Science.gov

Sample records for cartilage repair response

  1. Success rates and immunologic responses of autogenic, allogenic, and xenogenic treatments to repair articular cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Revell, Christopher M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2009-03-01

    This review examines current approaches available for articular cartilage repair, not only in terms of their regeneration potential, but also as a function of immunologic response. Autogenic repair techniques, including osteochondral plug transplantation, chondrocyte implantation, and microfracture, are the most widely accepted clinical treatment options due to the lack of immunogenic reactions, but only moderate graft success rates have been reported. Although suspended allogenic chondrocytes are shown to evoke an immune response upon implantation, allogenic osteochondral plugs and tissue-engineered grafts using allogenic chondrocytes exhibit a tolerable immunogenic response. Additionally, these repair techniques produce neotissue with success rates approaching those of currently available autogenic repair techniques, while simultaneously obviating their major hindrance of donor tissue scarcity. To date, limited research has been performed with xenogenic tissue, although several studies demonstrate the potential for its long-term success. This article focuses on the various treatment options for cartilage repair and their associated success rates and immunologic responses.

  2. Success Rates and Immunologic Responses of Autogenic, Allogenic, and Xenogenic Treatments to Repair Articular Cartilage Defects

    PubMed Central

    Revell, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    This review examines current approaches available for articular cartilage repair, not only in terms of their regeneration potential, but also as a function of immunologic response. Autogenic repair techniques, including osteochondral plug transplantation, chondrocyte implantation, and microfracture, are the most widely accepted clinical treatment options due to the lack of immunogenic reactions, but only moderate graft success rates have been reported. Although suspended allogenic chondrocytes are shown to evoke an immune response upon implantation, allogenic osteochondral plugs and tissue-engineered grafts using allogenic chondrocytes exhibit a tolerable immunogenic response. Additionally, these repair techniques produce neotissue with success rates approaching those of currently available autogenic repair techniques, while simultaneously obviating their major hindrance of donor tissue scarcity. To date, limited research has been performed with xenogenic tissue, although several studies demonstrate the potential for its long-term success. This article focuses on the various treatment options for cartilage repair and their associated success rates and immunologic responses. PMID:19063664

  3. Signaling Pathways in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Erminia; Pulsatelli, Lia; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In adult healthy cartilage, chondrocytes are in a quiescent phase characterized by a fine balance between anabolic and catabolic activities. In ageing, degenerative joint diseases and traumatic injuries of cartilage, a loss of homeostatic conditions and an up-regulation of catabolic pathways occur. Since cartilage differentiation and maintenance of homeostasis are finely tuned by a complex network of signaling molecules and biophysical factors, shedding light on these mechanisms appears to be extremely relevant for both the identification of pathogenic key factors, as specific therapeutic targets, and the development of biological approaches for cartilage regeneration. This review will focus on the main signaling pathways that can activate cellular and molecular processes, regulating the functional behavior of cartilage in both physiological and pathological conditions. These networks may be relevant in the crosstalk among joint compartments and increased knowledge in this field may lead to the development of more effective strategies for inducing cartilage repair. PMID:24837833

  4. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hurtig, Mark B.; Buschmann, Michael D.; Fortier, Lisa A.; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral defects in immature laboratory species, particularly the rabbit, was considered adequate; however, if successful and timely translation from animal models to regulatory approval and clinical use is the goal, a step-wise development using laboratory animals for screening and early development work followed by larger species such as the goat, sheep and horse for late development and pivotal studies is recommended. Such animals must have fully organized and mature cartilage. Both acute and chronic chondral defects can be used but the later are more like the lesions found in patients and may be more predictive. Quantitative and qualitative outcome measures such as macroscopic appearance, histology, biochemistry, functional imaging, and biomechanical testing of cartilage, provide reliable data to support investment decisions and subsequent applications to regulatory bodies for clinical trials. No one model or species can be considered ideal for pivotal studies, but the larger animal species are recommended for pivotal studies. Larger species such as the horse, goat and pig also allow arthroscopic delivery, and press-fit or sutured implant fixation in thick cartilage as well as second look arthroscopies and biopsy procedures. PMID:26069576

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  6. Local Morphological Response of the Distal Femoral Articular–Epiphyseal Cartilage Complex of Young Foals to Surgical Stab Incision and Potential Relevance to Cartilage Injury and Repair in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Eli H.S.; Ekman, Stina; Carlson, Cathy S.; Dolvik, Nils I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe the local morphological response of the articular–epiphyseal cartilage complex to surgical stab incision in the distal femur of foals, with emphasis on the relationship between growth cartilage injury, enchondral ossification, and repair. Design: Nine foals were induced into general anesthesia at the age of 13 to 15 days. Four full-thickness stab incision defects were created in the cartilage on the lateral aspect of the lateral trochlear ridge of the left distal femur. Follow-up examination was carried out from 1 to 49 days postoperatively, including examination of intact bones, sawed slabs, and histological sections. Results: Incision defects filled with cells displaying fibroblast-, chondrocyte-, and osteoblast-like characteristics, potentially validating the rationale behind the drilling of stable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans lesions in children. Incisions induced necrosis within the cartilage on the margins at all depths of the defects. Sharp dissection may therefore be contraindicated in cartilage repair in young individuals. Incisions caused a focal delay in enchondral ossification in 2 foals, apparently related to the orientation of the incision defect relative to the direction of ossification. Defects became progressively surrounded by subchondral bone, in which granulation tissue containing clasts and foci of osteoblast-like cells was observed. Continued enchondral ossification was therefore likely to result in healing of uncomplicated defects to morphologically normal bone. Conclusions: Epiphyseal growth cartilage injury had the potential to exert a negative effect on enchondral ossification. Enchondral ossification exerted a beneficial effect on repair. This relationship warrants consideration in future studies of cartilage injury and repair within the articular–epiphyseal cartilage complex of all species. PMID:26069670

  7. Cellular and Acellular Approaches for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are several choices of cells to use for cartilage repair. Cells are used as internal or external sources and sometimes in combination. In this article, an analysis of the different cell choices and their use and potential is provided. Embryonic cartilage formation is of importance when finding more about how to be able to perfect cartilage repair. Some suggestions for near future research based on up-to-date knowledge on chondrogenic cells are given to hopefully stimulate more studies on the final goal of cartilage regeneration. PMID:27340516

  8. Cartilage repair in the degenerative ageing knee

    PubMed Central

    Brittberg, Mats; Gomoll, Andreas H; Canseco, José A; Far, Jack; Lind, Martin; Hui, James

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Cartilage damage can develop due to trauma, resulting in focal chondral or osteochondral defects, or as more diffuse loss of cartilage in a generalized organ disease such as osteoarthritis. A loss of cartilage function and quality is also seen with increasing age. There is a spectrum of diseases ranging from focal cartilage defects with healthy surrounding cartilage to focal lesions in degenerative cartilage, to multiple and diffuse lesions in osteoarthritic cartilage. At the recent Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS) 2015, regenerative challenges in an ageing population were discussed by clinicians and basic scientists. A group of clinicians was given the task of discussing the role of tissue engineering in the treatment of degenerative cartilage lesions in ageing patients. We present the outcomes of our discussions on current treatment options for such lesions, with particular emphasis on different biological repair techniques and their supporting level of evidence. Results and interpretation Based on the studies on treatment of degenerative lesions and early OA, there is low-level evidence to suggest that cartilage repair is a possible treatment for such lesions, but there are conflicting results regarding the effect of advanced age on the outcome. We concluded that further improvements are needed for direct repair of focal, purely traumatic defects before we can routinely use such repair techniques for the more challenging degenerative lesions. Furthermore, we need to identify trigger mechanisms that start generalized loss of cartilage matrix, and induce subchondral bone changes and concomitant synovial pathology, to maximize our treatment methods for biological repair in degenerative ageing joints. PMID:27910738

  9. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  10. Animal Models for Cartilage Regeneration and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Szczodry, Michal; Bruno, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury and degeneration are leading causes of disability. Animal studies are critically important to developing effective treatments for cartilage injuries. This review focuses on the use of animal models for the study of the repair and regeneration of focal cartilage defects. Animals commonly used in cartilage repair studies include murine, lapine, canine, caprine, porcine, and equine models. There are advantages and disadvantages to each model. Small animal rodent and lapine models are cost effective, easy to house, and useful for pilot and proof-of-concept studies. The availability of transgenic and knockout mice provide opportunities for mechanistic in vivo study. Athymic mice and rats are additionally useful for evaluating the cartilage repair potential of human cells and tissues. Their small joint size, thin cartilage, and greater potential for intrinsic healing than humans, however, limit the translational value of small animal models. Large animal models with thicker articular cartilage permit study of both partial thickness and full thickness chondral repair, as well as osteochondral repair. Joint size and cartilage thickness for canine, caprine, and mini-pig models remain significantly smaller than that of humans. The repair and regeneration of chondral and osteochondral defects of size and volume comparable to that of clinically significant human lesions can be reliably studied primarily in equine models. While larger animals may more closely approximate the human clinical situation, they carry greater logistical, financial, and ethical considerations. A multifactorial analysis of each animal model should be carried out when planning in vivo studies. Ultimately, the scientific goals of the study will be critical in determining the appropriate animal model. PMID:19831641

  11. Equine Models of Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Fortier, Lisa A.; Frisbie, David D.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage injuries of the knee and ankle are common, and a number of different methods have been developed in an attempt to improve their repair. Clinically, there are 2 distinct aims of cartilage repair: 1) restoration of joint function and 2) prevention or at least delay of the onset of osteoarthritis. These goals can potentially be achieved through replacement of damaged or lost articular cartilage with tissue capable of functioning under normal physiological environments for an extended period, but limitations of the final repair product have long been recognized and still exist today. Screening of potential procedures for human clinical use is done by preclinical studies using animal models. This article reviews equine chondral defect models that have been recently recognized to have specific advantages for translation into human articular cartilage regeneration. Defect models in the femoropatellar, femorotibial, and tibiotalar joints have been developed. The horse provides the closest approximation to humans in terms of articular cartilage and subchondral bone thickness, and it is possible to selectively leave the entire calcified cartilage layer or completely remove it. The defect on the equine medial femoral condyle emulates medial femoral condylar lesions in humans. Other advantages of the equine model include an ability to use an arthroscope to create lesions and perform second-look arthroscopies, the large lesion size allowing for more tissue for evaluation, and the ability to have controlled exercise and test the ability of the repair to cope with athletic exercise as well as institute rehabilitation regimens. PMID:26069590

  12. Limited integrative repair capacity of native cartilage autografts within cartilage defects in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Gelse, Kolja; Riedel, Dominic; Pachowsky, Milena; Hennig, Friedrich F; Trattnig, Siegfried; Welsch, Götz H

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate integration and cellular outgrowth of native cartilage autografts transplanted into articular cartilage defects. Native cartilage autografts were applied into chondral defects in the femoral condyle of adult sheep. Within the defects, the calcified cartilage layer was either left intact or perforated to induce bone marrow stimulation. Empty defects served as controls. The joints were analyzed after 6 and 26 weeks by macroscopic and histological analysis using the ICRS II Score and Modified O'Driscoll Scores. Non-treated defects did not show any endogenous regenerative response and bone marrow stimulation induced fibrous repair tissue. Transplanted native cartilage grafts only insufficiently integrated with the defect borders. Cell death and loss of proteoglycans were present at the margins of the grafts at 6 weeks, which was only partially restored at 26 weeks. Significant cellular outgrowth from the grafts or defect borders could not be observed. Bonding of the grafts could be improved by additional bone marrow stimulation providing ingrowing cells that formed a fibrous interface predominantly composed of type I collagen. Transplanted native cartilage grafts remain as inert structures within cartilage defects and fail to induce integrative cartilage repair which rather demands additional cells provided by additional bone marrow stimulation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  14. Polymer Formulations for Cartilage Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowska, Anna; Jasionowski, Marek; Morris, J. E.; Chrisler, William B.; An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, V.

    2001-05-15

    Regeneration of destroyed articular cartilage can be induced by transplantation of cartilage cells into a defect. The best results are obtained with the use of autologus cells. However, obtaining large amounts of autologus cartilage cells causes a problem of creating a large cartilage defect in a donor site. Techniques are currently being developed to harvest a small number of cells and propagate them in vitro. It is a challenging task, however, due to the fact that ordinarily, in a cell culture on flat surfaces, chondrocytes do not maintain their in vivo phenotype and irreversibly diminish or cease the synthesis of aggregating proteoglycans. Therefore, the research is continuing to develop culture conditions for chondrocytes with the preserved phenotype.

  15. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Remodeling in Response to Focal Lesions in a Mini-Pig Model: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Matthew B.; Belkin, Nicole S.; Milby, Andrew H.; Henning, Elizabeth A.; Bostrom, Marc; Kim, Minwook; Pfeifer, Christian; Meloni, Gregory; Dodge, George R.; Burdick, Jason A.; Schaer, Thomas P.; Steinberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Preclinical large animal models are essential for evaluating new tissue engineering (TE) technologies and refining surgical approaches for cartilage repair. Some preclinical animal studies, including the commonly used minipig model, have noted marked remodeling of the subchondral bone. However, the mechanisms underlying this response have not been well characterized. Thus, our objective was to compare in-vivo outcomes of chondral defects with varied injury depths and treatments. Design: Trochlear chondral defects were created in 11 Yucatan minipigs (6 months old). Groups included an untreated partial-thickness defect (PTD), an untreated full-thickness defect (FTD), and FTDs treated with microfracture, autologous cartilage transfer (FTD-ACT), or an acellular hyaluronic acid hydrogel. Six weeks after surgery, micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantitatively assess defect fill and subchondral bone remodeling. The quality of cartilage repair was assessed using the ICRS-II histological scoring system and immunohistochemistry for type II collagen. A finite element model (FEM) was developed to assess load transmission. Results: Using μCT, substantial bone remodeling was observed for all FTDs, but not for the PTD group. The best overall histological scores and greatest type II collagen staining was found for the FTD-ACT and PTD groups. The FEM confirmed that only the FTD-ACT group could initially restore appropriate transfer of compressive loads to the underlying bone. Conclusions: The bony remodeling observed in this model system appears to be a biological phenomena and not a result of altered mechanical loading, with the depth of the focal chondral defect (partial vs. full thickness) dictating the bony remodeling response. The type of cartilage injury should be carefully controlled in studies utilizing this model to evaluate TE approaches for cartilage repair. PMID:25318414

  16. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair. PMID:27642587

  17. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: superior biologic properties of hyaline cartilage repairs.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ian; Lavigne, Patrick; Valenzuela, Herminio; Oakes, Barry

    2007-02-01

    Information regarding the quality of autologous chondrocyte implantation repair is needed to determine whether the current autologous chondrocyte implantation surgical technology and the subsequent biologic repair processes are capable of reliably forming durable hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage in vivo. We report and analyze the properties and qualities of autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs. We evaluated 66 autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs in 57 patients, 55 of whom had histology, indentometry, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring at reoperation for mechanical symptoms or pain. International Knee Documentation Committee scores were used to address clinical outcome. Maximum stiffness, normalized stiffness, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring were higher for hyaline articular cartilage repairs compared with fibrocartilage, with no difference in clinical outcome. Reoperations revealed 32 macroscopically abnormal repairs (Group B) and 23 knees with normal-looking repairs in which symptoms leading to arthroscopy were accounted for by other joint disorders (Group A). In Group A, 65% of repairs were either hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage compared with 28% in Group B. Autologous chondrocyte repairs composed of fibrocartilage showed more morphologic abnormalities and became symptomatic earlier than hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage repairs. The hyaline articular cartilage repairs had biomechanical properties comparable to surrounding cartilage and superior to those associated with fibrocartilage repairs.

  18. Strategies for Controlled Delivery of Biologics for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Johnny; Lu, Steven; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of biologics is an important component in the treatment of osteoarthritis and the functional restoration of articular cartilage. Numerous factors have been implicated in the cartilage repair process, but the uncontrolled delivery of these factors may not only reduce their full reparative potential and can also cause unwanted morphological effects. It is therefore imperative to consider the type of biologic to be delivered, the method of delivery, and the temporal as well as spatial presentation of the biologic to achieve the desired effect in cartilage repair. Additionally, the delivery of a single factor may not be sufficient in guiding neo-tissue formation, motivating recent research towards the delivery of multiple factors. This review will discuss the roles of various biologics involved in cartilage repair and the different methods of delivery for appropriate healing responses. A number of spatiotemporal strategies will then be emphasized for the controlled delivery of single and multiple bioactive factors in both in vitro and in vivo cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:24993610

  19. Enhanced cartilage repair in 'healer' mice-New leads in the search for better clinical options for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a poor capacity to undergo intrinsic repair. Current strategies for the repair of large cartilage defects are generally unsatisfactory because the restored cartilage does not have the same resistance to biomechanical loading as authentic articular cartilage and degrades over time. Recently, an exciting new research direction, focused on intrinsic cartilage regeneration rather than fibrous repair by external means, has emerged. This review explores the new findings in this rapidly moving field as they relate to the clinical goal of restoration of structurally robust, stable and non-fibrous articular cartilage following injury.

  20. Depletion of Gangliosides Enhances Articular Cartilage Repair in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Masatake; Onodera, Tomohiro; Homan, Kentaro; Sasazawa, Fumio; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Momma, Daisuke; Baba, Rikiya; Hontani, Kazutoshi; Joutoku, Zenta; Matsubara, Shinji; Yamashita, Tadashi; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of the healing mechanisms in damaged tissues is a critical step for establishing breakthroughs in tissue engineering. Articular cartilage is clinically one of the most successful tissues to be repaired with regenerative medicine because of its homogeneous extracellular matrix and few cell types. However, we only poorly understand cartilage repair mechanisms, and hence, regenerated cartilage remains inferior to the native tissues. Here, we show that glycosylation is an important process for hypertrophic differentiation during articular cartilage repair. GM3, which is a precursor molecule for most gangliosides, was transiently expressed in surrounding damaged tissue, and depletion of GM3 synthase enhanced cartilage repair. Gangliosides also regulated chondrocyte hypertrophy via the Indian hedgehog pathway. These results identify a novel mechanism of cartilage healing through chondrocyte hypertrophy that is regulated by glycosylation. Manipulation of gangliosides and their synthases may have beneficial effects on articular cartilage repair. PMID:28252046

  1. Knee Articular Cartilage Repair and Restoration Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Dustin L.; Schenck, Robert C.; Wascher, Daniel C.; Treme, Gehron

    2015-01-01

    Context: Isolated chondral and osteochondral defects of the knee are a difficult clinical challenge, particularly in younger patients for whom alternatives such as partial or total knee arthroplasty are rarely advised. Numerous surgical techniques have been developed to address focal cartilage defects. Cartilage treatment strategies are characterized as palliation (eg, chondroplasty and debridement), repair (eg, drilling and microfracture [MF]), or restoration (eg, autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI], osteochondral autograft [OAT], and osteochondral allograft [OCA]). Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for treatment articles using the keywords knee, articular cartilage, and osteochondral defect, with a focus on articles published in the past 5 years. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: In general, smaller lesions (<2 cm2) are best treated with MF or OAT. Furthermore, OAT shows trends toward greater longevity and durability as well as improved outcomes in high-demand patients. Intermediate-size lesions (2-4 cm2) have shown fairly equivalent treatment results using either OAT or ACI options. For larger lesions (>4 cm2), ACI or OCA have shown the best results, with OCA being an option for large osteochondritis dissecans lesions and posttraumatic defects. Conclusion: These techniques may improve patient outcomes, though no single technique can reproduce normal hyaline cartilage. PMID:26502188

  2. Generating cartilage repair from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Aixin; Hardingham, Timothy E; Kimber, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of degeneration and injury of articular cartilage has been very challenging for scientists and surgeons. As an avascular and hypocellular tissue, cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Chondrocytes are the only cell type in cartilage, in which they are surrounded by the extracellular matrix that they secrete and assemble. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects has achieved good results, but the limited resources and complexity of the procedure have hindered wider application. Stem cells form an alternative to chondrocytes as a source of chondrogenic cells due to their ability to proliferate extensively while retaining the potential for differentiation. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells have been differentiated into chondrocytes, but the limitations in their proliferative ability and the heterogeneous cell population hinder their adoption as a prime alternative source for generating chondrocytes. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are attractive as candidates for cell replacement therapy because of their unlimited self-renewal and ability for differentiation into mesodermal derivatives as well as other lineages. In this review, we focus on current protocols for chondrogenic differentiation of ESCs, in particular the chemically defined culture system developed in our lab that could potentially be adapted for clinical application.

  3. Mechanical properties of hyaline and repair cartilage studied by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Franke, O; Durst, K; Maier, V; Göken, M; Birkholz, T; Schneider, H; Hennig, F; Gelse, K

    2007-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue that is well adapted to the functional demands in joints but difficult to replicate via tissue engineering or regeneration. Its viscoelastic properties allow cartilage to adapt to both slow and rapid mechanical loading. Several cartilage repair strategies that aim to restore tissue and protect it from further degeneration have been introduced. The key to their success is the quality of the newly formed tissue. In this study, periosteal cells loaded on a scaffold were used to repair large partial-thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint of miniature pigs. The repair cartilage was analyzed 26 weeks after surgery and compared both morphologically and mechanically with healthy hyaline cartilage. Contact stiffness, reduced modulus and hardness as key mechanical properties were examined in vitro by nanoindentation in phosphate-buffered saline at room temperature. In addition, the influence of tissue fixation with paraformaldehyde on the biomechanical properties was investigated. Although the repair process resulted in the formation of a stable fibrocartilaginous tissue, its contact stiffness was lower than that of hyaline cartilage by a factor of 10. Fixation with paraformaldehyde significantly increased the stiffness of cartilaginous tissue by one order of magnitude, and therefore, should not be used when studying biomechanical properties of cartilage. Our study suggests a sensitive method for measuring the contact stiffness of articular cartilage and demonstrates the importance of mechanical analysis for proper evaluation of the success of cartilage repair strategies.

  4. The Functions of BMP3 in Rabbit Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Yiting; Shi, Yanping; Lei, Chen; Du, Bo; Li, Xuemin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-10-29

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in skeletal development and repair. Previously, we found fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) induced up-regulation of BMP2, 3, 4 in the process of rabbit articular cartilage repair, which resulted in satisfactory repair effects. As BMP2/4 show a clearly positive effect for cartilage repair, we investigated the functions of BMP3 in rabbit articular cartilage repair. In this paper, we find that BMP3 inhibits the repair of partial-thickness defect of articular cartilage in rabbit by inducing the degradation of extracellular matrix, interfering with the survival of chondrocytes surrounding the defect, and directly inhibiting the expression of BMP2 and BMP4. Meanwhile BMP3 suppress the repair of full-thickness cartilage defect by destroying the subchondral bone through modulating the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and directly increasing the expression of BMP4. Although BMP3 has different functions in the repair of partial and full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in rabbit, the regulation of BMP expression is involved in both of them. Together with our previous findings, we suggest the regulation of the BMP signaling pathway by BMP3 is essential in articular cartilage repair.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair: A Review.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Welsch, Goetz H; Potter, Hollis G

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries.

  6. Cartilage repair with autogenic perichondrium cell and polylactic acid grafts.

    PubMed

    Dounchis, J S; Bae, W C; Chen, A C; Sah, R L; Coutts, R D; Amiel, D

    2000-08-01

    The repair of articular cartilage injuries remains a challenge, with many of the current therapeutic strategies based on the grafting or recruitment of chondrogenic tissues or cells. This 1-year study compared the repair of a 3.7-mm diameter by 3-mm deep osteochondral defect in the medial femoral condyle of 24 New Zealand White rabbits; the defect was obtained using an autogenic perichondrium cell polylactic acid composite graft with a contralateral control in which the osteochondral defect remained empty. To elucidate the effect of host immune responses on the repair process after perichondrium cell transplantation, the results of the autogenic perichondrium cell polylactic acid graft group were compared with those obtained in the authors' previous 1-year study of allogenic perichondrium cell polylactic acid composite grafts implanted in a similar model. One year after surgery, the repair site underwent gross inspection and histologic, histomorphometric, biochemical, and biomechanical analyses. The autogenic perichondrium cell polylactic acid graft group (92%) and the control group in which the osteochondral defect remained empty (88%) resulted in a high percentage of grossly acceptable repairs. The autogenic grafts appeared to augment the intrinsic healing capacity of the animals (as compared with the animals in the No Implant Group). The autogenic perichondrium cell polylactic and grafts improved the histologic appearance and percentage of Type II collagen of the cartilaginous repair tissue. Compared with allogenic grafts, the autogenic grafts had better reconstitution of the subchondral bone. However, the results of this experimental model suggest a suboptimal concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the neocartilage matrix, a depressed surface of the repair tissue, a histologic appearance that was not equivalent to that of normal articular cartilage, and reduced biomechanical properties for the repair tissue. The future application of growth factors to this

  7. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    PubMed Central

    Jungmann, Pia M.; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Link, Thomas M.; Li, Xiaojuan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Welsch, Goetz H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair. PMID:24877139

  8. Cartilage repair surgery: outcome evaluation by using noninvasive cartilage biomarkers based on quantitative MRI techniques?

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Pia M; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S; Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Erdle, Benjamin; Link, Thomas M; Li, Xiaojuan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rummeny, Ernst J; Woertler, Klaus; Welsch, Goetz H

    2014-01-01

    New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  9. Blocking aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan interglobular domain abrogates cartilage erosion and promotes cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Little, Christopher B.; Meeker, Clare T.; Golub, Suzanne B.; Lawlor, Kate E.; Farmer, Pamela J.; Smith, Susan M.; Fosang, Amanda J.

    2007-01-01

    Aggrecan loss from cartilage in arthritis is mediated by aggrecanases. Aggrecanases cleave aggrecan preferentially in the chondroitin sulfate–2 (CS-2) domain and secondarily at the E373↓374A bond in the interglobular domain (IGD). However, IGD cleavage may be more deleterious for cartilage biomechanics because it releases the entire CS-containing portion of aggrecan. Recent studies identifying aggrecanase-2 (ADAMTS-5) as the predominant aggrecanase in mouse cartilage have not distinguished aggrecanolysis in the IGD from aggrecanolysis in the CS-2 domain. We generated aggrecan knockin mice with a mutation that rendered only the IGD resistant to aggrecanases in order to assess the contribution of this specific cleavage to cartilage pathology. The knockin mice were viable and fertile. Aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan IGD was not detected in knockin mouse cartilage in situ nor following digestion with ADAMTS-5 or treatment of cartilage explant cultures with IL-1α. Blocking cleavage in the IGD not only diminished aggrecan loss and cartilage erosion in surgically induced osteoarthritis and a model of inflammatory arthritis, but appeared to stimulate cartilage repair following acute inflammation. We conclude that blocking aggrecanolysis in the aggrecan IGD alone protects against cartilage erosion and may potentiate cartilage repair. PMID:17510707

  10. Cartilage repair: synthetics and scaffolds: basic science, surgical techniques, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kerker, Jordan T; Leo, Andrew J; Sgaglione, Nicholas A

    2008-12-01

    Symptomatic articular cartilage lesions have gained attention and clinical interest in recent years and can be difficult to treat. Historically, various biologic surgical treatment options have yielded inconsistent results because of the inferior biomechanical properties associated with a variable healing response. Improving technology and surgical advances has generated considerable research in cartilage resurfacing and optimizing hyaline tissue restoration. Biologic innovation and tissue engineering in cartilage repair have used matrix scaffolds, autologous and allogenic chondrocytes, cartilage grafts, growth factors, stem cells, and genetic engineering. Numerous evolving technologies and surgical approaches have been introduced into the clinical setting. This review will discuss the basic science, surgical techniques, and clinical outcomes of novel synthetic materials and scaffolds for articular cartilage repair.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of cartilage repair in the knee.

    PubMed

    Brown, Wendy E; Potter, Hollis G; Marx, Robert G; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Warren, Russell F

    2004-05-01

    Assessment of surgically repaired cartilage lesions with standardized cartilage sensitive magnetic resonance imaging was done to evaluate the integrity, morphologic features, and signal of the articular surface, thereby obtaining information about the natural history of these procedures in the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging also assessed the interface between the repaired and native cartilage, changes in the subchondral bone, and the appearance of cartilage over the opposite and adjacent (native) surfaces. One hundred eighty magnetic resonance imaging examinations were obtained in 112 patients who had cartilage-resurfacing procedures, including 86 microfractures and 35 autologous chondrocyte implantations, at a mean of 15 and 13 months after surgery, respectively. Autologous chondrocyte implantations showed consistently better fill of the defects at all times compared with microfracture. The graft hypertrophied in 63% of surgeries. The repair cartilage over the microfracture generally was depressed with respect to native cartilage. Propensity for bony overgrowth was most marked in the microfracture group, with loss of adjacent cartilage evident with progressive followup.

  12. The potential therapeutic use of stem cells in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Perera, Jonathan R; Jaiswal, Parag K; Khan, Wasim S

    2012-03-01

    As our population demographics change, osteoarthritis and cartilage defects are becoming more prevalent. The discovery of stems cells and their ability for indefinite regeneration has revolutionised the way cartilage problems are viewed. Tissue engineering has been shown to be the ideal way of repairing articular cartilage lesions, i.e. back to native tissue. Cartilage is an ideal tissue engineering target as it is avascular, aneural and alymphatic. The two main types of stem cells being investigated in chondrogenesis are embryological and mesenchymal stem cells. Research into embryological stem cells has been surrounded by controversy because of ethical, religious and social concerns. We discuss the use of embryological and mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage repair and the various factors involved in the differentiation into chondrocytes. We also discuss commonly used mesenchymal stem cell markers and their limitations.

  13. Surgical repair of cartilage defects of the patella.

    PubMed

    Atik, O S; Korkusuz, F

    2001-08-01

    The structure and biomechanical forces on the patellar joint challenges researchers to define an ideal method for resurfacing the patellar cartilage. The articular surface of the patella presents variability between individuals, and has various minor articulations that bear partial or total compressive, shear, and combined forces during movement. Surgical techniques for the repair of patellar cartilage defects have evolved from cumulative advances in basic science and technology. Such surgeries include the techniques that promote either fibrocartilage formation or hyalinelike cartilage formation. Techniques promoting the formation of fibrocartilage yield short-term solutions because fibrocartilage lacks the durability and the mechanical properties of articular hyaline cartilage. Currently, there is no ideal method for the repair of patellar cartilage defects; all methods are considered experimental. Additional controlled and randomized clinical studies with large series of patients and long-term followup are required.

  14. Silk microfiber-reinforced silk hydrogel composites for functional cartilage tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Yodmuang, Supansa; McNamara, Stephanie L.; Nover, Adam B.; Mandal, Biman B.; Agarwal, Monica; Kelly, Terri-Ann N.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Hung, Clark; Kaplan, David L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage tissue lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-regeneration due to slow matrix turnover, a limited supply of mature chondrocytes and insufficient vasculature. Although cartilage tissue engineering has achieved some success using agarose as a scaffolding material, major challenges of agarose-based cartilage repair, including non-degradability, poor tissue–scaffold integration and limited processing capability, have prompted the search for an alternative biomaterial. In this study, silk fiber–hydrogel composites (SF–silk hydrogels) made from silk microfibers and silk hydrogels were investigated for their potential use as a support material for engineered cartilage. We demonstrated the use of 100% silk-based fiber–hydrogel composite scaffolds for the development of cartilage constructs with properties comparable to those made with agarose. Cartilage constructs with an equilibrium modulus in the native tissue range were fabricated by mimicking the collagen fiber and proteoglycan composite architecture of native cartilage using biocompatible, biodegradable silk fibroin from Bombyx mori. Excellent chondrocyte response was observed on SF–silk hydrogels, and fiber reinforcement resulted in the development of more mechanically robust constructs after 42 days in culture compared to silk hydrogels alone. Thus, we demonstrate the versatility of silk fibroin as a composite scaffolding material for use in cartilage tissue repair to create functional cartilage constructs that overcome the limitations of agarose biomaterials, and provide a much-needed alternative to the agarose standard. PMID:25281788

  15. Silk microfiber-reinforced silk hydrogel composites for functional cartilage tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Yodmuang, Supansa; McNamara, Stephanie L; Nover, Adam B; Mandal, Biman B; Agarwal, Monica; Kelly, Terri-Ann N; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Hung, Clark; Kaplan, David L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage tissue lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-regeneration due to slow matrix turnover, a limited supply of mature chondrocytes and insufficient vasculature. Although cartilage tissue engineering has achieved some success using agarose as a scaffolding material, major challenges of agarose-based cartilage repair, including non-degradability, poor tissue-scaffold integration and limited processing capability, have prompted the search for an alternative biomaterial. In this study, silk fiber-hydrogel composites (SF-silk hydrogels) made from silk microfibers and silk hydrogels were investigated for their potential use as a support material for engineered cartilage. We demonstrated the use of 100% silk-based fiber-hydrogel composite scaffolds for the development of cartilage constructs with properties comparable to those made with agarose. Cartilage constructs with an equilibrium modulus in the native tissue range were fabricated by mimicking the collagen fiber and proteoglycan composite architecture of native cartilage using biocompatible, biodegradable silk fibroin from Bombyx mori. Excellent chondrocyte response was observed on SF-silk hydrogels, and fiber reinforcement resulted in the development of more mechanically robust constructs after 42 days in culture compared to silk hydrogels alone. Thus, we demonstrate the versatility of silk fibroin as a composite scaffolding material for use in cartilage tissue repair to create functional cartilage constructs that overcome the limitations of agarose biomaterials, and provide a much-needed alternative to the agarose standard.

  16. The repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects. Immune responses to reparative tissue formed by allogeneic growth plate chondrocyte implants

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabe, N.; Yoshinao, M. )

    1991-07-01

    Growth plate cartilage cultivated in vitro was attached with a fibrin clot to a full-thickness articular cartilage defect on knee joints in allogeneic New Zealand rabbits. The healing of the defects was assessed by gross examination, light microscopy, and immunologic analysis for 24 weeks. Immunologic assessment of cell-mediated immunity, cytotoxicity of a humoral antibody by a 51 chromium release assay, and immunofluorescence studies were carried out. During the first two weeks following grafting, healing was excellent in 11 of the 17 defects. From three to 24 weeks, 11 of 42 defects examined had good results. Host lymphocytes had accumulated around the allograft at two to 12 weeks. Most of the implanted cartilage grown in vitro died and was replaced by fibrous tissue. The immunologic studies suggested that the implanted cartilage began to degenerate two to three weeks after implantation partially because of a humoral immune response but more importantly because of cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  17. Clinical and MRI considerations in sports-related knee joint cartilage injury and cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Richard J; Houlihan-Burne, David G

    2011-02-01

    Cartilage injuries of the knee occur frequently in professional and amateur athletes and can be associated with severe debilitation and morbidity. They are commonly associated with ligament injuries but also may be frequently isolated. Increasing awareness and advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to increasing diagnosis and recognition of these injuries. Articular cartilage is just 2 to 4 mm thick and is avascular, alymphatic, and aneural. It has a limited capacity for healing, and there has been increasing use of cartilage repair techniques to treat these lesions in the active population. Strategies for cartilage repair include marrow stimulation techniques such as microfracture/drilling, osteochondral grafting, and autologous chondrocyte transplants. MRI is an important tool in the diagnosis and grading of cartilage injury and is useful in the follow-up and monitoring of these repair procedures. It is important for radiologists and clinicians to be aware of the capabilities and limitations of MRI in assessing cartilage injury and to be familiar with common postsurgical appearances to facilitate assessment and follow-up in this population. This article reviews the clinical findings and MRI imaging appearances of cartilage injury. The management options are discussed as well as common postsurgical appearances following the various interventions.

  18. Platelet interaction with modified articular cartilage. Its possible relevance to joint repair.

    PubMed Central

    Zucker-Franklin, D; Drosenberg, L

    1977-01-01

    During studies concerned with the platelet-collagen interaction, it was observed that platelets did not adhere to bovine or human articular cartilage and that cartilage did not induce platelet aggregation in vivo or in vitro. To study the mechanism responsible for this observation, the role of proteoglycans was examined. Purified cartilage collagen proved to be fully active as a platelet aggregant. Addition of small amounts of proteoglycan subunit (PGS) blocked platelet aggregation, whereas chondroitin sulfate, a major glycosaminoglycan component of cartilage matrix, impaired platelet aggregation only at concentrations which resulted in a marked increase in viscosity. Moreover, PGS abolished aggregation of platelets by polylysine but did not prevent aggregation by ADP, suggesting that PGS may block strategically placed lysine sites on the collagen molecule. Treatment of fresh articular cartilage with proteolytic enzymes rendered the tissue active as a platelet aggregant. In vivo experiments demonstrated that surgical scarification of rabbit articular cartilage does not result in adhesion of autologous platelets. Treatment of rabbit knee joints with intraarticular trypsin 1 wk before the injection of blood resulted in adhesion and aggregation of platelets on the surface of the lesions. Since there is evidence from other studies that some degree of cartilage healing may take place after initiation of an inflammatory response, it is postulated that induction of platelet-cartilage interaction may eventuate in cartilage repair. Images PMID:557500

  19. Embryonic versus mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Perera, Jonathan R; Jaiswal, Parag K; Khan, Wasim S; Adesida, Adetola

    2012-01-01

    As our population changes osteoarthritis and cartilage defects are becoming more prevalent. The discovery of stems cells and their ability for indefinite regeneration has revolutionised the way cartilage problems are viewed. Tissue engineering has been shown to be the ideal way of repairing articular cartilage lesions, i.e. back to native tissue. The two main types of stem cells being investigated in chondrogenesis are embryological and mesenchymal stem cells. Research into embryological stem cells has been surrounded by controversy because of tumour formation and damaging embryos during the harvest of cells. We discuss the use of embryological and mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage repair and the various factors involved in the differentiation into chondrocytes.

  20. Enhanced cartilage repair in ‘healer’ mice—New leads in the search for better clinical options for cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a poor capacity to undergo intrinsic repair. Current strategies for the repair of large cartilage defects are generally unsatisfactory because the restored cartilage does not have the same resistance to biomechanical loading as authentic articular cartilage and degrades over time. Recently, an exciting new research direction, focused on intrinsic cartilage regeneration rather than fibrous repair by external means, has emerged. This review explores the new findings in this rapidly moving field as they relate to the clinical goal of restoration of structurally robust, stable and non-fibrous articular cartilage following injury. PMID:27130635

  1. Comparison of Three Methods to Quantify Repair Cartilage Collagen Orientation.

    PubMed

    Ross, Keir A; Williams, Rebecca M; Schnabel, Lauren V; Mohammed, Hussni O; Potter, Hollis G; Bradica, Gino; Castiglione, Emme; Pownder, Sarah L; Satchell, Patrick W; Saska, Ryan A; Fortier, Lisa A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the noninvasive or minimally invasive and nondestructive imaging techniques of quantitative T2-mapping or multiphoton microscopy (MPM) respectively, could detect differences in cartilage collagen orientation similar to polarized light microscopy (PLM). It was hypothesized that MRI, MPM, and PLM would all detect quantitative differences between repair and normal cartilage tissue. Osteochondral defects in the medial femoral condyle were created and repaired in 5 mature goats. Postmortem, MRI with T2-mapping and histology were performed. T2 maps were generated and a mean T2 value was calculated for each region of interest. Histologic slides were assessed using MPM with measurements of autocorrelation ellipticity, and by PLM with application of a validated scoring method. Collagen orientation using each of the 3 modalities (T2-mapping, MPM, and PLM) was measured in the center of the repair tissue and compared to remote, normal cartilage. MRI, MPM, and PLM were able to detect a significant difference between repair and normal cartilage (n = 5). The average T2 value was longer for repair tissue (41.43 ± 9.81 ms) compared with normal cartilage (27.12 ± 14.22 ms; P = 0.04); MPM autocorrelation ellipticity was higher in fibrous tissue (3.75 ± 1.17) compared with normal cartilage (2.24 ± 0.51; P = 0.01); the average PLM score for repair tissue was lower (1.6 ± 1.02) than the score for remote normal cartilage (4.4 ± 0.42; P = 0.002). The strongest correlation among the methods was between MRI and PLM (r = -0.76; P = 0.01), followed by MPM and PLM (r = -0.58; P = 0.08), with the weakest correlation shown between MRI and MPM (r = 0.35; P = 0.31). All 3 imaging methods quantitatively measured differences in collagen orientation between repair and normal cartilage, but at very different levels of resolution. PLM is destructive to tissue and requires euthanasia, but because MPM can be used arthroscopically, both T2-mapping and MPM

  2. Direct Human Cartilage Repair Using Three-Dimensional Bioprinting Technology

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Breitenkamp, Kurt; Finn, M.G.; Lotz, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies cannot as yet fabricate new tissue that is indistinguishable from native cartilage with respect to zonal organization, extracellular matrix composition, and mechanical properties. Integration of implants with surrounding native tissues is crucial for long-term stability and enhanced functionality. In this study, we developed a bioprinting system with simultaneous photopolymerization capable for three-dimensional (3D) cartilage tissue engineering. Poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) with human chondrocytes were printed to repair defects in osteochondral plugs (3D biopaper) in layer-by-layer assembly. Compressive modulus of printed PEGDMA was 395.73±80.40 kPa, which was close to the range of the properties of native human articular cartilage. Printed human chondrocytes maintained the initially deposited positions due to simultaneous photopolymerization of surrounded biomaterial scaffold, which is ideal in precise cell distribution for anatomic cartilage engineering. Viability of printed human chondrocytes increased 26% in simultaneous polymerization than polymerized after printing. Printed cartilage implant attached firmly with surrounding tissue and greater proteoglycan deposition was observed at the interface of implant and native cartilage in Safranin-O staining. This is consistent with the enhanced interface failure strength during the culture assessed by push-out testing. Printed cartilage in 3D biopaper had elevated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content comparing to that without biopaper when normalized to DNA. These observations were consistent with gene expression results. This study indicates the importance of direct cartilage repair and promising anatomic cartilage engineering using 3D bioprinting technology. PMID:22394017

  3. Repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits through tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with chitosan hydrogel and chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Chen, Zhu; Liu, Kang; Wan, Yu-qing; Li, Xu-dong; Luo, Xu-wei; Bai, Yi-guang; Yang, Ze-long; Feng, Gang

    2015-11-01

    In our previous work, we prepared a type of chitosan hydrogel with excellent biocompatibility. In this study, tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with this chitosan hydrogel and costal chondrocytes was used to repair the articular cartilage defects. Chitosan hydrogels were prepared with a crosslinker formed by combining 1,6-diisocyanatohexane and polyethylene glycol. Chitosan hydrogel scaffold was seeded with rabbit chondrocytes that had been cultured for one week in vitro to form the preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage. This preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage was then transplanted into the defective rabbit articular cartilage. There were three treatment groups: the experimental group received preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage; the blank group received pure chitosan hydrogels; and, the control group had received no implantation. The knee joints were harvested at predetermined time. The repaired cartilage was analyzed through gross morphology, histologically and immunohistochemically. The repairs were scored according to the international cartilage repair society (ICRS) standard. The gross morphology results suggested that the defects were repaired completely in the experimental group after twelve weeks. The regenerated tissue connected closely with subchondral bone and the boundary with normal tissue was fuzzy. The cartilage lacuna in the regenerated tissue was similar to normal cartilage lacuna. The results of ICRS gross and histological grading showed that there were significant differences among the three groups (P<0.05). Chondrocytes implanted in the scaffold can adhere, proliferate, and secrete extracellular matrix. The novel tissue-engineered cartilage constructed in our research can completely repair the structure of damaged articular cartilage.

  4. Modulation of xylosyltransferase I expression provides a mechanism regulating glycosaminoglycan chain synthesis during cartilage destruction and repair.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Barré, Lydia; Magdalou, Jacques; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2009-03-01

    Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are characterized by loss of proteoglycans (PGs) and their glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that are essential for cartilage function. Here, we investigated the role of glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for PG-GAG chain assembly during joint cartilage destruction and repair processes. At various times after antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and papain-induced cartilage repair in rats, PG synthesis and deposition, expression of GTs, and GAG chain composition were analyzed. Our data showed that expression of the GT xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) gene initiating PG-GAG chain synthesis was significantly reduced in AIA rat cartilage and was associated with a decrease in PG synthesis. Interestingly, interleukin-1beta, the main proinflammatory cytokine incriminated in joint diseases, down-regulated the XT-I gene expression with a concomitant decrease in PG synthesis in rat cartilage explants ex vivo. However, cartilage from papain-injected rat knees showed up-regulation of XT-I gene expression and increased PG synthesis at early stages of cartilage repair, a process associated with up-regulation of TGF-beta1 gene expression and mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Consistently, silencing of XT-I expression by intraarticular injection of XT-I shRNA in rat knees prevented cartilage repair by decreasing PG synthesis and content. These findings show that GTs play a key role in the loss of PG-GAGs in joint diseases and identify novel targets for stimulating cartilage repair.

  5. Emerging technologies and fourth generation issues in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Michael W; Ackerman, George; Dines, Joshua S; Grande, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    The goals of successful cartilage repair include reducing pain, improving symptoms, and long-term function; preventing early osteoarthritis and subsequent total knee replacements; and rebuilding hyaline cartilage instead of fibrous tissue. Current methods such as microfracture, osteoarticular autograft transfer system, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation are somewhat successful in regenerating cartilage; however, they also have significant limitations. The future of fourth generation cartilage repair focuses on gene therapy, the use of stem cells (bone marrow, adipose, or muscle derived), and tissue engineering. Emerging techniques include creating elastin-like polymers derived from native elastin sequences to serve as biocompatible scaffolds; using hydrogels to obtain a homogeneous distribution of cells within a 3-dimensional matrix; and using nonviral gene delivery via nucleofection to allow mesenchymal stem cells the ability to express osteogenic growth factors. Although many of the techniques mentioned have yet to be used in a cartilage regeneration model, we have tried to anticipate how methods used in other specialties may facilitate improved cartilage repair.

  6. Mixed type I and type II collagen scaffold for cartilage repair: ultrastructural study of synovial membrane response and healing potential versus microfractures (a pilot study).

    PubMed

    Enea, D; Guerra, D; Roggiani, J; Cecconi, S; Manzotti, S; Quaglino, D; Pasquali-Ronchetti, I; Gigante, A

    2013-01-01

    The association between microfracture of the subchondral plate and a coverage scaffold has emerged as a promising strategy to treat cartilage lesions in a one-step procedure. Between different types of scaffolds (e.g. collagen, hyaluronic acid, polyglycolic acid) currently studied, type I collagen scaffold is the most used for this purpose, and is currently adopted for humans. The aim of this study was to test a novel scaffold made of mixed type I and II collagen (I-IICS) in order to define the immunological reaction of the synovial tissue and the repair capabilities induced by the collagen membrane when associated with microfracture. Eight New Zealand White rabbits, aged 180 days, were operated on bilaterally on the medial femoral condyle. A circular cartilage lesion was performed up to the calcified layer of the medial femoral condyle, and the centre of the lesion was microfractured. Randomly, one of the two lesions was covered with the I-IICS (treated), and the other was left uncovered (control). The synovial membrane reaction and the quality of the cartilage tissue repair were investigated at 2, 90, 180 and 270 days macroscopically, histomorphologically and ultrastructurally. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in synovial tissue by immunocytochemistry analyses was also investigated. In the control group, at 2 days gold particles were localized mainly on synoviocyte type A, less on synoviocytes type B and on collagen bundles; in the treated group the reaction is more intense in cells in the matrix, but at 180 days controls and treated joints were very similar. The synovial membranes of the joints receiving the I-IICS did not reveal significant changes compared to the age-matched controls. Signs of inflammation were present at the 90-day time-point, and became less evident at afterwards. The degradation of the scaffolds was already evident at the 90-day time-point. The quality of the cartilage repair of the rabbits treated with the I-IICS was

  7. Human Cartilage-Derived Progenitor Cells From Committed Chondrocytes for Efficient Cartilage Repair and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yangzi; Cai, Youzhi; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zi; Hu, Changchang; Tong, Tong; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Shufang; Neculai, Dante; Tuan, Rocky S; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage is not a physiologically self-renewing tissue. Injury of cartilage often progresses from the articular surface to the subchondral bone, leading to pathogenesis of tissue degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Therapies to treat cartilage defects using autologous chondrocyte-based tissue engineering have been developed and used for more than 20 years; however, the challenge of chondrocyte expansion in vitro remains. A promising cell source, cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs), has attracted recent attention. Because their origin and identity are still unclear, the application potential of CSPCs is under active investigation. Here we have captured the emergence of a group of stem/progenitor cells derived from adult human chondrocytes, highlighted by dynamic changes in expression of the mature chondrocyte marker, COL2, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) marker, CD146. These cells are termed chondrocyte-derived progenitor cells (CDPCs). The stem cell-like potency and differentiation status of CDPCs were determined by physical and biochemical cues during culture. A low-density, low-glucose 2-dimensional culture condition (2DLL) was critical for the emergence and proliferation enhancement of CDPCs. CDPCs showed similar phenotype as bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells but exhibited greater chondrogenic potential. Moreover, the 2DLL-cultured CDPCs proved efficient in cartilage formation both in vitro and in vivo and in repairing large knee cartilage defects (6-13 cm(2)) in 15 patients. These findings suggest a phenotype conversion between chondrocytes and CDPCs and provide conditions that promote the conversion. These insights expand our understanding of cartilage biology and may enhance the success of chondrocyte-based therapies. Injury of cartilage, a non-self-repairing tissue, often progresses to pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Although tissue-derived stem cells have been shown to

  8. Human Cartilage-Derived Progenitor Cells From Committed Chondrocytes for Efficient Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yangzi; Cai, Youzhi; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zi; Hu, Changchang; Tong, Tong; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Shufang; Neculai, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage is not a physiologically self-renewing tissue. Injury of cartilage often progresses from the articular surface to the subchondral bone, leading to pathogenesis of tissue degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Therapies to treat cartilage defects using autologous chondrocyte-based tissue engineering have been developed and used for more than 20 years; however, the challenge of chondrocyte expansion in vitro remains. A promising cell source, cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs), has attracted recent attention. Because their origin and identity are still unclear, the application potential of CSPCs is under active investigation. Here we have captured the emergence of a group of stem/progenitor cells derived from adult human chondrocytes, highlighted by dynamic changes in expression of the mature chondrocyte marker, COL2, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) marker, CD146. These cells are termed chondrocyte-derived progenitor cells (CDPCs). The stem cell-like potency and differentiation status of CDPCs were determined by physical and biochemical cues during culture. A low-density, low-glucose 2-dimensional culture condition (2DLL) was critical for the emergence and proliferation enhancement of CDPCs. CDPCs showed similar phenotype as bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells but exhibited greater chondrogenic potential. Moreover, the 2DLL-cultured CDPCs proved efficient in cartilage formation both in vitro and in vivo and in repairing large knee cartilage defects (6–13 cm2) in 15 patients. These findings suggest a phenotype conversion between chondrocytes and CDPCs and provide conditions that promote the conversion. These insights expand our understanding of cartilage biology and may enhance the success of chondrocyte-based therapies. Significance Injury of cartilage, a non-self-repairing tissue, often progresses to pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Although tissue-derived stem cells have been shown

  9. Hydrogels for the Repair of Articular Cartilage Defects

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Suzanne A.; Lowman, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage defects remains a significant challenge in orthopedic medicine. Hydrogels, three-dimensional polymer networks swollen in water, offer a unique opportunity to generate a functional cartilage substitute. Hydrogels can exhibit similar mechanical, swelling, and lubricating behavior to articular cartilage, and promote the chondrogenic phenotype by encapsulated cells. Hydrogels have been prepared from naturally derived and synthetic polymers, as cell-free implants and as tissue engineering scaffolds, and with controlled degradation profiles and release of stimulatory growth factors. Using hydrogels, cartilage tissue has been engineered in vitro that has similar mechanical properties to native cartilage. This review summarizes the advancements that have been made in determining the potential of hydrogels to replace damaged cartilage or support new tissue formation as a function of specific design parameters, such as the type of polymer, degradation profile, mechanical properties and loading regimen, source of cells, cell-seeding density, controlled release of growth factors, and strategies to cause integration with surrounding tissue. Some key challenges for clinical translation remain, including limited information on the mechanical properties of hydrogel implants or engineered tissue that are necessary to restore joint function, and the lack of emphasis on the ability of an implant to integrate in a stable way with the surrounding tissue. Future studies should address the factors that affect these issues, while using clinically relevant cell sources and rigorous models of repair. PMID:21510824

  10. Cartilage T2 assessment: differentiation of normal hyaline cartilage and reparative tissue after arthroscopic cartilage repair in equine subjects.

    PubMed

    White, Lawrence M; Sussman, Marshall S; Hurtig, Mark; Probyn, Linda; Tomlinson, George; Kandel, Rita

    2006-11-01

    To prospectively assess T2 mapping characteristics of normal articular cartilage and of cartilage at sites of arthroscopic repair, including comparison with histologic results and collagen organization assessed at polarized light microscopy (PLM). Study protocol was compliant with the Canadian Council on Animal Care Guidelines and approved by the institutional animal care committee. Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) and microfracture arthroplasty (MFx) were performed in knees of 10 equine subjects (seven female, three male; age range, 3-5 years). A site of arthroscopically normal cartilage was documented in each joint as a control site. Joints were harvested at 12 (n = 5) and 24 (n = 5) weeks postoperatively and were imaged at 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) with a 10-echo sagittal fast spin-echo acquisition. T2 maps of each site (21 OAT harvest, 10 MFx, 12 OAT plug, and 10 control sites) were calculated with linear least-squares curve fitting. Cartilage T2 maps were qualitatively graded as "organized" (normal transition of low-to-high T2 signal from deep to superficial cartilage zones) or "disorganized." Quantitative mean T2 values were calculated for deep, middle, and superficial cartilage at each location. Results were compared with histologic and PLM assessments by using kappa analysis. T2 maps were qualitatively graded as organized at 20 of 53 sites and as disorganized at 33 sites. Perfect agreement was seen between organized T2 and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage and between disorganized T2 and histologic findings of fibrous reparative tissue (kappa = 1.0). Strong agreement was seen between organized T2 and normal PLM findings and between disorganized T2 and abnormal PLM findings (kappa = .92). Quantitative assessment of the deep, middle, and superficial cartilage, respectively, showed mean T2 values of 53.3, 58.6, and 54.9 msec at reparative fibrous tissue sites and 40.7, 53.6, and 61.6 msec at hyaline cartilage sites. A

  11. Open Repair of Pectus Excavatum With Minimal Cartilage Resection

    PubMed Central

    Fonkalsrud, Eric W.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical experience with a new open repair for pectus excavatum (PE), with minimal cartilage resection. Summary Background Data: A wide variety of modified techniques of the Ravitch repair for PE have been used over the past 5 decades, with the complications and results being inconsistent. Extensive subperiosteal costal cartilage resection and perichondrial sheath detachment from the sternum may not be necessary for optimal repair. Methods: During a 12-month period, 75 consecutive patients with symptomatic PE underwent open repair using a new less invasive technique. After exposing the deformed costal cartilages, a short chip was resected medially adjacent to the sternum and laterally at the level where the chest had a near normal contour, allowing the cartilage to be elevated to the desired level with minimal force. A transverse anterior sternal osteotomy was used on most patients. A substernal support strut was used for 66 patients; the strut was placed anterior to the sternum in 9 patients under age 12 and over age 40 years. The strut was routinely removed within 6 months. Results: With a mean follow-up of 8.2 months, all but 1 patient regarded the results as very good or excellent. Mean operating time was 174 minutes; mean hospitalization was 2.7 days. There were no major complications or deaths. Conclusions: The open repair using minimal cartilage resection is effective for all variations of PE in patients of all ages, uses short operating time, provides a stable early postoperative chest wall, causes only mild postoperative pain, and produces good physiologic and cosmetic results. PMID:15273545

  12. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Background: We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. Methods: We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. Results: The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. Conclusions: The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage. PMID:26069691

  13. Cartilage Repair Approach and Treatment Characteristics in the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Elmali, Nurzat; Tandogan, Reha; Bozkurt, Murat; Demirel, Murat; Beyzadeoğlu, Tahsin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the approaches of Turkish Orthopaedic and Traumatology specialists towards the treatment of isolated focal cartilage lesions in the knee joint. Methods: An online questionnaire consisting of 21 questions was prepared and sent to a sample group comprising members of the Turkish Orthopaedics and Traumatology Association (TOTBID) and the Turkish Sports Injuries Arthroscopy and Knee Surgery Association (TUSYAD). The responses of 129 members were evaluated. Results: Of the total respondents to the questionnaire, approximately 1/3 worked in a private hospital, 1/3 in a university, 15% in a state hospital and 13% in a training and research hospital. An arthroscopic approach was applied fewer than 50 times per year by 20% of respondents, 50-100 times by 40%, 100-200 times by 24% and more than 200 times by 17%. The upper age limit for surgical repair of cartilage was reported as 50 years by 52% and 40 years by 25%. Similarly, the body mass index (BMI) upper limit was stated as below 30kg/m2 by 58% and below 25kg/m2 by 22%. The best results were thought to come from femoral condyle lesions by 85% of the surgeons. In patients with high activity expectations, the most frequently applied methods were 60% microfracture and 40% mosaicplasty. For lesions between 2.5 and 4cm2 in size, mosaicplasty was applied most often, followed by matrix-supported chondrocyte implantation. In lesions larger than 4cm2, MACI was the most common procedure. Although 70% of surgeons had never applied the matrix-supported microfracture method, 30% considered that it could be a choice for individuals with a high activity level. A return to sports following cartilage repair was accepted as 6 months for microfracture (86%), 9 months for mosaicplasty (63%), and 12 months for matrix-supported autologous chondrocyte implantation (73%). Conclusion: As there was a similar distribution of experienced and less experienced surgeons among the respondents, the results obtained from the

  14. Cartilage repair and joint preservation: medical and surgical treatment options.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Grün, Ulrich Wolfgang; Knutsen, Gunnar

    2011-10-01

    Articular cartilage defects are most often caused by trauma and osteoarthritis and less commonly by metabolic disorders of the subchondral bone, such as osteonecrosis and osteochondritis dissecans. Such defects do not heal spontaneously in adults and can lead to secondary osteoarthritis. Medications are indicated for symptomatic relief. Slow-acting drugs in osteoarthritis (SADOA), such as glucosamine and chondroitin, are thought to prevent cartilage degeneration. Reconstructive surgical treatment strategies aim to form a repair tissue or to unload compartments of the joint with articular cartilage damage. In this article, we selectively review the pertinent literature, focusing on original publications of the past 5 years and older standard texts. Particular attention is paid to guidelines and clinical studies with a high level of evidence, along with review articles, clinical trials, and book chapters. There have been only a few randomized trials of medical versus surgical treatments. Pharmacological therapies are now available that are intended to treat the cartilage defect per se, rather than the associated symptoms, yet none of them has yet been shown to slow or reverse the progression of cartilage destruction. Surgical débridement of cartilage does not prevent the progression of osteoarthritis and is thus not recommended as the sole treatment. Marrow-stimulating procedures and osteochondral grafts are indicated for small focal articular cartilage defects, while autologous chondrocyte implantationis mainly indicated for larger cartilage defects. These surgical reconstructive techniques play a lesser role in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Osteotomy near the knee joint is indicated for axial realignment when unilateral osteoarthritis of the knee causes axis deviation. Surgical reconstructive techniques can improve joint function and thereby postpone the need for replacement of the articular surface with an artificial joint.

