order to define velocity or motion coherently, the natural world must possess a means of identifying the same spatial locations over time (i.e., the places passed by an object must remain fixed in time if the notion of a "change in distance" is to be rendered coherent). However, if space is viewed as a special form of entity with an independent existence, as Newton believed, then the enduring spatial locations required for determining "velocity" make sense. Although philosophers for many years were receptive to Descartes' "relationalist" philosophy, modern research has tended to favor Newton's side of the dispute, for most physical theories rely upon notions of "velocity" or "acceleration" that require an independent space-time backdrop. Nevertheless, not all coherent theories meet Newton's demands--the modern theory of machines (i.e., connected gears) does not; thus, I explore the possibility that Newton's argument could be answered in this vein. My thesis traces through these concerns in great detail, concluding that, despite the appeal of Descartes' rejection of space as an independent entity, Cartesian science is unable to completely resolve the dilemma posed by Newton's argument.

  20. The effect of object-centered instructions in Cartesian and polar coordinates on saccade vector.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Jay A; Mieses, Alexa M; Konnova, Kira; Shiu, David

    2017-03-01

    Express saccades (ES) are the most reflexive saccadic eye movements, with very short reaction times of 70-110 ms. It is likely that ES have the shortest saccade reaction times (SRTs) possible given the known physiological and anatomical delays present in sensory and motor systems. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that a vector displacement of ES to spatially extended stimuli can be influenced by spatial cognition. Edelman, Kristjansson, and Nakayama (2007) found that when two horizontally separated visual stimuli appear at a random location, the spatial vector, but not the reaction time, of human ES is strongly influenced by an instruction to make a saccade to one side (either left or right) of a visual stimulus array. Presently, we attempt to extend these findings of cognitive effects on saccades in three ways: (a) determining whether ES could be affected by other types of spatial instructions: vertical, polar amplitude, and polar direction; (b) determining whether these spatial effects increased with practice; and (c) determining how these effects depended on SRTs. The results demonstrate that both types of Cartesian as well as polar amplitude instructions strongly affect ES vector, but only modestly affect SRTs. Polar direction instructions had sizable effects only on nonreflexive saccades where the visual stimuli could be viewed for several hundred milliseconds prior to saccade execution. Short- (trial order within a block) and long-term (experience across several sessions) practice had little effect, though the effect of instruction increased with SRT. Such findings suggest a generalized, innate ability of cognition to affect the most reflexive saccadic eye movements.

  1. The effect of object-centered instructions in Cartesian and polar coordinates on saccade vector

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Jay A.; Mieses, Alexa M.; Konnova, Kira; Shiu, David

    2017-01-01

    Express saccades (ES) are the most reflexive saccadic eye movements, with very short reaction times of 70–110 ms. It is likely that ES have the shortest saccade reaction times (SRTs) possible given the known physiological and anatomical delays present in sensory and motor systems. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that a vector displacement of ES to spatially extended stimuli can be influenced by spatial cognition. Edelman, Kristjansson, and Nakayama (2007) found that when two horizontally separated visual stimuli appear at a random location, the spatial vector, but not the reaction time, of human ES is strongly influenced by an instruction to make a saccade to one side (either left or right) of a visual stimulus array. Presently, we attempt to extend these findings of cognitive effects on saccades in three ways: (a) determining whether ES could be affected by other types of spatial instructions: vertical, polar amplitude, and polar direction; (b) determining whether these spatial effects increased with practice; and (c) determining how these effects depended on SRTs. The results demonstrate that both types of Cartesian as well as polar amplitude instructions strongly affect ES vector, but only modestly affect SRTs. Polar direction instructions had sizable effects only on nonreflexive saccades where the visual stimuli could be viewed for several hundred milliseconds prior to saccade execution. Short- (trial order within a block) and long-term (experience across several sessions) practice had little effect, though the effect of instruction increased with SRT. Such findings suggest a generalized, innate ability of cognition to affect the most reflexive saccadic eye movements. PMID:28265650

  2. Pseudo‐projection–driven, self‐gated cardiac cine imaging using cartesian golden step phase encoding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liheng; Derbyshire, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a novel two‐dimensional self‐gated imaging technique for free‐breathing cardiac cine MRI that is free of motion‐detection overhead and requires minimal planning for motion tracking. Methods Motion along the readout direction was extracted solely from normal Cartesian imaging readouts near ky = 0. During imaging, the readouts below a certain |ky| threshold were scaled in magnitude and filtered in time to form “pseudo‐projections,” enabling projection‐based motion tracking along readout without frequently acquiring the central phase encode. A discrete golden step phase encode scheme allowed the |ky| threshold to be freely set after the scan while maintaining uniform motion sampling. Results The pseudo‐projections stream displayed sufficient spatiotemporal resolution for both cardiac and respiratory tracking, allowing retrospective reconstruction of free‐breathing non‐electrocardiogram (ECG) cines. The technique was tested on healthy subjects, and the resultant image quality, measured by blood‐myocardium boundary sharpness, myocardial mass, and single‐slice ejection fraction was found to be comparable to standard breath‐hold ECG‐gated cines. Conclusion The use of pseudo‐projections for motion tracking was found feasible for cardiorespiratory self‐gated imaging. Despite some sensitivity to flow and eddy currents, the simplicity of acquisition makes the proposed technique a valuable tool for self‐gated cardiac imaging. Magn Reson Med 76:417–429, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID

  3. On the diffuse interface method using a dual-resolution Cartesian grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang; Yuan, Cheng-jun

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the applicability and performance of diffuse interface methods on a dual-resolution grid in solving two-phase flows. In the diffuse interface methods, the interface thickness represents a cut-off length scale in resolving the interfacial dynamics, and it was found that an apparent loss of mass occurs when the interface thickness is comparable to the length scale of flows [24]. From the accuracy and mass conservation point of view, it is desirable to have a thin interface in simulations. We propose to use a dual-resolution Cartesian grid, on which a finer resolution is applied to the volume fraction C than that for the velocity and pressure fields. Because the computation of C field is rather inexpensive compared to that required by velocity and pressure fields, dual-resolution grids can significantly increase the resolution of the interface with only a slight increase of computational cost, as compared to the single-resolution grid. The solution couplings between the fine grid for C and the coarse grid (for velocity and pressure) are delicately designed, to make sure that the interpolated velocity is divergence-free at a discrete level and that the mass and surface tension force are conserved. A variety of numerical tests have been performed to validate the method and check its performance. The dual-resolution grid appears to save nearly 70% of the computational time in two-dimensional simulations and 80% in three-dimensional simulations, and produces nearly the same results as the single-resolution grid. Quantitative comparisons are made with previous studies, including Rayleigh Taylor instability, steadily rising bubble, and partial coalescence of a drop into a pool, and good agreement has been achieved. Finally, results are presented for the deformation and breakup of three-dimensional drops in simple shear flows.

  4. Muonic hydrogen and the third Zemach moment

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.; Sick, Ingo

    2005-10-15

    We determine the third Zemach moment of hydrogen ({sub (2)}) using only the world data on elastic electron-proton scattering. This moment dominates the O(Z{alpha}){sup 5} hadronic correction to the Lamb shift in muonic atoms. The resulting moment, {sub (2)}=2.71(13) fm{sup 3}, is larger than some previously inferred values based on simple models. The contribution of that moment to the muonic hydrogen 2S level is -0.0247(12) meV.

  5. Gross shell structure of moments of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Deleplanque, M.A.; Frauendorf, S.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, A.

    2002-07-01

    Average yrast moments of inertia at high spins, where the pairing correlations are expected to be largely absent, were found to deviate from the rigid-body values. This indicates that shell effects contribute to the moment of inertia. We discuss the gross dependence of moments of inertia and shell energies on the neutron number in terms of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory. We show that the ground-state shell energies, nuclear deformations and deviations from rigid-body moments of inertia are all due to the same periodic orbits.

  6. Combined invariants to similarity transformation and to blur using orthogonal Zernike moments

    PubMed Central

    Beijing, Chen; Shu, Huazhong; Zhang, Hui; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    The derivation of moment invariants has been extensively investigated in the past decades. In this paper, we construct a set of invariants derived from Zernike moments which is simultaneously invariant to similarity transformation and to convolution with circularly symmetric point spread function (PSF). Two main contributions are provided: the theoretical framework for deriving the Zernike moments of a blurred image and the way to construct the combined geometric-blur invariants. The performance of the proposed descriptors is evaluated with various PSFs and similarity transformations. The comparison of the proposed method with the existing ones is also provided in terms of pattern recognition accuracy, template matching and robustness to noise. Experimental results show that the proposed descriptors perform on the overall better. PMID:20679028

  7. Geometrically Induced Interactions and Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    In order to evaluate the proper boundary conditions in spin dynamics eventually leading to the emergence of natural and artificial solitons providing for strong interactions and potentials with monopole charges, the paper outlines a new concept referring to a curvature-invariant formalism, where superintegrability is given by a special isometric condition. Instead of referring to the spin operators and Casimir/Euler invariants as the generator of rotations, a curvature-invariant description is introduced utilizing a double Gudermann mapping function (generator of sine Gordon solitons and Mercator projection) cross-relating two angular variables, where geometric phases and rotations arise between surfaces of different curvature. Applying this stereographic projection to a superintegrable Hamiltonian can directly map linear oscillators to Kepler/Coulomb potentials and/or monopoles with Pöschl-Teller potentials and vice versa. In this sense a large scale Kepler/Coulomb (gravitational, electro-magnetic) wave dynamics with a hyperbolic metric could be mapped as a geodesic vertex flow to a local oscillator singularity (Dirac monopole) with spherical metrics and vice versa. Attracting fixed points and dynamic constraints are given by special isometries with magic precession angles. The nonlinear angular encoding directly provides for a Shannon mutual information entropy measure of the geodesic phase space flow. The emerging monopole patterns show relations to spiral Fresnel holography and Berry/Aharonov-Bohm geometric phases subject to bifurcation instabilities and singularities from phase ambiguities due to a local (entropy) overload. Neutral solitons and virtual patterns emerging and mediating in the overlap region between charged or twisted holographic patterns are visualized and directly assigned to the Berry geometric phase revealing the role of photons, neutrons, and neutrinos binding repulsive charges in Coulomb, strong and weak interaction.

  8. Geometric Theory of Hinged Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, M. D.

    1995-02-01

    This article contains results connected with engineering mechanics. Among them are: a theorem "on the nonuniqueness of a statically determinable truss", a classification of hinged mechanisms and their schemes, and an example of a hinged mechanism with variable number of degrees of freedom. The study of general geometric properties is based on the concept, introduced here, of an abstract hinged device in Rd. This concept formalizes a well-known approach in the theory of mechanisms. The formalization gives rise to a number of interesting mathematical questions.

  9. Geometric methods in quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun

    Recent advances in the physical sciences and engineering have created great hopes for new computational paradigms and substrates. One such new approach is the quantum computer, which holds the promise of enhanced computational power. Analogous to the way a classical computer is built from electrical circuits containing wires and logic gates, a quantum computer is built from quantum circuits containing quantum wires and elementary quantum gates to transport and manipulate quantum information. Therefore, design of quantum gates and quantum circuits is a prerequisite for any real application of quantum computation. In this dissertation we apply geometric control methods from differential geometry and Lie group representation theory to analyze the properties of quantum gates and to design optimal quantum circuits. Using the Cartan decomposition and the Weyl group, we show that the geometric structure of nonlocal two-qubit gates is a 3-Torus. After further reducing the symmetry, the geometric representation of nonlocal gates is seen to be conveniently visualized as a tetrahedron. Each point in this tetrahedron except on the base corresponds to a different equivalent class of nonlocal gates. This geometric representation is one of the cornerstones for the discussion on quantum computation in this dissertation. We investigate the properties of those two-qubit operations that can generate maximal entanglement. It is an astonishing finding that if we randomly choose a two-qubit operation, the probability that we obtain a perfect entangler is exactly one half. We prove that given a two-body interaction Hamiltonian, it is always possible to explicitly construct a quantum circuit for exact simulation of any arbitrary nonlocal two-qubit gate by turning on the two-body interaction for at most three times, together with at most four local gates. We also provide an analytic approach to construct a universal quantum circuit from any entangling gate supplemented with local gates

  10. Geometric reasoning and spatial understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Binford, T.O.

    1982-01-01

    Progress has been made on extensions to ACRONYM which include: representation and reasoning with time, events, and sequences; collaboration with MIT to develop geometric learning: representation of function, and reasoning between structure and function. A new ribbon finder for ACRONYM is under construction. Work in figure/ground separation is underway as a basis for the ribbon finder. Preliminary results are shown in grouping operations to determine regularities in images. A stereo system has been completed which combines edge-based stereo matching with surface interpolation utilizing correspondence of gray levels. Design of a new stereo vision system is underway.

  11. Geometric morphology of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlei, Bernd R.; Prasad, Lakshman; Skourikhine, Alexei N.

    2000-10-01

    We present a new method to transform the spectral pixel information of a micrograph into an affine geometric description, which allows us to analyze the morphology of granular materials. We use spectral and pulse-coupled neural network based segmentation techniques to generate blobs, and a newly developed algorithm to extract dilated contours. A constrained Delaunay tessellation of the contour points results in a triangular mesh. This mesh is the basic ingredient of the Chodal Axis Transform, which provides a morphological decomposition of shapes. Such decomposition allows for grain separation and the efficient computation of the statistical features of granular materials.

  12. Graphene with geometrically induced vorticity.

    PubMed

    Pachos, Jiannis K; Stone, Michael; Temme, Kristan

    2008-04-18

    At half filling, the electronic structure of graphene can be modeled by a pair of free two-dimensional Dirac fermions. We explicitly demonstrate that in the presence of a geometrically induced gauge field an everywhere-real Kekulé modulation of the hopping matrix elements can correspond to a nonreal Higgs field with nontrivial vorticity. This provides a natural setting for fractionally charged vortices with localized zero modes. For fullerenelike molecules we employ the index theorem to demonstrate the existence of six low-lying states that do not depend strongly on the Kekulé-induced mass gap.

  13. Evolution: geometrical and dynamical aspects.

    PubMed

    Freguglia, Paolo; Bazzani, Armando

    2003-01-01

    We develop a possible axiomatic approach to the evolution theory that has been previously discussed in Freguglia [2002]. The axioms synthesize the fundamental ideas of evolution theory and allow a geometrical and dynamical interpretation of the generation law. Using the axioms we derive a simple reaction-diffusion model which introduces the species as self-organized stationary distribution of a finite population and simulates the evolution of a phenotypic character under the effect of an external perturbing action. The dynamical properties of the model are briefly presented using numerical simulations.

