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Sample records for case management intervention

  1. Arbitration Intervention Worker (AIW) Services: Case Management Overlay in a Juvenile Diversion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poythress, Norman G.; Dembo, Richard; DuDell, Gary; Wareham, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    In this issue we describe a clinical trials study of the impact of adding specific case manager overlay services to "treatment as usual" services for youths in a Juvenile Arbitration Program. In this first article we describe the experimental intervention, the Arbitration Intervention Worker (AIW) service, which was provided to a randomly selected…

  2. Effect of diabetic case management intervention on health service utilization in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soon Ae; Kim, Hyeongsu; Lee, Kunsei; Lin, Vivian; Liu, George

    2015-12-01

    This study is to estimate the effectiveness of a diabetic case management programme on health-care service utilization. The study population included 6007 as the intervention group and 956,766 as the control group. As the indicators of health-care service utilization, numbers of medical ambulatory consultations, days of medication prescribed and medical expenses for one year were used, and we analysed the claim data of the health insurance from 2005 to 2007. The study population was classified into three subgroups based on the number of medical ambulatory consultations per year before this intervention. In the under-serviced subgroup, the intervention group showed a significant increase in the number of consultations (3.2), days of prescribed medication (66.4) and medical expenses (287,900 KRW) compared with the control group. Conversely, in the over-serviced subgroup, the intervention group showed a less decrease days of prescribed medication (1.6) compared with the control group. This showed that the case management programme led the intervention group to optimize their utilization of health-care services by subgroups. It is necessary to evaluate the appropriateness of health-care usage and clinical outcome to show the direct effectiveness of the case management programme by subgroups.

  3. Effect of diabetic case management intervention on health service utilization in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soon Ae; Kim, Hyeongsu; Lee, Kunsei; Lin, Vivian; Liu, George

    2015-12-01

    This study is to estimate the effectiveness of a diabetic case management programme on health-care service utilization. The study population included 6007 as the intervention group and 956,766 as the control group. As the indicators of health-care service utilization, numbers of medical ambulatory consultations, days of medication prescribed and medical expenses for one year were used, and we analysed the claim data of the health insurance from 2005 to 2007. The study population was classified into three subgroups based on the number of medical ambulatory consultations per year before this intervention. In the under-serviced subgroup, the intervention group showed a significant increase in the number of consultations (3.2), days of prescribed medication (66.4) and medical expenses (287,900 KRW) compared with the control group. Conversely, in the over-serviced subgroup, the intervention group showed a less decrease days of prescribed medication (1.6) compared with the control group. This showed that the case management programme led the intervention group to optimize their utilization of health-care services by subgroups. It is necessary to evaluate the appropriateness of health-care usage and clinical outcome to show the direct effectiveness of the case management programme by subgroups. PMID:24821209

  4. The business case for a diabetes self-management intervention in a community general hospital.

    PubMed

    Micklethwaite, Ashley; Brownson, Carol A; O'Toole, Mary L; Kilpatrick, Kerry E

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing and increasingly compelling body of evidence that self-management interventions for persons with type 2 diabetes can be both effective and cost-effective from a societal perspective. Yet, the evidence is elusive that these interventions can produce a positive business case for a sponsoring provider organization in the short term. The lack of a business case limits the enthusiasm for provider organizations to implement these proven quality-enhancing interventions more widely. This article provides a case example of a self-management intervention in a community general hospital targeting an underserved population who have significant barriers to receiving regular health care. The 3-component program sought to improve meaningful access to care, increase health literacy related to type 2 diabetes, and partner with the enrollees to make long-term lifestyle changes. The intervention not only resulted in significant improvements in HbA1c levels (-0.77%) but saved the hospital an average of $551 per active patient per year, primarily by reducing hospital visits. With only 255 actively enrolled patients, the hospital can recover fully its total direct annual personnel and operating costs for the program. Because the program serves patients who would have been seen at other hospitals, it also enhanced care quality and reduced costs for the broader community in which the program is embedded.

  5. Beyond police crisis intervention: moving "upstream" to manage cases and places of behavioral health vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jennifer D; Beierschmitt, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Law enforcement officers continue to serve on the front lines as mental health interventionists, and as such have been subject to a wave of "first generation" reform designed to enhance their crisis response capabilities. Yet, this focus on crisis intervention has not answered recent calls to move "upstream" and bolster early intervention in the name of long-term recovery. This paper reports on findings from an action research project in Philadelphia aimed at exploring opportunities for enhanced upstream engagement. Study methods include spatial analyses of police mental health transportations from an eight year period (2004-2011) and qualitative data from twenty-three "framing conversations" with partners and other stakeholders, seven focus groups with police and outreach workers, five key informant interviews as well as document reviews of the service delivery system in Philadelphia. Recommendations include the need to move beyond a focus on what police can do to a wider conception of city agencies and business stakeholders who can influence vulnerable people and vulnerable spaces of the city. We argue for the need to develop shared principles and rules of engagement that clarify roles and stipulate how best to enlist city resources in a range of circumstances. Since issues of mental health, substance use and disorder are so tightly coupled, we stress the importance of establishing a data-driven approach to crime and disorder reduction in areas of the city we term "hotspots of vulnerability". In line with a recovery philosophy, such an approach should reduce opportunities for anti-social behavior among the "dually labeled" in ways consistent with "procedural justice". Furthermore, crime and disorder data flowing from police and security to behavioral health analysts could contribute to a more focused case management of "repeat utilizers" across the two systems. Our central argument is that a twin emphasis on "case management" and "place management" may provide

  6. Coping Card Usage can Further Reduce Suicide Reattempt in Suicide Attempter Case Management Within 3-Month Intervention.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Chuan; Hsieh, Ling-Yu; Wang, Ming-Yu; Chou, Cheng-Hsiang; Huang, Min-Wei; Ko, Huei-Chen

    2016-02-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of using crisis coping cards (n = 32) in the case management of suicide prevention compared with case management without the use of coping cards (n = 32) over a 3-month intervention period. The generalized estimating equation was used to examine the interaction effect between treatments and time on suicide risk, depression, anxiety, and hopelessness. Results indicated that subsequent suicidal behaviors, severity of suicide risk, depression, anxiety, and hopelessness were reduced more in the coping card intervention group compared to the case management only group. Moreover, for the survival curves of time to suicide reattempt, the coping card group showed a significantly longer time to reattempt than the case management only group at 2-month and 3-month intervention periods.

  7. Effectiveness of case management interventions for frequent users of healthcare services: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Lambert, Mireille; Dufour, Isabelle; Krieg, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Frequent users of healthcare services are a vulnerable population, often socioeconomically disadvantaged, who can present multiple chronic conditions as well as mental health problems. Case management (CM) is the most frequently performed intervention to reduce healthcare use and cost. This study aimed to examine the evidence of the effectiveness of CM interventions for frequent users of healthcare services. Design Scoping review. Data sources An electronic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, Scopus and CINAHL databases covering January 2004 to December 2015. A specific search strategy was developed for each database using keywords ‘case management’ and ‘frequent use’. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies To be included in the review, studies had to report effects of a CM intervention on healthcare use and cost or patient outcomes. Eligible designs included randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and controlled and non-controlled before–after studies. Studies limited to specific groups of patients or targeting a single disease were excluded. Three reviewers screened abstracts, screened each full-text article and extracted data, and discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Results The final review included 11 articles evaluating the effectiveness of CM interventions among frequent users of healthcare services. Two non-randomised controlled studies and 4 before–after studies reported positives outcomes on healthcare use or cost. Two randomised controlled trials, 2 before–after studies and 1 non-randomised controlled study presented mitigated results. Patient outcomes such as drug and alcohol use, health locus of control, patient satisfaction and psychological functioning were evaluated in 3 studies, but no change was reported. Conclusions Many studies suggest that CM could reduce emergency department visits and hospitalisations as well as cost. However, pragmatic randomised controlled trials of adequate power that

  8. Ayurvedic intervention in the management of uterine fibroids: A Case series

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Uterine enlargement is common in reproductive life of a female. Other than pregnancy, it is seen most frequently in the result of leiomyomas. Leiomyomas, are benign smooth muscle neoplasmas that typically originate from the myometrium, due to fibrous consistency and are also called as fibroid. They may be identified in asymptomatic women during routine pelvic examination or may cause symptoms. Typical complaints include pain, pressure sensations, dysmenorrhea or abnormal uterine bleeding. Management of uterine fibroid through surgery is available to meet urgent need of the patient, but challenges remain to establish a satisfactory conservatory medical treatment till date. Hence, it was critically reviewed in the context of Granthi Roga (disease) and treatment protocol befitting the Samprapti Vighatana of Granthi (encapsulated growth) was subjected in patients of uterine fibroids. Seven cases of uterine fibroid were managed by Ayurvedic intervention. Ultrasonography (USG) of the lower abdomen was the main investigative/diagnostic tool in this study. After 7 weeks, patients presented with USG report as absence of uterine fibroid. Ayurvedic formulations Kanchanara Guggulu, Shigru Guggulu, and Haridra Khand are found to be effective treatment modality in uterine fibroid. PMID:26664240

  9. Ayurvedic intervention in the management of uterine fibroids: A Case series.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Uterine enlargement is common in reproductive life of a female. Other than pregnancy, it is seen most frequently in the result of leiomyomas. Leiomyomas, are benign smooth muscle neoplasmas that typically originate from the myometrium, due to fibrous consistency and are also called as fibroid. They may be identified in asymptomatic women during routine pelvic examination or may cause symptoms. Typical complaints include pain, pressure sensations, dysmenorrhea or abnormal uterine bleeding. Management of uterine fibroid through surgery is available to meet urgent need of the patient, but challenges remain to establish a satisfactory conservatory medical treatment till date. Hence, it was critically reviewed in the context of Granthi Roga (disease) and treatment protocol befitting the Samprapti Vighatana of Granthi (encapsulated growth) was subjected in patients of uterine fibroids. Seven cases of uterine fibroid were managed by Ayurvedic intervention. Ultrasonography (USG) of the lower abdomen was the main investigative/diagnostic tool in this study. After 7 weeks, patients presented with USG report as absence of uterine fibroid. Ayurvedic formulations Kanchanara Guggulu, Shigru Guggulu, and Haridra Khand are found to be effective treatment modality in uterine fibroid.

  10. Anger Management Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochman, John E.; Palardy, Nicole R.; McElroy, Heather K.; Phillips, Nancy; Holmes, Khiela J.

    2004-01-01

    Two anger management interventions for aggressive children, Anger Coping and Coping Power, are described in this review article, including conceptual underpinnings, session format and content, and outcome research findings. Important issues and considerations in the implementation of such interventions are also presented. Overall, Anger Coping and…

  11. Case management.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, A H; Propotnik, T

    1997-03-01

    Providing cost-effective high quality healthcare services ranks as the number one concern for anyone involved with the healthcare delivery system. While quality of care should always be the number one priority, controlling healthcare costs receives most of the attention. With limited healthcare dollars and providers assuming more of the financial risk for services rendered, a whole assortment of cost-containment strategies are being introduced in an effort to maintain some semblance of financial viability. Healthcare providers can approach cost control from two different angles. On the fixed-cost operational overhead side, traditional cost-containment techniques have focused on downsizing, maximizing productivity, staffing redesign, improved purchasing contracts, standardization, inventory control, and other more individualized restructured service models. On the variable-cost clinical side, cost control has been approached by introducing a variety of cost-containment strategies designed to improve efficiency and effectiveness of provider performance. While many of these strategies, previously discussed in the Journal of Healthcare Resource Management have stressed the importance of education, guidelines, pathways, and other clinical "tools for improvement," the success of many of these tools resides in the ability to provide real-time intervention. Real-time intervention rather than the more passive retrospective variance analysis has the greatest potential for producing cost savings by actually making a recommendation that prevents the unwanted event from occurring. In many institutions, the case manager bears the responsibility for monitoring and managing these programs. This article describes various case management models currently used by different institutions.

  12. A case management intervention targeted to reduce healthcare consumption for frequent Emergency Department visitors: results from an adaptive randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jacqueline; Dolk, Anders; Torgerson, Jarl; Nyberg, Svante; Skau, Tommy; Forsberg, Birger C.; Werr, Joachim; Öhlen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Background A small group of frequent visitors to Emergency Departments accounts for a disproportionally large fraction of healthcare consumption including unplanned hospitalizations and overall healthcare costs. In response, several case and disease management programs aimed at reducing healthcare consumption in this group have been tested; however, results vary widely. Objectives To investigate whether a telephone-based, nurse-led case management intervention can reduce healthcare consumption for frequent Emergency Department visitors in a large-scale setup. Methods A total of 12 181 frequent Emergency Department users in three counties in Sweden were randomized using Zelen’s design or a traditional randomized design to receive either a nurse-led case management intervention or no intervention, and were followed for healthcare consumption for up to 2 years. Results The traditional design showed an overall 12% (95% confidence interval 4–19%) decreased rate of hospitalization, which was mostly driven by effects in the last year. Similar results were achieved in the Zelen studies, with a significant reduction in hospitalization in the last year, but mixed results in the early development of the project. Conclusion Our study provides evidence that a carefully designed telephone-based intervention with accurate and systematic patient selection and appropriate staff training in a centralized setup can lead to significant decreases in healthcare consumption and costs. Further, our results also show that the effects are sensitive to the delivery model chosen. PMID:25969342

  13. Acceptability and feasibility of a mobile phone-based case management intervention to retain mothers and infants from an Option B+ program in postpartum HIV care

    PubMed Central

    SCHWARTZ, Sheree R; CLOUSE, Kate; YENDE, Nompumelelo; VAN RIE, Annelies; BASSETT, Jean; RATSHEFOLA, Mamothe; PETTIFOR, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the acceptability and feasibility of a cell-phone based case manager intervention targeting HIV-infected pregnant women on highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods Pregnant women ≥36 weeks gestation attending antenatal care and receiving HAART through the Option B+ program at a primary care clinic in South Africa were enrolled into a prospective pilot intervention to receive text messages and telephone calls from a case manager through six weeks postpartum. Acceptability and feasibility of the intervention were assessed along with infant HIV testing rates and 10-week and 12-month postpartum maternal retention in care. Retention outcomes were compared to women of similar eligibility receiving care prior to the intervention. Results Fifty women were enrolled into the pilot from May-July 2013. Most (70%) were HAART-naive at time of conception and started HAART during antenatal care. During the intervention, the case manager sent 482 text messages and completed 202 telephone calls, for a median of 10 text messages and 4 calls/woman. Ninety-six percent completed the postpartum interview and 47/48 (98%) endorsed the utility of the intervention. Engagement in 10-week postpartum maternal HIV care was >90% in the pre-intervention (n=50) and intervention (n=50) periods; by 12-months retention fell to 72% and was the same across periods. More infants received HIV-testing by 10-weeks in the intervention period as compared to pre-intervention (90.0% vs. 63.3%, p<0.01). Conclusions Maternal support through a cell-phone based case manager approach was highly acceptable among South African HIV infected women on HAART and feasible, warranting further assessment of effectiveness. PMID:25656728

  14. Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management.