  15. Cartilage repair using human embryonic stem cell-derived chondroprogenitors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Aixin; Kapacee, Zoher; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi; Lucas, Robert J; Hardingham, Timothy E; Kimber, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    In initial work, we developed a 14-day culture protocol under potential GMP, chemically defined conditions to generate chondroprogenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The present study was undertaken to investigate the cartilage repair capacity of these cells. The chondrogenic protocol was optimized and validated with gene expression profiling. The protocol was also applied successfully to two lines of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs were encapsulated in fibrin gel and implanted in osteochondral defects in the patella groove of nude rats, and cartilage repair was evaluated by histomorphology and immunocytochemistry. Genes associated with chondrogenesis were upregulated during the protocol, and pluripotency-related genes were downregulated. Aggregation of chondrogenic cells was accompanied by high expression of SOX9 and strong staining with Safranin O. Culture with PluriSln1 was lethal for hESCs but was tolerated by hESC chondrogenic cells, and no OCT4-positive cells were detected in hESC chondrogenic cells. iPSCs were also shown to generate chondroprogenitors in this protocol. Repaired tissue in the defect area implanted with hESC-derived chondrogenic cells was stained for collagen II with little collagen I, but negligible collagen II was observed in the fibrin-only controls. Viable human cells were detected in the repair tissue at 12 weeks. The results show that chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs, using a chemically defined culture system, when implanted in focal defects were able to promote cartilage repair. This is a first step in evaluating these cells for clinical application for the treatment of cartilage lesions.

  16. Cartilage Repair Using Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Chondroprogenitors

    PubMed Central

    Kapacee, Zoher; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi; Lucas, Robert J.; Hardingham, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    In initial work, we developed a 14-day culture protocol under potential GMP, chemically defined conditions to generate chondroprogenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The present study was undertaken to investigate the cartilage repair capacity of these cells. The chondrogenic protocol was optimized and validated with gene expression profiling. The protocol was also applied successfully to two lines of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs were encapsulated in fibrin gel and implanted in osteochondral defects in the patella groove of nude rats, and cartilage repair was evaluated by histomorphology and immunocytochemistry. Genes associated with chondrogenesis were upregulated during the protocol, and pluripotency-related genes were downregulated. Aggregation of chondrogenic cells was accompanied by high expression of SOX9 and strong staining with Safranin O. Culture with PluriSln1 was lethal for hESCs but was tolerated by hESC chondrogenic cells, and no OCT4-positive cells were detected in hESC chondrogenic cells. iPSCs were also shown to generate chondroprogenitors in this protocol. Repaired tissue in the defect area implanted with hESC-derived chondrogenic cells was stained for collagen II with little collagen I, but negligible collagen II was observed in the fibrin-only controls. Viable human cells were detected in the repair tissue at 12 weeks. The results show that chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs, using a chemically defined culture system, when implanted in focal defects were able to promote cartilage repair. This is a first step in evaluating these cells for clinical application for the treatment of cartilage lesions. PMID:25273540

  17. A peek into the possible future of management of articular cartilage injuries: gene therapy and scaffolds for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hubert T; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Mizuno, Shuichi; Abelow, Stephen; Safran, Marc R

    2006-10-01

    Two rapidly progressing areas of research will likely contribute to cartilage repair procedures in the foreseeable future: gene therapy and synthetic scaffolds. Gene therapy refers to the transfer of new genetic information to cells that contribute to the cartilage repair process. This approach allows for manipulation of cartilage repair at the cellular and molecular level. Scaffolds are the core technology for the next generation of autologous cartilage implantation procedures in which synthetic matrices are used in conjunction with chondrocytes. This approach can be improved further using bioreactor technologies to enhance the production of extracellular matrix proteins by chondrocytes seeded onto a scaffold. The resulting "neo-cartilage implant" matures within the bioreactor, and can then be used to fill cartilage defects.

  18. Chitosan: A promising polymer for cartilage repair and viscosupplementation.

    PubMed

    Comblain, Fanny; Rocasalbas, Guillem; Gauthier, Sandrine; Henrotin, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful, degenerative and inflammatory disease that affects the entire synovial joints. Nowadays, no cure exists, and the pharmacological treatments are limited to symptoms alleviation. There is a need for a new efficient and safe treatment. Viscosupplementation is a process that aims to restore the normal rheological properties of synovial fluid. For the past years, hyaluronic acid was usually used but this molecule has some limitations including the short residency time in joint cavity. Recently, in vitro studies have suggested that chitosan could promote the expression of cartilage matrix components and reduce inflammatory and catabolic mediator's production by chondrocytes. In vivo, chitosan prevented cartilage degradation and synovial membrane inflammation in OA induced rabbit model. Several studies have also shown that chitosan could induce chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, chitosan is an interesting polymer to design scaffold and hydrogel for cartilage lesion repair, cells transplantation, sustained drug release and viscosupplementation.

  19. Repair of articular cartilage defects: part II. Treatment options.

    PubMed

    Chen, F S; Frenkel, S R; Di Cesare, P E

    1999-02-01

    Articular cartilage injuries result in numerous clinical symptoms, such as pain and decreased functional levels. Current therapeutic options being used include articular surface debridement, such as chondral shaving, abrasion chondroplasty, and subchondral perforation; soft-tissue arthroplasties, such as perichondrial and periosteal grafts; and osteochondral transplantation. None of these therapies, however, has resulted in the successful regeneration of a hyaline-like tissue that withstands normal joint loading and activity over prolonged periods. As a result, research is also being conducted on alternative therapeutic procedures to enhance the repair process and to stimulate the regeneration of a repair tissue with hyaline-like structural and biologic properties. Part I of this paper, which was published in January, discussed the basic science of cartilage healing. Part II presents the treatment options.

  20. Cartilage repair using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheet and MSCs-loaded bilayer PLGA scaffold in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yiying; Du, Yi; Li, Weixu; Dai, Xuesong; Zhao, Tengfei; Yan, Weiqi

    2014-06-01

    The integration of regenerated cartilage with surrounding native cartilage is a major challenge for the success of cartilage tissue-engineering strategies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether incorporation of the power of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheet to MSCs-loaded bilayer poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds can improve the integration and repair of cartilage defects in a rabbit model. Rabbit bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured and formed cell sheet. Full-thickness cylindrical osteochondral defects (4 mm in diameter, 3 mm in depth) were created in the patellar groove of 18 New Zealand white rabbits and the osteochondral defects were treated with PLGA scaffold (n = 6), PLGA/MSCs (n = 6) or MSC sheet-encapsulated PLGA/MSCs (n = 6). After 6 and 12 weeks, the integration and tissue response were evaluated histologically. The MSC sheet-encapsulated PLGA/MCSs group showed significantly more amounts of hyaline cartilage and higher histological scores than PLGA/MSCs group and PLGA group (P < 0.05). In addition, the MSC sheet-encapsulated PLGA/MCSs group showed the best integration between the repaired cartilage and surrounding normal cartilage and subchondral bone compared to other two groups. The novel method of incorporation of MSC sheet to PLGA/MCSs could enhance the ability of cartilage regeneration and integration between repair cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Transplantation of autologous MSC sheet combined with traditional strategies or cartilage debris might provide therapeutic opportunities for improving cartilage regeneration and integration in humans.

  1. Cartilage repair: past and future – lessons for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Brittberg, Mats; Dennis, James E; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne M; Erben, Reinhold G; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Luyten, Frank P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Since the first cell therapeutic study to repair articular cartilage defects in the knee in 1994, several clinical studies have been reported. An overview of the results of clinical studies did not conclusively show improvement over conventional methods, mainly because few studies reach level I of evidence for effects on middle or long term. However, these explorative trials have provided valuable information about study design, mechanisms of repair and clinical outcome and have revealed that much is still unknown and further improvements are required. Furthermore, cellular and molecular studies using new technologies such as cell tracking, gene arrays and proteomics have provided more insight in the cell biology and mechanisms of joint surface regeneration. Besides articular cartilage, cartilage of other anatomical locations as well as progenitor cells are now considered as alternative cell sources. Growth Factor research has revealed some information on optimal conditions to support cartilage repair. Thus, there is hope for improvement. In order to obtain more robust and reproducible results, more detailed information is needed on many aspects including the fate of the cells, choice of cell type and culture parameters. As for the clinical aspects, it becomes clear that careful selection of patient groups is an important input parameter that should be optimized for each application. In addition, the study outcome parameters should be improved. Although reduced pain and improved function are, from the patient's perspective, the most important outcomes, there is a need for more structure/tissue-related outcome measures. Ideally, criteria and/or markers to identify patients at risk and responders to treatment are the ultimate goal for these more sophisticated regenerative approaches in joint surface repair in particular, and regenerative medicine in general. PMID:19453519

  2. Cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Teixeira, Liliana S; Georgi, Nicole; Leijten, Jeroen; Wu, Ling; Karperien, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is the art aimed at repairing defects in the articular cartilage which covers the bony ends in the joints. Since its introduction in the early 1990s of the past century, cartilage tissue engineering using ACI has been used in thousands of patients to repair articular cartilage defects. This review focuses on emerging strategies to improve cartilage repair by incorporating fundamental knowledge of developmental and cell biology in the design of optimized strategies for cell delivery at the defect site and to locally stimulate cartilage repair responses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Immune modulation to improve tissue engineering outcomes for cartilage repair in the osteoarthritic joint.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Niamh; Farrell, Eric; Ritter, Thomas; Ryan, Aideen E; Murphy, J Mary

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a disabling degenerative joint disease affecting synovial joints and is associated with cartilage destruction, inflammation of the synovial membrane, and subchondral bone remodeling. Inflammation of the synovial membrane may arise secondary to degenerative processes in articular cartilage (AC), or may be a primary occurrence in OA pathogenesis. However, synovial inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis and disease progression of OA through the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and is associated with cartilage destruction and pain. The triggers that initiate activation of the immune response in OA are unknown, but crosstalk between osteoarthritic chondrocytes, cartilage degradation products, and the synovium may act to perpetuate this response. Increasing evidence has emerged highlighting an important role for pro-inflammatory mediators and infiltrating inflammatory cell populations in the progression of the disease. Tissue engineering strategies hold great potential for the repair of damaged AC in an osteoarthritic joint. However, an in-depth understanding of how OA-associated inflammation impacts chondrocyte and progenitor cell behavior is required to achieve efficient cartilage regeneration in a catabolic osteoarthritic environment. In this review, we will discuss the role of inflammation in OA, and investigate novel immune modulation strategies that may prevent disease progression and facilitate successful cartilage regeneration for the treatment of OA.

  4. Immune Modulation to Improve Tissue Engineering Outcomes for Cartilage Repair in the Osteoarthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Niamh; Farrell, Eric; Ritter, Thomas; Ryan, Aideen E.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a disabling degenerative joint disease affecting synovial joints and is associated with cartilage destruction, inflammation of the synovial membrane, and subchondral bone remodeling. Inflammation of the synovial membrane may arise secondary to degenerative processes in articular cartilage (AC), or may be a primary occurrence in OA pathogenesis. However, synovial inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis and disease progression of OA through the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and is associated with cartilage destruction and pain. The triggers that initiate activation of the immune response in OA are unknown, but crosstalk between osteoarthritic chondrocytes, cartilage degradation products, and the synovium may act to perpetuate this response. Increasing evidence has emerged highlighting an important role for pro-inflammatory mediators and infiltrating inflammatory cell populations in the progression of the disease. Tissue engineering strategies hold great potential for the repair of damaged AC in an osteoarthritic joint. However, an in-depth understanding of how OA-associated inflammation impacts chondrocyte and progenitor cell behavior is required to achieve efficient cartilage regeneration in a catabolic osteoarthritic environment. In this review, we will discuss the role of inflammation in OA, and investigate novel immune modulation strategies that may prevent disease progression and facilitate successful cartilage regeneration for the treatment of OA. PMID:24950588

  5. The effects of different doses of IGF-1 on cartilage and subchondral bone during the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Li, L; Yang, W; Cao, Y; Shi, Y; Li, X; Zhang, Q

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effects of different doses of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on the cartilage layer and subchondral bone (SB) during repair of full-thickness articular cartilage (AC) defects. IGF-1-loaded collagen membrane was implanted into full-thickness AC defects in rabbits. The effects of two different doses of IGF-1 on cartilage layer and SB adjacent to the defect, the cartilage structure, formation and integration, and the new SB formation were evaluated at the 1st, 4th and 8th week postoperation. Meanwhile, after 1 week treatment, the relative mRNA expressions in tissues adjacent to the defect, including cartilage and SB were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), respectively. Different doses of IGF-1 induced different gene expression profiles in tissues adjacent to the defect and resulted in different repair outcomes. Particularly, at high dose IGF-1 aided cell survival, regulated the gene expressions in cartilage layer adjacent defect and altered ECM composition more effectively, improved the formation and integrity of neo-cartilage. While, at low dose IGF-1 regulated the gene expressions in SB more efficaciously and subsequently promoted the SB remodeling and reconstruction. Different doses of IGF-1 induced different responses of cartilage or SB during the repair of full-thickness AC defects. Particularly, high dose of IGF-1 was more beneficial to the neo-cartilage formation and integration, while low dose of it was more effective for the SB formation. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cartilage and meniscal T2 relaxation time as non-invasive biomarker for knee osteoarthritis and cartilage repair procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baum, T.; Joseph, G.B.; Karampinos, D.C.; Jungmann, P.M.; Link, T.M.; Bauer, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective The purpose of this work was to review the current literature on cartilage and meniscal T2 relaxation time. Methods Electronic searches in PubMed were performed to identify relevant studies about T2 relaxation time measurements as non-invasive biomarker for knee osteoarthritis (OA) and cartilage repair procedures. Results Initial osteoarthritic changes include proteoglycan loss, deterioration of the collagen network, and increased water content within the articular cartilage and menisci. T2 relaxation time measurements are affected by these pathophysiological processes. It was demonstrated that cartilage and meniscal T2 relaxation time values were significantly increased in subjects with compared to those without radiographic OA and focal knee lesions, respectively. Subjects with OA risk factors such as overweight/obesity showed significantly greater cartilage T2 values than normal controls. Elevated cartilage and meniscal T2 relaxation times were found in subjects with vs without knee pain. Increased cartilage T2 at baseline predicted morphologic degeneration in the cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow over 3 years. Furthermore, cartilage repair tissue could be non-invasively assessed by using T2 mapping. Reproducibility errors for T2 measurements were reported to be smaller than the T2 differences in healthy and diseased cartilage indicating that T2 relaxation time may be a reliable discriminatory biomarker. Conclusions Cartilage and meniscal T2 mapping may be suitable as non-invasive biomarker to diagnose early stages of knee OA and to monitor therapy of OA. PMID:23896316

  7. Stem cell repair of physeal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae I; Terry Canale, S; Butler, Stephanie D; Hasty, Karen A

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the ability of cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to repair physeal defects, MSC-matrix constructs with 5% gelatin (group A), 10% gelatin/Gelfoam (Pharmacia, Peapack, NJ) (group B), and MSC grown in the presence of TGF-beta3 with Gelfoam (group C) were implanted in proximal tibial physeal defects created in 20 immature rabbits. Control groups (untreated partial defect and partial defect treated with Gelfoam) showed bony bar formation with varus deformities of 30 degrees and 28 degrees, respectively. Group A had an average 23 degrees varus deformity with bony bridge formation, and group B had mild varus angulation (average 14 degrees) of the proximal tibia. In group C, there was no significant varus deformity (average 9 degrees), and histologic examination showed that some of the columnation areas interspersed with chondrocytes were irregularly arranged in the matrix. These findings suggest that repair of physeal defects can be enhanced by the implantation of MSC cultured with TGF-beta3.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Repair: Clinical Studies and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    Punwar, Shahid; Khan, Wasim S

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage is frequently injured but shows little capacity for repair. Current treatment options include the use of procedures that stimulate repair through the stimulation of subchondral bone marrow and result in the formation of fibrocartilage. There is considerable interest in the use of cell-based treatment strategies and there are limited studies describing the use of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair with promising early results. This paper reviews the current treatment strategies for articular cartilage, describes use of mesenchymal stem cells for articular cartilage repair along with the results of clinical studies, and describes the future direction that these strategies are likely to take. PMID:21886696

  9. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character. PMID:26069577

  10. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Ashvin K.; Gibson, Matthew A.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Trice, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI) and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells) and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes). ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient's knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients. PMID:25210707

  11. Collagen Type IV and Laminin Expressions during Cartilage Repair and in Late Clinically Failed Repair Tissues from Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Toh, Wei Seong; Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Lind, Martin; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Spector, Myron

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the collagen type IV (Col4) isoform in articular cartilage and to evaluate the expressions of Col4 and laminin in the pericellular matrix (PCM) in damaged cartilage and during cartilage repair. Design The Col4 isoform was determined in chondrocytes isolated from 6 patients cultured up to 6 days and in 21% O2 or 1% O2, and the gene expression of Col4 α-chains was investigated. The distribution of Col4 and laminin in traumatically damaged cartilage (n = 7) and clinically failed cartilage repair (microfracture, TruFit, autologous chondrocyte implantation; n = 11) were investigated using immunohistochemistry. Normal human cartilage was used as control (n = 8). The distribution during clinical cartilage repair procedures was investigated in a minipig model with 6-month follow-up (untreated chondral, untreated osteochondral, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation; n = 10). Results The Col4 isoform in articular cartilage was characterized as α1α1α2, which is an isoform containing antiangiogenic domains in the NC1-terminals (arresten and canstatin). In normal cartilage, laminin and Col4 was exclusively found in the PCM. High amounts (>50%) of Col4 in the PCM significantly decreased in damaged cartilage (P = 0.004) and clinically failed repair tissue (P < 0.001). Laminin was only found with high expression (>50%) in 4/8 of the normal samples, which was not statistically significantly different from damaged cartilage (P = 0.15) or failed cartilage repair (P = 0.054). Conclusions Col4 in cartilage contain antiangiogenic domains and may play a role in the hypoxic environment in articular cartilage. Col4 and laminin was not found in the PCM of damaged and clinically failed repair. PMID:26958317

  12. Optimization and translation of MSC-based hyaluronic acid hydrogels for cartilage repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Isaac E.

    2011-12-01

    Traumatic injury and disease disrupt the ability of cartilage to carry joint stresses and, without an innate regenerative response, often lead to degenerative changes towards the premature development of osteoarthritis. Surgical interventions have yet to restore long-term mechanical function. Towards this end, tissue engineering has been explored for the de novo formation of engineered cartilage as a biologic approach to cartilage repair. Research utilizing autologous chondrocytes has been promising, but clinical limitations in their yield have motivated research into the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative cell source. MSCs are multipotent cells that can differentiate towards a chondrocyte phenotype in a number of biomaterials, but no combination has successfully recapitulated the native mechanical function of healthy articular cartilage. The broad objective of this thesis was to establish an MSC-based tissue engineering approach worthy of clinical translation. Hydrogels are a common class of biomaterial used for cartilage tissue engineering and our initial work demonstrated the potential of a photo-polymerizable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel to promote MSC chondrogenesis and improved construct maturation by optimizing macromer and MSC seeding density. The beneficial effects of dynamic compressive loading, high MSC density, and continuous mixing (orbital shaker) resulted in equilibrium modulus values over 1 MPa, well in range of native tissue. While compressive properties are crucial, clinical translation also demands that constructs stably integrate within a defect. We utilized a push-out testing modality to assess the in vitro integration of HA constructs within artificial cartilage defects. We established the necessity for in vitro pre-maturation of constructs before repair to achieve greater integration strength and compressive properties in situ. Combining high MSC density and gentle mixing resulted in integration strength over 500 k

  13. Effects of hormones and drugs on cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Franchimont, P; Bassleer, C; Henrotin, Y

    1989-08-01

    When cartilage is attacked, either by an excess of charges or by biochemical agents, its morphological and functional impairment is associated with a local homeostatic reaction; this includes a proliferative response (assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation) and a stimulation of proteoglycan and type II collagen (II coll) synthesis. This homeostatic reaction may be studied in vitro using tridimensional culture of human chondrocytes. Cartilage clusters are formed after 4 days' culture and chondrocytes multiply for the first 15 days of culture. Furthermore, human cartilage proteoglycans and II coll, assayed by specific radioimmunoassays, are released into the culture medium and constitute the new matrix of the clusters. Moreover, it appears that these human chondrocytes are targets for several hormones capable of stimulating a proliferative response without affecting proteoglycan and II coll synthesis.

  14. [Allograft of cultured chondrocytes into articular cartilage defects in rabbits--experimental study of the repair of articular cartilage injuries].

    PubMed

    Tsuge, H; Sasaki, T; Susuda, K; Abe, K

    1983-08-01

    Articular cartilage defects were created by dill holes, 2 mm wide and 3 mm deep, through the articular cartilage into the subchondral bone in the patellar groove of the femur in mature rabbits. The defects received graft of cultured chondrocytes and the matrix obtained from the primary culture of chondrocytes isolated from the articular cartilage or auricular cartilage in immature rabbits. The isolated cells were cultured for 10 to 14 days. For graft, the cultured chondrocytes together with the matrix were detached from the culture chamber using rubber policemen and centrifuged. The repair of the grafted defects or defects without graft (control) was histologically studied 2 to 12 weeks after operation. The defects without the graft were progressively filled with fibrous tissue containing spindle shaped cells, fibers perpendicular to the surface, and matrix showing weak metachromasia with toluidin blue at 8 weeks. The defects received articular cartilage cell graft were occupied by new cartilage tissue consisting colonylike crumps of chondrocytes 2 weeks after operation. The crumps showed strong metachromasia with toluidin blue and strong stainability for safranin-O. By 4-8 weeks, the defects were filled with homogeneous cartilage. At 12 weeks, arrangement of the chondrocytes of the superficial layer of the new cartilage became columnar as seen in the normal articular cartilage. The defects received elastic cartilage cell graft were filled by reformed cartilage with chondrocytes surrounded by elastic fibers 2-12 weeks after operation. The results indicate that allograft of cultured chondrocytes with matrix into the articular cartilage defects accerated the repair process of the defects by formation of the new cartilage derived from the grafted chondrocytes.

  15. The Role of Tissue Engineering in Articular Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair and regeneration continue to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased articular cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving articular cartilage therapy. This review provides an overall description of the current state and progress in articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Traditional therapies and related problems are introduced. More importantly, a variety of promising cell sources, biocompatible tissue engineered scaffolds, scaffoldless techniques, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli used in current articular cartilage tissue engineering are reviewed. Finally, the technical and regulatory challenges of articular cartilage tissue engineering and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:20201770

  16. Bone and cartilage repair by transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cells in murine joint defect model.

    PubMed

    Uto, Sakura; Nishizawa, Satoru; Takasawa, Yutaka; Asawa, Yukiyo; Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of cartilage regenerative medicine has been an important issue in the clinical field, because cartilage has the poor ability of self-repair. Currently, tissue engineering using autologous chondrocytes has risen, but we should investigate more appropriate cell sources that can be obtained without any quantitative limitation. In this study, we focused on induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, in which the ethical hurdle does not seem higher than that of embryonic stem cells. Mouse iPS cells were transplanted into the mouse joint defect model of the knee. Strains of the transplants and hosts were arranged to be either closest (homology 75% in genetic background) or identical (100%). For transplantation, we embedded the iPS cells within the collagen hydrogel in order to obtain the effective administration of the cells into defects, which induced the differentiation of the iPS cells. At 8 weeks of transplantation, although the iPS cells with a 75% homology to the host in the genetic background tended to form teratoma, those of 100% showed a joint regeneration. GFP immunohistochemistry proved that the transplanted iPS cells were responsible for the bone and cartilage repair. Taking these results together, the iPS cells are regarded as a promising cell source for the cartilage tissue engineering.

  17. Repair and tissue engineering techniques for articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral lesions due to injury or other pathology commonly result in the development of osteoarthritis, eventually leading to progressive total joint destruction. Although current progress suggests that biologic agents can delay the advancement of deterioration, such drugs are incapable of promoting tissue restoration. The limited ability of articular cartilage to regenerate renders joint arthroplasty an unavoidable surgical intervention. This Review describes current, widely used clinical repair techniques for resurfacing articular cartilage defects; short-term and long-term clinical outcomes of these techniques are discussed. Also reviewed is a developmental pipeline of regenerative biological products that over the next decade could revolutionize joint care by functionally healing articular cartilage. These products include cell-based and cell-free materials such as autologous and allogeneic cell-based approaches and multipotent and pluripotent stem-cell-based techniques. Central to these efforts is the prominent role that tissue engineering has in translating biological technology into clinical products; therefore, concomitant regulatory processes are also discussed. PMID:25247412

  18. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF CONTROLLED RELEASING DELIVERY OF BIOLOGICAL FACTORS FOR CARTILAGE REPAIR].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jialei; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-08-01

    To summarize the recent progress of the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors for cartilage repair. The recently published literature at home and abroad on the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors for cartilage repair was reviewed and summarized. Various biological factors have been applied for repairing cartilage. For better cartilage repair effects, controlled releasing delivery of biological factors can be applied by means of combining biological factors with degradable biomaterials, or by micro- and nano-particles. Meanwhile, multiple biologic delivery and temporally controlled delivery are also inevitable choices. Although lots of unsolved problems exist, the controlled releasing delivery of biological factors has been a research focus for cartilage repair because of the controllability and delicacy.

  19. Platelets promote cartilage repair and chondrocyte proliferation via ADP in a rodent model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Xu, Chunhua; Cheng, Xingyao; Liu, Yangyang; Yue, Ming; Hu, Mengjiao; Luo, Dongjiao; Niu, Yuxi; Ouyang, Hongwei; Ji, Jiansong; Hu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common age-related degenerative joint disease and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been shown to be beneficial in OA. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of platelets on chondrocytes and the underlying mechanisms. Anabolic and catabolic activity and the proliferation rate of chondrocytes were evaluated after co-culture with platelets. Chondrocyte gene expression was measured by real-time PCR. Chondrocyte protein expression and phosphorylation were measured by western blot. Chondrocytes treated with or without platelets were transplanted into a rat model of OA induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate and the repair of articular cartilage was evaluated macroscopically and histologically. Platelets significantly promoted the proliferation of chondrocytes, while mildly influencing anabolic and catabolic activity. Chondrocytes co-cultured with platelets showed significantly increased production of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7). The autocrine/paracrine effect of BMP7 was responsible for the increased proliferation of chondrocytes, via the ERK/CDK1/cyclin B1 signaling pathway. Transplantation of platelet-treated chondrocytes showed better cartilage repair in the OA model. Platelet-derived ADP was identified as the major mediator to promote the production of BMP7 and the proliferation of chondrocytes, through the ADP receptor P2Y1. Finally, direct injection of α,β-methyleneadenosine-5'-diphosphate into OA joints also enhanced cartilage repair. This study has identified that platelet-derived ADP, but not ATP, is the key mediator for platelet-promoted chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage repair in osteoarthritis. This finding may provide a key explanation for the therapeutic effect of platelets in OA and help shaping a strategy to improve OA therapy.

  20. The maturity of tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro affects the repairability for osteochondral defect.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng Zhe; Cho, Jae-Ho; Choi, Byung Hyune; Wang, Li Ming; Kim, Moon Suk; Park, So Ra; Yoon, Jeong Ho; Yun, Jung Ho; Oh, Hyun Ju; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering using cells and biocompatible scaffolds has emerged as a promising approach to repair of cartilage damage. To date, however, no engineered cartilage has proven to be equivalent to native cartilage in terms of biochemical and compression properties, as well as histological features. An alternative strategy for cartilage engineering is to focus on the in vivo regeneration potential of immature engineered cartilage. Here, we used a rabbit model to evaluate the extent to which the maturity of engineered cartilage influenced the remodeling and integration of implanted extracellular matrix scaffolds containing allogenous chondrocytes. Full-thickness osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of New Zealand white rabbits. Left knee defects were left untreated as a control (group 1), and right knee defects were implanted with tissue-engineered cartilage cultured in vitro for 2 days (group 2), 2 weeks (group 3), or 4 weeks (group 4). Histological, chemical, and compression assays of engineered cartilage in vitro showed that biochemical composition became more cartilagenous, and biomechanical property for compression gradually increased with culture time. In an in vivo study, gross imaging and histological observation at 1 and 3 months after implanting in vitro-cultured engineered cartilage showed that defects in groups 3 and 4 were repaired with hyaline cartilage-like tissue, whereas defects were only partially filled with fibrocartilage after 1 month in groups 1 and 2. At 3 months, group 4 showed striking features of hyaline cartilage tissue, with a mature matrix and a columnar arrangement of chondrocytes. Zonal distribution of type II collagen was most prominent, and the International Cartilage Repair Society score was also highest at this time. In addition, the subchondral bone was well ossified. In conclusion, in vivo engineered cartilage was remodeled when implanted; however, its extent to maturity varied with cultivation

  1. Articular Cartilage Repair: Where We Have Been, Where We Are Now, and Where We Are Headed.

    PubMed

    Grande, Daniel A; Schwartz, John A; Brandel, Eric; Chahine, Nadeen O; Sgaglione, Nicholas

    2013-10-01

    This review traces the genealogy of the field of articular cartilage repair from its earliest attempts to its present day vast proliferation of research advances. Prior to the 1980s there was only sporadic efforts to regenerate articular cartilage as it was considered to be incapable of regeneration based on historical dogma. The first flurry of reports documented the use of various cell types ultimately leading to the first successful demonstration of autologous chondrocyte transplantation which was later translated to clinical use and has resulted in the revised axiom that cartilage regeneration is possible. The current field of cartilage repair is multifaceted and some of the 1980s' vintage concepts have been revisited with state of the art technology now available. The future of the field is now poised to undertake the repair of whole cartilage surfaces beyond focal defects and an appreciation for integrated whole joint health to restore cartilage homeostasis.

  2. The Challenge and the Promise of Bone Marrow Cells for Human Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Chu, Constance R

    2015-04-01

    The cartilage repair potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells has been well described. Harnessing this potential for human articular cartilage repair remains challenging. Accessing bone marrow repair cells through marrow stimulation techniques such as microfracture is readily achieved with generally good but inconsistent results. Animal and human studies show feasibility for ex vivo processing of bone marrow to isolate, concentrate, and culture mesenchymal stem cells. Nevertheless, it has been difficult to show consistent and clinically meaningful improvement using bone marrow cell preparations above what has been achieved with microfracture. Consequently, microfracture continues to be the simplest and most commonly used method to enhance repair of focal articular cartilage defects. Emerging preclinical work in the equine model suggests a role for enhancing marrow-stimulation techniques through the use of natural scaffolds such as autologous platelet enriched fibrin as well as optimization of joint biology through localized gene therapy to support cartilage repair. In contrast to joint replacement where inert materials of known mechanical properties are used, host biology determines the relative success, failure, and durability of cartilage repair. As such, development of personalized strategies to improve the quality and durability of bone marrow cell-based articular cartilage repair represent exciting new areas of inquiry. Continued advances in stem cell biology, scaffold technologies, and methods to delineate and enhance host biology, both systemically and within the joint, hold promise for harnessing the full power of bone marrow cells to facilitate cartilage repair and regeneration.

  3. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10−6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  4. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengzhen; Zhang, Fengjie; He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  5. Repair of articular cartilage and meniscal tears by photoactive dyes: in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Jackson, Robert W.; Nosir, Hany R.; Matthews, James Lester; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.; Yuan, Dongwu

    1996-12-01

    We describe healing results of our 6 month study of a repair procedure which evokes the healing response in meniscal tears and partial thickness defects in articular cartilage by a non-thermal tissue sparing photochemical weld using 1,8-naphthalimide dyes. Welds of incisional flaps in adult sheep meniscus and femoral articular cartilage were made using the dye MBM Gold 012011012 at 12 mM in PBS, 457.9nm Argon ion laser radiation at 800 mW/cm2, 7.5 minutes with approximately 1 kg/cm2 externally applied pressure. Gross appearance of tissues in all welded knees appeared normal. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections disclosed close bonding of welded areas and continuing healing response as cellular recruitment.

  6. Evaluation of native hyaline cartilage and repair tissue after two cartilage repair surgery techniques with 23Na MR imaging at 7 T: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Zbýň, S; Stelzeneder, D; Welsch, G H; Negrin, L L; Juras, V; Mayerhoefer, M E; Szomolanyi, P; Bogner, W; Domayer, S E; Weber, M; Trattnig, S

    2012-08-01

    To compare the sodium normalized mean signal intensity (NMSI) values between patients after bone marrow stimulation (BMS) and matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) cartilage repair procedures. Nine BMS and nine MACT patients were included. Each BMS patient was matched with one MACT patient according to age [BMS 36.7 ± 10.7 (mean ± standard deviation) years; MACT 36.9 ± 10.0 years], postoperative interval (BMS 33.5 ± 25.3 months; MACT 33.2 ± 25.7 months), and defect location. All magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements were performed on a 7 T system. Proton images served for morphological evaluation of repair tissue using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system. Sodium NMSI values in the repair area and morphologically normal cartilage were calculated. Clinical outcome was assessed right after MRI. Analysis of covariance, t-tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. Sodium NMSI was significantly lower in BMS (P = 0.004) and MACT (P = 0.006) repair tissue, compared to reference cartilage. Sodium NMSI was not different between the reference cartilage in MACT and BMS patients (P = 0.664), however it was significantly higher in MACT than in BMS repair tissue (P = 0.028). Better clinical outcome was observed in BMS than in MACT patients. There was no difference between MOCART scores for MACT and BMS patients (P = 0.915). We did not observe any significant correlation between MOCART score and sodium repair tissue NMSI (r = -0.001; P = 0.996). Our results suggest higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and therefore, repair tissue of better quality in MACT than in BMS patients. Sodium imaging might be beneficial in non-invasive evaluation of cartilage repair surgery efficacy. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein 1 (CDMP1) transgenic mesenchymal stem cell sheets in repairing rabbit cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Yao, M; Liu, Y; Mu, L; Zhang, B; Wu, G

    2016-06-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the abilities of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein 1 (CDMP1) transgenic cell sheets in repairing rabbit cartilage defects. Rabbit CDMP1 transgenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets (CDMP1-BMSCs) were cultured on temperature-sensitive culture dishes, and CDMP1 expression and type II collagen protein in the cell sheets were detected. Tissue-engineered cell sheets were constructed and transplanted into defect rabbit thyroid cartilage, to investigate the expression of engineered cartilage collagen protein and proteoglycan (GAG). The experiment was divided into three groups; A) BMSC sheet, B) Ad-CMV-eGFP-transfected cell sheet, and C) Ad-CMV-hCDMP1-IRES-eGFP-transfected cell sheet. The expression of CDMP1 was detected in the transgenic cell sheets. The engineered cartilage exhibited positive immunohistochemical and Alcian blue staining. The expression levels of type II collagen protein and GAG in group A were positive, whereas those in group B and group C were negative (P < 0.05). The CDMP1-BMSC sheets had a good cartilage differentiation activity, and could effectively repair rabbit laryngeal cartilage defects.

  8. Repair of massively defected hemi-joints using demineralized osteoarticular allografts with protected cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Siming; Yang, Xiaohong; Tang, Shenghui; Zhang, Xunmeng; Feng, Zhencheng; Cui, Shuliang

    2015-08-01

    Surgical replacement of massively defected joints necessarily relies on osteochondral grafts effective to both of bone and cartilage. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) retains the osteoconductivity but destroys viable chondrocytes in the cartilage portion essential for successful restoration of defected joints. This study prepared osteochondral grafts of DBM with protected cartilage. Protected cartilage portions was characterized by cellular and molecular biology and the grafts were allogenically used for grafting. Protected cartilage showed similar histomorphological structure and protected proteins estimated by total proteins and cartilage specific proteins as in those of fresh controls when DBMs were generated in bone portions. Such grafts were successfully used for simultaneously repair of bone and cartilage in massively defected osteoarticular joints within 16 weeks post-surgery. These results present an allograft with clinical potential for simultaneous restoration of bone and cartilage in defected joints.

  9. Temporary immobilisation facilitates repair of chemically induced articular cartilage injury.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J M; Brandt, K D

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that immobilisation of the lower limb may prevent surface fibrillation and osteophyte formation, and reduce cell depletion, following injection of iodoacetate into the ipsilateral knee of the guinea-pig. The present study shows that temporary immobilisation also facilitates repair of the damaged cartilage during a subsequent period of remobilisation in which the animal is permitted to move 'on all fours'. Thus, in animals killed six weeks after a single intra-articular injection of iodoacetate (0.3 mg in 0.1 ml saline), and in which the injected knee had been immobilised for three weeks, Safranin-O staining of the articular cartilage was more intense, chondrocyte density greater, and osteophytosis much less marked than in animals injected with iodoacetate but killed immediately after the three weeks immobilisation period. By contrast, immobilisation for only one week failed to protect against degenerative changes and osteophytes caused by iodoacetate injection. Immobilisation alone produced no apparent pathological changes in animals which did not receive iodoacetate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6735906

  10. Cell factory-derived bioactive molecules with polymeric cryogel scaffold enhance the repair of subchondral cartilage defect in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankur; Bhat, Sumrita; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Gupta, Kailash C; Tägil, Magnus; Zheng, Ming Hao; Kumar, Ashok; Lidgren, Lars

    2015-07-14

    We have explored the potential of cell factory-derived bioactive molecules, isolated from conditioned media of primary goat chondrocytes, for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirms the presence of transforming growth factor-β1 in an isolated protein fraction (12.56 ± 1.15 ng/mg protein fraction). These bioactive molecules were used alone or with chitosan-agarose-gelatin cryogel scaffolds, with and without chondrocytes, to check whether combined approaches further enhance cartilage repair. To evaluate this, an in vivo study was conducted on New Zealand rabbits in which a subchondral defect (4.5 mm wide × 4.5 mm deep) was surgically created. Starting after the operation, bioactive molecules were injected at the defect site at regular intervals of 14 days. Histopathological analysis showed that rabbits treated with bioactive molecules alone had cartilage regeneration after 4 weeks. However, rabbits treated with bioactive molecules along with scaffolds, with or without cells, showed cartilage formation after 3 weeks; 6 weeks after surgery, the cartilage regenerated in rabbits treated with either bioactive molecules alone or in combinations showed morphological similarities to native cartilage. No systemic cytotoxicity or inflammatory response was induced by any of the treatments. Further, ELISA was done to determine systemic toxicity, which showed no difference in concentration of tumour necrosis factor-α in blood serum, before or after surgery. In conclusion, intra-articular injection with bioactive molecules alone may be used for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects, and bioactive molecules along with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds further enhance the repair. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered osteochondral composites in pigs.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiding; Wang, Qing; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Shixiang; Chang, Qing; Zuo, Qiang; Ren, Kewei; Fan, Weimin

    2011-04-01

    To compare the results of repair of knee cartilage defects with tissue-engineered osteochondral composites and tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs. Autologous chondrocytes and osteoblasts were seeded on scaffolds of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) to generate tissue-engineered cartilage and tissue-engineered bone, respectively. The tissue-engineered osteochondral composite was formed by a chondrocyte-PLGA construct sutured to an osteoblast-TCP construct with an absorbable suture. Cartilage defects were surgically created at the weightbearing surface of the bilateral femoral medial condyles of 12 mini-pigs. Thus, 24 defects in 12 pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: tissue-engineered osteochondral composite group, tissue-engineered cartilage group, and blank control group. Six months after surgery, the regenerated cartilage was scored macroscopically and histologically. The compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the cartilage were also assessed. The gross grading scale indicated that the mean scores of the tissue-engineered osteochondral composite group were significantly higher than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group. According to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Visual Histological Assessment Scale, the scores of the osteochondral composite group were significantly better than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group and blank control group. Assessment of compressive properties and GAG content showed better repair results in the osteochondral composite group than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group. Using tissue-engineered osteochondral composites to repair cartilage defects was better than that of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  12. The use of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair and regeneration: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Andy; Mitchell, Katrina; Soans, Julian; Kim, Louise; Zaidi, Razi

    2017-03-09

    The management of articular cartilage defects presents many clinical challenges due to its avascular, aneural and alymphatic nature. Bone marrow stimulation techniques, such as microfracture, are the most frequently used method in clinical practice however the resulting mixed fibrocartilage tissue which is inferior to native hyaline cartilage. Other methods have shown promise but are far from perfect. There is an unmet need and growing interest in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to improve the outcome for patients requiring cartilage repair. Many published reviews on cartilage repair only list human clinical trials, underestimating the wealth of basic sciences and animal studies that are precursors to future research. We therefore set out to perform a systematic review of the literature to assess the translation of stem cell therapy to explore what research had been carried out at each of the stages of translation from bench-top (in vitro), animal (pre-clinical) and human studies (clinical) and assemble an evidence-based cascade for the responsible introduction of stem cell therapy for cartilage defects. This review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines using CINHAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Knowledge databases from 1st January 1900 to 30th June 2015. In total, there were 2880 studies identified of which 252 studies were included for analysis (100 articles for in vitro studies, 111 studies for animal studies; and 31 studies for human studies). There was a huge variance in cell source in pre-clinical studies both of terms of animal used, location of harvest (fat, marrow, blood or synovium) and allogeneicity. The use of scaffolds, growth factors, number of cell passages and number of cells used was hugely heterogeneous. This review offers a comprehensive assessment of the evidence behind the translation of basic science to the clinical practice of cartilage repair. It has revealed a lack of connectivity between the in vitro, pre

  13. Influence of biological scaffold regulation on the proliferation of chondrocytes and the repair of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si-Qun; Xia, Jun; Chen, Jie; Lu, Jian-Xi; Wei, Yi-Bing; Chen, Fei-Yan; Huang, Gang-Yong; Shi, Jing-Sheng; Yu, Yong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of hard tissue engineering scaffold (the material is β-TCP) with different micro-structures on the proliferation of chondrocytes, and the influence of its composite erythrocytes on the repair of articular cartilage defects. Methods: Rabbit cartilage cells were on β-TCP bioceramic scaffold with different micro-structures in vitro, the proliferation growth trend of chondrocytes within the scaffold was calculated, and a optimal micro-structure suitable for cartilage cell growth was determined. Composite chondrocytes were implanted into rabbit models of articular cartilage defects, and the repair situation was observed. Results: the bioceramic scaffold with an inner diameter of 120 μm and an aperture of 500-630 μm was suitable for the growth of cartilage cells. Scaffold loaded with second generation of cartilage cell suspension got a top histological score of 20.76±2.13, which was closely similar to that of normal cartilage. Conclusion: When loaded with the second generation of cartilage cells, the β-TCP biological ceramic scaffold with a pore size of 500-630 μm, and an inner diameter of 120 μm, shows a best repairing effect on animal articular cartilage defects. PMID:27904662

  14. Quantitative assessment of optical properties in healthy cartilage and repair tissue by optical coherence tomography and histology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van der Pol, Edwin; Savci-Heijink, Cemile D.; Strackee, Simon D.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantification of the OCT signal is an important step toward clinical implementation of a diagnostic tool in cartilage imaging. Discrimination of structural cartilage differences in patients with osteoarthritis is critical, yet challenging. This study assesses the variation in the optical attenuation coefficient (μOCT) between healthy cartilage, repair tissue, bone and layers within repair tissue in a controlled setting. OCT and histology was used to assess goat talus articular surfaces in which central osteochondral defects were created. Exact matches of OCT and histology were selected for research. μOCT measurements were taken from healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Measured μOCT in healthy cartilage was higher compared to both repair tissue and bone tissue. Two possible mechanisms for the difference in attenuation were investigated. We studied morphological parameters in terms of nucleus count, nucleus size and inter-nucleus distance. Collagen content in healthy cartilage and repair tissue was assessed using polarization microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the nuclei did not demonstrate a difference in nucleus size and count between healthy cartilage and repair tissue. In healthy cartilage, cells were spaced farther apart and had a lower variation in local nuclear density compared to repair tissue. Polarization microscopy suggested higher collagen content in healthy cartilage compared to repair tissue. μOCT measurements can distinguish between healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Results suggest that cartilage OCT attenuation measurements could be of great impact in clinical diagnostics of osteoarthritis.

  15. SDF-1 accelerates Cartilage Defect Repairing by Recruiting BMSCs and Promoting Chondrolgenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuze; Sun, Xiaojuan; Lv, Jia; Zeng, Lingyuan; Wei, Xiaochun; Wei, Lei

    2017-05-06

    Chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is a powerful chemoattractant for the localization of CXCR4 positive bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) into the bone marrow. We studied the effects of SDF-1 on the cartilage defect repair by recruiting BMSCs and promoting its chondrolgenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Chemotaxis analysis with Transwell plate showed that SDF-1 could recruit BMSCs through SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. RT-PCR, ELISA, and western blot results suggested that the levels of type II collagen and GAG were increased after incubation the BMSCs with SDF-1 compared with without SDF-1 group. More positive Brdu-labeled BMSCs were detected at the cartilage defect region in the SDF-1+PLGA scaffold group (SP) in which those animals showed a smooth and transparent cartilage tissue with a strong staining of Toluidine blue and type II collagen compared with the no-SDF-1 groups. ICRS score suggested that the repair effect in the SDF-1+PLGA treated animals was improved compared with PLGA scaffold group alone at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery; the repair effect from the SDF+PLGA treated animals was significantly improved compared with the PLGA alone at 12 weeks after surgery. Our in vitro and in vivo results indicated: (1) SDF-1 could recruit the BMSCs into cartilage defect area. (2) SDF-1 induces BMSCs expressing type II collagen and GAG, which may accelerate the BMSCs transforming into chondrocytes under the cartilage microenvironment in vivo. (3) PLGA scaffold attached with SDF-1 remarkably promoted the cartilage defect repairing. The defected cartilage was filled with transparent cartilage 12 weeks after the surgery, which shared the similar structure with the adjacent normal cartilage. Taken together, this research provides a new strategy for cartilage defect repairing.

  16. Cartilage-like electrostatic stiffening of responsive cryogel scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Offeddu, G. S.; Mela, I.; Jeggle, P.; Henderson, R. M.; Smoukov, S. K.; Oyen, M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage is a structural tissue with unique mechanical properties deriving from its electrically-charged porous structure. Traditional three-dimensional environments for the culture of cells fail to display the complex physical response displayed by the natural tissue. In this work, the reproduction of the charged environment found in cartilage is achieved using polyelectrolyte hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol and polyacrylic acid. The mechanical response and morphology of microporous physically-crosslinked cryogels are compared to those of heat-treated chemical gels made from the same polymers, as a result of pH-dependent swelling. In contrast to the heat-treated chemically-crosslinked gels, the elastic modulus of the physical cryogels was found to increase with charge activation and swelling, explained by the occurrence of electrostatic stiffening of the polymer chains at large charge densities. At the same time, the permeability of both materials to fluid flow was impaired by the presence of electric charges. This cartilage-like mechanical behavior displayed by responsive cryogels can be reproduced in other polyelectrolyte hydrogel systems to fabricate biomimetic cellular scaffolds for the repair of the tissue. PMID:28230077

  17. Cartilage-like electrostatic stiffening of responsive cryogel scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offeddu, G. S.; Mela, I.; Jeggle, P.; Henderson, R. M.; Smoukov, S. K.; Oyen, M. L.

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage is a structural tissue with unique mechanical properties deriving from its electrically-charged porous structure. Traditional three-dimensional environments for the culture of cells fail to display the complex physical response displayed by the natural tissue. In this work, the reproduction of the charged environment found in cartilage is achieved using polyelectrolyte hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol and polyacrylic acid. The mechanical response and morphology of microporous physically-crosslinked cryogels are compared to those of heat-treated chemical gels made from the same polymers, as a result of pH-dependent swelling. In contrast to the heat-treated chemically-crosslinked gels, the elastic modulus of the physical cryogels was found to increase with charge activation and swelling, explained by the occurrence of electrostatic stiffening of the polymer chains at large charge densities. At the same time, the permeability of both materials to fluid flow was impaired by the presence of electric charges. This cartilage-like mechanical behavior displayed by responsive cryogels can be reproduced in other polyelectrolyte hydrogel systems to fabricate biomimetic cellular scaffolds for the repair of the tissue.

  18. Strategic Design and Fabrication of Engineered Scaffolds for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chen, Xiongbiao; Kulyk, William

    2012-01-01

    Damage to articular cartilage can eventually lead to osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating, degenerative joint disease that affects millions of people around the world. The limited natural healing ability of cartilage and the limitations of currently available therapies make treatment of cartilage defects a challenging clinical issue. Hopes have been raised for the repair of articular cartilage with the help of supportive structures, called scaffolds, created through tissue engineering (TE). Over the past two decades, different designs and fabrication techniques have been investigated for developing TE scaffolds suitable for the construction of transplantable artificial cartilage tissue substitutes. Advances in fabrication technologies now enable the strategic design of scaffolds with complex, biomimetic structures and properties. In particular, scaffolds with hybrid and/or biomimetic zonal designs have recently been developed for cartilage tissue engineering applications. This paper reviews critical aspects of the design of engineered scaffolds for articular cartilage repair as well as the available advanced fabrication techniques. In addition, recent studies on the design of hybrid and zonal scaffolds for use in cartilage tissue repair are highlighted. PMID:24955748

  19. A cell-free scaffold-based cartilage repair provides improved function hyaline-like repair at one year.

    PubMed

    Siclari, Alberto; Mascaro, Gennaro; Gentili, Chiara; Cancedda, Ranieri; Boux, Eugenio

    2012-03-01

    Bone marrow stimulation techniques in cartilage repair such as drilling are limited by the formation of fibrous to hyaline-like repair tissue. It has been suggested such techniques can be enhanced by covering the defect with scaffolds. We present an innovative approach using a polyglycolic acid (PGA)-hyaluronan scaffold with platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) in drilling. We asked whether (1) PRP immersed in a cell-free PGA-hyaluronan scaffold improves patient-reported 1-year outcomes for the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Score (KOOS), and (2) implantation of the scaffold in combination with bone marrow stimulation leads to the formation of hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue. We reviewed 52 patients who had arthroscopic implantation of the PGA-hyaluronan scaffold immersed with PRP in articular cartilage defects of the knee pretreated with Pridie drilling. Patients were assessed by KOOS. At 9 months followup, histologic staining was performed in specimens obtained from five patients to assess the repair tissue quality. The KOOS subscores improved for pain (55 to 91), symptoms (57 to 88), activities of daily living (69 to 86), sports and recreation (36 to 70), and quality of life (38 to 73). The histologic evaluation showed a homogeneous hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue. The cell-free PGA-hyaluronan scaffold combined with PRP leads to cartilage repair and improved patient-reported outcomes (KOOS) during 12 months of followup. Histologic sections showed morphologic features of hyaline-like repair tissue. Long-term followup is needed to determine if the cartilage repair tissue is durable. Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration.

  1. Nanoscale Surface Modifications of Medical Implants for Cartilage Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, MF; Szarko, M; Seifailan, A; Butler, PE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural cartilage regeneration is limited after trauma or degenerative processes. Due to the clinical challenge of reconstruction of articular cartilage, research into developing biomaterials to support cartilage regeneration have evolved. The structural architecture of composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is vital in guiding cell adhesion, migration and formation of cartilage. Current technologies have tried to mimic the cell’s nanoscale microenvironment to improve implants to improve cartilage tissue repair. Methods: This review evaluates nanoscale techniques used to modify the implant surface for cartilage regeneration. Results: The surface of biomaterial is a vital parameter to guide cell adhesion and consequently allow for the formation of ECM and allow for tissue repair. By providing nanosized cues on the surface in the form of a nanotopography or nanosized molecules, allows for better control of cell behaviour and regeneration of cartilage. Chemical, physical and lithography techniques have all been explored for modifying the nanoscale surface of implants to promote chondrocyte adhesion and ECM formation. Conclusion: Future studies are needed to further establish the optimal nanoscale modification of implants for cartilage tissue regeneration. PMID:28217208

  2. Cartilage-Repair Innovation at a Standstill: Methodologic and Regulatory Pathways to Breaking Free.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Stephen; Nakamura, Norimasa; Cole, Brian J; Erggelet, Christoph; Gomoll, Andreas H; Farr, Jack

    2016-08-03

    Articular cartilage defects strongly predispose patients to developing early joint degeneration and osteoarthritis, but for more than 15 years, no new cartilage-repair technologies that we know of have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Many studies examining novel approaches to cartilage repair, including cell, tissue, or matrix-based techniques, have shown great promise, but completing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to establish safety and efficacy has been challenging, providing a major barrier to bringing these innovations into clinical use. In this article, we review reasons that surgical innovations are not well-suited for testing through RCTs. We also discuss how analytical methods for reducing bias, such as propensity scoring, make prospective observational studies a potentially viable alternative for testing the safety and efficacy of cartilage-repair and other novel therapies, offering the real possibility of therapeutic innovation. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  3. Single-Stage Cartilage Repair Using Platelet-Rich Fibrin Scaffolds With Autologous Cartilaginous Grafts.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chin-Chean; Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chan, Wing P; Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Ho, Wei-Pin; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Chen, You-Tzung; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2017-09-01

    To avoid complicated procedures requiring in vitro chondrocyte expansion for cartilage repair, the development of a culture-free, 1-stage approach combining platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and autologous cartilage grafts may be the solution. To develop a feasible 1-step procedure to combine PRF and autologous cartilage grafts for articular chondral defects. Controlled laboratory study Methods: The chemotactic effects of PRF on chondrocytes harvested from the primary culture of rabbit cartilage were evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. The rabbit chondrocytes were cultured with different concentrations of PRF media and evaluated for their cell proliferation, chondrogenic gene expression, cell viability, and extracellular matrix synthesis abilities. For the in vivo study, the chondral defects were created on established animal models of rabbits. The gross anatomy, histology, and objective scores were evaluated to validate the treatment results. PRF improved the chemotaxis, proliferation, and viability of the cultured chondrocytes. The gene expression of the chondrogenic markers, including type II collagen and aggrecan, revealed that PRF induced the chondrogenic differentiation of cultured chondrocytes. PRF increased the formation and deposition of the cartilaginous matrix produced by cultured chondrocytes. The efficacy of PRF on cell viability was comparable with that of fetal bovine serum. In animal disease models, morphologic, histological, and objectively quantitative evaluation demonstrated that PRF combined with cartilage granules was feasible in facilitating chondral repair. PRF enhances the migration, proliferation, viability, and differentiation of chondrocytes, thus showing an appealing capacity for cartilage repair. The data altogether provide evidence to confirm the feasibility of 1-stage, culture-free method of combining PRF and autologous cartilage graft for repairing articular chondral defects. The single-stage, culture-free method of combining PRF and autologous

  4. Cartilage repair: third-generation cell-based technologies--basic science, surgical techniques, clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hettrich, Carolyn M; Crawford, Dennis; Rodeo, Scott A

    2008-12-01

    The goal of all cartilage replacement techniques is the reformation of mature organized hyaline cartilage. However, currently cartilage repair techniques lead principally to production of fibrocartilage, which has material properties that are inferior to hyaline cartilage. Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation hold promise for cartilage regeneration; however, these techniques still do not predictably result in hyaline cartilage formation. The newest, "third-generation techniques" have been developed to address the limitations of earlier techniques. These new procedures use 3 novel approaches: chondro-inductive or chondro-conductive matrix; use of allogeneic cells, both of which may allow a single-stage surgical approach; and techniques to mechanically condition the developing tissue before surgical application to improve the material properties and maturation of the implant. However, at this time there is very limited clinical data available on the nature and outcomes of these procedures.

  5. Adipose, Bone Marrow and Synovial Joint-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Christopher R.; Matta, Csaba; Zakany, Roza; Khan, Ilyas M.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Current cell-based repair strategies have proven unsuccessful for treating cartilage defects and osteoarthritic lesions, consequently advances in innovative therapeutics are required and mesenchymal stem cell-based (MSC) therapies are an expanding area of investigation. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and exerting paracrine effects. Due to their easy isolation, expansion, and low immunogenicity, MSCs are an attractive option for regenerative medicine for joint repair. Recent studies have identified several MSC tissue reservoirs including in adipose tissue, bone marrow, cartilage, periosteum, and muscle. MSCs isolated from these discrete tissue niches exhibit distinct biological activities, and have enhanced regenerative potentials for different tissue types. Each MSC type has advantages and disadvantages for cartilage repair and their use in a clinical setting is a balance between expediency and effectiveness. In this review we explore the challenges associated with cartilage repair and regeneration using MSC-based cell therapies and provide an overview of phenotype, biological activities, and functional properties for each MSC population. This paper also specifically explores the therapeutic potential of each type of MSC, particularly focusing on which cells are capable of producing stratified hyaline-like articular cartilage regeneration. Finally we highlight areas for future investigation. Given that patients present with a variety of problems it is unlikely that cartilage regeneration will be a simple “one size fits all,” but more likely an array of solutions that need to be applied systematically to achieve regeneration of a biomechanically competent repair tissue. PMID:28066501

  6. Heterotopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation--a realistic approach to support articular cartilage repair?

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Karym; Haisch, Andreas; John, Thilo; Marzahn, Ulrike; Lohan, Anke; Müller, Riccarda D; Kohl, Benjamin; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stoelzel, Katharina; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-12-01

    Injured articular cartilage is limited in its capacity to heal. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but it requires articular cartilage biopsies for sufficient autologous chondrocyte expansion in vitro. Hence, ACT is restricted by donor-site morbidity and autologous articular chondrocytes availability. The use of nonarticular heterotopic chondrocytes such as auricular, nasoseptal, or costal chondrocytes for ACT might overcome these limitations: heterotopic sources show lesser donor-site morbidity and a comparable extracellular cartilage matrix synthesis profile to articular cartilage. However, heterotopic (h)ACT poses a challenge. Particular tissue characteristics of heterotopic cartilage, divergent culturing peculiarities of heterotopic chondrocytes, and the advantages and drawbacks related to these diverse cartilage sources were critically discussed. Finally, available in vitro and in vivo experimental (h)ACT approaches were summarized. The quality of the cartilage engineered using heterotopic chondrocytes remains partly controversy due to the divergent methodologies and culture conditions used. While some encouraging in vivo results using (h)ACT have been demonstrated, standardized culturing protocols are strongly required. However, whether heterotopic chondrocytes implanted into joint cartilage defects maintain their particular tissue properties or can be adapted via tissue engineering strategies to fulfill regular articular cartilage functions requires further studies.

  7. Pilot Study of Cartilage Repair in the Knee Joint with Multiply Incised Chondral Allograft.

    PubMed

    Bardos, Tamas; Vancsodi, Jozsef; Farkas, Boglarka; Fazekas, Adam; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Bogner, Peter; Vermes, Csaba; Than, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Focal cartilage lesions in the knee joint have limited capacity to heal. Current animal experiments show that incisions of the deep zone of a cartilage allograft allow acceptable integration for the graft. We performed this clinical study to determine (1) if the multiply incised cartilage graft is surgically applicable for focal cartilage lesions, (2) whether this allograft has a potential to integrate to the repair site, and (3) if patients show clinical improvement. Seven patients with 8 chondral lesions were enrolled into the study. Symptomatic lesions between 2 and 8 cm(2) were accepted. Additional injuries were allowed but were addressed simultaneously. Grafts were tailored to match and the deep zone of the cartilage was multiply incised to augment the basal integration before securing in place. Rigorous postoperative physiotherapy followed. At 12 and 24 months the patients' satisfaction were measured and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients. Following the implantations no adverse reaction occurred. MRI evaluation postoperatively showed the graft in place in 5 out of 6 patients. In 1 patient, MRI suggested partial delamination at 1 year and graft degeneration at 2 years. Short Form-36 health survey and the Lysholm knee score demonstrated a significant improvement in the first year; however, by 2 years there was a noticeable drop in the scores. Conclusions. Multiply incised pure chondral allograft used for cartilage repair appears to be a relatively safe method. Further studies are necessary to assess its potential in cartilage repair before its clinical use.