  14. Moving walls and geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Marmo, Giuseppe; Samuel, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We unveil the existence of a non-trivial Berry phase associated to the dynamics of a quantum particle in a one dimensional box with moving walls. It is shown that a suitable choice of boundary conditions has to be made in order to preserve unitarity. For these boundary conditions we compute explicitly the geometric phase two-form on the parameter space. The unboundedness of the Hamiltonian describing the system leads to a natural prescription of renormalization for divergent contributions arising from the boundary.

  15. Science, art and geometrical imagination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    2011-06-01

    From the geocentric, closed world model of Antiquity to the wraparound universe models of relativistic cosmology, the parallel history of space representations in science and art illustrates the fundamental rôle of geometric imagination in innovative findings. Through the analysis of works of various artists and scientists like Plato, Dürer, Kepler, Escher, Grisey or the author, it is shown how the process of creation in science and in the arts rests on aesthetical principles such as symmetry, regular polyhedra, laws of harmonic proportion, tessellations, group theory, etc., as well as on beauty, conciseness and an emotional approach of the world.

  16. SQCD Vacua and Geometrical Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Wetenhall, Ben

    2008-11-23

    We consider the geometrical engineering constructions for the N = 1 SQCD vacua. After one T-duality, these geometries with wrapped D5 branes become N = 1 brane configurations with NS-branes and D4-branes. After performing a flop, the geometries contain branes, antibranes and branes wrapped on non-holomorphic cycles. The various tachyon condensations between pairs of wrapped D5 branes and anti-D5 branes together with deformations of the cycles give rise to a variety of supersymmetric and metastable non-supersymmetric vacua.

  17. NPP VIIRS Geometric Performance Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Wolfe, Robert E.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on-board the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite is scheduled for launch in October, 2011. It is to provide satellite measured radiance/reflectance data for both weather and climate applications. Along with radiometric calibration, geometric characterization and calibration of Sensor Data Records (SDRs) are crucial to the VIIRS Environmental Data Record (EDR) algorithms and products which are used in numerical weather prediction (NWP). The instrument geometric performance includes: 1) sensor (detector) spatial response, parameterized by the dynamic field of view (DFOV) in the scan direction and instantaneous FOV (IFOV) in the track direction, modulation transfer function (MTF) for the 17 moderate resolution bands (M-bands), and horizontal spatial resolution (HSR) for the five imagery bands (I-bands); 2) matrices of band-to-band co-registration (BBR) from the corresponding detectors in all band pairs; and 3) pointing knowledge and stability characteristics that includes scan plane tilt, scan rate and scan start position variations, and thermally induced variations in pointing with respect to orbital position. They have been calibrated and characterized through ground testing under ambient and thermal vacuum conditions, numerical modeling and analysis. This paper summarizes the results, which are in general compliance with specifications, along with anomaly investigations, and describes paths forward for characterizing on-orbit BBR and spatial response, and for improving instrument on-orbit performance in pointing and geolocation.

  18. Geometric effects in tomographic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, F.L.; Azevedo, S.G.; Martz, H.E. Jr.; Roberson, G.P.; Schneberk, D.J.; Skeate, M.F.

    1990-01-08

    In x-ray and ion-beam computerized tomography, there are a number of reconstruction effects, manifested as artifacts, that can be attributed to the geometry of the experimental setup and of the object being scanned. In this work, we will examine four geometric effects that are common to first-and third-generation (parallel beam, 180 degree) computerized tomography (CT) scanners and suggest solutions for each problem. The geometric effects focused on in this paper are: X-pattern'' artifacts (believed to be caused by several errors), edge-generated ringing artifacts (due to improper choice of the reconstruction filter and cutoff frequency), circular-ring artifacts (caused by employing uncalibrated detectors), and tuning-fork artifacts (generated by an incorrectly specified center-of-rotation). Examples of four effects are presented. The X-pattern and edge-generated ringing artifacts are presented with actual experimental data introducing the artifact. given the source of the artifact, we present simulated data designed to replicate the artifact. Finally, we suggest ways to reduce or completely remove these artifacts. The circular-ring and tuning-fork artifacts are introduced with actual experimental data as well, while digital signal processing solutions are employed to remove the artifacts from the data. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Image coding with geometric wavelets.

    PubMed

    Alani, Dror; Averbuch, Amir; Dekel, Shai

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new and efficient method for low bit-rate image coding which is based on recent development in the theory of multivariate nonlinear piecewise polynomial approximation. It combines a binary space partition scheme with geometric wavelet (GW) tree approximation so as to efficiently capture curve singularities and provide a sparse representation of the image. The GW method successfully competes with state-of-the-art wavelet methods such as the EZW, SPIHT, and EBCOT algorithms. We report a gain of about 0.4 dB over the SPIHT and EBCOT algorithms at the bit-rate 0.0625 bits-per-pixels (bpp). It also outperforms other recent methods that are based on "sparse geometric representation." For example, we report a gain of 0.27 dB over the Bandelets algorithm at 0.1 bpp. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, its time complexity can be significantely reduced by collecting a "global" GW n-term approximation to the image from a collection of GW trees, each constructed separately over tiles of the image.

  20. How to Introduce the Magnetic Dipole Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezerra, M.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Cougo-Pinto, M. V.; Farina, C.

    2012-01-01

    We show how the concept of the magnetic dipole moment can be introduced in the same way as the concept of the electric dipole moment in introductory courses on electromagnetism. Considering a localized steady current distribution, we make a Taylor expansion directly in the Biot-Savart law to obtain, explicitly, the dominant contribution of the…

  1. The classical model for moment tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, Walter; Tape, Carl

    2013-12-01

    A seismic moment tensor is a description of an earthquake source, but the description is indirect. The moment tensor describes seismic radiation rather than the actual physical process that initiates the radiation. A moment tensor `model' then ties the physical process to the moment tensor. The model is not unique, and the physical process is therefore not unique. In the classical moment tensor model, an earthquake arises from slip along a planar fault, but with the slip not necessarily in the plane of the fault. The model specifies the resulting moment tensor in terms of the slip vector, the fault normal vector and the Lamé elastic parameters, assuming isotropy. We review the classical model in the context of the fundamental lune. The lune is closely related to the space of moment tensors, and it provides a setting that is conceptually natural as well as pictorial. In addition to the classical model, we consider a crack plus double-couple model (CDC model) in which a moment tensor is regarded as the sum of a crack tensor and a double couple.

  2. Balancing Beams--For a Few Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    2008-01-01

    A 2 m long wooden beam provides an ideal demonstration tool for exploring moments. A class set is cheap and can be used at introductory and advanced levels. This article explores how such beams can be used to support learning about moments, equilibrium, vectors, and simultaneous equations. (Contains 7 figures.)

  3. Teachable Moment: Google Earth Takes Us There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ann; Davinroy, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the current educational climate, where clearly articulated learning objectives are required, it is clear that the spontaneous teachable moment still has its place. Authors Ann Williams and Thomas Davinroy think that instructors from almost any discipline can employ Google Earth as a tool to take advantage of teachable moments through the…

  4. Moments from Cumulants and Vice Versa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withers, Christopher S.; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2009-01-01

    Moments and cumulants are expressed in terms of each other using Bell polynomials. Inbuilt routines for the latter make these expressions amenable to use by algebraic manipulation programs. One of the four formulas given is an explicit version of Kendall's use of Faa di Bruno's chain rule to express cumulants in terms of moments.

  5. Joint moments of proper delay times

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Argüello, Angel M.; Martínez-Mares, Moisés; García, Julio C.

    2014-08-15

    We calculate negative moments of the N-dimensional Laguerre distribution for the orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic symmetries. These moments correspond to those of the proper delay times, which are needed to determine the statistical fluctuations of several transport properties through classically chaotic cavities, like quantum dots and microwave cavities with ideal coupling.

  6. Innovative moments and change in narrative therapy.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marlene; Santos, Anita; Gonçalves, Miguel; Martins, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Narrative therapy suggests that change happens by paying close attention in therapy to "unique outcomes," which are narrative details outside the main story (White & Epston, 1990). In this exploratory study, unique outcomes were analyzed in five good-outcome and five poor-outcome psychotherapy cases using the Innovative Moments Coding System (Gonçalves, Matos, & Santos, 2008). Across 127 sessions, innovative moments were coded in terms of salience and type. In accordance with the theory, results suggest that innovative moments are important to therapeutic change. Poor- and good-outcome groups have a global difference in the salience of the innovative moments. In addition, results suggest that two particular types of innovative moments are needed in narrative therapy for therapeutic change to take place: re-conceptualization and new experiences. Implications for future research using this model of analysis are discussed.

  7. Third Zemach moment of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Cloeet, Ian C.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2011-01-15

    Modern electron scattering experiments have determined the proton electric form factor G{sub Ep}(Q{sup 2}) to high precision. We utilize this data, represented by the different empirical form-factor parametrizations, to compute the third Zemach moment of the proton charge distribution. We find that existing data rule out a value of the third Zemach moment large enough to explain the current puzzle with the proton charge radius, determined from the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. This is in contrast to the recent paper of De Rujula. We also demonstrate that the size of the third Zemach moment is largely governed by the fourth moment of the conventional charge distributions , which enables us to obtain a rigorous upper bound on the magnitude of the third Zemach moment of the proton.

  8. Current flow in a 3-terminal thin film contact with dissimilar materials and general geometric aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Hung, Derek M. H.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2013-02-01

    The current flow pattern, together with the contact resistance, is calculated analytically in a Cartesian 3-terminal thin film contact with dissimilar materials. The resistivities and the geometric dimensions in the individual contact members, as well as the terminal voltages, may assume arbitrary values. We show that the current flow patterns and the contact resistance may be conveniently decomposed into the even and odd solution. The even solution gives exclusively and totally the current flowing from the source to the gate. The odd solution gives exclusively and totally the current flowing from the source to the drain. Current crowding at the edges, and current partition in different regions are displayed. The analytic solutions are validated using a simulation code. The bounds on the variation of the contact resistance are given. This paper may be considered as the generalization of the transmission line model and the Kennedy-Murley model that were used extensively in the characterization of thin-film devices. For completeness, we include the general results for the cylindrical geometry, which are qualitatively similar to the even solution of the Cartesian geometry.

  9. Electronic, magnetic, and geometric structure of metallo-carbohedrenes

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, B.V.; Khanna, S.N.; Jena, P. )

    1992-12-04

    The energetics and the electronic, magnetic, and geometric structure of the metallocarbohedrene Ti[sub 8]C[sub 12] have been calculated self-consistently in the density functional formulation. The structure of Ti[sub 8]C[sub 12] is a distorted dodecahedron with a binding energy of 6.1 electron volts per atom. The unusual stability is derived from covalent-like bonding between carbon atoms and between titanium and carbon atoms with no appreciable interaction between titanium atoms. The density of states at the Fermi energy is high and is derived from a strong hybridization between titanium 3d and carbon sp electrons. Titanium sites carry a small magnetic moment of 0.35 Bohr magneton per atom and the cluster is only weakly magnetic. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The elastic theory of shells using geometric algebra

    PubMed Central

    Lasenby, J.; Agarwal, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel derivation of the elastic theory of shells. We use the language of geometric algebra, which allows us to express the fundamental laws in component-free form, thus aiding physical interpretation. It also provides the tools to express equations in an arbitrary coordinate system, which enhances their usefulness. The role of moments and angular velocity, and the apparent use by previous authors of an unphysical angular velocity, has been clarified through the use of a bivector representation. In the linearized theory, clarification of previous coordinate conventions which have been the cause of confusion is provided, and the introduction of prior strain into the linearized theory of shells is made possible.

  11. String method for calculation of minimum free-energy paths in Cartesian space in freely-tumbling systems.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Davide; Faraldo-Gómez, José D

    2013-09-10

    The string method is a molecular-simulation technique that aims to calculate the minimum free-energy path of a chemical reaction or conformational transition, in the space of a pre-defined set of reaction coordinates that is typically highly dimensional. Any descriptor may be used as a reaction coordinate, but arguably the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms involved are the most unprejudiced and intuitive choice. Cartesian coordinates, however, present a non-trivial problem, in that they are not invariant to rigid-body molecular rotations and translations, which ideally ought to be unrestricted in the simulations. To overcome this difficulty, we reformulate the framework of the string method to integrate an on-the-fly structural-alignment algorithm. This approach, referred to as SOMA (String method with Optimal Molecular Alignment), enables the use of Cartesian reaction coordinates in freely tumbling molecular systems. In addition, this scheme permits the dissection of the free-energy change along the most probable path into individual atomic contributions, thus revealing the dominant mechanism of the simulated process. This detailed analysis also provides a physically-meaningful criterion to coarse-grain the representation of the path. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method we analyze the isomerization of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and the chair-to-inverted-chair transition of β-D mannose in explicit water. Notwithstanding the simplicity of these systems, the SOMA approach reveals novel insights into the atomic mechanism of these isomerizations. In both cases, we find that the dynamics and the energetics of these processes are controlled by interactions involving only a handful of atoms in each molecule. Consistent with this result, we show that a coarse-grained SOMA calculation defined in terms of these subsets of atoms yields nearidentical minimum free-energy paths and committor distributions to those obtained via a highly-dimensional string.

  12. String method for calculation of minimum free-energy paths in Cartesian space in freely-tumbling systems

    PubMed Central

    Branduardi, Davide; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.