    PubMed

    Doody, S B; Smith, C; Webb, J

    1991-03-01

    Managing pain is a complex and inexact science. Acute and chronic pain physically and psychologically affects and disables an overwhelming number of people. Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management have been reviewed. These methods can be used independently or in combination with other nonpharmacologic or pharmacologic methods of pain control. The goals of nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management include the reduction of pain, minimal adverse effects, and allowing patients to become active participants in their own care. Nurses are called on many times to comfort patients in pain. It is through their expertise and intervention that the goals of pain management succeed. PMID:2043331

  15. Beyond police crisis intervention: Moving “upstream” to manage cases and places of behavioral health vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer; Beierschmitt, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Law enforcement officers continue to serve on the front lines as mental health interventionists, and as such have been subject to a wave of “first generation” reform designed to enhance their crisis response capabilities. Yet, this focus on crisis intervention has not answered recent calls to move “upstream” and bolster early intervention in the name of long-term recovery. This paper reports on findings from an action research project in Philadelphia aimed at exploring opportunities for enhanced upstream engagement. Study methods include spatial analyses of police mental health transportations from an eight year period (2004–2011) and qualitative data from twenty-three “framing conversations” with partners and other stakeholders, seven focus groups with police and outreach workers, five key informant interviews as well as document reviews of the service delivery system in Philadelphia. Recommendations include the need to move beyond a focus on what police can do to a wider conception of city agencies and business stakeholders who can influence vulnerable people and vulnerable spaces of the city. We argue for the need to develop shared principles and rules of engagement that clarify roles and stipulate how best to enlist city resources in a range of circumstances. Since issues of mental health, substance use and disorder are so tightly coupled, we stress the importance of establishing a data-driven approach to crime and disorder reduction in areas of the city we term “hotspots of vulnerability”. In line with a recovery philosophy, such an approach should reduce opportunities for anti-social behavior among the “dually labeled” in ways consistent with “procedural justice”. Furthermore, crime and disorder data flowing from police and security to behavioral health analysts could contribute to a more focused case management of “repeat utilizers” across the two systems. Our central argument is that a twin emphasis on “case management” and

  16. Interventions to Improve Motivation and Retention of Community Health Workers Delivering Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM): Stakeholder Perceptions and Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Daniel L.; Källander, Karin; ten Asbroek, Augustinus H. A.; Kirkwood, Betty; Meek, Sylvia R.; Benton, Lorna; Conteh, Lesong; Tibenderana, James; Hill, Zelee

    2012-01-01

    Despite resurgence in the use of community health workers (CHWs) in the delivery of community case management of childhood illnesses, a paucity of evidence for effective strategies to address key constraints of worker motivation and retention endures. This work reports the results of semi-structured interviews with 15 international stakeholders, selected because of their experiences in CHW program implementation, to elicit their views on strategies that could increase CHW motivation and retention. Data were collected to identify potential interventions that could be tested through a randomized control trial. Suggested interventions were organized into thematic areas; cross-cutting approaches, recruitment, training, supervision, incentives, community involvement and ownership, information and data management, and mHealth. The priority interventions of stakeholders correspond to key areas of the work motivation and CHW literature. Combined, they potentially provide useful insight for programmers engaging in further enquiry into the most locally relevant, acceptable, and evidence-based interventions. PMID:23136286

  17. An effective environmental intervention for management of the 'mirror sign' in a case of probable Lewy body dementia.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ruiz, Nuria; Osorio, Ricardo S; Cruz, Isabel; Agüera-Ortiz, Luis; Olazarán, Javier; Sacks, Hayley; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Alzheimer Center Of The Queen Sofia Foundation Multidisciplinary Therapy Group

    2013-01-01

    The term 'mirror sign' refers to the inability to recognize the reflection of oneself in a mirror, while the ability to recognize others' faces often remains intact. In this article, we present a case of an 85-year-old woman, with probable Lewy body dementia, who stably exhibited a delusional 'mirror sign' for a period of 9 months. Following a straightforward, ecological, non-pharmacological intervention, her 'mirror sign' delusion was no longer present. PMID:22229711

  18. An effective environmental intervention for management of the 'mirror sign' in a case of probable Lewy body dementia.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ruiz, Nuria; Osorio, Ricardo S; Cruz, Isabel; Agüera-Ortiz, Luis; Olazarán, Javier; Sacks, Hayley; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Alzheimer Center Of The Queen Sofia Foundation Multidisciplinary Therapy Group

    2013-01-01

    The term 'mirror sign' refers to the inability to recognize the reflection of oneself in a mirror, while the ability to recognize others' faces often remains intact. In this article, we present a case of an 85-year-old woman, with probable Lewy body dementia, who stably exhibited a delusional 'mirror sign' for a period of 9 months. Following a straightforward, ecological, non-pharmacological intervention, her 'mirror sign' delusion was no longer present.

  19. The Impact of Integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Diseases Interventions to Prevent Malaria Fever in Children Less than Five Years Old in Bauchi State of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abegunde, Dele; Orobaton, Nosa

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria accounts for about 300,000 childhood deaths and 30% of under-five year old mortality in Nigeria annually. We assessed the impact of intervention strategies that integrated Patent Medicines Vendors into community case management of childhood-diseases, improved access to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) and distributed bed nets to households. We explored the influence of household socioeconomic characteristics on the impact of the interventions on fever in the under-five year olds in Bauchi State Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional case-controlled, interventional study, which sampled 3077 and 2737 under-5 year olds from 1,588 and 1601 households in pre- and post-intervention periods respectively, was conducted from 2013 to 2015. Difference-in-differences and logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the impact attributable to the interventions: integrated community case management of childhood illness which introduced trained public and private sector health providers and the possession of nets on the prevalence of fever. Results Two-week prevalence of fever among under-fives declined from 56.6% at pre-intervention to 42.5% at post-intervention. Fever-prevention fraction attributable to nets was statistically significant (OR = 0.217, 95% CI: 0.08–0.33). Children in the intervention group had significantly fewer incidence of fever than children in the control group had (OR = 0.765, 95% CI: 0.67–0.87). Although being in the intervention group significantly provided 23.5% protection against fever (95% CI: 0.13–0.33), the post-intervention likelihood of fever was also significantly less than at pre-intervention (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.50–0.65). The intervention protection fraction against fever was statistically significant at 43.4% (OR = 0.434, 95% CI: 0.36–0.50). Logistic regression showed that the odds of fever were lower in households with nets (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.60–0.88), among children whose mothers had higher

  20. Conservative management of broken guidewire: Case reports

    PubMed Central

    Ho, David W; Dinaram, Temujin; Lazar, Jason M; Marmur, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of coronary guidewires during percutaneous coronary intervention within a coronary vessel lumen are a rare but serious complication. There have been several cases reported in the literature, some managed with surgical intervention, others with medical therapy. We present two prospective cases from our center. Both cases were managed successfully with medical therapy. PMID:27489659

  1. Cryoanalgesia in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Trescot, Andrea M

    2003-07-01

    Cryoneuroablation, also known as cryoanalgesia or cryoneurolysis, is a specialized technique for providing long-term pain relief in interventional pain management settings. Modern cryoanalgesia traces its roots to Cooper et al who developed in 1961, a device that used liquid nitrogen in a hollow tube that was insulated at the tip and achieved a temperature of - 190 degrees C. Lloyd et al proposed that cryoanalgesia was superior to other methods of peripheral nerve destruction, including alcohol neurolysis, phenol neurolysis, or surgical lesions. The application of cold to tissues creates a conduction block, similar to the effect of local anesthetics. Long-term pain relief from nerve freezing occurs because ice crystals create vascular damage to the vasonervorum, which produces severe endoneural edema. Cryoanalgesia disrupts the nerve structure and creates wallerian degeneration, but leaves the myelin sheath and endoneurium intact. Clinical applications of cryoanalgesia extend from its use in craniofacial pain secondary to trigeminal neuralgia, posterior auricular neuralgia, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia; chest wall pain with multiple conditions including post-thoracotomy neuromas, persistent pain after rib fractures, and post herpetic neuralgia in thoracic distribution; abdominal and pelvic pain secondary to ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral, subgastric neuralgia; pudendal neuralgia; low back pain and lower extremity pain secondary to lumbar facet joint pathology, pseudosciatica, pain involving intraspinous ligament or supragluteal nerve, sacroiliac joint pain, cluneal neuralgia, obturator neuritis, and various types of peripheral neuropathy; and upper extremity pain secondary to suprascapular neuritis and other conditions of peripheral neuritis. This review describes historical concepts, physics and equipment, various clinical aspects, along with technical features, indications and contraindications, with clinical description of multiple conditions

  2. Unique patient issues: early interventions and management.

    PubMed

    Combelles, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Patient cases that present with recurring fertilization failure or complete abnormality in either the oocytes or sperm before fertilization are uncommon, yet they are devastating. This review presents several such instances, including oocyte maturation blocks, empty follicle syndrome, oocyte activation failures, defects in sperm phospholipase C isoform ζ, sperm structural anomalies, spontaneous oocyte activation, and unexplained cases. Diagnostic efforts have not only provided insight into possible etiologies but also have helped manage such challenging cases. Interventions may comprise cellular, molecular, or genetic analyses of gametes, as well as functional assays and/or modified treatment strategies. Consequently, infertility professionals can increasingly rely on evidence-based counseling with respect to prognosis and treatment options.

  3. Interventional Management of Vascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Renal transplantation is the therapy of choice in patients with end stage renal disease. Although transplant rejection remains the most common complication after renal transplantation, vascular anatomical complications occur in 1%-23% of renal transplant recipients. Interventional radiologists play an important role in the management of these complications. This review discusses the role of image-guided interventions within the context of multidisciplinary patient management. Particular emphasis is given to anatomical considerations unique to this patient population, techniques used for image-guided interventions, and outcomes of image-guided interventions. PMID:27641457

  4. Interventional Management of Nonvascular Renal Transplant Complications.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Kanti Pallav; LaBerge, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    Nonvascular complications represent a significant source of morbidity following renal transplantation and can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Postoperative problems include urinary tract obstruction or leakage and the development of peritransplant fluid collections. Interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients. Image-guided interventions are used to identify the underlying anatomical problem, relieve immediate symptoms, and allow planning for long-term resolution. In this article, we review the urinary tract anatomy relevant to renal transplantation, procedural techniques for image-guided urinary tract interventions and interventions on peritransplant fluid collections, and expected outcomes following image-guided interventions. PMID:27641456

  5. External Nursing Applications in the Supportive Management of Prolonged Postoperative Ileus: Description of Interventions and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Bernhard; von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Voggenreiter, Bernd; Vagedes, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged postoperative ileus is a common but clinically challenging problem that leads to patient discomfort and prolonged hospitalization; the condition is managed through a multimodular program of supportive measures. In anthroposophic nursing, the management of prolonged postoperative ileus involves additional tools, including external abdominal compresses and massages with plant or silver-containing oils and ointments. We describe 3 typical techniques: Oxalis tincture compresses, Thuja/Argentum ointment compresses, and massage with "Wala Melissenöl" (containing Melissa officinalis, Carvum cari, Foeniculum amari, and Origanum majorana). A 61-year-old man with chronic pain from adhesions after multiple abdominal surgical procedures developed a prolonged postoperative ileus after an elective ileostomy reversal. Following slow recovery during the first postoperative days, he began vomiting. A nasogastric tube was inserted, and daily Oxalis tincture compresses and massage with "Wala Melissenöl" and Thuja/Argentum ointment compresses were applied on the abdomen. The patient's symptoms gradually improved over the next 10 days. No prokinetic medications were needed to manage this episode. External abdominal nursing applications with plant substances and silver can be an additional tool in the management of prolonged postoperative ileus. PMID:27309410

  6. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to practice acquired skills in a simulated…

  7. Case Management Directors

    PubMed Central

    Bankston White, Cheri; Birmingham, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: Case management directors are in a dynamic position to affect the transition of care of patients across the continuum, work with all levels of providers, and support the financial well-being of a hospital. Most importantly, they can drive good patient outcomes. Although the position is critical on many different levels, there is little to help guide a new director in attending to all the “moving parts” of such a complex role. This is Part 2 of a two-part article written for case management directors, particularly new ones. Part 1 covered the first 4 of 7 tracks: (1) Staffing and Human Resources, (2) Compliance and Accreditation, (3) Discharge Planning and (4) Utilization Review and Revenue Cycle. Part 2 addresses (5) Internal Departmental Relationships (Organizational), (6) External Relationships (Community Agency), and (7) Quality and Program Outcomes. This article attempts to answer the following questions: Are case management directors prepared for an expanded role that affects departments and organizations outside of their own?How does a case management director manage the transition of care of patients while managing required relationships outside the department?How does the director manage program outcomes in such a complex department? Primary Practice Setting: The information is most meaningful to those case management directors who work in either stand-alone hospitals or integrated health systems and have frontline case managers (CMs) reporting to them. Findings/Conclusions: Part 1 found that case management directors would benefit from further research and documentation of “best practices” related to their role, particularly in the areas of leadership and management. The same conclusion applies to Part 2, which addresses the director's responsibilities outside her immediate department. Leadership and management skills apply as well to building strong, productive relationships across a broad spectrum of external organizations

  8. Operative interventions in the management of major postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Keriakos, R; Chaudhuri, S

    2012-01-01

    In many recent studies in the developed world, the incidence of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) has been rising, though the mortality has come down, suggesting improvement in the management of this condition. Since the publication of the RCOG guidelines in 2009 for management of PPH and the Sheffield guidelines for the use of Rusch balloon along with the initial small case series (Keriakos and Mukhopadhyay 2006), many units have introduced the guidelines into clinical practice. This has led to the reduction of surgical intervention in our unit. Major PPH accounted for 1.6% of the total deliveries in our hospital. Surgical interventions accounted for 7.8% of these cases and only 0.1% of the total deliveries. Risk factors for PPH were identified in 83%. In this paper, we reviewed the management of all patients who had major PPH and failed medical management over a period of about 4 years. All surgical interventions including Rusch balloon, B-Lynch suture, radiological interventions and hysterectomy were described. An update to Rusch balloon guidelines and Sheffield guidelines for management of major PPH are appended. PMID:22185528

  9. Case Management Directors

    PubMed Central

    Bankston-White, Cheri; Birmingham, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: Case management directors are in a dynamic position to affect the transition of care for patients across the continuum, work with all levels of providers, and support the financial well-being of a hospital. Most importantly, they can drive good patient outcomes. Although the position is critical on many different levels, there is little to help guide a new director in attending to all the “moving parts” of such a complex role. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide case management directors, particularly new ones, with a framework for understanding and fulfilling their role. We have divided the guide into seven tracks of responsibility. Part 1 discusses the first four tracks: (1) staffing and human resources, (2) compliance and accreditation, (3) discharge planning, and (4) utilization review and revenue cycle. Part 2 addresses (5) internal departmental relationships (organizational), (6) external relationships (Community agency), and (7) quality and program outcomes. Primary Practice Setting: The information is most meaningful to those case management directors who work in either stand-alone hospitals or integrated health systems, and have frontline case managers reporting to them. Findings/Conclusions: Case management directors would benefit from further research and documentation of “best practices” related to their role, particularly in the areas of leadership and management. New directors would benefit from mentoring and networking with one another. Implications for Case Management: As new regulations and models of care bring increased emphasis and focus to transitions of care, the role of the case management director continues to evolve, growing in importance and complexity. The growing financial impact of readmissions also brings added scrutiny and increased pressure to get the transitions of care right the first time. To operate most effectively, case management directors must understand the full range of their

  10. Modeling sustainable groundwater management: packaging and sequencing of policy interventions.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Encarna; Dinar, Ariel

    2013-04-15

    Of the many studies estimating effectiveness of policy reforms most have been considering various types of policy reforms in isolation from each other. Such pattern has also been the case in water resource regulations. In the case of groundwater almost all policy interventions considered in the literature have been implemented individually, without taking into account the possible interactions and impacts among them. In this paper, we focus on two policy instruments: water quota and uniform water tax. The paper demonstrates how packaging and sequencing sets of policy interventions, with possible triggers to initiate their time of implementation, may be more effective in achieving a sustainable groundwater management than single policies when environmental externalities exist. The policy instruments are applied to the Western la Mancha aquifer in Southeast Spain, a major aquifer that is managed by a command and control approach. PMID:23467104

  11. Modeling sustainable groundwater management: packaging and sequencing of policy interventions.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Encarna; Dinar, Ariel

    2013-04-15

    Of the many studies estimating effectiveness of policy reforms most have been considering various types of policy reforms in isolation from each other. Such pattern has also been the case in water resource regulations. In the case of groundwater almost all policy interventions considered in the literature have been implemented individually, without taking into account the possible interactions and impacts among them. In this paper, we focus on two policy instruments: water quota and uniform water tax. The paper demonstrates how packaging and sequencing sets of policy interventions, with possible triggers to initiate their time of implementation, may be more effective in achieving a sustainable groundwater management than single policies when environmental externalities exist. The policy instruments are applied to the Western la Mancha aquifer in Southeast Spain, a major aquifer that is managed by a command and control approach.

  12. [Pressure ulcer management--Evidence-based interventions].

    PubMed

    Rocha, J A; Miranda, M J; Andrade, M J

    2006-01-01

    Despite improved awareness and quality of care among health care personnel, pressure ulcers prevalence remains high especially in the inpatient setting. Pressure ulcers are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, affecting the quality of life of patients and their caregivers, and significantly increasing direct and indirect healthcare costs. Early risk assessment for developing a pressure ulcer is essential to decide on the appropriate preventive measures and for initiation of a tailored therapeutic approach. Interventions include strategies to reduce extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors associated with tissue ischemia, optimization of patient's nutritional status, and local wound care. This revision intends to review current evidence-based therapeutic interventions in pressure ulcer care, and support implementation of management protocols in an inpatient ward.

  13. Management of Dysfunctional Catheters and Tubes Inserted by Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous interventions are often used for enteral nutrition, biliary and urinary diversion, intra-abdominal fluid collection drainage, and central venous access. In most cases, radiologic and endoscopic placement of catheters and tubes has replaced the comparable surgical alternative. As experience with catheters and tubes grows, it becomes increasingly evident that the interventional radiologist needs to be an expert not only on device placement but also on device management. Tube dysfunction represents the most common complication requiring repeat intervention, which can be distressing for patients and other health care professionals. This manuscript addresses the etiologies and solutions to leaking and obstructed feeding tubes, percutaneous biliary drains, percutaneous catheter nephrostomies, and drainage catheters, including abscess drains. In addition, we will address the obstructed central venous catheter. PMID:26038615

  14. [Peri-interventional management of acute endovascular stroke treatment].