  8. Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Approaches for Cartilage Repair and/or Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Jofré, Claudio M.; Minguell, José J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage injuries caused by traumatic, mechanical and/or by progressive degeneration result in pain, swelling, subsequent loss of joint function and finally osteoarthritis. Due to the peculiar structure of the tissue (no blood supply), chondrocytes, the unique cellular phenotype in cartilage, receive their nutrition through diffusion from the synovial fluid and this limits their intrinsic capacity for healing. The first cellular avenue explored for cartilage repair involved the in situ transplantation of isolated chondrocytes. Latterly, an improved alternative for the above reparative strategy involved the infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which in addition to a self-renewal capacity exhibit a differentiation potential to chondrocytes, as well as a capability to produce a vast array of growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix compounds involved in cartilage development. In addition to the above and foremost reparative options up till now in use, other therapeutic options have been developed, comprising the design of biomaterial substrates (scaffolds) capable of sustaining MSC attachment, proliferation and differentiation. The implantation of these engineered platforms, closely to the site of cartilage damage, may well facilitate the initiation of an ‘in situ’ cartilage reparation process. In this mini-review, we examined the timely and conceptual development of several cell-based methods, designed to repair/regenerate a damaged cartilage. In addition to the above described cartilage reparative options, other therapeutic alternatives still in progress are portrayed. PMID:26019754

  9. Informing future cartilage repair strategies: a comparative study of three different human cell types for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin B

    2013-06-01

    A major clinical need exists for cartilage repair and regeneration. Despite many different strategies having been pursued, the identification of an optimised cell type and of pre-treatment conditions remains a challenge. This study compares the cartilage-like tissue generated by human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and human neonatal and adult chondrocytes cultured on three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds under various conditions in vitro and in vivo with the aim of informing future cartilage repair strategies based upon tissue-engineering approaches. After 3 weeks in vitro culture, all three cell types showed cartilage-like tissue formation on 3D poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid scaffolds only when cultured in chondrogenic medium. After 6 weeks of chondro-induction, neonatal chondrocyte constructs revealed the most cartilage-like tissue formation with a prominent superficial zone-like layer, a middle zone-like structure and the thinnest fibrous capsule. HBMSC constructs had the thickest fibrous capsule formation. Under basal culture conditions, neonatal articular chondrocytes failed to form any tissue, whereas HBMSCs and adult chondrocytes showed thick fibrous capsule formation at 6 weeks. After in vivo implantation, all groups generated more compact tissues compared with in vitro constructs. Pre-culturing in chondrogenic media for 1 week before implantation reduced fibrous tissue formation in all cell constructs at week 3. After 6 weeks, only the adult chondrocyte group pre-cultured in chondrogenic media was able to maintain a more chondrogenic/less fibrocartilaginous phenotype. Thus, pre-culture under chondrogenic conditions is required to maintain a long-term chondrogenic phenotype, with adult chondrocytes being a more promising cell source than HBMSCs for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  10. New perspectives for articular cartilage repair treatment through tissue engineering: A contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Leonardi, Rosalia; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Di Giunta, Angelo; Loreto, Carla; Castorina, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper review we describe benefits and disadvantages of the established methods of cartilage regeneration that seem to have a better long-term effectiveness. We illustrated the anatomical aspect of the knee joint cartilage, the current state of cartilage tissue engineering, through mesenchymal stem cells and biomaterials, and in conclusion we provide a short overview on the rehabilitation after articular cartilage repair procedures. Adult articular cartilage has low capacity to repair itself, and thus even minor injuries may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. Numerous efforts have been made to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, and to date several researchers aim to implement clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords, examining the current literature on the well-known tissue engineering methods for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24829869

  11. Similar hyaline-like cartilage repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits using isotropic and anisotropic collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    de Mulder, Eric L W; Hannink, Gerjon; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daamen, Willeke F; Buma, Pieter

    2014-02-01

    Lesions in knee joint articular cartilage (AC) have limited repair capacity. Many clinically available treatments induce a fibrous-like cartilage repair instead of hyaline cartilage. To induce hyaline cartilage repair, we hypothesized that type I collagen scaffolds with fibers aligned perpendicular to the AC surface would result in qualitatively better tissue repair due to a guided cellular influx from the subchondral bone. By specific freezing protocols, type I collagen scaffolds with isotropic and anisotropic fiber architectures were produced. Rabbits were operated on bilaterally and two full thickness defects were created in each knee joint. The defects were filled with (1) an isotropic scaffold, (2) an anisotropic scaffold with pores parallel to the cartilage surface, and (3) an anisotropic scaffold with pores perpendicular to the cartilage surface. Empty defects served as controls. After 4 (n=13) and 12 (n=13) weeks, regeneration was scored qualitatively and quantitatively using histological analysis and a modified O'Driscoll score. After 4 weeks, all defects were completely filled with partially differentiated hyaline cartilage tissue. No differences in O'Driscoll scores were measured between empty defects and scaffold types. After 12 weeks, all treatments led to hyaline cartilage repair visualized by increased glycosaminoglycan staining. Total scores were significantly increased for parallel anisotropic and empty defects over time (p<0.05). The results indicate that collagen scaffolds allow the formation of hyaline-like cartilage repair. Fiber architecture had no effect on cartilage repair.

  12. Morphological MRI and T2 mapping of cartilage repair tissue after mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage in a pig model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qichun; Zuo, Qiang; Hu, Qianqian; Feng, Yang; Cui, Weiding; Fan, Weimin; Zou, Yuefen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage for the treatment of osteochondral defects in a pig model with advanced MR technique. Eight adolescent miniature pigs were used. The right knee underwent mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage for treatment of focal osteochondral defects, while the left knee was repaired via single mosaicplasty as controls. At 6, 12, 18 and 26 weeks after surgery, repair tissue was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system and T2 mapping. Then, the results of MRI for 26 weeks were compared with findings of macroscopic and histologic studies. The MOCART scores showed that the repaired tissue of the tissue-engineered cartilage group was statistically better than that of controls (P < 0.001). A significant correlation was found between macroscopic and MOCART scores (P < 0.001). Comparable mean T2 values were found between adjacent cartilage and repair tissue in the experimental group (P > 0.05). For zonal T2 value evaluation, there were no significant zonal T2 differences for repair tissue in controls (P > 0.05). For the experimental group, zonal T2 variation was found in repair tissue (P < 0.05). MRI, macroscopy and histology showed better repair results and bony incorporation in mosaicplasty with the tissue-engineered cartilage group than those of the single mosaicplasty group. Mosaicplasty with the tissue-engineered cartilage is a promising approach to repair osteochodndral defects. Morphological MRI and T2 mapping provide a non-invasive method for monitoring the maturation and integration of cartilage repair tissue in vivo. PMID:25050115

  13. Morphological MRI and T2 mapping of cartilage repair tissue after mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qichun; Zuo, Qiang; Hu, Qianqian; Feng, Yang; Cui, Weiding; Fan, Weimin; Zou, Yuefen

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage for the treatment of osteochondral defects in a pig model with advanced MR technique. Eight adolescent miniature pigs were used. The right knee underwent mosaicplasty with tissue-engineered cartilage for treatment of focal osteochondral defects, while the left knee was repaired via single mosaicplasty as controls. At 6, 12, 18 and 26 weeks after surgery, repair tissue was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system and T2 mapping. Then, the results of MRI for 26 weeks were compared with findings of macroscopic and histologic studies. The MOCART scores showed that the repaired tissue of the tissue-engineered cartilage group was statistically better than that of controls (P < 0.001). A significant correlation was found between macroscopic and MOCART scores (P < 0.001). Comparable mean T2 values were found between adjacent cartilage and repair tissue in the experimental group (P > 0.05). For zonal T2 value evaluation, there were no significant zonal T2 differences for repair tissue in controls (P > 0.05). For the experimental group, zonal T2 variation was found in repair tissue (P < 0.05). MRI, macroscopy and histology showed better repair results and bony incorporation in mosaicplasty with the tissue-engineered cartilage group than those of the single mosaicplasty group. Mosaicplasty with the tissue-engineered cartilage is a promising approach to repair osteochodndral defects. Morphological MRI and T2 mapping provide a non-invasive method for monitoring the maturation and integration of cartilage repair tissue in vivo.

  14. Correlation between histological outcome and surgical cartilage repair technique in the knee: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    DiBartola, Alex C; Everhart, Joshua S; Magnussen, Robert A; Carey, James L; Brophy, Robert H; Schmitt, Laura C; Flanigan, David C

    2016-06-01

    Compare histological outcomes after microfracture (MF), autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), and osteochondral autograft transfer (OATS). Literature review using PubMed MEDLINE, SCOPUS, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Cochrane Collaboration Library. Inclusion criteria limited to English language studies International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grading criteria for cartilage analysis after ACI (autologous chondrocyte implantation), MF (microfracture), or OATS (osteochondral autografting) repair techniques. Thirty-three studies investigating 1511 patients were identified. Thirty evaluated ACI or one of its subtypes, six evaluated MF, and seven evaluated OATS. There was no evidence of publication bias (Begg's p=0.48). No statistically significant correlation was found between percent change in clinical outcome and percent biopsies showing ICRS Excellent scores (R(2)=0.05, p=0.38). Percent change in clinical outcome and percent of biopsies showing only hyaline cartilage were significantly associated (R(2)=0.24, p=0.024). Mean lesion size and histological outcome were not correlated based either on percent ICRS Excellent (R(2)=0.03, p=0.50) or percent hyaline cartilage only (R(2)=0.01, p=0.67). Most common lesion location and histological outcome were not correlated based either on percent ICRS Excellent (R(2)=0.03, p=0.50) or percent hyaline cartilage only (R(2)=0.01, p=0.67). Microfracture has poorer histologic outcomes than other cartilage repair techniques. OATS repairs primarily are comprised of hyaline cartilage, followed closely by cell-based techniques, but no significant difference was found cartilage quality using ICRS grading criteria among OATS, ACI-C, MACI, and ACI-P. IV, meta-analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  16. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  17. Cartilage repair with chondrocytes in fibrin hydrogel and MPEG polylactide scaffold: an in vivo study in goats.

    PubMed

    Lind, Martin; Larsen, Allan; Clausen, Christian; Osther, Kurt; Everland, Hanne

    2008-07-01

    Polylactic acid polymers have been used extensively as biomaterials and have shown promising properties for cartilage tissue engineering. Numerous scaffold materials exist and the optimal scaffold needs to be identified. We have tried to assess the possibilities for cartilage repair by the use of two different scaffold techniques; autologous chondrocytes in a fibrin hydrogel and a novel MPEG-PLGA scaffold, where autologous chondrocytes are immobilized within the MPEG-PLGA scaffold by a fibrin hydrogel. Twenty adult goats were used for the study. A 6 mm circular full-thickness cartilage defect was created in both medial femoral condyles. The defects were randomized to the following four treatment groups. (1) Empty defect (control). (2) Subchondral drilling (control). (3) Fibrin hydrogel with autologous chondrocytes. (4) Fibrin hydrogel/chondrocyte solution in a MPEG-PLGA porous scaffold. Animals were followed for 4 month. Eight defects in each treatment group completed the study. ICRS macroscopic scoring (0-12). Indentation test was performed to assess stiffness of repair tissue. Histological analyses was performed using O'Driscoll and Pineda cartilage scores as well as percentage tissue filling of the defects. The MPEG-PLGA/chondrocytes scaffold was the superior treatment modality based on the macroscopic surface score, histological scores and defect filling. The mechanical test demonstrated no difference between treatment groups. The MPEG-PLGA/chondrocyte composite demonstrated significantly better cartilage repair response than empty defects, osteochondral drilling and fibrin hydrogel with chondrocytes. The novel MPEG-PLGA scaffold in combination with chondrocytes need further studies with respect to longer follow-up times.

  18. Uninduced adipose-derived stem cells repair the defect of full-thickness hyaline cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ning; Li, Lei; Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Lv, Cheng-Yu

    2009-04-01

    To testify the effect of the stem cells derived from the widely distributed fat tissue on repairing full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were derived from adipose tissue and cultured in vitro. Twenty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups randomly. The cultured ADSCs mixed with calcium alginate gel were used to fill the full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects created at the patellafemoral joint, and the defects repaired with gel or without treatment served as control groups. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the reconstructed tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Histological analysis and qualitative scoring were also performed to detect the outcome. Full thickness hyaline cartilage defects were repaired completely with ADSCs-derived tissue. The result was better in ADSCs group than the control ones. The microstructure of reconstructed tissue with ADSCs was similar to that of hyaline cartilage and contained more cells and regular matrix fibers, being better than other groups. Plenty of collagen fibers around cells could be seen under transmission electron microscopy. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in comparison with other groups at each time point (t equal to 4.360, P less than 0.01). These results indicate that stem cells derived from mature adipose without induction possess the ability to repair cartilage defects.

  19. Differentiating the extent of cartilage repair in rabbit ears using nonlinear optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X Q; Xu, Y H; Liao, C X; Liu, W G; Cheng, K K; Chen, J X

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) was used as a noninvasive and label-free tool to detect and quantify the extent of the cartilage recovery. Two cartilage injury models were established in the outer ears of rabbits that created a different extent of cartilage recovery based on the presence or absence of the perichondrium. High-resolution NLOM images were used to measure cartilage repair, specifically through spectral analysis and image texture. In contrast to a wound lacking a perichondrium, wounds with intact perichondria demonstrated significantly larger TPEF signals from cells and matrix, coarser texture indicating the more deposition of type I collagen. Spectral analysis of cells and matrix can reveal the matrix properties and cell growth. In addition, texture analysis of NLOM images showed significant differences in the distribution of cells and matrix of repaired tissues with or without perichondrium. Specifically, the decay length of autocorrelation coefficient based on TPEF images is 11.2 ± 1.1 in Wound 2 (with perichondrium) and 7.5 ± 2.0 in Wound 1 (without perichondrium), indicating coarser image texture and faster growth of cells in repaired tissues with perichondrium (p < 0.05). Moreover, the decay length of autocorrelation coefficient based on collagen SHG images also showed significant difference between Wound 2 and 1 (16.2 ± 1.2 vs. 12.2 ± 2.1, p < 0.05), indicating coarser image texture and faster deposition of collagen in repaired tissues with perichondrium (Wound 2). These findings suggest that NLOM is an ideal tool for studying cartilage repair, with potential applications in clinical medicine. NLOM can capture macromolecular details and distinguish between different extents of cartilage repair without the need for labelling agents.

  20. AMIC Cartilage Repair in a Professional Soccer Player

    PubMed Central

    Bark, S.; Riepenhof, H.; Gille, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a professional soccer player suffering from a traumatic cartilage lesion grade IV according to the Outerbridge classification at the femoral condyle treated with an enhanced microfracture technique (AMIC). Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) is an innovative treatment for localized full-thickness cartilage defects combining the well-known microfracturing with collagen scaffold and fibrin glue. Because of the cartilage lesion (3 cm2), an AMIC procedure was performed followed by a rehabilitation program according to the protocols in the literature, (Steadman et al.; 2003). After 8 months of rehabilitation, the player returned to team training and after 10 months to competition. Altogether he returned to the same skill level for almost one year after the index operation. He is very satisfied with the clinical results after AMIC, which corresponds with the Lysholm score of 90 points at 12 months. PMID:23259120

  1. Cell Seeding Densities in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques for Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage repair techniques have been among the most intensively investigated treatments in orthopedics for the past decade, and several different treatment modalities are currently available. Despite the extensive research effort within this field, the generation of hyaline cartilage remains a considerable challenge. There are many parameters attendant to each of the cartilage repair techniques that can affect the amount and types of reparative tissue generated in the cartilage defect, and some of the most fundamental of these parameters have yet to be fully investigated. For procedures in which in vitro-cultured autologous chondrocytes are implanted under a periosteal or synthetic membrane cover, or seeded onto a porous membrane or scaffold, little is known about how the number of cells affects the clinical outcome. Few published clinical studies address the cell seeding density that was employed. The principal objective of this review is to provide an overview of the cell seeding densities used in cell-based treatments currently available in the clinic for cartilage repair. Select preclinical studies that have informed the use of specific cell seeding densities in the clinic are also discussed.

  2. Exploiting endogenous fibrocartilage stem cells to regenerate cartilage and repair joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Chen, Mo; Pylawka, Serhiy; Kong, Danielle; Iwaoka, George M.; Kalajzic, Ivo; Yao, Hai; Shi, Chancheng; Sun, Dongming; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Koslovsky, David A.; Koch, Alia; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration using stem cell-based transplantation faces many hurdles. Alternatively, therapeutically exploiting endogenous stem cells to regenerate injured or diseased tissue may circumvent these challenges. Here we show resident fibrocartilage stem cells (FCSCs) can be used to regenerate and repair cartilage. We identify FCSCs residing within the superficial zone niche in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. A single FCSC spontaneously generates a cartilage anlage, remodels into bone and organizes a haematopoietic microenvironment. Wnt signals deplete the reservoir of FCSCs and cause cartilage degeneration. We also show that intra-articular treatment with the Wnt inhibitor sclerostin sustains the FCSC pool and regenerates cartilage in a TMJ injury model. We demonstrate the promise of exploiting resident FCSCs as a regenerative therapeutic strategy to substitute cell transplantation that could be beneficial for patients suffering from fibrocartilage injury and disease. These data prompt the examination of utilizing this strategy for other musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:27721375

  3. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix.

  4. Pilot Study of Cartilage Repair in the Knee Joint with Multiply Incised Chondral Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Vancsodi, Jozsef; Farkas, Boglarka; Fazekas, Adam; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Bogner, Peter; Vermes, Csaba; Than, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Focal cartilage lesions in the knee joint have limited capacity to heal. Current animal experiments show that incisions of the deep zone of a cartilage allograft allow acceptable integration for the graft. Questions/Purposes We performed this clinical study to determine (1) if the multiply incised cartilage graft is surgically applicable for focal cartilage lesions, (2) whether this allograft has a potential to integrate to the repair site, and (3) if patients show clinical improvement. Patients and Methods Seven patients with 8 chondral lesions were enrolled into the study. Symptomatic lesions between 2 and 8 cm2 were accepted. Additional injuries were allowed but were addressed simultaneously. Grafts were tailored to match and the deep zone of the cartilage was multiply incised to augment the basal integration before securing in place. Rigorous postoperative physiotherapy followed. At 12 and 24 months the patients’ satisfaction were measured and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients. Results Following the implantations no adverse reaction occurred. MRI evaluation postoperatively showed the graft in place in 5 out of 6 patients. In 1 patient, MRI suggested partial delamination at 1 year and graft degeneration at 2 years. Short Form–36 health survey and the Lysholm knee score demonstrated a significant improvement in the first year; however, by 2 years there was a noticeable drop in the scores. Conclusions. Multiply incised pure chondral allograft used for cartilage repair appears to be a relatively safe method. Further studies are necessary to assess its potential in cartilage repair before its clinical use. PMID:26069710

  5. Does Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment repair articular cartilage injury? A rabbit model study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) regiment has been used to treat fractures with non-union and to promote bone union in general. The effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage metabolism has been characterized. Yet, the effect of LIPUS to repair articular cartilage injury remains unclear in vivo. Methods We designed a study to investigate the effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage repairing in a rabbit severe cartilage injury model. Eighteen rabbits were divided into three groups: Sham-operated group, operated group without-LIPUS-treatment, operated group with-LIPUS-treatment (a daily 20-minute treatment for 3 months). Full-thickness cartilage defects were surgically created on the right side distal femoral condyle without intending to penetrate into the subchondral bone, which mimicked severe chondral injury. MR images for experimental joints, morphology grading scale, and histopathological Mankin score were evaluated. Results The preliminary results showed that the operated groups with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment had significantly higher Mankin score and morphological grading scale compared with the sham-operated group. However, there was no significant difference between the with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment groups. Cartilage defects filled with proliferative tissue were observed in the with-LIPUS-treatment group grossly and under MR images, however which presented less up-take under Alcian blue stain. Furthermore, no new deposition of type II collagen or proliferation of chondrocyte was observed over the cartilage defect after LIPUS treatment. Conclusion LIPUS has no significant therapeutic potential in treating severe articular cartilage injury in our animal study. PMID:24507771

  6. Evaluation of the effects of electrical stimulation on cartilage repair in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Zuzzi, Denise Cristina; Ciccone, Carla de Campos; Neves, Lia Mara Grosso; Mendonça, Josué Sampaio; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto

    2013-08-01

    This study describes the organization of mature hyaline xiphoid cartilage during repair in animals submitted to electrical current stimulation. Twenty male Wistar rats, 90 days old, were divided into a control group (CG) and a treated group (TG). A cylindrical full-thickness cartilage defects were created with a 3-mm punch in anesthetized animals. After 24h, TG received daily applications of a continuous electrical current (1Hz/20μA) for 5min. The animals were sacrificed after 7, 21 and 35 days for structural analysis. In CG, the repair tissue presented fibrous characteristics, with fibroblastic cells being infiltrated and permeated by blood vessels. Basophilic foci of cartilage tissue were observed on day 35. In TG, the repair tissue also presented fibrous characteristics, but a larger number of thick collagen fibers were seen on day 21. A large number of cartilaginous nests were observed on day 35. Cell numbers were significantly higher in TG. Calcification points were detected in TG on day 35. There was no difference in elastic fibers between groups. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the presence of chondrocyte-like cells in CG at all time points, but only on days 21 and 35 in TG. The amount of cuprolinic blue-stained proteoglycans was higher in TG on day 35. Microcurrent stimulation accelerates the repair process in non-articular hyaline cartilage.

  7. Comparison of articular cartilage repair by autologous chondrocytes with and without in vitro cultivation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hongsen; Liao, Chun-Jen; Wang, Yao-Hong; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Chun-Nan; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Huang, Yi-You; Jiang, Ching-Chuan

    2010-04-01

    autologous chondrocyte implantation usually requires in vitro cell expansion before implantation. We compared the efficacy of cartilage regeneration by in vitro-expanded chondrocytes at high density and freshly harvested chondrocytes at low density. surgically created osteochondral defects at weight-bearing surface of femoral condyles of domestic pigs were repaired by biphasic cylindrical porous plugs of DL-poly-lactide-co-glycolide and beta-tricalcium phosphate. Plugs were seeded with autologous chondrocytes in its chondral phase, and press-fit to defects. Seeded cells were (1) in vitro-expanded chondrocytes harvested from stifle joint 3 weeks before implantation and (2) freshly harvested chondrocytes from recipient knee. Seeding densities were 70 x 10(6) and 7 x 10(6) cells/mL, respectively. Cell-free plugs served as control and defects remained untreated as null control. Outcome was examined at 6 months with International Cartilage Repair Society Scale. the two experimental groups were repaired by hyaline cartilage with collagen type II and Safranin-O. Tissue in control group was primarily fibrocartilage. No regeneration was found in null control. Experimental groups had higher mean International Cartilage Repair Society scores than control in surface, matrix, and cell distribution, but were comparable with control in cell viability, subchondral bone, and mineralization. No significant difference existed between two experimental groups in any of the six categories. Uni-axial indentation test revealed similar creeping stress-relaxation property as native cartilage on experimental, but not control, specimen. cartilage could regenerate in both experimental models, in comparable quality. Culture of chondrocytes before implantation is not necessary.

  8. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kasper, F Kurtis; Scott, David W; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and bone repair, respectively, at 6 and 12 weeks. Correlation analysis revealed significant associations between specific cartilage indices and subchondral bone parameters that varied with location in the defect (cortical vs. trabecular region), time point (6 vs. 12 weeks), and experimental group (insulin-like growth factor-1 only, bone morphogenetic protein-2 only, or both growth factors). In particular, significant correlations consistently existed between cartilage surface regularity and bone quantity parameters. Overall, correlation analysis between cartilage and bone repair provided a fuller understanding of osteochondral repair and can help drive informed studies for future osteochondral regeneration strategies.

  9. Chondroinduction Is the Main Cartilage Repair Response to Microfracture and Microfracture With BST-CarGel: Results as Shown by ICRS-II Histological Scoring and a Novel Zonal Collagen Type Scoring Method of Human Clinical Biopsy Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hoemann, Caroline D; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Chevrier, Anik; Chen, Gaoping; Lascau-Coman, Viorica; Mathieu, Colleen; Changoor, Adele; Yaroshinsky, Alex; McCormack, Robert G; Stanish, William D; Buschmann, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Current cartilage repair histological scoring systems are unable to explain the relationship between collagen type II deposition and overall repair quality. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel zonal collagen type (ZCT) 5-point scoring system to measure chondroinduction in human clinical biopsy specimens collected after marrow stimulation. The hypothesis was that the ZCT scores would correlate with the International Cartilage Repair Society-II (ICRS-II) overall histological repair assessment score and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Descriptive laboratory study. After optimizing safranin O staining for GAG and immunostaining for human collagen type II and type I (Col2 and Col1, respectively), serial sections from clinical osteochondral repair biopsy specimens (13 months after microfracture or microfracture with BST-CarGel; n = 39 patients) were stained and 3 blinded readers performed histomorphometry for percentage of staining, ICRS-II histological scoring, polarized light microscopy (PLM) scoring, and 5-point ZCT scoring based on tidemark morphology, zonal distribution of Col2 and Col1, and Col1 percentage stain. Because 1 biopsy specimen was missing bone, 38 biopsy specimens were evaluated for ICRS-II, PLM, and ZCT scores. Chondroinduction was identified in 21 biopsy specimens as a Col2 matrix fused to bone that spanned the deep-middle-superficial zones ("full-thickness hyaline repair"), deep-middle zones, or deep zone ("stalled hyaline") that was covered with a variable-thickness Col1-positive matrix, and was scored, respectively, as ZCT = 1 (n = 4 biopsy specimens), ZCT = 2 (n = 6) and ZCT = 3 (n = 11). Other biopsy specimens (n = 17) were fibrocartilage (n = 9; ZCT = 4), fibrous tissue (n = 4, ZCT = 5), or non-marrow derived (n = 4; ZCT = 0). Non-marrow derived tissue had a mean mature tidemark score of 84 out of 100 versus a regenerating tidemark score of 24 for all other biopsy specimens (P = .005). Both "stalled hyaline" repair and

  10. Cartilage repair in osteoarthritic patients: utopia or real opportunity?

    PubMed Central

    Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2009-01-01

    As medical advances lengthen average life expectancy, osteoarthritis (OA) will become a larger public health problem - not only because it is a manifestation of aging but also because it usually takes many years to reach clinical relevance. OA is already one of the ten most disabling diseases in industrialized countries. The huge financial burden emphasizes the acute need for new and more effective treatments for articular cartilage defects, especially since there are few disease modifying drugs or treatments for OA. There is no cure for OA and the management of OA is largely palliative, focusing on the alleviation of symptoms. Recent longitudinal non-controlled trials suggest that autologous chondrocyte transplantation techniques, which are indicated for young people with traumatic cartilage defects, could also be used in degenerative defects of elderly people with OA. This report discusses this therapeutic opportunity in view of some recently published data. PMID:20948690

  11. Articular Cartilage Repair Through Muscle Cell-Based Tissue Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Histologic scores were compared using the Kruskal- Wallis test. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS Macroscopic and histologic findings...2005;20: 2017 –27. 29. Pritzker KP, Gay S, Jimenez SA, Ostergaard K, Pelletier JP, Revell PA, et al. Osteoarthritis cartilage histopathology: grading and...analysis of variance except for comparisons of histologic scores, which were per- formed by Kruskal- Wallis analysis. Post hoc analysis was performed with

  12. Biology of platelet-rich plasma and its clinical application in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous concentrated cocktail of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, and has been considered to be potentially effective for cartilage repair. In addition, the fibrinogen in PRP may be activated to form a fibrin matrix to fill cartilage lesions, fulfilling the initial requirements of physiological wound healing. The anabolic, anti-inflammatory and scaffolding effects of PRP based on laboratory investigations, animal studies, and clinical trials are reviewed here. In vitro, PRP is found to stimulate cell proliferation and cartilaginous matrix production by chondrocytes and adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), enhance matrix secretion by synoviocytes, mitigate IL-1β-induced inflammation, and provide a favorable substrate for MSCs. In preclinical studies, PRP has been used either as a gel to fill cartilage defects with variable results, or to slow the progression of arthritis in animal models with positive outcomes. Findings from current clinical trials suggest that PRP may have the potential to fill cartilage defects to enhance cartilage repair, attenuate symptoms of osteoarthritis and improve joint function, with an acceptable safety profile. Although current evidence appears to favor PRP over hyaluronan for the treatment of osteoarthritis, the efficacy of PRP therapy remains unpredictable owing to the highly heterogeneous nature of reported studies and the variable composition of the PRP preparations. Future studies are critical to elucidate the functional activity of individual PRP components in modulating specific pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25164150

  13. Repair of osteochondral defects with in vitro engineered cartilage based on autologous bone marrow stromal cells in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    He, Aijuan; Liu, Lina; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Yu; Liu, Yi; Liu, Fangjun; Wang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-01-01

    Functional reconstruction of large osteochondral defects is always a major challenge in articular surgery. Some studies have reported the feasibility of repairing articular osteochondral defects using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and biodegradable scaffolds. However, no significant breakthroughs have been achieved in clinical translation due to the instability of in vivo cartilage regeneration based on direct cell-scaffold construct implantation. To overcome the disadvantages of direct cell-scaffold construct implantation, the current study proposed an in vitro cartilage regeneration strategy, providing relatively mature cartilage-like tissue with superior mechanical properties. Our strategy involved in vitro cartilage engineering, repair of osteochondral defects, and evaluation of in vivo repair efficacy. The results demonstrated that BMSC engineered cartilage in vitro (BEC-vitro) presented a time-depended maturation process. The implantation of BEC-vitro alone could successfully realize tissue-specific repair of osteochondral defects with both cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, the maturity level of BEC-vitro had significant influence on the repaired results. These results indicated that in vitro cartilage regeneration using BMSCs is a promising strategy for functional reconstruction of osteochondral defect, thus promoting the clinical translation of cartilage regeneration techniques incorporating BMSCs. PMID:28084417

  14. Stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis by glucuronosyltransferase-I gene delivery: A strategy to promote cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, N.; Barré, L.; Benani, A.; Netter, P.; Magdalou, J.; Fournel-Gigleux, S.; Ouzzine, M.

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage components, mainly proteoglycans (PGs), leading to destruction of the tissue. We investigate a therapeutic strategy based on stimulation of PG synthesis by gene transfer of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-synthesizing enzyme, β1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I) to promote cartilage repair. We previously reported that IL-1β down-regulated the expression and activity of GlcAT-I in primary rat chondrocytes. Here, by using antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that GlcAT-I inhibition impaired PG synthesis and deposition in articular cartilage explants, emphasizing the crucial role of this enzyme in PG anabolism. Thus, primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants were engineered by lipid-mediated gene delivery to efficiently overexpress a human GlcAT-I cDNA. Interestingly, GlcAT-I overexpression significantly enhanced GAG synthesis and deposition as evidenced by 35S-sulfate incorporation, histology, estimation of GAG content, and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis analysis. Metabolic labeling and Western blot analyses further suggested that GlcAT-I expression led to an increase in the abundance rather than in the length of GAG chains. Importantly, GlcAT-I delivery was able to overcome IL-1β-induced PG depletion and maintain the anabolic activity of chondrocytes. Moreover, GlcAT-I also restored PG synthesis to a normal level in cartilage explants previously depleted from endogenous PGs by IL-1β-treatment. In concert, our investigations strongly indicated that GlcAT-I was able to control and reverse articular cartilage defects in terms of PG anabolism and GAG content associated with IL-1β. This study provides a basis for a gene therapy approach to promote cartilage repair in degenerative joint diseases. PMID:15601778

  15. Stem cell therapies for knee cartilage repair: the current status of preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John A; Little, Dianne; Toth, Alison P; Moorman, Claude T; Tucker, Bradford S; Ciccotti, Michael G; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-09-01

    Articular cartilage damage of the knee is common, causing significant morbidity worldwide. Many adult tissues contain cells that are able to differentiate into multiple cell types, including chondrocytes. These stem cells have gained significant attention over the past decade and may become frontline management for cartilage defects in the very near future. The role of stem cells in the treatment of knee osteochondral defects was reviewed. Recent animal and clinical studies were reviewed to determine the benefits and potential outcomes of using stem cells for cartilage defects. Literature review. A PubMed search was undertaken. The key phrase "stem cells and knee" was used. The search included reviews and original articles over an unlimited time period. From this search, articles outlining animal and clinical trials were selected. A search of current clinical trials in progress was performed on the clinicaltrials.gov website, and "stem cells and knee" was used as the search phrase. Stem cells have been used in many recent in vitro and animal studies. A number of cell-based approaches for cartilage repair have progressed from preclinical animal studies into clinical trials. The use of stem cells for the treatment of cartilage defects is increasing in animal and clinical studies. Methods of delivery of stem cells to the knee's cartilage vary from direct injection to implantation with scaffolds. While these approaches are highly promising, there is currently limited evidence of a direct clinical benefit, and further research is required to assess the overall outcome of stem cell therapies for knee cartilage repair. © 2013 The Author(s).

  16. Stem Cell Therapies for Knee Cartilage Repair: The Current Status of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John A.; Little, Dianne; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Tucker, Bradford S.; Ciccotti, Michael G.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage damage of the knee is common, causing significant morbidity worldwide. Many adult tissues contain cells that are able to differentiate into multiple cell types, including chondrocytes. These stem cells have gained significant attention over the past decade and may become frontline management for cartilage defects in the very near future. Purpose The role of stem cells in the treatment of knee osteochondral defects was reviewed. Recent animal and clinical studies were reviewed to determine the benefits and potential outcomes of using stem cells for cartilage defects. Study Design Literature review. Methods A PubMed search was undertaken. The key phrase “stem cells and knee” was used. The search included reviews and original articles over an unlimited time period. From this search, articles outlining animal and clinical trials were selected. A search of current clinical trials in progress was performed on the clinicaltrials.gov website, and “stem cells and knee” was used as the search phrase. Results Stem cells have been used in many recent in vitro and animal studies. A number of cell-based approaches for cartilage repair have progressed from preclinical animal studies into clinical trials. Conclusion The use of stem cells for the treatment of cartilage defects is increasing in animal and clinical studies. Methods of delivery of stem cells to the knee’s cartilage vary from direct injection to implantation with scaffolds. While these approaches are highly promising, there is currently limited evidence of a direct clinical benefit, and further research is required to assess the overall outcome of stem cell therapies for knee cartilage repair. PMID:24220016

  17. Tissue-Derived Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds: Emerging Applications in Cartilage and Meniscus Repair.

    PubMed

    Monibi, Farrah A; Cook, James L

    2017-03-07

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common problem in orthopedic practice. Given the long-term consequences of unaddressed cartilage and meniscal pathology, a number of treatments have been attempted to stimulate repair or to replace the injured tissue. Despite advances in orthopedic surgery, effective treatments for cartilage and meniscus injuries remain a significant clinical challenge. Tissue engineering is a developing field that aims to regenerate injured tissues with a combination of cells, scaffolds, and signals. Many natural and synthetic scaffold materials have been developed and tested for the repair and restoration of a number of musculoskeletal tissues. Among these, biological scaffolds derived from cell and tissue-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) have shown great promise in tissue engineering given the critical role of the ECM for maintaining the biological and biomechanical properties, structure, and function of native tissues. This review article presents emerging applications for tissue-derived ECM scaffolds in cartilage and meniscus repair. We examine normal ECM composition and the current and future methods for potential treatment of articular cartilage and meniscal defects with decellularized scaffolds.

  18. Arthroscopic, histological and MRI analyses of cartilage repair after a minimally invasive method of transplantation of allogeneic synovial mesenchymal stromal cells into cartilage defects in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomomasa; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi; Hatsushika, Daisuke; Horie, Masafumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Atsuya; Hishikawa, Shuji; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Background aims Transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may induce repair of cartilage defects. We transplanted synovial MSCs into cartilage defects using a simple method and investigated its usefulness and repair process in a pig model. Methods The chondrogenic potential of the porcine MSCs was compared in vitro. Cartilage defects were created in both knees of seven pigs, and divided into MSCs treated and non-treated control knees. Synovial MSCs were injected into the defect, and the knee was kept immobilized for 10 min before wound closure. To visualize the actual delivery and adhesion of the cells, fluorescence-labeled synovial MSCs from transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) pig were injected into the defect in a subgroup of two pigs. In these two animals, the wounds were closed before MSCs were injected and observed for 10 min under arthroscopic control. The defects were analyzed sequentially arthroscopically, histologically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 3 months. Results Synovial MSCs had a higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other MSCs examined. Arthroscopic observations showed adhesion of synovial MSCs and membrane formation on the cartilage defects before cartilage repair. Quantification analyses for arthroscopy, histology and MRI revealed a better outcome in the MSC-treated knees than in the non-treated control knees. Conclusions Leaving a synovial MSC suspension in cartilage defects for 10 min made it possible for cells to adhere in the defect in a porcine cartilage defect model. The cartilage defect was first covered with membrane, then the cartilage matrix emerged after transplantation of synovial MSCs. PMID:22309371

  19. Mechanical stimulation enhances integration in an in vitro model of cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, John S; DeCroos, Amritha J N; Petrera, Massimo; Park, Sam; Kandel, Rita A

    2016-06-01

    (1) To characterize the effects of mechanical stimulation on the integration of a tissue-engineered construct in terms of histology, biochemistry and biomechanical properties; (2) to identify whether cells of the implant or host tissue were critical to implant integration; and (3) to study cells believed to be involved in lateral integration of tissue-engineered cartilage to host cartilage. We hypothesized that mechanical stimulation would enhance the integration of the repair implant with host cartilage in an in vitro integration model. Articular cartilage was harvested from 6- to 9-month-old bovine metacarpal-phalangeal joints. Constructs composed of tissue-engineered cartilage implanted into host cartilage were placed in spinner bioreactors and maintained on a magnetic stir plate at either 0 (static control) or 90 (experimental) rotations per minute (RPM). The constructs from both the static and spinner bioreactors were harvested after either 2 or 4 weeks of culture and evaluated histologically, biochemically, biomechanically and for gene expression. The extent and strength of integration between tissue-engineered cartilage and native cartilage improved significantly with both time and mechanical stimulation. Integration did not occur if the implant was not viable. The presence of stimulation led to a significant increase in collagen content in the integration zone between host and implant at 2 weeks. The gene profile of cells in the integration zone differs from host cartilage demonstrating an increase in the expression of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), aggrecan and type II collagen. This study shows that the integration of in vitro tissue-engineered implants with host tissue improves with mechanical stimulation. The findings of this study suggests that consideration should be given to implementing early loading (mechanical stimulation) into future in vivo studies investigating the long-term viability and integration of tissue

  20. Cartilage regeneration and repair testing in a surrogate large animal model.

    PubMed

    Simon, Timothy M; Aberman, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    The aging human population is experiencing increasing numbers of symptoms related to its degenerative articular cartilage (AC), which has stimulated the investigation of methods to regenerate or repair AC. However, the seemingly inherent limited capacity for AC to regenerate persists to confound the various repair treatment strategies proposed or studied. Animal models for testing AC implant devices and reparative materials are an important and required part of the Food and Drug Administration approval process. Although final testing is ultimately performed in humans, animal testing allows for a wider range of parameters and combinations of test materials subjected to all the biological interactions of a living system. We review here considerations, evaluations, and experiences with selection and use of animal models and describe two untreated lesion models useful for testing AC repair strategies. These created lesion models, one deep (6 mm and through the subchondral plate) the other shallow (to the level of the subchondral bone plate) were placed in the middle one-third of the medial femoral condyle of the knee joints of goats. At 1-year neither the deep nor the shallow full-thickness chondral defects generated a repair that duplicated natural AC. Moreover, progressive deleterious changes occurred in the AC surrounding the defects. There are challenges in translation from animals to humans as anatomy and structures are different and immobilization to protect delicate repairs can be difficult. The tissues potentially generated by proposed cartilage repair strategies must be compared with the spontaneous changes that occur in similarly created untreated lesions. The prevention of the secondary changes in the surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone described in this article should be addressed with the introduction of treatments for repairs of the articulating surface.

  1. Surgical implants and technologies for cartilage repair and preservation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Stroh, D Alex; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-05-01

    Focal lesions of the articular cartilage of the knee can be managed with a variety of products and technologies in an attempt to restore function to the afflicted joint and forestall the need for possible total knee arthroplasty. Among these approaches are non-implant-based procedures (arthroscopic chondroplasty and microfracture), grafting procedures (autografts/mosaicplasty and allografts), cell-based procedures (autologous chondrocyte implantation) and nonbiologic implants (metallic plugs and cell-free polymers). For each clinically established procedure there are also a number of investigational variations that aim to improve the in vivo quality of the regenerated/restored cartilage surface. This article analyzes existing and developing non-implant- and graft-based technologies for the repair or restoration of the articular cartilage of the knee based on a review of the published literature.

  2. [Cartilage repair and subchondral bone reconstruction based on three-dimensional printing technique].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Jin, Zhongmin; Bian, Weiguo; Liu, Yaxiong; He, Jiankang; Wang, Ling

    2014-03-01

    To investigate whether subchondral bone microstructural parameters are related to cartilage repair during large osteochondral defect repairing based on three-dimensional (3-D) printing technique. Biomimetic biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by using 3-D printing technique. The right trochlea critical sized defects (4.8 mm in diameter, 7.5 mm in depth) were created in 40 New Zealand white rabbits (aged 6 months, weighing 2.5-3.5 kg). Biomimetic biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were implanted into the defects in the experimental group (n = 35), and no composite scaffolds implantation served as control group (n = 5); the left side had no defect as sham-operation group. Animals of experimental and sham-operation groups were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after operation, while animals of control group were sampled at 24 weeks. Subchondral bone microstructural parameters and cartilage repair were quantitatively analyzed using Micro-CT and Wayne scoring system. Correlation analysis and regression analysis were applied to reveal the relationship between subchondral bone parameters and cartilage repair. The subchondral bone parameters included bone volume fraction (BV/TV), bone surface area fraction (BSA/BV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular number (Tb.N), and trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp). In the experimental group, articular cartilage repair was significantly improved at 52 weeks postoperatively, which was dominated by hyaline cartilage tissue, and tidal line formed. Wayne scores at 24 and 52 weeks were significantly higher than that at 16 weeks in the experimental group (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between at 24 and 52 weeks (P > 0.05); the scores of experimental group were significantly lower than those of sham-operation group at all time points (P < 0.05). In the experimental group, new subchondral bone migrated from the surrounding defect to the centre, and subchondral bony plate formed at

  3. Cartilage repair surgery for full-thickness defects of the knee in Germany: indications and epidemiological data from the German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU).

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Feucht, Matthias J; Fritz, Jürgen; Albrecht, Dirk; Spahn, Gunter; Angele, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of cartilage defects of the knee remains an important issue with high relevance. In October 2013 the German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU) was initiated in order to study indications, epidemiology and (clinical) outcome of different cartilage repair techniques. The present evaluation of the registry baseline data was initiated to report common practices of cartilage repair surgery in Germany. 1065 consecutive patients who underwent surgical cartilage treatment of the knee have been included (complete data sets available in 1027 cases; FU rate 96.4 %) between October 1, 2013 and June 30, 2015. Data collection was performed using a web-based RDE System. All data were provided by the attending physician at the time of arthroscopic or open surgery of the affected knee. In 1027 cartilage repair procedures, single defects were treated in 80 % of the cases with the majority of the defects located on the medial femoral condyle, followed by the patella. Degenerative defects grade III or IV according to ICRS were treated in 60 % of the cases and therefore were found more frequently compared to traumatic or post-traumatic lesions. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) was the most common technique followed by bone marrow stimulation (BMS) and osteochondral transplantation (OCT). While ACI was performed in defects with a mean size of 4.11 cm(2) SD SD 2.16), BMS and OCT (1.51 cm(2), SD 1.19; p < 0.01) were applied in significantly smaller defects (both p < 0.01). Independent of defect size, the ratio of ACI versus BMS applications differed between different defect locations. ACI was used preferably in defects located on the patella. The present analysis of data from the German Cartilage Registry shows that the vast majority of cartilage repair procedures were applied in degenerative, non-traumatic cartilage defects. Experts in Germany seem to follow the national and international guidelines in terms that bone marrow stimulation is applied in

  4. Conserving Cartilage In Microtia Repair: The Modular Component Assembly Approach To Rebuilding A Human Ear

    PubMed Central

    Gandy, Jessica R.; Lemieux, Bryan; Foulad, Allen; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current methods of microtia repair include carving an auricular framework from the costal synchondrosis. This requires considerable skill and may create a substantial donor site defect. Here, we present a modular component assembly (MCA) approach that minimizes the procedural difficulty and reduces the amount of cartilage to a single rib. Study Design Ex vivo study and survey Methods A single porcine rib was sectioned into multiple slices using a cartilage guillotine, cut into components outlined by 3D-printed templates, and assembled into an auricular scaffold. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) was used to bend cartilage slices for creation of the helical rim. Chondrocyte viability was confirmed using confocal imaging. Ten surgeons reviewed the scaffold constructed with the MCA approach to evaluate aesthetics, relative stability, and clinical feasibility. Results An auricular framework with projection and curvature was fashioned from one rib. Surgeons found the MCA scaffold to meet minimal aesthetic and anatomic acceptability. When embedded under a covering, the region of the helix and anti-helix of the scaffold scored significantly higher on the assessment survey than that of an embedded alloplast implant (t-value=0.01). Otherwise, no difference was found between the embedded MCA and alloplast implants (t-value >0.05). EMR treated cartilage was found to be viable. Conclusion This study demonstrates that one rib can be used to create an aesthetic and durable framework for microtia repair. Precise assembly and the ability to obtain thin, uniform slices of cartilage were essential. This cartilage-sparing MCA approach may be an alternative to classic techniques. PMID:26720326

  5. A Stereological Method for the Quantitative Evaluation of Cartilage Repair Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2015-01-01

    Objective To implement stereological principles to develop an easy applicable algorithm for unbiased and quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair. Design Design-unbiased sampling was performed by systematically sectioning the defect perpendicular to the joint surface in parallel planes providing 7 to 10 hematoxylin–eosin stained histological sections. Counting windows were systematically selected and converted into image files (40-50 per defect). The quantification was performed by two-step point counting: (1) calculation of defect volume and (2) quantitative analysis of tissue composition. Step 2 was performed by assigning each point to one of the following categories based on validated and easy distinguishable morphological characteristics: (1) hyaline cartilage (rounded cells in lacunae in hyaline matrix), (2) fibrocartilage (rounded cells in lacunae in fibrous matrix), (3) fibrous tissue (elongated cells in fibrous tissue), (4) bone, (5) scaffold material, and (6) others. The ability to discriminate between the tissue types was determined using conventional or polarized light microscopy, and the interobserver variability was evaluated. Results We describe the application of the stereological method. In the example, we assessed the defect repair tissue volume to be 4.4 mm3 (CE = 0.01). The tissue fractions were subsequently evaluated. Polarized light illumination of the slides improved discrimination between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage and increased the interobserver agreement compared with conventional transmitted light. Conclusion We have applied a design-unbiased method for quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair, and we propose this algorithm as a natural supplement to existing descriptive semiquantitative scoring systems. We also propose that polarized light is effective for discrimination between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. PMID:26069715

  6. A Stereological Method for the Quantitative Evaluation of Cartilage Repair Tissue.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2015-04-01

    To implement stereological principles to develop an easy applicable algorithm for unbiased and quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair. Design-unbiased sampling was performed by systematically sectioning the defect perpendicular to the joint surface in parallel planes providing 7 to 10 hematoxylin-eosin stained histological sections. Counting windows were systematically selected and converted into image files (40-50 per defect). The quantification was performed by two-step point counting: (1) calculation of defect volume and (2) quantitative analysis of tissue composition. Step 2 was performed by assigning each point to one of the following categories based on validated and easy distinguishable morphological characteristics: (1) hyaline cartilage (rounded cells in lacunae in hyaline matrix), (2) fibrocartilage (rounded cells in lacunae in fibrous matrix), (3) fibrous tissue (elongated cells in fibrous tissue), (4) bone, (5) scaffold material, and (6) others. The ability to discriminate between the tissue types was determined using conventional or polarized light microscopy, and the interobserver variability was evaluated. We describe the application of the stereological method. In the example, we assessed the defect repair tissue volume to be 4.4 mm(3) (CE = 0.01). The tissue fractions were subsequently evaluated. Polarized light illumination of the slides improved discrimination between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage and increased the interobserver agreement compared with conventional transmitted light. We have applied a design-unbiased method for quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair, and we propose this algorithm as a natural supplement to existing descriptive semiquantitative scoring systems. We also propose that polarized light is effective for discrimination between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage.

  7. Effect of porosities of bilayered porous scaffolds on spontaneous osteochondral repair in cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jian; Ding, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-bilayered scaffolds with the same porosity or different ones on the two layers were fabricated, and the porosity effect on in vivo repairing of the osteochondral defect was examined in a comparative way for the first time. The constructs of scaffolds and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were implanted into pre-created osteochondral defects in the femoral condyle of New Zealand white rabbits. After 12 weeks, all experimental groups exhibited good cartilage repairing according to macroscopic appearance, cross-section view, haematoxylin and eosin staining, toluidine blue staining, immunohistochemical staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction of characteristic genes. The group of 92% porosity in the cartilage layer and 77% porosity in the bone layer resulted in the best efficacy, which was understood by more biomechanical mimicking of the natural cartilage and subchondral bone. This study illustrates unambiguously that cartilage tissue engineering allows for a wide range of scaffold porosity, yet some porosity group is optimal. It is also revealed that the biomechanical matching with the natural composite tissue should be taken into consideration in the design of practical biomaterials, which is especially important for porosities of a multi-compartment scaffold concerning connected tissues. PMID:26813511

  8. Cartilage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Arnold I.

    1984-01-01

    Cartilage is a fundamental biological material that helps to shape the body and then helps to support it. Its fundamental properties of strength and resilience are explained in terms of the tissue's molecular structure. (JN)

  9. Cartilage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Arnold I.

    1984-01-01

    Cartilage is a fundamental biological material that helps to shape the body and then helps to support it. Its fundamental properties of strength and resilience are explained in terms of the tissue's molecular structure. (JN)

  10. Iron oxide labelling of human mesenchymal stem cells in collagen hydrogels for articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Heymer, Andrea; Haddad, Daniel; Weber, Meike; Gbureck, Uwe; Jakob, Peter M; Eulert, Jochen; Nöth, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    For the development of new therapeutical cell-based strategies for articular cartilage repair, a reliable cell monitoring technique is required to track the cells in vivo non-invasively and repeatedly. We present a systematic and detailed study on the performance and biological impact of a simple and efficient labelling protocol for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Commercially available very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOPs) were used as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Iron uptake via endocytosis was confirmed histologically with prussian blue staining and quantified by mass spectrometry. Compared with unlabelled cells, VSOP-labelling did neither influence the viability nor the proliferation potential of hMSCs. Furthermore, iron incorporation did not affect hMSCs in undergoing adipogenic, osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation, as demonstrated histologically and by gene expression analyses. The efficiency of the labelling protocol was assessed with high-resolution MR imaging at 11.7T. VSOP-labelled hMSCs were visualised in a collagen type I hydrogel, which is in clinical use for matrix-based articular cartilage repair. The presence of VSOP-labelled hMSCs was indicated by distinct hypointense spots in the MR images, as a result of iron specific loss of signal intensity. In summary, this labelling technique has great potential to visualise hMSCs and track their migration after transplantation for articular cartilage repair with MR imaging.

  11. Zone-specific integrated cartilage repair using a scaffold-free tissue engineered construct derived from allogenic synovial mesenchymal stem cells: Biomechanical and histological assessments.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Hiromichi; Nansai, Ryosuke; Ando, Wataru; Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Hart, David A; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2015-11-26

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the zone-specific integration properties of articular cartilage defects treated in vivo with scaffold-free three-dimensional tissue-engineered constructs (TECs) derived from allogenic synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a porcine model. The TEC derived from the synovial MSCs was implanted into chondral defects in the medial femoral condyle of the knee. The integration boundary of repair tissue with the adjacent host cartilage was morphologically and biomechanically evaluated at 6 months post-implantation. Histological assessments showed that the repair tissue in each zone was well integrated with the adjacent host cartilage, with an apparent secure continuity of the extracellular matrix. There were no significant differences in histological scores between the integration boundary and the center of the repair tissue at every zone. Nonetheless, in all the specimens subjected to mechanical testing, failure occurred at the integration boundary. The average tensile strength of the integration boundary vs normal cartilage was 0.6 vs 4.9, 3.0 vs 12.6, and 5.5 vs 12.8MPa at the superficial, middle, and deep layers, respectively. Thus, these results indicate the most fragile point in the repair tissue remained at the integration boundary in spite of the apparent secure tissue continuity and equivalent histological quality with the center of the repair tissue. Such tissue vulnerability at the surface integration boundary could affect the long-term durability of the tissue repair, and thus, special consideration will be needed in the post-operative rehabilitation programming to enhance the longevity of such repair tissues in response to normal knee loading.

  12. Fracture repair of reptilian dermal bones: can reptiles form secondary cartilage?

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, C R; Ferguson, M W

    1986-01-01

    The fracture repair of reptilian dermal bones has not previously been reported. Moreover, repair of fractured dermal bones in birds and mammals involves secondary chondrogenesis whereas that of amphibians does not. Therefore an investigation into the repair of fractured reptilian dermal bones could reveal the stage during vertebrate evolution at which the process of secondary chondrogenesis appeared. Experimental incisions were made in the parietal bones of seventeen lizards (3 species) and 2 snakes (1 species). These resulted in a fracture environment of limited vascularity and increased movement--two known stimuli of secondary chondrogenesis in birds and mammals. Re-epithelialisation was rapid and dead bony fragments quickly sequestered. The blood blot was quickly organised into connective tissue, the dural periostea proliferated, osteoblasts differentiated and bony union was effected after 18 days. The width of the fracture gap was the principal variable affecting the chronology of fracture repair. Secondary cartilage was not detected in any specimen, of any species, at any stage of the fracture repair. It therefore appears that the progenitor cells on reptilian dermal bones are not capable of forming secondary cartilage and that this tissue arose comparatively late in vertebrate evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:3693062

  13. 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy for assessment of cartilage repair tissue: volumetric characterisation and correlation to established classification systems.

    PubMed

    Schöne, M; Männicke, N; Somerson, J S; Marquaß, B; Henkelmann, R; Mochida, J; Aigner, T; Raum, K; Schulz, R M

    2016-02-08

    Objective and sensitive assessment of cartilage repair outcomes lacks suitable methods. This study investigated the feasibility of 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to quantify cartilage repair outcomes volumetrically and their correlation with established classification systems. 32 sheep underwent bilateral treatment of a focal cartilage defect. One or two years post-operatively the repair outcomes were assessed and scored macroscopically (Outerbridge, ICRS-CRA), by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, MOCART), and histopathology (O'Driscoll, ICRS-I and ICRS-II). The UBM data were acquired after MRI and used to reconstruct the shape of the initial cartilage layer, enabling the estimation of the initial cartilage thickness and defect volume as well as volumetric parameters for defect filling, repair tissue, bone loss and bone overgrowth. The quantification of the repair outcomes revealed high variations in the initial thickness of the cartilage layer, indicating the need for cartilage thickness estimation before creating a defect. Furthermore, highly significant correlations were found for the defect filling estimated from UBM to the established classification systems. 3D visualisation of the repair regions showed highly variable morphology within single samples. This raises the question as to whether macroscopic, MRI and histopathological scoring provide sufficient reliability. The biases of the individual methods will be discussed within this context. UBM was shown to be a feasible tool to evaluate cartilage repair outcomes, whereby the most important objective parameter is the defect filling. Translation of UBM into arthroscopic or transcutaneous ultrasound examinations would allow non-destructive and objective follow-up of individual patients and better comparison between the results of clinical trials.

  14. Parathyroid Hormone-Induced Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Chondrogenic Differentiation and its Repair of Articular Cartilage Injury in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yushu; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Shujiang; Du, Xiufan; Bai, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background We explored the effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH)-induced bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) complexed with fibrin glue (FG) in the repair of articular cartilage injury in rabbits. Material/Methods Forty-eight rabbits randomized into four groups were subjected to articular surgery (cartilage loss). The PTH and non-PTH intervention groups included transplantation with PTH/BMSC/FG xenogeneic and BMSC/FG xenogeneic complexes, respectively, into the injured area. The injured group contained no transplant while the control group comprised rabbits without any articular injury. Samples were monitored for cartilage repair up to three months post-surgery. Immunohistochemistry as well as real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR and Western blot were used to analyze the expression of type II collagen and aggrecan in the repaired tissue. Results At 12 weeks post-surgery, the loss of articular cartilage in the PTH group was fully repaired by hyaline tissue. Typical cartilage lacunae and intact subchondral bone were found. The boundary separating the surrounding normal cartilage tissue disappeared. The gross and International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) histological ranking of the repaired tissue was significantly higher in the PTH intervention group than in the non-PTH intervention and injury groups (p<0.05) without any significant difference compared to the control group (p>0.05). Type II collagen and aggrecan stained positive and the average optical density, relative mRNA expression and protein-integrated optical density in the PTH group were higher than in non-PTH and injured groups (p<0.05) but not significantly different from the control group (p>0.05). Conclusions PTH/BMSC/FG xenogeneic complexes effectively repaired the loss of cartilage in rabbit knee injury. PMID:27847384

  15. Cartilage repair of experimentally 11 induced osteochondral defects in New Zealand White rabbits.

    PubMed

    Aulin, C; Jensen-Waern, M; Ekman, S; Hägglund, M; Engstrand, T; Hilborn, J; Hedenqvist, P

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair in adult humans, and methods used to stimulate regeneration often result in re-growth of fibrous cartilage, which has lower durability. No current treatment option can provide complete repair. The possibility of growth factor delivery into the joint for cartilage regeneration after injury would be an attractive treatment option. A full thickness osteochondral defect of 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm deep was created by mechanical drilling in the medial femoral condyle in 20 female adult New Zealand White rabbits. In an attempt to improve regeneration a hyaluronic hydrogel system, with or without bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) was delivered intraarticularly. The contralateral joint defect was treated with saline as control. Throughout the study, rabbits were clinically examined and after 12 (n = 6) or 24 (n = 9) weeks, the rabbits were euthanized and the joints evaluated by histology. The defects healed with fibrocartilage like tissue, and the filling of the defects ranged from less than 25% to complete. The healing of the defects varied both inter- and intra-group wise. Treatment with hyaluronan gel with or without BMP-2 had no effect on cartilage regeneration compared with controls. Instead, severe ectopic bone formation was found in seven joints treated with BMP-2. In conclusion, the present study shows that neither treatment with hyaluronic gel alone, nor in combination with BMP-2, improves the healing of an induced cartilage defect in rabbits. It further shows that BMP-2 can induce ectopic bone formation, which severely affects the functionality of the joint.

  16. Self-assembling peptide hydrogel fosters chondrocyte extracellular matrix production and cell division: Implications for cartilage tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiday, J.; Jin, M.; Kurz, B.; Hung, H.; Semino, C.; Zhang, S.; Grodzinsky, A. J.

    2002-07-01

    Emerging medical technologies for effective and lasting repair of articular cartilage include delivery of cells or cell-seeded scaffolds to a defect site to initiate de novo tissue regeneration. Biocompatible scaffolds assist in providing a template for cell distribution and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in a three-dimensional geometry. A major challenge in choosing an appropriate scaffold for cartilage repair is the identification of a material that can simultaneously stimulate high rates of cell division and high rates of cell synthesis of phenotypically specific ECM macromolecules until repair evolves into steady-state tissue maintenance. We have devised a self-assembling peptide hydrogel scaffold for cartilage repair and developed a method to encapsulate chondrocytes within the peptide hydrogel. During 4 weeks of culture in vitro, chondrocytes seeded within the peptide hydrogel retained their morphology and developed a cartilage-like ECM rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen, indicative of a stable chondrocyte phenotype. Time-dependent accumulation of this ECM was paralleled by increases in material stiffness, indicative of deposition of mechanically functional neo-tissue. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of a self-assembling peptide hydrogel as a scaffold for the synthesis and accumulation of a true cartilage-like ECM within a three-dimensional cell culture for cartilage tissue repair.