    2014-01-01

    The string method is a molecular-simulation technique that aims to calculate the minimum free-energy path of a chemical reaction or conformational transition, in the space of a pre-defined set of reaction coordinates that is typically highly dimensional. Any descriptor may be used as a reaction coordinate, but arguably the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms involved are the most unprejudiced and intuitive choice. Cartesian coordinates, however, present a non-trivial problem, in that they are not invariant to rigid-body molecular rotations and translations, which ideally ought to be unrestricted in the simulations. To overcome this difficulty, we reformulate the framework of the string method to integrate an on-the-fly structural-alignment algorithm. This approach, referred to as SOMA (String method with Optimal Molecular Alignment), enables the use of Cartesian reaction coordinates in freely tumbling molecular systems. In addition, this scheme permits the dissection of the free-energy change along the most probable path into individual atomic contributions, thus revealing the dominant mechanism of the simulated process. This detailed analysis also provides a physically-meaningful criterion to coarse-grain the representation of the path. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method we analyze the isomerization of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and the chair-to-inverted-chair transition of β-D mannose in explicit water. Notwithstanding the simplicity of these systems, the SOMA approach reveals novel insights into the atomic mechanism of these isomerizations. In both cases, we find that the dynamics and the energetics of these processes are controlled by interactions involving only a handful of atoms in each molecule. Consistent with this result, we show that a coarse-grained SOMA calculation defined in terms of these subsets of atoms yields nearidentical minimum free-energy paths and committor distributions to those obtained via a highly-dimensional string. PMID

  13. Quantum molecular dynamics of hydrogen bonded complexes of rigid molecules using the semiclassical initial value representation in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2007-08-07

    Semiclassical initial value representation calculations are performed for the constrained water dimer in Cartesian coordinates. The study represents the first application of a previously reported method [Issak and Roy, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 084103 (2005); 126, 024111 (2007)] to a molecular cluster. Bound state energies are calculated for a dimer of rigid water molecules (H2O)2 as well as its deuterated form (D2O)2. The results show that the approach fares well with respect to accuracy in capturing quantum effects in intermolecular interactions.

  14. Solwnd: A 3D Compressible MHD Code for Solar Wind Studies. Version 1.0: Cartesian Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, Anil E.

    1996-01-01

    Solwnd 1.0 is a three-dimensional compressible MHD code written in Fortran for studying the solar wind. Time-dependent boundary conditions are available. The computational algorithm is based on Flux Corrected Transport and the code is based on the existing code of Zalesak and Spicer. The flow considered is that of shear flow with incoming flow that perturbs this base flow. Several test cases corresponding to pressure balanced magnetic structures with velocity shear flow and various inflows including Alfven waves are presented. Version 1.0 of solwnd considers a rectangular Cartesian geometry. Future versions of solwnd will consider a spherical geometry. Some discussions of this issue is presented.

  15. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-07

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a "coconut" micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.

  16. Wrinkled flames and geometrical stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denet, Bruno; Joulin, Guy

    2011-07-01

    Localized wrinkles of thin premixed flames subject to hydrodynamic instability and geometrical stretch of uniform intensity (S) are studied. A stretch-affected nonlinear and nonlocal equation, derived from an inhomogeneous Michelson-Sivashinsky equation, is used as a starting point, and pole decompositions are used as a tool. Analytical and numerical descriptions of isolated (centered or multicrested) wrinkles with steady shapes (in a frame) and various amplitudes are provided; their number increases rapidly with 1/S>0. A large constant S>0 weakens or suppresses all localized wrinkles (the larger the wrinkles, the easier the suppression), whereas S<0 strengthens them; oscillations of S further restrict their existence domain. Self-similar evolutions of unstable many-crested patterns are obtained. A link between stretch, nonlinearity, and instability with the cutoff size of the wrinkles in turbulent flames is suggested. Open problems are evoked.

  17. Geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chong; Sun, Xiaowei; Wang, Youde

    2013-12-15

    It is well-known that the LIE (Locally Induction Equation) admit soliton-type solutions and same soliton solutions arise from different and apparently irrelevant physical models. By comparing the solitons of LIE and Killing magnetic geodesics, we observe that these solitons are essentially decided by two families of isometries of the domain and the target space, respectively. With this insight, we propose the new concept of geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds, such as geometric Schrödinger flows and KdV flows for maps. Moreover, we give several examples of geometric solitons of the Schrödinger flow and geometric KdV flow, including magnetic curves as geometric Schrödinger solitons and explicit geometric KdV solitons on surfaces of revolution.

  18. A Method to Calculate Protein Dipole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, Brett; Mazzeo, Brian

    2009-10-01

    The electric dipole moments of globular proteins, determined experimentally by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, contribute to both protein function and structure. Numerical computations of dipole moments can be obtained from structures in the Protein Data Bank. However, previous computations in literature have agreed with experimental results for only a limited number of proteins. This paper presents a method to compute the pH-dependent dipole moment. The protein molecule is considered as an array of electrical point charges in aqueous solution. The dipole moment is calculated as the vector sum of two components: (1)the core dipole moment which emerges from the unequal sharing of electrons in covalent bonds; (2)the surface charge dipole moment resulting from pH-dependent side chain partial charges. pKa shifts for each side chain amino acid are determined by the H++ server employing the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The net charge and dipole moment over a range of pH are calculated. The Oncley equation is used to predict the dielectric increment at arbitrary pH, temperature, and protein concentration.

  19. Table of nuclear electric quadrupole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    This Table is a compilation of experimental measurements of static electric quadrupole moments of ground states and excited states of atomic nuclei throughout the periodic table. To aid identification of the states, their excitation energy, half-life, spin and parity are given, along with a brief indication of the method and any reference standard used in the particular measurement. Experimental data from all quadrupole moment measurements actually provide a value of the product of the moment and the electric field gradient [EFG] acting at the nucleus. Knowledge of the EFG is thus necessary to extract the quadrupole moment. A single recommended moment value is given for each state, based, for each element, wherever possible, upon a standard reference moment for a nuclear state of that element studied in a situation in which the electric field gradient has been well calculated. For several elements one or more subsidiary EFG/moment reference is required and their use is specified. The literature search covers the period to mid-2015.

  20. Surmounting the Cartesian Cut Through Philosophy, Physics, Logic, Cybernetics, and Geometry: Self-reference, Torsion, the Klein Bottle, the Time Operator, Multivalued Logics and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, Diego L.

    2011-01-01

    In this transdisciplinary article which stems from philosophical considerations (that depart from phenomenology—after Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger and Rosen—and Hegelian dialectics), we develop a conception based on topological (the Moebius surface and the Klein bottle) and geometrical considerations (based on torsion and non-orientability of manifolds), and multivalued logics which we develop into a unified world conception that surmounts the Cartesian cut and Aristotelian logic. The role of torsion appears in a self-referential construction of space and time, which will be further related to the commutator of the True and False operators of matrix logic, still with a quantum superposed state related to a Moebius surface, and as the physical field at the basis of Spencer-Brown's primitive distinction in the protologic of the calculus of distinction. In this setting, paradox, self-reference, depth, time and space, higher-order non-dual logic, perception, spin and a time operator, the Klein bottle, hypernumbers due to Musès which include non-trivial square roots of ±1 and in particular non-trivial nilpotents, quantum field operators, the transformation of cognition to spin for two-state quantum systems, are found to be keenly interwoven in a world conception compatible with the philosophical approach taken for basis of this article. The Klein bottle is found not only to be the topological in-formation for self-reference and paradox whose logical counterpart in the calculus of indications are the paradoxical imaginary time waves, but also a classical-quantum transformer (Hadamard's gate in quantum computation) which is indispensable to be able to obtain a complete multivalued logical system, and still to generate the matrix extension of classical connective Boolean logic. We further find that the multivalued logic that stems from considering the paradoxical equation in the calculus of distinctions, and in particular, the imaginary solutions to this equation

  1. Detecting neutrino magnetic moments with conducting loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apyan, Aram; Apyan, Armen; Schmitt, Michael

    2008-02-01

    It is well established that neutrinos have mass, yet it is very difficult to measure those masses directly. Within the standard model of particle physics, neutrinos will have an intrinsic magnetic moment proportional to their mass. We examine the possibility of detecting the magnetic moment using a conducting loop. According to Faraday’s law of induction, a magnetic dipole passing through a conducting loop induces an electromotive force in the loop. We compute this electromotive force for neutrinos in several cases, based on a fully covariant formulation of the problem. We discuss prospects for a real experiment, as well as the possibility to test the relativistic formulation of intrinsic magnetic moments.

  2. The Gulf Moment: Arab Relations Since 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    THE GULF MOMENT: ARAB RElATIONS SINCE 201 t Florence Gaub UNITED STATES ARMY WAR COLLEGE PRESS CarlisleBarracks,PA .., STRENGTH-’WISDOM U.S...SUBTITLE The Gulf Moment: Arab Relations Since 2011 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Institute and U.S. Army War College Press THE GULF MOMENT: ARAB RELATIONS SINCE 2011 Florence Gaub May 2015 The views expressed in this report are

  3. Development of multiphase Navier-Stokes simulation capability for turbulent gas flow over laminar liquid for Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Sha; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a novel and efficient Cartesian-grid based simulation capability for the study of an incompressible, turbulent gas layer over a liquid flow with disparate Reynolds numbers in two phases. This capability couples a turbulent gas-flow solver and a liquid-layer based on a second-order accurate Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM) at the deformable interface. The turbulent gas flow solver solves the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations via direct numerical simulation or through turbulence closure (unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Models) for Reynolds numbers O(106). In this application, a laminar liquid layer solution is obtained from depth-integrated Navier-Stokes equations utilizing shallow water wave assumptions. The immersed boundary method (BDIM) enforces the coupling at the deformable interface, the boundary conditions to turbulence closure equations and defines the domain geometry on the Cartesian grid. Validations are made for the turbulent gas channel flow over high-viscosity liquid. This simulation capability can be applied to problems in the oil and industrial sector such as channel and pipe flows with heavy oils as well as wind wave generation in shallow waters. Sponsored by the Chevron Energy Technology Company.

  4. Applications of the Cartesian coordinate tensor transfer technique in the simulations of vibrational circular dichroism spectra of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Andrushchenko, Valery; Bouř, Petr

    2010-01-01

    The application of the Cartesian coordinate tensor transfer (CCT) technique for simulations of the IR absorption and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of relatively large nucleic acid fragments is demonstrated on several case studies. The approach is based on direct ab initio calculations of atomic tensors, determining molecular properties, for relatively small fragments, and subsequent transfer of these tensors to the larger systems in Cartesian coordinates. This procedure enables precise computations of vibrational spectra for large biomolecular systems, currently with up to several thousands of atoms. The versatile ability of the CCT methods is emphasized on the examples of VCD and IR absorption spectra calculations for B- and Z-forms of DNA, single-, double-, and triple-stranded RNA helices and DNA structures with different base content and sequences. The development and recent improvements of the methodology are followed, including utilization of the constrained normal mode optimization (NMO) strategy and combined quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. Advantages, drawbacks, and recommendations for future improvements of the CCT method as applied to nucleic acid spectra calculations are discussed.

  5. A Cartesian classical second-quantized many-electron Hamiltonian, for use with the semiclassical initial value representation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H

    2012-10-21

    A new classical model for the general second-quantized many-electron Hamiltonian in Cartesian coordinates and momenta is presented; this makes semiclassical (SC) calculations using an initial value representation (IVR) more useful than the classical Hamiltonian in action-angle variables given earlier by Miller and White [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 5059-5066 (1986)]. If only 1-electron terms are included in this Hamiltonian, the classical equations of motion for the Cartesian variables are linear, and the SC-IVR gives exact results for the propagator (and thus for transition probabilities, the energy spectrum, etc.), as confirmed by analytic proof and numerical calculations. Though this new Hamiltonian is not exact when 2-electron interactions are included, we observe good results for the SC-IVR transition probabilities for times that are not too long. Test calculations, for example, show that the SC-IVR is accurate for times long enough to obtain good result for the eigenvalue spectrum (i.e., the energy levels of the electronic system).

  6. Convergence and superconvergence of staggered discontinuous Galerkin methods for the three-dimensional Maxwell’s equations on Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric T.; Ciarlet, Patrick; Yu, Tang Fei

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a new type of staggered discontinuous Galerkin methods for the three dimensional Maxwell’s equations is developed and analyzed. The spatial discretization is based on staggered Cartesian grids so that many good properties are obtained. First of all, our method has the advantages that the numerical solution preserves the electromagnetic energy and automatically fulfills a discrete version of the Gauss law. Moreover, the mass matrices are diagonal, thus time marching is explicit and is very efficient. Our method is high order accurate and the optimal order of convergence is rigorously proved. It is also very easy to implement due to its Cartesian structure and can be regarded as a generalization of the classical Yee’s scheme as well as the quadrilateral edge finite elements. Furthermore, a superconvergence result, that is the convergence rate is one order higher at interpolation nodes, is proved. Numerical results are shown to confirm our theoretical statements, and applications to problems in unbounded domains with the use of PML are presented. A comparison of our staggered method and non-staggered method is carried out and shows that our method has better accuracy and efficiency.

  7. Statistical scaling of geometric characteristics in stochastically generated pore microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Guadagnini, Alberto; Winter, C. Larrabee

    2015-05-21

    In this study, we analyze the statistical scaling of structural attributes of virtual porous microstructures that are stochastically generated by thresholding Gaussian random fields. Characterization of the extent at which randomly generated pore spaces can be considered as representative of a particular rock sample depends on the metrics employed to compare the virtual sample against its physical counterpart. Typically, comparisons against features and/patterns of geometric observables, e.g., porosity and specific surface area, flow-related macroscopic parameters, e.g., permeability, or autocorrelation functions are used to assess the representativeness of a virtual sample, and thereby the quality of the generation method. Here, we rely on manifestations of statistical scaling of geometric observables which were recently observed in real millimeter scale rock samples [13] as additional relevant metrics by which to characterize a virtual sample. We explore the statistical scaling of two geometric observables, namely porosity (Φ) and specific surface area (SSA), of porous microstructures generated using the method of Smolarkiewicz and Winter [42] and Hyman and Winter [22]. Our results suggest that the method can produce virtual pore space samples displaying the symptoms of statistical scaling observed in real rock samples. Order q sample structure functions (statistical moments of absolute increments) of Φ and SSA scale as a power of the separation distance (lag) over a range of lags, and extended self-similarity (linear relationship between log structure functions of successive orders) appears to be an intrinsic property of the generated media. The width of the range of lags where power-law scaling is observed and the Hurst coefficient associated with the variables we consider can be controlled by the generation parameters of the method.