    PubMed

    Schönenberger, S; Bösel, J

    2015-10-01

    Due to the ground breaking consistent evidence that supports the effect of endovascular stroke treatment (EST), many acute care hospitals and stroke centers will have to be prepared to provide this treatment in an optimal way within the coming years. In addition to the intervention itself, patient preparation, stabilization and monitoring during the treatment as well as the aftercare represent significant challenges and have mostly not yet been sufficiently investigated. Under these aspects, the questions of optimal sedation and airway management have received the highest attention. Based on retrospective study results it already seems to be justified, respecting certain criteria, to prefer EST with the patient under conscious sedation (CS) in comparison to general anesthesia (GA) and to only switch to GA in cases of emergency until this question has been clarified by prospective studies. This and other aspects of peri-interventional management, such as logistics, monitoring, blood pressure, ventilation settings, postprocedural steps of intensive or stroke unit care and imaging follow-up are summarized in this overview. The clinical and radiological selection of patients and thus the decision for intervention or technical aspects of the intervention itself will not be part of this article. PMID:26311331

  15. Bleeding Scrotal Vascular Lesions: Interventional Management with Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Jaganathan, Sriram; Gamanagatti, Shivanand Mukund, Amar; Dhar, Anita

    2011-02-15

    Vascular lesions of the scrotum are uncommon; the most common among them are varicocele lesions. The other vascular lesions that may involve the scrotum are hemangioma, lymphangioma, and arteriovenous malformations, which are exceedingly rare. The imaging modalities useful in the diagnosis and management of scrotal vascular lesions are grayscale sonography, color Doppler sonography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, and digital subtraction angiography. We present two cases of scrotal vascular lesions involving the extratesticular scrotal soft tissues. Patients presented with bleeding and were treated by radiological interventional technique. We emphasize the importance of superselective catheterization and distal embolization.

  16. Angiographic and Interventional Management for a Esophagopericardial Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Keng You, Qiong He, Song-Jian; Mo, Hai-Liang

    2013-06-19

    We reported a case of a 78-year-old patient with esophagopericardial fistula who was referred for angiographic and interventional management. Emergent implantation of the esophageal stent could not lengthen or even save the patient’s life. One week later, the patient died of multiple organ failure, which was probably from formation of granulation tissue and stent migration. Therefore, if the inflammatory to the esophagopericardial fistula had been better controlled initially, and the implantation of the esophageal stent delayed, our patient would have survived.

  17. [Case management: a concept analysis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Tai; Feng, Ming-Chu; Ko, Nai-Ying

    2013-08-01

    While the case management approach has been increasingly applied to healthcare worldwide in recent years, significant differences in application exist among discrete medical systems. This paper applies a methodology outlined by Walker and Avant to analyze the case management concept. This methodology is designed to assist medical staff to understand a concept in order to better achieve concept goals. The case management approach works to leverage organizational strategies to resolve case-specific circumstances and issues in order to accomplish organizational goals. Defining attributes of case management include: (1) highly complex cases; (2) the use of multidisciplinary professional teams to resolve case problems in the most cost-effective manner; (3) the use of case managers to manage the effective integration and operation of the multidisciplinary team; and (4) helping cases improve and make effective use of medical system resources.

  18. Principles of Empirically Supported Interventions Applied to Anger Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Oetting, Eugene R.; DiGiuseppe, Raymond A.

    2002-01-01

    This article applies the Principles of Empirically Supported Interventions (PESI) in counseling psychology to anger management with adults. The review suggests that there is empirical support for cognitive-behavioral interventions generally and for four specific interventions (relaxation, cognitive, behavioral skill enhancement, and combinations…

  19. Phase Contrasts for Multiphase Single Case Intervention Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard I.; Brossart, Daniel F.

    2006-01-01

    The movement toward evidence-based interventions (EBI) in school psychology places new expectations on scientist-practitioners for evaluating intervention effectiveness (Kratochwill & Stoiber, 2000, 2002). Many such interventions in the school context are conducted for individual students, requiring single case designs. In this paper we provide…

  20. Diversity in case management modalities: the Summit model.

    PubMed

    Peterson, G A; Drone, I D; Munetz, M R

    1997-06-01

    Though ubiquitous in community mental health agencies, case management suffers from a lack of consensus regarding its definition, essential components, and appropriate application. Meaningful comparisons of various case management models await such a consensus. Global assessments of case management must be replaced by empirical studies of specific interventions with respect to the needs of specific populations. The authors describe a highly differentiated and prescriptive system of case management involving the application of more than one model of service delivery. Such a diversified and targeted system offers an opportunity to study the technology of case management in a more meaningful manner. PMID:9211044

  1. Diversity in case management modalities: the Summit model.

    PubMed

    Peterson, G A; Drone, I D; Munetz, M R

    1997-06-01

    Though ubiquitous in community mental health agencies, case management suffers from a lack of consensus regarding its definition, essential components, and appropriate application. Meaningful comparisons of various case management models await such a consensus. Global assessments of case management must be replaced by empirical studies of specific interventions with respect to the needs of specific populations. The authors describe a highly differentiated and prescriptive system of case management involving the application of more than one model of service delivery. Such a diversified and targeted system offers an opportunity to study the technology of case management in a more meaningful manner.

  2. Integration of interventional bronchoscopy in the management of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Nicolas; Mazieres, Julien; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Rouviere, Damien; Didier, Alain; Hermant, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Tracheal or bronchial proximal stenoses occur as complications in 20-30% of lung cancers, resulting in a dramatic alteration in quality of life and poor prognosis. Bronchoscopic management of these obstructions is based on what are known as "thermal" techniques for intraluminal stenosis and/or placement of tracheal or bronchial prostheses for extrinsic compressions, leading to rapid symptom palliation in the vast majority of patients. This invasive treatment should only be used in cases of symptomatic obstructions and in the presence of viable bronchial tree and downstream parenchyma. This review aims to clarify 1) the available methods for assessing the characteristics of stenoses before treatment, 2) the various techniques available including their preferred indications, outcomes and complications, and 3) the integration of interventional bronchoscopy in the multidisciplinary management of proximal bronchial cancers and its synergistic effects with the other specific treatments (surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy).

  3. Case management: a management system for quality and cost effective outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dees, J P; Anderson, N L

    1996-08-01

    1. Case management is an effective strategy for occupational health nurses to use to reduce corporate health insurance, workers' compensation, and disability expenditures. 2. Case management has evolved from a reactive to a proactive strategy useful in many arenas. While there are differences among group health, workers' compensation, and disability, the basic case management process is the same. 3. Early intervention and comprehensive assessment are the foundation of a successful case management process. 4. Occupational health nurses have extensive clinical, interpersonal, and management skills enabling them to excel as case managers. PMID:8852236

  4. The role of the case manager in a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Huston, Carol J

    2002-01-01

    Disease management programs provide new opportunities and roles for case managers to provide population-based healthcare to the chronically ill. This article identifies common components of disease management programs and examines roles assumed by case managers in disease management programs such as baseline assessment, performing economic analyses of diseases and their respective associated resource utilization, developing and/or implementing care guidelines or algorithms, educational interventions, disease management program implementation, and outcomes assessment. Areas of expertise needed to be an effective case manager in a disease management program are also identified.

  5. The role of the case manager in a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Huston, C J

    2001-01-01

    Disease management programs provide new opportunities and roles for case managers to provide population-based healthcare to the chronically ill. This article identifies common components of disease management programs and examines roles assumed by case managers in disease management programs such as baseline assessment, performing economic analyses of diseases and their respective associated resource utilization, developing and/or implementing care guidelines or algorithms, educational interventions, disease management program implementation, and outcomes assessment. Areas of expertise needed to be an effective case manager in a disease management program are also identified.

  6. Evaluation of Probation Case Management (PCM) for Drug-Involved Women Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monica; Guydish, Joseph; Prem, Rosemary; Jessup, Martha A.; Cervantes, Armando; Bostrom, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Based on availability of case management services, drug-involved women offenders entered either a probation case management (PCM) intervention(n = 65) or standard probation(n = 44). Participants were placed in the case management condition until all slots were filled, then placed in standard probation until case management slots opened.…

  7. Case Management: Service or Symptom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netting, F. Ellen

    1992-01-01

    Provides overview of case management, its history, and contemporary models. Examines challenges that case management poses for social work profession: covering up issue that health and human services delivery system is nonsystem; maintaining client-centered perspective in cost-obsessed environment; dealing with quality control; coping with…

  8. Management of vitiligo patients with surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Shokeen, Divya

    2016-05-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder of unknown etiology. Medical treatments are usually reasonably effective for nonstable vitiligo patches; however, for vitiligo patches that have been stable for a substantial period of time, surgical intervention should be considered. In this article, surgical interventions for vitiligo are reviewed, including split-thickness skin grafting, suction blister grafting, miniature punch grafting, and cultured melanocyte transplantation. PMID:27274556

  9. Do TQM interventions change management culture? Findings and implications.

    PubMed

    Gerowitz, M B

    1998-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of TQM/CQI interventions on the culture and performance of top management teams. The findings suggest culture is related to performance but that TQM/CQI interventions are not associated with either performance or culture change. Implications for additional research and for practice are discussed.

  10. Health policy and case management.

    PubMed

    Mark, D D

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the performance of and support for case management using a policy framework in order to increase case managers' awareness of policy making and facilitate successful planning for future policy initiatives. Feldstein's (1996) theory of opposing legislative outcomes indicates that legislation can be viewed on a continuum, ranging from legislation that meets the needs of the public to legislation considered to be in the self-interest of the participants and legislators. The current health care system requires that case managers working for publicly funded health care organizations balance the need for stewardship of U.S. tax dollars and the health care needs of consumers. It is apparent from the literature that case managers are successfully achieving this balance. However, certain conditions should exist that allow for case manager decision-making that promotes effective and efficient utilization of health care resources. Case managers must work within the context of the health care policy environment. Realizing that it is more likely that the conflicts between stewardship and the provision of health care services will continue, case managers' knowledge and influence regarding policy making becomes imperative in order to ensure that these conflicting goals do not become mutually exclusive.

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Complications of Interventional Radiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lessne, Mark L.; Holly, Brian; Huang, Steven Y.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided interventions have allowed for minimally invasive treatment of many common diseases, obviating the need for open surgery. While percutaneous interventions usually represent a safer approach than traditional surgical alternatives, complications do arise nonetheless. Inadvertent injury to blood vessels represents one of the most common types of complications, and its affect can range from inconsequential to catastrophic. The interventional radiologist must be prepared to manage hemorrhagic risks from percutaneous interventions. This manuscript discusses this type of iatrogenic injury, as well as preventative measures and treatments for postintervention bleeding. PMID:26038617

  12. A Case Study of a "Double-Dose" Mathematics Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratofil, Michelle Dahlsten

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to discover and describe the components of a "double-dose" math intervention that resulted in increased mathematics achievement for high school Algebra I intervention participants in an effort to inform local decisions regarding program improvements and to provide insight to other educators…

  13. Choosing among Techniques for Quantifying Single-Case Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manolov, Rumen; Solanas, Antonio; Sierra, Vicenta; Evans, Jonathan J.

    2011-01-01

    If single-case experimental designs are to be used to establish guidelines for evidence-based interventions in clinical and educational settings, numerical values that reflect treatment effect sizes are required. The present study compares four recently developed procedures for quantifying the magnitude of intervention effect using data with known…

  14. Adventure Based Interventions: The Case for Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning, Chris

    The Rank Foundation's director of youth projects for northern England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland presents personal views on at-risk youth and ways that adventure-based interventions can meet their needs. Young people today suffer from the constant bombardment of advertising campaigns promoting material consumerism as the criterion for…

  15. Administrative Sanctions, Classroom Management, and Intervention Strategies: Building Blocks for School-Wide Discipline. CASE/CCBD Mini-Library Series on Safe, Drug-Free, and Effective Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Cal

    Part of a series of monographs on safe, drug-free, and effective schools, this monograph discusses the new discipline requirements under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the role of administrators in developing a range of intervention strategies to manage the behavior of students with behavior problems. Following an introductory…

  16. Decreasing Students' Stress through Time Management Training: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Oberst, Verena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a time management training program on perceived control of time and perceived stress in the context of higher education. Twenty-three undergraduate students attended a time management training intervention and reported demands, perceived stress and perceived control of time directly before 2 and…

  17. The Managerial Nature of Case Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolk, James L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Contends that case managers engage in the practice of management. Employs Mintzberg's seminal research on chief executive behavior to argue that case managers' work is similarly characterized by brevity, variety, and fragmentation. Notes that case managers perform the 10 roles developed by Mintzberg. Describes roles and presents case managers'…

  18. Exercise intervention for management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Deusinger, Susan S

    2012-01-01

    Obesity touches the lives of most Americans regardless of age. In adults, accrual of co-morbidities, including frank disability, impacts health in ways that mandate aggressive public health action. In children, the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity raises serious prospective concerns for life as these children enter adulthood. Action is imperative to provide medical interventions and preventive strategies to reduce the threat this condition poses to future generations. Obesity primarily results from an energy regulation imbalance within the body; understanding its origin and effects requires considering both the intake (via eating) and output (via moving) of energy. This article focuses on how exercise and physical activity (i.e., energy output) can influence the primary condition of obesity and its health sequelae. Components, strategies, and expected outcomes of exercise and lifestyle activity are addressed. Successful long-term participation in daily movement requires matching exercise regimens and physical activity outlets to individual preferences and environmental conditions. Activity habits of Americans must change at home and in the workplace, schools and the community to positively influence health. Although the goals of Healthy People 2010 to reduce sedentary behavior have not been met, success of other public health interventions (e.g., immunizations, use of bicycle helmets) suggests that social change to alter activity habits can be achieved. Failure to reach our public health goals should serve as a catalyst for broad-based action to help children, adolescents, and adults attain and maintain behaviors that reduce the risk of obesity and its health insults.

  19. Interventional pain management in the palliative care patient.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Marlene E; Miller-Saultz, Debbie; Wuhrman, Elsa; Kosharskyy, Boleslav

    2012-09-01

    For the majority of patients, cancer pain can be treated using the World Health Organization cancer pain guidelines; however, for 10-20% of patients with advanced cancer, adequate pain control cannot be achieved using these methods owing to disease pathophysiology preventing administration/absorption of pain medications or intolerance due to opioid toxicities. The need to expand analgesic treatment when oral, transdermal, and intravenous therapies fail requires exploration of interventional pain management techniques such as neuraxial (e.g. epidural and intrathecal) infusion therapies and neurolytic interventions. Nurses caring for patients with cancer pain should develop their knowledge of these multimodal approaches to cancer pain management.