  17. Influence of acupuncture in treatment of knee osteoarthritis and cartilage repairing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Bao, Fei; Wang, Yan; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    As two major non-operative methods, physiotherapy and acupuncture have been proved to be safe and effective in osteoarthritis (OA) treatment. However, only a little study focused on functions of both methods on cartilage repairing. The main goal of this research is to prove and compare effectiveness of acupuncture and physiotherapy on OA, and to explore their possible efficacy on cartilage repairing. One hundred knees of 50 participants with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) were randomly divided into acupuncture group and physiotherapy group. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used to evaluate the motor function of knee joints, followed by MRI scanning to measure T2 values in ten cartilage sub-regions in tibiofemoral joints. Significant lower scores of total WOMAC and three subscales on the 4th weekend were observed in both groups than those of the baseline (P < 0.01). For acupuncture group, scores of total WOMAC and three subscales for pain, stiffness and physical function on 4th weekend were significantly lower than those of the physiotherapy group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). T2 values in anterior medial tibial sub-region (MTa) and anterior lateral tibial sub-region (LTa) were significantly lower in acupuncture group on 4th weekend than those of the baseline (P < 0.05). No significant difference in T2 values was detected in physiotherapy group. These results indicate that acupuncture represents certain clinical effect on KOA which is superior compared with physiotherapy, and hint the possible roles of acupuncture in promoting cartilage repairing. PMID:27725880

  18. Influence of acupuncture in treatment of knee osteoarthritis and cartilage repairing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Bao, Fei; Wang, Yan; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    As two major non-operative methods, physiotherapy and acupuncture have been proved to be safe and effective in osteoarthritis (OA) treatment. However, only a little study focused on functions of both methods on cartilage repairing. The main goal of this research is to prove and compare effectiveness of acupuncture and physiotherapy on OA, and to explore their possible efficacy on cartilage repairing. One hundred knees of 50 participants with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) were randomly divided into acupuncture group and physiotherapy group. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used to evaluate the motor function of knee joints, followed by MRI scanning to measure T2 values in ten cartilage sub-regions in tibiofemoral joints. Significant lower scores of total WOMAC and three subscales on the 4th weekend were observed in both groups than those of the baseline (P < 0.01). For acupuncture group, scores of total WOMAC and three subscales for pain, stiffness and physical function on 4th weekend were significantly lower than those of the physiotherapy group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). T2 values in anterior medial tibial sub-region (MTa) and anterior lateral tibial sub-region (LTa) were significantly lower in acupuncture group on 4th weekend than those of the baseline (P < 0.05). No significant difference in T2 values was detected in physiotherapy group. These results indicate that acupuncture represents certain clinical effect on KOA which is superior compared with physiotherapy, and hint the possible roles of acupuncture in promoting cartilage repairing.

  19. Epidemiology and imaging of the subchondral bone in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Menetrey, Jacques; Unno-Veith, Florence; Madry, Henning; Van Breuseghem, Iwan

    2010-04-01

    Articular cartilage and the subchondral bone act as a functional unit. Following trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis or osteoarthritis, this intimate connection may become disrupted. Osteochondral defects-the type of defects that extend into the subchondral bone-account for about 5% of all articular cartilage lesions. They are very often caused by trauma, in about one-third of the cases by osteoarthritis and rarely by osteochondritis dissecans. Osteochondral defects are predominantly located on the medial femoral condyle and also on the patella. Frequently, they are associated with lesions of the menisci or the anterior cruciate ligament. Because of the close relationship between the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone, imaging of cartilage defects or cartilage repair should also focus on the subchondral bone. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently considered to be the key modality for the evaluation of cartilage and underlying subchondral bone. However, the choice of imaging technique also depends on the nature of the disease that caused the subchondral bone lesion. For example, radiography is still the golden standard for imaging features of osteoarthritis. Bone scintigraphy is one of the most valuable techniques for early diagnosis of spontaneous osteonecrosis about the knee. A CT scan is a useful technique to rule out a possible depression of the subchondral bone plate, whereas a CT arthrography is highly accurate to evaluate the stability of the osteochondral fragment in osteochondritis dissecans. Particularly for the problem of subchondral bone lesions, image evaluation methods need to be refined for adequate and reproducible analysis. This article highlights recent studies on the epidemiology and imaging of the subchondral bone, with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Repair of porcine articular cartilage defect with a biphasic osteochondral composite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ching-Chuan; Chiang, Hongsen; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lin, Yu-Ju; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Shieh, Chang-Shun; Huang, Yi-You; Tuan, Rocky S

    2007-10-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been recently used to treat cartilage defects. Partly because of the success of mosaicplasty, a procedure that involves the implantation of native osteochondral plugs, it is of potential significance to consider the application of ACI in the form of biphasic osteochondral composites. To test the clinical applicability of such composite construct, we repaired osteochondral defect with ACI at low cell-seeding density on a biphasic scaffold, and combined graft harvest and implantation in a single surgery. We fabricated a biphasic cylindrical porous plug of DL-poly-lactide-co-glycolide, with its lower body impregnated with beta-tricalcium phosphate as the osseous phase. Osteochondral defects were surgically created at the weight-bearing surface of femoral condyles of Lee-Sung mini-pigs. Autologous chondrocytes isolated from the cartilage were seeded into the upper, chondral phase of the plug, which was inserted by press-fitting to fill the defect. Defects treated with cell-free plugs served as control. Outcome of repair was examined 6 months after surgery. In the osseous phase, the biomaterial retained in the center and cancellous bone formed in the periphery, integrating well with native subchondral bone with extensive remodeling, as depicted on X-ray roentgenography by higher radiolucency. In the chondral phase, collagen type II immunohistochemistry and Safranin O histological staining showed hyaline cartilage regeneration in the experimental group, whereas only fibrous tissue formed in the control group. On the International Cartilage Repair Society Scale, the experimental group had higher mean scores in surface, matrix, cell distribution, and cell viability than control, but was comparable with the control group in subchondral bone and mineralization. Tensile stress-relaxation behavior determined by uni-axial indentation test revealed similar creep property between the surface of the experimental specimen and native

  1. New physically and chemically crosslinked hyaluronate (HA)-based hydrogels for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Huin-Amargier, Cécile; Marchal, Philippe; Payan, Elisabeth; Netter, Patrick; Dellacherie, Edith

    2006-02-01

    When dissolved in aqueous solutions, sodium hyaluronate substituted with low amounts of alkyl chains [amphiphilic hyaluronate (HA)] can give rise to hydrogels thanks to intermolecular reversible hydrophobic interactions, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) network. Such hydrogels possess shear-thinning properties and can thus be injected in cartilage defect to promote chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage repair. However, these hydrogels are only physically crosslinked and can progressively loose their 3D structure when they are in contact with aqueous fluids. To overcome this drawback, HA derivatives substituted with dodecyl chains were chemically crosslinked by a difunctional reagent, tetraethylene glycol ditosylate (TEG-diOTs). To preserve the shear-thinning properties of amphiphilic HA, small amounts of TEG-diOTs were used so as to obtain a low chemical crosslinking ratio. After optimization of the synthesis parameters, aqueous solutions of the HA derivatives, crosslinked both physically and chemically, were obtained, with rheological properties improved compared to the amphiphilic polymers. As the hydrogels are aimed to cartilage repair, they were sterilized by wet heating; the effect of this treatment on the polymer characteristics was analyzed by different techniques. A similar study was carried out on HA derivatives stored under conditions mimicking physiological ones. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effects of microcurrent stimulation on Hyaline cartilage repair in immature male rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigate the effects of microcurrent stimulation on the repair process of xiphoid cartilage in 45-days-old rats. Methods Twenty male rats were divided into a control group and a treated group. A 3-mm defect was then created with a punch in anesthetized animals. In the treated group, animals were submitted to daily applications of a biphasic square pulse microgalvanic continuous electrical current during 5 min. In each application, it was used a frequency of 0.3 Hz and intensity of 20 μA. The animals were sacrificed at 7, 21 and 35 days after injury for structural analysis. Results Basophilia increased gradually in control animals during the experimental period. In treated animals, newly formed cartilage was observed on days 21 and 35. No statistically significant differences in birefringent collagen fibers were seen between groups at any of the time points. Treated animals presented a statistically larger number of chondroblasts. Calcification points were observed in treated animals on day 35. Ultrastructural analysis revealed differences in cell and matrix characteristics between the two groups. Chondrocyte-like cells were seen in control animals only after 35 days, whereas they were present in treated animals as early as by day 21. The number of cuprolinic blue-stained proteoglycans was statistically higher in treated animals on days 21 and 35. Conclusion We conclude that microcurrent stimulation accelerates the cartilage repair in non-articular site from prepuberal animals. PMID:23331612

  3. Effects of microcurrent stimulation on hyaline cartilage repair in immature male rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    de Campos Ciccone, Carla; Zuzzi, Denise Cristina; Neves, Lia Mara Grosso; Mendonça, Josué Sampaio; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto

    2013-01-19

    In this study, we investigate the effects of microcurrent stimulation on the repair process of xiphoid cartilage in 45-days-old rats. Twenty male rats were divided into a control group and a treated group. A 3-mm defect was then created with a punch in anesthetized animals. In the treated group, animals were submitted to daily applications of a biphasic square pulse microgalvanic continuous electrical current during 5 min. In each application, it was used a frequency of 0.3 Hz and intensity of 20 μA. The animals were sacrificed at 7, 21 and 35 days after injury for structural analysis. Basophilia increased gradually in control animals during the experimental period. In treated animals, newly formed cartilage was observed on days 21 and 35. No statistically significant differences in birefringent collagen fibers were seen between groups at any of the time points. Treated animals presented a statistically larger number of chondroblasts. Calcification points were observed in treated animals on day 35. Ultrastructural analysis revealed differences in cell and matrix characteristics between the two groups. Chondrocyte-like cells were seen in control animals only after 35 days, whereas they were present in treated animals as early as by day 21. The number of cuprolinic blue-stained proteoglycans was statistically higher in treated animals on days 21 and 35. We conclude that microcurrent stimulation accelerates the cartilage repair in non-articular site from prepuberal animals.

  4. Granulocyte macrophage - colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) significantly enhances articular cartilage repair potential by microfracture.

    PubMed

    Truong, M-D; Choi, B H; Kim, Y J; Kim, M S; Min, B-H

    2017-08-01

    To investigate whether granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can be used to increase the number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in blood clots formed by microfracture arthroplasty (MFX) and whether it can improve the therapeutic outcome for cartilage repair. Thirty-six New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) GM-CSF, (3) MFX, and (4) GM-CSF + MFX. GM-CSF was administrated intravenously (IV) at 10 μg/kg body weight 20 min before the MFX surgery. The repaired tissues were retrieved and examined by histological observation, quantitative assessment, and biochemical assays at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. The number of MSCs was measured in the blood clots by the colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. The kinetic profile and distribution of GM-CSF in vivo was also evaluated by near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. In the histological observations and chemical assays examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, the MFX after GM-CSF administration showed better cartilage repair than the one without GM-CSF. The CFU-F assay showed a significantly larger amount of MSCs present in the blood clots of the GM-CSF + MFX group than in the blood clots of the other groups. The blood concentration of GM-CSF peaked at 10 min and decreased back to almost the initial level after a couple of hours. GM-CSF was distributed in many organs including the bone marrow but was not observed clearly in the joint cavity. Intravenous administration of GM-CSF together with MFX could be a promising therapeutic protocol to enhance the repair of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V. N.; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair. PMID:26549401

  6. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V N; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-11-09

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair.

  7. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ando, Wataru; Fujie, Hiromichi; Moriguchi, Yu; Nansai, Ryosuke; Shimomura, Kazunori; Hart, David A; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2012-09-28

    The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  8. Cartilage repair: A review of Stanmore experience in the treatment of osteochondral defects in the knee with various surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, S; Bentley, G; Briggs, Twr; Skinner, Ja; Carrington, Rwj; Pollock, R; Flanagan, Am

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage damage in the young adult knee, if left untreated, it may proceed to degenerative osteoarthritis and is a serious cause of disability and loss of function. Surgical cartilage repair of an osteochondral defect can give the patient significant relief from symptoms and preserve the functional life of the joint. Several techniques including bone marrow stimulation, cartilage tissue based therapy, cartilage cell seeded therapies and osteotomies have been described in the literature with varying results. Established techniques rely mainly on the formation of fibro-cartilage, which has been shown to degenerate over time due to shear forces. The implantation of autologous cultured chondrocytes into an osteochondral defect, may replace damaged cartilage with hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage. This clinical review assesses current surgical techniques and makes recommendations on the most appropriate method of cartilage repair when managing symptomatic osteochondral defects of the knee. We also discuss the experience with the technique of autologous chondrocyte implantation at our institution over the past 11 years.

  9. Cartilage repair: A review of Stanmore experience in the treatment of osteochondral defects in the knee with various surgical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, S; Bentley, G; Briggs, TWR; Skinner, JA; Carrington, RWJ; Pollock, R; Flanagan, AM

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage in the young adult knee, if left untreated, it may proceed to degenerative osteoarthritis and is a serious cause of disability and loss of function. Surgical cartilage repair of an osteochondral defect can give the patient significant relief from symptoms and preserve the functional life of the joint. Several techniques including bone marrow stimulation, cartilage tissue based therapy, cartilage cell seeded therapies and osteotomies have been described in the literature with varying results. Established techniques rely mainly on the formation of fibro-cartilage, which has been shown to degenerate over time due to shear forces. The implantation of autologous cultured chondrocytes into an osteochondral defect, may replace damaged cartilage with hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage. This clinical review assesses current surgical techniques and makes recommendations on the most appropriate method of cartilage repair when managing symptomatic osteochondral defects of the knee. We also discuss the experience with the technique of autologous chondrocyte implantation at our institution over the past 11 years. PMID:20697474

  10. Nasal chondrocyte-based engineered autologous cartilage tissue for repair of articular cartilage defects: an observational first-in-human trial.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Barbero, Andrea; Miot, Sylvie; Wixmerten, Anke; Feliciano, Sandra; Wolf, Francine; Asnaghi, Adelaide M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Haug, Martin; Schaefer, Dirk J; Martin, Ivan; Jakob, Marcel

    2016-10-22

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor repair capacity, leading to progressive joint damage, and cannot be restored predictably by either conventional treatments or advanced therapies based on implantation of articular chondrocytes. Compared with articular chondrocytes, chondrocytes derived from the nasal septum have superior and more reproducible capacity to generate hyaline-like cartilage tissues, with the plasticity to adapt to a joint environment. We aimed to assess whether engineered autologous nasal chondrocyte-based cartilage grafts allow safe and functional restoration of knee cartilage defects. In a first-in-human trial, ten patients with symptomatic, post-traumatic, full-thickness cartilage lesions (2-6 cm(2)) on the femoral condyle or trochlea were treated at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. Chondrocytes isolated from a 6 mm nasal septum biopsy specimen were expanded and cultured onto collagen membranes to engineer cartilage grafts (30 × 40 × 2 mm). The engineered tissues were implanted into the femoral defects via mini-arthrotomy and assessed up to 24 months after surgery. Primary outcomes were feasibility and safety of the procedure. Secondary outcomes included self-assessed clinical scores and MRI-based estimation of morphological and compositional quality of the repair tissue. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01605201. The study is ongoing, with an approved extension to 25 patients. For every patient, it was feasible to manufacture cartilaginous grafts with nasal chondrocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Engineered tissues were stable through handling with forceps and could be secured in the injured joints. No adverse reactions were recorded and self-assessed clinical scores for pain, knee function, and quality of life were improved significantly from before surgery to 24 months after surgery. Radiological assessments indicated variable degrees of

  11. Cell and matrix response of temporomandibular cartilage to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Utreja, Achint; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Yadav, Sumit; Villa, Max M.; Li, Yingcui; Jiang, Xi; Nanda, Ravindra; Rowe, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The generation of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) has greatly aided our understanding of the development of connective tissues such as bone and cartilage. Perturbation of a biological system such as the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) within its adaptive remodeling capacity is particularly useful in analyzing cellular lineage progression. The objectives of this study were to determine: (i) if GFP reporters expressed in the TMJ indicate the different stages of cell maturation in fibrocartilage and (ii) how mechanical loading affects cellular response in different regions of the cartilage. Design/Methods Four-week-old transgenic mice harboring combinations of fluorescent reporters (Dkk3-eGFP, Col1a1(3.6kb)-GFPcyan, Col1a1(3.6kb)-GFPtpz, Col2a1-GFPcyan, and Col10a1-RFPcherry) were used to analyze the expression pattern of transgenes in the mandibular condylar cartilage. To study the effect of TMJ loading, animals were subjected to forced mouth opening with custom springs exerting 50 grams force for 1 hour/day for 5 days. Dynamic mineralization and cellular proliferation (EdU-labeling) were assessed in loaded vs control mice. Results Dkk3 expression was seen in the superficial zone of the mandibular condylar cartilage, followed by Col1 in the cartilage zone, Col2 in the prehypertrophic zone, and Col10 expression hypertrophic zone at and below the tidemark. TMJ loading increased expression of the GFP reporters and EdU-labeling of cells in the cartilage, resulting in a thickness increase of all layers of the cartilage. In addition, mineral apposition increased resulting in Col10 expression by unmineralized cells above the tidemark. Conclusion The TMJ responded to static loading by forming thicker cartilage through adaptive remodeling. PMID:26362410

  12. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a bMSC and BMP-2 polymeric trilayer system in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Vayas, Raquel; Reyes, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Évora, María; Del Rosario, Carlos; Delgado, Araceli; Évora, Carmen

    2017-07-04

    In this study a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) tri-layer scaffold is proposed for cartilage repair. The trilayer system consists of a base layer formed by a tablet of PLGA microspheres, a second layer composed of a microsphere suspension placed on top of the tablet, and the third layer, which constitutes an external electrospun PLGA thin polymeric membrane. Combinations of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) encapsulated in the microspheres of the suspension layer, and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (bMSC) seeded on the electrospun membrane, are evaluated by histologic analyses and immunohistochemistry in a critical size osteochondral defect in rabbits. Five experimental groups, including a control group (empty defect), a blank group (blank scaffold), a bMSC treated group, two groups treated with 2.5 μg or 8.5 μg of BMP-2 and another two groups implanted with bMSC-BMP-2 combination are evaluated. The repair area increases throughout the experimental time (24 weeks). The repair observed in the treated groups is statistically higher than in control and blank groups. However, the bMSC-BMP-2 combination does not enhance the BMP-2 response. In conclusion, BMP-2 and bMSC repaired effectively the osteochondral defect in the rabbits. The bMSC-BMP-2 combination did not produce synergism.

  13. An Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Derived Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Applied with Bone Marrow Stimulation for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that implanting a bioactive scaffold into a cartilage defect site can enhance cartilage repair after bone marrow stimulation (BMS). However, most of the current scaffolds are derived from xenogenous tissue and/or artificial polymers. The implantation of these scaffolds adds risks of pathogen transmission, undesirable inflammation, and other immunological reactions, as well as ethical issues in clinical practice. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of implanting autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell–derived extracellular matrix (aBMSC-dECM) scaffolds after BMS for cartilage repair. Methods: Full osteochondral defects were performed on the trochlear groove of both knees in 24 rabbits. One group underwent BMS only in the right knee (the BMS group), and the other group was treated by implantation of the aBMSC-dECM scaffold after BMS in the left knee (the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group). Results: Better repair of cartilage defects was observed in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group than in the BMS group according to gross observation, histological assessments, immunohistochemistry, and chemical assay. The glycosaminoglycan and DNA content, the distribution of proteoglycan, and the distribution and arrangement of type II and I collagen fibers in the repaired tissue in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group at 12 weeks after surgery were similar to that surrounding normal hyaline cartilage. Conclusions: Implanting aBMSC-dECM scaffolds can enhance the therapeutic effect of BMS on articular cartilage repair, and this combination treatment is a potential method for successful articular cartilage repair. PMID:24666429

  14. Immunohistochemical study of collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in human cartilage repair tissue following autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Menage, J; Sandell, L J; Evans, E H; Richardson, J B

    2009-10-01

    This study has assessed the relative proportions of type I and II collagens and IIA procollagen in full depth biopsies of repair tissue in a large sample of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Sixty five full depth biopsies were obtained from knees of 58 patients 8-60 months after treatment by ACI alone (n=55) or in combination with mosaicplasty (n=10). In addition articular cartilage was examined from eight individuals (aged 10-50) as controls. Morphology and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in the repair tissue were studied. Repair cartilage thickness was 2.89+/-1.5 mm and there was good basal integration between the repair cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral bone. Sixty five percent of the biopsies were predominantly fibrocartilage (mostly type I collagen and IIA procollagen), 15% were hyaline cartilage (mostly type II collagen), 17% were of mixed morphology and 3% were fibrous tissue (mostly type I collagen). Type II collagen and IIA procollagen were usually found in the lower regions near the bone and most type II collagen was present 30-60 months after treatment. The presence of type IIA procollagen in the repair tissue supports our hypothesis that this is indicative of a developing cartilage, with the ratio of type II collagen:procollagen IIA increasing from <2% in the first two years post-treatment to 30% three to five years after treatment. This suggests that cartilage repair tissue produced following ACI treatment, is likely to take some years to mature.

  15. [Nasal septum cartilage-silica gel complex for repairing nasal deformities of unilateral cleft lip].

    PubMed

    Li, Qingwei; Sheng, Zunqi; Tang, Shengjian; Yang, Biaobing; Yu, Xiaohua

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate the operative methods and therapeutic effects of nasal septum cartilage-silica gel complex for two-stage repair of nasal deformities of unilateral cleft lip. From June 2001 to June 2007, 38 cases of secondary nasal deformity and septum deviation of cleft lip were treated with transplanting nasal septum cartilage-silica gel complex. Among of them, there were 21 males and 17 females, aging 14-23 years with an average of 17.6 years. All cases were with nasal deformities of unilateral cleft lip, including 21 cases of complete cleft lip and 17 cases of incomplete cleft lip. The locations were left side in 26 cases and right side in 12 cases. Nasal deformities were columella nasi deflexion, flattened nasal tip, pteleorrhine and alanasi collapse. The patients received 1-4 times operations, and the interval of two operations was 3-10 years (mean 5.5 years). According to nasal deformity, the nasal septum cartilage of 1.8 cm x 1.2 cm was cut, and transplanted into the nose point phantom surface forming "the shield" to extend nose column and to raise the tip of the nose. At the same time the nasal tip fat-connective tissue flap graft with fat knot was given. After fixation, the nasal alar cartilage and soft tissues were reduced to normal position. Primary healing of the incisions was achieved in all cases. The nasal deformity was corrected. The postoperative follow-up period was 12-18 months with an average of 15.6 months. All the patients of regional cartilage scars had no complication. The figure of nose was slinky, the height of apex of nose and the shape of nose was natural, the apex of nose, nasal ala, nostrils and nasal columella were satisfactory [(the results were satisfactory in 30 cases (78.9%), general in 8 cases (21.1%)]. The nose department overall esthetics shape was improved in all the patients, no complications of the phantom sliding, shifting and exposure, hemorrhage and infection occurred. The nasal septum cartilage-silica gel complex to repair

  16. Tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by a biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 avidin binding technique for the repairing of cartilage defects in the weight-bearing area of knee joints in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Zhou, J; Cao, L; Wang, H R; Dong, J; Chen, Z R

    2017-05-01

    The lack of effective treatment for cartilage defects has prompted investigations using tissue engineering techniques for their regeneration and repair. The success of tissue-engineered repair of cartilage may depend on the rapid and efficient adhesion of transplanted cells to a scaffold. Our aim in this study was to repair full-thickness defects in articular cartilage in the weight-bearing area of a porcine model, and to investigate whether the CD44 monoclonal antibody biotin-avidin (CBA) binding technique could provide satisfactory tissue-engineered cartilage. Cartilage defects were created in the load-bearing region of the lateral femoral condyle of mini-type pigs. The defects were repaired with traditional tissue-engineered cartilage, tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with the biotin-avidin (BA) technique, tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with the CBA technique and with autologous cartilage. The biomechanical properties, Western blot assay, histological findings and immunohistochemical staining were explored. The CBA group showed similar results to the autologous group in biomechanical properties, Moran's criteria, histological tests and Wakitani histological scoring. These results suggest that tissue-engineered cartilage constructed using the CBA technique could be used effectively to repair cartilage defects in the weight-bearing area of joints.Cite this article: H. Lin, J. Zhou, L. Cao, H. R. Wang, J. Dong, Z. R. Chen. Tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by a biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 avidin binding technique for the repairing of cartilage defects in the weight-bearing area of knee joints in pigs. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:-295. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.65.BJR-2016-0277. © 2017 Chen et al.

  17. Synovial fluid hyaluronan mediates MSC attachment to cartilage, a potential novel mechanism contributing to cartilage repair in osteoarthritis using knee joint distraction.

    PubMed

    Baboolal, Thomas G; Mastbergen, Simon C; Jones, Elena; Calder, Stuart J; Lafeber, Floris P J G; McGonagle, Dennis

    2016-05-01

    Knee joint distraction (KJD) is a novel, but poorly understood, treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) associated with remarkable 'spontaneous' cartilage repair in which resident synovial fluid (SF) multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may play a role. We hypothesised that SF hyaluronic acid (HA) inhibited the initial interaction between MSCs and cartilage, a key first step to integration, and postulate that KJD environment favoured MSC/cartilage interactions. Attachment of dual-labelled SF-MSCs were assessed in a novel in vitro human cartilage model using OA and rheumatoid arthritic (RA) SF. SF was digested with hyaluronidase (hyase) and its effect on adhesion was observed using confocal microscopy. MRI and microscopy were used to image autologous dual-labelled MSCs in an in vivo canine model of KJD. SF-HA was investigated using gel electrophoresis and densitometry. Osteoarthritic-synovial fluid (OA-SF) and purified high molecular weight (MW) HA inhibited SF-MSC adhesion to plastic, while hyase treatment of OA-SF but not RA-SF significantly increased MSC adhesion to cartilage (3.7-fold, p<0.05) These differences were linked to the SF mediated HA-coat which was larger in OA-SF than in RA-SF. OA-SF contained >9 MDa HA and this correlated with increases in adhesion (r=0.880). In the canine KJD model, MSC adhesion to cartilage was evident and also dependent on HA MW. These findings highlight an unappreciated role of SF-HA on MSC interactions and provide proof of concept that endogenous SF-MSCs are capable of adhering to cartilage in a favourable biochemical and biomechanical environment in OA distracted joints, offering novel one-stage strategies towards joint repair. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. In Vivo Evaluation of a Novel Oriented Scaffold-BMSC Construct for Enhancing Full-Thickness Articular Cartilage Repair in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weimin; Liu, Jian; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has been proven usefulness in cartilage defect repair. For effective cartilage repair, the structural orientation of the cartilage scaffold should mimic that of native articular cartilage, as this orientation is closely linked to cartilage mechanical functions. Using thermal-induced phase separation (TIPS) technology, we have fabricated an oriented cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived scaffold with a Young's modulus value 3 times higher than that of a random scaffold. In this study, we test the effectiveness of bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-scaffold constructs (cell-oriented and random) in repairing full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits. While histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed efficient cartilage regeneration and cartilaginous matrix secretion at 6 and 12 weeks after transplantation in both groups, the biochemical properties (levels of DNA, GAG, and collagen) and biomechanical values in the oriented scaffold group were higher than that in random group at early time points after implantation. While these differences were not evident at 24 weeks, the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the regenerated cartilage in the oriented scaffold-BMSC construct group were similar to that of native cartilage. These results demonstrate that an oriented scaffold, in combination with differentiated BMSCs can successfully repair full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits, and produce cartilage enhanced biomechanical properties. PMID:26695629

  19. Cartilage Repair in the Inflamed Joint: Considerations for Biological Augmentation Toward Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Celeste; Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Martin, Ivan; Shimomura, Kazunori; Lane, John G; Peretti, Giuseppe Michele; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage repair/regeneration procedures (e.g., microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI]) typically result in a satisfactory outcome in selected patients. However, the vast majority of patients with chronic symptoms and, in general, a more diseased joint, do not benefit from these surgical techniques. The aims of this work were to (1) review factors negatively influencing the joint environment; (2) review current adjuvant therapies that can be used to improve results of cartilage repair/regeneration procedures in patients with more diseased joints, (3) outline future lines of research and promising experimental approaches. Chronicity of symptoms and advancing patient age appear to be the most relevant factors negatively affecting clinical outcome of cartilage repair/regeneration. Preliminary experience with hyaluronic acid, platelet-rich plasma, and mesenchymal stem cell has been positive but there is no strong evidence supporting the use of these products and this requires further assessment with high-quality, prospective clinical trials. The use of a Tissue Therapy strategy, based on more mature engineered tissues, holds promise to tackle limitations of standard ACI procedures. Current research has highlighted the need for more targeted therapies, and (1) induction of tolerance with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or by preventing IL-6 downregulation; (2) combined IL-4 and IL-10 local release; and (3) selective activation of the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling appear to be the most promising innovative strategies. For older patients and for those with chronic symptoms, adjuvant therapies are needed in combination with microfracture and ACI.

  20. Detection of cytokines at the cartilage/pannus junction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: implications for the role of cytokines in cartilage destruction and repair.

    PubMed

    Chu, C Q; Field, M; Allard, S; Abney, E; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1992-10-01

    Cytokine release at the cartilage/pannus junction (CPJ) may be involved in cartilage destruction and tissue repair in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tissue samples of CPJ from 12 RA patients were examined for the presence of cytokines using immunohistochemical techniques with immunoaffinity purified F(ab')2 antibodies raised against recombinant human cytokines. Twenty-four areas of distinct CPJ at which a discrete junction between cartilage and overlying pannus exists were observed. In all specimens, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 alpha. IL-6, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 were detected in cells in pannus particularly along the surface of cartilage and at the site of cartilage erosion. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that most cytokine containing cells also labelled with a macrophage marker (CD68). About 50% of blood vessel endothelial cells stained for GM-CSF. Twelve areas of diffuse fibroblastic CPJ, at which an indistinct margin is seen between cartilage and pannus were examined. At this site, TGF-beta 1 was the only cytokine detected in fibroblast-like cells. None of these cytokines were detected in synovial tissue at the normal synovium/cartilage junction. Chondrocytes from all 11 normal specimens as well as those from RA patients stained for IL-1 alpha, TNF-alpha, IL-6, GM-CSF and TGF-beta 1, especially those close to subchondral bone. However, IL-1 beta, interferon-gamma and lymphotoxin were not detected in either the normal synovium/cartilage junction or rheumatoid CPJ.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Combination of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and cartilage fragments contribute to enhanced repair of osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering using stem cells and biomaterials is considered a promising approach despite poor outcomes. We hypothesise that articular cartilage fragments provides native environmental cues to enhance stem cell differentiation. As such we evaluated the chondrogenic differentiation and repair of critical size defect in a human explant osteochondral model (OD) using bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and homogenised cartilage. BM-MSCs were established from the bone-marrow plugs of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and characterized. Osteochondral tissue was trimmed and a central drill defect (∼2mm) was made. Chondrogenic repair was evaluated by filling the OD defect area with either BM-MSCs (Group II), homogenized cartilage (Group III) or a combination of both BM-MSCs and homogenized cartilage (Group IV). OD with no added cell or tissue served as control (Group I). Samples were maintained in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 28 days. Microscopic images showed maximal OD closure in Group IV. Partial OD closure was observed in Group II and to a lesser extent in Group III. Haematoxylin-eosin staining revealed immature cartilaginous matrix in Group II and more mature matrix in Group IV. Sircol™ Assay showed increased collagen deposition in both Group II and Group IV. Immunostaining for both groups revealed positive staining for type II collagen. Combining BM-MSCs and homogenised cartilage demonstrated enhanced cartilage formation and defect filling in a human ex-vivo osteochondral model.

  2. Prospective evaluation of serum biomarker levels and cartilage repair by autologous chondrocyte transplantation and subchondral drilling in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Nganvongpanit, Korakot; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Chaochird, Patama; Klunklin, Kasisin; Warrit, Kanawee; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Luevitoonvechkij, Sirichai; Arpornchayanon, Olarn; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate serum chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) levels and the capability of cartilage repair of full-thickness cartilage defects after treatment with two different fundamental surgical techniques: autologous chondrocyte transplantation (AC) and subchondral drilling (SD). Methods A 4-mm-diameter full-thickness cartilage defect was created in each of 10 skeletally mature male outbred dogs. The dogs were randomly separated into two groups. Groups A and B were treated with AC and SD, respectively. An evaluation was made at the 24th week of the experiment. Serum was analyzed prospectively – preoperatively and at 6-week intervals – for CS and HA levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ELISA-based assays, respectively. Results The cartilage repair assessment score (median ± standard deviation) of group A (9.5 ± 2.5) was significantly higher than that of group B (2.5 ± 1.3) (P < 0.05). Group A also demonstrated a better quality of hyaline-like cartilage repair. Prospective analysis of serum WF6 and HA levels between the two groups did not show any significant difference. Serum WF6 levels at the 24th week of the experiment had a negative correlation (r = -0.69, P < 0.05) with the cartilage repair assessment score, whereas serum HA levels tended to correlate positively (r = 0.46, 0.1

    cartilage marker levels. AC treatment demonstrated a smoother surface, less fissure, better border integration, and a more reliable outcome of repairing cartilage. Moreover, a decreasing level of serum WF6, which correlated with good quality of the repairing tissue at the end of the follow-up period, was found predominantly in the AC group. Serum WF6 therefore should be further explored as a sensitive marker for the noninvasive therapeutic evaluation of cartilage repair procedures. PMID

  3. Modeling the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Basu, Reshmi; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2002-06-01

    Cartilage laser thermoforming, also known as laser reshaping, is a new surgical procedure that allows in-situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. During laser irradiation, cartilage becomes sufficiently subtle or deformable for stretching and shaping into new stable configurations. This study describes the experimental and theoretical characterization of the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation (Nd:YAG). The surface temperature history of cartilage specimens was monitored during heating and thermal relaxation; using laser exposure times ranging between 1 and 15 s and laser powers of 1 to 10 W. The experimental results were then used to validate a finite element model, which accounts for heat diffusion, light propagation in tissue, and heat loss due to water evaporation. The simultaneous solution of the energy and mass diffusion equations resulted in predictions of temperature distribution in cartilage that were in good agreement with experiments. The model simulations will provide insights to the relationship between the laser treatment parameters (exposure time, laser beam diameter, and power) and the onset of new molecular arrangements and cell thermal injury in the material, thus conceiving basic guidelines of laser thermoforming.

  4. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies used in the clinical repair of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Brian J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important issues facing cartilage tissue engineering is the inability to move technologies into the clinic. Despite the multitude of current research in the field, it is known that 90% of new drugs that advance past animal studies fail clinical trials. The objective of this review is to provide readers with an understanding of the scientific details of tissue engineered cartilage products that have demonstrated a certain level of efficacy in humans, so that newer technologies may be developed upon this foundation. Compared to existing treatments, such as microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation, a tissue engineered product can potentially provide more consistent clinical results in forming hyaline repair tissue and in filling the entirety of the defect. The various tissue engineering strategies (e.g., cell expansion, scaffold material, media formulations, biomimetic stimuli, etc.) used in forming these products, as collected from published literature, company websites, and relevant patents, are critically discussed. The authors note that many details about these products remain proprietary, not all information is made public, and that advancements to the products are continuously made. Nevertheless, by understanding the design and production processes of these emerging technologies, one can gain tremendous insight into how to best use them and also how to design the next generation of tissue engineered cartilage products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies used in the clinical repair of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brian J.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important issues facing cartilage tissue engineering is the inability to move technologies into the clinic. Despite the multitude of review articles on the paradigm of biomaterials, signals, and cells, it is reported that 90% of new drugs that advance past animal studies fail clinical trials (1). The intent of this review is to provide readers with an understanding of the scientific details of tissue engineered cartilage products that have demonstrated a certain level of efficacy in humans, so that newer technologies may be developed upon this foundation. Compared to existing treatments, such as microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation, a tissue engineered product can potentially provide more consistent clinical results in forming hyaline repair tissue and in filling the entirety of the defect. The various tissue engineering strategies (e.g., cell expansion, scaffold material, media formulations, biomimetic stimuli, etc.) used in forming these products, as collected from published literature, company websites, and relevant patents, are critically discussed. The authors note that many details about these products remain proprietary, not all information is made public, and that advancements to the products are continuously made. Nevertheless, by fully understanding the design and production processes of these emerging technologies, one can gain tremendous insight into how to best use them and also how to design the next generation of tissue engineered cartilage products. PMID:27177218

  6. Possible role of the Ec peptide of IGF-1Ec in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Armakolas, Nikolaos; Dimakakos, Andreas; Armakolas, Athanasios; Antonopoulos, Athanasios; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Ec peptide (PEc) of insulin-like growth factor 1 Ec (IGF-1Ec) induces human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) mobilization and activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) in various cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of PEc on the mobilization and differentiation of hMSCs, as well as the possibility of its implementation in combination with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) for cartilage repair. The effects of the exogenous administration of PEc and TGF-β1, alone and in combination, on hMSCs were assessed using a trypan blue assay, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, Alcian blue staining, wound healing assays and migration/invasion assays. It was determined that PEc is involved in the differentiation process of hMSCs towards hyaline cartilage. Treatment of hMSCs with either PEc, TGF-β1 or both, demonstrated comparable cartilage matrix deposition. Furthermore, treatment with PEc in combination with TGF-β1 was associated with a significant increase in hMSC mobilization when compared with treatment with TGF-β1 or PEc alone (P<0.05). Thus, PEc appears to facilitate in vitro hMSC mobilization and differentiation towards chondrocytes, enhancing the role of TGF-β1. PMID:27571686

  7. Repair of articular cartilage in rabbit osteochondral defects promoted by extracorporeal shock wave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C.-H.; Yen, Y.-S.; Chen, P.-L.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the stimulative effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on the articular cartilage regeneration in the rabbit osteochondral defect model for the first time. An osteochondral defect, 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth, was drilled in the patellar groove at the distal end of each femur in 24 mature New Zealand rabbits. The right patellar defects received 500 impulses of shock waves of (at 14 kV) at 1 week after surgery and were designated as the experimental samples; the left patellar defects served as control. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after ESWT, cartilage repair was evaluated macroscopically and histologically using a semiquantitative grading scale. The total scores of the macroscopic evaluation at 4, 8, and 12 weeks in the experimental group were superior to those in the control group (statistical significance level ). As to the total scores of the histologic evaluation, the experimental group showed a tendency toward a better recovery than the control group at 4 weeks (). At 8 and 12 weeks the differences between the experimental and control groups became mild and had no significance on statistical analysis. These findings suggested that regeneration of articular cartilage defects might be promoted by ESWT, especially at the early stage. The easy and safe ESWT is potentially viable for clinical application.

  8. Transplantation of free tibial periosteal grafts for the repair of articular cartilage defect: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravijot; Chauhan, Vijendra; Chauhan, Neena; Sharma, Sansar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Articular chondrocytes have got a long lifespan but rarely divides after maturity. Thus, an articular cartilage has a limited capacity for repair. Periosteal grafts have chondrogenic potential and have been used to repair defects in the articular cartilage. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the differentiation of free periosteal grafts in the patellofemoral joint where the cambium layer faces the subchondral bone and to investigate the applicability of periosteal grafts in the reconstruction of articular surfaces. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out over a period of 1 year on 25 adult, male Indian rabbits after obtaining permission from the institutional animal ethical committee. A full-thickness osteochondral defect was created by shaving off the whole articular cartilage of the patella of the left knee. The defect thus created was grafted with free periosteal graft. The patella of the right knee was taken as a control where no grafting was done after shaving off the articular cartilage. The first animal was used to study the normal histology of the patellar articular cartilage and periosteum obtained from the medial surface of tibial condyle. Rest 24 animals were subjected to patellectomy, 4 each at serial intervals of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 48 weeks and the patellar articular surfaces were examined macroscopically and histologically. Results: The grafts got adherent to the underlying patellar articular surface at the end of 4 weeks. Microscopically, graft incorporation could be appreciated at 4 weeks. Mesenchymal cells of the cambium layer were seen differentiating into chondrocytes by the end of 4 weeks in four grafts (100%) and they were arranged in a haphazard manner. Till the end of 8 weeks, the cellular arrangement was mostly wooly. At 16 weeks, one graft (25%) had wooly arrangement of chondrocytes and three grafts (75%) had columnar formation of cells. Same percentage was maintained at 32 weeks. Four grafts (100%) at

  9. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway promotes regenerative repair of cutaneous and cartilage injury

    PubMed Central

    Bastakoty, Dikshya; Saraswati, Sarika; Cates, Justin; Lee, Ethan; Nanney, Lillian B.; Young, Pampee P.

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing in mammals is a fibrotic process. The mechanisms driving fibrotic (as opposed to regenerative) repair are poorly understood. Herein we report that therapeutic Wnt inhibition with topical application of small-molecule Wnt inhibitors can reduce fibrosis and promote regenerative cutaneous wound repair. In the naturally stented model of ear punch injury, we found that Wnt/β-catenin pathway is activated most notably in the dermis of the wound bed early (d 2) after injury and subsides to baseline levels by d10. Topical application of either of 2 mechanistically distinct small-molecule Wnt pathway inhibitors (a tankyrase inhibitor, XAV-939, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved casein kinase activator, pyrvinium) in C57Bl/6J mice resulted in significantly increased rates of wound closure (72.3 ± 14.7% with XAV-939; and 52.1 ± 20.9% with pyrvinium) compared with contralateral controls (38.1 ± 23.0 and 40.4.±16.7%, respectively). Histologically, Wnt inhibition reduced fibrosis as measured by α-smooth muscle actin positive myofibroblasts and collagen type I α1 synthesis. Wnt inhibition also restored skin architecture including adnexal structures in ear wounds and dermal–epidermal junction with rete pegs in excisional wounds. Additionally, in ear punch injury Wnt inhibitor treatment enabled regeneration of auricular cartilage. Our study shows that pharmacologic Wnt inhibition holds therapeutic utility for regenerative repair of cutaneous wounds.—Bastakoty, D., Saraswati, S., Cates, J., Lee, E., Nanney, L. B., Young, P. P. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway promotes regenerative repair of cutaneous and cartilage injury. PMID:26268926

  10. [Phosphorylatable short peptide conjugated chitosan mediated gene therapy for repair of articular cartilage defect in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ronglan; Peng, Xiaoxiang; Chu, Hairong; Song, Wei

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of phosphorylatable short peptide ((P)SP) conjugated chitosan (CS) ((P)SP-CS)mediated insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) gene and human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) gene local transfection on the repair of articular cartilage defect. Co-expression plasmid pBudCE4.1-IL-1Ra + IGF-1, single gene expression plasmid pBudCE4.1-IL-1Ra and pBudCE4.1-IGF-1 were constructed and combined with (P)SP-CS to form (P)SP-CS/pDNA complexes. Thirty 3-month-old healthy male New Zealand white rabbits, weighing 2.0-2.5 kg, double legs were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 12). Lateral femoral condyle articular surface was only exposed in sham-operated group (group A); full-thickness cartilage defects were created in the articular surface of the lateral femoral condyle of the knee in 4 intervention groups: (P)SP-CS/pBudCE4.1 (group B), (P)SP-CS/pBudCE4.1-IL-1Ra (group C), (P)SP-CS/pBudCE4.1-IGF-1 (group D), and (P)SP-CS/pBudCE4.1-IL-1Ra + IGF-1 (group E). At 1 week after operation, intra-articular injection of (P)SP-CS/pDNA complexes was administrated 2 times a week for 7 weeks in each intervention group, the same volume normal saline in group A. The general condition of animal was observed after operation, and rabbits were sacrificed at 8 weeks. Knee joint synovial fluid was collected to measure the concentrations of the IL-1Ra and IGF-1 by ELISA; mRNA expressions of Aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and MMP inhibitor 1 (TIMP-1) were detected by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR; the chondrogenic phenotype of nascent cells in the damage zone was identified by alcian blue-periodic acid/schiff (AB-PAS) histochemistry and Aggrecan immunohistochemistry staining. Thirty experimental rabbits all survived to the end of experiment, without infection and death. Large amounts of exogenous proteins of IGF-1 and IL-1Ra were detected in the synovial fluid of 4 intervention groups. There were significant differences between groups D, E and

  11. The use of autologous adult, allogenic juvenile, and combined juvenile-adult cartilage fragments for the repair of chondral defects.

    PubMed

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Martin, James A; Marmotti, Antonio; Kurriger, Gail L; Lehman, Abigail D; Rossi, Roberto; Amendola, Annunziato

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the repair of chondral lesions treated with combined autologous adult/allogenic juvenile cartilage fragments, compared with isolated adult and isolated juvenile cartilage fragments. Fifty-eight adult (>16 week old) and five juvenile (<6 week old) New Zealand White female rabbits were used. A large osteochondral defect was created in the center of the femoral trochlea of adult rabbits. The rabbits were divided in four groups: Group 1 = untreated defects (controls); Group 2 = adult cartilage fragments; Group 3 = juvenile cartilage fragments; and Group 4 = adult + juvenile cartilage fragments. Killings were performed at 3 and 6 months. The defects were evaluated with ICRS macroscopic score, modified O'Driscoll score, and Collagen type II immunostaining. At 3 months, Group 4 performed better than Group 1, in terms of modified O'Driscoll score (p = 0.001) and Collagen type II immunostaining (p = 0.015). At 6 months, Group 4 showed higher modified O'Driscoll score (p = 0.003) and Collagen type II immunostaining score (p < 0.001) than Group 1. Histologically, also Group 3 performed better than Group 1 (p = 0.03), and Group 4 performed better than Group 2 (p = 0.004). Mixing adult and juvenile cartilage fragments improved cartilage repair in a rabbit model. In the clinical setting, a new "one-stage" procedure combining the two cartilage sources can be hypothesized, with the advantages of improved chondral repair and large defect coverage, because of the use of an off-the-shelf juvenile allograft. Further studies on larger animals and clinical trials are required to confirm these results.

  12. Ectopic bone formation during tissue-engineered cartilage repair using autologous chondrocytes and novel plasma-derived albumin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Robla Costales, David; Junquera, Luis; García Pérez, Eva; Gómez Llames, Sara; Álvarez-Viejo, María; Meana-Infiesta, Álvaro

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: first, to evaluate the production of cartilaginous tissue in vitro and in vivo using a novel plasma-derived scaffold, and second, to test the repair of experimental defects made on ears of New Zealand rabbits (NZr) using this approach. Scaffolds were seeded with chondrocytes and cultured in vitro for 3 months to check in vitro cartilage production. To evaluate in vivo cartilage production, a chondrocyte-seeded scaffold was transplanted subcutaneously to a nude mouse. To check in vivo repair, experimental defects made in the ears of five New Zealand rabbits (NZr) were filled with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds. In vitro culture produced mature chondrocytes with no extracellular matrix (ECM). Histological examination of redifferentiated in vitro cultures showed differentiated chondrocytes adhered to scaffold pores. Subcutaneous transplantation of these constructs to a nude mouse produced cartilage, confirmed by histological study. Experimental cartilage repair in five NZr showed cartilaginous tissue repairing the defects, mixed with calcified areas of bone formation. It is possible to produce cartilaginous tissue in vivo and to repair experimental auricular defects by means of chondrocyte cultures and the novel plasma-derived scaffold. Further studies are needed to determine the significance of bone formation in the samples. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 2-year postoperative evaluation of a patient with a symptomatic full-thickness patellar cartilage defect repaired with particulated juvenile cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Kevin F; Daner, William; Yao, Jian Q

    2010-06-01

    This case report describes the early results of a 36-year-old man who underwent repair of a symptomatic full-thickness patellar cartilage defect with transplanted particulated juvenile articular cartilage. At 2 years postoperatively, the patient has experienced substantial clinical improvement in both pain and function when evaluated with both International Knee Documentation Committee subjective evaluation and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score outcome measures. Two-year postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates fill of the defect with repair tissue and near complete resolution of preoperative subchondral bone edema. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this case report is the first to report clinical results of this new technique at 2 years postoperatively.

  14. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair: monitoring its success by magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sally; McCall, Iain W; Darby, Alan J; Menage, Janis; Evans, Helena; Harrison, Paul E; Richardson, James B

    2003-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is being used increasingly for the treatment of cartilage defects. In spite of this, there has been a paucity of objective, standardised assessment of the outcome and quality of repair tissue formed. We have investigated patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), some in conjunction with mosaicplasty, and developed objective, semiquantitative scoring schemes to monitor the repair tissue using MRI and histology. Results indicate repair tissue to be on average 2.5 mm thick. It was of varying morphology ranging from predominantly hyaline in 22% of biopsy specimens, mixed in 48%, through to predominantly fibrocartilage, in 30%, apparently improving with increasing time postgraft. Repair tissue was well integrated with the host tissue in all aspects viewed. MRI scans provide a useful assessment of properties of the whole graft area and adjacent tissue and is a noninvasive technique for long-term follow-up. It correlated with histology (P = 0.02) in patients treated with ACI alone. PMID:12716454

  15. Acrylamide Polymer Double-Network Hydrogels: Candidate Cartilage Repair Materials with Cartilage-Like Dynamic Stiffness and Attractive Surgery-Related Attachment Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Markus P; Daniels, Alma U; Ronken, Sarah; García, Helena Ardura; Friederich, Niklaus F; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian P; Wirz, Dieter

    2011-10-01

    In focal repair of joint cartilage and meniscus, initial stiffness and strength of repairs are generally much less than surrounding tissue. This increases early failure potential. Secure primary fixation of the repair material is also a problem. Acrylamide polymer double-network (DN) hydrogels are candidate-improved repair materials. DN gels have exceptional strength and toughness compared to ordinary gels. This stems from the double-network structure in which there is a high molar ratio of the second network to the first network, with the first network highly crosslinked and the second loosely crosslinked. Previous studies of acrylic PAMPS/PDMAAm and PAMPS/PAAm DN gels demonstrated physicochemical stability and tissue compatibility as well as the ability to foster cartilage formation. Mechanical properties related to surgical use were tested in 2 types of DN gels. Remarkably, these >90%-water DN gels exhibited dynamic impact stiffness (E*) values (~1.1 and ~1.5 MPa) approaching swine meniscus (~2.9 MPa). Dynamic impact energy-absorbing capability was much lower (median loss angles of ~2°) than swine meniscus (>10°), but it is intriguing that >90%-water materials can efficiently store energy. Also, fine 4/0 suture tear-out strength approached cartilage (~2.1 and ~7.1 N v. ~13.5 N). Initial strength of attachment of DN gels to cartilage with acrylic tissue adhesive was also high (~0.20 and ~0.15 N/mm(2)). DN gel strength and toughness properties stem from optimized entanglement of the 2 network components. DN gels thus have obvious structural parallels with cartilaginous tissues, and their surgical handling properties make them ideal candidates for clinical use.

  16. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing; Liu, Huanhuan; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2014-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing

    2014-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. PMID:25154784

  18. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model.

    PubMed

    Mak, J; Jablonski, C L; Leonard, C A; Dunn, J F; Raharjo, E; Matyas, J R; Biernaskie, J; Krawetz, R J

    2016-03-17

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ "super-healer" strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not.

  19. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model

    PubMed Central

    Mak, J.; Jablonski, C. L.; Leonard, C. A.; Dunn, J. F.; Raharjo, E.; Matyas, J. R.; Biernaskie, J.; Krawetz, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ “super-healer” strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not. PMID:26983696

  20. Functional tissue engineering in articular cartilage repair: is there a role for electromagnetic biophysical stimulation?

    PubMed

    Fini, Milena; Pagani, Stefania; Giavaresi, Gianluca; De Mattei, Monica; Ongaro, Alessia; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Massari, Leo; Cadossi, Matteo

    2013-08-01

    Hyaline cartilage lesions represent an important global health problem. Several approaches have been developed in the last decades to resolve this disability cause, including tissue engineering, but to date, there is not a definitive procedure that is able to promote a repair tissue with the same mechanical and functional characteristics of native cartilage, and to obtain its integration in the subchondral bone. The need of resolutive technologies to obtain a "more effective" tissue substitutes has led Butler to propose the "Functional Tissue Engineering" (FTE) paradigm, whose principles are outlined in a so-called FTE road map. It consists of a two-phase strategy: in vitro tissue engineering and clinically surgery evaluation. The first phase, based on construct development, should take into account not only the chondrocyte biology, as their sensitivity to biochemical and physical stimuli, the risk of dedifferentiation in culture, and the ability to produce extracellular matrix, but also the features of suitable scaffolds. The in vivo phase analyzes the inflammatory microenvironment where the construct will be placed, because the cytokines released by synoviocytes and chondrocytes could affect the construct integrity, and, in particular, cause matrix degradation. The use of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) represents an innovative therapeutic approach, because it is demonstrated that this physical stimulus increases the anabolic activity of chondrocytes and cartilage explants with consequent increase of matrix synthesis, but, at the same time, PEMFs limit the catabolic effects of inflammatory cytokines, reducing the construct degradation inside the surgical microenvironment. PEMFs mediate an up-regulation of A2A adenosine receptors and a potentiation of their anti-inflammatory effects.

  1. Scaffold-based repair for cartilage healing: a systematic review and technical note.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Roffi, Alice; Di Martino, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to address the treatment of chondral and osteochondral knee lesions through the use of scaffolds, by showing surgical options and results of this scaffold-based repair approach for the healing of the articular surface. All studies published in English addressing cartilage scaffold-based treatment were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (1) Levels I to IV evidence addressing the outlined areas of interest, (2) measures of functional or clinical outcome, (3) knee cartilage lesions, and (4) minimum of 2 years of follow-up. The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles per year from 1995 to February 2012. The number of selected articles was 51, with 40 focusing on 2-step procedures and 11 focusing on 1-step procedures. The evaluation of evidence level showed 3 randomized studies, 10 comparative studies, 33 case series, and 5 case reports. Regenerative scaffold-based procedures are emerging as a therapeutic option for the treatment of chondral lesions, but well-designed studies are lacking. Systematic long-term evaluation of these techniques and randomized studies are necessary to confirm the potential of this treatment approach, especially compared with the available traditional treatments. Different 1-step scaffold-based strategies are emerging to simplify the procedure and reduce costs. Level IV, systematic review of Level I to IV studies. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of bone morphogenetic proteins in mesenchymal stem cell stimulation of cartilage and bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Scarfì, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix-associated bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) govern a plethora of biological processes. The BMPs are members of the transforming growth factor-β protein superfamily, and they actively participate to kidney development, digit and limb formation, angiogenesis, tissue fibrosis and tumor development. Since their discovery, they have attracted attention for their fascinating perspectives in the regenerative medicine and tissue engineering fields. BMPs have been employed in many preclinical and clinical studies exploring their chondrogenic or osteoinductive potential in several animal model defects and in human diseases. During years of research in particular two BMPs, BMP2 and BMP7 have gained the podium for their use in the treatment of various cartilage and bone defects. In particular they have been recently approved for employment in non-union fractures as adjunct therapies. On the other hand, thanks to their potentialities in biomedical applications, there is a growing interest in studying the biology of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), the rules underneath their differentiation abilities, and to test their true abilities in tissue engineering. In fact, the specific differentiation of MSCs into targeted cell-type lineages for transplantation is a primary goal of the regenerative medicine. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge of BMP roles and signaling in MSC biology and differentiation capacities. In particular the article focuses on the potential clinical use of BMPs and MSCs concomitantly, in cartilage and bone tissue repair. PMID:26839636

  3. Preclinical Studies on Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Growth Plate Cartilage Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Rosa; Foster, Bruce K.; Xian, Cory J.

    2011-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been a strong interest in searching for biological treatments for regeneration of injured growth plate cartilage and prevention of its bony repair. Various means have been tried, including implantation of chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), together with exogenous growth factor and scaffolds, and gene therapy. However, with the lack of success with chondrocytes, more research has focussed on MSC-based treatments. In addition to circumvent limitations with MSC-based treatments (including cell harvest-associated morbidity, difficulties/time/cost involved in MSC isolation and ex vivo expansion, and potential disease transmission), mobilising endogenous MSCs to the growth plate injury site and enhancing in situ regeneration mechanisms would represent an alternative attractive approach. Further studies are required to investigate the potential particularly in large animal models or clinical setting of the ex vivo MSC approach and the feasibility of the endogenous MSC in situ approach in growth plate regeneration. PMID:21808649

  4. Mechanical properties and structure-function relationships in articular cartilage repaired using IGF-I gene-enhanced chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Darvin J; Ortved, Kyla F; Nixon, Alan J; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the benefits of IGF-I gene therapy in enhancing the histologic and biochemical content of cartilage repaired by chondrocyte transplantation. However, there is little to no data on the mechanical performance of IGF-I augmented cartilage grafts. This study evaluated the compressive properties of full-thickness chondral defects in the equine femur repaired with and without IGF-I gene therapy. Animals were randomly assigned to one of three study cohorts based on chondrocyte treatment provided in each defect: (i) IGF-I gene delivered by recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-5; (ii) AAV-5 delivering GFP as a reporter; (iii) naïve cells without virus. In each case, the opposite limb was implanted with a fibrin carrier without cells. Samples were prepared for confined compression testing to measure the aggregate modulus and hydraulic permeability. All treatment groups, regardless of cell content or transduction, had mechanical properties inferior to native cartilage. Overexpression of IGF-I increased modulus and lowered permeability relative to other treatments. Investigation of structure-property relationships revealed that Ha and k were linearly correlated with GAG content but logarithmically correlated with collagen content. This provides evidence that IGF-I gene therapy can improve healing of articular cartilage and can greatly increase the mechanical properties of repaired grafts.

  5. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants elicit hyaline cartilage repair integrated with porous subchondral bone in microdrilled rabbit defects.

    PubMed

    Hoemann, C D; Sun, J; McKee, M D; Chevrier, A; Rossomacha, E; Rivard, G-E; Hurtig, M; Buschmann, M D

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that microfractured ovine defects are repaired with more hyaline cartilage when the defect is treated with in situ-solidified implants of chitosan-glycerol phosphate (chitosan-GP) mixed with autologous whole blood. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize chitosan-GP/blood clots in vitro, and (2) to develop a rabbit marrow stimulation model in order to determine the effects of the chitosan-GP/blood implant and of debridement on the formation of incipient cartilage repair tissue. Blood clots were characterized by histology and in vitro clot retraction tests. Bilateral 3.5 x 4 mm trochlear defects debrided into the calcified layer were pierced with four microdrill holes and filled with a chitosan-GP/blood implant or allowed to bleed freely as a control. At 1 day post-surgery, initial defects were characterized by histomorphometry (n=3). After 8 weeks of repair, osteochondral repair tissues between or through the drill holes were evaluated by histology, histomorphometry, collagen type II expression, and stereology (n=16). Chitosan-GP solutions structurally stabilized the blood clots by inhibiting clot retraction. Treatment of drilled defects with chitosan-GP/blood clots led to the formation of a more integrated and hyaline repair tissue above a more porous and vascularized subchondral bone plate compared to drilling alone. Correlation analysis of repair tissue between the drill holes revealed that the absence of calcified cartilage and the presence of a porous subchondral bone plate were predictors of greater repair tissue integration with subchondral bone (P<0.005), and of a higher total O'Driscoll score (P<0.005 and P<0.01, respectively). Chitosan-GP/blood implants applied in conjunction with drilling, compared to drilling alone, elicited a more hyaline and integrated repair tissue associated with a porous subchondral bone replete with blood vessels. Concomitant regeneration of a vascularized bone plate during cartilage repair

  6. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    PubMed

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016.

  7. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants improve hyaline cartilage repair in ovine microfracture defects.