  8. Statistical scaling of geometric characteristics in stochastically generated pore microstructures

    DOE PAGES

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Guadagnini, Alberto; Winter, C. Larrabee

    2015-05-21

    In this study, we analyze the statistical scaling of structural attributes of virtual porous microstructures that are stochastically generated by thresholding Gaussian random fields. Characterization of the extent at which randomly generated pore spaces can be considered as representative of a particular rock sample depends on the metrics employed to compare the virtual sample against its physical counterpart. Typically, comparisons against features and/patterns of geometric observables, e.g., porosity and specific surface area, flow-related macroscopic parameters, e.g., permeability, or autocorrelation functions are used to assess the representativeness of a virtual sample, and thereby the quality of the generation method. Here, wemore » rely on manifestations of statistical scaling of geometric observables which were recently observed in real millimeter scale rock samples [13] as additional relevant metrics by which to characterize a virtual sample. We explore the statistical scaling of two geometric observables, namely porosity (Φ) and specific surface area (SSA), of porous microstructures generated using the method of Smolarkiewicz and Winter [42] and Hyman and Winter [22]. Our results suggest that the method can produce virtual pore space samples displaying the symptoms of statistical scaling observed in real rock samples. Order q sample structure functions (statistical moments of absolute increments) of Φ and SSA scale as a power of the separation distance (lag) over a range of lags, and extended self-similarity (linear relationship between log structure functions of successive orders) appears to be an intrinsic property of the generated media. The width of the range of lags where power-law scaling is observed and the Hurst coefficient associated with the variables we consider can be controlled by the generation parameters of the method.« less

  9. Geometric Quantization and Foliation Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerritt, Paul

    A standard question in the study of geometric quantization is whether symplectic reduction interacts nicely with the quantized theory, and in particular whether "quantization commutes with reduction." Guillemin and Sternberg first proposed this question, and answered it in the affirmative for the case of a free action of a compact Lie group on a compact Kahler manifold. Subsequent work has focused mainly on extending their proof to non-free actions and non-Kahler manifolds. For realistic physical examples, however, it is desirable to have a proof which also applies to non-compact symplectic manifolds. In this thesis we give a proof of the quantization-reduction problem for general symplectic manifolds. This is accomplished by working in a particular wavefunction representation, associated with a polarization that is in some sense compatible with reduction. While the polarized sections described by Guillemin and Sternberg are nonzero on a dense subset of the Kahler manifold, the ones considered here are distributional, having support only on regions of the phase space associated with certain quantized, or "admissible", values of momentum. We first propose a reduction procedure for the prequantum geometric structures that "covers" symplectic reduction, and demonstrate how both symplectic and prequantum reduction can be viewed as examples of foliation reduction. Consistency of prequantum reduction imposes the above-mentioned admissibility conditions on the quantized momenta, which can be seen as analogues of the Bohr-Wilson-Sommerfeld conditions for completely integrable systems. We then describe our reduction-compatible polarization, and demonstrate a one-to-one correspondence between polarized sections on the unreduced and reduced spaces. Finally, we describe a factorization of the reduced prequantum bundle, suggested by the structure of the underlying reduced symplectic manifold. This in turn induces a factorization of the space of polarized sections that agrees

  10. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, data analysis, Videos S

  11. Magnetic moments in graphene with vacancies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Jing; Wu, Han-Chun; Yu, Da-Peng; Liao, Zhi-Min

    2014-08-07

    Vacancies can induce local magnetic moments in graphene, paving the way to make magnetic functional graphene. Due to the interaction between magnetic moments and conduction carriers, the magnetotransport properties of graphene can be modulated. Here, the effects of vacancy induced magnetic moments on the electrical properties of graphene are studied via magnetotransport measurements and spin-polarized density functional theory calculations. We show by quantum Hall measurements that a sharp resonant Vπ state is introduced in the midgap region of graphene with vacancies, resulting in the local magnetic moment. The coupling between the localized Vπ state and the itinerant carrier is tuned by varying the carrier concentration, temperature, magnetic field, and vacancy density, which results in a transition between hopping transport and the Kondo effect and a transition between giant negative magnetoresistance (MR) and positive MR. This modulated magnetotransport is valuable for graphene based spintronic devices.

  12. Neutrino masses, mixing, moments, and matter

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The present status of neutrino masses, mixing, and electromagnetic moments is surveyed. Potential enhancements of neutrino oscillations, decay, and spin-flavor precession due to their interactions with matter are described.

  13. Magnetic dipole moments for composite dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, Alfredo; Barajas, Luis; Cembranos, Jose A.R. E-mail: luisedua@buffalo.edu

    2016-03-01

    We study neutral dark matter candidates with a nonzero magnetic dipole moment. We assume that they are composite states of new fermions related to the strong phase of a new gauge interaction. In particular, invoking a dark flavor symmetry, we analyze the composition structure of viable candidates depending on the assignations of hypercharge and the multiplets associated to the fundamental constituents of the extended sector. We determine the magnetic dipole moments for the neutral composite states in terms of their constituents masses.

  14. Droplet-model predictions of charge moments

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1982-04-01

    The Droplet Model expressions for calculating various moments of the nuclear charge distribution are given. There are contributions to the moments from the size and shape of the system, from the internal redistribution induced by the Coulomb repulsion, and from the diffuseness of the surface. A case is made for the use of diffuse charge distributions generated by convolution as an alternative to Fermi-functions.

  15. Toroidal Dipole Moment of a Massless Neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Perez, E. Reyes

    2009-04-20

    We obtain the toroidal dipole moment of a massless neutrino {tau}{sub v{sub I}}{sup M} using the results for the anapole moment of a massless Dirac neutrino a{sub v{sub I}}{sup D}, which was obtained in the context of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions (SM)SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y}.

  16. On the dipole moment of CO/+/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Certain, P. R.; Woods, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Results of self-consistent field calculations on neutral CO, its positive ion, and on neutral CN to verify an earlier estimate of the dipole moment of CO(+) in its ground super 2 Sigma state. Based on the above-mentioned calculations, direct evidence is obtained that the dipole moment (relative to the center of mass) is approximately 2.5 plus or minus 0.5 C, as previously determined by Kopelman and Klemperer (1962).

  17. Quantum geometric phase in Majorana's stellar representation: mapping onto a many-body Aharonov-Bohm phase.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Patrick

    2012-06-15

    The (Berry-Aharonov-Anandan) geometric phase acquired during a cyclic quantum evolution of finite-dimensional quantum systems is studied. It is shown that a pure quantum state in a (2J+1)-dimensional Hilbert space (or, equivalently, of a spin-J system) can be mapped onto the partition function of a gas of independent Dirac strings moving on a sphere and subject to the Coulomb repulsion of 2J fixed test charges (the Majorana stars) characterizing the quantum state. The geometric phase may be viewed as the Aharonov-Bohm phase acquired by the Majorana stars as they move through the gas of Dirac strings. Expressions for the geometric connection and curvature, for the metric tensor, as well as for the multipole moments (dipole, quadrupole, etc.), are given in terms of the Majorana stars. Finally, the geometric formulation of the quantum dynamics is presented and its application to systems with exotic ordering such as spin nematics is outlined.

  18. Moments of fusion-barrier distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, K. E.; Esbensen, H.; Jiang, C. L.; Back, B. B.; Stefanini, A. M.; Montagnoli, G.

    2016-10-01

    A study of fusion-barrier distributions through an analysis of their moments is presented. The moments can be obtained from least-squares fits of the energy-weighted fusion cross sections without the need of calculating second derivatives. The zeroth and first moments determine the fusion radius R and the Coulomb barrier VC. These two quantities are the same as the parameters R and VC that are used in the well-known expression, E σ =π R2(E -VC) , for the fusion cross section at high energies. The second and third moments, M2 and M3, determine the width and skewness of the barrier distribution, respectively. From these global parameters new correlations for the study of heavy-ion-induced fusion reactions can be obtained. Systems exhibiting a large coupling to transfer reactions show a small fusion radius as well as a large second moment. A negative third moment is correlated with a prolate deformation of the target nucleus.

  19. Geometric Reasoning for Automated Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Knight, Russell L.; Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An important aspect of mission planning for NASA s operation of the International Space Station is the allocation and management of space for supplies and equipment. The Stowage, Configuration Analysis, and Operations Planning teams collaborate to perform the bulk of that planning. A Geometric Reasoning Engine is developed in a way that can be shared by the teams to optimize item placement in the context of crew planning. The ISS crew spends (at the time of this writing) a third or more of their time moving supplies and equipment around. Better logistical support and optimized packing could make a significant impact on operational efficiency of the ISS. Currently, computational geometry and motion planning do not focus specifically on the optimized orientation and placement of 3D objects based on multiple distance and containment preferences and constraints. The software performs reasoning about the manipulation of 3D solid models in order to maximize an objective function based on distance. It optimizes for 3D orientation and placement. Spatial placement optimization is a general problem and can be applied to object packing or asset relocation.

  20. Geometrical aspects of quantum spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Pei -Ming

    1996-05-11

    Various geometrical aspects of quantum spaces are presented showing the possibility of building physics on quantum spaces. In the first chapter the authors give the motivations for studying noncommutative geometry and also review the definition of a Hopf algebra and some general features of the differential geometry on quantum groups and quantum planes. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 the noncommutative version of differential calculus, integration and complex structure are established for the quantum sphere S12 and the quantum complex projective space CP{sub q}(N), on which there are quantum group symmetries that are represented nonlinearly, and are respected by all the aforementioned structures. The braiding of Sq2 and CPq(N) is also described. In Chapter 4 the quantum projective geometry over the quantum projective space CPq(N) is developed. Collinearity conditions, coplanarity conditions, intersections and anharmonic ratios is described. In Chapter 5 an algebraic formulation of Reimannian geometry on quantum spaces is presented where Riemannian metric, distance, Laplacian, connection, and curvature have their quantum counterparts. This attempt is also extended to complex manifolds. Examples include the quantum sphere, the complex quantum projective space and the two-sheeted space. The quantum group of general coordinate transformations on some quantum spaces is also given.

  1. Generalized Geometric Quantum Speed Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Diego Paiva; Cianciaruso, Marco; Céleri, Lucas C.; Adesso, Gerardo; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O.

    2016-04-01

    The attempt to gain a theoretical understanding of the concept of time in quantum mechanics has triggered significant progress towards the search for faster and more efficient quantum technologies. One of such advances consists in the interpretation of the time-energy uncertainty relations as lower bounds for the minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states of a quantum system, also known as quantum speed limits. We investigate how the nonuniqueness of a bona fide measure of distinguishability defined on the quantum-state space affects the quantum speed limits and can be exploited in order to derive improved bounds. Specifically, we establish an infinite family of quantum speed limits valid for unitary and nonunitary evolutions, based on an elegant information geometric formalism. Our work unifies and generalizes existing results on quantum speed limits and provides instances of novel bounds that are tighter than any established one based on the conventional quantum Fisher information. We illustrate our findings with relevant examples, demonstrating the importance of choosing different information metrics for open system dynamics, as well as clarifying the roles of classical populations versus quantum coherences, in the determination and saturation of the speed limits. Our results can find applications in the optimization and control of quantum technologies such as quantum computation and metrology, and might provide new insights in fundamental investigations of quantum thermodynamics.

  2. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  3. Geometric aspects of ordering phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugliandolo, Leticia F.

    2017-01-01

    A macroscopic system prepared in a disordered phase and quenched across a second-order phase transition into an ordered phase undergoes a coarsening process whereby it orders locally in one of the equilibrium states. The study of the evolution of the morphology of the ordered structures in two dimensions has recently unveiled two interesting and generic features. On the one hand, the dynamics first approach a critical percolating state via the growth of a new lengthscale and satisfying scaling properties with respect to it. The time needed to reach the critical percolating state diverges with the system size, though more weakly than the equilibration time. On the other hand, once the critical percolating structures established, the geometrical and statistical properties at larger scales than the one established by the usual dynamic growing length remain the ones of critical percolation. These observations are common to different microscopic dynamics (single spin flip, local and non-local spin exchange, voter) in pure or weakly disordered systems. We discuss these results and we refer to the relevant publications for details. xml:lang="fr"

  4. The Design and Construction of an Electrohydrodynamic Cartesian Robot for the Preparation of Tissue Engineering Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Hashimdeen, Shaikh Hafeez; Miodownik, Mark; Edirisinghe, Mohan J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we bring together replicating rapid prototyping technology with electrohydrodynamic phenomena to develop a device with the ability to build structures in three-dimensions while simultaneously affording the user a degree of designing versatility and ease that is not seen in conventional computer numerically controlled machines. An attempt at reproducing an actual human ear using polycaprolactone was pursued to validate the hardware. Five different polycaprolactone solution concentrations between 7–15 wt% were used and printing was performed at applied voltages that ranged from 1 to 6 kV and at flow rates from 5µl/min to 60µl/min. The corresponding geometrical and aesthetic features of the printed constructs were studied to determine the effectiveness of the device. The 15 wt% concentration at 60µl/min under an applied electric field of 6 kV was identified as the best operating parameters to work with. PMID:25405473

  5. The geometric semantics of algebraic quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Cruz Morales, John Alexander; Zilber, Boris

    2015-08-06

    In this paper, we will present an ongoing project that aims to use model theory as a suitable mathematical setting for studying the formalism of quantum mechanics. We argue that this approach provides a geometric semantics for such a formalism by means of establishing a (non-commutative) duality between certain algebraic and geometric objects.

  6. Geometric Growing Patterns: What's the Rule?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourigan, Mairéad; Leavy, Aisling

    2015-01-01

    While within a geometric repeating pattern, there is an identifiable core which is made up of objects that repeat in a predictable manner, a geometric growing pattern (also called visual or pictorial growing patterns in other curricula) "is a pattern that is made from a sequence of figures [or objects] that change from one term to the next in…

  7. Early Sex Differences in Weighting Geometric Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lourenco, Stella F.; Addy, Dede; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Fabian, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    When geometric and non-geometric information are both available for specifying location, men have been shown to rely more heavily on geometry compared to women. To shed insight on the nature and developmental origins of this sex difference, we examined how 18- to 24-month-olds represented the geometry of a surrounding (rectangular) space when…

  8. Geometrical splitting and reduction of Feynman diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydychev, Andrei I.

    2016-10-01

    A geometrical approach to the calculation of N-point Feynman diagrams is reviewed. It is shown that the geometrical splitting yields useful connections between Feynman integrals with different momenta and masses. It is demonstrated how these results can be used to reduce the number of variables in the occurring functions.