  20. Case Study: Interventions for an ADHD Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This case study was done in partial fulfillment of a Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.) Graduate Course the participant-observer was completing. The participant-observer learned a lot about Dmitrov, the child in this study. Dmitrov was a 2nd-grade student who was diagnosed (late in the school year) with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity…

  1. Non-interventional management of resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Doumas, Michael; Tsioufis, Costas; Faselis, Charles; Lazaridis, Antonios; Grassos, Haris; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most popular fields of research in modern medicine due to its high prevalence and its major impact on cardiovascular risk and consequently on global health. Indeed, about one third of individuals worldwide has hypertension and is under increased long-term risk of myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death. On the other hand, resistant hypertension, the “uncontrollable” part of arterial hypertension despite appropriate therapy, comprises a much greater menace since long-standing, high levels of blood pressure along with concomitant debilitating entities such as chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus create a prominent high cardiovascular risk milieu. However, despite the alarming consequences, resistant hypertension and its effective management still have not received proper scientific attention. Aspects like the exact prevalence and prognosis are yet to be clarified. In an effort to manage patients with resistant hypertension appropriately, clinical doctors are still racking their brains in order to find the best therapeutic algorithm and surmount the substantial difficulties in controlling this clinical entity. This review aims to shed light on the effective management of resistant hypertension and provide practical recommendations for clinicians dealing with such patients. PMID:25349652

  2. Case management: unraveling the confusion.

    PubMed

    Bower, K

    1998-01-01

    I'm going to close with some of my ideas about the characteristics that case managers exhibit. I have a great deal of professional respect for case managers. I think that you are a tenacious lot. One of the major things that case managers do is help create new alternatives to problems. You open doors; no ... you first build the door and then you open it. You're creative, persistent, and resourceful. You are sometimes asked to solve all of an organization's problems. I think that is a tremendous burden, and that you can get confused because of that role conflict and confusion. What model is best for my organization? Within that is my patient population. What is it that they need? What are the current issues that you are seeing? How is my case management role different from other roles? How large a scope of practice can I handle and be reasonably successful with the patients with whom I'm dealing? How many different kinds of approaches and models are needed within my organization? Look toward the future; think about the future in terms of your crystal balls. What trends do you see building in either the demographics or the health and social environments that are going to influence health care in the future? What effect will the aging of our population have on you and your case management practice? What issues are going to be related to those trends? How many more people do we have living in fragmented families? What's going to happens in terms of resources available for patients? How can case management influence those changes? I don't think we're going to see the pace of change in the health care industry slow down. We will continue to have health care organizations address social issues in addition to pathophysiologic ones. No matter what the role and how it evolves, case management will always be at the junction of change in health care. This will be difficult at times to deal with. It will also be a source of satisfaction for those in the role because of the

  3. Quick management of accidental tritium exposure cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishwanath P; Badiger, N M; Managanvi, S S; Bhat, H R

    2012-07-01

    Removal half-life (RHL) of tritium is one of the best means for optimising medical treatment, reduction of committed effective dose (CED) and quick/easy handling of a large group of workers for medical treatment reference. The removal of tritium from the body depends on age, temperature, relative humidity and daily rainfall; so tritium removal rate, its follow-up and proper data analysis and recording are the best techniques for management of accidental acute tritium exposed cases. The decision of referring for medical treatment or medical intervention (MI) would be based on workers' tritium RHL history taken from their bodies at the facilities. The workers with tritium intake up to 1 ALI shall not be considered for medical treatment as it is a derived limit of annual total effective dose. The short-term MI may be considered for tritium intake of 1-10 ALI; however, if the results show intake ≥100 ALI, extended strong medical/therapeutic intervention may be recommended based on the severity of exposure for maximum CED reduction requirements and annual total effective dose limit. The methodology is very useful for pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) which are mainly operated by Canada and India and future fusion reactor technologies. Proper management will optimise the cases for medical treatment and enhance public acceptance of nuclear fission and fusion reactor technologies.

  4. Responding to the Increased Needs of College Students: A Case Study of Case Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelesky, Kristin; Weatherford, Ryan D.; Silbert, Janelle

    2016-01-01

    The psychological needs of college students lead to overwhelming demand on college counseling centers' resources. In this article, we review models of case management in Higher Education including the administrative, behavioral intervention, and counseling center models. We also present a case study of the 3-year development of a counseling center…

  5. Disease management interventions: what's in the black box?

    PubMed

    Linden, Ariel; Roberts, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In discussing evaluation techniques to assess disease management (DM) program outcomes, it is often assumed that DM program interventions are premised on sound clinical judgment, an understanding of the disease process, and knowledge of the psychosocial models of behavioral change that must be used to effect those processes and ultimately improve the health outcomes that are being evaluated. This paper describes eight commonly used behavioral change models applied in the healthcare industry today. They represent programs designed to address individual, interpersonal, and community level factors as well as "packaged" comprehensive approaches. These models illustrate the breadth of approaches to consider when designing or assessing DM program interventions. Careful consideration of the type of behavioral change desired and the theories of how to effect such change should be an integral part of designing disease management program interventions.

  6. Classroom Management: Teacher Training, Attitudes and Beliefs, and Intervention Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladner, Margaret Catherine Davis

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factors that are associated with teacher classroom management with regard to training, attitudes and beliefs, and intervention practices of general and special education teachers in dealing with classroom control. These factors were examined in general and special education classrooms. The participants for this study were…

  7. A Rationale and Bibliography for Classroom Management and Intervention Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This 51-item bibliography offers a selection of writings on issues and problems related to classroom management and discipline. Most citations concern works written between 1972-1983. Intervention techniques in dealing with deviant behavior are highlighted along with discipline and control in the classroom. Articles on methods of behavior…

  8. Teaching Classroom Management-- A Potential Public Health Intervention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Ruth; Hansford, Lorraine; Edwards, Vanessa; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Norman, Shelley; Ingarfield, Sara; Sharkey, Siobhan; Logan, Stuart; Ford, Tamsin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of a classroom management course as a public health intervention. Improved socio-emotional skills may boost children's developmental and academic trajectory, while the costs of behaviour problems are enormous for schools with considerable impact on others' well-being.…

  9. Partnership as an Intervention Strategy in Self-Managing Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timperley, Helen S.; Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes strategy used by New Zealand Ministry of Education to intervene in 26 self-managing schools by developing a partnership with the schools and their communities. Documents difficulties encountered in the first phase (year one) of the intervention and the successes of the second phase (year two). (Contains 1 figure, 3 tables, and 27…

  10. Avoiding Procrastination through Time Management: An Experimental Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Häfner, Alexander; Oberst, Verena; Stock, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term time management intervention on procrastination. Procrastination is a serious issue for many students and associated with different negative consequences, such as anxiety or low grades. As procrastination is described as a self-regulatory failure, a training programme focussing…

  11. Varicocele - a case for early intervention.

    PubMed

    Bach, Phil V; Najari, Bobby B; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Testicular varicocele, which is defined as the dilation of the veins draining the testicle, has long been associated with a detrimental effect on testicular function. Despite a lack of high-quality, prospective data, recent evidence has shed light on potential links between varicocele and male infertility and serum testosterone levels. Similarly, varicocele repair has increasingly been shown to have a beneficial impact on pregnancy rates, semen parameters, and on improving serum testosterone in adult men. Numerous studies have assessed the optimal technique for varicocele repair and the bulk of the evidence has shown the microsurgical inguinal/subinguinal approach to have the highest success rates, the lowest overall complication rates, and the lowest recurrence rates. The management of varicocele in adolescents remains a clinical conundrum, but contemporary evidence suggests early deleterious effects of varicocele on testicular function in some patients. Well-designed prospective trials are critical to delineate the true impact and role of varicocele repair on male infertility and hypogonadism in adult and adolescent men. PMID:27508071

  12. Varicocele – a case for early intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Phil V.; Najari, Bobby B.; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Testicular varicocele, which is defined as the dilation of the veins draining the testicle, has long been associated with a detrimental effect on testicular function. Despite a lack of high-quality, prospective data, recent evidence has shed light on potential links between varicocele and male infertility and serum testosterone levels. Similarly, varicocele repair has increasingly been shown to have a beneficial impact on pregnancy rates, semen parameters, and on improving serum testosterone in adult men. Numerous studies have assessed the optimal technique for varicocele repair and the bulk of the evidence has shown the microsurgical inguinal/subinguinal approach to have the highest success rates, the lowest overall complication rates, and the lowest recurrence rates. The management of varicocele in adolescents remains a clinical conundrum, but contemporary evidence suggests early deleterious effects of varicocele on testicular function in some patients. Well-designed prospective trials are critical to delineate the true impact and role of varicocele repair on male infertility and hypogonadism in adult and adolescent men. PMID:27508071

  13. Case studies of ergonomic interventions in automotive parts distribution operations.

    PubMed

    Ulin, Sheryl S; Keyserling, W Monroe

    2004-12-01

    Ergonomic job analysis, intervention design, and intervention implementation are essential components of an ergonomics program designed to reduce worker exposure to risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders. As part of a 4-year study to reduce overexertion injuries in the service parts division of a major automaker, intervention case studies were identified that could be used at multiple facilities across the division. Interventions were developed and implemented. The three case studies include 1) self-elevating powered vehicle for transporting parts throughout the facility and for reaching to high bin locations; 2) lift and tilt pallet jacks for packing small parts into large bin-like containers; and 3) single-level telescoping conveyor used for delivering hand-held totes for subsequent sorting operations. Several analysis methods were used to assess worker exposure before and after intervention implementation (biomechanical analysis, posture analysis, worker interviews, and activity analysis). Following implementation, a decrease in exposure to risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders was documented. Worker interviews revealed acceptance and agreement that risk factors associated with the targeted tasks were reduced. Each case study includes a description of the implementation hurdles and can serve as both primary and secondary prevention of musculoskeletal disorders. Future work should document worker health and/or symptom changes as well as changes in risk factor exposure. PMID:15638260

  14. Case studies of ergonomic interventions in automotive parts distribution operations.

    PubMed

    Ulin, Sheryl S; Keyserling, W Monroe

    2004-12-01

    Ergonomic job analysis, intervention design, and intervention implementation are essential components of an ergonomics program designed to reduce worker exposure to risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders. As part of a 4-year study to reduce overexertion injuries in the service parts division of a major automaker, intervention case studies were identified that could be used at multiple facilities across the division. Interventions were developed and implemented. The three case studies include 1) self-elevating powered vehicle for transporting parts throughout the facility and for reaching to high bin locations; 2) lift and tilt pallet jacks for packing small parts into large bin-like containers; and 3) single-level telescoping conveyor used for delivering hand-held totes for subsequent sorting operations. Several analysis methods were used to assess worker exposure before and after intervention implementation (biomechanical analysis, posture analysis, worker interviews, and activity analysis). Following implementation, a decrease in exposure to risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders was documented. Worker interviews revealed acceptance and agreement that risk factors associated with the targeted tasks were reduced. Each case study includes a description of the implementation hurdles and can serve as both primary and secondary prevention of musculoskeletal disorders. Future work should document worker health and/or symptom changes as well as changes in risk factor exposure.

  15. Stakeholder opinions on the practicality of management interventions to control bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Catherine E; Gortázar, Christian; White, Piran C L; Hutchings, Michael R; Vicente, Joaquín

    2015-05-01

    Livestock disease control strategies are usually determined at national and international levels, yet their successful implementation is determined by stakeholders operating at local scales. Such stakeholders may also have detailed knowledge that would contribute to the development of disease control options suited to the socio-cultural and environmental conditions where management is undertaken. The aim of this study was to evaluate stakeholders' opinions of a list of potential bovine tuberculosis (TB) management interventions for South Central Spain. This area has high TB prevalence in wildlife and livestock, so veterinarians, livestock farmers and hunters are all key stakeholders in TB management. A literature review identified possible management activities. The effectiveness of each intervention was ranked by local experts, and practicality was ranked by hunters, cattle farmers and veterinarians, using a best-worst scaling exercise as part of a questionnaire. The most effective intervention, the banning of supplemental feeding of game species, was not considered practical by stakeholders. The most effective and practical interventions were the separation of wildlife and livestock access to waterholes, testing cattle every 3 months on farms with a recent positive TB case and removing gut-piles from the land after hunting events. Although all three of these options were well supported, each stakeholder group supported different approaches more strongly, suggesting that it might be effective to promote different disease management contributions in different stakeholder communities. This integrated approach contributes to the identification of the optimum combination of management tools that can be delivered effectively.

  16. Evaluating an online stress management intervention for college students.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Samuel; Frazier, Patricia A; Meredith, Liza

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a theory-based online intervention designed to improve stress management in undergraduate students. The intervention focused on present control because it has been found to be associated with a range of positive outcomes, including lower levels of depression, anxiety, and stress, controlling for a range of other variables (e.g., Frazier et al., 2011, 2012). Two pilot studies were first conducted to confirm that our intervention could increase present control. We then randomly assigned psychology students (n = 292) who were prescreened to have lower scores on the present control subscale of the Perceived Control Over Stressful Events Scale (Frazier et al., 2011) to 1 of 3 conditions: the present control intervention, the present control intervention plus feedback, and stress-information only. Seventy-six percent (n = 223) began the intervention, and 87% (n = 195) of those completed the posttest and 3-week follow-up. The 2 present control intervention groups had lower levels of stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms (on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995) and perceived stress (on the Perceived Stress Scale; Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) relative to the stress-information-only group at posttest and 3-week follow-up (mean between group d at follow-up = .35, mean within group d for intervention groups at follow-up = -.46). Further, mediation analyses revealed that these effects were mediated by changes in present control. Our intervention represents a potentially valuable tool for college mental health services.

  17. Evaluating an online stress management intervention for college students.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Samuel; Frazier, Patricia A; Meredith, Liza

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a theory-based online intervention designed to improve stress management in undergraduate students. The intervention focused on present control because it has been found to be associated with a range of positive outcomes, including lower levels of depression, anxiety, and stress, controlling for a range of other variables (e.g., Frazier et al., 2011, 2012). Two pilot studies were first conducted to confirm that our intervention could increase present control. We then randomly assigned psychology students (n = 292) who were prescreened to have lower scores on the present control subscale of the Perceived Control Over Stressful Events Scale (Frazier et al., 2011) to 1 of 3 conditions: the present control intervention, the present control intervention plus feedback, and stress-information only. Seventy-six percent (n = 223) began the intervention, and 87% (n = 195) of those completed the posttest and 3-week follow-up. The 2 present control intervention groups had lower levels of stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms (on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995) and perceived stress (on the Perceived Stress Scale; Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) relative to the stress-information-only group at posttest and 3-week follow-up (mean between group d at follow-up = .35, mean within group d for intervention groups at follow-up = -.46). Further, mediation analyses revealed that these effects were mediated by changes in present control. Our intervention represents a potentially valuable tool for college mental health services. PMID:24635586

  18. When a Hearing Test Battery Delays Intervention: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renda, Susan C.; Downs, David

    1993-01-01

    A case study is presented of a girl with a hearing impairment for whom extensive, corroborative hearing testing delayed the start of intervention. This contributed to speech, language, listening, and behavioral problems and prolonged her parents' denial of the hearing loss. Remediation began after starting aural habilitation based on limited,…

  19. Planning Intervention Using Dynamic Assessments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasson, Natalie; Dodd, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic assessments (DA) of language have been shown to be a useful addition to the battery of tests used to diagnose language impairments in children, and to evaluate their skills. The current article explores the value of the information gained from a DA in planning intervention for a child with language impairment. A single case study was used…

  20. A brief intervention for fatigue management in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Lise; Gagnon, Pierre; Leblond, Francine; Gélinas, Céline; Savard, Josée; Dupuis, Réjeanne; Duval, Karine; Larochelle, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized control trial was to verify the effectiveness of a brief group intervention that combines stress management psycho-education and physical activity (ie, independent variable) intervention in reducing fatigue and improving energy level, quality of life (mental and physical), fitness (VO 2submax), and emotional distress (ie, dependent variables) in breast cancer survivors. This study applied Lazarus and Folkman stress-coping theoretical framework, as well as Salmon's unifying theory of physical activity. Eighty-seven French-speaking women who had completed their treatments for nonmetastatic breast cancer at a university hospital in Quebec City, Canada, were randomly assigned to either the group intervention (experimental) or the usual-care (control) condition. Data were collected at baseline, postintervention, and at 3-month follow-up. The 4-week group intervention was cofacilitated by 2 nurses. Results showed that participants in the intervention group showed greater improvement in fatigue, energy level, and emotional distress at 3-month follow-up, and physical quality of life at postintervention, compared with the participants in the control group. These results suggest that a brief psycho-educational group intervention focusing on active coping strategies and physical activity is beneficial to cancer survivors after breast cancer treatments.