    PubMed

    Hoemann, Caroline D; Hurtig, Mark; Rossomacha, Evgeny; Sun, Jun; Chevrier, Anik; Shive, Matthew S; Buschmann, Michael D

    2005-12-01

    Microfracture is a surgical procedure that is used to treat focal articular cartilage defects. Although joint function improves following microfracture, the procedure elicits incomplete repair. As blood clot formation in the microfracture defect is an essential initiating event in microfracture therapy, we hypothesized that the repair would be improved if the microfracture defect were filled with a blood clot that was stabilized by the incorporation of a thrombogenic and adhesive polymer, specifically, chitosan. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate (1) blood clot adhesion in fresh microfracture defects and (2) the quality of the repair, at six months postoperatively, of microfracture defects that had been treated with or without chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood clot implants, using a sheep model. In eighteen sheep, two 1-cm2 full-thickness chondral defects were created in the distal part of the femur and treated with microfracture; one defect was made in the medial femoral condyle, and the other defect was made in the trochlea. In four sheep, microfracture defects were created bilaterally; the microfracture defects in one knee received no further treatment, and the microfracture defects in the contralateral knee were filled with chitosan-glycerol phosphate/autologous whole blood and the implants were allowed to solidify. Fresh defects in these four sheep were collected at one hour postoperatively to compare the retention of the chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood clot with that of the normal clot and to define the histologic characteristics of these fresh defects. In the other fourteen sheep, microfracture defects were made in only one knee and either were left untreated (control group; six sheep) or were treated with chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implant (treatment group; eight sheep), and the quality of repair was assessed histologically, histomorphometrically, and biochemically at six months postoperatively. In the defects that were examined

  8. Tomorrow's skeleton staff: mesenchymal stem cells and the repair of bone and cartilage.

    PubMed

    Otto, W R; Rao, J

    2004-02-01

    Stem cells are regenerating medicine. Advances in stem cell biology, and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in particular, are demonstrating that many clinical options once thought to be science fiction may be attainable as fact. The extra- and intra-cellular signalling used by stem cells as they differentiate into lineages appropriate to their destination are becoming understood. Thus, the growth stimuli afforded by LIF, FGF-2 and HGF, as well as the complementary roles of Wnt and Dickkopf-1 in stem cell proliferation are evident. The ability to direct multi-lineage mesenchymal stem sell (MSC) potential towards an osteogenic phenotype by stimulation with Menin and Shh are important, as are the modulatory roles of Notch-1 and PPARgamma. Control of chondrocytic differentiation is effected by interplay of Brachyury, BMP-4 and TGFbeta3. Smads 1, 4 and 5 also play a role in these phenotypic expressions. The ability to culture MSC has led to their use in tissue repair, both as precursor and differentiated cell substitutes, and with successful animal models of bone and cartilage repair using MSC, their clinical use is accelerating. However, MSC also suppress some T-cell functions in transplanted hosts, and could facilitate tumour growth, so a cautious approach is needed.

  9. Computational analysis of cartilage implants based on an interpenetrated polymer network for tissue repairing.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Sara; Poveda-Reyes, Sara; Ferrer, Gloria Gallego; Ochoa, Ignacio; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2014-10-01

    Interpenetrated polymer networks (IPNs), composed by two independent polymeric networks that spatially interpenetrate, are considered as valuable systems to control permeability and mechanical properties of hydrogels for biomedical applications. Specifically, poly(ethyl acrylate) (PEA)-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) IPNs have been explored as good hydrogels for mimicking articular cartilage. These lattices are proposed as matrix implants in cartilage damaged areas to avoid the discontinuity in flow uptake preventing its deterioration. The permeability of these implants is a key parameter that influences their success, by affecting oxygen and nutrient transport and removing cellular waste products to healthy cartilage. Experimental try-and-error approaches are mostly used to optimize the composition of such structures. However, computational simulation may offer a more exhaustive tool to test and screen out biomaterials mimicking cartilage, avoiding expensive and time-consuming experimental tests. An accurate and efficient prediction of material's permeability and internal directionality and magnitude of the fluid flow could be highly useful when optimizing biomaterials design processes. Here we present a 3D computational model based on Sussman-Bathe hyperelastic material behaviour. A fluid structure analysis is performed with ADINA software, considering these materials as two phases composites where the solid part is saturated by the fluid. The model is able to simulate the behaviour of three non-biodegradable hydrogel compositions, where percentages of PEA and PHEA are varied. Specifically, the aim of this study is (i) to verify the validity of the Sussman-Bathe material model to simulate the response of the PEA-PHEA biomaterials; (ii) to predict the fluid flux and the permeability of the proposed IPN hydrogels and (iii) to study the material domains where the passage of nutrients and cellular waste products is reduced leading to an inadequate flux

  10. PGA-associated heterotopic chondrocyte cocultures: implications of nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, K; Marzahn, U; John, T; Hoyer, M; Zreiqat, H; Witthuhn, A; Kohl, B; Haisch, A; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2013-01-01

    The availability of autologous articular chondrocytes remains a limiting issue in matrix assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Non-articular heterotopic chondrocytes could be an alternative autologous cell source. The aims of this study were to establish heterotopic chondrocyte cocultures to analyze cell-cell compatibilities and to characterize the chondrogenic potential of nasoseptal chondrocytes compared to articular chondrocytes. Primary porcine and human nasoseptal and articular chondrocytes were investigated for extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM) expression in a monolayer culture. 3D polyglycolic acid- (PGA) associated porcine heterotopic mono- and cocultures were assessed for cell vitality, types II, I, and total collagen-, and proteoglycan content. The type II collagen, lubricin, and Sox9 gene expressions were significantly higher in articular compared with nasoseptal monolayer chondrocytes, while type IX collagen expression was lower in articular chondrocytes. Only β1-integrin gene expression was significantly inferior in humans but not in porcine nasoseptal compared with articular chondrocytes, indicating species-dependent differences. Heterotopic chondrocytes in PGA cultures revealed high vitality with proteoglycan-rich hyaline-like ECM production. Similar amounts of type II collagen deposition and type II/I collagen ratios were found in heterotopic chondrocytes cultured on PGA compared to articular chondrocytes. Quantitative analyses revealed a time-dependent increase in total collagen and proteoglycan content, whereby the differences between heterotopic and articular chondrocyte cultures were not significant. Nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes monocultured in PGA or cocultured with articular chondrocytes revealed a comparable high chondrogenic potential in a tissue engineering setting, which created the opportunity to test them in vivo for articular cartilage repair. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Return to Sport After Articular Cartilage Repair in Athletes' Knees: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew B; Pineda, Miguel; Harris, Joshua D; Flanigan, David C

    2016-04-01

    To perform a systematic review of cartilage repair in athletes' knees to (1) determine which (if any) of the most commonly implemented surgical techniques help athletes return to competition, (2) identify which patient- or defect-specific characteristics significantly affect return to sport, and (3) evaluate the methodologic quality of available literature. A systematic review of multiple databases was performed. Return to preinjury level of sport was defined as the ability to play in the same or greater level (i.e., league or division) of competition after surgery. Study methodologic quality for all studies analyzed in this review was evaluated with the Coleman Methodology Score. Systematic review of 1,278 abstracts identified 20 level I-IV studies for inclusion but only 1 randomized controlled trial. Twenty studies (1,117 subjects) were included. Subjects (n = 970) underwent 1 of 4 surgeries (microfracture [n = 529], autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI, n = 259], osteochondral autograft [n = 139], or osteochondral allograft [n = 43]), and 147 were control patients. The rate of return to sports was greatest after osteochondral autograft transplantation (89%) followed by osteochondral allograft, ACI, and microfracture (88%, 84%, and 75%, respectively). Osteochondral autograft transplantation and ACI had statistically significantly greater rates of return to sports compared with microfracture (P < .001, P < .01; Fisher exact test). Athletes may return to sports participation after microfracture, ACI, osteochondral autograft, or osteochondral allograft, but microfracture patients were least likely to return to sports. The athletes who had a better prognosis after surgery were younger, had a shorter preoperative duration of symptoms, underwent no previous surgical interventions, participated in a more rigorous rehabilitation protocol, and had smaller cartilage defects. Level IV, systematic review of Level I-IV studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of

  12. Is autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) an adequate treatment option for repair of cartilage defects in paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2013-08-01

    Cartilage lesions in the knee of juvenile patients require an effective repair to regain life-long functional activity of the joint. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is discussed to be advantageous over other methods for cartilage repair regarding long-term outcome. ACI has successfully been applied in juvenile patients, although currently recommended for patients ≥18 years of age. Only few controlled clinical trials present evidence of efficacy and safety of ACI in adolescent patients. ACI products have to undergo the process of a marketing authorisation application, including the submission of a paediatric investigation plan (PIP). Data from prospective clinical studies or retrospective collection of long-term data in paediatric patients should be submitted for risk-benefit evaluation by the Paediatric Committee (PDCO).

  13. Cartilage defect repair in horses: Current strategies and recent developments in regenerative medicine of the equine joint with emphasis on the surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Cokelaere, Stefan; Malda, Jos; van Weeren, René

    2016-08-01

    Chondral and osteochondral lesions due to injury or other pathology are highly prevalent conditions in horses (and humans) and commonly result in the development of osteoarthritis and progression of joint deterioration. Regenerative medicine of articular cartilage is an emerging clinical treatment option for patients with articular cartilage injury or disease. Functional articular cartilage restoration, however, remains a major challenge, but the field is progressing rapidly and there is an increasing body of supportive clinical and scientific evidence. This review gives an overview of the established and emerging surgical techniques employed for cartilage repair in horses. Through a growing insight in surgical cartilage repair possibilities, surgeons might be more stimulated to explore novel techniques in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Advances in autologous chondrocyte implantation and related techniques for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    2013-04-01

    Articular cartilage is a specialized tissue exhibiting low intrinsic capabilities of regeneration or healing after injury. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and scaffold-supported ACI are often used for treatment of larger chondral defects (> 2 cm2). These utilize open surgery re-implantation of ex vivo cultured autologous chondrocytes harvested as a biopsy arthroscopically in a prior surgery. This two-step procedure is an advanced and expensive treatment that despite high expectations have failed to regenerate articular cartilage in a consistent and predictable fashion, and as many as 25% the operated of patients have dissatisfactory outcomes. The objective of the present thesis was to address and investigate methods for optimizing the steps involved in the ACI and scaffold-supported ACI treatment including chondrocyte culture environment, chondrocyte labeling and tracking, improved biomaterials, and cell seeding densities. We hypothesized that these areas were eligible for targeted optimization, which has been addressed in the five papers constituting the work performed in the present thesis. The first two studies address the in vitro cell expansion of chondrocytes before re-implantation. After validation of hypoxia-suitable housekeeping genes for quantitative gene expression analysis using previously validated algorithms (study 1) the effect of combined hypoxic- and 3D culture on human chondrocytes gene expression was investigated (study 2). An in vitro experiment was performed to determine the effect on gene expression of an intracellular superparamagnetic labeling agent for 1.5T MRI-tracking of alginate-embedded human chondrocytes (study 3). We further performed a literature study, reviewing the cell seeding densities of the implanted chondrocytes used in clinically available cell transplantation-based treatments for cartilage repair (study 4). Finally, we tested the addition of dermatan sulfate to a clinically approved methoxy-polyethen-glycol (MPEG

  15. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  16. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  17. Use of the second harmonic generation microscopy to evaluate chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeaux-Rego, P.; Baratti, M. O.; Duarte, A. S. S.; Ribeiro, T. B.; Andreoli-Risso, M. F.; Vidal, B.; Miranda, J. B.; Adur, J.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Pelegati, V. B.; Costa, F. F.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.; Luzo, A.; Olalla Saad, S. T.

    2012-03-01

    Articular cartilage injury remains one of the major concerns in orthopedic surgery. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has been introduced to avoid some of the side effects and complications of current techniques.. With the aim to evaluate chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, we used Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy to analyze the aggregation and orientation of collagen fibrils in the hyaline cartilage of rabbit knees. The experiment was performed using implants with type II collagen hydrogel (a biomaterial that mimics the microenvironment of the cartilage), one implant containing MSC and one other without MSC (control). After 10 weeks, the rabbit knees were dissected and fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization in the extracellular matrix of the lesions were verified by SHG. The result showed significant differences, whereas in histological sections of the cartilaginous lesions with MSC the collagen fibers are organized and regular; in the control sections the collagen fibers are more irregular, with absence of cells. A macroscopic analysis of the lesions confirmed this difference, showing a greater percentage of lesions filling in knees treated with MSC than in the knees used as controls. This study demonstrates that SHG microscopy will be an excellent tool to help in the evaluation of the effectiveness of MSC-based cell therapy for cartilage repair.

  18. Comparison of ultrasound and optical coherence tomography techniques for evaluation of integrity of spontaneously repaired horse cartilage.

    PubMed

    Virén, T; Huang, Y P; Saarakkala, S; Pulkkinen, H; Tiitu, V; Linjama, A; Kiviranta, I; Lammi, M J; Brünott, A; Brommer, H; Van Weeren, R; Brama, P A J; Zheng, Y P; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare sensitivity of ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques for the evaluation of the integrity of spontaneously repaired horse cartilage. Articular surfaces of horse intercarpal joints, featuring both intact tissue and spontaneously healed chondral or osteochondral defects, were imaged ex vivo with arthroscopic ultrasound and laboratory OCT devices. Quantitative ultrasound (integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), apparent integrated backscattering coefficient (AIB) and ultrasound roughness index (URI)) and optical parameters (optical reflection coefficient (ORC), optical roughness index (ORI) and optical backscattering (OBS)) were determined and compared with histological integrity and mechanical properties of the tissue. Spontaneously healed tissue could be quantitatively discerned from the intact tissue with ultrasound and OCT techniques. Furthermore, several significant correlations (p < 0.05) were detected between ultrasound and OCT parameters. Superior resolution of OCT provided a more accurate measurement of cartilage surface roughness, while the ultrasound backscattering from the inner structures of the cartilage matched better with the histological findings. Since the techniques were found to be complementary to each other, dual modality imaging techniques could provide a useful tool for the arthroscopic evaluation of the integrity of articular cartilage.

  19. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints: correlations with histological findings.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hongyue; Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Zhongqing; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate repair tissue (RT) after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models using quantitative MRI and investigate the correlations between MRI and histological findings. The animal experiment was approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of our college. Thirty-six full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints were assigned to the microfracture or joint debridement group (as control). Each group consisted of 3-week, 5-week, and 7-week subgroups. MR imaging, including a three-dimensional double-echo steady-state sequence (3D-DESS), and T2 mapping were performed at 3, 5, and 7 weeks postoperatively. The thickness and T2 indices of RT were calculated. After MRI scans at each time point, operation sites were removed to make hematoxylin-eosin (H&E)-stained sections. Histological results were evaluated using the modified O'Driscoll score system. Comparisons were made between the two groups with respect to the MRI and histological findings, and correlation analysis was performed within each group. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of RT in the two groups increased over time, while the T2 index decreased. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of the microfracture group were higher than in the joint debridement group at each time point. The T2 index of the microfracture group was lower than in the joint debridement group at 3 weeks (P = 0.006), while it was higher than in the joint debridement group at 5 and 7 weeks (P = 0.025 and 0.025). The thickness index was positively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: r s = 0.745, P < 0.001; joint debridement: r s = 0.680, P = 0.002). The T2 index was negatively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: r s = -0.715, P = 0.002; joint debridement: r s = -0.826, P < 0.001). Significant improvement over time after microfracture can

  20. Biologic enhancement of cartilage repair: the role of platelet-rich plasma and other commercially available growth factors.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramon; Cuscó, Xavier; Seijas, Roberto; Álvarez, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ares, Oscar; Wang-Saegusa, Ana; García-Balletbó, Montserrat

    2015-04-01

    In part, people's quality of life depends on the "health" of their cartilage because its damage or deterioration causes pain that limits mobility and reduces autonomy. Predisposing genetic factors and modern-life environmental factors, such as diet, excessive physical exercise, or the absence of any physical exercise, in addition to injuries that can occur, all contribute to the onset and development of chronic degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis. Regenerative medicine focuses on the repair, replacement, or regeneration of cells, tissues, or organs to restore impaired function from any cause, including congenital defects, disease, and trauma.

  1. Establishing proof of concept: Platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow aspirate concentrate may improve cartilage repair following surgical treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Niall A; Murawski, Christopher D; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Savage-Elliott, Ian; Kennedy, John G

    2012-07-18

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries in the athletic patient. They present a challenging clinical problem as cartilage has a poor potential for healing. Current surgical treatments consist of reparative (microfracture) or replacement (autologous osteochondral graft) strategies and demonstrate good clinical outcomes at the short and medium term follow-up. Radiological findings and second-look arthroscopy however, indicate possible poor cartilage repair with evidence of fibrous infill and fissuring of the regenerative tissue following microfracture. Longer-term follow-up echoes these findings as it demonstrates a decline in clinical outcome. The nature of the cartilage repair that occurs for an osteochondral graft to become integrated with the native surround tissue is also of concern. Studies have shown evidence of poor cartilage integration, with chondrocyte death at the periphery of the graft, possibly causing cyst formation due to synovial fluid ingress. Biological adjuncts, in the form of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), have been investigated with regard to their potential in improving cartilage repair in both in vitro and in vitro settings. The in vitro literature indicates that these biological adjuncts may increase chondrocyte proliferation as well as synthetic capability, while limiting the catabolic effects of an inflammatory joint environment. These findings have been extrapolated to in vitro animal models, with results showing that both PRP and BMAC improve cartilage repair. The basic science literature therefore establishes the proof of concept that biological adjuncts may improve cartilage repair when used in conjunction with reparative and replacement treatment strategies for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

  2. The effect of systemic administration of G-CSF on a full-thickness cartilage defect in a rabbit model MSC proliferation as presumed mechanism: G-CSF for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Akagi, R; Akatsu, Y; Fukawa, T; Hoshi, H; Yamamoto, Y; Enomoto, T; Sato, Y; Nakagawa, R; Takahashi, K; Yamaguchi, S; Sasho, T

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation in vitro and to determine whether pre-microfracture systemic administration of G-CSF (a bone marrow stimulant) could improve the quality of repaired tissue of a full-thickness cartilage defect in a rabbit model. MSCs from rabbits were cultured in a control medium and medium with G-CSF (low-dose: 4 μg, high-dose: 40 μg). At one, three, and five days after culturing, cells were counted. Differential potential of cultured cells were examined by stimulating them with a osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic medium.A total of 30 rabbits were divided into three groups. The low-dose group (n = 10) received 10 μg/kg of G-CSF daily, the high-dose group (n = 10) received 50 μg/kg daily by subcutaneous injection for three days prior to creating cartilage defects. The control group (n = 10) was administered saline for three days. At 48 hours after the first injection, a 5.2 mm diameter cylindrical osteochondral defect was created in the femoral trochlea. At four and 12 weeks post-operatively, repaired tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. The cell count in the low-dose G-CSF medium was significantly higher than that in the control medium. The differentiation potential of MSCs was preserved after culturing them with G-CSF.Macroscopically, defects were filled and surfaces were smoother in the G-CSF groups than in the control group at four weeks. At 12 weeks, the quality of repaired cartilage improved further, and defects were almost completely filled in all groups. Microscopically, at four weeks, defects were partially filled with hyaline-like cartilage in the G-CSF groups. At 12 weeks, defects were repaired with hyaline-like cartilage in all groups. G-CSF promoted proliferation of MSCs in vitro. The systemic administration of G-CSF promoted the repair of damaged cartilage possibly through increasing the number

  3. The Effect of Exercise on the Early Stages of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Induced Cartilage Repair in a Rat Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shoki; Aoyama, Tomoki; Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Iijima, Hirotaka; Tajino, Junichi; Zhang, Xiangkai; Kiyan, Wataru; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage is challenging owing to the restriction in the ability of articular cartilage to repair itself. Therefore, cell supplementation therapy is possible cartilage repair method. However, few studies have verified the efficacy and safety of cell supplementation therapy. The current study assessed the effect of exercise on early the phase of cartilage repair following cell supplementation utilizing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) intra-articular injection. An osteochondral defect was created on the femoral grooves bilaterally of Wistar rats. Mesenchymal stromal cells that were obtained from male Wistar rats were cultured in monolayer. After 4 weeks, MSCs were injected into the right knee joint and the rats were randomized into an exercise or no-exercise intervention group. The femurs were divided as follows: C group (no exercise without MSC injection); E group (exercise without MSC injection); M group (no exercise with MSC injection); and ME group (exercise with MSC injection). At 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the injection, the femurs were sectioned and histologically graded using the Wakitani cartilage repair scoring system. At 2 weeks after the injection, the total histological scores of the M and ME groups improved significantly compared with those of the C group. Four weeks after the injection, the scores of both the M and ME groups improved significantly. Additionally, the scores in the ME group showed a significant improvement compared to those in the M group. The improvement in the scores of the E, M, and ME groups at 8 weeks were not significantly different. The findings indicate that exercise may enhance cartilage repair after an MSC intra-articular injection. This study highlights the importance of exercise following cell transplantation therapy. PMID:26968036

  4. How Can Nanotechnology Help to Repair the Body? Advances in Cardiac, Skin, Bone, Cartilage and Nerve Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Perán, Macarena; García, María Angel; Lopez-Ruiz, Elena; Jiménez, Gema; Marchal, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnologists have become involved in regenerative medicine via creation of biomaterials and nanostructures with potential clinical implications. Their aim is to develop systems that can mimic, reinforce or even create in vivo tissue repair strategies. In fact, in the last decade, important advances in the field of tissue engineering, cell therapy and cell delivery have already been achieved. In this review, we will delve into the latest research advances and discuss whether cell and/or tissue repair devices are a possibility. Focusing on the application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering research, this review highlights recent advances in the application of nano-engineered scaffolds designed to replace or restore the followed tissues: (i) skin; (ii) cartilage; (iii) bone; (iv) nerve; and (v) cardiac. PMID:28809213

  5. Sodium Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ankle Joint in Cadaver Specimens, Volunteers, and Patients After Different Cartilage Repair Techniques at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Zbýň, Štefan; Brix, Martin O.; Juras, Vladimir; Domayer, Stephan E.; Walzer, Sonja M.; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Apprich, Sebastian; Buckenmaier, Kai; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of cartilage repair techniques such as microfracture (MFX) or matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) is to produce repair tissue (RT) with sufficient glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a direct and noninvasive evaluation of the GAG content in native cartilage and RT. In the femoral cartilage, this method was able to distinguish between RTs produced by MFX and MACT having different GAG contents. However, it needs to be clarified whether sodium MRI can be useful for evaluating RT in thin ankle cartilage. Thus, the aims of this 7-T study were (1) to validate our sodium MRI protocol in cadaver ankle samples, (2) to evaluate the sodium corrected signal intensities (cSI) in cartilage of volunteers, (3) and to compare sodium values in RT between patients after MFX and MACT treatment. Materials and Methods Five human cadaver ankle samples as well as ankles of 9 asymptomatic volunteers, 6 MFX patients and 6 MACT patients were measured in this 7-T study. Sodium values from the ankle samples were compared with histochemically evaluated GAG content. In the volunteers, sodium cSI values were calculated in the cartilages of ankle and subtalar joint. In the patients, sodium cSI in RT and reference cartilage were measured, morphological appearance of RT was evaluated using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system, and clinical outcome before and after surgery was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score and Modified Cincinnati Knee Scale. All regions of interest were defined on morphological images and subsequently transferred to the corresponding sodium images. Analysis of variance, t tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. Results In the patients, significantly lower sodium cSI values were found in RT than in reference cartilage for the MFX (P = 0.007) and MACT patients (P = 0.008). Sodium cSI and

  6. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging of ankle joint in cadaver specimens, volunteers, and patients after different cartilage repair techniques at 7 T: initial results.

    PubMed

    Zbýň, Štefan; Brix, Martin O; Juras, Vladimir; Domayer, Stephan E; Walzer, Sonja M; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Apprich, Sebastian; Buckenmaier, Kai; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    The goal of cartilage repair techniques such as microfracture (MFX) or matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) is to produce repair tissue (RT) with sufficient glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a direct and noninvasive evaluation of the GAG content in native cartilage and RT. In the femoral cartilage, this method was able to distinguish between RTs produced by MFX and MACT having different GAG contents. However, it needs to be clarified whether sodium MRI can be useful for evaluating RT in thin ankle cartilage. Thus, the aims of this 7-T study were (1) to validate our sodium MRI protocol in cadaver ankle samples, (2) to evaluate the sodium corrected signal intensities (cSI) in cartilage of volunteers, (3) and to compare sodium values in RT between patients after MFX and MACT treatment. Five human cadaver ankle samples as well as ankles of 9 asymptomatic volunteers, 6 MFX patients and 6 MACT patients were measured in this 7-T study. Sodium values from the ankle samples were compared with histochemically evaluated GAG content. In the volunteers, sodium cSI values were calculated in the cartilages of ankle and subtalar joint. In the patients, sodium cSI in RT and reference cartilage were measured, morphological appearance of RT was evaluated using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system, and clinical outcome before and after surgery was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score and Modified Cincinnati Knee Scale. All regions of interest were defined on morphological images and subsequently transferred to the corresponding sodium images. Analysis of variance, t tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. In the patients, significantly lower sodium cSI values were found in RT than in reference cartilage for the MFX (P = 0.007) and MACT patients (P = 0.008). Sodium cSI and MOCART scores in RT did not differ between

  7. Do Cartilage Repair Procedures Prevent Degenerative Meniscus Changes? Longitudinal T1ρ and Morphological Evaluation at 3.0T

    PubMed Central

    Jungmann, Pia M.; Li, Xiaojuan; Nardo, Lorenzo; Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Lin, Wilson; Ma, C. Benjamin; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cartilage repair (CR) procedures are widely accepted for treatment of isolated cartilage defects at the knee joint. However, it is not well known whether these procedures prevent degenerative joint disease. Hypothesis/Purpose CR procedures prevent accelerated qualitative and quantitative progression of meniscus degeneration in individuals with focal cartilage defects. Study Design Cohort Study; Level of evidence 2b Methods A total of 94 subjects were studied. CR procedures were performed on 34 patients (n=16 osteochondral transplantation, n=18 microfracture); 34 controls were matched. An additional 13 patients received CR and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (CR&ACL) and 13 patients received only ACL reconstruction. 3.0T MRI with T1ρ mapping and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) sequences was performed to analyze menisci quantitatively and qualitatively (Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score, WORMS). CR and CR&ACL patients were examined 4 months (n=34; n=13), 1 (n=21; n=8) and 2 (n=9; n=5) years post CR. Control subjects were scanned at baseline and after 1 and 2 years, ACL patients after 1 and 2 years. Results At baseline, global meniscus T1ρ values were higher in individuals with CR (14.2±0.6ms; P=0.004) and in individuals with CR&ACL (17.1±0.9ms; P<0.001) when compared to controls (12.8±0.6ms). After two years, there was a statistical difference between T1ρ at the overlying meniscus above cartilage defects (16.4±1.0ms) and T1ρ of the subgroup of control knees without cartilage defects (12.1±0.8ms; P<0.001) and a statistical trend to the CR group (13.3±1.0 ms; P=0.088). At baseline, 35% of subjects with CR showed morphological meniscus tears at the overlying meniscus; 10% of CR subjects showed an increase of WORMS meniscus score within the first year, none progressed in the second year. Control subjects with (without) cartilage defects showed meniscus tears in 30% (5%) at baseline; 38% (19

  8. Transplantation of Scaffold-Free Cartilage-Like Cell-Sheets Made from Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair: A Preclinical Study.

    PubMed

    Itokazu, Maki; Wakitani, Shigeyuki; Mera, Hisashi; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Sato, Yasushi; Takagi, Mutsumi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The object of this study was to determine culture conditions that create stable scaffold-free cartilage-like cell-sheets from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) and to assess their effects after transplantation into osteochondral defects in nude rats. (Experiment 1) The hBMSCs were harvested from 3 males, the proliferative and chondrogenic capacities were assessed at passage 1, and the cells were expanded in 3 different culture conditions: (1) 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS), (2) 10% FBS, and (3) 5% FBS with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). The cells were harvested and made chondrogenic pellet culture. The cell proliferation rate, glycosaminoglycan/DNA ratio, and safranin-O staining intensity of pellets cultured condition 3 were higher than those of conditions 1 and 2. (Experiment 2) The hBMSCs were expanded and passaged 3 times under culture condition 3, and fabricate the cell-sheets in chondrogenic medium either with or without FBS. The cell-sheets fabricated with FBS maintained their size with flat edges. (Experiment 3) The cell-sheets were transplanted into osteochondral defects in nude rats. Histological analysis was performed at 2, 4, and 12 weeks after surgery. The osteochondral repair was better after sheet transplantation than in the control group and significantly improved Wakitani score. Immunostaining with human-specific vimentin antibody showed that the transplanted cells became fewer and disappeared at 12 weeks. These results indicate that culture with FGF-2 may help to quickly generate sufficient numbers of cells to create stable and reliable scaffold-free cartilage-like cell-sheets, which contribute to the regeneration of osteochondral defects.

  9. Three dimensional patient-specific collagen architecture modulates cartilage responses in the knee joint during gait.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Mononen, Mika E; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific variation of collagen fibril orientations can affect cartilage stresses in knee joints. However, this has not been confirmed by 3-D analyses. Therefore, we present a novel method for evaluation of the effect of patient-specific collagen architecture on time-dependent mechanical responses of knee joint cartilage during gait. 3-D finite element (FE) models of a human knee joint were created with the collagen architectures obtained from T2 mapped MRI (patient-specific model) and from literature (literature model). The effect of accuracy of the implementation of collagen fibril architecture into the model was examined by using a submodel with denser FE mesh. Compared to the literature model, fibril strains and maximum principal stresses were reduced especially in the superficial/middle regions of medial tibial cartilage in the patient-specific model after the loading response of gait (up to -413 and -26%, respectively). Compared to the more coarsely meshed joint model, the patient-specific submodel demonstrated similar strain and stress distributions but increased values particularly in the superficial cartilage regions (especially stresses increased >60%). The results demonstrate that implementation of subject-specific collagen architecture of cartilage in 3-D modulates location- and time-dependent mechanical responses of human knee joint cartilage. Submodeling with more accurate implementation of collagen fibril architecture alters cartilage stresses particularly in the superficial/middle tissue.

  10. Auricular cartilage repair using cryogel scaffolds loaded with BMP-7-expressing primary chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Odabas, S; Feichtinger, G A; Korkusuz, P; Inci, I; Bilgic, E; Yar, A S; Cavusoglu, T; Menevse, S; Vargel, I; Piskin, E

    2013-10-01

    The loss of cartilage tissue due to trauma, tumour surgery or congenital defects, such as microtia and anotia, is one of the major concerns in head and neck surgery. Recently tissue-engineering approaches, including gene delivery, have been proposed for the regeneration of cartilage tissue. In this study, primary chondrocytes were genetically modified with plasmid-encoding bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) via the commercially available non-viral Turbofect vector, with the aim of bringing ex vivo transfected chondrocytes to resynthesize BMP-7 in vitro as they would in vivo. Genetically modified cells were implanted into gelatin-oxidized dextran scaffolds and cartilage tissue formation was investigated in 15 × 15 mm auricular cartilage defects in vivo in 48 New Zealand (NZ) white rabbits for 4 months. The results were evaluated via histology and early gene expression. Early gene expression results indicated a strong effect of exogenous BMP-7 on matrix synthesis and chondrocyte growth. In addition, histological analysis results exhibited significantly better cartilage healing with BMP-7-modified (transfected) cells than in the non-modified (non-transfected) group and as well as the control.

  11. Osteochondral allograft transplantation in cartilage repair: Graft storage paradigm, translational models, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, William D; Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Görtz, Simon; Amiel, David; Sah, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of articular cartilage injury and disease has become an increasingly relevant part of orthopaedic care. Articular cartilage transplantation, in the form of osteochondral allografting, is one of the most established techniques for restoration of articular cartilage. Our research efforts over the last two decades have supported the transformation of this procedure from experimental "niche" status to a cornerstone of orthopaedic practice. In this Kappa Delta paper, we describe our translational and clinical science contributions to this transformation: (1) to enhance the ability of tissue banks to process and deliver viable tissue to surgeons and patients, (2) to improve the biological understanding of in vivo cartilage and bone remodeling following osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation in an animal model system, (3) to define effective surgical techniques and pitfalls, and (4) to identify and clarify clinical indications and outcomes. The combination of coordinated basic and clinical studies is part of our continuing comprehensive academic OCA transplant program. Taken together, the results have led to the current standards for OCA processing and storage prior to implantation and also novel observations and mechanisms of the biological and clinical behavior of OCA transplants in vivo. Thus, OCA transplantation is now a successful and increasingly available treatment for patients with disabling osteoarticular cartilage pathology.

  12. Gene- and stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying; Wang, Bing

    2015-04-15

    Cell-based regeneration of damaged or diseased articular cartilage still faces significant clinical challenge due to inadequate environmental regulation of stem cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. The role of insulin-like growth factor in critical steps of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis has potential in optimizing the therapeutic use of mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage disorders. In addition to the previously described benefits of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector for in vivo gene therapy, demonstrated by Frisch and colleagues, such vector is also a safe and efficient delivery system for the genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via ex vivo insulin-like growth factor 1 gene transfer, so that implanted mesenchymal stem cells continuously release a therapeutic level of insulin-like growth factor 1 to achieve sustained mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis for cartilage regeneration.

  13. Extracellular Matrix (ECM) Multilayer Membrane as a Sustained Releasing Growth Factor Delivery System for rhTGF-β3 in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Hyug; Kim, Moon Suk; Kim, Young Jick; Choi, Byung Hyune; Lee, Chun Tek; Park, So Ra; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human transforming growth factor beta-3 (rhTGF-β3) is a key regulator of chondrogenesis in stem cells and cartilage formation. We have developed a novel drug delivery system that continuously releases rhTGF-β3 using a multilayered extracellular matrix (ECM) membrane. We hypothesize that the sustained release of rhTGF-β3 could activate stem cells and result in enhanced repair of cartilage defects. The properties and efficacy of the ECM multilayer-based delivery system (EMLDS) are investigated using rhTGF-β3 as a candidate drug. The bioactivity of the released rhTGF-ß3 was evaluated through chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using western blot and circular dichroism (CD) analyses in vitro. The cartilage reparability was evaluated through implanting EMLDS with endogenous and exogenous MSC in both in vivo and ex vivo models, respectively. In the results, the sustained release of rhTGF-ß3 was clearly observed over a prolonged period of time in vitro and the released rhTGF-β3 maintained its structural stability and biological activity. Successful cartilage repair was also demonstrated when rabbit MSCs were treated with rhTGF-β3-loaded EMLDS ((+) rhTGF-β3 EMLDS) in an in vivo model and when rabbit chondrocytes and MSCs were treated in ex vivo models. Therefore, the multilayer ECM membrane could be a useful drug delivery system for cartilage repair. PMID:27258120

  14. [Repair of articular cartilage defects by autologous bone mesenchymal stem cells and allogeneic costal chondrocytes in the knee of Wuzhishan miniature pigs].

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Ni, Jiangdong; Zhang, Shou; Fan, Zhongcheng

    2017-08-28

    To investigate the feasibility of construction of tissue engineered cartilage by co-culture of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and costal chondrocytes (CCs), and to provide theoretical basis and experimental basis for clinical repair of articular cartilage defects by Wuzhishan miniature pig knee cartilage defects with co-cultured cells.
 Methods: Density gradient centrifugation method was used to isolate BMSCs from Wuzhishan miniature pig. The double enzyme digestion method was used to isolate CCs. The passage 3 generation of BMSCs and passage 2 generation of CCs were randomly divided into 3 groups: a co-culture group of BMSCs:CCs for 1:2 (Group A), a simple CCs (Group B), and a simple BMSCs (Group C). The cell growth curve was drawn, and the content of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) of external separation in chondrocytes was determined. The 12 Wuzhishan miniature pigs were randomly divided into a co-culture cells/collagen membrane experimental group, a collagen membrane control group and the blank group. In the co-culture cells/collagen membrane experimental group, the co-cultured cells/collagen membrane were implanted into the cartilage defects of the mandibular condyle; in the collagen membrane control group, only collagen membrane was implanted; while in the blank group, nothing was implanted. Six animals were sacrificed at 8 and 16 weeks after surgery respectively (2 animals in each group). General observation, cartilage histological score and histopathological examination were carried out.
 Results: The BMSCs and co-culture cells grew well. The biological activity of CCs was good. After 16 weeks of operation, the repair tissues in the co-cultured cells/collagen membrane experimental group showed hyaline cartilage features: smooth, flat, and integrated well with the surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. The collagen membrane in the collagen membrane control group was fibrously repaired. Repair tissue gross score in the co-culture cells

  15. Repair of rabbit cartilage defect based on the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and Nano-HA/PLLA composite material.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weimin; Guo, Daiqi; Peng, Liangquan; Chen, Yun Fang; Cui, Jiaming; Xiong, Jianyi; Lu, Wei; Duan, Li; Chen, Kang; Zeng, Yanjun; Wang, Daping

    2017-02-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) and Nano-hydroxyapatite/poly (l-lactic acid) (Nano-HA/PLLA) in repairing the rabbit knee joint with full-thickness cartilage defect. Method The rBMSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro, and the third generation of rBMSCs was co-cultured with the Nano-HA/PLLA to construct the tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC). Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits were selected and randomly divided into three groups, namely, TEC group, Nano-HA/PLLA group, and control group. A cartilage defect model with the diameter of 4.5 mm and depth of 5 mm was constructed on the articular surface of medial malleolus of rabbit femur. General observation, histological observation, and Wakitani's histological scoring were conducted in the 12th and 24th week postoperatively. Results The results of TEC group indicated that new cartilage tissue was formed on the defect site and subchondral bone achieved physiological integration basically. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses indicated the generation of massive extracellular matrix. In contrast, limited regeneration and reconstruction of cartilage was achieved in the Nano-HA/PLLA group and control group, with a significant difference from the TEC group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the effect of cartilage repair was positively correlated with time. Conclusion The porous Nano-HA/PLLA combined with BMSCs promoted the repair of weight-bearing bone of adult rabbit's knee joint with cartilage defect.

  16. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant from MRL/MpJ Super-Healer Mice Does Not Improve Articular Cartilage Repair in the C57Bl/6 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Catherine A.; Lee, Woo-Yong; Tailor, Pankaj; Salo, Paul T.; Kubes, Paul; Krawetz, Roman J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage has been the focus of multiple strategies to improve its regenerative/ repair capacity. The Murphy Roths Large (MRL/MpJ) “super-healer” mouse demonstrates an unusual enhanced regenerative capacity in many tissues and provides an opportunity to further study endogenous cartilage repair. The objective of this study was to test whether the super-healer phenotype could be transferred from MRL/MpJ to non-healer C57Bl/6 mice by allogeneic bone marrow transplant. Methodology The healing of 2mm ear punches and full thickness cartilage defects was measured 4 and 8 weeks after injury in control C57Bl/6 and MRL/MpJ “super-healer” mice, and in radiation chimeras reconstituted with bone marrow from the other mouse strain. Healing was assessed using ear hole diameter measurement, a 14 point histological scoring scale for the cartilage defect and an adapted version of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International scale for assessment of osteoarthritis in mouse knee joints. Principal Findings Normal and chimeric MRL mice showed significantly better healing of articular cartilage and ear wounds along with less severe signs of osteoarthritis after cartilage injury than the control strain. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, bone marrow transplant from MRL mice did not confer improved healing on the C57Bl/6 chimeras, either in regards to ear wound healing or cartilage repair. Conclusion and Significance The elusive cellular basis for the MRL regenerative phenotype still requires additional study and may possibly be dependent on additional cell types external to the bone marrow. PMID:26120841

  17. Evaluation of cartilage, synovium and adipose tissue as cellular sources for osteochondral repair.

    PubMed

    Innes, J F; Gordon, C; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Rhodes, N P; Clegg, P D

    2013-09-01

    Osteochondral lesions are a major cause of pain and disability in several species including dogs, horses and human beings. The objective of this study was to assess three potential sources of canine cells for their osteochondral regenerative potential. Cartilage, synovium and adipose tissue cells were grown in pellet culture in chondrogenic or osteogenic media. Cartilage-derived pellets displayed the best chondrogenic differentiation as indicated by significantly higher COL2A1 and SOX9 mRNA expression, greater glycosaminoglycan content, and higher retention of Safranin-O stain compared to the synovium and adipose-derived cells. Following application of the osteogenic media, all three cell sources exhibited small areas of positive alizarin red staining. Poor intracellular alkaline phosphatase activity was found in all three cell types when stimulated although osteocalcin and RUNX2 expression were significantly increased. Cells isolated and cultured from canine articular cartilage retained their specific chondrocytic phenotype. Furthermore, canine adipocytes and synovial cells did not undergo chondrogenic differentiation and did not exhibit evidence of multipotency. Although osteogenic differentiation was initiated at a genomic level, phenotypic osteoblastic differentiation was not observed. The findings of this study suggest that cells isolated from canine adipose tissue and synovium are sub-optimal substitutes for chondrocytes when engineering articular cartilage in vitro.

  18. Intraarticular Hyaluronic Acid Injection after Microfracture Technique for the Management of Full-Thickness Cartilage Defects Does Not Improve the Quality of Repair Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bostan, Bora; Erdem, Mehmet; Koseoglu, Resid Dogan; Asci, Murat; Sen, Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Tissue repair that occurs after microfracture does not include hyaline-like cartilage. Therefore, other treatment modalities must be combined with microfracture to improve repair tissue quality. In this study, we combined exogenous hyaluronic acid with microfracture. Design: Thirty mature New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups as control, microfracture (MF), and microfracture and hyaluronic acid (MFHA). Four-millimetre full-thickness cartilage defects were created in the medial femoral condyle of each rabbit. Microfracture was performed on defects in the MF and MFHA groups. At 1 week following surgery, 1 mL of saline was injected into the knees of the control and MF groups, whereas 1 mL (15 mg/mL) hyaluronic acid was injected into the knees of the MFHA group 3 times weekly. At 6 months postsurgery, defects were evaluated according to the ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society) and Wakitani scales. Results: According to the ICRS and Wakitani scales, the quality of repair tissue was improved in MF and MFHA groups as compared the control group (P = 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). No significant difference was observed between the MF and MFHA groups (P = 0.342). Conclusions: According to the model in this study, no beneficial effect was obtained when HA injection was combined with microfracture in the treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects. PMID:26069616

  19. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  20. Matrigel scaffold combined with Ad-hBMP7-transfected chondrocytes improves the repair of rabbit cartilage defect

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaopeng; Li, Jing; Xia, Bo; Yang, Huilin; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Man; Liu, Fan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore an effective method for the repair of cartilage defects using chitosan/glycerophosphate (C/GP) gel- and Matrigel-engineered human bone morphogenetic protein 7 (hBMP7)-expressing chondrocytes. Rabbit chondrocytes were obtained, cultured in vitro and transfected with an adenovirus containing hBMP7 and green fluorescent protein (Ad-hBMP7-GFP). The expression of hBMP7 in the transfected cells was tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. The phenotype of the transfected cells was evaluated by detecting the yields of collagen II and hyaluronic acid using RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The growth of chondrocytes in the C/GP gel and Matrigel was accessed by measuring the cell growth rate, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and observation under a scanning microscope. Twelve adult male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups. Two cartilage defects were created in the rabbits' knees by aseptic surgery. Group A (n=4) did not receive any treatment, group B (n=4) were treated with C/GP gel and Matrigel-engineered Ad-mock-GFP-transfected chondrocytes, and group C (n=4) were treated with C/GP gel and Matrigel-engineered Ad-hBMP7-GFP-transfected chondrocytes. Rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks after transplantation, and the repair effect was measured by the Wakitani scoring method. On the basis of the RT-PCR and western blot results, hBMP7 was efficiently overexpressed in the Ad-hBMP7-GFP-transfected chondrocytes. The ELISA results showed that the yields of collagen II and hyaluronic acid in Ad-hBMP7-GFP-transfected chondrocytes were significantly higher than those in Ad-mock-GFP-transfected chondrocytes. Chondrocytes have a better morphology and arrangement in a Matrigel scaffold than in C/GP, as assessed by H&E staining and scanning microscopy. According to the Wakitani score, Matrigel combined with Ad-hBMP7-GFP-transfected chondrocytes

  1. Repair of articular cartilage defects with a novel injectable in situ forming material in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Kawamura, Daisuke; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Tsukuda, Yukinori; Ohzawa, Nobuo; Ito, Masayuki; Izumisawa, Yasuharu; Minami, Akio

    2012-01-01

    We developed an ultra-purified in situ forming gel as an injectable delivery vehicle of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Our objective was to assess reparative tissues treated with autologous BMSCs implanted using the injectable implantation system into osteochondral defects in a canine model. Forty-eight osteochondral defects in the patella groove of the knee joint were created in 12 adult beagle dogs (two defects in each knee). The defects were divided into a defect group (n = 16), an acellular novel material implantation (material) group (n = 16), and a BMSCs implantation using the current vehicle system (material with BMSCs) group (n = 16). The reparative tissues at 16 weeks postoperatively were assessed through gross, histological, and mechanical analyses. The reparative tissues of the material with BMSCs group were substituted with firm and smooth hyaline-like cartilage tissue that was perfectly integrated into the host tissues. This treatment group obviously enhanced the subchondral bone reconstruction. The compressive modulus of the reparative tissues was significantly higher in the material with BMSCs group than the other groups. This study demonstrated that the implantation of BMSCs using our novel in situ forming material induced a mature hyaline-like cartilage repair of osteochondral defects in a canine model.

  2. A silk fibroin/chitosan scaffold in combination with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to repair cartilage defects in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiang; She, Rongfeng; Huang, Wenliang; Dong, Zhijun; Mo, Gang; Liu, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were seeded in a three-dimensional scaffold of silk fibroin (SF) and chitosan (CS) to repair cartilage defects in the rabbit knee. Totally 54 rabbits were randomly assigned to BMSCs + SF/CS scaffold, SF/CS scaffold and control groups. A cylindrical defect was created at the patellofemoral facet of the right knee of each rabbit and repaired by scaffold respectively. Samples were prepared at 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-surgery for gross observation, hematoxylin-eosin and toluidine blue staining, type II collagen immunohistochemistry, Wakitani histology. The results showed that differentiated BMSCs proliferated well in the scaffold. In the BMSCs + SF/CS scaffold group, the bone defect was nearly repaired, the scaffold was absorbed and immunohistochemistry was positive. In the SF/CS scaffold alone group, fiber-like tissues were observed, the scaffold was nearly degraded and immunohistochemistry was weakly positive. In the control group, the defect was not well repaired and positive immunoreactions were not detected. Modified Wakitani scores were superior in the BMSCs + SF/CS scaffold group compared with those in other groups at 4, 8 and 12 weeks (P < 0.05). A SF/CS scaffold can serve as carrier for stem cells to repair cartilage defects and may be used for cartilage tissue engineering.

  3. Frictional response of bovine articular cartilage under creep loading following proteoglycan digestion with chondroitinase ABC.

    PubMed

    Basalo, Ines M; Chen, Faye Hui; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2006-02-01

    The specific aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chondroitinase ABC treatment on the frictional response of bovine articular cartilage against glass, under creep loading. The hypothesis is that chondroitinase ABC treatment increases the friction coefficient of bovine articular cartilage under creep. Articular cartilage samples (n = 12) harvested from two bovine knee joints (1-3 months old) were divided into a control group (intact specimens) and a treated group (chondroitinase ABC digestion), and tested in unconfined compression with simultaneous continuous sliding (+/- 4 mm at 1 mm/s) under a constant applied stress of 0.5 MPa, for 2500 s. The time-dependent response of the friction coefficient was measured. With increasing duration of loading, treated samples exhibited a significantly higher friction coefficient than control samples as assessed by the equilibrium value (treated: micro(eq) = 0.19 +/- 0.02; control: micro(eq) = 0.12 +/- 0.03; p = 0.002), though the coefficient achieved immediately upon loading did not increase significantly (treated: micro(min) = 0.0053 +/- 0.0025; control: micro(min) = 0.037 +/- 0.0013; p = 0.19). Our results demonstrate that removal of the cartilage glycosaminoglycans using chondroitinase ABC significantly increases the overall time-dependent friction coefficient of articular cartilage. These findings strengthen the motivation for developing chondroprotective strategies by increasing cartilage chondroitin sulfate content in osteoarthritic joints.

  4. In-situ crosslinkable and self-assembling elastin-like polypeptide block copolymers for cartilage tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dong Woo

    This work describes the development of genetically engineered elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) block copolymers as in-situ gelling scaffolds for cartilage tissue repair. The central hypothesis underlying this work is that ELP based biopolymers can be exploited as injectable biomaterials by rapid chemical crosslinking. To prove this, gene libraries encoding ELP having different molecular weights and amino acid sequences, and ELP block copolymers composed of various ELP blocks having diverse amino acid composition, length, and phase transition behavior were synthesized by recursive directional ligation, expressed in E. Coli and purified by inverse transition cycling. Mannich-type condensation of hydroxymethylphosphines (HMPs) with primary- and secondary-amines of amino acids was developed as a new crosslinking method of polypeptides. Chemically crosslinked ELP hydrogels were formed rapidly in an aqueous solution by reaction of ELPs containing periodic lysine residues with HMPs. The crosslinking density and mechanical property of the ELP hydrogels were controlled at the sequence level by varying the Lys density in ELPs composed of mono-block as well as by segregation of the Lys residues within specific blocks of tri-block architectures. Fibroblasts embedded in ELP hydrogels survived the crosslinking process and were viable after in vitro culture for at least 3 days. The DNA content of fibroblasts within the tri-block gels was significantly higher than that in the mono-block gels at day 3. These results suggest that the HMP crosslinked ELP block copolymer hydrogels show finely tuned mechanical properties and different microenvironments for cell viability as well as potential as in-situ crosslinkable biopolymers for tissue repair applications with load-bearing environments. As an alternative, rheological behavior of the ELP block copolymers and ELP-grafted hyaluronic acids (HAs) as artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) showed that they were thermally aggregated into

  5. Bilateral alar cartilage reduction rhinoplasty allows primary repair of alar defects in the bulbous nose.

    PubMed

    Al-Benna, Sammy

    2012-01-01

    Plastic surgeons have many reconstructive options for lower nasal skin defects, but given the unique aesthetic features of nasal skin the best source for reconstruction is nasal skin itself, when sufficient quantity exists. The purpose of this study is to determine the outcome of bilateral alar cartilage reduction rhinoplasty in combination with a nasal flap to facilitate immediate reconstruction of defects of the nasal tip, soft triangle and alar margin. This prospective study analyzed the aesthetic outcome after reconstruction with bilateral alar cartilage reduction rhinoplasty to reduce the nasal rim and create an excess of skin sufficient to facilitate immediate reconstruction of defects of the nasal tip, soft triangle and alar margin. All wounds healed primarily and patient satisfaction was achieved. Bilateral alar cartilage reduction rhinoplasty allows single-stage reconstruction of defects of the nasal tip, soft triangle, and medial alar rim in the bulbous nose. By placing incisions along the borders of the aesthetic subunits, this novel approach to primary reconstruction of the nasal tip, soft triangle, and medial alar rim provides skin with a superior color and texture match, maintains a satisfactory contour of the nasal rim, and optimizes the likelihood of good scar quality.

  6. Marine Collagen Scaffolds for Nasal Cartilage Repair: Prevention of Nasal Septal Perforations in a New Orthotopic Rat Model Using Tissue Engineering Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bermueller, Christian; Elsaesser, Alexander F.; Sewing, Judith; Baur, Nina; von Bomhard, Achim; Scheithauer, Marc; Notbohm, Holger; Rotter, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Autologous grafts are frequently needed for nasal septum reconstruction. Because they are only available in limited amounts, there is a need for new cartilage replacement strategies. Tissue engineering based on the use of autologous chondrocytes and resorbable matrices might be a suitable option. So far, an optimal material for nasal septum reconstruction has not been identified. The aim of our study was to provide the first evaluation of marine collagen for use in nasal cartilage repair. First, we studied the suitability of marine collagen as a cartilage replacement matrix in the context of in vitro three dimensional cultures by analyzing cell migration, cytotoxicity, and extracellular matrix formation using human and rat nasal septal chondrocytes. Second, we worked toward developing a suitable orthotopic animal model for nasal septum repair, while simultaneously evaluating the biocompatibility of marine collagen. Seeded and unseeded scaffolds were transplanted into nasal septum defects in an orthotopic rat model for 1, 4, and 12 weeks. Explanted scaffolds were histologically and immunohistochemically evaluated. Scaffolds did not induce any cytotoxic reactions in vitro. Chondrocytes were able to adhere to marine collagen and produce cartilaginous matrix proteins, such as collagen type II. Treating septal cartilage defects in vivo with seeded and unseeded scaffolds led to a significant reduction in the number of nasal septum perforations compared to no replacement. In summary, we demonstrated that marine collagen matrices provide excellent properties for cartilage tissue engineering. Marine collagen scaffolds are able to prevent septal perforations in an autologous, orthotopic rat model. This newly described experimental surgical procedure is a suitable way to evaluate new scaffold materials for their applicability in the context of nasal cartilage repair. PMID:23621795

  7. Single-stage cartilage repair in the knee with microfracture covered with a resorbable polymer-based matrix and autologous bone marrow concentrate.

    PubMed

    Enea, D; Cecconi, S; Calcagno, S; Busilacchi, A; Manzotti, S; Kaps, C; Gigante, A

    2013-12-01

    Different single-stage surgical approaches are currently under evaluation to repair focal cartilage lesions. This study aims to analyze the clinical and histological results after treatment of focal condylar articular lesions of the knee with microfracture and subsequent covering with a resorbable polyglycolic acid/hyaluronan (PGA -HA) matrix augmented with autologous bone marrow concentrate (BMC). Nine patients with focal lesions of the condylar articular cartilage were consecutively treated with arthroscopic PGA -HA-covered microfracture and bone marrow concentrate (PGA -HA-CMBMC). Patients were retrospectively assessed using standardized assessment tools and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Five patients consented to undergo second look arthroscopy and 2 consented biopsy harvest. All the patients but one showed improvement in clinical scoring from the pre-operative situation to the latest follow-up (average 22±2months). The mean IKDC subjective score, Lysholm score, VAS and the median Tegner score significantly increased from baseline to the latest follow-up. Cartilage macroscopic assessment at 12months revealed that one repair appeared normal, three almost normal and one appeared abnormal. Histological analysis proofed hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue formation in one case. MRI at 8 to 12months follow-up showed complete defect filling. The first clinical experience with single-stage treatment of focal cartilage defects of the knee with microfracture and covering with the PGA -HA matrix augmented with autologous BMC (PGA -HA-CMBMC) suggests that it is safe, it improves knee function and has the potential to regenerate hyaline-like cartilage. IV, case series. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Marine collagen scaffolds for nasal cartilage repair: prevention of nasal septal perforations in a new orthotopic rat model using tissue engineering techniques.

    PubMed

    Bermueller, Christian; Schwarz, Silke; Elsaesser, Alexander F; Sewing, Judith; Baur, Nina; von Bomhard, Achim; Scheithauer, Marc; Notbohm, Holger; Rotter, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Autologous grafts are frequently needed for nasal septum reconstruction. Because they are only available in limited amounts, there is a need for new cartilage replacement strategies. Tissue engineering based on the use of autologous chondrocytes and resorbable matrices might be a suitable option. So far, an optimal material for nasal septum reconstruction has not been identified. The aim of our study was to provide the first evaluation of marine collagen for use in nasal cartilage repair. First, we studied the suitability of marine collagen as a cartilage replacement matrix in the context of in vitro three dimensional cultures by analyzing cell migration, cytotoxicity, and extracellular matrix formation using human and rat nasal septal chondrocytes. Second, we worked toward developing a suitable orthotopic animal model for nasal septum repair, while simultaneously evaluating the biocompatibility of marine collagen. Seeded and unseeded scaffolds were transplanted into nasal septum defects in an orthotopic rat model for 1, 4, and 12 weeks. Explanted scaffolds were histologically and immunohistochemically evaluated. Scaffolds did not induce any cytotoxic reactions in vitro. Chondrocytes were able to adhere to marine collagen and produce cartilaginous matrix proteins, such as collagen type II. Treating septal cartilage defects in vivo with seeded and unseeded scaffolds led to a significant reduction in the number of nasal septum perforations compared to no replacement. In summary, we demonstrated that marine collagen matrices provide excellent properties for cartilage tissue engineering. Marine collagen scaffolds are able to prevent septal perforations in an autologous, orthotopic rat model. This newly described experimental surgical procedure is a suitable way to evaluate new scaffold materials for their applicability in the context of nasal cartilage repair.

  9. Proteomic Analysis Profile of Engineered Articular Cartilage with Chondrogenic Differentiated Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Loaded Polyglycolic Acid Mesh for Weight-Bearing Area Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lunli; Zhou, Xiao; Wu, Yaohao; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chen; Zhou, Heng; Guo, Fangfang

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possibility of full-thickness defects repair in porcine articular cartilage (AC) weight-bearing area using chondrogenic differentiated autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) with a follow-up of 3 and 6 months, which is successive to our previous study on nonweight-bearing area. The isolated ASCs were seeded onto the phosphoglycerate/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) with chondrogenic induction in vitro for 2 weeks as the experimental group prior to implantation in porcine AC defects (8 mm in diameter, deep to subchondral bone), with PGA/PLA only as control. With follow-up time being 3 and 6 months, both neo-cartilages of postimplantation integrated well with the neighboring normal cartilage and subchondral bone histologically in experimental group, whereas only fibrous tissue in control group. Immunohistochemical and toluidine blue staining confirmed similar distribution of COL II and glycosaminoglycan in the regenerated cartilage to the native one. A vivid remolding process with repair time was also witnessed in the neo-cartilage as the compressive modulus significantly increased from 70% of the normal cartilage at 3 months to nearly 90% at 6 months, which is similar to our former research. Nevertheless, differences of the regenerated cartilages still could be detected from the native one. Meanwhile, the exact mechanism involved in chondrogenic differentiation from ASCs seeded on PGA/PLA is still unknown. Therefore, proteome is resorted leading to 43 proteins differentially identified from 20 chosen two-dimensional spots, which do help us further our research on some committed factors. In conclusion, the comparison via proteome provided a thorough understanding of mechanisms implicating ASC differentiation toward chondrocytes, which is further substantiated by the present study as a perfect supplement to the former one in nonweight-bearing area. PMID:24044689

  10. Implantation of rAAV5-IGF-I Transduced Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Cartilage Repair in Full-thickness Defects in the Equine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ortved, Kyla F; Begum, Laila; Mohammed, Hussni O; Nixon, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage injury often precipitates osteoarthritis which has driven research to bolster repair in cartilage impact damage. Autologous chondrocytes transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I were evaluated in chondral defects in a well-established large animal model. Cartilage was harvested from the talus of 24 horses; chondrocytes were isolated and stored frozen. Twenty million cells were cultured and transduced with 105 AAV vg/cell prior to implantation. Chondrocytes from eight horses were transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I, chondrocytes from eight horses with rAAV5-GFP, and chondrocytes from eight horses were not transduced. A 15 mm full-thickness chondral defect was created arthroscopically in the lateral trochlear ridge of the femur in both femoropatellar joints. Treated defects were filled with naive or gene-enhanced chondrocytes, in fibrin vehicle. Control defects in the opposite limb received fibrin alone. rAAV5-IGF-I transduced chondrocytes resulted in significantly better healing at 8 week arthroscopy and 8 month necropsy examination when compared to controls. At 8 months, defects implanted with cells expressing IGF-I had better histological scores compared to control defects and defects repaired with naive chondrocytes. This included increased chondrocyte predominance and collagen type II, both features of hyaline-like repair tissue. The equine model closely approximates human cartilage healing, indicating AAV-mediated genetic modification of chondrocytes may be clinically beneficial to humans. PMID:25311491

  11. Effects of mechanical loading on human mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Yong, Kar Wey; Choi, Jean Yu

    2017-05-19

    Today, articular cartilage damage is a major health problem, affecting people of all ages. The existing conventional articular cartilage repair techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), microfracture, and mosaicplasty, have many shortcomings which negatively affect their clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop an alternative and efficient articular repair technique that can address those shortcomings. Cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to create a tissue-engineered cartilage derived from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), shows great promise for improving articular cartilage defect therapy. However, the use of tissue-engineered cartilage for the clinical therapy of articular cartilage defect still remains challenging. Despite the importance of mechanical loading to create a functional cartilage has been well demonstrated, the specific type of mechanical loading and its optimal loading regime is still under investigation. This review summarizes the most recent advances in the effects of mechanical loading on human MSCs. First, the existing conventional articular repair techniques and their shortcomings are highlighted. The important parameters for the evaluation of the tissue-engineered cartilage, including chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation of human MSCs are briefly discussed. The influence of mechanical loading on human MSCs is subsequently reviewed and the possible mechanotransduction signaling is highlighted. The development of non-hypertrophic chondrogenesis in response to the changing mechanical microenvironment will aid in the establishment of a tissue-engineered cartilage for efficient articular cartilage repair. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel combined with Ad-hTGF-β1 transfected mesenchymal stem cells to repair rabbit articular cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Qi, Bai-wen; Yu, Ai-xi; Zhu, Shao-bo; Zhou, Min; Wu, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the feasibility and therapeutic effect of repairing rabbit articular cartilage defects using thermo-sensitive chitosan/poly (vinyl alcohol) composite hydrogel engineered Ad-hTGF-β1-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Rabbit's bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were obtained and cultured in vitro and transfected with a well-constructed Ad-hTGF-β1 vector, the cartilage phenotype of the transfected cells was tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits with articular cartilage defects were randomly divided into four groups: group A was treated with CS/PVA gel and transfected BMSCs; group B received CS/PVA gel and un-transfected BMSCs; group C was treated with CS/PVA gel alone and group D was the untreated control group. Experimental animals of each group were killed at 16 weeks after operation. General observation, Masson's trichrome staining and collagen II immunohistological staining of the specimens were performed to evaluate the repair effect. The Wakitani scoring method was used to evaluate the repair effect. RT-PCR and Western blot confirmed that the hTGF-β1 gene was expressed in BMSCs and triggered the expression of specific markers of cartilage differentiation such as aggrecan mRNA and Collagen II in BMSCs after transfection with Ad-hTGF-β1. Sixteen weeks after operation, the defects in group A had smooth and flat surfaces, and the defects appeared to have completely healed, exhibiting almost the same color and texture as the surrounding cartilage. Masson's trichrome staining showed that the cell arrangement and density of regenerated cartilage tissue in group A was not significantly different from that of normal cartilage tissue. The immunohistochemical staining of Col II showed a strong expression in group A and weak expression in group B, but no expression in groups C and D. According to the Wakitani score, the difference between

  13. Next Generation Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC)–Based Cartilage Repair Using Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineered Constructs Generated with Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Ando, Wataru; Moriguchi, Yu; Sugita, Norihiko; Yasui, Yukihiko; Koizumi, Kota; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A.; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Because of its limited healing capacity, treatments for articular cartilage injuries are still challenging. Since the first report by Brittberg, autologous chondrocyte implantation has been extensively studied. Recently, as an alternative for chondrocyte-based therapy, mesenchymal stem cell–based therapy has received considerable research attention because of the relative ease in handling for tissue harvest, and subsequent cell expansion and differentiation. This review summarizes latest development of stem cell therapies in cartilage repair with special attention to scaffold-free approaches. PMID:27340513

  14. Structural characteristics of the collagen network in human normal, degraded and repair articular cartilages observed in polarized light and scanning electron microscopies.