  9. Second-quantized formulation of geometric phases

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, Shinichi; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2005-07-15

    The level crossing problem and associated geometric terms are neatly formulated by the second-quantized formulation. This formulation exhibits a hidden local gauge symmetry related to the arbitrariness of the phase choice of the complete orthonormal basis set. By using this second-quantized formulation, which does not assume adiabatic approximation, a convenient exact formula for the geometric terms including off-diagonal geometric terms is derived. The analysis of geometric phases is then reduced to a simple diagonalization of the Hamiltonian, and it is analyzed both in the operator and path-integral formulations. If one diagonalizes the geometric terms in the infinitesimal neighborhood of level crossing, the geometric phases become trivial (and thus no monopole singularity) for arbitrarily large but finite time interval T. The integrability of Schroedinger equation and the appearance of the seemingly nonintegrable phases are thus consistent. The topological proof of the Longuet-Higgins' phase-change rule, for example, fails in the practical Born-Oppenheimer approximation where a large but finite ratio of two time scales is involved and T is identified with the period of the slower system. The difference and similarity between the geometric phases associated with level crossing and the exact topological object such as the Aharonov-Bohm phase become clear in the present formulation. A crucial difference between the quantum anomaly and the geometric phases is also noted.

  10. Electric dipole transition moments and permanent dipole moments for spin-orbit configuration interaction wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roostaei, B.; Ermler, W. C.

    2012-03-01

    A procedure for calculating electric dipole transition moments and permanent dipole moments from spin-orbit configuration interaction (SOCI) wave functions has been developed in the context of the COLUMBUS ab initio electronic structure programs. The SOCI procedure requires relativistic effective core potentials and their corresponding spin-orbit coupling operators to define the molecular Hamiltonian, electric dipole transition moment and permanent dipole moment matrices. The procedure can be used for any molecular system for which the COLUMBUS SOCI circuits are applicable. Example applications are reported for transition moments and dipole moments for a series of electronic states of LiBe and LiSr defined in diatomic relativistic ωω-coupling.

  11. Geometric Hamiltonian quantum mechanics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Davide

    2016-08-01

    Adopting a geometric point of view on Quantum Mechanics is an intriguing idea since, we know that geometric methods are very powerful in Classical Mechanics then, we can try to use them to study quantum systems. In this paper, we summarize the construction of a general prescription to set up a well-defined and self-consistent geometric Hamiltonian formulation of finite-dimensional quantum theories, where phase space is given by the Hilbert projective space (as Kähler manifold), in the spirit of celebrated works of Kibble, Ashtekar and others. Within geometric Hamiltonian formulation quantum observables are represented by phase space functions, quantum states are described by Liouville densities (phase space probability densities), and Schrödinger dynamics is induced by a Hamiltonian flow on the projective space. We construct the star-product of this phase space formulation and some applications of geometric picture are discussed.

  12. L-moments and TL-moments of the generalized lambda distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    The 4-parameter generalized lambda distribution (GLD) is a flexible distribution capable of mimicking the shapes of many distributions and data samples including those with heavy tails. The method of L-moments and the recently developed method of trimmed L-moments (TL-moments) are attractive techniques for parameter estimation for heavy-tailed distributions for which the L- and TL-moments have been defined. Analytical solutions for the first five L- and TL-moments in terms of GLD parameters are derived. Unfortunately, numerical methods are needed to compute the parameters from the L- or TL-moments. Algorithms are suggested for parameter estimation. Application of the GLD using both L- and TL-moment parameter estimates from example data is demonstrated, and comparison of the L-moment fit of the 4-parameter kappa distribution is made. A small simulation study of the 98th percentile (far-right tail) is conducted for a heavy-tail GLD with high-outlier contamination. The simulations show, with respect to estimation of the 98th-percent quantile, that TL-moments are less biased (more robost) in the presence of high-outlier contamination. However, the robustness comes at the expense of considerably more sampling variability. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Solution of the Skyrme Hartree Fock Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (V) HFODD(v2.08k)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Olbratowski, P.

    2005-05-01

    We describe the new version (v2.08k) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. Similarly as in the previous version (v2.08i), all symmetries can be broken, which allows for calculations with angular frequency and angular momentum tilted with respect to the mass distribution. In the new version, three minor errors have been corrected. New Version Program SummaryTitle of program: HFODD; version: 2.08k Catalogue number: ADVA Catalogue number of previous version: ADTO (Comput. Phys. Comm. 158 (2004) 158) Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVA Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Does the new version supersede the previous one: yes Computers on which this or another recent version has been tested: SG Power Challenge L, Pentium-II, Pentium-III, AMD-Athlon Operating systems under which the program has been tested: UNIX, LINUX, Windows-2000 Programming language used: Fortran Memory required to execute with typical data: 10M words No. of bits in a word: 64 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 52 631 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 266 885 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem: The nuclear mean-field and an analysis of its symmetries in realistic cases are the main ingredients of a description of nuclear states. Within the Local Density Approximation, or for a zero-range velocity-dependent Skyrme interaction, the nuclear mean-field is local and velocity dependent. The locality allows for an effective and fast solution of the self-consistent Hartree-Fock equations, even for heavy nuclei, and for various nucleonic ( n-particle n-hole) configurations, deformations, excitation energies, or angular momenta. Similar Local Density Approximation in the particle-particle channel, which is equivalent to using a zero

  14. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-02

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion.

  15. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  16. Boundary effects in welded steel moment connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Hyeog

    Unprecedented widespread failure of welded moment connections in steel frames caused by the 1994 Northridge and the 1995 Kobe earthquakes have alarmed the engineering communities throughout the world. Welded moment connections in steel frames have been traditionally designed by using the classical beam theory which leads to assumptions that the flanges transfer moment while the web connection primarily resists the shear force. However, this study shows that the magnitude and direction of the principal stresses in the connection region are better approximated by using truss analogy rather than the classical beam theory. Accordingly, both the bending moment and the shear force are transferred across the connection near the beam flanges through diagonal strut action. Thus, the beam flange region of the traditionally designed connection is overloaded. This conclusion explains, to a large extent, the recently observed steel moment connection failures. In this study, detailed finite element analyses were carried out for a representative beam-to-column subassemblage with fully welded connection. The stress distribution in the beam web and flanges in the vicinity of the connection were closely studied. The factors responsible for stress redistribution and concentration were identified by using fundamental principles of mechanics. It was concluded that peak resultant stresses can exceed the values used in simple design calculations by large margins. Using the finite element analysis results and the truss analogy to establish a realistic load path in the connection, a practical and more rational analysis and design procedure was developed. The proposed design procedure and the new connection details were successfully validated through cyclic load testing of a nearly full size specimen. The truss model represented the force transmission around the beam-to-column moment connection region very well. Results of the finite element analyses and the laboratory testing showed

  17. Aerodynamic yawing moment characteristics of bird wings.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2005-06-21

    The aerodynamic yawing moments due to sideslip are considered for wings of birds. Reference is made to the experience with aircraft wings in order to identify features which are significant for the yawing moment characteristics. Thus, it can be shown that wing sweep, aspect ratio and lift coefficient have a great impact. Focus of the paper is on wing sweep which can considerably increase the yawing moment due to sideslip when compared with unswept wings. There are many birds the wings of which employ sweep. To show the effect of sweep for birds, the aerodynamic characteristics of a gull wing which is considered as a representative example are treated in detail. For this purpose, a sophisticated aerodynamic method is used to compute results of high precision. The yawing moments of the gull wing with respect to the sideslip angle and the lift coefficient are determined. They show a significant level of yaw stability which strongly increases with the lift coefficient. It is particularly high in the lift coefficient region of best gliding flight conditions. In order to make the effect of sweep more perspicuous, a modification of the gull wing employing no sweep is considered for comparison. It turns out that the unswept wing yields yawing moments which are substantially smaller than those of the original gull wing with sweep. Another feature significant for the yawing moment characteristics concerns the fact that sweep is at the outer part of bird wings. By considering the underlying physical mechanism, it is shown that this feature is most important for the efficiency of wing sweep. To sum up, wing sweep provides a primary contribution to the yawing moments. It may be concluded that this is an essential reason why there is sweep in bird wings.

  18. A Great Moment for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    illustrates how the appearance of a stellar image at the focal plane is fully controllable. Fast and thorough optical adjustment ensures the best possible optical quality at all times . 9. Image Quality of the VLT This diagram demonstrates that First Light specifications have been fully met and, more impressively, that the actual VLT performance is sometimes already within the more stringent specifications that were expected to be fulfilled only three years from now. The final steps before "First Light" The final, critical testing phase commenced with the installation of the 8.2-m primary (at that time still uncoated) Zerodur mirror and 1.1-m secondary Beryllium mirror during the second half of April. The optics were then gradually brought into position during carefully planned, successive adjustments. Due to the full integration of an advanced, active control system into the VLT concept, this delicate process went amazingly fast, especially when compared to other ground-based telescopes. It included a number of short test exposures in early May, first with the Guide Camera that is used to steer the telescope. Later, some exposures were made with the Test Camera mounted just below the main mirror at the Cassegrain Focus, in a central space inside the mirror cell. It will continue to be used during the upcoming Commissioning Phase, until the first major instruments (FORS and ISAAC) are attached to the UT1, later in 1998. The 8.2-m mirror was successfully aluminized at the Paranal Mirror Coating facility on May 20 and was reattached to the telescope tube the day thereafter, cf. ESO PR Photos 13a-e/98 and ESO PR Photos 14a-i/98. Further test exposures were then made to check the proper functioning of the telescope mechanics, optics and electronics. This has lead up to the moment of First Light , i.e. the time when the telescope is considered able to produce the first, astronomically useful images. Despite an intervening spell of bad atmospheric conditions, this important event

  19. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-10-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  20. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers.

    PubMed

    Stagner, L; Heidbrink, W W

    2014-11-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, "Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry," J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, "Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes," Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5-11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  1. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-15

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  2. Zernike moments as a useful tool for ACE imager aerological data retrieval (stratospheric temperature and cloud product)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodion, Jan; Fussen, Didier; Filip, Vanhellemont; Mateshvili, Nina; Christine, Bingen; Maxime, Stapelle; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Gilbert, Kathy; Walker, Kaley; Bernath, Peter

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) was launched in August 2003 aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT-I, and is at present fully operational. ACE circles the Earth at an altitude of 650 km with an orbital inclination of 74° . Solar occultation is the primary observation technique used by the on board instruments, which consist of a high resolution Fourier Transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), a dual optical spectrophotometer (MAESTRO) and two filtered imagers, subject of this presentation. While the Sun is setting below or rising from behind the Earth's horizon, at every timestamp, the imagers capture a snapshot of the Sun as seen through the atmosphere. On these pictures, the apparent Sun width is about 25 km at the tangent point and the apparent Sun height varies from almost 0.7 km in the optically thick, lower troposphere where the Sun image is highly flattened by the refraction to its maximum (about 25 km at the tangent point) where refractive effects are negligible. Used in image processing, image moments are certain particular weighted averages (moments) of the image pixel's intensities, or functions of those moments, usually chosen to have some attractive property on interpretation. Zernike moments were first introduced by Teague (1980) based on the complex, orthogonal functions called Zernike polynomials. Though computationally very complex compared to geometric and Legendre moments, Zernike moments have proved to be superior in terms of their feature representation capability and low noise sensitivity. Also, the construction of different moment invariants makes them well suited for our research. A detailed image analysis of ACE imager data using Zernike moments provides us the necessary information for the retrieval of temperature profiles from a series of distorted images of an object of known shape such as the Sun. These temperature profiles are validated with ACE-FTS data. Besides, a preliminary cloud product could be derived and, in addition, a

  3. Different Estimation Procedures for the Parameters of the Extended Exponential Geometric Distribution for Medical Data

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Pedro L.; Perdoná, Gleici S. C.

    2016-01-01

    We have considered different estimation procedures for the unknown parameters of the extended exponential geometric distribution. We introduce different types of estimators such as the maximum likelihood, method of moments, modified moments, L-moments, ordinary and weighted least squares, percentile, maximum product of spacings, and minimum distance estimators. The different estimators are compared by using extensive numerical simulations. We discovered that the maximum product of spacings estimator has the smallest mean square errors and mean relative estimates, nearest to one, for both parameters, proving to be the most efficient method compared to other methods. Combining these results with the good properties of the method such as consistency, asymptotic efficiency, normality, and invariance we conclude that the maximum product of spacings estimator is the best one for estimating the parameters of the extended exponential geometric distribution in comparison with its competitors. For the sake of illustration, we apply our proposed methodology in two important data sets, demonstrating that the EEG distribution is a simple alternative to be used for lifetime data. PMID:27579052

  4. The promise of geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Richtsmeier, Joan T; DeLeon, Valerie Burke; Lele, Subhash R

    2002-01-01

    Nontraditional or geometric morphometric methods have found wide application in the biological sciences, especially in anthropology, a field with a strong history of measurement of biological form. Controversy has arisen over which method is the "best" for quantifying the morphological difference between forms and for making proper statistical statements about the detected differences. This paper explains that many of these arguments are superfluous to the real issues that need to be understood by those wishing to apply morphometric methods to biological data. Validity, the ability of a method to find the correct answer, is rarely discussed and often ignored. We explain why demonstration of validity is a necessary step in the evaluation of methods used in morphometrics. Focusing specifically on landmark data, we discuss the concepts of size and shape, and reiterate that since no unique definition of size exists, shape can only be recognized with reference to a chosen surrogate for size. We explain why only a limited class of information related to the morphology of an object can be known when landmark data are used. This observation has genuine consequences, as certain morphometric methods are based on models that require specific assumptions, some of which exceed what can be known from landmark data. We show that orientation of an object with reference to other objects in a sample can never be known, because this information is not included in landmark data. Consequently, a descriptor of form difference that contains information on orientation is flawed because that information does not arise from evidence within the data, but instead is a product of a chosen orientation scheme. To illustrate these points, we apply superimposition, deformation, and linear distance-based morphometric methods to the analysis of a simulated data set for which the true differences are known. This analysis demonstrates the relative efficacy of various methods to reveal the true

  5. Women's collective constructions of embodied practices through memory work: Cartesian dualism in memories of sweating and pain.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Val; Harden, Angela; Johnson, Katherine; Reavey, Paula; Strange, Vicki; Willig, Carla

    2004-03-01

    The research presented in this paper uses memory work as a method to explore six women's collective constructions of two embodied practices, sweating and pain. The paper identifies limitations in the ways in which social constructionist research has theorized the relationship between discourse and materiality, and it proposes an approach to the study of embodiment which enjoins, rather than bridges, the discursive and the non-discursive. The paper presents an analysis of 25 memories of sweating and pain which suggests that Cartesian dualism is central to the women's accounts of their experiences. However, such dualism does not operate as a stable organizing principle. Rather, it offers two strategies for the performance of a split between mind and body. The paper traces the ways in which dualism can be both functional and restrictive, and explores the tensions between these two forms. The paper concludes by identifiying opportunities and limitations associated with memory work as a method for studying embodiment.