  1. Interventional bronchoscopy in the management of thoracic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hardavella, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Educational Aims To highlight the various methods of interventional bronchoscopy. To inform about the indications for palliation and curative bronchoscopy in lung cancer. Interventional bronchoscopy is a rapidly expanding field in respiratory medicine offering minimally invasive therapeutic and palliative procedures for all types of lung neoplasms. This field has progressed over the last couple of decades with the application of new technology. The HERMES European curriculum recommendations include interventional bronchoscopy skills in the modules of thoracic tumours and bronchoscopy [1]. However, interventional bronchoscopy is not available in all training centres and consequently, not all trainees will obtain experience unless they rotate to centres specifically offering such training. In this review, we give an overview of interventional bronchoscopic procedures used for the treatment and palliation of thoracic malignancy. These can be applied either with flexible or rigid bronchoscopy or a combination of both depending on the anatomical location of the tumour, the complexity of the case, bleeding risk, the operator’s expertise and preference as well as local availability. Specialised anaesthetic support and appropriately trained endoscopy staff are essential, allowing a multimodality approach to meet the high complexity of these cases. PMID:26632425

  2. Prevention and Management of Infectious Complications of Percutaneous Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Philip, Asher; Richter, Michael D.; Gupta, Sanjay; Lessne, Mark L.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications following interventional radiology (IR) procedures can cause significant patient morbidity and, potentially, mortality. As the number and breadth of IR procedures grow, it becomes increasingly evident that interventional radiologists must possess a thorough understanding of these potential infectious complications. Furthermore, given the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, emphasis on cost containment, and attention to quality of care, it is critical to have infection control strategies to maximize patient safety. This article reviews infectious complications associated with percutaneous ablation of liver tumors, transarterial embolization of liver tumors, uterine fibroid embolization, percutaneous nephrostomy, percutaneous biliary interventions, central venous catheters, and intravascular stents. Emphasis is placed on incidence, risk factors, prevention, and management. With the use of these strategies, IR procedures can be performed with reduced risk of infectious complications. PMID:26038616

  3. Outpatient percutaneous and endoscopic surgery in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Marion R

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of interventional pain management from inception through the present is examined. Increasing demand from patients, referring physicians and third party payors for proven interventions which provide long-term functional relief of symptoms or primary correction of common spinal pain syndromes is discussed. The role of current palliative therapy as compared to the proven clinical validity of outpatient percutaneous and endoscopic spinal surgical techniques is reviewed. Practitioners are encouraged to transition from the use of spinal injections and narcotics of unproven benefit to percutaneous and endoscopic spinal intervention as primary therapy of herniated lumbar disc, discogenic spinal pain, and lumbar spinal stenosis in appropriately selected patients. SD, Expenditures and health status among adults with back and neck problems. PMID:23256229

  4. Interdisciplinary Management of Gingivitis Artefacta Major: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pattnaik, Naina; Satpathy, Anurag; Mohanty, Rinkee; Nayak, Rashmita; Sahoo, Surjeet

    2015-01-01

    Cases described here discuss interdisciplinary (periodontal and behavioral) approach in the management of rare and difficult to diagnose self-inflicted injuries of gingiva such as gingivitis artefacta major. Self-inflicted injuries to the gingiva are rare and their management by periodontal therapy alone is inadequate. Proper management of this condition requires early detection and effective psychological treatment through behavioral therapy in addition to the treatment of dental lesion. Three male patients in their twenties presented with traumatic injuries of gingiva with history of self-injury and underlying emotional disturbances. Following basic periodontal intervention, their self-inflicting behavior was confirmed on psychiatric consultation. All of them underwent cognitive behavior therapy and were able to successfully curb their self-inflicting behavior prior to any definitive dental procedures. These cases illustrate the essentiality of behavioral intervention in addition to periodontal procedures in the management of such lesions. PMID:26664762

  5. Interdisciplinary Management of Gingivitis Artefacta Major: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Pattnaik, Naina; Satpathy, Anurag; Mohanty, Rinkee; Nayak, Rashmita; Sahoo, Surjeet

    2015-01-01

    Cases described here discuss interdisciplinary (periodontal and behavioral) approach in the management of rare and difficult to diagnose self-inflicted injuries of gingiva such as gingivitis artefacta major. Self-inflicted injuries to the gingiva are rare and their management by periodontal therapy alone is inadequate. Proper management of this condition requires early detection and effective psychological treatment through behavioral therapy in addition to the treatment of dental lesion. Three male patients in their twenties presented with traumatic injuries of gingiva with history of self-injury and underlying emotional disturbances. Following basic periodontal intervention, their self-inflicting behavior was confirmed on psychiatric consultation. All of them underwent cognitive behavior therapy and were able to successfully curb their self-inflicting behavior prior to any definitive dental procedures. These cases illustrate the essentiality of behavioral intervention in addition to periodontal procedures in the management of such lesions. PMID:26664762

  6. Progress and Outcomes for Children with Autism Receiving Parent-Managed Intensive Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eikeseth, Svein; Martin, Neil T.; Mudford, Oliver C.; Reeves, David

    2001-01-01

    Data were analyzed from 66 young children with autism served by 25 different early intervention consultants and receiving parent-managed interventions. Parent-managed intensive interventions resulted in progress for 60 children for mental age, adaptive behavior, and language skills. Interventions did not reproduce results from clinic-based…

  7. The impact of staff case manager-case management supervisor relationship on job satisfaction and retention of RN case managers.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Tierney D

    2005-01-01

    A positive relationship between staff RN case managers and their case management supervisor significantly impacts job satisfaction and retention in case managers. Literature review supports the premise that staff need to trust their supervisor and that there is a connection between this trust and job satisfaction. Staff case managers need to have a voice at work and feel empowered, and a supervisor's leadership style can influence job satisfaction and retention in their staff.

  8. Obamacare 2012: prognosis unclear for interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), informally referred to as ObamaCare, is a United States federal statute signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010. ACA has substantially changed the landscape of medical practice in the United States and continues to influence all sectors, in particular evolving specialties such as interventional pain management. ObamaCare has been signed into law amidst major political fallouts, has sustained a Supreme Court challenge and emerged bruised, but still very much alive. While proponents argue that ObamaCare will provide insurance for almost everyone, with an improvement in the quality of and reduction in the cost of health care,, opponents criticize it as being a massive bureaucracy laden with penalties and taxes, that will ultimately eliminate personal medicine and individual practices. Based on the 2 years since the passage of ACA in 2010, the prognosis for interventional pain management is unclear. The damage sustained to interventional pain management and the majority of medicine practices is irreparable. ObamaCare may provide insurance for all, but with cuts in Medicare to fund Obamacare, a limited expansion of Medicaid, the inadequate funding of exchanges, declining employer health insurance coverage and skyrocketing disability claims, the coverage will be practically nonexistent. ObamaCare is composed of numerous organizations and bureaucracies charged with controlling the practice of medicine through the extension of regulations. Apart from cutting reimbursements and reducing access to interventional pain management, administration officials are determined to increase the role of midlevel practitioners and reduce the role of individual physicians by liberalizing the scope of practice regulations and introducing proposals to reduce medical education and training.

  9. Obamacare 2012: prognosis unclear for interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), informally referred to as ObamaCare, is a United States federal statute signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010. ACA has substantially changed the landscape of medical practice in the United States and continues to influence all sectors, in particular evolving specialties such as interventional pain management. ObamaCare has been signed into law amidst major political fallouts, has sustained a Supreme Court challenge and emerged bruised, but still very much alive. While proponents argue that ObamaCare will provide insurance for almost everyone, with an improvement in the quality of and reduction in the cost of health care,, opponents criticize it as being a massive bureaucracy laden with penalties and taxes, that will ultimately eliminate personal medicine and individual practices. Based on the 2 years since the passage of ACA in 2010, the prognosis for interventional pain management is unclear. The damage sustained to interventional pain management and the majority of medicine practices is irreparable. ObamaCare may provide insurance for all, but with cuts in Medicare to fund Obamacare, a limited expansion of Medicaid, the inadequate funding of exchanges, declining employer health insurance coverage and skyrocketing disability claims, the coverage will be practically nonexistent. ObamaCare is composed of numerous organizations and bureaucracies charged with controlling the practice of medicine through the extension of regulations. Apart from cutting reimbursements and reducing access to interventional pain management, administration officials are determined to increase the role of midlevel practitioners and reduce the role of individual physicians by liberalizing the scope of practice regulations and introducing proposals to reduce medical education and training. PMID:22996858

  10. 75 FR 27375 - Postal Rate Case Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION Postal Rate Case Management AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is seeking comments relevant to management of an anticipated exigent postal rate case. It...

  11. [Management of acute and subacute clinical situations by interventional radiology: non-vascular interventions and treatment for hemoptysis].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Balázs; Doros, Attila

    2015-04-26

    Interventional radiology provides fast, straightforward and tolerable solutions for many medical problems including acute and subacute situations. Aspiration and drainage of fluid collections, biliary and endourologic interventions and gastrointestinal interventions are parts of non-vascular interventions. In addition, the authors discuss in detail interventional radiological treatment options in patients with hemoptysis. In acute cases interventions must be performed within 12-24 hours. For background, an everyday 24 hours service should be provided with well-trained personnel, high quality equipment and devices, and a reasonable financial reimbursement should be included, too. Multidisciplinary teamwork, consultations, consensus in indications and structured education should make these centers function most effectively. PMID:26047152

  12. Risk, harm and intervention: the case of child obesity.

    PubMed

    Merry, Michael S; Voigt, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate the enormous ethical complexity that is prevalent in child obesity cases. This complexity, we argue, favors a cautious approach. Against those perhaps inclined to blame neglectful parents, we argue that laying the blame for child obesity at the feet of parents is simplistic once the broader context is taken into account. We also show that parents not only enjoy important relational prerogatives worth defending, but that children, too, are beneficiaries of that relationship in ways difficult to match elsewhere. Finally, against the backdrop of growing public concern and pressure to intervene earlier in the life cycle, we examine the perhaps unintended stigmatizing effects that labeling and intervention can have and consider a number of risks and potential harms occasioned by state interventions in these cases.

  13. Effectiveness of case management for homeless persons: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Vet, Renée; van Luijtelaar, Maurice J A; Brilleslijper-Kater, Sonja N; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Beijersbergen, Mariëlle D; Wolf, Judith R L M

    2013-10-01

    We reviewed the literature on standard case management (SCM), intensive case management (ICM), assertive community treatment (ACT), and critical time intervention (CTI) for homeless adults. We searched databases for peer-reviewed English articles published from 1985 to 2011 and found 21 randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental studies comparing case management to other services. We found little evidence for the effectiveness of ICM. SCM improved housing stability, reduced substance use, and removed employment barriers for substance users. ACT improved housing stability and was cost-effective for mentally ill and dually diagnosed persons. CTI showed promise for housing, psychopathology, and substance use and was cost-effective for mentally ill persons. More research is needed on how case management can most effectively support rapid-rehousing approaches to homelessness.

  14. Education for Effective Case Management Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Pamela S.; Mansfield, Jerry A.

    2003-01-01

    Managed care organization employees (n=115) attended case management training that included case studies, problem solving and communication skills, and focus on internal capability. Three-month follow-up showed that case managers now ask more questions, have more confidence, mentor new employees, and work with greater accuracy. (SK)

  15. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Deep Venous Thrombosis: Advanced Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Gerard J.

    2011-06-15

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is often managed with a health care pathway that funnels patients to anticoagulation therapy alone. This 'usual treatment' is designed to stop propagation and embolisation of venous thrombus but not remove it. Surgical thrombectomy was once the only option in severe cases in which limbs were threatened, but thrombus removal is no longer restricted to emergency cases. Interventional radiologists are now using advanced endovascular techniques to achieve thrombus removal in a minimally invasive manner in a very short treatment time, thereby quickly restoring patency, relieving acute symptoms, and potentially limiting the subsequent development of postthrombotic syndrome when followed with anticoagulation and compression regimens. This article provides an overview of the interventions available for treating DVT. One of the newer 'single-session' techniques is isolated pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, which is described here in detail with supporting cases.

  16. A review of web based interventions for managing tobacco use.

    PubMed

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Verma, Rohit

    2014-07-01

    Web based interventions (WBIs) have been developed for various health conditions. These include interventions for various psychoactive substance use disorders including tobacco and alcohol. Tobacco use has remained the single largest preventable cause of global mortality and morbidity for many years. It is responsible for around 6 million deaths annually world-wide. Ironically, most of the tobacco users reside in resource poor low and middle-income countries. The article reviews the existing literature on WBIs for management of tobacco use. The literature search was performed using MedLine, PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase and Cochrane Review for relevant English language articles published from 1998 up to 2013. There is limited support for effectiveness of WBIs for managing tobacco use among adolescents. Although most of the trials among adults found WBIs to be more effective at short term follow-up (a few days to weeks), the benefits failed to extend beyond 3 months in most of the studies. All but one interventions studied in a randomized controlled trial is for smoking forms.

  17. A Review of Web Based Interventions for Managing Tobacco Use

    PubMed Central

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Verma, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Web based interventions (WBIs) have been developed for various health conditions. These include interventions for various psychoactive substance use disorders including tobacco and alcohol. Tobacco use has remained the single largest preventable cause of global mortality and morbidity for many years. It is responsible for around 6 million deaths annually world-wide. Ironically, most of the tobacco users reside in resource poor low and middle-income countries. The article reviews the existing literature on WBIs for management of tobacco use. The literature search was performed using MedLine, PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase and Cochrane Review for relevant English language articles published from 1998 up to 2013. There is limited support for effectiveness of WBIs for managing tobacco use among adolescents. Although most of the trials among adults found WBIs to be more effective at short term follow-up (a few days to weeks), the benefits failed to extend beyond 3 months in most of the studies. All but one interventions studied in a randomized controlled trial is for smoking forms. PMID:25035543

  18. Hypertension management: lifestyle interventions in a transcultural context.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tai Mooi

    2009-12-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney diseases. According to estimation, the prevalence of hypertension will increase unless extensive and effective preventive measures are implemented. The diversity of languages and cultures of the hypertensive patients requiring adequate blood pressure control make communications difficult in many instances. Nursing intervention for patients to adopt a healthy lifestyle requires effective communication. But the communication problems encountered in a culturally diverse context can result in undesirable outcomes for the patients and the health-care team. This paper describes the production of a document to assist staff address the difficulty in intercultural communication, which could be used anywhere in the world. This document can facilitate nursing intervention to achieve optimal hypertension management in a transcultural context, responding to the challenge regarding preventive measures to halt increase in hypertension prevalence. PMID:19909410

  19. Obesity management interventions: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Yaskin, Joseph; Toner, Richard W; Goldfarb, Neil

    2009-12-01

    The burden of disease associated with the obesity epidemic shortens lives, and prevalence is accelerating. As with other chronic diseases, improved outcomes are associated with effective self-management of obesity across the life span. The disease of obesity, then, fits squarely within the disease management and chronic care models. This article reviews selected interventions, described in peer-reviewed literature, designed to achieve significant weight loss for individuals identified as overweight or obese. The study objective is to provide an overview of the full range of methods and models for weight loss, including some available without medical supervision. The intended audience includes individuals and organizations with an expressed interest in disease management and the chronic care models. Our review identified promising lines of investigation for future research that span diverse medical disciplines applied to obesity. The quality of the studies included in our review was uneven, and compromises the current evidence for effectiveness and efficacy. Generally, our results showed that combination approaches-surgical or pharmacologic, combined with a behavioral intervention-were most likely to be effective.

  20. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures for chronic pain management

    PubMed Central

    Korbe, Samuel; Udoji, Esther N; Ness, Timothy J; Udoji, Mercy A

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography has multiple advantages over traditional radiologic imaging modalities when used for interventional procedures. It allows improved visualization of the anatomy while avoiding ionizing radiation and risks associated with contrast use. It has proved superiority at accuracy of delivery and procedural effectiveness over blind procedures when used in association with interventional pain procedures. Although limited in its ability to see through bony structures, ultrasound has utility in visualizing soft tissues and vascular structures in anatomic regions of interest resulting in increased use for posterior neuraxial, periaxial, peripheral nerve and joint-related structures. Current evidence for use in these settings is presented here. In some cases, optimal utility may be improved by combining ultrasonography with other imaging modalities. PMID:26402316

  1. The managerial nature of case management.

    PubMed

    Wolk, J L; Sullivan, W P; Hartmann, D J

    1994-03-01

    Case managers have been viewed as engaging in direct practice, community practice, or both. This article offers a third view: Case managers also engage in the practice of management. Employing Mintzberg's seminal research on chief executive behavior, the authors argue that case managers' work is similarly characterized by brevity, variety, and fragmentation. Case managers perform the 10 roles developed in Mintzberg's original study. These roles are divided into three groups: interpersonal, including figurehead, leader, and liaison; informational, including monitor, disseminator, and spokesperson; and decision-making, including entrepreneur, disturbance handler, resource allocator, and negotiator. Case managers' tasks associated with each role are presented. Considering their work as managerial in nature will help case managers more effectively assist clients in goal achievement.

  2. Interventional Radiological Management of Prehepatic Obstruction the Splanchnic Venous System

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan Keussen, Inger; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate interventional radiological management of patients with symptomatic portal hypertension secondary to obstruction of splanchnic veins. Material and Methods. Twenty-four patients, 15 males and 9 females, 0.75 to 79 years old (mean, 36.4 years), with symptomatic portal hypertension, secondary to splanchnic venous obstruction, were treated by percutaneous methods. Causes and extent of splanchnic venous obstruction and methods are summarized following a retrospective evaluation. Results. Obstructions were localized to the main portal vein (n = 22), intrahepatic portal veins (n = 8), splenic vein (n = 4), and/or mesenteric veins (n = 4). Interventional treatment of 22 (92%) patients included recanalization (n = 19), pharmacological thrombolysis (n = 1), and mechanical thrombectomy (n = 5). Partial embolization of the spleen was done in five patients, in two of them as the only possible treatment. TIPS placement was necessary in 10 patients, while an existing occluded TIPS was revised in two patients. Transhepatic embolization of varices was performed in one patient, and transfemoral embolization of splenorenal shunt was performed in another. Thirty-day mortality was 13.6% (n=3). During the follow-up, ranging between 2 days and 58 months, revision was necessary in five patients. An immediate improvement of presenting symptoms was achieved in 20 patients (83%). Conclusion. We conclude that interventional procedures can be successfully performed in the majority of patients with obstruction of splanchnic veins, with subsequent improvement of symptoms. Treatment should be customized according to the site and nature of obstruction.