    PubMed

    Changoor, A; Nelea, M; Méthot, S; Tran-Khanh, N; Chevrier, A; Restrepo, A; Shive, M S; Hoemann, C D; Buschmann, M D

    2011-12-01

    This study characterizes collagen organization (CO) in human normal (n = 6), degraded (n = 6) and repair (n = 22) cartilages, using polarized light (PLM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. CO was assessed using a recently developed PLM-CO score (Changoor et al. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2011;19:126-35), and zonal proportions measured. SEM images were captured from locations matched to PLM. Fibre orientations were assessed in SEM and compared to those observed in PLM. CO was also assessed in individual SEM images and combined to generate a SEM-CO score for overall CO analogous to PLM-CO. Fibre diameters were measured in SEM. PLM-CO and SEM-CO scores were correlated, r = 0.786 (P < 0.00001, n = 32), after excluding two outliers. Orientation observed in PLM was validated by SEM since PLM/SEM correspondence occurred in 91.6% of samples. Proportions of the deep (DZ), transitional (TZ) and superficial (SZ) zones averaged 74.0 ± 9.1%, 18.6 ± 7.0%, and 7.3 ± 1.2% in normal, and 45.6 ± 10.7%, 47.2 ± 10.1% and 9.5 ± 3.4% in degraded cartilage, respectively. Fibre diameters in normal cartilage increased with depth from the articular surface [55.8 ± 9.4 nm (SZ), 87.5 ± 1.8 nm (TZ) and 108.2 ± 1.8 nm (DZ)]. Fibre diameters were smaller in repair biopsies [60.4 ± 0.7 nm (SZ), 63.2 ± 0.6 nm (TZ) and 67.2 ± 0.8 nm (DZ)]. Degraded cartilage had wider fibre diameter ranges and bimodal distributions, possibly reflecting new collagen synthesis and remodelling or collagen fibre unravelling. Repair tissues revealed the potential of microfracture-based repair procedures to produce zonal CO resembling native articular cartilage structure. Values are reported as mean ± 95% confidence interval. This detailed assessment of collagen architecture could benefit the development of cartilage repair strategies intended to recreate functional collagen architecture. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International

  15. An emergency response team for membrane repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2005-01-01

    On demand, rapid Ca(2+)-triggered homotypic and exocytic membrane-fusion events are required to repair a torn plasma membrane, and we propose that this emergency-based fusion differs fundamentally from other rapid, triggered fusion reactions. Emergency fusion might use a specialized protein and organelle emergency response team that can simultaneously promote impromptu homotypic fusion events between organelles and exocytic fusion events along the vertices between these fusion products and the plasma membrane.

  16. An emergency response team for membrane repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2005-01-01

    On demand, rapid Ca(2+)-triggered homotypic and exocytic membrane-fusion events are required to repair a torn plasma membrane, and we propose that this emergency-based fusion differs fundamentally from other rapid, triggered fusion reactions. Emergency fusion might use a specialized protein and organelle emergency response team that can simultaneously promote impromptu homotypic fusion events between organelles and exocytic fusion events along the vertices between these fusion products and the plasma membrane.

  17. Effect of low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes in the repair of articular cartilage defects in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Li, Zhong-li; Fu, Yang-mu; Wang, Zhi-gang; Wei, Min; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Juan-li

    2011-05-01

    Microfracture is a type of bone marrow stimulation in arthroscopic cartilage repair. However, the overall concentration of the mesenchymal stem cells is quite low and declines with age, and in the end the lesion is filled by fibrocartilage. The aim of this research was to investigate a novel method of enhancing microfracture by determining whether low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes would facilitate cartilage repair in a rabbit model. Full-thickness cartilage defects were created at the medial femoral condyle of 36 mature New Zealand white rabbits without penetrating subchondral bone. The rabbits were randomly divided into three groups. In experimental group A, low-energy shock-wave therapy was performed in microfracture holes (diameter, 1 mm) at an energy flux density (EFD) of 0.095 mJ/mm² and 200 impulses by DolorClast Master (Electro Medical Systems SA, Switzerland) microprobe (diameter, 0.8 mm). In experimental group B, microfracture was performed alone. The untreated rabbits served as a control group. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the operations, repair tissues at the defects were analyzed stereologically, histologically, and immunohistochemically. The defects were filled gradually with repair tissues in experimental groups A and B, and no repair tissues had formed in the control group at 12 weeks. Repair tissues in experimental group A contained more chondrocytes, proteoglycans, and collagen type II than those in experimental group B. In experimental group B, fibrous tissues had formed at the defects at 8 and 12 weeks. Histological analysis of experimental group A showed a better Wakitani score (P < 0.05) than in experimental group B at 8 and 12 weeks after the operation. In the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits, low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes facilitated the production of hyaline-like cartilage repair tissues more than microfracture alone. This model demonstrates a new method of improving microfracture

  18. Subchondral chitosan/blood implant-guided bone plate resorption and woven bone repair is coupled to hyaline cartilage regeneration from microdrill holes in aged rabbit knees.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Morales, J; Lafantaisie-Favreau, C-H; Chen, G; Hoemann, C D

    2014-02-01

    Little is known of how to routinely elicit hyaline cartilage repair tissue in middle-aged patients. We tested the hypothesis that in skeletally aged rabbit knees, microdrill holes can be stimulated to remodel the bone plate and induce a more integrated, voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair tissue when treated by subchondral chitosan/blood implants. New Zealand White rabbits (13 or 32 months old, N = 7) received two 1.5 mm diameter, 2 mm depth drill holes in each knee, either left to bleed as surgical controls or press-fit with a 10 kDa (distal hole: 10K) or 40 kDa (proximal hole: 40K) chitosan/blood implant with fluorescent chitosan tracer. Post-operative knee effusion was documented. Repair tissues at day 0 (N = 1) and day 70 post-surgery (N = 6) were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, and by histological scoring and histomorphometry (SafO, Col-2, and Col-1) at day 70. All chitosan implants were completely cleared after 70 days, without increasing transient post-operative knee effusion compared to controls. Proximal control holes had worse osteochondral repair than distal holes. Both implant formulations induced bone remodeling and improved lateral integration of the bone plate at the hole edge. The 40K implant inhibited further bone repair inside 50% of the proximal holes, while the 10K implant specifically induced a "wound bloom" reaction, characterized by decreased bone plate density in a limited zone beyond the initial hole edge, and increased woven bone (WB) plate repair inside the initial hole (P = 0.016), which was accompanied by a more voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair (P < 0.05 vs control defects). In a challenging aged rabbit model, bone marrow-derived hyaline cartilage repair can be promoted by treating acute drill holes with a biodegradable subchondral implant that elicits bone plate resorption followed by anabolic WB repair within a 70-day repair period. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by

  19. Use of a biological reactor and platelet-rich plasma for the construction of tissue-engineered bone to repair articular cartilage defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huibo; Sun, Shui; Liu, Haili; Chen, Hua; Rong, Xin; Lou, Jigang; Yang, Yunbei; Yang, Yi; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects are a major clinical burden worldwide. Current methods to repair bone defects include bone autografts, allografts and external fixation. In recent years, the repair of bone defects by tissue engineering has emerged as a promising approach. The present study aimed to assess a novel method using a biological reactor with platelet-rich plasma to construct tissue-engineered bone. Beagle bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and differentiated into osteoblasts and chondroblasts using platelet-rich plasma and tricalcium phosphate scaffolds cultured in a bioreactor for 3 weeks. The cell scaffold composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and implanted into beagles with articular cartilage defects. The expression of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase and bone γ-carboxyglutamate protein (BGLAP) were assessed using polymerase chain reaction after 3 months. Articular cartilage specimens were observed histologically. Adhesion and distribution of BMSCs on the β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold were confirmed by SEM. Histological examination revealed that in vivo bone defects were largely repaired 12 weeks following implantation. The expression levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and BGLAP in the experimental groups were significantly elevated compared with the negative controls. BMSCs may be optimum seed cells for tissue engineering in bone repair. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) provides a rich source of cytokines to promote BMSC function. The β-TCP scaffold is advantageous for tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and 3D structure that promotes cell adhesion, growth and differentiation. The tissue-engineered bone was constructed in a bioreactor using BMSCs, β-TCP scaffolds and PRP and displayed appropriate morphology and biological function. The present study provides an efficient method for the generation of tissue-engineered bone for cartilage repair, compared with previously used

  20. A Novel Cross-Linked Hyaluronic Acid Porous Scaffold for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christoph; Berger, Manuela; Baumgartner, Renate R.; Höller, Sonja; Zwickl, Hannes; Niculescu-Morzsa, Eugenia; Halbwirth, Florian; Nehrer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose An important feature of biomaterials used in cartilage regeneration is their influence on the establishment and stabilization of a chondrocytic phenotype of embedded cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a porous 3-dimensional scaffold made of cross-linked hyaluronic acid on the expression and synthesis performance of human articular chondrocytes. Materials and Methods Osteoarthritic chondrocytes from 5 patients with a mean age of 74 years were passaged twice and cultured within the cross-linked hyaluronic acid scaffolds for 2 weeks. Analyses were performed at 3 different time points. For estimation of cell content within the scaffold, DNA-content (CyQuant cell proliferation assay) was determined. The expression of chondrocyte-specific genes by embedded cells as well as the total amount of sulfated glycosaminoglycans produced during the culture period was analyzed in order to characterize the synthesis performance and differentiation status of the cells. Results Cells showed a homogenous distribution within the scaffold. DNA quantification revealed a reduction of the cell number. This might be attributed to loss of cells from the scaffold during media exchange connected with a stop in cell proliferation. Indeed, the expression of cartilage-specific genes and the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans were increased and the differentiation index was clearly improved. Conclusions These results suggest that the attachment of osteoarthritic P2 chondrocytes to the investigated material enhanced the chondrogenic phenotype as well as promoted the retention. PMID:27375842

  1. Thermo-optical response of cartilage during feedback-controlled laser-assisted reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brian J.; Milner, Thomas E.; Anvari, Bahman; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Vagratashvili, Victor; Sobol, Emil N.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    1997-05-01

    Cartilage undergoes characteristic deformation following laser irradiation below the ablation threshold. Measurements of surface temperature and integrated scattered light intensity were performed during laser irradiation. Porcine auricular cartilage (1 - 2 mm thickness) was irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser (lambda equals 1.32 micrometer) with varying dose (J/cm2). Surface temperature was monitored using a single element HgCdTe infrared detector, responsive between 10 - 14 micrometer. A HeNe laser beam (lambda equals 632.8 nm) was incident on the back surface of the cartilage specimen and fractional integrated back scattered light intensity was measured using an integrating sphere and a silicon photodiode. Laser irradiation (2 W, 5.83 W/cm2, 50 Hz PRR) was allowed to proceed until surface temperature reached 70 degrees Celsius. Cartilage deformation was observed in each instance. Integrated scattered light intensity reached a plateau before the peak temperature (70 degrees) was reached. At increased laser power (10 W, 39.45 W/cm2, 50 Hz PRR), a feedback controlled cryogen spray was used to maintain surface temperature below 50 degrees Celsius. A similar plateau response was also noted in integrated scattered light intensity. This signal may be used to optimize the process of stress relaxation in laser cartilage reshaping. Several clinical applications are discussed.

  2. New resource for the computation of cartilage biphasic material properties with the interpolant response surface method

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Kathryn E.; Kourtis, Lampros C.; Besier, Thor F.; Lindsey, Derek P.; Gold, Garry E.; Delp, Scott L.; Beaupre, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage material properties are important for understanding joint function and diseases, but can be challenging to obtain. Three biphasic material properties (aggregate modulus, Poisson's ratio and permeability) can be determined using an analytical or finite element model combined with optimisation to find the material properties values that best reproduce an experimental creep curve. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy-to-use resource to determine biphasic cartilage material properties. A Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface was generated from interpolation of finite element simulations of creep indentation tests. Creep indentation tests were performed on five sites across a tibial plateau. A least-squares residual search of the Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface resulted in a best-fit curve for each experimental condition with corresponding material properties. These sites provided a representative range of aggregate moduli (0.48–1.58 MPa), Poisson's ratio (0.00–0.05) and permeability (1.7 × 10−15−5.4 × 10−15 m4/N s) values found in human cartilage. PMID:19675978

  3. New resource for the computation of cartilage biphasic material properties with the interpolant response surface method.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kathryn E; Kourtis, Lampros C; Besier, Thor F; Lindsey, Derek P; Gold, Garry E; Delp, Scott L; Beaupre, Gary S

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage material properties are important for understanding joint function and diseases, but can be challenging to obtain. Three biphasic material properties (aggregate modulus, Poisson's ratio and permeability) can be determined using an analytical or finite element model combined with optimisation to find the material properties values that best reproduce an experimental creep curve. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy-to-use resource to determine biphasic cartilage material properties. A Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface was generated from interpolation of finite element simulations of creep indentation tests. Creep indentation tests were performed on five sites across a tibial plateau. A least-squares residual search of the Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface resulted in a best-fit curve for each experimental condition with corresponding material properties. These sites provided a representative range of aggregate moduli (0.48-1.58 MPa), Poisson's ratio (0.00-0.05) and permeability (1.7 x 10(- 15)-5.4 x 10(- 15) m(4)/N s) values found in human cartilage. The resource is freely available from https://simtk.org/home/va-squish.

  4. Reprogramming of blood cells into induced pluripotent stem cells as a new cell source for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueying; Liu, Tie; Van Halm-Lutterodt, Nicholas; Chen, JiaYu; Su, Qingjun; Hai, Yong

    2016-02-17

    An attempt was made to reprogram peripheral blood cells into human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSCs) as a new cell source for cartilage repair. We generated chondrogenic lineage from human peripheral blood via hiPSCs using an integration-free method. Peripheral blood cells were either obtained from a human blood bank or freshly collected from volunteers. After transforming peripheral blood cells into iPSCs, the newly derived iPSCs were further characterized through karyotype analysis, pluripotency gene expression and cell differentiation ability. iPSCs were differentiated through multiple steps, including embryoid body formation, hiPSC-mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cell expansion, and chondrogenic induction for 21 days. Chondrocyte phenotype was then assessed by morphological, histological and biochemical analysis, as well as the chondrogenic expression. hiPSCs derived from peripheral blood cells were successfully generated, and were characterized by fluorescent immunostaining of pluripotent markers and teratoma formation in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis showed that MSC markers CD73 and CD105 were present in monolayer cultured hiPSC-MSC-like cells. Both alcian blue and toluidine blue staining of hiPSC-MSC-chondrogenic pellets showed as positive. Immunohistochemistry of collagen II and X staining of the pellets were also positive. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan content was significantly increased, and the expression levels of the chondrogenic markers COL2, COL10, COL9 and AGGRECAN were significantly higher in chondrogenic pellets than in undifferentiated cells. These results indicated that peripheral blood cells could be a potential source for differentiation into chondrogenic lineage in vitro via generation of mesenchymal progenitor cells. This study supports the potential applications of utilizing peripheral blood cells in generating seed cells for cartilage regenerative medicine in a patient-specific and cost-effective approach.

  5. Effects of In Vitro Low Oxygen Tension Preconditioning of Adipose Stromal Cells on Their In Vivo Chondrogenic Potential: Application in Cartilage Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Olivier; Lesoeur, Julie; Sourice, Sophie; Masson, Martial; Fellah, Borhane Hakim; Geffroy, Olivier; Lallemand, Elodie; Weiss, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multipotent stromal cell (MSC)-based regenerative strategy has shown promise for the repair of cartilage, an avascular tissue in which cells experience hypoxia. Hypoxia is known to promote the early chondrogenic differentiation of MSC. The aim of our study was therefore to determine whether low oxygen tension could be used to enhance the regenerative potential of MSC for cartilage repair. Methods MSC from rabbit or human adipose stromal cells (ASC) were preconditioned in vitro in control or chondrogenic (ITS and TGF-β) medium and in 21 or 5% O2. Chondrogenic commitment was monitored by measuring COL2A1 and ACAN expression (real-time PCR). Preconditioned rabbit and human ASC were then incorporated into an Si-HPMC hydrogel and injected (i) into rabbit articular cartilage defects for 18 weeks or (ii) subcutaneously into nude mice for five weeks. The newly formed tissue was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated by cartilage-specific immunohistological staining and scoring. The phenotype of ASC cultured in a monolayer or within Si-HPMC in control or chondrogenic medium and in 21 or 5% O2 was finally evaluated using real-time PCR. Results/Conclusions 5% O2 increased the in vitro expression of chondrogenic markers in ASC cultured in induction medium. Cells implanted within Si-HPMC hydrogel and preconditioned in chondrogenic medium formed a cartilaginous tissue, regardless of the level of oxygen. In addition, the 3D in vitro culture of ASC within Si-HPMC hydrogel was found to reinforce the pro-chondrogenic effects of the induction medium and 5% O2. These data together indicate that although 5% O2 enhances the in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of ASC, it does not enhance their in vivo chondrogenesis. These results also highlight the in vivo chondrogenic potential of ASC and their potential value in cartilage repair. PMID:23638053

  6. Osteochondral Biopsy Analysis Demonstrates That BST-CarGel Treatment Improves Structural and Cellular Characteristics of Cartilage Repair Tissue Compared With Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Méthot, Stéphane; Changoor, Adele; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Stanish, William D.; Restrepo, Alberto; Shive, Matthew S.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The efficacy and safety of BST-CarGel, a chitosan-based medical device for cartilage repair, was compared with microfracture alone at 1 year during a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) in the knee. The quality of repair tissue of osteochondral biopsies collected from a subset of patients was compared using blinded histological assessments. Methods The international RCT evaluated repair tissue quantity and quality by 3-dimensional quantitative magnetic resonance imaging as co-primary endpoints at 12 months. At an average of 13 months posttreatment, 21/41 BST-CarGel and 17/39 microfracture patients underwent elective second look arthroscopies as a tertiary endpoint, during which ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society) macroscopic scoring was carried out, and osteochondral biopsies were collected. Stained histological sections were evaluated by blinded readers using ICRS I and II histological scoring systems. Collagen organization was evaluated using a polarized light microscopy score. Results BST-CarGel treatment resulted in significantly better ICRS macroscopic scores (P = 0.0002) compared with microfracture alone, indicating better filling, integration, and tissue appearance. Histologically, BST-CarGel resulted in a significant improvement of structural parameters—Surface Architecture (P = 0.007) and Surface/Superficial Assessment (P = 0.042)—as well as cellular parameters—Cell Viability (P = 0.006) and Cell Distribution (P = 0.032). No histological parameters were significantly better for the microfracture group. BST-CarGel treatment also resulted in a more organized repair tissue with collagen stratification more similar to native hyaline cartilage, as measured by polarized light microscopy scoring (P = 0.0003). Conclusion Multiple and independent analyses in this biopsy substudy demonstrated that BST-CarGel treatment results in improved structural and cellular characteristics of repair tissue at 1 year posttreatment compared with

  7. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements.

  8. Low molecular weight fraction of shark cartilage can modulate immune responses and abolish angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zuhair M; Feyzi, Reza; Sheikhian, Ali; Bargahi, Afshar; Mostafaie, Ali; Mansouri, Kamran; Shahrokhi, Somayeh; Ghazanfari, Tooba; Shahabi, Shahram

    2005-06-01

    Shark cartilage has proven to have inhibitory effects on angiogenesis. In this research, we studied the effects of shark cartilage on the immune system. Firstly, we isolated and purified a shark cartilage protein fraction with the most immunostimulatory effects. Our fraction was composed of two proteins with molecular weights of about 14 and 15 kDa. This fraction highly augments delayed-type hypersensitivity response against sRBC in mice, and decreases the cytotoxic activity of Natural Killer cells. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injection of this fraction to tumor-bearing mice could increase T-cell infiltration into the tumor, and decrease the tumor lesion size. Also, this fraction has strong inhibitory effect on HBMEC proliferation and migration in fibrin matrix. According to these results, we suppose that this fraction is a good candidate for further studies in cancer therapy.

  9. Evaluation of cartilage repair tissue after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation using a hyaluronic-based or a collagen-based scaffold with morphological MOCART scoring and biochemical T2 mapping: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Goetz Hannes; Mamisch, Tallal Charles; Zak, Lukas; Blanke, Matthias; Olk, Alexander; Marlovits, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-05-01

    In cartilage repair, bioregenerative approaches using tissue engineering techniques have tried to achieve a close resemblance to hyaline cartilage, which might be visualized using advanced magnetic resonance imaging. To compare cartilage repair tissue at the femoral condyle noninvasively after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation using Hyalograft C, a hyaluronic-based scaffold, to cartilage repair tissue after transplantation using CaReS, a collagen-based scaffold, with magnetic resonance imaging using morphologic scoring and T2 mapping. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Twenty patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (Hyalograft C, n = 10; CaReS, n = 10) underwent 3-T magnetic resonance imaging 24 months after surgery. Groups were matched by age and defect size/localization. For clinical outcome, the Brittberg score was assessed. Morphologic analysis was applied using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue score, and global and zonal biochemical T2 mapping was performed to reflect biomechanical properties with regard to collagen matrix/content and hydration. The clinical outcome was comparable in each group. The magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue score showed slightly but not significantly (P= .210) better results in the CaReS group (76.5) compared to the Hyalograft C group (70.0), with significantly better (P= .004) constitution of the surface of the repair tissue in the CaReS group. Global T2 relaxation times (milliseconds) for healthy surrounding cartilage were comparable in both groups (Hyalograft C, 49.9; CaReS, 51.9; P= .398), whereas cartilage repair tissue showed significantly higher results in the CaReS group (Hyalograft C, 48.2; CaReS, 55.5; P= .011). Zonal evaluation showed no significant differences (P > or = .05). Most morphologic parameters provided comparable results for both repair tissues. However, differences in the surface and higher T2 values for

  10. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair.

    PubMed

    Reumann, Marie K; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1(-/-) mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1(-/-) mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1(-/-) callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair.

  11. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Marie K.; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Steven B.; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1−/− mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1−/− mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1−/− callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. PMID:21726677

  12. Articular Cartilage Injury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Mithoefer, Kai; Scopp, Jason M.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the athletic population are observed with increasing frequency and, due to limited intrinsic healing capacity, can lead to progressive pain and functional limitation over time. If left untreated, isolated cartilage lesions can lead to progressive chondropenia or global cartilage loss over time. A chondropenia curve is described to help predict the outcome of cartilage injury based on different lesion and patient characteristics. Nutriceuticals and chondroprotective agents are being investigated as tools to slow the development of chondropenia. Several operative techniques have been described for articular cartilage repair or replacement and, more recently, cartilage regeneration. Rehabilitation guidelines are being developed to meet the needs of these new techniques. Next-generation techniques are currently evaluated to optimize articular cartilage repair biology and to provide a repair cartilage tissue that can withstand the high mechanical loads experienced by the athlete with consistent long-term durability. PMID:26069548

  13. Acute and chronic response of articular cartilage to Ho:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauner, Kenneth B.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Patel, Dinesh K.

    1992-06-01

    A Ho:YAG laser system operating at a wavelength of 2.1 microns has recently been introduced for use in arthroscopic surgery. The acceptability of this new tool will be determined not only by its ability to resect tissue, but also by its long term effects on articular surfaces. In order to investigate these issues further, we performed two studies to evaluate the acute and chronic effects of the laser on cartilaginous tissue. We evaluated the acute, in vitro effects of 2.1 micron laser irradiation on articular and fibrocartilage. This included the measurement of ablation efficiency, ablation threshold and thermal damage in both meniscus and articular cartilage. To document the chronic effects on articular cartilage in vivo, we next performed a ten week healing study. Eight sheep weighing 30 - 40 kg underwent bilateral arthrotomy procedures. Multiple full thickness and partial thickness defects were created. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, and 10 weeks. The healing study demonstrated: (1) no healing of full or partial thickness defects at 10 weeks with hyaline cartilage; (2) fibrocartilaginous granulation tissue filling full thickness defects at two and four weeks, but no longer evident at ten weeks; (3) chondrocyte necrosis extending to greater than 900 microns distal to ablation craters at four weeks with no evidence of repair at later dates; and (4) chondrocyte hyperplasia at the borders of the damage zone at two weeks but no longer evident at later sacrifice dates.

  14. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates.

  15. BST-CarGel® Treatment Maintains Cartilage Repair Superiority over Microfracture at 5 Years in a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stanish, William D.; McCormack, Robert; Forriol, Francisco; Mohtadi, Nicholas; Pelet, Stéphane; Desnoyers, Jacques; Méthot, Stéphane; Vehik, Kendra; Restrepo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective The efficacy and safety of BST-CarGel®, a chitosan scaffold for cartilage repair was compared with microfracture alone at 1 year during a multicenter randomized controlled trial in the knee. This report was undertaken to investigate 5-year structural and clinical outcomes. Design The international randomized controlled trial enrolled 80 patients, aged 18 to 55 years, with grade III or IV focal lesions on the femoral condyles. Patients were randomized to receive BST-CarGel® treatment or microfracture alone, and followed standardized 12-week rehabilitation. Co-primary endpoints of repair tissue quantity and quality were evaluated by 3-dimensional MRI quantification of the degree of lesion filling (%) and T2 relaxation times. Secondary endpoints were clinical benefit measured with WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) questionnaires and safety. General estimating equations were used for longitudinal statistical analysis of repeated measures. Results Blinded MRI analysis demonstrated that BST-CarGel®-treated patients showed a significantly greater treatment effect for lesion filling (P = 0.017) over 5 years compared with microfracture alone. A significantly greater treatment effect for BST-CarGel® was also found for repair tissue T2 relaxation times (P = 0.026), which were closer to native cartilage compared to the microfracture group. BST-CarGel® and microfracture groups showed highly significant improvement at 5 years from pretreatment baseline for each WOMAC subscale (P < 0.0001), and there were no differences between the treatment groups. Safety was comparable for both groups. Conclusions BST-CarGel® was shown to be an effective mid-term cartilage repair treatment. At 5 years, BST-CarGel® treatment resulted in sustained and significantly superior repair tissue quantity and quality over microfracture alone. Clinical benefit following BST-CarGel® and microfracture treatment were highly significant over baseline

  16. Constructing adolescent fatherhood: responsibilities and intergenerational repair.

    PubMed

    Tuffin, Keith; Rouch, Gareth; Frewin, Karen

    2010-06-01

    The parenthood literature has, until recently, paid scant attention to adolescent fathers. Negative stereotypes portray these young men as delinquents, unwilling to participate in the lives of their children. Recent research has challenged negative views by examining the impact of fatherhood on these young men and concluding that they are far from uninvolved and disinterested in their children. The current study extends this line of research by charting the ways young fathers talk about their responsibilities and hopes for their children's futures. Young fathers were interviewed and the data analysed discursively in order to further explore the meaning of fatherhood. The analysis focuses on the ways paternal responsibilities were constructed and the notion of intergenerational repair is introduced as one of the features of this talk. The implications for practitioners are discussed in the context of a more critical approach whereby taken-for-granted assumptions are questioned in this highly politicised area.

  17. Repair of articular cartilage defect by autologous transplantation of basic fibroblast growth factor gene-transduced chondrocytes with adeno-associated virus vector.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Naoki; Saito, Tomoyuki; Uesugi, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Naomi; Xin, Ke-Qin; Okuda, Kenji; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Keiya; Koshino, Tomihisa

    2005-01-01

    To examine the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) gene-transduced chondrocytes on the repair of articular cartilage defects. LacZ gene or bFGF gene was transduced into primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes with the use of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector. These gene-transduced chondrocytes were embedded in collagen gel and transplanted into a full-thickness defect in the articular cartilage of the patellar groove of a rabbit. The efficiency of gene transduction was assessed according to the percentage of LacZ-positive cells among the total number of living cells. The concentration of bFGF in the culture supernatant was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to confirm the production by bFGF gene-transduced chondrocytes. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after transplantation, cartilage repair was evaluated histologically and graded semiquantitatively using a histologic scoring system ranging from 0 (complete regeneration) to 14 (no regeneration) points. LacZ gene expression by chondrocytes was maintained until 8 weeks in >85% of the in vitro population. LacZ-positive cells were found at the transplant sites for at least 4 weeks after surgery. The mean concentration of bFGF was significantly increased in bFGF gene-transduced cells compared with control cells (P < 0.01). Semiquantitative histologic scoring indicated that the total score was significantly lower in the bFGF-transduced group than in the control group throughout the observation period. These results demonstrated that gene transfer to chondrocytes by an ex vivo method was established with the AAV vector, and transplantation of bFGF gene-transduced chondrocytes had a clear beneficial effect on the repair of rabbit articular cartilage defects.

  18. Characterization of auricular chondrocytes and auricular/articular chondrocyte co-cultures in terms of an application in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Maren; John, Thilo; El-Sayed, Karym; Marzahn, Ulrike; Aue, Annekatrin; Kohl, Benjamin; Stoelzel, Katharina; Ertel, Wolfgang; Blottner, Dieter; Haisch, Andreas; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-05-01

    Cartilage injury remains a challenge in orthopedic surgery as articular cartilage only has a limited capacity for intrinsic healing. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but requires articular cartilage biopsies for autologous chondrocyte expansion. The use of heterotopic chondrocytes derived from non-articular cartilage sources such as auricular chondrocytes may be a novel approach for ACT. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether co-cultured articular/auricular chondrocytes exhibit characteristics comparable to articular chondrocytes. Analysis of the proliferation rate, extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM) gene and protein expression (type II and I collagen, elastin, lubricin), beta1-integrins and the chondrogenic transcription factor sox9 in articular/auricular chondrocytes was performed using RTD-PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. Additionally, three-dimensional (3D) chondrocyte mono- and co-cultures were established. The proliferative activity and elastin gene expression were lower and that of type II collagen and lubricin was higher in articular compared with auricular chondrocytes. The species generally did not influence the chondrocyte characteristics, with the exception of type I collagen and sox9 expression, which was higher in porcine but not in human articular chondrocytes compared with both types of auricular chondrocytes. beta1-integrin gene expression did not differ significantly between the chondrocyte types. The type II collagen gene and protein expression was higher in articular chondrocyte monocultures and was slightly higher in co-cultures compared with monocultured auricular chondrocytes. Both chondrocyte types survived in co-culture. Despite their differing expression profiles, co-cultures revealed some adjustment in the ECM expression of both chondrocyte types.

  19. Injectable Perlecan Domain 1-Hyaluronan Microgels Potentiate the Cartilage Repair Effect of BMP2 in a Murine Model of Early Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Padma P.; McCoy, Sarah Y.; Jha, Amit K.; Yang, Weidong; Jia, Xinqiao; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Kirn-Safran, Catherine B.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use bioengineered injectable microgels to enhance the action of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and stimulate cartilage matrix repair in a reversible animal model of osteoarthritis (OA). A module of perlecan (PlnD1) bearing heparan sulfate (HS) chains was covalently immobilized to hyaluronic acid (HA) microgels for the controlled release of BMP2 in vivo. Articular cartilage damage was induced in mice using a reversible model of experimental OA and was treated by intra-articular injection of PlnD1-HA particles with BMP2 bound to HS. Control injections consisted of BMP2 free PlnD1-HA particles, HA particles, free BMP2 or saline. Knees dissected following these injections were analyzed using histological, immunostaining and gene expression approaches. Our results show that knees treated with PlnD1-HA/BMP2 had lesser OA-like damage compared to control knees. In addition, the PlnD1-HA/BMP2-treated knees had higher mRNA levels encoding for type II collagen, proteoglycans, and xylosyltransferase 1, a rate-limiting anabolic enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycan chains, relative to control knees (PlnD1-HA). This finding was paralleled by enhanced levels of aggrecan in the articular cartilage of PlnD1-HA/BMP2 treated knees. Additionally, decreases in the mRNA levels encoding for cartilage-degrading enzymes and type X collagen were seen relative to controls. In conclusion, PlnD1-HA microgels constitute a formulation improvement compared to HA for efficient in vivo delivery and stimulation of proteoglycan and cartilage matrix synthesis in mouse articular cartilage. Ultimately, PlnD1-HA/BMP2 may serve as an injectable therapeutic agent for slowing or inhibiting the onset of OA after knee injury. PMID:22455987

  20. Cartilage repair with osteochondral autografts in sheep: effect of biophysical stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Benazzo, Franco; Cadossi, Matteo; Cavani, Francesco; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Giardino, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    The effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on the integration of osteochondral autografts was evaluated in sheep. After osteochondral grafts were performed, the animals were treated with PEMFs for 6 h/day or sham-treated. Six animals were sacrificed at 1 month. Fourteen animals were treated for 2 months and sacrificed at 6 months. At 1 month, the osteogenic activity at the transplant-host subchondral bone interface was increased in PEMF-treated animals compared to controls. Articular cartilage was healthy in controls and stimulated animals. At 6 months, complete resorption was observed in four control grafts only. Cyst-like resorption areas were more frequent within the graft of sham-treated animals versus PEMF-treated. The average volume of the cysts was not significantly different between the two groups; nevertheless, analysis of the variance of the volumes demonstrated a significant difference. The histological score showed no significant differences between controls and stimulated animals, but the percentage of surface covered by fibrous tissue was higher in the control group than in the stimulated one. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha concentration in the synovial fluid was significantly lower, and transforming growth factor-beta1 was significantly higher, in PEMF-treated animals compared to controls. One month after osteochondral graft implantation, we observed larger bone formation in PEMF-treated grafts which favors early graft stabilization. In the long term, PEMF exposure limited the bone resorption in subchondral bone; furthermore, the cytokine profile in the synovial fluid was indicative of a more favorable articular environment for the graft.

  1. Cartilage repair by local delivery of transforming growth factor-β1 or bone morphogenetic protein-2 from a novel, segmented polyurethane/polylactic-co-glycolic bilayered scaffold.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Ricardo; Delgado, Araceli; Solis, Raul; Sanchez, Esther; Hernandez, Antonio; San Roman, Julio; Evora, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the in vitro and in vivo release kinetics and evaluate the grades of repair induced by either the release of 50 ng of transforming growth factor-β1 or 2.5 or 5 μg of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) from a bilayer scaffold of segmented polyurethane/polylactic-co-glycolic (SPU/PLGA) in osteochondral defects, in a rabbit model. The scaffold consisted of a porous, bone-directed PLGA layer, overlaid with a cartilage-directed layer of growth factor (GF)-loaded PLGA microspheres, dispersed in a matrix of SPU. The PLGA porous layer was fabricated by gas foaming. Microspheres were prepared by a double emulsion method. SPU was synthesized by following the two-step method. GF release kinetics were assessed using iodinated ((125)I) GFs. The in vivo release profiles of both GFs fitted to zero-order kinetics, demonstrating a consistently good control of their release rates by SPU. Cartilage-like tissue, characterized by histological analysis, scoring, and immunolabeling of chondrogenic differentiation markers, was observed only after 12 weeks, maintaining integrity up to at least 24 weeks, independently of the GF and the dose of BMP-2. The biocompatibility and the resulting good quality, hyaline repair cartilage convert this system into a promising candidate for future applications in osteochondral lesions.

  2. Role of Chondrocytes in Cartilage Formation, Progression of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akkiraju, Hemanth; Nohe, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) covers the diarthrodial joints and is responsible for the mechanical distribution of loads across the joints. The majority of its structure and function is controlled by chondrocytes that regulate Extracellular Matrix (ECM) turnover and maintain tissue homeostasis. Imbalance in their function leads to degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis (OA). OA is characterized by cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and stiffening of joints. Cartilage degeneration is a consequence of chondrocyte hypertrophy along with the expression of proteolytic enzymes. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS) are an example of these enzymes that degrade the ECM. Signaling cascades involved in limb patterning and cartilage repair play a role in OA progression. However, the regulation of these remains to be elucidated. Further the role of stem cells and mature chondrocytes in OA progression is unclear. The progress in cell based therapies that utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) infusion for cartilage repair may lead to new therapeutics in the long term. However, many questions are unanswered such as the efficacy of MSCs usage in therapy. This review focuses on the role of chondrocytes in cartilage formation and the progression of OA. Moreover, it summarizes possible alternative therapeutic approaches using MSC infusion for cartilage restoration. PMID:27347486

  3. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  4. T2 star relaxation times for assessment of articular cartilage at 3 T: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mamisch, Tallal Charles; Hughes, Timothy; Mosher, Timothy J; Mueller, Christoph; Trattnig, Siegfried; Boesch, Chris; Welsch, Goetz Hannes

    2012-03-01

    T2 mapping techniques use the relaxation constant as an indirect marker of cartilage structure, and the relaxation constant has also been shown to be a sensitive parameter for cartilage evaluation. As a possible additional robust biomarker, T2* relaxation time is a potential, clinically feasible parameter for the biochemical evaluation of articular cartilage. The knees of 15 healthy volunteers and 15 patients after microfracture therapy (MFX) were evaluated with a multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping technique and a multi-echo gradient-echo T2* mapping sequence at 3.0 Tesla MRI. Inline maps, using a log-linear least squares fitting method, were assessed with respect to the zonal dependency of T2 and T2* relaxation for the deep and superficial regions of healthy articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. There was a statistically significant correlation between T2 and T2* values. Both parameters demonstrated similar spatial dependency, with longer values measured toward the articular surface for healthy articular cartilage. No spatial variation was observed for cartilage repair tissue after MFX. Within this feasibility study, both T2 and T2* relaxation parameters demonstrated a similar response in the assessment of articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. The potential advantages of T2*-mapping of cartilage include faster imaging times and the opportunity for 3D acquisitions, thereby providing greater spatial resolution and complete coverage of the articular surface.

  5. The effects of staged intra-articular injection of cultured autologous mesenchymal stromal cells on the repair of damaged cartilage: a pilot study in caprine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of chondral injuries remains a major issue despite the many advances made in cartilage repair techniques. Although it has been postulated that the use of marrow stimulation in combination with cell-based therapy may provide superior outcome, this has yet to be demonstrated. A pilot study was thus conducted to determine if bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) have modulatory effects on the repair outcomes of bone marrow stimulation (BMS) techniques. Methods Two full-thickness chondral 5 mm diameter defects were created in tandem on the medial condyle of left stifle joints of 18 Boer caprine (N = 18). Goats were then divided equally into three groups. Simultaneously, bone marrow aspirates were taken from the iliac crests from the goats in Group 1 and were sent for BM-MSC isolation and expansion in vitro. Six weeks later, BMS surgery, which involves subchondral drilling at the defect sites, was performed. After two weeks, the knees in Group 1 were given autologous intra-articular BM-MSCs (N = 6). In Group 2, although BMS was performed there were no supplementations provided. In Group 3, no intervention was administered. The caprines were sacrificed after six months. Repairs were evaluated using macroscopic assessment through the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scoring, histologic grading by O’Driscoll score, biochemical assays for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and gene expressions for aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9. Results Histological and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated hyaline-like cartilage regeneration in the transplanted sites particularly in Group 1. In contrast, tissues in Groups 2 and 3 demonstrated mainly fibrocartilage. The highest ICRS and O’Driscoll scorings was also observed in Group 1, while the lowest score was seen in Group 3. Similarly, the total GAG/total protein as well as chondrogenic gene levels were expressed in the same order, that is highest in Group 1 while the lowest in Group

  6. Effect of Transplanting Various Concentrations of a Composite of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel on Articular Cartilage Repair in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Chul-Won; Kim, Jin-A; Rhim, Ji-Heon; Park, Yong-Geun; Chung, Jun Young; Lee, Han-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have therapeutic potential for cartilage repair. However, the optimal concentration of MSCs for cartilage repair remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to explore the feasibility of cartilage repair by human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) and to determine the optimal concentrations of the MSCs in a rabbit model. Methods Osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of femur in 55 rabbits. Four experimental groups (11 rabbits/group) were treated by transplanting the composite of hUCB-MSCs and HA with various MSCs concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 x 107 cells/ml). One control group was left untreated. At 4, 8, and 16 weeks post-transplantation, the degree of cartilage repair was evaluated grossly and histologically. Findings Overall, transplanting hUCB-MSCs and HA hydrogel resulted in cartilage repair tissue with better quality than the control without transplantation (P = 0.015 in 0.1, P = 0.004 in 0.5, P = 0.004 in 1.0, P = 0.132 in 1.5 x 107 cells/ml). Interestingly, high cell concentration of hUCB-MSCs (1.5×107 cells/ml) was inferior to low cell concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 x 107 cells/ml) in cartilage repair (P = 0.394,P = 0.041, P = 0.699, respectively). The 0.5 x 107 cells/ml group showed the highest cartilage repair score at 4, 8 and 16 weeks post transplantation, and followed by 0.1x107 cells/ml group or 1.0 x 107 cell/ml group. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that transplantation of the composite of hUCB-MSCs and HA is beneficial for cartilage repair. In addition, this study shows that optimal MSC concentration needs to be determined for better cartilage repair. PMID:27824874

  7. Repair of superficial osteochondral defects with an autologous scaffold-free cartilage construct in a caprine model: implantation method and short-term results.

    PubMed

    Brehm, W; Aklin, B; Yamashita, T; Rieser, F; Trüb, T; Jakob, R P; Mainil-Varlet, P

    2006-12-01

    To compare four different implantation modalities for the repair of superficial osteochondral defects in a caprine model using autologous, scaffold-free, engineered cartilage constructs, and to describe the short-term outcome of successfully implanted constructs. Scaffold-free, autologous cartilage constructs were implanted within superficial osteochondral defects created in the stifle joints of nine adult goats. The implants were distributed between four 6-mm-diameter superficial osteochondral defects created in the trochlea femoris and secured in the defect using a covering periosteal flap (PF) alone or in combination with adhesives (platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or fibrin), or using PRP alone. Eight weeks after implantation surgery, the animals were killed. The defect sites were excised and subjected to macroscopic and histopathologic analyses. At 8 weeks, implants that had been held in place exclusively with a PF were well integrated both laterally and basally. The repair tissue manifested an architecture similar to that of hyaline articular cartilage. However, most of the implants that had been glued in place in the absence of a PF were lost during the initial 4-week phase of restricted joint movement. The use of human fibrin glue (FG) led to massive cell infiltration of the subchondral bone. The implantation of autologous, scaffold-free, engineered cartilage constructs might best be performed beneath a PF without the use of tissue adhesives. Successfully implanted constructs showed hyaline-like characteristics in adult goats within 2 months. Long-term animal studies and pilot clinical trials are now needed to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment strategy.

  8. Cartilage Repair With or Without Meniscal Transplantation and Osteotomy for Lateral Compartment Chondral Defects of the Knee: Case Series With Minimum 2-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D; Hussey, Kristen; Saltzman, Bryan M; McCormick, Frank M; Wilson, Hillary; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Cole, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    Treatment decision making for chondral defects in the knee is multifactorial. Articular cartilage pathology, malalignment, and meniscal deficiency must all be addressed to optimize surgical outcomes. To determine whether significant clinical improvements in validated clinical outcome scores are observed at minimum 2-year follow-up after articular cartilage repair of focal articular cartilage defects of the lateral compartment of the knee with or without concurrent distal femoral osteotomy and lateral meniscus transplant. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Symptomatic adults who underwent surgical treatment (microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI], osteochondral autograft or allograft) of full-thickness lateral compartment chondral defects of the knee with or without a postmeniscectomy compartment or valgus malalignment by a single surgeon with minimum 2-year follow-up were analyzed. Validated patient-reported and surgeon-measured outcomes were collected pre- and postsurgery. Pre- and postoperative outcomes were compared via Student t tests. Thirty-five subjects (mean age, 29.6 ± 10.5 years) were analyzed. Patients had been symptomatic for 2.51 ± 3.52 years prior to surgery and had undergone 2.11 ± 1.18 surgeries prior to study enrollment, with a mean duration of follow-up of 3.65 ± 1.71 years. The mean defect size was 4.42 ± 2.06 cm(2). Surgeries included ACI (n = 18), osteochondral allograft (n = 14), osteochondral autograft (n = 2), and microfracture (n = 1). There were 18 subjects who underwent concomitant surgery (14 lateral meniscus transplant, 3 distal femoral osteotomy, and 1 combined). Statistically significant (P < .05) and clinically meaningful improvements were observed at final follow-up in Lysholm, subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDS), Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales, Short Form-12 (SF-12) scores, and patient satisfaction. At follow-up, patients undergoing isolated articular

  9. Cartilage immunoprivilege depends on donor source and lesion location.

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; DuRaine, G D; Lee, C A; Huey, D J; Borjesson, D L; Murphy, B G; Hu, J C Y; Baumgarth, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2015-09-01

    The ability to repair damaged cartilage is a major goal of musculoskeletal tissue engineering. Allogeneic (same species, different individual) or xenogeneic (different species) sources can provide an attractive source of chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering, since autologous (same individual) cells are scarce. Immune rejection of non-autologous hyaline articular cartilage has seldom been considered due to the popular notion of "cartilage immunoprivilege". The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of allogeneic and xenogeneic engineered neocartilage tissue for cartilage repair. To address this, scaffold-free tissue engineered articular cartilage of syngeneic (same genetic background), allogeneic, and xenogeneic origin were implanted into two different locations of the rabbit knee (n=3 per group/location). Xenogeneic engineered cartilage and control xenogeneic chondral explants provoked profound innate inflammatory and adaptive cellular responses, regardless of transplant location. Cytological quantification of immune cells showed that, while allogeneic neocartilage elicited an immune response in the patella, negligible responses were observed when implanted into the trochlea; instead the responses were comparable to microfracture-treated empty defect controls. Allogeneic neocartilage survived within the trochlea implant site and demonstrated graft integration into the underlying bone. In conclusion, the knee joint cartilage does not represent an immune privileged site, strongly rejecting xenogeneic but not allogeneic chondrocytes in a location-dependent fashion. This difference in location-dependent survival of allogeneic tissue may be associated with proximity to the synovium. Through a series of in vivo studies this research demonstrates that articular cartilage is not fully immunoprivileged. In addition, we now show that anatomical location of the defect, even within the same joint compartment, strongly influences the degree of the

  10. [The anatomical structure similarity research on auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage].

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyong; Fan, Fei; Li, Wenzhi; Li, Binbin; You, Jianjun; Wang, Huan

    2015-09-01

    There are many scaffold materials of repairing nasal alar cartilage defects. Auricuiar cartilage was used extensively in terms of its abundant tissues, good elasticity, little donor-site malformation, good plasticity etc. The authors dissected auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage, measured cartilage's morphous data and found some similar territories with nasal alar cartilage in the structure of auricular cartilage. An anatomical study was performed using 10 adult cadavers acquired through Plastic Surgery Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Seven male and three female cadav-ers were included in the study. Harvest 20 auricular cartilage specimens and 20 nasal alar cartilage specimens. Then, Computed Tomography Scan on the auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage were performed. The datas were imported into mimics and three-dimensional reconstructions of the auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage were carried on. Parts of the auricular cartilage, such as conchal fossa, tragus, intertragic notch, and cymba of auricular concha, curs of helix and curs of helix, triangular fossa, are ana-tomically similar to nasal alar cartilage. This study reports the anatomy of auricular cartilage and nasal alar cartilage, found some territories in the auricular cartilage, such as conchal fossa, tragus, intertragic notch, and cymba of auricular concha, curs of helix and curs of helix, triangular fossa, are anatomically similar to nasal alar cartilage. This research provides the anatomical basis that auricular cartilage was used to repair the nasal cartilage defect.

  11. Autologous, allogeneic, induced pluripotent stem cell or a combination stem cell therapy? Where are we headed in cartilage repair and why: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Lucienne A; de Windt, Tommy S; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke C M; Saris, Daniël B F

    2015-05-15

    The evolution of articular cartilage repair procedures has resulted in a variety of cell-based therapies that use both autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). As these cells are increasingly available and show promising results both in vitro and in vivo, cell-based strategies, which aim to improve ease of use and cost-effectiveness, are progressively explored. The use of MSCs in cartilage repair makes it possible to develop single-stage cell-based therapies. However, true single-stage procedures rely on one intervention, which will limit cell sources to fraction concentrates containing autologous MSCs or culture-expanded allogeneic MSCs. So far, it seems both autologous and allogeneic cells can safely be applied, but clinical studies are still ongoing and little information on clinical outcome is available. Further development of cell-based therapies may lead to clinical-grade, standardized, off-the-shelf products with easy handling for orthopedic surgeons. Although as of yet no preclinical or clinical studies are ongoing which explore the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for cartilage repair, a good manufacturing practice-grade induced pluripotent stem cell line might become the basis for such a product in the future, providing that cell fate can be controlled. The use of stem cells in clinical trials brings along new ethical issues, such as proper controls and selecting primary outcome measures. More clinical trials are needed to estimate detailed risk-benefit ratios and trials must be carefully designed to minimize risks and burdens for patients while choosing outcome measures that allow for adequate comparison with results from similar trials. In this review, we discuss the different aspects of new stem cell-based treatments, including safety and ethical issues, as well as provide an overview of current clinical trials exploring these approaches and future perspectives.

  12. Morphometric evaluation of condylar cartilage of growing rats in response to mandibular retractive forces.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Milena Peixoto Nogueira; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; de Salles, Carlos Luiz Fernandes; de Souza, Fabrício Dias; Suga, Uhana Seifert Guimarães; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga

    2013-01-01

    The mandibular condylar surface is made up of four layers, i.e., an external layer composed of dense connective tissue, followed by a layer of undifferentiated cells, hyaline cartilage and bone. Few studies have demonstrated the behavior of the condylar cartilage when the mandible is positioned posteriorly, as in treatments for correcting functional Class III malocclusion. The aim of this study was to assess the morphologic and histological aspects of rat condyles in response to posterior positioning of the mandible. Thirty five-week-old male Wistar rats were selected and randomly divided into two groups: A control group (C) and an experimental group (E) which received devices for inducing mandibular retrusion. The animals were euthanized at time intervals of 7, 21 and 30 days after the experiment had began. For histological analysis, total condylar thickness was measured, including the proliferative, hyaline and hypertrophic layers, as well as each layer separately, totaling 30 measurements for each parameter of each animal. The greatest difference in cartilage thickness was observed in 21 days, although different levels were observed in the other periods. Group E showed an increase of 39.46% in the total layer, reflected by increases in the thickness of the hypertrophic (42.24%), hyaline (46.92%) and proliferative (17.70%) layers. Posteriorly repositioning the mandible produced a series of histological and morphological responses in the condyle, suggesting condylar and mandibular adaptation in rats.

  13. Enhanced apoptotic and reduced protective response in chondrocytes following endoplasmic reticulum stress in osteoarthritic cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Koji; Hirose, Jun; Senba, Kei; Yamabe, Soichiro; Oike, Yuichi; Gotoh, Tomomi; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been shown to participate in many disease pathologies. Although recent reports have demonstrated that ER stress in chondrocytes is present in human osteoarthritis (OA), its role in the pathology of cartilage degeneration, such as chondrocyte apoptosis, remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression of phosphorylated PERK (pPERK), ubiquitin (Ub), GRP78, CHOP, phosphorylated JNK (pJNK) and cleaved caspase-3 (C-CASP3) and the mRNA splicing of XBP1 (XBP1 splicing) in human OA cartilage by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Additionally, human chondrocytes were treated with several concentrations of tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer, to assess the impact of ER stress on the mRNA expression of CHOP, XBP1 splicing and apoptosis, as determined by real-time PCR, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses respectively. In human OA cartilage, the number of chondrocytes expressing pPERK, Ub, CHOP and pJNK positively correlated with cartilage degeneration and the number of C-CASP3-positive chondrocytes. XBP1 splicing and GRP78 expression in severe OA containing the greatest number of C-CASP3-positive chondrocytes were similar to the levels in mild OA, however, XBP1 splicing was higher in moderate OA than in mild and severe OA. Tunicamycin dose dependently increased CHOP expression and apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes. Although tunicamycin upregulated XBP1 splicing in cultured chondrocytes, its impact on XBP1 splicing was weakened at higher concentrations. In conclusion, the present results indicate that ER stress may contribute to chondrocyte apoptosis along with OA progression, which was closely associated with an enhanced apoptotic response and a reduced protective response by the cells. PMID:21294793

  14. Subchondral pre-solidified chitosan/blood implants elicit reproducible early osteochondral wound-repair responses including neutrophil and stromal cell chemotaxis, bone resorption and repair, enhanced repair tissue integration and delayed matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we evaluated a novel approach to guide the bone marrow-driven articular cartilage repair response in skeletally aged rabbits. We hypothesized that dispersed chitosan particles implanted close to the bone marrow degrade in situ in a molecular mass-dependent manner, and attract more stromal cells to the site in aged rabbits compared to the blood clot in untreated controls. Methods Three microdrill hole defects, 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm deep, were created in both knee trochlea of 30 month-old New Zealand White rabbits. Each of 3 isotonic chitosan solutions (150, 40, 10 kDa, 80% degree of deaceylation, with fluorescent chitosan tracer) was mixed with autologous rabbit whole blood, clotted with Tissue Factor to form cylindrical implants, and press-fit in drill holes in the left knee while contralateral holes received Tissue Factor or no treatment. At day 1 or day 21 post-operative, defects were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and stereology for bone and soft tissue repair. Results All 3 implants filled the top of defects at day 1 and were partly degraded in situ at 21 days post-operative. All implants attracted neutrophils, osteoclasts and abundant bone marrow-derived stromal cells, stimulated bone resorption followed by new woven bone repair (bone remodeling) and promoted repair tissue-bone integration. 150 kDa chitosan implant was less degraded, and elicited more apoptotic neutrophils and bone resorption than 10 kDa chitosan implant. Drilled controls elicited a poorly integrated fibrous or fibrocartilaginous tissue. Conclusions Pre-solidified implants elicit stromal cells and vigorous bone plate remodeling through a phase involving neutrophil chemotaxis. Pre-solidified chitosan implants are tunable by molecular mass, and could be beneficial for augmented marrow stimulation therapy if the recruited stromal cells can progress to bone and cartilage repair. PMID:23324433

  15. 49 CFR 230.67 - Responsibility for inspection and repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders § 230.67 Responsibility for inspection and repairs. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall inspect and repair all steam locomotives and tenders under their control. All...

  16. 49 CFR 230.67 - Responsibility for inspection and repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders § 230.67 Responsibility for inspection and repairs. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall inspect and repair all steam locomotives and tenders under their control. All...

  17. 49 CFR 230.67 - Responsibility for inspection and repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders § 230.67 Responsibility for inspection and repairs. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall inspect and repair all steam locomotives and tenders under their control. All...

  18. 49 CFR 230.67 - Responsibility for inspection and repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders § 230.67 Responsibility for inspection and repairs. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall inspect and repair all steam locomotives and tenders under their control. All defects...

  19. 49 CFR 230.67 - Responsibility for inspection and repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders § 230.67 Responsibility for inspection and repairs. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall inspect and repair all steam locomotives and tenders under their control. All defects...