  6. A General Method to Estimate Earthquake Moment and Magnitude using Regional Phase Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2009-11-19

    This paper presents a general method of estimating earthquake magnitude using regional phase amplitudes, called regional M{sub o} or regional M{sub w}. Conceptually, this method uses an earthquake source model along with an attenuation model and geometrical spreading which accounts for the propagation to utilize regional phase amplitudes of any phase and frequency. Amplitudes are corrected to yield a source term from which one can estimate the seismic moment. Moment magnitudes can then be reliably determined with sets of observed phase amplitudes rather than predetermined ones, and afterwards averaged to robustly determine this parameter. We first examine in detail several events to demonstrate the methodology. We then look at various ensembles of phases and frequencies, and compare results to existing regional methods. We find regional M{sub o} to be a stable estimator of earthquake size that has several advantages over other methods. Because of its versatility, it is applicable to many more events, particularly smaller events. We make moment estimates for earthquakes ranging from magnitude 2 to as large as 7. Even with diverse input amplitude sources, we find magnitude estimates to be more robust than typical magnitudes and existing regional methods and might be tuned further to improve upon them. The method yields a more meaningful quantity of seismic moment, which can be recast as M{sub w}. Lastly, it is applied here to the Middle East region using an existing calibration model, but it would be easy to transport to any region with suitable attenuation calibration.

  7. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors.

    PubMed

    Egan, R; Philippe, M; Wera, L; Fagnard, J F; Vanderheyden, B; Dennis, A; Shi, Y; Cardwell, D A; Vanderbemden, P

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm(3)) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m(2) (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K).

  8. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, R.; Philippe, M.; Wera, L.; Fagnard, J. F.; Vanderheyden, B.; Dennis, A.; Shi, Y.; Cardwell, D. A.; Vanderbemden, P.

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm3) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m2 (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K).

  9. Pedagogical tools to explore Cartesian mind-body dualism in the classroom: philosophical arguments and neuroscience illusions.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Scott; Hamilton, Trevor J

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental discussion in lower-level undergraduate neuroscience and psychology courses is Descartes's "radical" or "mind-body" dualism. According to Descartes, our thinking mind, the res cogitans, is separate from the body as physical matter or substance, the res extensa. Since the transmission of sensory stimuli from the body to the mind is a physical capacity shared with animals, it can be confused, misled, or uncertain (e.g., bodily senses imply that ice and water are different substances). True certainty thus arises from within the mind and its capacity to doubt physical stimuli. Since this doubting mind is a thinking thing that is distinct from bodily stimuli, truth and certainty are reached through the doubting mind as cogito ergo sum, or the certainty of itself as it thinks: hence Descartes's famous maxim, I think, therefore I am. However, in the last century of Western philosophy, with nervous system investigation, and with recent advances in neuroscience, the potential avenues to explore student's understanding of the epistemology and effects of Cartesian mind-body dualism has expanded. This article further explores this expansion, highlighting pedagogical practices and tools instructors can use to enhance a psychology student's understanding of Cartesian dualistic epistemology, in order to think more critically about its implicit assumptions and effects on learning. It does so in two ways: first, by offering instructors an alternative philosophical perspective to dualistic thinking: a mind-body holism that is antithetical to the assumed binaries of dualistic epistemology. Second, it supplements this philosophical argument with a practical component: simple mind-body illusions that instructors may use to demonstrate contrary epistemologies to students. Combining these short philosophical and neuroscience arguments thereby acts as a pedagogical tool to open new conceptual spaces within which learning may occur.

  10. Pedagogical tools to explore Cartesian mind-body dualism in the classroom: philosophical arguments and neuroscience illusions

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Scott; Hamilton, Trevor J.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental discussion in lower-level undergraduate neuroscience and psychology courses is Descartes’s “radical” or “mind-body” dualism. According to Descartes, our thinking mind, the res cogitans, is separate from the body as physical matter or substance, the res extensa. Since the transmission of sensory stimuli from the body to the mind is a physical capacity shared with animals, it can be confused, misled, or uncertain (e.g., bodily senses imply that ice and water are different substances). True certainty thus arises from within the mind and its capacity to doubt physical stimuli. Since this doubting mind is a thinking thing that is distinct from bodily stimuli, truth and certainty are reached through the doubting mind as cogito ergo sum, or the certainty of itself as it thinks: hence Descartes’s famous maxim, I think, therefore I am. However, in the last century of Western philosophy, with nervous system investigation, and with recent advances in neuroscience, the potential avenues to explore student’s understanding of the epistemology and effects of Cartesian mind-body dualism has expanded. This article further explores this expansion, highlighting pedagogical practices and tools instructors can use to enhance a psychology student’s understanding of Cartesian dualistic epistemology, in order to think more critically about its implicit assumptions and effects on learning. It does so in two ways: first, by offering instructors an alternative philosophical perspective to dualistic thinking: a mind-body holism that is antithetical to the assumed binaries of dualistic epistemology. Second, it supplements this philosophical argument with a practical component: simple mind-body illusions that instructors may use to demonstrate contrary epistemologies to students. Combining these short philosophical and neuroscience arguments thereby acts as a pedagogical tool to open new conceptual spaces within which learning may occur. PMID:26321981

  11. Harmonic Models in Cartesian and Internal Coordinates to Simulate the Absorption Spectra of Carotenoids at Finite Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Ávila Ferrer, Francisco J; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2013-11-12

    When large structural displacements take place between the ground state (GS) and excited state (ES) minima of polyatomic molecules, the choice of a proper set of coordinates can be crucial for a reliable simulation of the vibrationally resolved absorption spectrum. In this work, we study two carotenoids that undergo structural displacements from GS to ES minima of different magnitude, from small displacements for violaxanthin to rather large ones for β-carotene isomers. Their finite-temperature (77 and 300 K) spectra are simulated at the harmonic level, including Duschinsky effect, by time-dependent (TD) and time-independent (TI) approaches, using (TD)DFT computed potential energy surfaces (PES). We adopted two approaches to construct the harmonic PES, the Adiabatic (AH) and Vertical Hessian (VH) models and, for AH, two reference coordinate frames: Cartesian and valence internal coordinates. Our results show that when large displacements take place, Cartesian coordinates dramatically fail to describe curvilinear displacements and to account for the Duschinsky matrix, preventing a realistic simulation of the spectra within the AH model, where the GS and ES PESs are quadratically expanded around their own equilibrium geometry. In contrast, internal coordinates largely amend such deficiencies and deliver reasonable spectral widths. As expected, both coordinate frames give similar results when small displacements occur. The good agreement between VH and experimental line shapes indicates that VH model, in which GS and ES normal modes are both evaluated at the GS equilibrium geometry, is a good alternative to deal with systems exhibiting large displacements. The use of this model can be, however, problematic when imaginary frequencies arise. The extent of the nonorthogonality of the Dushinsky matrix in internal coordinates and its correlation with the magnitude of the displacement of the GS and ES geometries is analyzed in detail.

  12. Wave simulation in 2D heterogeneous transversely isotropic porous media with fractional attenuation: A Cartesian grid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Emilie; Chiavassa, Guillaume; Lombard, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    A time-domain numerical modeling of transversely isotropic Biot poroelastic waves is proposed in two dimensions. The viscous dissipation occurring in the pores is described using the dynamic permeability model developed by Johnson-Koplik-Dashen (JKD). Some of the coefficients in the Biot-JKD model are proportional to the square root of the frequency. In the time-domain, these coefficients introduce shifted fractional derivatives of order 1/2, involving a convolution product. Based on a diffusive representation, the convolution kernel is replaced by a finite number of memory variables that satisfy local-in-time ordinary differential equations, resulting in the Biot-DA (diffusive approximation) model. The properties of both the Biot-JKD and the Biot-DA models are analyzed: hyperbolicity, decrease of energy, dispersion. To determine the coefficients of the diffusive approximation, two approaches are analyzed: Gaussian quadratures and optimization methods in the frequency range of interest. The nonlinear optimization is shown to be the better way of determination. A splitting strategy is then applied to approximate numerically the Biot-DA equations. The propagative part is discretized using a fourth-order ADER scheme on a Cartesian grid, whereas the diffusive part is solved exactly. An immersed interface method is implemented to take into account heterogeneous media on a Cartesian grid and to discretize the jump conditions at interfaces. Numerical experiments are presented. Comparisons with analytical solutions show the efficiency and the accuracy of the approach, and some numerical experiments are performed to investigate wave phenomena in complex media, such as multiple scattering across a set of random scatterers.

  13. Calculation of steady and unsteady transonic flow using a Cartesian mesh and gridless boundary conditions with application to aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshman, David

    A numerical method for the solution of inviscid compressible flow using an array of embedded Cartesian meshes in conjunction with gridless surface boundary conditions is developed. The gridless boundary treatment is implemented by means of a least squares fitting of the conserved flux variables using a cloud of nodes in the vicinity of the surface geometry. The method allows for accurate treatment of the surface boundary conditions using a grid resolution an order of magnitude coarser than required of typical Cartesian approaches. Additionally, the method does not suffer from issues associated with thin body geometry or extremely fine cut cells near the body. Unlike some methods that consider a gridless (or "meshless") treatment throughout the entire domain, multi-grid acceleration can be effectively incorporated and issues associated with global conservation are alleviated. The "gridless" surface boundary condition provides for efficient and simple problem set up since definition of the body geometry is generated independently from the field mesh, and automatically incorporated into the field discretization of the domain. The applicability of the method is first demonstrated for steady flow of single and multi-element airfoil configurations. Using this method, comparisons with traditional body-fitted grid simulations reveal that steady flow solutions can be obtained accurately with minimal effort associated with grid generation. The method is then extended to unsteady flow predictions. In this application, flow field simulations for the prescribed oscillation of an airfoil indicate excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, it is shown that the phase lag associated with shock oscillation is accurately predicted without the need for a deformable mesh. Lastly, the method is applied to the prediction of transonic flutter using a two-dimensional wing model, in which comparisons with moving mesh simulations yield nearly identical results. As a result

  14. Eight-moment approximation solar wind models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Espen Lyngdal; Leer, Egil

    1995-01-01

    Heat conduction from the corona is important in the solar wind energy budget. Until now all hydrodynamic solar wind models have been using the collisionally dominated gas approximation for the heat conductive flux. Observations of the solar wind show particle distribution functions which deviate significantly from a Maxwellian, and it is clear that the solar wind plasma is far from collisionally dominated. We have developed a numerical model for the solar wind which solves the full equation for the heat conductive flux together with the conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy. The equations are obtained by taking moments of the Boltzmann equation, using an 8-moment approximation for the distribution function. For low-density solar winds the 8-moment approximation models give results which differ significantly from the results obtained in models assuming the gas to be collisionally dominated. The two models give more or less the same results in high density solar winds.

  15. The moments of inertia of mars

    SciTech Connect

    Bills, B.G. )

    1989-05-01

    The mean moment of inertia of Mars is, at present, very poorly constrained. The generally accepted value of 0.365 MR{sup 2} is obtained by assuming that the observed second degree gravity field can be decomposed into a hydrostatic oblate spheroid and a nonhydrostatic prolate spheroid with an equatorial axis of symmetry. An alternative decomposition is advocated in the present analysis. If the nonhydrostatic component is a maximally triaxial ellipsoid (intermediate moment midway between greatest and least) the hydrostatic component is consistent with a mean moment of 0.345 MR{sup 2}. The plausibility of this decomposition is supported by statistical arguments and comparison with the Earth, Moon and Venus. If confirmed, this new value would have significant implications for the inferred composition and climatic history of Mars. The Mars Observer mission may help resolve this issue.

  16. An online database of nuclear electromagnetic moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertzimekis, T. J.; Stamou, K.; Psaltis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of nuclear magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments are considered quite important for the understanding of nuclear structure both near and far from the valley of stability. The recent advent of radioactive beams has resulted in a plethora of new, continuously flowing, experimental data on nuclear structure - including nuclear moments - which hinders the information management. A new, dedicated, public and user friendly online database (http://magneticmoments.info) has been created comprising experimental data of nuclear electromagnetic moments. The present database supersedes existing printed compilations, including also non-evaluated series of data and relevant meta-data, while putting strong emphasis on bimonthly updates. The scope, features and extensions of the database are reported.

  17. Manipulating magnetic moments by superconducting currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.

    2017-03-01

    We show that the interaction between a superconducting order parameter and the magnetic moment of an atomic cluster in a two-dimensional s -wave superconductor with Rashba spin-orbit coupling generates magnetic anisotropy that can be stronger or comparable to the magnetic anisotropy due to the crystal field and the shape of the cluster. Transport current through the superconductor produces the effective magnetic field acting on the cluster's magnetic moment. The direction of the effective field depends on the direction of the current, thus allowing one to manipulate the magnetic moment by the superconducting current. Due to the large density of the superconducting current this method of magnetization reversal can be more advantageous at low temperatures than the spin-transfer torque method that requires a large spin-polarized current through a normal metal.

  18. On the errors in molecular dipole moments derived from accurate diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Coppens; Volkov; Abramov; Koritsanszky

    1999-09-01

    The error in the molecular dipole moment as derived from accurate X-ray diffraction data is shown to be origin dependent in the general case. It is independent of the choice of origin if an electroneutrality constraint is introduced, even when additional constraints are applied to the monopole populations. If a constraint is not applied to individual moieties, as is appropriate for multicomponent crystals or crystals containing molecular ions, the geometric center of the entity considered is a suitable choice of origin for the error treatment.

  19. A modified coupled pair functional approach. [for dipole moment calculation of metal hydride ground states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, D. P.; Langhoff, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A modified coupled pair functional (CPF) method is presented for the configuration interaction problem that dramatically improves properties for cases where the Hartree-Fock reference configuration is not a good zeroth-order wave function description. It is shown that the tendency for CPF to overestimate the effect of higher excitations arises from the choice of the geometric mean for the partial normalization denominator. The modified method is demonstrated for ground state dipole moment calculations of the NiH, CuH, and ZnH transition metal hydrides, and compared to singles-plus-doubles configuration interaction and the Ahlrichs et al. (1984) CPF method.