  3. Reported Use and Acceptability of Self-Management Interventions to Target Behavioral Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briesch, Amy M.; Briesch, Jacquelyn M.; Mahoney, Corrine

    2014-01-01

    Although self-management interventions have a long history of empirical evaluation, attention has not been paid toward understanding actual use of this class of interventions. From a nationally representative sample of school psychology practitioners, a total of 295 respondents were presented with a description of a self-management intervention as…

  4. Case Studies for Management Development in Bangladesh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    Eight case studies appropriate for use in a course in management development were prepared and are provided in this document. The typical case describes a real business situation in which a real manager had to reach a decision. The case gives quantitative and qualitative information that is, or may be, relevant to that decision. Questions for…

  5. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  6. The empirical foundations of telemedicine interventions for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Bashshur, Rashid L; Shannon, Gary W; Smith, Brian R; Alverson, Dale C; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M; Coye, Molly J; Doarn, Charles R; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Kvedar, Joseph C; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S; Sanders, Jay H; Watson, Andrew R; Weinstein, Ronald S; Yellowlees, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings.

  7. The Empirical Foundations of Telemedicine Interventions for Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Gary W.; Smith, Brian R.; Alverson, Dale C.; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G.; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M.; Coye, Molly J.; Doarn, Charles R.; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Kvedar, Joseph C.; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C.; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S.; Sanders, Jay H.; Watson, Andrew R.; Weinstein, Ronald S.; Yellowlees, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings. PMID:24968105

  8. Organizational Commitment, Knowledge Management Interventions, and Learning Organization Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massingham, Peter; Diment, Kieren

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between organizational commitment and knowledge management initiatives in developing learning organization capacity (LOC). Design/methodology/approach: This is an empirical study based on a single case study, using partial least squares (PLS) analysis. Findings: The strategic…

  9. Managing patients with multimorbidity: systematic review of interventions in primary care and community settings

    PubMed Central

    Soubhi, Hassan; Fortin, Martin; Hudon, Catherine; O’Dowd, Tom

    2012-01-01

    a change to the organisation of care delivery, usually through case management or enhanced multidisciplinary team work. In the remaining four studies, intervention components were predominantly patient oriented. Overall the results were mixed, with a trend towards improved prescribing and drug adherence. The results indicated that it is difficult to improve outcomes in this population but that interventions focusing on particular risk factors in comorbid conditions or functional difficulties in multimorbidity may be more effective. No economic analyses were included, although the improvements in prescribing and risk factor management in some studies could provide potentially important cost savings. Conclusions Evidence on the care of patients with multimorbidity is limited, despite the prevalence of multimorbidity and its impact on patients and healthcare systems. Interventions to date have had mixed effects, although are likely to be more effective if targeted at risk factors or specific functional difficulties. A need exists to clearly identify patients with multimorbidity and to develop cost effective and specifically targeted interventions that can improve health outcomes. PMID:22945950

  10. CASE MANAGEMENT INSIDER. Thinking of Separating Utilization Management and Case Management? Think Again!

    PubMed

    Cesta, Toni

    2016-03-01

    Case management should be designed as a fully patient-centric model with all the roles and functions of the case manager and social worker performed as part of a package of services provided to the patient, not as a series of tasks that are disjointed and performed in isolation of each other. When case management models separate these roles, they create an environment in which these roles no longer interface and no longer are applied with the patient's current and long-term care needs in mind. Be very cautious when implementing such models and as you can see above, the argument that the collaborative model is less expensive simply does not hold true. Whenever possible, try to keep your case management roles and functions as integrated as possible for the greatest success and achievement of outcomes! PMID:26964417

  11. Intervention strategies for the management of human error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1993-01-01

    This report examines the management of human error in the cockpit. The principles probably apply as well to other applications in the aviation realm (e.g. air traffic control, dispatch, weather, etc.) as well as other high-risk systems outside of aviation (e.g. shipping, high-technology medical procedures, military operations, nuclear power production). Management of human error is distinguished from error prevention. It is a more encompassing term, which includes not only the prevention of error, but also a means of disallowing an error, once made, from adversely affecting system output. Such techniques include: traditional human factors engineering, improvement of feedback and feedforward of information from system to crew, 'error-evident' displays which make erroneous input more obvious to the crew, trapping of errors within a system, goal-sharing between humans and machines (also called 'intent-driven' systems), paperwork management, and behaviorally based approaches, including procedures, standardization, checklist design, training, cockpit resource management, etc. Fifteen guidelines for the design and implementation of intervention strategies are included.

  12. A brief intervention for weight management in primary care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity affects 25% of the UK adult population but modest weight loss can reduce the incidence of obesity-related chronic disease. Some effective weight loss treatments exist but there is no nationally available National Health Service (NHS) treatment service, and general practitioners (GPs) rarely discuss weight management with patients or support behavior change. Evidence shows that commercial weight management services, that most primary care trusts have 'on prescription', are more effective than primary care treatment. Methods/design We propose a controlled trial where patients will be randomized to receive either the offer of help by referral to a weight management service and follow-up to assess progress, or advice to lose weight on medical grounds. The primary outcome will be weight change at 12-months. Other questions are: what actions do people take to manage their weight in response to the two GP intervention types? How do obese patients feel about GPs opportunistically discussing weight management and how does this vary by intervention type? How do GPs feel about raising the issue opportunistically and giving the two types of brief intervention? What is the cost per kg/m2 lost for each intervention? Research assistants visiting GP practices in England (n = 60) would objectively measure weight and height prior to GP consultations and randomize willing patients (body mass index 30+, excess body fat, 18+ years) using sealed envelopes. Full recruitment (n = 1824) is feasible in 46 weeks, requiring six sessions of advice-giving per GP. Participants will be contacted at 3 months (postintervention) via telephone to identify actions they have taken to manage their weight. We will book appointments for participants to be seen at their GP practice for a 12-month follow-up. Discussion Trial results could make the case for brief interventions for obese people consulting their GP and introduce widespread simple treatments akin to the NHS Stop

  13. Literature review: pharmacists' interventions to improve control and management in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Nazir, Saeed Ur Rashid; Saleem, Fahad; Masood, Imran

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common disease in which excessive levels of blood glucose (sugar) occur. In simple terms, diabetes is generally due to failure in the effective functioning of insulin. Common types of diabetes include type 1 and type 2, which have different treatment options. In the general population, type 2 diabetes is more prevalent than type 1, and type 2 accounts for more than 90% of all known cases of diabetes. The current review examines the contributions of pharmacists to the more positive, long-term prognosis of patients with DM through improvements in its control and management. The authors conducted a systematic literature search. Twenty-seven studies were identified that demonstrated the effects of a pharmacist's intervention on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In all cases, it was reported that the intervention was successful in reducing HbA1c in patients with DM. Pharmacist interventions have also proven successful in improving patient lipid profiles, cardiovascular outcomes, and body mass indexes (BMIs), and in reducing other complications associated with the disease. It was also reported that economic advantages were associated with a pharmacist's management of DM.

  14. [The case manager, a geriatrics healthcare coordinator].

    PubMed

    Dauriac, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The case manager mobilises the resources available within a geographic sector determined by the Centre for the autonomy and integration of Alzheimer's patients in order to respond to complex cases of elderly patient care. PMID:23951867

  15. Multidisciplinary interventions in the management of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    LeBovidge, Jennifer S; Elverson, Wendy; Timmons, Karol G; Hawryluk, Elena B; Rea, Corinna; Lee, Margaret; Schneider, Lynda C

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common pediatric skin disease. AD has a significant effect on patient and family quality of life caused by intense pruritus, sleep disruption, dietary and nutritional concerns, and psychological stress associated with the disease and its management. Multidisciplinary approaches to AD care have been developed in appreciation of the complex interplay among biological, psychological, behavioral, and dietary factors that affect disease control and the wide range of knowledge, skills, and support that patients and families require to effectively manage and cope with this condition. Common components of multidisciplinary treatment approaches include medical evaluation and management by an AD specialist, education and nursing care, psychological and behavioral support, and nutritional assessment and guidance. Models of care include both clinical programs and structured educational groups provided as adjuncts to standard clinical care. Available evidence suggests beneficial effects of multidisciplinary interventions in improving disease severity and quality of life, particularly for patients with moderate-to-severe disease. Additional research is needed to identify the best candidates for the various multidisciplinary approaches and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of these programs. PMID:27497275

  16. Current Status of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours (GEP-NETs)

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Cappucci, Matteo; Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Tipaldi, Marcello Andrea; Hatzidakis, Adam; Rebonato, Alberto; Rossi, Michele

    2015-02-15

    Within the group of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NETs), several heterogeneous malignancies are included with a variety of clinical manifestations and imaging characteristics. Often these cases are inoperable and minimal invasive treatment offered by image-guided procedures appears to be the only option. Interventional radiology offers a valid solution in the management of primary and metastatic GEP-NETs. The purpose of this review article is to describe the current status of the role of Interventional Radiology in the management of GEP-NETs.

  17. Iowa Case Management for Rural Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, James A.; Vaughan Sarrazin, Mary S.; Huber, Diane L.; Vaughn, Thomas; Block, Robert I.; Reedy, Amanda R.; Jang, MiJin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive, strengths-based model of case management for clients in drug abuse treatment. Method: 503 volunteers from residential or intensive outpatient treatment were randomly assigned to one of three conditions of Iowa Case Management (ICM) plus treatment as usual…

  18. NASW Standards for Social Work Case Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Social Workers, Washington, DC.

    This document presents the standards for social work case management created by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). Social work case management is defined as "a method of providing services whereby a professional social worker assesses the needs of the client and the client's family, when appropriate, and arranges, coordinates,…

  19. Reviewing case management in community psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Bush, Tony

    Case management is a process of psychiatric care provision that uses a structured and focused approach to effectively assess individual patient's needs. The aim of this article is to examine the current status of case management in NHS community mental health care in terms of therapeutic impact and relevance. PMID:16209396

  20. The Practice of Case Management "As Lived."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClam, Tricia; Woodside, Marianne

    1998-01-01

    The role of the case manager today is explored through interviews with human-services professionals. Identifies eight themes that describe the case manager's work and skills: multiple roles, organizational abilities, communication skills, setting-specific knowledge, ethical decision making, boundaries, objectivity, and personal qualities.…

  1. Interprofessional Intervention to Support Mature Women: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Pechacek, Judith M; Drake, Diana; Terrell, Carrie Ann; Torkelson, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the impact interprofessional teamwork has on patient outcomes is of great interest to health care providers, educators, and administrators. This article describes one clinical team, Women's Health Specialists, and their implementation of an interprofessional health intervention course: "Mindfulness and Well-being: The Mature Woman" (MW: MW) to support mature women's health needs in midlife (age 40-70 years) and empower patient involvement in self-care. The provider team works to understand how their interprofessional education and collaborative practice (IPECP) interventions focused on supporting midlife women are associated with improved quality and clinical outcomes. This case study describes the work of the Women's Health Specialists clinic in partnership with the National Center for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice to study the impact an interprofessional team has on the health needs of women in midlife. This article summarizes the project structure, processes, outputs, and outcomes. Data collection, analysis, strategy, and next steps for future midlife women's projects are also discussed. PMID:26376571

  2. Intervention models for the management of children with signs of pneumonia or malaria by community health workers.

    PubMed

    Winch, Peter J; Gilroy, Kate E; Wolfheim, Cathy; Starbuck, Eric S; Young, Mark W; Walker, Lynette D; Black, Robert E

    2005-07-01

    A systematic review was conducted to categorize and describe Intervention Models involving community health workers (CHWs) that aim to improve case management of sick children at the household and community levels. The review focused on management of children with signs of malaria or pneumonia. Seven Intervention Models were identified, and classified according to: (1) the role of CHWs and families in assessment and treatment of children, (2) system of referral to the nearest health facility (verbal or facilitated), and (3) the location in the community of the drug stock. Standardization of terminology for Intervention Models using this or a similar classification could facilitate comparison and selection of models, including deciding how to modify programmes when policies change concerning first-line drugs, and setting priorities for further research. Of the seven models, that of CHW pneumonia case management (Model 6) has the strongest evidence for an impact on mortality. Pneumonia case management by CHWs is a child health intervention that warrants considerably more attention, particularly in Africa and South Asia. PMID:15965032

  3. Community-based intervention to manage an outbreak of MRSA skin infections in a county jail.

    PubMed

    Elias, Abdallah F; Chaussee, Michael S; McDowell, Emily J; Huntington, Mark K

    2010-07-01

    This article describes a community-based intervention to manage an outbreak of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections in a midwestern county jail. A systematic investigation conducted by a family medicine residency program identified 64 total cases and 19 MRSA cases between January 1 and December 31, 2007. Factors contributing to MRSA transmission included inadequate surveillance, lack of antibacterial soap, and a defective laundry process. All 19 isolates were CA-MRSA and all seven tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were USA300. Four of the seven isolates showed variation of their PFGE patterns. A primary care approach using community-based resources effectively reduced the number of cases in this heterogeneous outbreak of CA-MRSA, with the last MRSA being isolated in October 2007. PMID:20466702

  4. Psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions for managing stress in multiple sclerosis: the contribution of mindfulness-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz San José, A; Oreja-Guevara, C; Cebolla Lorenzo, S; Carrillo Notario, L; Rodríguez Vega, B; Bayón Pérez, C

    2016-03-01

    Depression or anxiety in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been linked to a more severe course of the disease and higher numbers of relapses, in addition to poorer treatment adherence and exacerbated immune system dysregulation. Recent investigations indicate that psychotherapeutic interventions for stress management, such as mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), could improve quality of life, depression, anxiety, and fatigue in MS patients. Mindfulness fosters the ability to slow down and observe experiences as they truly are, which improves affect regulation. Mindfulness is acquired through training; its advantage over other psychotherapeutic interventions is that effects may remain over time, since cultivating mindfulness depends on regular practising of abilities learned during training. The objective of this article is to review the current evidence of psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions, including MBIs for stress management, and their beneficial effects on MS patients.

  5. Psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions for managing stress in multiple sclerosis: the contribution of mindfulness-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz San José, A; Oreja-Guevara, C; Cebolla Lorenzo, S; Carrillo Notario, L; Rodríguez Vega, B; Bayón Pérez, C

    2016-03-01

    Depression or anxiety in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been linked to a more severe course of the disease and higher numbers of relapses, in addition to poorer treatment adherence and exacerbated immune system dysregulation. Recent investigations indicate that psychotherapeutic interventions for stress management, such as mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), could improve quality of life, depression, anxiety, and fatigue in MS patients. Mindfulness fosters the ability to slow down and observe experiences as they truly are, which improves affect regulation. Mindfulness is acquired through training; its advantage over other psychotherapeutic interventions is that effects may remain over time, since cultivating mindfulness depends on regular practising of abilities learned during training. The objective of this article is to review the current evidence of psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions, including MBIs for stress management, and their beneficial effects on MS patients. PMID:26385015

  6. Science, Social Work, and Intervention Research: The Case of "Critical Time Intervention"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention research is an important, yet often neglected, focus of social work scholars and investigators. The purpose of this article is to review significant milestones and recent advances in intervention research. Methodological and analytical developments in intervention research are discussed in the context of science and social work.…

  7. Chiropractic management of chronic idiopathic meralgia paresthetica: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This report describes the case of a patient with chronic idiopathic meralgia paresthetica associated with bilateral sacroiliac joint dysfunction who was managed with chiropractic care. Clinical Features A 35-year-old white woman presented to a private chiropractic clinic with a complaint of numbness in the right anterolateral thigh region. Neurological assessment revealed a diminution of sensibility and discrimination on the right lateral femoral cutaneous nerve territory. Pain was rated as 8.5 on a numeric pain scale of 0 to 10. Musculoskeletal examination of the pelvic region disclosed bilateral sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Intervention and Outcomes Chiropractic management included pelvic mobilizations, myofascial therapy, transverse friction massage, and stretching exercises. After 3 visits (2 weeks later), result of neurological evaluation was normal, with no residual numbness over the lateral thigh. Conclusion In the present case, chiropractic management with standard and applied kinesiology techniques resulted in recovery of meralgia paresthetica symptoms for this patient. PMID:22942840

  8. The Effect of a "Mindful Restaurant Eating" Intervention on Weight Management in Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, Gayle M.; Brown, Adama

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a "Mindful Restaurant Eating" intervention on weight management. Design: Randomized control trial. Setting: Greater metropolitan area of Austin, Texas. Participants: Women (n = 35) 40-59 years old who eat out at least 3 times per week. Intervention: The intervention, using 6 weekly 2-hour, small group sessions,…

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Standardized Behavior Management Intervention for Students with Externalizing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Martin; Sundell, Knut; Morris, Richard J.; Karlberg, Martin; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the results from a Swedish randomized controlled trial of a standardized behavior management intervention. The intervention targeted students with externalizing behavior in a regular education setting. First- and second-grade students (N = 100) from 38 schools were randomly assigned to either the intervention or an active…

  10. Stress Management in the Health Care Setting: Matching Interventions with Patient Coping Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martelli, Michael F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Prospective preprosthetic oral surgery patients were presented with a problem-focused, emotion-focused, or mixed-focus stress management intervention. The mixed-focus intervention produced the best overall response to surgery; the emotion-focused intervention produced the lowest adjustment levels. Better adjustment and satisfaction and lower…

  11. [The case of Giorgia: a systemic cognitive postrationalist intervention].