  20. Participation of DNA repair in the response to 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Michael D.; Wilson, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-metabolite 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is employed clinically to manage solid tumors including colorectal and breast cancer. Intracellular metabolites of 5-FU can exert cytotoxic effects via inhibition of thymidylate synthetase, or through incorporation into RNA and DNA, events that ultimately activate apoptosis. In this review, we cover the current data implicating DNA repair processes in cellular responsiveness to 5-FU treatment. Evidence points to roles for base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). However, mechanistic details remain unexplained, and other pathways have not been exhaustively interrogated. Homologous recombination is of particular interest, because it resolves unrepaired DNA intermediates not properly dealt with by BER or MMR. Furthermore, crosstalk among DNA repair pathways and S-phase checkpoint signaling has not been examined. Ongoing efforts aim to design approaches and reagents that (i) approximate repair capacity and (ii) mediate strategic regulation of DNA repair in order to improve the efficacy of current anti-cancer treatments. PMID:18979208

  1. Repair of Torn Avascular Meniscal Cartilage Using Undifferentiated Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells: From In Vitro Optimization to a First‐in‐Human Study

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Michael R.; Howells, Nicholas R.; Parry, Michael C.; Austin, Eric; Kafienah, Wael; Brady, Kyla; Goodship, Allen E.; Eldridge, Jonathan D.; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meniscal cartilage tears are common and predispose to osteoarthritis (OA). Most occur in the avascular portion of the meniscus where current repair techniques usually fail. We described previously the use of undifferentiated autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded onto a collagen scaffold (MSC/collagen‐scaffold) to integrate meniscal tissues in vitro. Our objective was to translate this method into a cell therapy for patients with torn meniscus, with the long‐term goal of delaying or preventing the onset of OA. After in vitro optimization, we tested an ovine‐MSC/collagen‐scaffold in a sheep meniscal cartilage tear model with promising results after 13 weeks, although repair was not sustained over 6 months. We then conducted a single center, prospective, open‐label first‐in‐human safety study of patients with an avascular meniscal tear. Autologous MSCs were isolated from an iliac crest bone marrow biopsy, expanded and seeded into the collagen scaffold. The resulting human‐MSC/collagen‐scaffold implant was placed into the meniscal tear prior to repair with vertical mattress sutures and the patients were followed for 2 years. Five patients were treated and there was significant clinical improvement on repeated measures analysis. Three were asymptomatic at 24 months with no magnetic resonance imaging evidence of recurrent tear and clinical improvement in knee function scores. Two required subsequent meniscectomy due to retear or nonhealing of the meniscal tear at approximately 15 months after implantation. No other adverse events occurred. We conclude that undifferentiated MSCs could provide a safe way to augment avascular meniscal repair in some patients. Registration: EU Clinical Trials Register, 2010‐024162‐22. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1237–1248 PMID:28186682

  2. Altered responsiveness to TGF-β results in reduced Papss2 expression and alterations in the biomechanical properties of mouse articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have indicated that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling has a critical role in cartilage homeostasis and repair, yet the mechanisms of TGF-β's chondroprotective effects are not known. Our objective in this study was to identify downstream targets of TGF-β that could act to maintain biochemical and biomechanical properties of cartilage. Methods Tibial joints from 20-week-old mice that express a dominant-negative mutation of the TGF-β type II receptor (DNIIR) were graded histologically for osteoarthritic changes and tested by indentation to evaluate their mechanical properties. To identify gene targets of TGF-β, microarray analysis was performed using bovine articular chondrocytes grown in micromass culture that were either treated with TGF-β or left untreated. Phosphoadenosine phosphosynthetase 2 (PAPSS2) was identified as a TGF-β-responsive gene. Papss2 expression is crucial for proper sulfation of cartilage matrix, and its deficiency causes skeletal defects in mice and humans that overlap with those seen in mice with mutations in TGF-β-signaling genes. Regulation of Papss2 was verified by real time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Alterations in sulfation of glycosaminoglycans were analyzed by critical electrolyte concentration and Alcian blue staining and immunofluorescence for chondroitin-4-sulfate, unsulfated chondroitin and the aggrecan core protein. Results DNIIR mutants showed reduced mechanical properties and osteoarthritis-like changes when compared to wild-type control mice. Microarray analysis identified a group of genes encoding matrix-modifying enzymes that were regulated by TGF-β. Papss2 was upregulated in bovine articular chondrocytes after treatment with TGF-β and downregulated in cartilage from DNIIR mice. Articular cartilage in DNIIR mice demonstrated reduced Alcian blue staining at critical electrolyte concentrations and reduced chondroitin-4-sulfate staining. Staining for unsulfated

  3. Sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ayman A.; El Wardany, Mohammed A.; Abo El Ezz, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Many reconstructive techniques have been proposed to prevent postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. However, no total agreement has been reached to the best technique. Aim: Assessment of the efficacy of sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain. Study Design: This is a retrospective case series study, level IV evidence. Materials and Methods : Twenty three patients were involved in this study. Seventeen patients had intraoperative CSF leakage and were treated immediately by our technique. Six patients had postoperative CSF rhinorrhea and had delayed treatment with our technique after failure of conservative measures and external lumbar CSF drainage for more than three days. The technique involved intradural placement of autologous muscle graft supplemented with extradural composite septal cartilage graft, composed of a piece of the posterior cartilaginous septum with its covering mucoperichondrium on one side only to fit into the sellar defect as a double layer button. Results: CSF leak was of grade 1 in 6 patients (26.1%), grade 2 in 10 patients (43.5%) and grade 3 in 7 patients (30.4%). None of the patients in our study had postoperative CSF leak after the use of our technique during the follow up period (mean 24 ± 10.47 standard deviation months). None of the patients developed treatment-related complications. All the patients had well developed mucosal covering of the sellar defect after two months. Conclusion: Our technique of sellar repair by using autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts is effective in treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain even in

  4. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC: Shetty-Kim technique) - A matrix based acellular single stage arthroscopic cartilage repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Kim, Seok Jung; Shetty, Vishvas; Jang, Jae Deog; Huh, Sung Woo; Lee, Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The defects of articular cartilage in the knee joint are a common degenerative disease and currently there are several established techniques to treat this problem, each with their own advantages and shortcomings. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard but the technique is expensive, time-consuming and most versions require two stage procedures and an arthrotomy. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) is a single-stage arthroscopic procedure and we developed. This method uses microfracture technique with atelocollagen mixed with fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We introduce this ACIC techniques and its scientific background.

  5. Repair of bone defects in vivo using tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage grafts produced from nasal chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, Katie; Kwarciak, Agnieska; Freeman, Christine; Brook, Ian; Hatton, Paul; Crawford, Aileen

    2017-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains clinically challenging. The aim of our study was to use a rat model to use nasal chondrocytes to engineer a hypertrophic cartilage tissue which could be remodelled into bone in vivo by endochondral ossification. Primary adult rat nasal chondrocytes were isolated from the nasal septum, the cell numbers expanded in monolayer culture and the cells cultured in vitro on polyglycolic acid scaffolds in chondrogenic medium for culture periods of 5-10 weeks. Hypertrophic differentiation was assessed by determining the temporal expression of key marker genes and proteins involved in hypertrophic cartilage formation. The temporal changes in the genes measured reflected the temporal changes observed in the growth plate. Collagen II gene expression increased 6 fold by day 7 and was then significantly downregulated from day 14 onwards. Conversely, collagen X gene expression was detectable by day 14 and increased 100-fold by day 35. The temporal increase in collagen X expression was mirrored by increases in alkaline phosphatase gene expression which also was detectable by day 14 with a 30-fold increase in gene expression by day 35. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the engineered constructs showed increased chondrocyte cell volume (31-45 μm), deposition of collagen X in the extracellular matrix and expression of alkaline phosphatase activity. However, no cartilage mineralisation was observed in in vitro culture of up to 10 weeks. On subcutaneous implantation of the hypertrophic engineered constructs, the grafts became vascularised, cartilage mineralisation occurred and loss of the proteoglycan in the matrix was observed. Implantation of the hypertrophic engineered constructs into a rat cranial defect resulted in angiogenesis, mineralisation and remodelling of the cartilage tissue into bone. Micro-CT analysis indicated that defects which received the engineered hypertrophic constructs showed 38.48% in bone volume

  6. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Seedhom, Bahaa B.; Carey, Duane O.; Bulpitt, Andy J.; Treanor, Darren E.; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted. PMID:26850081

  7. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Scott; Seedhom, Bahaa B; Carey, Duane O; Bulpitt, Andy J; Treanor, Darren E; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted.

  8. Human Suprapatellar Fat Pad-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Repair in a Model of Severe Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Criado, Ignacio; Mellado-López, Maravillas; Alastrue-Agudo, Ana; Griffeth, Richard J; Forteza-Vila, Jerónimo; García, Montserrat

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage degeneration is associated with degenerative bone and joint processes in severe osteoarthritis (OA). Spontaneous cartilage regeneration is extremely limited. Often the treatment consists of a partial or complete joint implant. Adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) transplantation has been shown to restore degenerated cartilage; however, regenerative differences of ASC would depend on the source of adipose tissue. The infra- and suprapatellar fat pads surrounding the knee offer a potential autologous source of ASC for patients after complete joint substitution. When infrapatellar- and suprapatellar-derived stromal vascular fractions (SVF) were compared, a significantly higher CD105 (+) population was found in the suprapatellar fat. In addition, the suprapatellar SVF exhibited increased numbers of colony formation units and a higher population doubling in culture compared to the infrapatellar fraction. Both the suprapatellar- and infrapatellar-derived ASC were differentiated in vitro into mature adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. However, the suprapatellar-derived ASC showed higher osteogenic and chondrogenic efficiency. Suprapatellar-derived ASC transplantation in a severe OA mouse model significantly diminished the OA-associated knee inflammation and cartilage degenerative grade, significantly increasing the production of glycosaminoglycan and inducing endogenous chondrogenesis in comparison with the control group. Overall, suprapatellar-derived ASC offer a potential autologous regenerative treatment for patients with multiple degenerative OA. PMID:28769981

  9. Human Suprapatellar Fat Pad-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Repair in a Model of Severe Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Criado, Ignacio; Meseguer-Ripolles, Jose; Mellado-López, Maravillas; Alastrue-Agudo, Ana; Griffeth, Richard J; Forteza-Vila, Jerónimo; Cugat, Ramón; García, Montserrat; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage degeneration is associated with degenerative bone and joint processes in severe osteoarthritis (OA). Spontaneous cartilage regeneration is extremely limited. Often the treatment consists of a partial or complete joint implant. Adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) transplantation has been shown to restore degenerated cartilage; however, regenerative differences of ASC would depend on the source of adipose tissue. The infra- and suprapatellar fat pads surrounding the knee offer a potential autologous source of ASC for patients after complete joint substitution. When infrapatellar- and suprapatellar-derived stromal vascular fractions (SVF) were compared, a significantly higher CD105 (+) population was found in the suprapatellar fat. In addition, the suprapatellar SVF exhibited increased numbers of colony formation units and a higher population doubling in culture compared to the infrapatellar fraction. Both the suprapatellar- and infrapatellar-derived ASC were differentiated in vitro into mature adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. However, the suprapatellar-derived ASC showed higher osteogenic and chondrogenic efficiency. Suprapatellar-derived ASC transplantation in a severe OA mouse model significantly diminished the OA-associated knee inflammation and cartilage degenerative grade, significantly increasing the production of glycosaminoglycan and inducing endogenous chondrogenesis in comparison with the control group. Overall, suprapatellar-derived ASC offer a potential autologous regenerative treatment for patients with multiple degenerative OA.

  10. Cartilage Engineering and Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toffanin, R.; Bader, A.; Cogoli, A.; Carda, C.; Fantazzini, P.; Garrido, L.; Gomez, S.; Hall, L.; Martin, I.; Murano, E.; Poncelet, D.; Pörtner, R.; Hoffmann, F.; Roekaerts, D.; Ronney, P.; Triebel, W.; Tummers, M.

    2005-06-01

    The complex effects of mechanical forces and growth factors on articular cartilage development still need to be investigated in order to identify optimal conditions for articular cartilage repair. Strictly controlled in vitro studies under modelled or space microgravity conditions can improve our understanding of the fundamental role of gravity in articular cartilage development. The main objective of this Topical Team is to use modelled microgravity as a tool to elucidate the fundamental science of cartilage regeneration. Particular attention is, therefore, given to the effects of physical forces under altered gravitational conditions, applied using controlled bioreactor systems, on cell metabolism, cell differentiation and tissue development. Specific attention is also directed toward the potential advantages of using magnetic resonance methods for the non-destructive characterisation of scaffolds, chondrocytes-polymer constructs and tissue engineered cartilage.

  11. Responsiveness of quantitative cartilage measures over one year in knee osteoarthritis: comparison of radiography and MRI assessments.

    PubMed

    Cromer, Megan S; Bourne, Roger M; Fransen, Marlene; Fulton, Roger; Wang, Shih-Chang

    2014-01-01

    To directly compare the responsiveness of quantitative imaging measures of disease progression in knee osteoarthritis (OA). In the medial compartment of the knee comparison was made between: 1) radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN); 2) global quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) of cartilage volume; 3) regional qMRI of cartilage thickness; and 4) regional analysis using an ordered value (OV) methodology. 3T MRI and weight-bearing radiography of the knees were performed at baseline and 1-year timepoints in 23 subjects (mean age 63 years) with symptomatic knee OA. Standardized response means (SRM) were calculated for each measure. Statistical analysis to determine significance of change between timepoints was performed with a two-tailed Student's t-test (JSN, global, regional analysis) and nonparametric Mann-Whitney test (ordered values). At 1 year, global cartilage volume losses of 2.3% (SRM -0.44) in the medial tibia and 6.9% in the medial femur (SRM -0.74) were recorded. SRM for JSN was -0.46. Regional analysis revealed largest reductions in cartilage thickness in the external (SRM -0.84) weight-bearing subregion of the medial femur and in the posterior subregion of the medial tibia (SRM -0.79). OV analysis in the medial compartment revealed areas of cartilage thinning (four ranked OV) and cartilage thickening (two ranked OV). The MRI OV approach proved to be a superior analysis tool for detecting changes in cartilage morphology over a 1-year period. Radiographically defined JSN was found to be the least responsive measurement method of knee OA disease progression. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A novel, minimally-invasive technique of cartilage repair in the human knee using arthroscopic microfracture and injections of mesenchymal stem cells and hyaluronic acid--a prospective comparative study on safety and short-term efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin B L; Wang, Victor T Z; Chan, Yiong Huak; Hui, James H P

    2012-11-01

    Most current cell-based cartilage repair techniques require some form of scaffolds and 2 separate surgical procedures. We propose a novel, scaffold-less technique of cartilage repair in the human knee that combines arthroscopic microfracture and outpatient intra-articular injections of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and hyaluronic acid (HA). Seventy matched (age, sex, lesion size) knees with symptomatic cartilage defects underwent cartilage repair with the proposed technique (n = 35) or an open technique (n = 35) in which the MSCs were implanted beneath a sutured periosteal patch over the defect. Prospective evaluation of both groups were performed using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Cartilage Injury Evaluation Package, which included questions from the Short-Form (SF-36) Health Survey, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation form, Lysholm knee scale, and Tegner activity level scale. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation was also performed at 1 year for most patients. There were no clinically significant adverse events reported through the course of our study. At the fi nal follow-up (mean = 24.5 months), there was significant improvement in mean IKDC, Lysholm, SF-36 physical component score and visual analogue pain scores in both treatment groups. In the short term, the results of this novel technique are comparable to the open procedure with the added advantages of being minimally invasive and requiring only a single operation under general anaesthesia. Its safety has been validated and its efficacy is currently being evaluated in an ongoing randomised controlled trial.

  13. Response of engineered cartilage tissue to biochemical agents as studied by proton magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Potter, K; Butler, J J; Horton, W E; Spencer, R G

    2000-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results correlate with the biochemical composition of cartilage matrix and can therefore be used to evaluate natural tissue development and the effects of biologic interventions. Chondrocytes harvested from day-16 chick embryo sterna were inoculated into an MRI-compatible hollow-fiber bioreactor. The tissue that formed over a period of 2-4 weeks was studied biochemically, histologically, and with MRI. Besides natural development, the response of the tissue to administration of retinoic acid, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and daily dosing with ascorbic acid was studied. Tissue wet and dry weight, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and collagen content all increased with development time, while tissue hydration decreased. The administration of retinoic acid resulted in a significant reduction in tissue wet weight, proteoglycan content, and cell number and an increase in hydration as compared with controls. Daily dosing with ascorbic acid increased tissue collagen content significantly compared with controls, while the administration of IL-1beta resulted in increased proteoglycan content. The water proton longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates correlated well with GAG and collagen concentrations of the matrix as well as with tissue hydration. In contrast, the magnetization transfer value for the tissue correlated only with total collagen. Finally, the self-diffusion coefficient of water correlated with tissue hydration. Parameters derived from MR images obtained noninvasively can be used to quantitatively assess the composition of cartilage tissue generated in a bioreactor. We conclude that MRI is a promising modality for the assessment of certain biochemical properties of cartilage in a wide variety of settings.

  14. Brain’s DNA Repair Response to Neurotoxicants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    mycotoxins , and an organochloriine pesticide). At the end of the second year of the project, we have found that the temporal and spatial profile of OGG1...BODY TASK 1. MEASUREMENT OF REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE AND DNA REPAIR RESPONSES ELICITED BY MYCOTOXINS (OCHRATOXIN-A, RUBRATOXIN...1) The effects of two mycotoxins (ochratoxin-A and rubratoxin-B), and an organochlorine pesticide (dieldrin), on the capacity of brain to repair

  15. The relationship of the compressive modulus of articular cartilage with its deformation response to cyclic loading: does cartilage optimize its modulus so as to minimize the strains arising in it due to the prevalent loading regime?

    PubMed

    Barker, M K; Seedhom, B B

    2001-03-01

    To investigate the relationship of the instantaneous compressive modulus with its deformation response to cyclic loading typical of that encountered at the knee joint during level walking. The study was performed on 24 osteochondral plugs taken from three unembalmed cadaveric knees. As the compressive modulus of cartilage has been shown to vary topographically across the knee in an established manner, the specimens were taken from specific sites on the femur and tibia of each knee. All the cartilage specimens were immersed in Hanks' salt solution at 37 degrees C and were subjected to the same cyclic loading regimen that was representative of a typical walking cycle in a specialized indentation apparatus, for over 1 h. The viscous and elastic components of matrix strain, the creep rate and the cartilage compressive modulus were measured. The latter was found to be significantly related to the strain response of cartilage to cyclic loading. Elastic strain varied exponentially with the compressive modulus; specimens with a modulus less than 4 MPa experienced elastic strains in the range 0.18-0.36, whereas stiffer specimens experienced strains between 0.05 and 0.13. Viscous strain varied linearly with cartilage stiffness and was as low as 0.02 at the lower values of the compressive modulus but increased to 0.22 for a compressive modulus of 18 MN/m(2). The rate of creep under cyclic load was inversely linearly related to cartilage stiffness. The strain response of soft specimens approached steady state by 200 cycles but that of stiff specimens did not approach it until 1300 cycles. It was hypothesized that the viscous strain response of cartilage can be explained in terms of differences in permeability between specimens of different compressive modulus, stiffer cartilage having a lower permeability than soft cartilage.

  16. Antirheumatic drug response signatures in human chondrocytes: potential molecular targets to stimulate cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Kristin; Häupl, Thomas; Lübke, Carsten; Ringe, Jochen; Morawietz, Lars; Wachtel, Anja; Sittinger, Michael; Kaps, Christian

    2009-01-01

    treatment with NSAIDs and the DMARD chloroquine phosphate had only moderate to minor effects. Treatment with the DMARDs azathioprine, gold sodium thiomalate, and methotrexate efficiently reverted chondrocyte RA-related gene expression toward the 'healthy' level. Pathways of cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, transforming growth factor-beta/Toll-like receptor/Jak-STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) signalling and extracellular matrix receptor interaction were targeted by antirheumatics. Conclusions Our findings indicate that RA-relevant stimuli result in the molecular activation of catabolic and inflammatory processes in human chondrocytes that are reverted by antirheumatic treatment. Candidate genes that evolved in this study for new therapeutic approaches include suppression of specific immune responses (COX-2, IL-23A, and IL-6) and activation of cartilage regeneration (CTGF and CYR-61). PMID:19192274

  17. Repair of large full-thickness cartilage defect by activating endogenous peripheral blood stem cells and autologous periosteum flap transplantation combined with patellofemoral realignment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei-Li; Ao, Ying-Fang; Ke, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Gong, Xi; Jiang, Dong; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2014-03-01

    Minimal-invasive procedure and one-step surgery offer autologous mesenchymal stem cells derived from peripheral blood (PB-MSCs) a promising prospective in the field of cartilage regeneration. We report a case of a 19-year-old male athlete of kickboxing with ICRS grade IV chondral lesions at the 60° region of lateral femoral trochlea, which was repaired by activating endogenous PB-MSCs plus autologous periosteum flap transplantation combined with correcting the patellofemoral malalignment. After a 7.5 year follow-up, the result showed that the patient returned to competitive kickboxing. Second-look under arthroscopy showed a smooth surface at 8 months postoperation. The IKDC 2000 subjective score, Lysholm score and Tegner score were 95, 98 and 9 respectively at the final follow up. CT and MRI evaluations showed a significant improvement compared with those of pre-operation. © 2013.

  18. Immunological response to tissue-engineered cartilage derived from auricular chondrocytes and a PLLA scaffold in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2010-02-01

    The immune response against biomaterials in tissue-engineered constructs could potentially worsen the outcome of tissue regeneration, but immunological reactions between host and donor in tissue-engineered constructs remain to be clarified. In the present study, we syngenically transplanted tissue-engineered cartilage constructs consisting of C57BL/6 mice auricular chondrocytes and poly-l-lactic acid scaffolds (MW:200,000) into EGFP transgenic mice of C57BL/6 background, and evaluated the response by the localization of donor-derived and host-derived cells, the latter of which were distinguished by the presence of EGFP. While donor-derived cells constituted the areas of regenerated cartilage, host-derived cells were increased in number for the initial two weeks, and then decreased and excluded to non-cartilage areas thereafter. Furthermore, EGFP positivity was mostly co-localized with that of F4/80, suggesting most of the host-derived cells in the tissue-engineered constructs could be macrophages. Immunohistochemical staining of the tissue-engineered cartilage constructs revealed expression of factors related to immune privilege in chondrocytes, such as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), fas ligand (FasL) and others. Co-culture of chondrocytes and macrophages in vitro increased the expression of MIF and FasL in the chondrocytes, suggesting that chondrocytes in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs could regulate the actions of host-derived macrophages by expressing factors related to immune privilege.

  19. Morphological and biochemical T2 evaluation of cartilage repair tissue based on a hybrid double echo at steady state (DESS-T2d) approach.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Goetz H; Mamisch, Tallal C; Zak, Lukas; Mauerer, Andreas; Apprich, Sebastian; Stelzeneder, David; Marlovits, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2011-10-01

    To use a new approach which provides, based on the widely used three-dimensional double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequence, in addition to the morphological information, the generation of biochemical T2 maps in one hybrid sequence. In 50 consecutive MRIs at 3.0 Tesla (T) after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the knee, by the use this new DESS-T2d approach, the morphological Magnetic resonance Observation of CArtilage Repair Tissue (MOCART) score, as well as biochemical T2d values were assessed. Furthermore, these results were correlated to standard morphological sequences as well as to standard multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping. The MOCART score correlated (Pearson:0.945; P < 0.001) significantly as assessed with standard morphological sequences (68.8 ± 13.2) and the morphological images of the DESS T2d sequence (68.7 ± 12.6). T2 and T2d relaxation times (ms) were comparable in between the control cartilage (T2: 52.5 ± 11.4; T2d: 46.6 ± 10.3) and the repair tissue (T2: 54.4 ± 11.4; T2d: 47.5 ± 13.0) (T2: P = 0.157; T2d: P = 0.589). As expected, T2d values were lower than the standard-T2 values, however, both functional relaxation times correlated significantly (Pearson:0.429; P < 0.001). The presented hybrid approach provides the possibility to combine morphological and biochemical MRI in one fast 3D sequence, and thus, may attract for the clinical use of biochemical MRI. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Immunology and cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin; Sigal, Ian R; Grande, Daniel A

    2015-12-01

    The intrinsic regenerative capacity of avascular cartilage is limited. Cartilage injuries result in chronic, non-healing lesions requiring surgical management. Frequently, these surgical techniques make use of allogeneic cells and tissues. This review discusses the immune status of these materials. Cartilage allografts, often used in orthopedic and plastic surgeries, have rarely provoked a significant immune response. In whole cartilage transplants, the dense matrix produced by chondrocytes inhibits lymphocyte migration, preventing immune detection rendering them "antigen sequestered." It is unclear whether isolated chondrocytes are immune-privileged; chondrocytes express immune inhibitory B7 molecules, indicating that they have some ability to modulate immune reactions. Allogeneic cartilage grafts often involve a bony portion often retaining immunogenic cells and proteins-to facilitate good surgical attachment and concern that this may enhance inflammation and immune rejection. However, studies of failed cartilage grafts have not found immune responses to be a contributing factor. Meniscus allografts, which also retain a bony portion, raise similar concerns as cartilage allografts. Despite this, the plugs improved patient outcomes, indicating that the immunological effects were not clinically significant. Finally, allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) also are being investigated as a treatment for cartilage damage. MSCs have been demonstrated to have unique immunomodulatory properties including their ability to reduce immune cell infiltration and to modulate inflammation. In summary, the immunogenic properties of cartilage vary with the type of allograft used: Cartilage allografts demonstrate active immune-suppressive mechanisms as evidenced by lack of allograft rejection, while MSC allografts appear to be safe for transplantation.

  1. Histochemical evidence for radiation enhancement of lysosomal response following hyperthermia of tail cartilage in baby rat

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, R.; Rogers, M.A.; Hume, S.P.

    1981-08-01

    The activity of the lysosomal enzyme ..beta..-glucuronidase has been investigated in cartilage following heating and/or x irradiation of the baby rat tail. No increase in enzyme activity above the control level was seen after irradiation for up to 48 hours after treatment. In contrast, enzyme activity was increased immediately after a hyperthermal treatment of 44/sup 0/C for 30 min, was maximal at 2x control level by 2 to 5 hours, and returned to normal by 10 hours after treatment. A less severe treatment of 44/sup 0/C for 15 min resulted in a smaller increase in ..beta..-glucuronidase activity over the same time course. When 4 Gy of x rays were given immediately after 44/sup 0/C for 15 min, the enzyme activity was increased above the response following heat alone and decayed more slowly. By 48 hours after treatment, the enzyme activity was still significantly greater than the control level. The data indicate that hyperthermal treatments which are insufficient to cause gross tissue damage can cause a transient increase in ..beta..-glucuronidase activity in baby rat cartilage.

  2. Further Insight into the Depth-Dependent Microstructural Response of Cartilage to Compression Using a Channel Indentation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Thambyah, Ashvin; Broom, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Stress relaxation and structural analysis were used to investigate the zonally differentiated microstructural response to compression of the integrated cartilage-on-bone tissue system. Fifteen cartilage-on-bone samples were divided into three equal groups and their stress relaxation responses obtained at three different levels of axial compressive strain defined as low (~20%), medium (~40%) and high (~60%). All tests were performed using a channel indenter which included a central relief space designed to capture the response of the matrix adjacent to the directly loaded regions. On completion of each stress relaxation test and while maintaining the imposed axial strain, the samples were formalin fixed, decalcified, and then sectioned for microstructural analysis. Chondron aspect ratios were used to determine the extent of relative strain at different zonal depths. The stress relaxation response of cartilage to all three defined levels of axial strain displayed an initial highly viscous response followed by a significant elastic response. Chondron aspect ratio measurements showed that at the lowest level of compression, axial deformation was confined to the superficial cartilage layer, while in the medium and high axial strain samples the deformation extended into the midzone. The cells in the deep zone remained undeformed for all compression levels. PMID:24023589

  3. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies.

  4. Deciphering chondrocyte behaviour in matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation to undergo accurate cartilage repair with hyaline matrix.

    PubMed

    Demoor, M; Maneix, L; Ollitrault, D; Legendre, F; Duval, E; Claus, S; Mallein-Gerin, F; Moslemi, S; Boumediene, K; Galera, P

    2012-06-01

    Since the emergence in the 1990s of the autologous chondrocytes transplantation (ACT) in the treatment of cartilage defects, the technique, corresponding initially to implantation of chondrocytes, previously isolated and amplified in vitro, under a periosteal membrane, has greatly evolved. Indeed, the first generations of ACT showed their limits, with in particular the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the monolayer culture, inducing the synthesis of fibroblastic collagens, notably type I collagen to the detriment of type II collagen. Beyond the clinical aspect with its encouraging results, new biological substitutes must be tested to obtain a hyaline neocartilage. Therefore, the use of differentiated chondrocytes phenotypically stabilized is essential for the success of ACT at medium and long-term. That is why researchers try now to develop more reliable culture techniques, using among others, new types of biomaterials and molecules known for their chondrogenic activity, giving rise to the 4th generation of ACT. Other sources of cells, being able to follow chondrogenesis program, are also studied. The success of the cartilage regenerative medicine is based on the phenotypic status of the chondrocyte and on one of its essential component of the cartilage, type II collagen, the expression of which should be supported without induction of type I collagen. The knowledge accumulated by the scientific community and the experience of the clinicians will certainly allow to relief this technological challenge, which influence besides, the validation of such biological substitutes by the sanitary authorities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The cartilage-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Hoemann, Caroline D; Lafantaisie-Favreau, Charles-Hubert; Lascau-Coman, Viorica; Chen, Gaoping; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica

    2012-05-01

    In the knee joint, the purpose of the cartilage-bone interface is to maintain structural integrity of the osteochondral unit during walking, kneeling, pivoting, and jumping--during which tensile, compressive, and shear forces are transmitted from the viscoelastic articular cartilage layer to the much stiffer mineralized end of the long bone. Mature articular cartilage is integrated with subchondral bone through a approximately 20 to approximately 250 microm thick layer of calcified cartilage. Inside the calcified cartilage layer, perpendicular chondrocyte-derived collagen type II fibers become structurally cemented to collagen type I osteoid deposited by osteoblasts. The mature mineralization front is delineated by a thin approximately 5 microm undulating tidemark structure that forms at the base of articular cartilage. Growth plate cartilage is anchored to epiphyseal bone, sometimes via a thin layer of calcified cartilage and tidemark, while the hypertrophic edge does not form a tidemark and undergoes continual vascular invasion and endochondral ossification (EO) until skeletal maturity upon which the growth plates are fully resorbed and replaced by bone. In this review, the formation of the cartilage-bone interface during skeletal development and cartilage repair, and its structure and composition are presented. Animal models and human anatomical studies show that the tidemark is a dynamic structure that forms within a purely collagen type II-positive and collagen type I-negative hyaline cartilage matrix. Cartilage repair strategies that elicit fibrocartilage, a mixture of collagen type I and type II, are predicted to show little tidemark/calcified cartilage regeneration and to develop a less stable repair tissue-bone interface. The tidemark can be regenerated through a bone marrow-driven growth process of EO near the articular surface.

  6. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Alexander J; Gardner, Oliver F W; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W; Stoddart, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  7. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Alexander J.; Gardner, Oliver F. W.; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W.; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  8. Role of mismatch repair in the Escherichia coli UVM response.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H S; Palejwala, V A; Rahman, M S; Dunman, P M; Wang, G; Humayun, M Z

    1996-12-01

    Mutagenesis at 3,N4-ethenocytosine (epsilonC), a nonpairing mutagenic lesion, is significantly enhanced in Escherichia coli cells pretreated with UV, alkylating agents, or H2O2. This effect, termed UVM (for UV modulation of mutagenesis), is distinct from known DNA damage-inducible responses, such as the SOS response, the adaptive response to alkylating agents, or the oxyR-mediated response to oxidative agents. Here, we have addressed the hypothesis that UVM results from transient depletion of a mismatch repair activity that normally acts to reduce mutagenesis. To test whether the loss of mismatch repair activities results in the predicted constitutive UVM phenotype, E. coli cells defective for methyl-directed mismatch repair, for very-short-patch repair, or for the N-glycosylase activities MutY and MutM were treated with the UVM-inducing agent 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine, with subsequent transfection of M13 viral single-stranded DNA bearing a site-specific epsilonC lesion. Survival of the M13 DNA was measured as transfection efficiency, and mutation fixation at the lesion was characterized by multiplex sequencing technology. The results showed normal UVM induction patterns in all the repair-defective strains tested. In addition, normal UVM induction was observed in cells overexpressing MutH, MutL, or MutS. All strains displayed UVM reactivation, the term used to describe the increased survival of epsilonC-containing DNA in UVM-induced cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the UVM response is independent of known mismatch repair systems in E. coli and may thus represent a previously unrecognized misrepair or misreplication pathway.

  9. Angiogenic response in the chick chorioallantoic membrane model to laser-irradiated cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Wong, Brian J.; Milner, Thomas E.; Wilson, Marie; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    1999-06-01

    Laser radiation can be used to reshape cartilage grafts via thermally mediated stress relaxation. While several studies have addressed the biophysical changes accompanying reshaping, cartilage viability following laser irradiation has not been extensively investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of angioinvasion of irradiated cartilage explant placed onto the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Angioinvasion of the tissue matrix does not occur in viable cartilage tissue, whereas denatured tissue is readily vasculairzed and/or resorbed in vivo. Porcine septal cartilage specimens were removed from freshly sacrificed animals and divided into three protocols (n=10 each group) consisting of an untreated control, cartilage boiled in saline solution for one hour, and a laser irradiated group (Nd:YAG, λ=1.32 μm, 30.8 W/cm2, irradiation time = 10 sec). Following laser irradiation, tissue specimens were washed in antibiotic solution sand cut into small cubes (~1.5 mm3). The cartilage specimens were placed onto the surface of twenty CAMs, six of which, survived the entire 14 days incubation period. After incubation, the membranes and specimens were fixed in situ with formaldehyde, an then photographed using a dissection microscope. Cartilage specimens were prepared for histologic evaluation and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Examination with a dissecting microscope showed no obvious vascular invasion of the cartilage or loss of gross tissue integrity in both the control and laser treated groups. In contrast, boiled specimens appeared to be partially or completely resorbed by the surrounding CAM vascular network. These gross findings were also confirmed by histological examination. In summary, our preliminary studies suggest that cartilage specimens treated using the present laser parameters remain resistant to angioinvasion or metabolism by the CAM, whereas boiled tissue undergoes resorption. Clinically, uncontrolled heating may

  10. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  11. Characterization of cartilage metabolic response to static and dynamic stress using a mechanical explant test system.

    PubMed

    Torzilli, P A; Grigiene, R; Huang, C; Friedman, S M; Doty, S B; Boskey, A L; Lust, G

    1997-01-01

    A new mechanical explant test system was used to study the metabolic response (via proteoglycan biosynthesis) of mature, weight-bearing canine articular cartilage subjected to static and dynamic compressive stresses. Stresses ranging from 0.5 to 24 MPa were applied sinusoidally at 1 Hz for intervals of 2-24 h. The explants were loaded in unconfined compression and compared to age-matched unloaded explants. Both static and dynamic compressive stress significantly decreased proteoglycan biosynthesis (range 25-85%) for all loading time intervals. The inhibition was proportional to the applied stress but was independent of loading time. After rehydration upon load removal, the measured water content of the loaded explants was not different from the unloaded explants for all test variables. Autoradiographic and electron microscopic analysis of loaded explants showed viable chondrocytes throughout the matrix. Our results suggest that the decreased metabolic response of cyclically loaded explants may be dominated by the static component (RMS) of the dynamic load. Furthermore, the observed decreased metabolism may be more representative of the in situ tissue response than that of unloaded explants, in which we found an increasing rate of metabolism for up to 6 days after explant removal.

  12. A novel nano-structured porous polycaprolactone scaffold improves hyaline cartilage repair in a rabbit model compared to a collagen type I/III scaffold: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Hansen, Ole Møller; Kristiansen, Asger Albæk; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Nielsen, Agnete Desirée; Nygaard, Jens Vinge; Bünger, Cody Erik; Lind, Martin

    2012-06-01

    To develop a nano-structured porous polycaprolactone (NSP-PCL) scaffold and compare the articular cartilage repair potential with that of a commercially available collagen type I/III (Chondro-Gide) scaffold. By combining rapid prototyping and thermally induced phase separation, the NSP-PCL scaffold was produced for matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation. Lyophilizing a water-dioxane-PCL solution created micro and nano-pores. In vitro: The scaffolds were seeded with rabbit chondrocytes and cultured in hypoxia for 6 days. qRT-PCR was performed using primers for sox9, aggrecan, collagen type 1 and 2. In vivo: 15 New Zealand White Rabbits received bilateral osteochondral defects in the femoral intercondylar grooves. Autologous chondrocytes were harvested 4 weeks prior to surgery. There were 3 treatment groups: (1) NSP-PCL scaffold without cells. (2) The Chondro-Gide scaffold with autologous chondrocytes and (3) NSP-PCL scaffold with autologous chondrocytes. Observation period was 13 weeks. Histological evaluation was made using the O'Driscoll score. In vitro: The expressions of sox9 and aggrecan were higher in the NSP-PCL scaffold, while expression of collagen 1 was lower compared to the Chondro-Gide scaffold. In vivo: Both NSP-PCL scaffolds with and without cells scored significantly higher than the Chondro-Gide scaffold when looking at the structural integrity and the surface regularity of the repair tissue. No differences were found between the NSP-PCL scaffold with and without cells. The NSP-PCL scaffold demonstrated higher in vitro expression of chondrogenic markers and had higher in vivo histological scores compared to the Chondro-Gide scaffold. The improved chondrocytic differentiation can potentially produce more hyaline cartilage during clinical cartilage repair. It appears to be a suitable cell-free implant for hyaline cartilage repair and could provide a less costly and more effective treatment option than the Chondro-Gide scaffold with cells.

  13. Contact models of repaired articular surfaces: influence of loading conditions and the superficial tangential zone.

    PubMed

    Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2011-07-01

    The superficial tangential zone (STZ) plays a significant role in normal articular cartilage's ability to support loads and retain fluids. To date, tissue engineering efforts have not replicated normal STZ function in cartilage repairs. This finite element study examined the STZ's role in normal and repaired articular surfaces under different contact conditions. Contact area and pressure distributions were allowed to change with time, tension-compression nonlinearity modeled collagen behavior in the STZ, and nonlinear geometry was incorporated to accommodate finite deformation. Responses to loading via impermeable and permeable rigid surfaces were compared to loading via normal cartilage, a more physiologic condition, anticipating the two rigid loading surfaces would bracket that of normal. For models loaded by normal cartilage, an STZ placed over the inferior repair region reduced the short-term axial compression of the articular surface by 15%, when compared to a repair without an STZ. Covering the repair with a normal STZ shifted the flow patterns and strain levels back toward that of normal cartilage. Additionally, reductions in von Mises stress (21%) and an increase in fluid pressure (13%) occurred in repair tissue under the STZ. This continues to show that STZ properties of sufficient quality are likely critical for the survival of transplanted constructs in vivo. However, response to loading via normal cartilage did not always fall within ranges predicted by the rigid surfaces. Use of more physiologic contact models is recommended for more accurate investigations into properties critical to the success of repair tissues.

  14. The role of flow-independent viscoelasticity in the biphasic tensile and compressive responses of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Huang, C Y; Mow, V C; Ateshian, G A

    2001-10-01

    A long-standing challenge in the biomechanics of connective tissues (e.g., articular cartilage, ligament, tendon) has been the reported disparities between their tensile and compressive properties. In general, the intrinsic tensile properties of the solid matrices of these tissues are dictated by the collagen content and microstructural architecture, and the intrinsic compressive properties are dictated by their proteoglycan content and molecular organization as well as water content. These distinct materials give rise to a pronounced and experimentally well-documented nonlinear tension-compression stress-strain responses, as well as biphasic or intrinsic extracellular matrix viscoelastic responses. While many constitutive models of articular cartilage have captured one or more of these experimental responses, no single constitutive law has successfully described the uniaxial tensile and compressive responses of cartilage within the same framework. The objective of this study was to combine two previously proposed extensions of the biphasic theory of Mow et al. [1980, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 102, pp. 73-84] to incorporate tension-compression nonlinearity as well as intrinsic viscoelasticity of the solid matrix of cartilage. The biphasic-conewise linear elastic model proposed by Soltz and Ateshian [2000, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 122, pp. 576-586] and based on the bimodular stress-strain constitutive law introduced by Curnier et al. [1995, J. Elasticity, 37, pp. 1-38], as well as the biphasic poroviscoelastic model of Mak [1986, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 108, pp. 123-130], which employs the quasi-linear viscoelastic model of Fung [1981, Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, Springer-Verlag, New York], were combined in a single model to analyze the response of cartilage to standard testing configurations. Results were compared to experimental data from the literature and it was found that a simultaneous prediction of compression and tension experiments of

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E.; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-01-01

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis. PMID:28335520

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-03-20

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis.

  17. A Review of the Combination of Experimental Measurements and Fibril-Reinforced Modeling for Investigation of Articular Cartilage and Chondrocyte Response to Loading

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Wouter; Isaksson, Hanna; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Herzog, Walter; Korhonen, Rami K.

    2013-01-01

    The function of articular cartilage depends on its structure and composition, sensitively impaired in disease (e.g. osteoarthritis, OA). Responses of chondrocytes to tissue loading are modulated by the structure. Altered cell responses as an effect of OA may regulate cartilage mechanotransduction and cell biosynthesis. To be able to evaluate cell responses and factors affecting the onset and progression of OA, local tissue and cell stresses and strains in cartilage need to be characterized. This is extremely challenging with the presently available experimental techniques and therefore computational modeling is required. Modern models of articular cartilage are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, and they include many aspects of the real tissue structure and composition. In this paper, we provide an overview of the computational applications that have been developed for modeling the mechanics of articular cartilage at the tissue and cellular level. We concentrate on the use of fibril-reinforced models of cartilage. Furthermore, we introduce practical considerations for modeling applications, including also experimental tests that can be combined with the modeling approach. At the end, we discuss the prospects for patient-specific models when aiming to use finite element modeling analysis and evaluation of articular cartilage function, cellular responses, failure points, OA progression, and rehabilitation. PMID:23653665

  18. Biophysical Stimuli: A Review of Electrical and Mechanical Stimulation in Hyaline Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vaca-González, Juan J; Guevara, Johana M; Moncayo, Miguel A; Castro-Abril, Hector; Hata, Yoshie; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2017-09-01

    Objective Hyaline cartilage degenerative pathologies induce morphologic and biomechanical changes resulting in cartilage tissue damage. In pursuit of therapeutic options, electrical and mechanical stimulation have been proposed for improving tissue engineering approaches for cartilage repair. The purpose of this review was to highlight the effect of electrical stimulation and mechanical stimuli in chondrocyte behavior. Design Different information sources and the MEDLINE database were systematically revised to summarize the different contributions for the past 40 years. Results It has been shown that electric stimulation may increase cell proliferation and stimulate the synthesis of molecules associated with the extracellular matrix of the articular cartilage, such as collagen type II, aggrecan and glycosaminoglycans, while mechanical loads trigger anabolic and catabolic responses in chondrocytes. Conclusion The biophysical stimuli can increase cell proliferation and stimulate molecules associated with hyaline cartilage extracellular matrix maintenance.

  19. Cartilage Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead to joint damage and deformity. Causes of cartilage problems include Tears and injuries, such as sports injuries Genetic factors Other disorders, such as some types of arthritis Osteoarthritis results from breakdown of cartilage. ...

  20. Brain’s DNA Repair Response to Neurotoxicants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is associated with death of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) of the brain. Military personnel abroad are at...a greater risk of exposure to pesticides and toxins which may selectively damage DA neurons in the SN and increase the probability of development of...oxyradicals which damage macromolecules, including DNA. We hypothesized that regulation of the DNA repair response within certain neurons of the SN (the

  1. Biocompatibility and preclinical feasibility tests of a temperature-sensitive hydrogel for the purpose of surgical wound pain control and cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Seol, Dongrim; Magnetta, Michael J; Ramakrishnan, Prem S; Kurriger, Gail L; Choe, Hyeonghun; Jang, Keewoong; Martin, James A; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2013-07-13

    We recently introduced a novel pluronic F127 and hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel (HG) designed to deliver a broad range of therapeutics. The reverse-thermal responsive HG exhibits physical properties that seem to be ideal for the local delivery of drug- and cell-based therapies to specific anatomic sites through percutaneous injection. However, questions related to the HG's safety and efficacy must first be addressed. To address these issues, we performed standard in vitro cytotoxicity and drug release tests and in vivo biocompatibility tests in a rat model. In addition, we determined whether the HG was an effective stem cell carrier in a rat cartilage defect model. We found that the HG showed viability and biocompatibility levels similar to those reported for F127 or hyaluronic acid alone. In vitro drug release studies with bupivacaine, a drug used clinically for local pain relief, revealed that after an initial burst bupivacaine was released continuously for 10 days. Stem cells loaded in the HG were retained in situ and stimulated cartilage regeneration in experimental defects. Taken as a whole, these findings support further efforts to develop the HG as a versatile system for the delivery of a wide range of therapeutic agents in humans. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2013. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Biocompatibility and preclinical feasibility tests of a temperature-sensitive hydrogel for the purpose of surgical wound pain control and cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Seol, Dongrim; Magnetta, Michael J; Ramakrishnan, Prem S; Kurriger, Gail L; Choe, Hyeonghun; Jang, Keewoong; Martin, James A; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2013-11-01

    We recently introduced a novel pluronic F127 and hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel (HG) designed to deliver a broad range of therapeutics. The reverse-thermal responsive HG exhibits physical properties that seem to be ideal for the local delivery of drug- and cell-based therapies to specific anatomic sites through percutaneous injection. However, questions related to the HG's safety and efficacy must first be addressed. To address these issues, we performed standard in vitro cytotoxicity and drug release tests and in vivo biocompatibility tests in a rat model. In addition, we determined whether the HG was an effective stem cell carrier in a rat cartilage defect model. We found that the HG showed viability and biocompatibility levels similar to those reported for F127 or hyaluronic acid alone. In vitro drug release studies with bupivacaine, a drug used clinically for local pain relief, revealed that after an initial burst bupivacaine was released continuously for 10 days. Stem cells loaded in the HG were retained in situ and stimulated cartilage regeneration in experimental defects. Taken as a whole, these findings support further efforts to develop the HG as a versatile system for the delivery of a wide range of therapeutic agents in humans. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Inhomogeneous Response of Articular Cartilage: A Three-Dimensional Multiphasic Heterogeneous Study

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Sara; Armengol, Monica; J. Price, Andrew; A. Hulley, Philippa; S. Gill, Harinderjit; Doblaré, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage exhibits complex mechano-electrochemical behaviour due to its anisotropy, inhomogeneity and material non-linearity. In this work, the thickness and radial dependence of cartilage properties are incorporated into a 3D mechano-electrochemical model to explore the relevance of heterogeneity in the behaviour of the tissue. The model considers four essential phenomena: (i) osmotic pressure, (ii) convective and diffusive processes, (iii) chemical expansion and (iv) three-dimensional through-the-thickness heterogeneity of the tissue. The need to consider heterogeneity in computational simulations of cartilage behaviour and in manufacturing biomaterials mimicking this tissue is discussed. To this end, healthy tibial plateaus from pigs were mechanically and biochemically tested in-vitro. Heterogeneous properties were included in the mechano-electrochemical computational model to simulate tissue swelling. The simulation results demonstrated that swelling of the heterogeneous samples was significantly lower than swelling under homogeneous and isotropic conditions. Furthermore, there was a significant reduction in the flux of water and ions in the former samples. In conclusion, the computational model presented here can be considered as a valuable tool for predicting how the variation of cartilage properties affects its behaviour, opening up possibilities for exploring the requirements of cartilage-mimicking biomaterials for tissue engineering. Besides, the model also allows the establishment of behavioural patterns of swelling and of water and ion fluxes in articular cartilage. PMID:27327166

  4. Repair of microtia with sculpted rib cartilage grafts in identical, mirror-image twins: a case study.

    PubMed

    Brent, Burt

    2011-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities more commonly occur in multiple births-which are on the rise because of assisted reproductive techniques and fertility-stimulating drugs. One-third of twins are identical, and mirror-imaging is not as rare as one might think. It usually goes unnoticed because the differences between them are so subtle-unless they have an obvious congenital deformity. The author presents such a case, in which mirror-image twins were each afflicted with unilateral microtia. His management and repair of their ear deformities is presented herein.

  5. Growth plate cartilage shows different strain patterns in response to static versus dynamic mechanical modulation.

    PubMed

    Kaviani, Rosa; Londono, Irene; Parent, Stefan; Moldovan, Florina; Villemure, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Longitudinal growth of long bones and vertebrae occurs in growth plate cartilage. This process is partly regulated by mechanical forces, which are one of the underlying reasons for progression of growth deformities such as idiopathic adolescent scoliosis and early-onset scoliosis. This concept of mechanical modulation of bone growth is also exploited in the development of fusionless treatments of these deformities. However, the optimal loading condition for the mechanical modulation of growth plate remains to be identified. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro static versus dynamic modulation and of dynamic loading parameters, such as frequency and amplitude, on the mechanical responses and histomorphology of growth plate explants. Growth plate explants from distal ulnae of 4-week-old swines were extracted and randomly distributed among six experimental groups: baseline ([Formula: see text]), control ([Formula: see text]), static ([Formula: see text]) and dynamic ([Formula: see text]). For static and dynamic groups, mechanical modulation was performed in vitro using an Indexed CartiGen bioreactor. A stress relaxation test combined with confocal microscopy and digital image correlation was used to characterize the mechanical responses of each explant in terms of peak stress, equilibrium stress, equilibrium modulus of elasticity and strain pattern. Histomorphometrical measurements were performed on toluidine blue tissue sections using a semi-automatic custom-developed MATLAB toolbox. Results suggest that compared to dynamic modulation, static modulation changes the strain pattern of the tissue and thus is more detrimental for tissue biomechanics, while the histomorphological parameters are not affected by mechanical modulation. Also, under dynamic modulation, changing the frequency or amplitude does not affect the biomechanical response of the tissue. Results of this study will be useful in finding optimal and non-damaging parameters

  6. Schisandrae Fructus ethanol extract ameliorates inflammatory responses and articular cartilage damage in monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jongsik; Choi, Eun Ok; Kwon, Da Hye; Kong, Gyu Min; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Bum Hoi; Kim, Gi-Young; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Sung Goo; Choi, Young Whan; Hong, Su Hyun; Park, Cheol; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Schisandrae Fructus, the fruit of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill., is widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a number of chronic diseases. Although, Schisandrae Fructus was recently reported to attenuate the interleukin (IL)-1β-induced inflammatory response in chondrocytes in vitro, its protective and therapeutic potential against osteoarthritis (OA) in an animal model remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the ethanol extract of Schisandrae Fructus (SF) on inflammatory responses and cartilage degradation in a monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced OA rat model. Our results demonstrated that administration with SF had a tendency to attenuate MIA-induced damage of articular cartilage as determined by a histological grade of OA. SF significantly suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in MIA-induced OA rats. SF also effectively inhibited expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, thereby inhibiting the release of NO and prostaglandin E2. In addition, the elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinases-13 and two biomarkers for diagnosis and progression of OA, such as cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and C-telopeptide of type II collagen, were markedly ameliorated by SF administration. These findings indicate that SF could be a potential candidate for the treatment of OA. PMID:28507472

  7. In vitro glycation of articular cartilage alters the biomechanical response of chondrocytes in a depth-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fick, J M; Huttu, M R J; Lammi, M J; Korhonen, R K

    2014-10-01

    To determine if increasing cartilage cross-links through in vitro glycation of cartilage explants can alter the biomechanical response of chondrocytes to compressive deformation. Bovine osteochondral explants were either incubated with cell culture solution supplemented with (n = 7) or without (n = 7) ribose for 42 h in order to induce glycation. Deformation-induced changes in cell volume, dimensions and local tissue strains were determined through confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the use of a custom built micro-compression device. Osteochondral explants were also utilized to demonstrate changes in depth-wise tissue properties, biomechanical tissue properties and cross-links such as pentosidine (Pent), hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) and lysyl pyridinoline (LP). The ribose treated osteochondral samples experienced reduced cell volume deformation in the upper tissue zone by ∼ 8% (P = 0.005), as compared the control samples, through restricting cell expansion. In the deeper tissue zone, cell volume deformation was increased by ∼ 12% (P < 0.001) via the transmission of mechanical signals further into the tissue depth. Biomechanical testing of the ribose treated osteochondral samples demonstrated an increase in the equilibrium and dynamic strain dependent moduli (P < 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively). The biochemical analysis revealed an increase in Pent cross-links (P < 0.001). Depth-wise tissue property analyses revealed increased levels of carbohydrate content, greater levels of fixed charge density and an increased carbohydrate to protein ratio from 6 to 16%, 55-100% and 72-79% of the normalized tissue thickness (from the surface), respectively, in the ribose-treated group (P < 0.05). In vitro glycation alters the biomechanical response of chondrocytes in cartilage differently in upper and deeper zones, offering possible insights into how aging could alter cell deformation behavior in cartilage. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society

  8. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Steven R

    2012-08-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. The changes in periarticular bone tend to occur very early in the development of OA. Although chondrocytes also have the capacity to modulate their functional state in response to loading, the capacity of these cells to repair and modify their surrounding extracellular matrix is relatively limited in comparison to the adjacent subchondral bone. This differential adaptive capacity likely underlies the more rapid appearance of detectable skeletal changes in OA in comparison to the articular cartilage. The OA changes in periarticular bone include increases in subchondral cortical bone thickness, gradual decreases in subchondral trabeular bone mass, formation of marginal joint osteophytes, development of bone cysts and advancement of the zone of calcified cartilage between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The expansion of the zone of calcified cartilage contributes to overall thinning of the articular cartilage. The mechanisms involved in this process include the release of soluble mediators from chondrocytes in the deep zones of the articular cartilage and/or the influences of microcracks that have initiated focal remodeling in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in an attempt to repair the microdamage. There is the need for further studies to define the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the interaction between subchondral bone and articular cartilage and for applying this information to the development of therapeutic interventions to improve the

  9. Resurfacing Damaged Articular Cartilage to Restore Compressive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Stephanie; Donnelly, Patrick E.; Gittens, Jamila; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Surface damage to articular cartilage is recognized as the initial underlying process causing the loss of mechanical function in early-stage osteoarthritis. In this study, we developed structure-modifying treatments to potentially prevent, stabilize or reverse the loss in mechanical function. Various polymers (chondroitin sulfate, carboxymethylcellulose, sodium hyaluronate) and photoinitiators (riboflavin, irgacure 2959) were applied to the surface of collagenase-degraded cartilage and crosslinked in situ using UV light irradiation. While matrix permeability and deformation significantly increased following collagenase-induced degradation of the superficial zone, resurfacing using tyramine-substituted sodium hyaluronate and riboflavin decreased both values to a level comparable to that of intact cartilage. Repetitive loading of resurfaced cartilage showed minimal variation in the mechanical response over a 7 day period. Cartilage resurfaced using a low concentration of riboflavin had viable cells in all zones while a higher concentration resulted in a thin layer of cell death in the uppermost superficial zone. Our approach to repair surface damage initiates a new therapeutic advance in the treatment of injured articular cartilage with potential benefits that include enhanced mechanical properties, reduced susceptibility to enzymatic degradation and reduced adhesion of macrophages. PMID:25468298

  10. Tissue engineered cartilage on collagen and PHBV matrices.

    PubMed

    Köse, Gamze Torun; Korkusuz, Feza; Ozkul, Aykut; Soysal, Yasemin; Ozdemir, Taner; Yildiz, Cemil; Hasirci, Vasif

    2005-09-01

    Cartilage engineering is a very novel approach to tissue repair through use of implants. Matrices of collagen containing calcium phosphate (CaP-Gelfix), and matrices of poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) (PHBV) were produced to create a cartilage via tissue engineering. The matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron diffraction spectroscopy (EDS). Porosity and void volume analysis were carried out to characterize the matrices. Chondrocytes were isolated from the proximal humerus of 22 week-old male, adult, local albino rabbits. For cell type characterization, Type II collagen was measured by Western Blot analysis. The foams were seeded with 1x10(6) chondrocytes and histological examinations were carried out to assess cell-matrix interaction. Macroscopic examination showed that PHBV (with or without chondrocytes) maintained its integrity for 21 days, while CaP-Gelfix was deformed and degraded within 15 days. Cell-containing and cell-free matrices were implanted into full thickness cartilage defects (4.5 mm in diameter and 4 mm in depth) at the patellar groove on the right and left knees of eight rabbits, respectively. In vivo results at 8 and 20 weeks with chondrocyte seeded PHBV matrices presented early cartilage formation resembling normal articular cartilage and revealed minimal foreign body reaction. In CaP-Gelfix matrices, fibrocartilage formation and bone invasion was noted in 20 weeks. Cells maintained their phenotype in both matrices. PHBV had better healing response than CaP-Gelfix. Both matrices were effective in cartilage regeneration. These matrices have great potential for use in the repair of joint cartilage defects.

  11. A new pressure chamber to study the biosynthetic response of articular cartilage to mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Steinmeyer, J; Torzilli, P A; Burton-Wurster, N; Lust, G

    1993-01-01

    A prototype chamber was used to apply a precise cyclic or static load on articular cartilage explants under sterile conditions. A variable pressure, pneumatic controller was constructed to power the chamber's air cylinder, capable of applying, with a porous load platen, loads of up to 10 MPa at cycles ranging from 0 to 10 Hz. Pig articular cartilage explants were maintained successfully in this chamber for 2 days under cyclic mechanical loading of 0.5 Hz, 0.5 MPa. Explants remained sterile, viable and metabolically active. Cartilage responded to this load with a decreased synthesis of fibronectin and a small but statistically significant elevation in proteoglycan content. Similar but less extensive effects on fibronectin synthesis were observed with the small static load (0.016 MPa) inherent in the design of the chamber.

  12. Chromosome territories reposition during DNA damage-repair response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Local higher-order chromatin structure, dynamics and composition of the DNA are known to determine double-strand break frequencies and the efficiency of repair. However, how DNA damage response affects the spatial organization of chromosome territories is still unexplored. Results Our report investigates the effect of DNA damage on the spatial organization of chromosome territories within interphase nuclei of human cells. We show that DNA damage induces a large-scale spatial repositioning of chromosome territories that are relatively gene dense. This response is dose dependent, and involves territories moving from the nuclear interior to the periphery and vice versa. Furthermore, we have found that chromosome territory repositioning is contingent upon double-strand break recognition and damage sensing. Importantly, our results suggest that this is a reversible process where, following repair, chromosome territories re-occupy positions similar to those in undamaged control cells. Conclusions Thus, our report for the first time highlights DNA damage-dependent spatial reorganization of whole chromosomes, which might be an integral aspect of cellular damage response. PMID:24330859

  13. Matrix deposition modulates the viscoelastic shear properties of hydrogel-based cartilage grafts.

    PubMed

    Wan, Leo Q; Jiang, Jie; Miller, Diana E; Guo, X Edward; Mow, Van C; Lu, Helen H

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogel-based scaffolds such as alginate have been extensively investigated for cartilage tissue engineering, largely due to their biocompatibility, ambient gelling conditions, and the ability to support chondrocyte phenotype. While it is well established that the viscoelastic response of articular cartilage is essential for articulation and load bearing, the time-dependent mechanical properties of hydrogel-based cartilage scaffolds have not been extensively studied. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the intrinsic viscoelastic shear properties of chondrocyte-laden alginate scaffolds and determine the effects of seeding density and culturing time on these properties. Specifically, the viscoelastic properties (equilibrium and dynamic shear moduli and dynamic phase shift angle) of these engineered cartilage grafts were measured under torsional shear. In addition, the rapid ramp-step shear stress relaxation of the alginate-based cartilage scaffolds was modeled using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory. It was found that scaffold stiffness increased with both culturing time and cell density, whereas viscosity did not change significantly with cell density (30 vs. 60 million/mL). Similar to native cartilage, the energy dissipation of engineered scaffolds under pure shear is highly correlated to the glycosaminoglycan content. In contrast, collagen content was not strongly correlated to scaffold shear modulus, especially the instantaneous shear modulus predicted by the quasi-linear viscoelastic model. The findings of this study provide new insights into the structure-function relationship of engineered cartilage and design of functional grafts for cartilage repair.

  14. Matrix Deposition Modulates the Viscoelastic Shear Properties of Hydrogel-Based Cartilage Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Leo Q.; Jiang, Jie; Miller, Diana E.; Guo, X. Edward; Mow, Van C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogel-based scaffolds such as alginate have been extensively investigated for cartilage tissue engineering, largely due to their biocompatibility, ambient gelling conditions, and the ability to support chondrocyte phenotype. While it is well established that the viscoelastic response of articular cartilage is essential for articulation and load bearing, the time-dependent mechanical properties of hydrogel-based cartilage scaffolds have not been extensively studied. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the intrinsic viscoelastic shear properties of chondrocyte-laden alginate scaffolds and determine the effects of seeding density and culturing time on these properties. Specifically, the viscoelastic properties (equilibrium and dynamic shear moduli and dynamic phase shift angle) of these engineered cartilage grafts were measured under torsional shear. In addition, the rapid ramp-step shear stress relaxation of the alginate-based cartilage scaffolds was modeled using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory. It was found that scaffold stiffness increased with both culturing time and cell density, whereas viscosity did not change significantly with cell density (30 vs. 60 million/mL). Similar to native cartilage, the energy dissipation of engineered scaffolds under pure shear is highly correlated to the glycosaminoglycan content. In contrast, collagen content was not strongly correlated to scaffold shear modulus, especially the instantaneous shear modulus predicted by the quasi-linear viscoelastic model. The findings of this study provide new insights into the structure–function relationship of engineered cartilage and design of functional grafts for cartilage repair. PMID:21142626

  15. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Effect of glutaraldehyde fixation on the frictional response of immature bovine articular cartilage explants.