  20. Mexican sign language recognition using normalized moments and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís-V., J.-Francisco; Toxqui-Quitl, Carina; Martínez-Martínez, David; H.-G., Margarita

    2014-09-01

    This work presents a framework designed for the Mexican Sign Language (MSL) recognition. A data set was recorded with 24 static signs from the MSL using 5 different versions, this MSL dataset was captured using a digital camera in incoherent light conditions. Digital Image Processing was used to segment hand gestures, a uniform background was selected to avoid using gloved hands or some special markers. Feature extraction was performed by calculating normalized geometric moments of gray scaled signs, then an Artificial Neural Network performs the recognition using a 10-fold cross validation tested in weka, the best result achieved 95.83% of recognition rate.

  1. Early and Late Inhibitions Elicited by a Peripheral Visual Cue on Manual Response to a Visual Target: Are They Based on Cartesian Coordinates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawryszewski, Luiz G.; Carreiro, Luiz Renato R.; Magalhaes, Fabio V.

    2005-01-01

    A non-informative cue (C) elicits an inhibition of manual reaction time (MRT) to a visual target (T). We report an experiment to examine if the spatial distribution of this inhibitory effect follows Polar or Cartesian coordinate systems. C appeared at one out of 8 isoeccentric (7[degrees]) positions, the C-T angular distances (in polar…

  2. Oscillating Hadron and Jet Multiplicity Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, W.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the moments of multiplicity distributions in e+e- annihilation and the ratios Hq (cumulant over factorial moments Kq/Fq) have been determined both for the hadronic final state and for jets at variable resolution. These ratios show an oscillatory behaviour as function of q with strong dependence of the amplitude and length of oscillation on the jet resolution parameter ycut. The recent explanation of this phenomenon based on perturbative QCD calculations is discussed.

  3. First moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-06-01

    We extrapolate the first moments of the generalized parton distributions using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. The calculation is based on the one loop level with the finite range regularization. The description of the lattice data is satisfactory, and the extrapolated moments at physical pion mass are consistent with the results obtained with dimensional regularization, although the extrapolation in the momentum transfer to t=0 does show sensitivity to form factor effects, which lie outside the realm of chiral perturbation theory. We discuss the significance of the results in the light of modern experiments as well as QCD inspired models.

  4. Practical method for balancing airplane moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamburger, H

    1924-01-01

    The present contribution is the sequel to a paper written by Messrs. R. Fuchs, L. Hopf, and H. Hamburger, and proposes to show that the methods therein contained can be practically utilized in computations. Furthermore, the calculations leading up to the diagram of moments for three airplanes, whose performance in war service gave reason for complaint, are analyzed. Finally, it is shown what conclusions can be drawn from the diagram of moments with regard to the defects in these planes and what steps may be taken to remedy them.

  5. Gravitational forces and moments on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, T. R.; Likins, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    The solution of problems of attitude dynamics of spacecraft and the influence of gravitational forces and moments is examined. Arguments are presented based on Newton's law of gravitation, and employing the methods of Newtonian (vectorial) mechanics, with minimal recourse to the classical concepts of potential theory. The necessary ideas were developed and relationships were established to permit the representation of gravitational forces and moments exerted on bodies in space by other bodies, both in terms involving the mass distribution properties of the bodies, and in terms of vector operations on those scalar functions classically described as gravitational potential functions.

  6. Third Zemach moment of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Ian C. Cloet, Gerald A. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Modern electron scattering experiments have determined the proton electric form factor, G_{Ep}(Q^2), to high precision. We utilize this data, represented by the different form factor parametrizations, to compute the third Zemach moment of the proton charge distribution. We find that existing data rule out a value of the third Zemach moment large enough to explain the current puzzle with the proton charge radius determined from the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. This is in contrast with the recent claim of De Rujula [arXiv:1008.3861].

  7. Determination of the Neutron Magnetic Moment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Greene, G. L.; Ramsey, N. F.; Mampe, W.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Smith, K.; Dress, W. B.; Miller, P. D.; Perrin, P.

    1981-06-01

    The neutron magnetic moment has been measured with an improvement of a factor of 100 over the previous best measurement. Using a magnetic resonance spectrometer of the separated oscillatory field type capable of determining a resonance signal for both neutrons and protons (in flowing H{sub 2}O), we find ..mu..{sub n}/..mu..{sub p} = 0.68497935(17) (0.25 ppM). The neutron magnetic moment can also be expressed without loss of accuracy in a variety of other units.

  8. Geometric symmetries in superfluid vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kozik, Evgeny; Svistunov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Dynamics of quantized vortex lines in a superfluid feature symmetries associated with the geometric character of the complex-valued field, w(z)=x(z)+iy(z), describing the instant shape of the line. Along with a natural set of Noether's constants of motion, which - apart from their rather specific expressions in terms of w(z) - are nothing but components of the total linear and angular momenta of the fluid, the geometric symmetry brings about crucial consequences for kinetics of distortion waves on the vortex lines, the Kelvin waves. It is the geometric symmetry that renders Kelvin-wave cascade local in the wave-number space. Similar considerations apply to other systems with purely geometric degrees of freedom.

  9. Heat transfer in geometrically similar cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riekert, P; Held, A

    1941-01-01

    The power and heat-stress conditions of geometrically similar engines are discussed. The advantages accruing from smaller cylinder dimensions are higher specific horsepower, lower weight per horsepower, lower piston temperature, and less frontal area, with reduced detonation tendency.

  10. Hidden geometric correlations in real multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja; Boguñá, Marián; Ángeles Serrano, M.; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos

    2016-11-01

    Real networks often form interacting parts of larger and more complex systems. Examples can be found in different domains, ranging from the Internet to structural and functional brain networks. Here, we show that these multiplex systems are not random combinations of single network layers. Instead, they are organized in specific ways dictated by hidden geometric correlations between the layers. We find that these correlations are significant in different real multiplexes, and form a key framework for answering many important questions. Specifically, we show that these geometric correlations facilitate the definition and detection of multidimensional communities, which are sets of nodes that are simultaneously similar in multiple layers. They also enable accurate trans-layer link prediction, meaning that connections in one layer can be predicted by observing the hidden geometric space of another layer. And they allow efficient targeted navigation in the multilayer system using only local knowledge, outperforming navigation in the single layers only if the geometric correlations are sufficiently strong.

  11. The perception of geometrical structure from congruence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lappin, Joseph S.; Wason, Thomas D.

    1989-01-01

    The principle function of vision is to measure the environment. As demonstrated by the coordination of motor actions with the positions and trajectories of moving objects in cluttered environments and by rapid recognition of solid objects in varying contexts from changing perspectives, vision provides real-time information about the geometrical structure and location of environmental objects and events. The geometric information provided by 2-D spatial displays is examined. It is proposed that the geometry of this information is best understood not within the traditional framework of perspective trigonometry, but in terms of the structure of qualitative relations defined by congruences among intrinsic geometric relations in images of surfaces. The basic concepts of this geometrical theory are outlined.

  12. Concepts and Figures in Geometric Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Efraim; Nachlieli, Talli

    1998-01-01

    Opens with the theoretical construct of figural concepts. Argues that geometrical figures are characterized by both conceptual and sensorial properties. Investigates the effects of interaction between conceptual and figural components. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  13. Applying the Moment Distance Framework to LiDAR Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, E. L.; Aguilar-Amuchastegui, N.; Henebry, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    In the past decade or so, there have only been limited approaches formulated for the analysis of waveform LiDAR data. We illustrate how the Moment Distance (MD) framework can characterize the shape of the LiDAR waveforms using simple, computationally fast, geometric operations. We assess the relationship of the MD metrics to some key waveform landmarks - such as locations of peaks, power of returns, and pseudo-heights - using LVIS datasets acquired over a tropical forest in La Selva, Costa Rica in 1998 and 2005. We also apply the MD framework to 2003 LVIS data from Howland Forest, Maine. We also explore the effects of noise on the MD Index (MDI). Our results reveal that the MDI can capture important dynamics in canopy structure. Movement in the location of the peaks is detected by shifts in the MDI. Because this new approach responds to waveform shape, it is more sensitive to changes of location of peak returns than to the power of the return. Results also suggest a positive relationship between the MDI and the canopy pseudo-height.

  14. Variation in the human Achilles tendon moment arm during walking.

    PubMed

    Rasske, Kristen; Thelen, Darryl G; Franz, Jason R

    2017-02-01

    The Achilles tendon (AT) moment arm is an important determinant of ankle moment and power generation during locomotion. Load and depth-dependent variations in the AT moment arm are generally not considered, but may be relevant given the complex triceps surae architecture. We coupled motion analysis and ultrasound imaging to characterize AT moment arms during walking in 10 subjects. Muscle loading during push-off amplified the AT moment arm by 10% relative to heel strike. AT moment arms also varied by 14% over the tendon thickness. In walking, AT moment arms are not strictly dependent on kinematics, but exhibit important load and spatial dependencies.

  15. The Geometric Grids of the Hieratic Numeral.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulfotouh, Hossam M. K.

    The paper discusses the geometrical designs of the hieratic numeral signs. It shows the regular-grid-patterns of squares upon which, the shapes of the already decoded hieratic numeral-signs, have been designed. Also, it shows the design of some hieratic numeral signs, based on subdividing the circle; and the hieratic signs of modular notation. It might reveal the basic geometrical level of understanding of anonymous ancient Egyptians who designed them some four thousand years ago.

  16. Neural coding of image structure and contrast polarity of Cartesian, hyperbolic, and polar gratings in the primary and secondary visual cortex of the tree shrew.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Jordan; De Luna, Paolo; Rainer, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    We comprehensively characterize spiking and visual evoked potential (VEP) activity in tree shrew V1 and V2 using Cartesian, hyperbolic, and polar gratings. Neural selectivity to structure of Cartesian gratings was higher than other grating classes in both visual areas. From V1 to V2, structure selectivity of spiking activity increased, whereas corresponding VEP values tended to decrease, suggesting that single-neuron coding of Cartesian grating attributes improved while the cortical columnar organization of these neurons became less precise from V1 to V2. We observed that neurons in V2 generally exhibited similar selectivity for polar and Cartesian gratings, suggesting that structure of polar-like stimuli might be encoded as early as in V2. This hypothesis is supported by the preference shift from V1 to V2 toward polar gratings of higher spatial frequency, consistent with the notion that V2 neurons encode visual scene borders and contours. Neural sensitivity to modulations of polarity of hyperbolic gratings was highest among all grating classes and closely related to the visual receptive field (RF) organization of ON- and OFF-dominated subregions. We show that spatial RF reconstructions depend strongly on grating class, suggesting that intracortical contributions to RF structure are strongest for Cartesian and polar gratings. Hyperbolic gratings tend to recruit least cortical elaboration such that the RF maps are similar to those generated by sparse noise, which most closely approximate feedforward inputs. Our findings complement previous literature in primates, rodents, and carnivores and highlight novel aspects of shape representation and coding occurring in mammalian early visual cortex.

  17. Geometric sensitivity of ClearPET™ Neuro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlich, Brigitte; Weber, Simone

    2007-02-01

    ClearPET™ Neuro is a small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner dedicated to brain studies on rats and primates. The design of ClearPET™ Neuro leads to a specific geometric sensitivity, characterized by inhomogeneous and, depending on the measurement setup, even incomplete data. With respect to reconstruction techniques, homogeneous and complete data sets are a 'must' for analytical reconstruction methods, whereas iterative methods take the geometrical sensitivity into account during the reconstruction process. Nevertheless, here a homogeneous geometric sensitivity over the field of view is highly desirable. Therefore, this contribution aims at studying the impact of different scanner geometries and measurement setups on the geometric sensitivity. A data set of coincident events is computed for certain settings that contains each possible crystal combination once. The lines of response are rebinned into normalizing sinograms and backprojected into sensitivity images. Both, normalizing sinograms and sensitivity images mirror the geometric sensitivity and therefore, provide information which setting enables most complete and homogeneous data sets. An optimal measurement setup and scanner geometry in terms of homogeneous geometric sensitivity is found by analyzing the sensitivity images.

  18. Exploration of Learning Strategies Associated With Aha Learning Moments.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Jobeth W

    2016-01-01

    Educators recognize aha moments as powerful aspects of learning. Yet limited research has been performed regarding how to promote these learning moments. This article describes an exploratory study of aha learning moments as experienced and described by participants. Findings showed use of visuals, scenarios, storytelling, Socratic questions, and expert explanation led to aha learning moments. The findings provide guidance regarding the types of learning strategies that can be used to promote aha moments.

  19. Right-handed neutrino magnetic moments

    SciTech Connect

    Aparici, Alberto; Santamaria, Arcadi; Kim, Kyungwook; Wudka, Jose

    2009-07-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of the most general effective Lagrangian, up to operators of dimension five, built with standard model fields and interactions including right-handed neutrinos. In particular, we find there is a dimension five electroweak moment operator of right-handed neutrinos, not discussed previously in the literature, which could have interesting phenomenological consequences.

  20. Nuclear spins and moments: Fundamental structural information

    SciTech Connect

    Semmes, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Predictions for the low energy structure of well deformed odd-A Pm and Sm nuclei in the A {approx} 130 region are given, based on the particle-rotor model. Distinctive magnetic dipole properties (static moments and transition rates) are expected for certain Nilsson configurations, and comparisons to recent data are made for {sup 133}Pm, {sup 135}Sm and {sup 133}Sm.

  1. Nuclear spins and moments: Fundamental structural information

    SciTech Connect

    Semmes, P.B.

    1991-12-31

    Predictions for the low energy structure of well deformed odd-A Pm and Sm nuclei in the A {approx} 130 region are given, based on the particle-rotor model. Distinctive magnetic dipole properties (static moments and transition rates) are expected for certain Nilsson configurations, and comparisons to recent data are made for {sup 133}Pm, {sup 135}Sm and {sup 133}Sm.

  2. Joe McCarthy's Fantastic Moment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darsey, James

    1995-01-01

    Explains Joe McCarthy's rhetoric and its apparent resistance to exorcism by historical fact through the literary genre of fantasy. Argues that McCarthy could not be discredited or argued against because he took no positions but presented his audience with a sustained moment of hesitation in which every claim on credulity was offset by a denial of…

  3. The controls at low hinge moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pris, M

    1932-01-01

    A very stable airplane remains very maneuverable when the hinge moments of the controls remain inferior to those obtained with the conventional forms and when the wing lift at high angles has been improved. From this point of view, elevators balanced by recoil of the hinge, and slotted wings present some interesting features.