    PubMed

    Cimbolli, Paola

    2011-01-01

    To describe and to explain a clinical case from a cognitive systemic perspective means to focus on "how" the different data were set in order and organized during the therapy. The theoretical and clinical experience that uses this approach is based upon the integration of two conceptual models: the cognitive postrationalist one and the relational systemic one. These two approaches are founded upon the concept of system. The first one addresses the internal dimension, focusing on something that is not directly observable, taking into account the development processes and the maintenance of identity, that is to say the self organization of personal meaning. On the other hand, the second approach considers the structure of relations, its path and boundary, focusing on the mode of communication. The cognitive systemic model springs out of the integration of these two different ways of observing our object of investigation, intending to better the knowledge of the individual and of its context. The essay describes a clinical case study along a processual systemic method, in every phase, beginning with the intervention on the individual's system, subsequently engaging the family's system and all the sub systems that are part of the subjective experience.

  12. Intensive outpatient comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Tabatha H; Lockhart, Ann-Louise T; Garcia, Rocio V; Raj, Jeslina J; Peterson, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    Recent randomized clinical trials have established the efficacy of Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT) in treating children and adults with Tourette syndrome and persistent tic disorders. However, the standard CBIT protocol uses a weekly outpatient treatment format (i.e., 8 sessions over 10 wk), which may be inconvenient or impractical for some patients, particularly patients, who are required to travel long distances in order to receive care. In contrast, an intensive outpatient program may increase accessibility to evidence-based behavioral treatments for Tourette syndrome and other persistent tic disorders by eliminating the necessity of repeated travel. This case series evaluated the use of an intensive outpatient program CBIT (IOP CBIT) for the treatment of 2 preadolescent males (ages 10 and 14 years) with Tourette syndrome. The IOP CBIT treatment protocol included several hours of daily treatment over a 4-d period. Both children evidenced notable reductions in their tics and maintained treatment gains at follow-up. Moreover, both patients and their parents expressed treatment satisfaction with the IOP CBIT format. This case series addresses an important research gap in the behavioral treatment of tic disorders literature. The patients’ treatment outcomes indicate that IOP CBIT is a promising treatment that warrants more systematic investigation. PMID:25325069

  13. Adaptive management and the value of information: learning via intervention in epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Shea, Katriona; Tildesley, Michael J; Runge, Michael C; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J; Ferrari, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    Optimal intervention for disease outbreaks is often impeded by severe scientific uncertainty. Adaptive management (AM), long-used in natural resource management, is a structured decision-making approach to solving dynamic problems that accounts for the value of resolving uncertainty via real-time evaluation of alternative models. We propose an AM approach to design and evaluate intervention strategies in epidemiology, using real-time surveillance to resolve model uncertainty as management proceeds, with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) culling and measles vaccination as case studies. We use simulations of alternative intervention strategies under competing models to quantify the effect of model uncertainty on decision making, in terms of the value of information, and quantify the benefit of adaptive versus static intervention strategies. Culling decisions during the 2001 UK FMD outbreak were contentious due to uncertainty about the spatial scale of transmission. The expected benefit of resolving this uncertainty prior to a new outbreak on a UK-like landscape would be £45-£60 million relative to the strategy that minimizes livestock losses averaged over alternate transmission models. AM during the outbreak would be expected to recover up to £20.1 million of this expected benefit. AM would also recommend a more conservative initial approach (culling of infected premises and dangerous contact farms) than would a fixed strategy (which would additionally require culling of contiguous premises). For optimal targeting of measles vaccination, based on an outbreak in Malawi in 2010, AM allows better distribution of resources across the affected region; its utility depends on uncertainty about both the at-risk population and logistical capacity. When daily vaccination rates are highly constrained, the optimal initial strategy is to conduct a small, quick campaign; a reduction in expected burden of approximately 10,000 cases could result if campaign targets can be updated on

  14. Adaptive management and the value of information: learning via intervention in epidemiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shea, Katriona; Tildesley, Michael J.; Runge, Michael C.; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J.; Ferrari, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal intervention for disease outbreaks is often impeded by severe scientific uncertainty. Adaptive management (AM), long-used in natural resource management, is a structured decision-making approach to solving dynamic problems that accounts for the value of resolving uncertainty via real-time evaluation of alternative models. We propose an AM approach to design and evaluate intervention strategies in epidemiology, using real-time surveillance to resolve model uncertainty as management proceeds, with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) culling and measles vaccination as case studies. We use simulations of alternative intervention strategies under competing models to quantify the effect of model uncertainty on decision making, in terms of the value of information, and quantify the benefit of adaptive versus static intervention strategies. Culling decisions during the 2001 UK FMD outbreak were contentious due to uncertainty about the spatial scale of transmission. The expected benefit of resolving this uncertainty prior to a new outbreak on a UK-like landscape would be £45–£60 million relative to the strategy that minimizes livestock losses averaged over alternate transmission models. AM during the outbreak would be expected to recover up to £20.1 million of this expected benefit. AM would also recommend a more conservative initial approach (culling of infected premises and dangerous contact farms) than would a fixed strategy (which would additionally require culling of contiguous premises). For optimal targeting of measles vaccination, based on an outbreak in Malawi in 2010, AM allows better distribution of resources across the affected region; its utility depends on uncertainty about both the at-risk population and logistical capacity. When daily vaccination rates are highly constrained, the optimal initial strategy is to conduct a small, quick campaign; a reduction in expected burden of approximately 10,000 cases could result if campaign targets can be updated on

  15. Adapting hypertension self-management interventions to enhance their sustained effectiveness among urban African Americans.

    PubMed

    Ameling, Jessica M; Ephraim, Patti L; Bone, Lee R; Levine, David M; Roter, Debra L; Wolff, Jennifer L; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L; Noronha, Gary J; Fagan, Peter J; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Hickman, Debra; Simmons, Michelle; Purnell, Leon; Fisher, Annette; Cooper, Lisa A; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Albert, Michael C; Flynn, Sarah J; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-01-01

    African Americans suffer disproportionately poor hypertension control despite the availability of efficacious interventions. Using principles of community-based participatory research and implementation science, we adapted established hypertension self-management interventions to enhance interventions' cultural relevance and potential for sustained effectiveness among urban African Americans. We obtained input from patients and their family members, their health care providers, and community members. The process required substantial time and resources, and the adapted interventions will be tested in a randomized controlled trial.

  16. Hospital program weds case, disease management.

    PubMed

    1997-10-01

    To lower its readmission rates and inpatient length of stay for three high-volume chronic conditions, Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs, CO, developed a program that combines clinical pathways with a cross-continuum disease management program. Community physicians refer patients to the program. Hospital-based care managers guide patients in the acute setting before handing them off to outpatient case managers, who coordinate the patient's transition to home care. Clinicians at Memorial sold administrators on the "care-case management" approach by arguing that increased inpatient efficiency would offset potential revenue shortfalls due to fewer admissions.

  17. Using Self-Management Interventions to Address General Education Behavioral Needs: Assessment of Effectiveness and Feasibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briesch, Amy M.; Daniels, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive self-management intervention was utilized to increase the on-task behavior of three African American students within an urban middle-school setting. The intervention was designed to necessitate minimal management on the part of the general education classroom teacher by utilizing an electronic prompting device, as well as a…

  18. Parents' Use of Physical Interventions in the Management of Their Children's Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David; Hawkins, Sarah; Cooper, Viv

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although training staff supporting people with challenging behaviour in physical interventions has become accepted practice, parents are often left to fend for themselves while managing equivalent behaviours. The study explores parents' experience of managing severe challenging behaviours, their use of physical interventions and access…

  19. Social Competence Intervention in Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASDS) - A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amin, Noor A.; Oweini, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine the effectiveness of a combined intervention in remediating the social skills in a first-grader with a disorder from the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The researcher also aimed to identify the changes observed during the intervention period. The combined intervention consisted of reading…

  20. Surgical and interventional management of complications caused by acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. It requires acute hospitalization, with a reported annual incidence of 13 to 45 cases per 100000 persons. In severe cases there is persistent organ failure and a mortality rate of 15% to 30%, whereas mortality of mild pancreatitis is only 0% to 1%. Treatment principles of necrotizing pancreatitis and the role of surgery are still controversial. Despite surgery being effective for infected pancreatic necrosis, it carries the risk of long-term endocrine and exocrine deficiency and a morbidity and mortality rate of between 10% to 40%. Considering high morbidity and mortality rates of operative necrosectomy, minimally invasive strategies are being explored by gastrointestinal surgeons, radiologists, and gastroenterologists. Since 1999, several other minimally invasive surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic approaches to drain and debride pancreatic necrosis have been described. In patients who do not improve after technically adequate drainage, necrosectomy should be performed. When minimal invasive management is unsuccessful or necrosis has spread to locations not accessible by endoscopy, open abdominal surgery is recommended. Additionally, surgery is recognized as a major determinant of outcomes for acute pancreatitis, and there is general agreement that patients should undergo surgery in the late phase of the disease. It is important to consider multidisciplinary management, considering the clinical situation and the comorbidity of the patient, as well as the surgeons experience. PMID:25309073

  1. Iowa Case Management for Rural Drug Abuse.

    PubMed

    Hall, James A; Sarrazin, Mary S Vaughan; Huber, Diane L; Vaughn, Thomas; Block, Robert I; Reedy, Amanda R; Jang, Mijin

    2009-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive, strengths-based model of case management for clients in drug abuse treatment. METHOD: 503 volunteers from residential or intensive outpatient treatment were randomly assigned to one of three conditions of Iowa Case Management (ICM) plus treatment as usual (TAU), or to a fourth condition of TAU only. All were assessed at intake and followed at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Clients in all four conditions significantly decreased substance use by 3 months after intake and maintained most gains over time. However, the addition of ICM to TAU did not improve substance use outcomes. CONCLUSION: Overall, the addition of case management did not significantly improve drug treatment as hypothesized by both researchers and clinicians. Some results were mixed, possibly due to the heterogeneous sample, wide range of case management activities, or difficulty retaining participants over time.

  2. Iowa Case Management for Rural Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hall, James A.; Sarrazin, Mary S. Vaughan; Huber, Diane L.; Vaughn, Thomas; Block, Robert I.; Reedy, Amanda R.; Jang, MiJin

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive, strengths-based model of case management for clients in drug abuse treatment. Method 503 volunteers from residential or intensive outpatient treatment were randomly assigned to one of three conditions of Iowa Case Management (ICM) plus treatment as usual (TAU), or to a fourth condition of TAU only. All were assessed at intake and followed at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Clients in all four conditions significantly decreased substance use by 3 months after intake and maintained most gains over time. However, the addition of ICM to TAU did not improve substance use outcomes. Conclusion Overall, the addition of case management did not significantly improve drug treatment as hypothesized by both researchers and clinicians. Some results were mixed, possibly due to the heterogeneous sample, wide range of case management activities, or difficulty retaining participants over time. PMID:22065018

  3. Multimedia case management system implemented in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Howard D.; Davis, Midge L.; Handy, Dale L.; Kvarfordt, Kent B.; Ford, Glenn

    1999-01-01

    Managing the timely access of information is a major challenge facing law enforcement agencies. One of the areas of greatest need is that of the case management process. During the course of FY98, the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), the Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center (CTAC), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and the Criminal Investigative Bureau (CIB) of the state of Idaho, created a Northwest testbed to develop and integrate a multimedia case management system. A system was developed to assist investigators in tracking and maintaining investigative cases and improving access to internal and external data resources. In this paper, we discuss the results of our case management system development and the ability to present state and federal information incorporating object oriented and multimedia techniques. We then outline our plans for future research and development.

  4. Recognizing and managing boundary issues in case management.

    PubMed

    Walsh, J

    2000-01-01

    Much of the literature on worker-client boundaries in clinical practice is based on assumptions that the relationship between the two parties is structured and formal. These assumptions do not always apply in community-based case management practice, where the worker and client interact in a wide variety of settings and circumstances. The relative informality of case management makes the establishment of appropriate worker-client boundaries both critical and difficult. In this article key principles for recognizing and managing boundary issues are presented and discussed. PMID:11107659

  5. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T. ); Roberts, K.H. . Walter A. Haas School of Business)

    1992-01-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  6. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T.; Roberts, K.H.

    1992-09-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  7. Measuring Response to Intervention: Comparing Three Effect Size Calculation Techniques for Single-Case Design Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sarah Gwen

    2012-01-01

    Response to intervention (RTI) is increasingly being used in educational settings to make high-stakes, special education decisions. Because of this, the accurate use and analysis of single-case designs to monitor intervention effectiveness has become important to the RTI process. Effect size methods for single-case designs provide a useful way to…

  8. Interventions in Cases of Elderly Abuse within Medical Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooyman, Nancy R.; Tomita, Sue

    This paper describes a model, to be adopted or adapted by human services professionals, for overcoming barriers to the detection, intervention, and prevention of elder abuse. The barriers (professional denial of abuse problems, lack of detection, guidelines and intervention procedures, and the absence of community support services) are identified…

  9. Communication Intervention for Children with Cochlear Implants: Two Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, David J.; Leonard, Jeannette S.; Pachuilo, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the intervention programs attended and progress made by two children (ages 3 and 7) who exhibited considerable differences in benefit from their cochlear implants. Their intervention programs employed both analytical and synthetic auditory training and emphasized the development of speech production and language skills.…

  10. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 Research, Part I.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Huber, Diane L; Downey, William T

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004. The purpose of this research was to validate the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in 2 parts of an article. Part I discusses the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Manager's Role and Functions Survey Instrument (CMRFSI). The research leads to the identification of 6 new essential functions and 6 new knowledge areas, which describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the survey results and focuses on identifying the empirical activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using factor analysis. It also discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, it summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study.

  11. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 research, part II.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Downey, William T; Huber, Diane L

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004 for the purpose of validating the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in an article of 2 parts. Part I, which was published in the previous issue of this journal, discussed the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Managers' Role and Functions Survey Instrument and the identification of new 6 essential functions and 6 knowledge areas that describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the results and focuses on identifying the empirical (statistically derived) activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using exploratory factor analysis. It discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, Part II summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study.