    PubMed

    Oungoulian, Sevan R; Hehir, Kristin E; Zhu, Kaicen; Willis, Callen E; Marinescu, Anca G; Merali, Natasha; Ahmad, Christopher S; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2014-02-07

    This study examined functional properties and biocompatibility of glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine articular cartilage over several weeks of incubation at body temperature to investigate its potential use as a resurfacing material in joint arthroplasty. In the first experiment, treated cartilage disks were fixed using 0.02, 0.20 and 0.60% glutaraldehyde for 24h then incubated, along with an untreated control group, in saline for up to 28d at 37°C. Both the equilibrium compressive and tensile moduli increased nearly twofold in treated samples compared to day 0 control, and remained at that level from day 1 to 28; the equilibrium friction coefficient against glass rose nearly twofold immediately after fixation (day 1) but returned to control values after day 7. Live explants co-cultured with fixed explants showed no quantitative difference in cell viability over 28d. In general, no significant differences were observed between 0.20 and 0.60% groups, so 0.20% was deemed sufficient for complete fixation. In the second experiment, cartilage-on-cartilage frictional measurements were performed under a migrating contact configuration. In the treated group, one explant was fixed using 0.20% glutaraldehyde while the apposing explant was left untreated; in the control group both explants were left untreated. From day 1 to 28, the treated group exhibited either no significant difference or slightly lower friction coefficient than the untreated group. These results suggest that a properly titrated glutaraldehyde treatment can reproduce the desired functional properties of native articular cartilage and maintain these properties for at least 28d at body temperature.

  17. Mechanical stimulation of mesenchymal stem cells: Implications for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Niamh; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J

    2017-08-01

    Articular cartilage is a load-bearing tissue playing a crucial mechanical role in diarthrodial joints, facilitating joint articulation, and minimizing wear. The significance of biomechanical stimuli in the development of cartilage and maintenance of chondrocyte phenotype in adult tissues has been well documented. Furthermore, dysregulated loading is associated with cartilage pathology highlighting the importance of mechanical cues in cartilage homeostasis. The repair of damaged articular cartilage resulting from trauma or degenerative joint disease poses a major challenge due to a low intrinsic capacity of cartilage for self-renewal, attributable to its avascular nature. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered a promising cell type for cartilage replacement strategies due to their chondrogenic differentiation potential. Chondrogenesis of MSCs is influenced not only by biological factors but also by the environment itself, and various efforts to date have focused on harnessing biomechanics to enhance chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, recapitulating mechanical cues associated with cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, may facilitate the development of a cellular phenotype resembling native articular cartilage. The goal of this review is to summarize current literature examining the effect of mechanical cues on cartilage homeostasis, disease, and MSC chondrogenesis. The role of biological factors produced by MSCs in response to mechanical loading will also be examined. An in-depth understanding of the impact of mechanical stimulation on the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs in terms of endogenous bioactive factor production and signaling pathways involved, may identify therapeutic targets and facilitate the development of more robust strategies for cartilage replacement using MSCs. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society

  18. MSC exosome as a cell-free MSC therapy for cartilage regeneration: Implications for osteoarthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Toh, Wei Seong; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Hui, James Hoi Po; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapies have demonstrated efficacy in cartilage repair in animal and clinical studies. The efficacy of MSC-based therapies which was previously predicated on the chondrogenic potential of MSC is increasingly attributed to the paracrine secretion, particularly exosomes. Exosomes are thought to function primarily as intercellular communication vehicles to transfer bioactive lipids, nucleic acids (mRNAs and microRNAs) and proteins between cells to elicit biological responses in recipient cells. For MSC exosomes, many of these biological responses translated to a therapeutic outcome in injured or diseased cells. Here, we review the current understanding of MSC exosomes, discuss the possible mechanisms of action in cartilage repair within the context of the widely reported immunomodulatory and regenerative potency of MSC exosomes, and provide new perspectives for development of an off-the-shelf and cell-free MSC therapy for treatment of cartilage injuries and osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  20. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H; Hsieh, Peggy

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Antonia F.; Klatt, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage damaged by trauma has a limited capacity to regenerate. Current methods for treating small chondral defects include palliative treatment with arthroscopic debridement and lavage, reparative treatment with marrow stimulation techniques (e.g. microfracture), and restorative treatment, including osteochondral grafting and autologous chondrocyte implantation. Larger defects are treated by osteochondral allografting or total joint replacements. However, the future of treating cartilage defects lies in providing biologic solutions through cartilage regeneration. Laboratory and clinical studies have examined the treatment of larger lesions using tissue engineered cartilage. Regenerated cartilage can be derived from various cell types, including chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells, and pluripotent stem cells. Common scaffolding materials include proteins, carbohydrates, synthetic materials, and composite polymers. Scaffolds may be woven, spun into nanofibers, or configured as hydrogels. Chondrogenesis may be enhanced with the application of chondroinductive growth factors. Finally, bioreactors are being developed to enhance nutrient delivery and provide mechanical stimulation to tissue-engineered cartilage ex vivo. The multi-disciplinary approaches currently being developed to produce cartilage promise to bring the dream of cartilage regeneration in clinical use to reality. PMID:23637149

  2. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingjie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ma, Ning; Hao, Chunxiang; Guo, Weimin; Zou, Gengyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Mingxue; Gao, Shuang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2017-01-01

    The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed. PMID:28246531

  3. Cellular and Matrix Response of the Mandibular Condylar Cartilage to Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Eliane H.; O’ Brien, Mara H.; Lima, Alexandro; Kalajzic, Zana; Tadinada, Aditya; Nanda, Ravindra; Yadav, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cellular and matrix effects of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) on mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and subchondral bone. Materials and Methods Botox (0.3 unit) was injected into the right masseter of 5-week-old transgenic mice (Col10a1-RFPcherry) at day 1. Left side masseter was used as intra-animal control. The following bone labels were intraperitoneally injected: calcein at day 7, alizarin red at day 14 and calcein at day 21. In addition, EdU was injected 48 and 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice were sacrificed 30 days after Botox injection. Experimental and control side mandibles were dissected and examined by x-ray imaging and micro-CT. Subsequently, MCC along with the subchondral bone was sectioned and stained with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), EdU, TUNEL, alkaline phosphatase, toluidine blue and safranin O. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for pSMAD and VEGF. Results Bone volume fraction, tissue density and trabecular thickness were significantly decreased on the right side of the subchondral bone and mineralized cartilage (Botox was injected) when compared to the left side. There was no significant difference in the mandibular length and condylar head length; however, the condylar width was significantly decreased after Botox injection. Our histology showed decreased numbers of Col10a1 expressing cells, decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in the subchondral bone and mandibular condylar cartilage, decreased TRAP activity and mineralization of Botox injected side cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, we observed reduced proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan distribution and decreased expression of pSMAD 1/5/8 and VEGF in the MCC of the Botox injected side in comparison to control side. Conclusion Injection of Botox in masseter muscle leads to decreased mineralization and matrix deposition, reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and increased cell apoptosis in the

  4. The response of bone, articular cartilage and tendon to exercise in the horse

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Elwyn C

    2006-01-01

    Horses can gallop within hours of birth, and may begin training for athletic competition while still growing. This review cites studies on the effects of exercise on bone, tendon and articular cartilage, as detected by clinical and research imaging techniques, tissue biochemical analysis and microscopy of various kinds. For bone, alterations in bone mineral content, mineral density and the morphology of the mineralized tissue are the most common end-points. Apparent bone density increases slightly after athletic training in the cortex, but substantially in the major load paths of the epiphyses and cuboidal bones, despite the lower material density of the new bone, which is deposited subperiosteally and on internal surfaces without prior osteoclastic resorption. With training of greater intensity, adaptive change is supervened by patho-anatomical change in the form of microdamage and frank lesions. In tendon, collagen fibril diameter distribution changes significantly during growth, but not after early training. The exact amount and type of protracted training that does cause reduction in mass average diameter (an early sign of progressive microdamage) have not been defined. Training is associated with an increase in the cross-sectional area of some tendons, possibly owing to slightly greater water content of non-collagenous or newly synthesized matrix. Early training may be associated with greater thickness of hyaline but not calcified articular cartilage, at least in some sites. The age at which adaptation of cartilage to biomechanical influences can occur may thus extend beyond very early life. However, cartilage appears to be the most susceptible of the three tissues to pathological alteration. The effect of training exercise on the anatomical or patho-anatomical features of connective tissue structures is affected by the timing, type and amount of natural or imposed exercise during growth and development which precedes the training. PMID:16637875

  5. Cartilage mechanical response under dynamic compression at physiological stress levels following collagenase digestion.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonghun; Nicoll, Steven B; Mauck, Robert L; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that enzymatic degradation by collagenase significantly reduces dynamic moduli and increases compressive strains of bovine articular cartilage under physiological compressive stress levels and loading frequencies. Twenty-seven distal femoral cartilage plugs (3 mm diameter) were loaded in a custom apparatus under load control, with a load up to 40 N and loading frequencies of 0.1, 1, 10, and 40 Hz, before and after incubation in physiological buffered saline containing various concentrations of collagenase (0, 2, and 10 U/mL). Collagenase digestion reduced the equilibrium Young's modulus by 49% with 2 U/mL and 61% with 10 U/mL, while the decrease in dynamic modulus at 40 Hz was in the range of 13-20% with 2 U/mL and 24-33% with 10 U/mL, relative to respective controls. The amplitudes of dynamic compressive strains increased from 22 +/- 6% to 26 +/- 8% at 0.1 Hz and 9.6 +/- 3.3% to 13.5 +/- 3.2% at 40 Hz, with 10 U/mL collagenase. This experimental study serves to confirm that collagen contributes significantly to the dynamic compressive properties of cartilage, by demonstrating that collagenase digestion impairs these properties, under stress amplitudes and frequencies which are representative of physiological loading conditions.

  6. Quantitative Cartilage Imaging in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, Felix; Wirth, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative measures of cartilage morphology (i.e., thickness) represent potentially powerful surrogate endpoints in osteoarthritis (OA). These can be used to identify risk factors of structural disease progression and can facilitate the clinical efficacy testing of structure modifying drugs in OA. This paper focuses on quantitative imaging of articular cartilage morphology in the knee, and will specifically deal with different cartilage morphology outcome variables and regions of interest, the relative performance and relationship between cartilage morphology measures, reference values for MRI-based knee cartilage morphometry, imaging protocols for measurement of cartilage morphology (including those used in the Osteoarthritis Initiative), sensitivity to change observed in knee OA, spatial patterns of cartilage loss as derived by subregional analysis, comparison of MRI changes with radiographic changes, risk factors of MRI-based cartilage loss in knee OA, the correlation of MRI-based cartilage loss with clinical outcomes, treatment response in knee OA, and future directions of the field. PMID:22046518

  7. SUMO-mediated regulation of DNA damage repair and responses

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation plays important roles during DNA damage repair and responses. Recent broad-scope and substrate-based studies have shed light on the regulation and significance of sumoylation during these processes. An emerging paradigm is that sumoylation of many DNA metabolism proteins is controlled by DNA engagement. Such “on-site modification” can explain low substrate modification levels and has important implications in sumoylation mechanisms and effects. New studies also suggest that sumoylation can regulate a process through an ensemble effect or via major substrates. Additionally, we describe new trends in the functional effects of sumoylation, such as bi-directional changes in biomolecule binding and multi-level coordination with other modifications. These emerging themes and models will stimulate our thinking and research in sumoylation and genome maintenance. PMID:25778614

  8. Cartilage Repair Using Composites of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel in a Minipig Model

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Chul-Won; Chung, Jun-Young; Park, Yong-Geun

    2015-01-01

    The cartilage regeneration potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) with a hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel composite has shown remarkable results in rat and rabbit models. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the consistent regenerative potential in a pig model using three different cell lines. A full-thickness chondral injury was intentionally created in the trochlear groove of each knee in 6 minipigs. Three weeks later, an osteochondral defect, 5 mm wide by 10 mm deep, was created, followed by an 8-mm-wide and 5-mm-deep reaming. A mixture (1.5 ml) of hUCB-MSCs (0.5 × 107 cells per milliliter) and 4% HA hydrogel composite was then transplanted into the defect on the right knee. Each cell line was used in two minipigs. The osteochondral defect created in the same manner on the left knee was untreated to act as the control. At 12 weeks postoperatively, the pigs were sacrificed, and the degree of subsequent cartilage regeneration was evaluated by gross and histological analysis. The transplanted knee resulted in superior and more complete hyaline cartilage regeneration compared with the control knee. The cellular characteristics (e.g., cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation capacity) of the hUCB-MSCs influenced the degree of cartilage regeneration potential. This evidence of consistent cartilage regeneration using composites of hUCB-MSCs and HA hydrogel in a large animal model could be a stepping stone to a human clinical trial in the future. Significance To date, several studies have investigated the chondrogenic potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs); however, the preclinical studies are still limited in numbers with various results. In parallel, in the past several years, the cartilage regeneration potential of hUCB-MSCs with a hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel composite have been investigated and remarkable results in rat and rabbit models have been

  9. Tissue engineering strategies to study cartilage development, degeneration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Coburn, Jeannine; Centola, Matteo; Murab, Sumit; Barbero, Andrea; Kaplan, David L; Martin, Ivan; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on the generation of grafts to repair cartilage defects due to traumatic injury and disease. However engineered cartilage tissues have also a strong scientific value as advanced 3D culture models. Here we first describe key aspects of embryonic chondrogenesis and possible cell sources/culture systems for in vitro cartilage generation. We then review how a tissue engineering approach has been and could be further exploited to investigate different aspects of cartilage development and degeneration. The generated knowledge is expected to inform new cartilage regeneration strategies, beyond a classical tissue engineering paradigm.

  10. Proteomic analysis of engineered cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xinzhu; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tissue engineering holds promise for the treatment of damaged and diseased tissues, especially for those tissues that do not undergo repair and regeneration readily in situ. Many techniques are available for cell and tissue culturing and differentiation of chondrocytes using a variety of cell types, differentiation methods, and scaffolds. In each case, it is critical to demonstrate the cellular phenotype and tissue composition, with particular attention to the extracellular matrix molecules that play a structural role and that contribute to the mechanical properties of the resulting tissue construct. Mass spectrometry provides an ideal analytical method with which to characterize the full spectrum of proteins produced by tissue engineered cartilage. Using normal cartilage tissue as a standard, tissue engineered cartilage can be optimized according to the entire proteome. Proteomic analysis is a complementary approach to biochemical, immunohistochemical, and mechanical testing of cartilage constructs. Proteomics is applicable as an analysis approach to most cartilage constructs generated from a variety of cellular sources including primary chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, proteomics can be used to optimize novel scaffolds and bioreactor applications, yielding cartilage tissue with the proteomic profile of natural cartilage. PMID:26445845

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds promise for the treatment of damaged and diseased tissues, especially for those tissues that do not undergo repair and regeneration readily in situ. Many techniques are available for cell and tissue culturing and differentiation of chondrocytes using a variety of cell types, differentiation methods, and scaffolds. In each case, it is critical to demonstrate the cellular phenotype and tissue composition, with particular attention to the extracellular matrix molecules that play a structural role and that contribute to the mechanical properties of the resulting tissue construct. Mass spectrometry provides an ideal analytical method with which to characterize the full spectrum of proteins produced by tissue-engineered cartilage. Using normal cartilage tissue as a standard, tissue-engineered cartilage can be optimized according to the entire proteome. Proteomic analysis is a complementary approach to biochemical, immunohistochemical, and mechanical testing of cartilage constructs. Proteomics is applicable as an analysis approach to most cartilage constructs generated from a variety of cellular sources including primary chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, proteomics can be used to optimize novel scaffolds and bioreactor applications, yielding cartilage tissue with the proteomic profile of natural cartilage.

  12. Potential regulation of cartilage metabolism in osteoarthritis by fibronectin fragments.

    PubMed

    Homandberg, G A

    1999-10-15

    There are few candidates for biochemical pathways that either initiate or amplify catabolic processes involved in osteoarthritis (OA). Perhaps, one of the most likely sources for such pathways may be within the extracellular matrix itself. This review focuses on an example of how specific degradation products of the extracellular matrix of cartilage, produced during proteolytic damage, have the potential to enhance OA-like processes. In this example, these products can induce or activate other factors, such as catabolic cytokines, that amplify the damage. The damage, in turn, enhances levels of the degradation products themselves, as in a positive feedback loop. Since these products are derived from the cartilage matrix, they could be considered barometers of the health of the cartilage that signal to the chondrocyte, through outside to inside signaling, the health or status of the surrounding matrix. The best example and most characterized system is that of fragments of the matrix protein, fibronectin (Fn), although as discussed later, other recently discovered fragment systems may also have the potential to regulate cartilage metabolism. In the case of Fn fragments (Fn-fs), the Fn-fs enhance levels of catabolic cytokines as in OA and, thus, are potentially earlier damage mediators than catabolic cytokines. The Fn-fs up-regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression, significantly enhance degradation and loss of proteoglycan (PG) from cartilage and temporarily suppress PG synthesis, all events observed in OA. However, this Fn-f system may be involved in normal cartilage homeostasis as well. For example, low concentrations of Fn-fs enhance anabolic activities and could play a role in normal homeostasis. This system may also be involved in not only amplifying damage but also coupling damage to repair. For example, high concentrations of Fn-fs that might arise in OA temporarily offset the anabolic response of lower Fn-f concentrations and cause short

  13. Shark cartilage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shark cartilage is also used for arthritis, psoriasis, wound healing, damage to the retina of the eye due ... study drugs for rare conditions. Arthritis. Eye complications. Wound healing. Other conditions. More evidence is needed to rate ...

  14. Articular cartilage tissue engineering: the role of signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Heenam; Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    2017-01-01

    Effective early disease modifying options for osteoarthritis remain lacking. Tissue engineering approach to generate cartilage in vitro has emerged as a promising option for articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Signaling molecules and matrix modifying agents, derived from knowledge of cartilage development and homeostasis, have been used as biochemical stimuli toward cartilage tissue engineering and have led to improvements in the functionality of engineered cartilage. Clinical translation of neocartilage faces challenges, such as phenotypic instability of the engineered cartilage, poor integration, inflammation, and catabolic factors in the arthritic environment; these can all contribute to failure of implanted neocartilage. A comprehensive understanding of signaling molecules involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis and their actions on engineered cartilage will be crucial. Thus, while it is important to continue deriving inspiration from cartilage development and homeostasis, it has become increasing necessary to incorporate knowledge from osteoarthritis pathogenesis into cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26811234

  15. Articular cartilage tissue engineering: the role of signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heenam; Paschos, Nikolaos K; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    2016-03-01

    Effective early disease modifying options for osteoarthritis remain lacking. Tissue engineering approach to generate cartilage in vitro has emerged as a promising option for articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Signaling molecules and matrix modifying agents, derived from knowledge of cartilage development and homeostasis, have been used as biochemical stimuli toward cartilage tissue engineering and have led to improvements in the functionality of engineered cartilage. Clinical translation of neocartilage faces challenges, such as phenotypic instability of the engineered cartilage, poor integration, inflammation, and catabolic factors in the arthritic environment; these can all contribute to failure of implanted neocartilage. A comprehensive understanding of signaling molecules involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis and their actions on engineered cartilage will be crucial. Thus, while it is important to continue deriving inspiration from cartilage development and homeostasis, it has become increasingly necessary to incorporate knowledge from osteoarthritis pathogenesis into cartilage tissue engineering.

  16. The effect of recombinant human fibroblast growth factor-18 on articular cartilage following single impact load.

    PubMed

    Barr, Lynne; Getgood, Alan; Guehring, Hans; Rushton, Neil; Henson, Frances M D

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to ascertain the effect of recombinant human Fibroblast Growth Factor-18 (rhFGF18) on the repair response of mechanically damaged articular cartilage. Articular cartilage discs were harvested from healthy mature horses (n = 4) and subjected to single impact load (SIL). The impacted explants, together with unimpacted controls were cultured in modified DMEM ± 200 ng/ml rhFGF18 for up to 30 days. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release into the media was measured using the dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay. Aggrecan neopepitope CS846, collagen type II synthesis (CPII) and cleavage (C2C) were measured by ELISA. Histological analysis and TUNEL staining were used to assess repair cell number and cell death. Impacted explants treated with rhFGF18 showed significantly more GAG and CS846 release into the media (p < 0.05), there was also a significant decrease in C2C levels at Day 20. Loaded sections treated with rhFGF18 had more repair cells and significantly less cell death (p < 0.001) at Day 30 in culture. In an in vitro damage/repair model, rhFGF18 increases the proteoglycan synthesis, the repair cell number and prevents apoptosis at Day 30. This suggests that rhFGF18 may be a good candidate for enhancement of cartilage repair following mechanical damage. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Metabolic Response of Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage to Biochemically Characterized Collagen Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Schadow, Saskia; Simons, Viktor S.; Lochnit, Guenter; Kordelle, Jens; Gazova, Zuzana; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Steinmeyer, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    The most frequent disease of the locomotor system is osteoarthritis (OA), which, as a chronic joint disease, might benefit more from nutrition than acute illnesses. Collagen hydrolysates (CHs) are peptidic mixtures that are often used as nutraceuticals for OA. Three CHs were characterized biochemically and pharmacologically. Our biophysical (MALDI-TOF-MS, NMR, AFM) and fluorescence assays revealed marked differences between CHs of fish (Peptan® F 5000, Peptan® F 2000) and porcine (Mobiforte®) origin with respect to the total number of peptides and common peptides between them. Using a novel dual radiolabeling procedure, no CH modulated collagen biosynthesis in human knee cartilage explants. Peptan® F 2000 enhanced the activities of the aggrecanase ADMATS4 and ADMATS5 in vitro without loss of proteoglycan from cartilage explants; the opposite effect was observed with Mobiforte®. Interleukin (IL)-6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -3 and -13 levels were elevated in explants that were treated with Mobiforte® and Peptan® F 5000, but not with Peptan® F 2000. In conclusion, the heterogeneous peptide composition and disparate pharmacological effects between CHs suggest that the effect of a CH preparation cannot be extrapolated to other formulations. Thus, the declaration of a CH as a safe and effective nutraceutical requires a thorough examination of its pleiotropic effects. PMID:28117674

  18. Activation of the Homeostatic Intracellular Repair Response during Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jahania, Salik M.; Sengstock, David; Vaitkevicius, Peter; Andres, Allen; Ito, Bruce R.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Mentzer, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The homeostatic intracellular repair response (HIR2) is an endogenous beneficial pathway that eliminates damaged mitochondria and dysfunctional proteins in response to stress. The underlying mechanism is adaptive autophagy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the HIR2 response is activated in the heart in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and to assess whether it is associated with the duration of ischemic arrest and predicted surgical outcome. Methods Autophagy was assessed in 19 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass or valve surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Biopsies of the right atrial appendage obtained before initiation of CPB and after weaning from CPB were analyzed for autophagy by immunoblotting for LC3, Beclin-1, Atg5-12, and p62. Changes in p62, a marker of autophagic flux, were correlated with duration of ischemia and with the mortality/morbidity risk scores obtained from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (v2.73). Results Heart surgery was associated with a robust increase in autophagic flux indicated by depletion of LC3-I, LC3-II, Beclin-1, and Atg5-12; the magnitude of change for each of these factors correlated significantly with changes in the flux marker p62. Moreover, changes in p62 correlated directly with cross clamp time and inversely with the mortality/morbidity risk scores. Conclusion These findings are consistent with preclinical studies indicating that HIR2 is cardioprotective, and reveal that it is activated in patients in response to myocardial ischemic stress. Strategies designed to amplify HIR2 during conditions of cardiac stress may have therapeutic utility and represent an entirely new approach to myocardial protection in patients undergoing heart surgery. PMID:23415552

  19. [Articular cartilage regeneration using stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kanamoto, Takashi; Nakamura, Norimasa; Nakata, Ken; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2008-12-01

    Articular cartilage plays pivotal roles in securing smooth joint kinematics and act as a shock absorber, however, it has minimal healing potential. Chondral injury could lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and therefore is a major clinical concern. There have been marrow stimulating technique and osteochondral transplantation explored to promote cartilage repair. In addition, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been developed by Peterson and Brittberg and more than 20,000 cases underwent the procedure all over the world. Recent progress in stem cell research has raised the potential application of stem cell therapy to cartilage repair. In this review, potential application of bone marrow or synovial-derived mesenchymal cells to promote cartilage repair would be discussed.

  20. Chondrogenic Progenitor Cells Respond to Cartilage Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyeonghun; Zheng, Hongjun; Yu, Yin; Jang, Keewoong; Walter, Morgan W.; Lehman, Abigail D.; Ding, Lei; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypocellularity resulting from chondrocyte death in the aftermath of mechanical injury is thought to contribute to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. However, we observed that nonviable areas in cartilage injured by blunt impact were repopulated within 7–14 days by cells that appeared to migrate from the surrounding matrix. The aim of this study was to assess our hypothesis that the migrating cell population included chondrogenic progenitor cells that were drawn to injured cartilage by alarmins. Methods Osteochondral explants obtained from mature cattle were injured by blunt impact or scratching, resulting in localized chondrocyte death. Injured sites were serially imaged by confocal microscopy, and migrating cells were evaluated for chondrogenic progenitor characteristics. Chemotaxis assays were used to measure the responses to chemokines, injury-conditioned medium, dead cell debris, and high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1). Results Migrating cells were highly clonogenic and multipotent and expressed markers associated with chondrogenic progenitor cells. Compared with chondrocytes, these cells overexpressed genes involved in proliferation and migration and underexpressed cartilage matrix genes. They were more active than chondrocytes in chemotaxis assays and responded to cell lysates, conditioned medium, and HMGB-1. Glycyrrhizin, a chelator of HMGB-1 and a blocking antibody to receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inhibited responses to cell debris and conditioned medium and reduced the numbers of migrating cells on injured explants. Conclusion Injuries that caused chondrocyte death stimulated the emergence and homing of chondrogenic progenitor cells, in part via HMGB-1 release and RAGE-mediated chemotaxis. Their repopulation of the matrix could promote the repair of chondral damage that might otherwise contribute to progressive cartilage loss. PMID:22777600

  1. Cartilage biomarkers in ankylosing spondylitis: relationship to clinical variables and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Stone, Millicent; Payne, Ursula; Zhang, Xiang; Ionescu, Mirela; Lobanok, Tatiana; King, Lindsay; Poole, A Robin; Inman, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a progressive disease in which chronic inflammation can lead to extensive new bone formation throughout the spine. At present, few measures of the activity or extent of the disease are available. In this study, we sought to determine whether markers of cartilage synthesis and degradation could provide such quantitative measures. Serum samples from 23 patients receiving infliximab treatment for AS were obtained at baseline and at weeks 2, 6, 14, and 22. Patients were stratified with respect to joint involvement and baseline levels of inflammatory markers, and responders were defined according to the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis 20% criteria. Serial measurements of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and IL-1 were done at each time point. The following biomarkers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: the proteoglycan aggrecan 846 epitope, a marker of cartilage turnover; C-propeptide of type II collagen (CPII), a biosynthesis marker; and the Col2-3/4(long mono) (C2C) and Col2-3/4(short) (C1-2C) neoepitopes, reflecting collagen cleavage of type II collagen and type I/type II collagen, respectively. At baseline, patients with AS demonstrated significant elevations in serum levels of CPII, the 846 epitope, and the CPII-to-C2C (CPII:C2C) ratio (but not C2C or C1-2C) compared with normal controls. Of the biomarkers examined, only CPII:C2C showed a correlation with the C-reactive protein (CRP) level. Among the biomarker-cytokine relationships, TGFbeta demonstrated a trend toward a positive correlation with the 846 epitope. In AS, elevated serum levels of CPII and the 846 epitope may be related to biosynthetic turnover of hyaline cartilage and the intervertebral discs but may also reflect progressive bone formation as a result of endochondral ossification. The correlation of the CPII:C2C ratio with CRP suggests that the CPII:C2C ratio might

  2. Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Plasma (L-PRP) Versus Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) For Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee: A Comparative Evaluation in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Davoud; Fakhrjou, Ashraf

    2015-10-01

    Articular cartilage injuries of the knee are among the most debilitating injuries leading to osteoarthritis due to limited regenerative capability of cartilaginous tissue. The use of platelet concentrates containing necessary growth factors for cartilage healing has recently emerged as a new treatment method. The efficacy of two types of different platelet concentrates were compared in the treatment of acute articular cartilage injuries of the knee in an animal model. Eighteen adult Iranian mixed breed male dogs were used to conduct this experimental study. Full thickness articular cartilage defects (diameter 6 mm, depth 5 mm) were created in the weight bearing area of femoral condyles of both hind limbs in all dogs (n = 72). Twelve dogs were randomly selected to receive treatment and their right and left hind limb defects were treated by L-PRP and L-PRF implantation respectively, while no treatment was undertaken in six other dogs as controls. The animals were euthanized at 4, 16 and 24 weeks following surgery and the resultant repair tissue was investigated macroscopically and microscopically. At each sampling time, 4 treated dogs and 2 control dogs were euthanized, therefore 8 defects per group were evaluated. Mean macroscopic scores of the treated defects were higher than the controls at all sampling times with significant differences (P < 0.05) observed between L-PRF treated and control defects (10.13 vs. 8.37) and L-PRP treated and control defects (10 vs. 8.5) at 4 and 16 weeks, respectively. A similar trend in mean total microscopic scores was observed with a significant difference (P < 0.05) between L-PRP treated and control defects at 4 (9.87 vs. 7.62) and 16 (13.38 vs. 11) weeks. No significant difference was observed between the platelet concentrate treated defects in either mean macroscopic scores or mean total microscopic scores. Both L-PRP and L-PRF could be used to effectively promote the healing of articular cartilage defects of the knee.

  3. Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Plasma (L-PRP) Versus Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) For Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee: A Comparative Evaluation in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Davoud; Fakhrjou, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Articular cartilage injuries of the knee are among the most debilitating injuries leading to osteoarthritis due to limited regenerative capability of cartilaginous tissue. The use of platelet concentrates containing necessary growth factors for cartilage healing has recently emerged as a new treatment method. Objectives: The efficacy of two types of different platelet concentrates were compared in the treatment of acute articular cartilage injuries of the knee in an animal model. Materials and Methods: Eighteen adult Iranian mixed breed male dogs were used to conduct this experimental study. Full thickness articular cartilage defects (diameter 6 mm, depth 5 mm) were created in the weight bearing area of femoral condyles of both hind limbs in all dogs (n = 72). Twelve dogs were randomly selected to receive treatment and their right and left hind limb defects were treated by L-PRP and L-PRF implantation respectively, while no treatment was undertaken in six other dogs as controls. The animals were euthanized at 4, 16 and 24 weeks following surgery and the resultant repair tissue was investigated macroscopically and microscopically. At each sampling time, 4 treated dogs and 2 control dogs were euthanized, therefore 8 defects per group were evaluated. Results: Mean macroscopic scores of the treated defects were higher than the controls at all sampling times with significant differences (P < 0.05) observed between L-PRF treated and control defects (10.13 vs. 8.37) and L-PRP treated and control defects (10 vs. 8.5) at 4 and 16 weeks, respectively. A similar trend in mean total microscopic scores was observed with a significant difference (P < 0.05) between L-PRP treated and control defects at 4 (9.87 vs. 7.62) and 16 (13.38 vs. 11) weeks. No significant difference was observed between the platelet concentrate treated defects in either mean macroscopic scores or mean total microscopic scores. Conclusions: Both L-PRP and L-PRF could be used to effectively

  4. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation and functional cartilage microtissue formation for in vivo cartilage regeneration by cartilage extracellular matrix-derived particles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Heyong; Wang, Yu; Sun, Zhen; Sun, Xun; Xu, Yichi; Li, Pan; Meng, Haoye; Yu, Xiaoming; Xiao, Bo; Fan, Tian; Wang, Yiguo; Xu, Wenjing; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of preparing a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), designated cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs). Through a series of processes involving pulverization, sieving, and decellularization, fresh cartilage was made into CEDPs with a median diameter of 263 ± 48 μm. Under microgravity culture conditions in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS), bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate rapidly on the surface of CEDPs with high viability. Histological evaluation and gene expression analysis indicated that BMSCs were differentiated into mature chondrocytes after 21 days of culture without the use of exogenous growth factors. Functional cartilage microtissue aggregates of BMSC-laden CEDPs formed as time in culture increased. Further, the microtissue aggregates were directly implanted into trochlear cartilage defects in a rat model (CEDP+MSC group). Gait analysis and histological results indicated that the CEDP+MSC group obtained better and more rapid joint function recovery and superior cartilage repair compared to the control groups, in which defects were treated with CEDPs alone or only fibrin glue, at both 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the innovative cell carrier derived from cartilage ECM could promote chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue facilitated cartilage regeneration. This strategy for cell culture, stem cell differentiation and one-step surgery using cartilage microtissue for cartilage repair provides novel prospects for cartilage tissue engineering and may have further broad clinical applications. We proposed a method to prepare a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage ECM, termed cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs), which can support proliferation of MSCs and facilitate their chondrogenic differentiation. Further, the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue of MSC-laden CEDP aggregates for

  5. Selection of Suitable Reference Genes for Normalization of Quantitative Real-Time PCR in Cartilage Tissue Injury and Repair in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao-Xiang; Zhao, Rong-Lan; Song, Wei; Chu, Hai-Rong; Li, Meng; Song, Shu-Ya; Li, Guang-Zhou; Liang, Dong-Chun

    2012-01-01

    When studying the altered expression of genes associated with cartilage regeneration by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR), reference genes with highly stable expression during different stages of chondrocyte developmental are necessary to normalize gene expression accurately. Until now, no reports evaluating expression changes of commonly used reference genes in rabbit articular cartilage have been published. In this study, defects were made in rabbit articular cartilage, with or without insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) treatment, to create different chondrocyte living environments. The stability and intensity of the expressions of the candidate reference genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), 18S Ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), cyclophilin (CYP), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT1), and β-2-microglobulin (B2M) were evaluated. The data were analyzed by geNorm and NormFinder. B2M and 18S rRNA were identified to be suitable reference genes for rabbit cartilage tissues. PMID:23203068

  6. Overview of cartilage biology and new trends in cartilage stimulation.

    PubMed

    Triche, Rachel; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2013-03-01

    This article reviews the basics of articular cartilage biology, which provide a necessary foundation for understanding the evolving field of articular cartilage injury and repair. The currently popular treatment options for osteochondral injury (microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer system, osteochondral allograft, autologous chondrocyte implantation, and the use of scaffolds with autologous chondrocyte implantation) document the significant advances made in this area in the past 2 decades. Integration of newly available information and technology derived from advances in molecular biology and tissue engineering holds even greater promise for continued advances in optimal management of this challenging problem.

  7. Smart Polymeric Hydrogels for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: A Review on the Chemistry and Biological Functions.

    PubMed

    Eslahi, Niloofar; Abdorahim, Marjan; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2016-11-14

    Stimuli responsive hydrogels (SRHs) are attractive bioscaffolds for tissue engineering. The structural similarity of SRHs to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of many tissues offers great advantages for a minimally invasive tissue repair. Among various potential applications of SRHs, cartilage regeneration has attracted significant attention. The repair of cartilage damage is challenging in orthopedics owing to its low repair capacity. Recent advances include development of injectable hydrogels to minimize invasive surgery with nanostructured features and rapid stimuli-responsive characteristics. Nanostructured SRHs with more structural similarity to natural ECM up-regulate cell-material interactions for faster tissue repair and more controlled stimuli-response to environmental changes. This review highlights most recent advances in the development of nanostructured or smart hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Different types of stimuli-responsive hydrogels are introduced and their fabrication processes through physicochemical procedures are reported. The applications and characteristics of natural and synthetic polymers used in SRHs are also reviewed with an outline on clinical considerations and challenges.

  8. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  9. Host DNA repair proteins in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in lung epitehlial cells and in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host DNA damage and DNA repair response to bacterial infections and its significance are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that infection by Gram-negative bacterium P. aeruginosa significantly altered the expression and enzymatic activity of base excision DNA repair protein OGG1 in lung epi...

  10. Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma & Platelet-Rich Fibrin with and without Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 on Repairing Full-Thickness Cartilage Defects in Knees of Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Bahmanpour, Soghra; Ghasemi, Maryam; Sadeghi-Naini, Mohsen; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to create biomaterial scaffolds like platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) containing stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) as a chemokine to induce hyaline cartilage regeneration of rabbit knee in a full thickness defect. Methods: We created a full thickness defect in the trochlear groove of thirty-six bilateral knees of eighteen mature male rabbits. The knees were randomly divided into six groups (group I: untreated control, group II: PRP, group III: PRF, group IV: Gelatin+SDF1, group V: PRP+SDF1, and group VI: PRF+SDF1). After four weeks, the tissue specimens were evaluated by macroscopic examination and histological grading, immunofluorescent staining for collagen type II, and analyzed for cartilage marker genes by real-time PCR. The data were compared using statistical methods (SPSS 20, Kruskal-Wallis test, Bonferroni post hoc test and P<0.05). Results: Macroscopic evaluations revealed that international cartilage repair society (ICRS) scores of the PRF+SDF1 group were higher than other groups. Microscopic analysis showed that the ICRS score of the PRP group was significantly lower than other groups. Immunofluorescent staining for collagen II demonstrated a remarkable distribution of type II collagen in the Gel+SDF1, PRP+SDF1 and PRF+SDF1 groups compared with other groups. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of SOX9 and aggrecan were significantly greater in the PRF+SDF1, PRP+SDF1, Gel+SDF1 and PRF groups than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our results indicate that implantation of PRF scaffold containing SDF1 led to the greatest evaluation scores of full-thickness lesions in rabbits. PMID:27853331

  11. Mismatch repair status may predict response to adjuvant chemotherapy in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Riazy, Maziar; Kalloger, Steve E; Sheffield, Brandon S; Peixoto, Renata D; Li-Chang, Hector H; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-10-01

    Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair have been associated with inferior response to 5-FU in colorectal cancer. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is similarly treated with pyrimidine analogs, yet the predictive value of mismatch repair status for response to these agents has not been examined in this malignancy. A tissue microarray with associated clinical outcome, comprising 254 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was stained for four mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Mismatch repair deficiency and proficiency was determined by the absence or presence of uniform nuclear staining in tumor cells, respectively. Cases identified as mismatch repair deficient on the tissue microarray were confirmed by immunohistochemistry on whole slide sections. Of the 265 cases, 78 (29%) received adjuvant treatment with a pyrimidine analog and 41 (15%) showed a mismatch repair-deficient immunoprofile. Multivariable disease-specific survival in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort demonstrated that adjuvant chemotherapy, regional lymph-node status, gender, and the presence of tumor budding were significant independent prognostic variables (P≤0.04); however, none of the eight clinico-pathologic covariates examined in the mismatch repair-deficient cohort were of independent prognostic significance. Univariable assessment of disease-specific survival revealed an almost identical survival profile for both treated and untreated patients with a mismatch repair-deficient profile, while treatment in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort conferred a greater than 10-month median disease-specific survival advantage over their untreated counterparts (P=0.0018). In this cohort, adjuvant chemotherapy with a pyrimidine analog conferred no survival advantage to mismatch repair-deficient pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. Mismatch repair immunoprofiling is a feasible predictive marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients, and further prospective

  12. Editorial Commentary: Microfracture for Focal Cartilage Defects: Is the Hip Like the Knee?

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2016-01-01

    Reading about microfracture for focal cartilage defects of the hip, we ponder whether the hip resembles the knee with regard to focal cartilage defects. Minimally invasive microfracture has been a first-line therapy for focal cartilage defects. Microfracture results in fibrous cartilage and unpredictable repair volume, which could be better than absent cartilage, particularly if knee symptoms abate. However, of late, microfracture is not recommended because destruction of subchondral anatomy may result in subchondral cyst formation.

  13. Regulation of DNA Repair Mechanisms: How the Chromatin Environment Regulates the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Jens; Richly, Holger

    2017-08-05

    Cellular DNA is constantly challenged by damage-inducing factors derived from exogenous or endogenous sources. In order to maintain genome stability and integrity, cells have evolved a wide variety of DNA repair pathways which counteract different types of DNA lesions, also referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR). However, DNA in eukaryotes is highly organized and compacted into chromatin representing major constraints for all cellular pathways, including DNA repair pathways, which require DNA as their substrate. Therefore, the chromatin configuration surrounding the lesion site undergoes dramatic remodeling to facilitate access of DNA repair factors and subsequent removal of the DNA lesion. In this review, we focus on the question of how the cellular DNA repair pathways overcome the chromatin barrier, how the chromatin environment is rearranged to facilitate efficient DNA repair, which proteins mediate this re-organization process and, consequently, how the altered chromatin landscape is involved in the regulation of DNA damage responses.

  14. Review: tissue engineering for regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Temenoff, J S; Mikos, A G

    2000-03-01

    Joint pain due to cartilage degeneration is a serious problem, affecting people of all ages. Although many techniques, often surgical, are currently employed to treat this affliction, none have had complete success. Recent advances in biology and materials science have pushed tissue engineering to the forefront of new cartilage repair techniques. This review seeks to condense information for the biomaterialist interested in developing materials for this application. Articular cartilage anatomy, types of injury, and current repair methods are explained. The need for biomaterials, current commonly used materials for tissue-engineered cartilage, and considerations in scale-up of cell-biomaterial constructs are summarized.

  15. A synthetic thermo-sensitive hydrogel for cartilage bioprinting and its biofunctionalization with polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Blokzijl, Maarten M.; Gawlitta, Debby; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; Hennink, Wim E.; Malda, Jos; Vermonden, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels based on triblock copolymers of polyethylene glycol and partially methacrylated poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide mono/dilactate) are an attractive class of biomaterials due to their biodegradability, cytocompatibility, and tunable thermo-responsive and mechanical properties. By fine-tuning these properties, the hydrogels can be 3D bioprinted, to generate e.g. constructs for cartilage repair. This study investigated whether hydrogels based on the above mentioned polymer with a 10% degree of methacrylation (M10P10), support cartilage formation by chondrocytes, and whether the incorporation of methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA) or methacrylated hyaluronic acid (HAMA) can improve the mechanical properties, long-term stability, and printability. Chondrocyte-laden M10P10 hydrogels were cultured for 42 days to evaluate chondrogenesis. M10P10 hydrogels with or without polysaccharides were evaluated for their mechanical properties (before and after UV photo-cross-linking), degradation kinetics, and printability. Extensive cartilage matrix production occurred in M10P10 hydrogels, highlighting their potential for cartilage repair strategies. The incorporation of polysaccharides increased the storage modulus of polymer mixtures and decreased the degradation kinetics in cross-linked hydrogels. Addition of HAMA to M10P10 hydrogels improved printability and resulted in 3D constructs with excellent cell viability. Hence, this novel combination of M10P10 with HAMA forms an interesting class of hydrogels for cartilage bioprinting. PMID:27171342

  16. Mechanical properties of natural cartilage and tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Little, Christopher James; Bawolin, Nahshon Kenneth; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2011-08-01

    There has been much research over the past two decades with the aim of engineering cartilage constructs for repairing or restoring damaged cartilage. To engineer healthy neocartilage, the constructs must have mechanical properties matching those of native cartilage as well as appropriate for the loading conditions of the joint. This article discusses the mechanical behavior of native cartilage and surveys different types of tensile, compressive, and shear tests with their limitations. It also comprehensively reviews recent work and achievements in developing the mathematical models representing the mechanical properties of both native and engineered cartilage. Different methods for enhancing the mechanical properties of engineered cartilage are also discussed, including scaffold design, mechanical stimulation, and chemical stimulation. This article concludes with recommendations for future research aimed at achieving engineered cartilage with mechanical properties matching those found in native cartilage.

  17. sb203580 preconditioning recharges matrix-expanded human adult stem cells for chondrogenesis in an inflammatory environment - A feasible approach for autologous stem cell based osteoarthritic cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Pizzute, Tyler; Li, Jingting; He, Fan; Pei, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Autologous stem cells are a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration; however, cell replicative senescence and joint posttraumatic inflammation provide challenges in bringing this treatment modality to fruition. In this study, we hypothesized that preconditioning with p38 MAPK inhibitor (sb203580) would recharge decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) expanded human synovium-derived stem cell (hSDSC) chondrogenesis in an inflammatory environment. We found that preconditioning with sb203580 greatly enhanced dECM expanded hSDSC proliferation and chondrogenic potential while supplementation with sb203580 in an induction medium dramatically retarded hSDSC chondrogenic differentiation, even for dECM expanded cells. We also found that sb203580 preconditioning enhanced matrix-expanded hSDSC chondrogenic capacity even in an interleukin-1 (IL-1) induced inflammatory environment. Non-detectable expression of HLA-DR in the hSDSCs grown on allogeneic dECM indicates the feasibility of commercial preparation of these dECMs from healthy, young donors for patients who need autologous transplantation. Our study indicated that p38 MAPK inhibitor has a distinctive priming effect on dECM mediated stem cell cartilage regeneration. Combined rejuvenation with sb203580 and dECM expansion can precondition hSDSCs' resurfacing capacity for osteoarthritic patients with cartilage defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Articular cartilage biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, K.E.; Schleyerbach, R.; Hascall, V.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: Cartilage Matrix Components; Biosynthesis and Characterization of Cartilage--Specific Matrix Components and Events; Cartilage Metabolism; In Vitro Studies of Articular Cartilage Metabolism; Normal and Pathologic Metabolism of Cartilage; and Destruction of the Articular Cartilage in Rheumatoid Diseases. Some of the paper topics are: magnetic resonance imaging; joint destruction; age-related changes; proteoglycan structure; and biosynthesis of cartilage proteoglycan.

  19. Multiscale Mechanics of Articular Cartilage: Potentials and Challenges of Coupling Musculoskeletal, Joint, and Microscale Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, J. P.; Sibole, S.; van Donkelaar, C. C.; van Turnhout, M. C.; Oomens, C. W. J.; Weiss, J. A.; Guilak, F.; Erdemir, A.

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage experiences significant mechanical loads during daily activities. Healthy cartilage provides the capacity for load bearing and regulates the mechanobiological processes for tissue development, maintenance, and repair. Experimental studies at multiple scales have provided a fundamental understanding of macroscopic mechanical function, evaluation of the micromechanical environment of chondrocytes, and the foundations for mechanobiological response. In addition, computational models of cartilage have offered a concise description of experimental data at many spatial levels under healthy and diseased conditions, and have served to generate hypotheses for the mechanical and biological function. Further, modeling and simulation provides a platform for predictive risk assessment, management of dysfunction, as well as a means to relate multiple spatial scales. Simulation-based investigation of cartilage comes with many challenges including both the computational burden and often insufficient availability of data for model development and validation. This review outlines recent modeling and simulation approaches to understand cartilage function from a mechanical systems perspective, and illustrates pathways to associate mechanics with biological function. Computational representations at single scales are provided from the body down to the microstructure, along with attempts to explore multiscale mechanisms of load sharing that dictate the mechanical environment of the cartilage and chondrocytes. PMID:22648577

  20. Hyaluronan-based scaffolds to tissue-engineer cartilage implants for laryngotracheal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Weidenbecher, Mark; Henderson, James H; Tucker, Harvey M; Baskin, Jonathan Z; Awadallah, Amad; Dennis, James E

    2007-10-01

    Donor site morbidity, including pneumothorax, can be a considerable problem when harvesting cartilage grafts for laryngotracheal reconstruction (LTR). Tissue-engineered cartilage may offer a solution to this problem. This study investigated the feasibility of using Hyalograft C combined with autologous chondrocytes to tissue engineer cartilage grafts for LTR in rabbits. Animal study. Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits underwent LTR: 12 rabbits received autologous tissue-engineered cartilage grafts and 6 animals, serving as a positive control group, native auricular cartilage. To determine any differences in response to the site of implantation and any potential immune response to the scaffold, a second piece of engineered neocartilage and a non-cell-loaded scaffold were inserted paralaryngeally into a subset of the rabbits. The rabbits were sacrificed 3, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks after the LTR and their larynx examined. None of the 18 rabbits showed signs of respiratory distress. A smooth, noninflammatory scar was visible intraluminally. Histologically, the native auricular cartilage implants showed excellent integration without any signs of inflammation or cartilage degradation. In contrast, all tissue-engineered grafts and empty scaffolds revealed marked signs of an unspecific foreign body reaction, leading to a complete degradation of the neocartilage, whether implanted para- or intralaryngeally. In contrast to the success with which Hyalograft C has been applied in articular defect repair, our results indicate that, in rabbits, Hyalograft C initiates a foreign body reaction if implanted intra- or paralaryngeally, leading to cartilage degradation and possible graft failure. These findings suggest limitations on the environment in which Hyalograft C can be applied.

  1. The application of POSS nanostructures in cartilage tissue engineering: the chondrocyte response to nanoscale geometry.

    PubMed

    Oseni, Adelola O; Butler, Peter E; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-11-01

    Despite extensive research into cartilage tissue engineering (CTE), there is still no scaffold ideal for clinical applications. Various synthetic and natural polymers have been investigated in vitro and in vivo, but none have reached widespread clinical use. The authors investigate the potential of POSS-PCU, a synthetic nanocomposite polymer, for use in CTE. POSS-PCU is modified with silsesquioxane nanostructures that improve its biological and physical properties. The ability of POSS-PCU to support the growth of ovine nasoseptal chondrocytes was evaluated against a polymer widely used in CTE, polycaprolactone (PCL). Scaffolds with varied concentrations of the POSS molecule were also synthesized to investigate their effect on chondrocyte growth. Chondrocytes were seeded onto scaffold disks (PCU negative control; POSS-PCU 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%; PCL). Cytocompatibilty was evaluated using cell viability, total DNA, collagen and GAG assays. Chondrocytes cultured on POSS-PCU (2% POSS) scaffolds had significantly higher viability than PCL scaffolds (p < 0.001). Total DNA, collagen and sGAG protein were also greater on POSS-PCU scaffolds compared with PCL (p > 0.05). POSS-PCU (6% and 8% POSS) had improved viability and proliferation over an 18 day culture period compared with 2% and 4% POSS-PCU (p < 0.0001). Increasing the percentage of POSS in the scaffolds increased the size of the pores found in the scaffolds (p < 0.05). POSS-PCU has excellent potential for use in CTE. It supports the growth of chondrocytes in vitro and the POSS modification significantly enhances the growth and proliferation of nasoseptal chondrocytes compared with traditional scaffolds such as PCL.

  2. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Beddoes, Charlotte M; Whitehouse, Michael R; Briscoe, Wuge H; Su, Bo

    2016-06-03

    Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN) hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  3. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Beddoes, Charlotte M.; Whitehouse, Michael R.; Briscoe, Wuge H.; Su, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN) hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour. PMID:28773566

  4. Laser-induced regeneration of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil; Shekhter, Anatoly; Guller, Anna; Baum, Olga; Baskov, Andrey

    2011-08-01

    Laser radiation provides a means to control the fields of temperature and thermo mechanical stress, mass transfer, and modification of fine structure of the cartilage matrix. The aim of this outlook paper is to review physical and biological aspects of laser-induced regeneration of cartilage and to discuss the possibilities and prospects of its clinical applications. The problems and the pathways of tissue regeneration, the types and features of cartilage will be introduced first. Then we will review various actual and prospective approaches for cartilage repair; consider possible mechanisms of laser-induced regeneration. Finally, we present the results in laser regeneration of joints and spine disks cartilages and discuss some future applications of lasers in regenerative medicine.

  5. How the structural integrity of the matrix can influence the microstructural response of articular cartilage to compression.

    PubMed

    Fick, James M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how the structural integrity of healthy, surface-removed (healthy), and degenerate matrices can modify the response of cartilage to compression. Six groups of specimens were loaded up to the onset of consolidation or at full consolidation (N = 30, 5 per group, respectively) and then subsequently chemically fixed to capture the deformed state of the tissues. Creep compression was applied through an 8 mm flat-ended indenter containing a 450 μm diameter central pore, providing a region of high stress that also allowed the tissue samples to deform freely around the indenter pore during compression. Differential interference contrast microscopy was used in order to explore the microstructural responses of the tissues. The results demonstrated that superficial layer removal or tissue degeneration can reduce the observed deformation within the tissue region corresponding to the central pore of the loading indenter. Fibril crimping within the central pore matrix and matrix shear at the indenter edge regions are also reduced by both superficial layer removal and by tissue degeneration. These findings suggest that surface removal or tissue degeneration renders the matrix more susceptible to deformation and can also reduce the tissue's ability to transfer forces over a greater surface area and induce stress within the matrix.

  6. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  7. Importance of material properties and porosity of bone on mechanical response of articular cartilage in human knee joint--a two-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Mikko S; Mononen, Mika E; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha; Virén, Tuomas; Korhonen, Rami K

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical behavior of bone is determined by the structure and intrinsic, local material properties of the tissue. However, previously presented knee joint models for evaluation of stresses and strains in joints generally consider bones as rigid bodies or linearly elastic solid materials. The aim of this study was to estimate how different structural and mechanical properties of bone affect the mechanical response of articular cartilage within a knee joint. Based on a cadaver knee joint, a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) model of a knee joint including bone, cartilage, and meniscus geometries was constructed. Six different computational models with varying properties for cortical, trabecular, and subchondral bone were created, while the biphasic fibril-reinforced properties of cartilage and menisci were kept unaltered. The simplest model included rigid bones, while the most complex model included specific mechanical properties for different bone structures and anatomically accurate trabecular structure. Models with different porosities of trabecular bone were also constructed. All models were exposed to axial loading of 1.9 times body weight within 0.2 s (mimicking typical maximum knee joint forces during gait) while free varus-valgus rotation was allowed and all other rotations and translations were fixed. As compared to results obtained with the rigid bone model, stresses, strains, and pore pressures observed in cartilage decreased depending on the implemented properties of trabecular bone. Greatest changes in these parameters (up to -51% in maximum principal stresses) were observed when the lowest modulus for trabecular bone (measured at the structural level) was used. By increasing the trabecular bone porosity, stresses and strains were reduced substantially in the lateral tibial cartilage, while they remained relatively constant in the medial tibial plateau. The present results highlight the importance of long bones, in particular, their mechanical

  8. Approaches for plasma membrane wounding and assessment of lysosome-mediated repair responses

    PubMed Central

    Corrotte, M.; Castro-Gomes, T.; Koushik, A.B.; Andrews, N.W.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid plasma membrane repair is essential to restore cellular homeostasis and improve cell survival after injury. Several mechanisms for plasma membrane repair have been proposed, including formation of an intracellular vesicle patch, reduction of plasma membrane tension, lesion removal by endocytosis, and/or shedding of the wounded membrane. Under all conditions studied to date, plasma membrane repair is strictly dependent on the entry of calcium into cells, from the extracellular medium. Calcium-dependent exocytosis of lysosomes is an important early step in the plasma membrane repair process, and defects in plasma membrane repair have been observed in cells carrying mutations responsible for serious lysosomal diseases, such as Chediak–Higashi (Huynh, Roth, Ward, Kaplan, & Andrews, 2004) and Niemann–Pick Disease type A (Tam et al., 2010). A functional role for release of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase, which generates ceramide on the cell surface and triggers endocytosis, has been described (Corrotte et al., 2013; Tam et al., 2010). Therefore, procedures for measuring the extent of lysosomal fusion with the plasma membrane of wounded cells are important indicators of the cellular repair response. The importance of carefully selecting the methodology for experimental plasma membrane injury, in order not to adversely impact the membrane repair machinery, is becoming increasingly apparent. Here, we describe physiologically relevant methods to induce different types of cellular wounds, and sensitive assays to measure the ability of cells to secrete lysosomes and reseal their plasma membrane. PMID:25665445

  9. The superior regenerative potential of muscle-derived stem cells for articular cartilage repair is attributed to high cell survival and chondrogenic potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongshuai; Lu, Aiping; Tang, Ying; Beckman, Sarah; Nakayama, Naoki; Poddar, Minakshi; Hogan, MaCalus V; Huard, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Three populations of muscle-derived cells (PP1, PP3, and PP6) were isolated from mouse skeletal muscle using modified preplate technique and retrovirally transduced with BMP4/GFP.  In vitro, the PP1 cells (fibroblasts) proliferated significantly slower than the PP3 (myoblasts) and PP6 cells (muscle-derived stem cells); the PP1 and PP6 cells showed a superior rate of survival compared with PP3 cells under oxidative stress; and the PP6 cells showed significantly superior chondrogenic capabilities than PP1 and PP3 cells. In vivo, the PP6 cells promoted superior cartilage regeneration compared with the other muscle-derived cell populations. The cartilage defects in the PP6 group had significantly higher histological scores than those of the other muscle-derived cell groups, and GFP detection revealed that the transplanted PP6 cells showed superior in vivo cell survival and chondrogenic capabilities compared with the PP1 and PP3 cells. PP6 cells (muscle-derived stem cells) are superior to other primary muscle-derived cells for use as a cellular vehicle for BMP4-based ex vivo gene therapy to heal full-thickness osteo-chondral defects. The superiority of the PP6/muscle-derived stem cells appears to be attributable to a combination of increased rate of in vivo survival and superior chondrogenic differentiation capacity. PMID:27990446

  10. Induction of inflammatory cytokines by cartilage extracts.

    PubMed

    Merly, Liza; Simjee, Shabana; Smith, Sylvia L

    2007-03-01

    Shark cartilage extracts were examined for induction of cytokines and chemokines in human peripheral blood leukocytes. Primary leukocyte cultures were exposed to a variety of aqueous and organic extracts prepared from several commercial brands of shark cartilage. From all commercial sources of shark cartilage tested the acid extracts induced higher levels of TNFalpha than other extracts. Different commercial brands of shark cartilage varied significantly in cytokine-inducing activity. TNFalpha induction was seen as early as 4 h and IFNgamma at detectable levels for up to four days. Shark cartilage extracts did not induce physiologically significant levels of IL-4. Results suggest that shark cartilage, preferentially, induces Th1 type inflammatory cytokines. When compared to bovine cartilage extract, collagen, and chondroitin sulfate, shark cartilage induced significantly higher levels of TNFalpha. Treatment with digestive proteases (trypsin and chymotrypsin) reduced the cytokine induction response by 80%, suggesting that the active component(s) in cartilage extracts is proteinaceous. The induction of Th1 type cytokine response in leukocytes is a significant finding since shark cartilage, taken as a dietary supplement for a variety of chronic degenerative diseases, would be contraindicated in cases where the underlying pathology of the chronic condition is caused by inflammation.

  11. Spaceflight-Relevant Challenges of Radiation and/or Reduced Weight Bearing Cause Arthritic Responses in Knee Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Willey, J S; Kwok, A T; Moore, J E; Payne, V; Lindburg, C A; Balk, S A; Olson, J; Black, P J; Walb, M C; Yammani, R R; Munley, M T

    2016-10-01

    There is little known about the effect of both reduced weight bearing and exposure to radiation during spaceflight on the mechanically-sensitive cartilage lining the knee joint. In this study, we characterized cartilage damage in rat knees after periods of reduced weight bearing with/without exposure to solar-flare-relevant radiation, then cartilage recovery after return to weight bearing. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 120) were either hindlimb unloaded (HLU) via tail suspension or remained weight bearing in cages (GROUND). On day 5, half of the HLU and GROUND rats were 1 Gy total-body X-ray irradiated during HLU, and half were sham irradiated (SHAM), yielding 4 groups: GROUND-SHAM; GROUND-IR; HLU-SHAM; and HLU-IR. Hindlimbs were collected from half of each group of rats on day 13. The remaining rats were then removed from HLU or remained weight bearing,