  4. The Teachable Moment and the Handicapped Infant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, M. Beth

    The report examines, from a cognitive developmental view, research on the teachable moment or critical learning period in handicapped infants. The author explains that developmental gaps are produced by a mismatch between the infant's readiness and opportunity to learn. Characteristics and educational implications of specific handicapping…

  5. Multipole moments of bumpy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Vigeland, Sarah J.

    2010-11-15

    General relativity predicts the existence of black holes, compact objects whose spacetimes depend only on their mass, spin, and charge in vacuum (the 'no-hair' theorem). As various observations probe deeper into the strong fields of black hole candidates, it is becoming possible to test this prediction. Previous work suggested that such tests can be performed by measuring whether the multipolar structure of black hole candidates has the form that general relativity demands, and introduced a family of 'bumpy black hole' spacetimes to be used for making these measurements. These spacetimes have generalized multipoles, where the deviation from the Kerr metric depends on the spacetime's 'bumpiness'. In this paper, we show how to compute the Geroch-Hansen moments of a bumpy black hole, demonstrating that there is a clean mapping between the deviations used in the bumpy black hole formalism and the Geroch-Hansen moments. We also extend our previous results to define bumpy black holes whose current moments, analogous to magnetic moments of electrodynamics, deviate from the canonical Kerr value.

  6. Using Aha! Moments to Understand Leadership Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lori L.; Lewis, Lauren J.

    2012-01-01

    As Huber (2002) noted, striving to understand how leadership is taught and learned is both a challenge and an opportunity facing leadership educators. This article describes the "Leadership Aha! Moment" assignment used in a leadership theory course to help students recognize the intersection of leadership theories and their daily lives while…

  7. Teachable Moments. All 18 Issues from 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drum, Jan; Otero, George

    "Teachable Moments" are teaching aids about global perspectives in education. Number 1 describes an activity that lets students feel what it is like to be a refugee. Number 2 involves discussion of why people are hungry, rich, or poor. Number 3 helps students learn to deal with experts' opinions on global problems. Number 4 uses…

  8. Moments, Mixed Methods, and Paradigm Dialogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denzin, Norman K.

    2010-01-01

    I reread the 50-year-old history of the qualitative inquiry that calls for triangulation and mixed methods. I briefly visit the disputes within the mixed methods community asking how did we get to where we are today, the period of mixed-multiple-methods advocacy, and Teddlie and Tashakkori's third methodological moment. (Contains 10 notes.)

  9. The Magic Moment: Creating Color Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartges, Dan

    2009-01-01

    If there is a truly magic moment in art class, it must be when a student--of any age--attains a working knowledge of color's core principles. At that point, she or he becomes able to consistently create color harmony in any painting, regardless of the subject matter. From then on, that student gains greater confidence, can paint better pictures…

  10. Pedagogical Moments: Affective Sexual Literacies in Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kyra

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers three pedagogical moments in the film "Tomorrow, When the War Began" (2010), contemplating the way in which they open a space for conversations about feelings, sexuality and gender. "Tomorrow, When the War Began" follows the plight of 17-year-old Ellie who returns to her rural town from a camping trip with…

  11. Avalanche!--Teachable Moments in Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Shayne

    2005-01-01

    Rarely do outdoor educators get the opportunity to safely incorporate an avalanche while the topic of the day is actually avalanche awareness and forecasting. Many similar possibilities exist in the expeditionary context, but even brief excursions may result in incredible learning experiences. These "teachable moments" occur regularly in the…

  12. The Doubling Moment: Resurrecting Edgar Allan Poe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnick, J. Bradley; Mergil, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This article expands upon Jeffrey Wilhelm's and Brian Edmiston's (1998) concept of a doubling of viewpoints by encouraging middle level students to use dramatization to take on multiple perspectives, to pose interpretive questions, and to enhance critical inquiry from inside and outside of texts. The doubling moment is both the activation of…

  13. "To Value Every Child in the Moment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article takes as its starting point the assertion that the purpose of primary education is to value every child in the moment. The author examines one particular story by a six-year-old girl as an example of what this assertion implies, and of its significance for teaching and learning within the primary school.

  14. Three-Dimensional Geometric Analysis of Felid Limb Bone Allometry

    PubMed Central

    Doube, Michael; Conroy, Alexis Wiktorowicz; Christiansen, Per; Hutchinson, John R.; Shefelbine, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies of bone allometry typically use simple measurements taken in a small number of locations per bone; often the midshaft diameter or joint surface area is compared to body mass or bone length. However, bones must fulfil multiple roles simultaneously with minimum cost to the animal while meeting the structural requirements imposed by behaviour and locomotion, and not exceeding its capacity for adaptation and repair. We use entire bone volumes from the forelimbs and hindlimbs of Felidae (cats) to investigate regional complexities in bone allometry. Method/Principal Findings Computed tomographic (CT) images (16435 slices in 116 stacks) were made of 9 limb bones from each of 13 individuals of 9 feline species ranging in size from domestic cat (Felis catus) to tiger (Panthera tigris). Eleven geometric parameters were calculated for every CT slice and scaling exponents calculated at 5% increments along the entire length of each bone. Three-dimensional moments of inertia were calculated for each bone volume, and spherical radii were measured in the glenoid cavity, humeral head and femoral head. Allometry of the midshaft, moments of inertia and joint radii were determined. Allometry was highly variable and related to local bone function, with joint surfaces and muscle attachment sites generally showing stronger positive allometry than the midshaft. Conclusions/Significance Examining whole bones revealed that bone allometry is strongly affected by regional variations in bone function, presumably through mechanical effects on bone modelling. Bone's phenotypic plasticity may be an advantage during rapid evolutionary divergence by allowing exploitation of the full size range that a morphotype can occupy. Felids show bone allometry rather than postural change across their size range, unlike similar-sized animals. PMID:19270749

  15. Microbial hotspots and hot moments in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Soils are the most heterogeneous parts of the biosphere, with an extremely high differentiation of properties and processes within nano- to macroscales. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of input of labile organics by plants creates microbial hotspots over short periods of time - the hot moments. We define microbial hotspots as small soil volumes with much faster process rates and much more intensive interactions compared to the average soil conditions. Such hotspots are found in the rhizosphere, detritusphere, biopores (including drilosphere) and on aggregate surfaces, but hotspots are frequently of mixed origin. Hot moments are short-term events or sequences of events inducing accelerated process rates as compared to the averaged rates. Thus, hotspots and hot moments are defined by dynamic characteristics, i.e. by process rates. For this hotspot concept we extensively reviewed and examined the localization and size of hotspots, spatial distribution and visualization approaches, transport of labile C to and from hotspots, lifetime and process intensities, with a special focus on process rates and microbial activities. The fraction of active microorganisms in hotspots is 2-20 times higher than in the bulk soil, and their specific activities (i.e. respiration, microbial growth, mineralization potential, enzyme activities, RNA/DNA ratio) may also be much higher. The duration of hot moments in the rhizosphere is limited and is controlled by the length of the input of labile organics. It can last a few hours up to a few days. In the detritusphere, however, the duration of hot moments is regulated by the output - by decomposition rates of litter - and lasts for weeks and months. Hot moments induce succession in microbial communities and intense intra- and interspecific competition affecting C use efficiency, microbial growth and turnover. The faster turnover and lower C use efficiency in hotspots counterbalances the high C inputs, leading to the absence of strong

  16. Geometric error of cervical point A calculated through traditional reconstruction procedures for brachytherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Yeh, Shyh-An; Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chen, Pang-Yu

    2015-09-08

    Brachytherapy used in local cervical cancer is still widely based on 2D standard dose planning with the prescription to point A, which is invisible on imaging and located at a high-dose gradient. In this study, the geometric location error of point A was investigated. It is traditionally reconstructed in the treatment planning system after carefully digitizing the point marks that were previously drawn on the orthogonal radiographs into the system. Two Cartesian coordinates of point A were established and compared. One was built up based on the geometric definition of point A and would be taken as the true coordinate, while the other was built up through traditional clinical treatment procedures and named as the practical coordinate. The orthogonal-film reconstruction technique was used and the location error between the practical and the true coordinate introduced from the variations of, first, the angle between the tandem and the simulator gantry-rotation-axis, and second, the interval between the tandem flange and the simulator isocenter, was analyzed. The location error of point A was higher if the tandem was rotated away from the gantry-rotation-axis or if the location of the tandem flange was set away from the isocenter. If a tandem with a 30-degree curvature was rotated away from the gantry-rotation-axis 10 degrees in the anterior-posterior (AP) view, and there was an 8.7 cm interval between the flange and the isocenter, the location error of point A would be greater than 3 mm without including other errors from simulator calibration, data input, patient setup and movements. To reduce the location error of point A calculated for traditional reconstruction procedures, it is suggested to move the couch or patient to make the mid-point of two points A near the isocenter and the tandem in the AP view parallel to the gantry-rotation-axis as much as possible.

  17. Geometric error of cervical point A calculated through traditional reconstruction procedures for brachytherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Yeh, Shyh-An; Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chen, Pang-Yu

    2015-09-01

    Brachytherapy used in local cervical cancer is still widely based on 2D standard dose planning with the prescription to point A, which is invisible on imaging and located at a high-dose gradient. In this study, the geometric location error of point A was investigated. It is traditionally reconstructed in the treatment planning system after carefully digitizing the point marks that were previously drawn on the orthogonal radiographs into the system. Two Cartesian coordinates of point A were established and compared. One was built up based on the geometric definition of point A and would be taken as the true coordinate, while the other was built up through traditional clinical treatment procedures and named as the practical coordinate. The orthogonal film reconstruction technique was used and the location error between the practical and the true coordinate introduced from the variations of, first, the angle between the tandem and the simulator gantry rotation axis, and second, the interval between the tandem flange and the simulator isocenter, was analyzed. The location error of point A was higher if the tandem was rotated away from the gantry rotation axis or if the location of the tandem flange was set away from the isocenter. If a tandem with a 30° curvature was rotated away from the gantry rotation axis 10° in the anterior-posterior (AP) view, and there was an 8.7 cm interval between the flange and the isocenter, the location error of point A would be 3 mm without including other errors from simulator calibration, data input, patient setup, and movements. To reduce the location error of point A calculated for traditional reconstruction procedures, it is suggested to move the couch or patient to make the mid-point of two points A near the isocenter and the tandem in the AP view parallel to the gantry rotation axis as much as possible. PACS number: 87.55.km.

  18. Light beams with general direction and polarization: Global description and geometric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nityananda, R.; Sridhar, S.

    2014-02-01

    We construct the manifold describing the family of plane monochromatic light waves with all directions, polarizations, phases and intensities. A smooth description of polarization, valid over the entire sphere S2 of directions, is given through the construction of an orthogonal basis pair of complex polarization vectors for each direction; any light beam is then uniquely and smoothly specified by giving its direction and two complex amplitudes. This implies that the space of all light beams is the six dimensional manifold S2×C2∖{0}, the (untwisted) Cartesian product of a sphere and a two dimensional complex vector space minus the origin. A Hopf map (i.e. mapping the two complex amplitudes to the Stokes parameters) then leads to the four dimensional manifold S2×S2 which describes beams with all directions and polarization states. This product of two spheres can be viewed as an ordered pair of two points on a single sphere, in contrast to earlier work in which the same system was represented using Majorana's mapping of the states of a spin one quantum system to an unordered pair of points on a sphere. This is a different manifold, CP2, two dimensional complex projective space, which does not faithfully represent the full space of all directions and polarizations. Following the now-standard framework, we exhibit the fibre bundle whose total space is the set of all light beams of non-zero intensity, and base space S2×S2. We give the U(1) connection which determines the geometric phase as the line integral of a one-form along a closed curve in the total space. Bases are classified as globally smooth, global but singular, and local, with the last type of basis being defined only when the curve traversed by the system is given. Existing as well as new formulae for the geometric phase are presented in this overall framework.

  19. Generating moment matching scenarios using optimization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2013-05-16

    An optimization based method is proposed to generate moment matching scenarios for numerical integration and its use in stochastic programming. The main advantage of the method is its flexibility: it can generate scenarios matching any prescribed set of moments of the underlying distribution rather than matching all moments up to a certain order, and the distribution can be defined over an arbitrary set. This allows for a reduction in the number of scenarios and allows the scenarios to be better tailored to the problem at hand. The method is based on a semi-infinite linear programming formulation of the problem that is shown to be solvable with polynomial iteration complexity. A practical column generation method is implemented. The column generation subproblems are polynomial optimization problems; however, they need not be solved to optimality. It is found that the columns in the column generation approach can be efficiently generated by random sampling. The number of scenarios generated matches a lower bound of Tchakaloff's. The rate of convergence of the approximation error is established for continuous integrands, and an improved bound is given for smooth integrands. Extensive numerical experiments are presented in which variants of the proposed method are compared to Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo methods on both numerical integration problems and stochastic optimization problems. The benefits of being able to match any prescribed set of moments, rather than all moments up to a certain order, is also demonstrated using optimization problems with 100-dimensional random vectors. Here, empirical results show that the proposed approach outperforms Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo based approaches on the tested problems.

  20. Generating moment matching scenarios using optimization techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2013-05-16

    An optimization based method is proposed to generate moment matching scenarios for numerical integration and its use in stochastic programming. The main advantage of the method is its flexibility: it can generate scenarios matching any prescribed set of moments of the underlying distribution rather than matching all moments up to a certain order, and the distribution can be defined over an arbitrary set. This allows for a reduction in the number of scenarios and allows the scenarios to be better tailored to the problem at hand. The method is based on a semi-infinite linear programming formulation of the problem thatmore » is shown to be solvable with polynomial iteration complexity. A practical column generation method is implemented. The column generation subproblems are polynomial optimization problems; however, they need not be solved to optimality. It is found that the columns in the column generation approach can be efficiently generated by random sampling. The number of scenarios generated matches a lower bound of Tchakaloff's. The rate of convergence of the approximation error is established for continuous integrands, and an improved bound is given for smooth integrands. Extensive numerical experiments are presented in which variants of the proposed method are compared to Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo methods on both numerical integration problems and stochastic optimization problems. The benefits of being able to match any prescribed set of moments, rather than all moments up to a certain order, is also demonstrated using optimization problems with 100-dimensional random vectors. Here, empirical results show that the proposed approach outperforms Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo based approaches on the tested problems.« less