  12. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 Research, Part I.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Huber, Diane L; Downey, William T

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004. The purpose of this research was to validate the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in 2 parts of an article. Part I discusses the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Manager's Role and Functions Survey Instrument (CMRFSI). The research leads to the identification of 6 new essential functions and 6 new knowledge areas, which describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the survey results and focuses on identifying the empirical activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using factor analysis. It also discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, it summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study. PMID:16444117

  13. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 research, part II.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Downey, William T; Huber, Diane L

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004 for the purpose of validating the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in an article of 2 parts. Part I, which was published in the previous issue of this journal, discussed the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Managers' Role and Functions Survey Instrument and the identification of new 6 essential functions and 6 knowledge areas that describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the results and focuses on identifying the empirical (statistically derived) activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using exploratory factor analysis. It discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, Part II summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study. PMID:16582699

  14. The Empirical Evidence for the Telemedicine Intervention in Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Gary W.; Smith, Brian R.; Woodward, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The research presented here assesses the scientific evidence for the telemedicine intervention in the management of diabetes (telediabetes), gestational diabetes, and diabetic retinopathy. The impetus derives from the confluence of high prevalence of these diseases, increasing incidence, and rising costs, while telemedicine promises to ameliorate, if not prevent, type 2 diabetes and its complications. Materials and Methods: A purposeful review of the literature identified relevant publications from January 2005 to December 2013. These were culled to retain only credible research articles for detailed review and analysis. The search yielded approximately 17,000 articles with no date constraints. Of these, 770 appeared to be research articles within our time frame. A review of the abstracts yielded 73 articles that met the criteria for inclusion in the final analysis. Evidence is organized by research findings regarding feasibility/acceptance, intermediate outcomes (e.g., use of service, and screening compliance), and health outcomes (control of glycemic level, lipids, body weight, and physical activity.) Results: Definitions of telediabetes varied from study to study vis-à-vis diabetes subtype, setting, technology, staffing, duration, frequency, and target population. Outcome measures also varied. Despite these vagaries, sufficient evidence was obtained from a wide variety of research studies, consistently pointing to positive effects of telemonitoring and telescreening in terms of glycemic control, reduced body weight, and increased physical exercise. The major contributions point to telemedicine's potential for changing behaviors important to diabetes control and prevention, especially type 2 and gestational diabetes. Similarly, screening and monitoring for retinopathy can detect symptoms early that may be controlled or treated. Conclusions: Overall, there is strong and consistent evidence of improved glycemic control among persons with type 2

  15. Reducing maladaptive weight management practices: developing a psychoeducational intervention program.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Karina M; LeBow, Michael D

    2007-04-01

    Previous research has addressed the issues of behavior change and eating disorder prevention among adolescents and young women. The current study was designed to evaluate: (a) whether an 8-week psychoeducational intervention can reduce maladaptive weight-management practices in women (University females, N=24) with sub-clinical levels of eating pathology; and (b) whether its implementation reduces the risk of developing more severe eating pathology across time. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (EX) group or a self-monitoring control (SMC) group. Statistically significant changes on measures of eating pathology, including the Eating Attitudes Test-26 [Garner, D. M., Olmsted, M. P., Bohr, Y., & Garfinkel, P. (1982). The Eating Attitudes Test: psychometric features and clinical correlates. Psychological Medicine, 12, 871-878]; Forbidden Food Survey [Ruggerio, L., Williamson, D. A., Davis, C. J., Schlundt, D. G., & Carey, M. P. (1988). Forbidden Food Survey: Measure of bulimic's anticipated emotional reactions to specific foods. Addictive Behaviors, 13, 267-274]; and Bulimia Test-Revised [Thelen, M. H., Farmer, J., Wonderlich, S., & Smith, M. (1991). A revision of the bulimia test: The BULIT-R. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 3(1), 119-124] were observed, as were changes in body image, as measured by the Body Shape Questionnaire [Cooper, P. J., Taylor, M. J., Cooper, Z., & Fairburn, C. G. (1987). The development and validation of the body shape questionnaire. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 6(4), 485-494]. Additional significant between-group differences in eating behavior, as measured by daily meal records, were also seen. Participants in the EX group evidenced improvements in scores which were significantly different from those observed in the SMC group. Unfortunately, attrition limited the utility of follow up data. PMID:17336790

  16. Community mobilization and household level waste management for dengue vector control in Gampaha district of Sri Lanka; an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Abeyewickreme, W; Wickremasinghe, A R; Karunatilake, K; Sommerfeld, Johannes; Kroeger, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Waste management through community mobilization to reduce breeding places at household level could be an effective and sustainable dengue vector control strategy in areas where vector breeding takes place in small discarded water containers. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of this assumption. Methods An intervention study was conducted from February 2009 to February 2010 in the populous Gampaha District of Sri Lanka. Eight neighborhoods (clusters) with roughly 200 houses each were selected randomly from high and low dengue endemic areas; 4 of them were allocated to the intervention arm (2 in the high and 2 in the low endemicity areas) and in the same way 4 clusters to the control arm. A baseline household survey was conducted and entomological and sociological surveys were carried out simultaneously at baseline, at 3 months, at 9 months and at 15 months after the start of the intervention. The intervention programme in the treatment clusters consisted of building partnerships of local stakeholders, waste management at household level, the promotion of composting biodegradable household waste, raising awareness on the importance of solid waste management in dengue control and improving garbage collection with the assistance of local government authorities. Results The intervention and control clusters were very similar and there were no significant differences in pupal and larval indices of Aedes mosquitoes. The establishment of partnerships among local authorities was well accepted and sustainable; the involvement of communities and households was successful. Waste management with the elimination of the most productive water container types (bowls, tins, bottles) led to a significant reduction of pupal indices as a proxy for adult vector densities. Conclusion The coordination of local authorities along with increased household responsibility for targeted vector interventions (in our case solid waste management due to the type of

  17. Interventional Radiologist's perspective on the management of bone metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, R L; Buy, X; Grasso, R F; Luppi, G; Faiella, E; Quattrocchi, C C; Pantano, F; Beomonte Zobel, B; Tonini, G; Santini, D; Palussiere, J

    2015-08-01

    Bone metastases can be treated by interventional radiologists with a minimally invasive approach. Such treatments are performed percutaneously under radiological imaging guidance. Different interventional techniques can be applied with curative or palliative intent depending on lesions and patients' status. In the whole, available interventional techniques are distinguished into "ablative" and "consolidative". Ablative techniques achieve bone tumor necrosis by dramatically increasing or decreasing intra-tumoral temperature. This option can be performed in order to alleviate pain or to eradicate the lesion. On the other hand, consolidative techniques aim at obtaining bone defect reinforcement mainly to alleviate pain and prevent pathological fractures. We herein present evidence supporting the application of each different interventional technique, as well as common strategies followed by interventional radiologists while approaching bone metastases.

  18. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Kotumachagi Sangappa; Uma, H L; Nagarathna, J; Kumar, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Eruption disturbances related to the position include ectopic eruption and transpositions. The occurrence of ectopic eruption is most commonly associated with maxillary incisors. The normal eruption, position and morphology of these teeth are crucial to craniofacial development, facial esthetics as well as phonetics. It is essential that the clinicians have thorough knowledge of the eruption disturbances in order to make an appropriate, as well as timely intervention, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. How to cite this article: Suresh KS, Uma HL, Nagarathna J, Kumar P. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):227-233. PMID:26604543

  19. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Kotumachagi Sangappa; Uma, HL; Nagarathna, J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eruption disturbances related to the position include ectopic eruption and transpositions. The occurrence of ectopic eruption is most commonly associated with maxillary incisors. The normal eruption, position and morphology of these teeth are crucial to craniofacial development, facial esthetics as well as phonetics. It is essential that the clinicians have thorough knowledge of the eruption disturbances in order to make an appropriate, as well as timely intervention, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. How to cite this article: Suresh KS, Uma HL, Nagarathna J, Kumar P. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):227-233. PMID:26604543

  20. Intensive case management for severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, Marina; Irving, Claire B; Park, Bert; Marshall, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background Intensive Case Management (ICM) is a community based package of care, aiming to provide long term care for severely mentally ill people who do not require immediate admission. ICM evolved from two original community models of care, Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and Case Management (CM), where ICM emphasises the importance of small caseload (less than 20) and high intensity input. Objectives To assess the effects of Intensive Case Management (caseload <20) in comparison with non-Intensive Case Management (caseload > 20) and with standard community care in people with severe mental illness. To evaluate whether the effect of ICM on hospitalisation depends on its fidelity to the ACT model and on the setting. Search methods For the current update of this review we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2009), which is compiled by systematic searches of major databases, hand searches and conference proceedings. Selection criteria All relevant randomised clinical trials focusing on people with severe mental illness, aged 18 to 65 years and treated in the community-care setting, where Intensive Case Management, non-Intensive Case Management or standard care were compared. Outcomes such as service use, adverse effects, global state, social functioning, mental state, behaviour, quality of life, satisfaction and costs were sought. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For binary outcomes we calculated relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data we estimated mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% confidence interval (CI). We employed a random-effects model for analyses. We performed a random-effects meta-regression analysis to examine the association of the intervention’s fidelity to the ACT model and the rate of hospital use in the setting where the trial was conducted with the treatment effect. Main results We included 38 trials

  1. Minimally invasive image-guided interventional management of Haemobilia.

    PubMed

    Prasad, T V; Gupta, A K; Garg, P; Pal, S; Gamanagatti, S

    2015-01-01

    Hemobilia is a well known cause for upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleed seen commonly in setting of iatrogenic or accidental trauma and various inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. Patients present with UGI bleed and symptoms of associated biliary obstruction. Management options in intractable cases are surgery and endovascular embolisation. We report a series of eighteen patients presented with severe hemobilia from January 2010 to October 2014, who were managed by endovascular approach in our department. Etiology in these patients were trauma (n = 3), liver biopsy (n = 3), surgery (n = 3), percutaneous procedures (n = 2), inflammatory (n-3), neoplasm (n = 1) and the rest were idiopathic. Angiography revealed pseudoaneurysms of hepatic artery (n = 5), splenic artery (n = 1) and gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) and arterio-biliary fistula (n = 1). Embolising agents used were detachable coils (n = 10) and glue (n = 8). All patients had technical and clinical success with minor non-consequential complications. Our findings show that endovascular embolisation is a simple, safe, accurate and effective treatment in patients with severe hemobilia. It is a viable alternative to major and potentially morbid surgeries. PMID:27522737

  2. An intervention to maximize medication management by caregivers of persons with memory loss: Intervention overview and two-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lingler, Jennifer H; Sereika, Susan M; Amspaugh, Carolyn M; Arida, Janet A; Happ, Mary E; Houze, Martin P; Kaufman, Robert R; Knox, Melissa L; Tamres, Lisa K; Tang, Fengyan; Erlen, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    Overseeing medication-taking is a critical aspect of dementia caregiving. This trial examined a tailored, problem-solving intervention designed to maximize medication management practices among caregivers of persons with memory loss. Eighty-three community-dwelling dyads (patient + informal caregiver) with a baseline average of 3 medication deficiencies participated. Home- and telephone-based sessions were delivered by nurse or social worker interventionists and addressed basics of managing medications, plus tailored problem solving for specific challenges. The outcome of medication management practices was assessed using the Medication Management Instrument for Deficiencies in the Elderly (MedMaIDE) and an investigator-developed Medication Deficiency Checklist (MDC). Linear mixed modeling showed both the intervention and usual care groups had fewer medication management problems as measured by the MedMaIDE (F = 6.91, p < .01) and MDC (F = 9.72, p < .01) at 2 months post-intervention. Reduced medication deficiencies in both groups suggests that when nurses or social workers merely raise awareness of the importance of medication adherence, there may be benefit.

  3. Review and Analysis of Literature on Self-Management Interventions to Promote Appropriate Classroom Behaviors (1988-2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briesch, Amy M.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1980s, J. W. Fantuzzo and colleagues conducted a review of the self-management literature in order to better define the characteristics of this class of interventions. Results indicated that many interventions were minimally student-directed despite the title "self-managed" and that student-managed interventions demonstrated…

  4. Email Intervention Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Stierwalt, Julie A. G.; LaPointe, Leonard L.

    2010-01-01

    An email intervention for two individuals with TBI was conducted to investigate if this electronic medium shows potential as a therapeutic delivery method. Specifically, this study measured participants’ compliance with a plan that incorporated email and a reading assignment. Prior to the email intervention, the clinician and participants designed an intervention plan which included specific guidelines for scheduled email correspondence regarding a daily reading task. After reviewing the daily emails, the clinician provided therapeutic feedback. The participants’ compliance with the plan was measured by the punctuality of email correspondence and completion of tasks as detailed in the plan. Over a 4-week intervention period, both participants demonstrated improvement in task completion and time adherence. Email proved to be a feasible option as a therapeutic delivery method for these individuals. PMID:25945174

  5. Interventional Pain Management in Rheumatological Diseases - A Three Years Physiatric Experience in a Tertiary Medical College Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Suzon Al; Das, Gautam; Khan, Amin Uddin A

    2011-01-01

    Background Interventional pain management (IPM) is a branch of medical science that deals with management of painful medical conditions using specially equipped X-ray machines and anatomical landmarks. Interventional physiatry is a branch of physical medicine and rehabilitation that treats painful conditions through intervention in peripheral joints, the spine, and soft tissues. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using three years of hospital records (2006 to 2008) from the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at Chittagong Medical College Hospital in Bangladesh, with a view toward highlighting current interventional pain practice in a tertiary medical college hospital. Results The maximum amount of intervention was done in degenerative peripheral joint disorders (600, 46.0%), followed by inflammatory joint diseases (300, 23.0%), soft tissue rheumatism (300, 23.0%), and radicular or referred lower back conditions (100, 8.0%). Of the peripheral joints, the knee was the most common site of intervention. Motor stimulation-guided intralesional injection of methylprednisolone into the piriformis muscle was given in 10 cases of piriformis syndrome refractory to both oral medications and therapeutic exercises. Soft tissue rheumatism of unknown etiology was most common in the form of adhesive capsulitis (90, 64.3%), and is discussed separately. Epidural steroid injection was practiced for various causes of lumbar radiculopathy, with the exception of infective discitis. Conclusions All procedures were performed using anatomical landmarks, as there were no facilities for the C-arm/diagnostic ultrasound required for accurate and safe intervention. A dedicated IPM setup should be a requirement in all PMR departments, to provide better pain management and to reduce the burden on other specialties. PMID:22220242

  6. Surgical Management of Stuttering Ischemic Priapism: A Case Report and Concise Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Raslan, M; Hiew, K; Hoyle, A; Ross, D G; Betts, C D; Maddineni, S B

    2016-03-01

    Stuttering priapism is an extremely rare and poorly understood entity. We present a rare case of a 47-year-old Afro-Caribbean gentleman who required proximal shunt procedure to treat his ischemic stuttering priapism after he had failed medical management. We provided a concise review of the literature on the surgical management of ischemic priapism. This case highlighted the importance of prompt surgical intervention in prolonged stuttering priapism to avoid serious psychological and functional complications. PMID:26977408

  7. Providers' Perspectives on Case Management of a Healthy Start Program: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Imelda K.; Mulhall, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    and the case managers' comments were transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis, a deductive approach. Data were collected in 2013 and analyzed in 2015. Case managers are challenged by externalities (demographic shifts in target populations, poverty); contractual requirements (predefined catchment neighborhoods, caseload); limited support (client incentives, tailored training, and a high staff turnover rate); and logistic difficulties (organizational issues). Their approach to case management tends to be focused on linking clients to adequate services rather than reporting performance. Case managers favored measurable deliverables rather than operational work products. A proposed solution to current challenges emphasizes and encourages the iterative learning process and shared decision making between program targets, funders and providers. Case managers are aware of the challenging environment in which they operate for their clients and for themselves. However, future interventions will require clearly identified performance measures and increased systems support. PMID:27149061

  8. Communication action for case managers. Techniques to manage conflict.

    PubMed

    Marino, T Y; Kahnoski, B

    1998-01-01

    The art of communication can facilitate case management in an optimum sense. It can also create conflict issues if handled inappropriately. In this article, the authors explore the basic tenets of the communication process. On this basic foundation, conflict and approaches to conflict resolution are explored. Specifically, Kare Anderson's Triangle Talk model is used in conjunction with a specific case that demonstrates the potential for positive communication outcomes. The model offers three principles, which are discussed individually. Good communication skills are a prime component of therapy and case management. It is important to the case outcome that the communication is done well. However, it is unusual for health care providers to have specialized training in the skills of conflict negotiation. The authors offer the reader an opportunity to apply what is presented in this article in a self-study module at the end. PMID:9526394

  9. Developing a Manualized Occupational Therapy Diabetes Management Intervention: Resilient, Empowered, Active Living With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carandang, Kristine; Davis, Shain

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on the development of a manualized occupational therapy intervention for diabetes management. An initial theoretical framework and core content areas for a Stage I intervention manual were developed based on an in-depth needs assessment and review of existing literature. After evaluation by a panel of experts and completion of a feasibility study, the intervention was revised into a Stage 2 manual in preparation for a randomized study evaluating the intervention's efficacy. In developing the initial manual, we delineated core theoretical principles to allow for flexible application and tailoring of the intervention's content areas. Expert panel feedback and feasibility study results led to changes to the intervention structure and content as we developed the Stage 2 manual. Through describing this process, we illustrate the dynamic evolution of intervention manuals, which undergo revisions due to both theoretical and practical considerations at each stage of the research-to-clinical practice pipeline. PMID:26594741

  10. Problem Solving Interventions for Diabetes Self-management and Control: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.; Schumann, Kristina P.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    Aims Problem solving is deemed a core skill for patient diabetes self-management education. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the published literature on the effect of problem-solving interventions on diabetes self-management and disease control. Data Sources We searched PubMed and PsychINFO electronic databases for English language articles published between November 2006 and September 2012. Reference lists from included studies were reviewed to capture additional studies. Study Selection Studies reporting problem-solving intervention or problem solving as an intervention component for diabetes self-management training and disease control were included. Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Study design, sample characteristics, measures, and results were reviewed. Data Synthesis Sixteen intervention studies (11 adult, 5 children/adolescents) were randomized controlled trials, and 8 intervention studies (6 adult, 2 children/adolescents) were quasi-experimental designs. Conclusions Studies varied greatly in their approaches to problem-solving use in patient education. To date, 36% of adult problem-solving interventions and 42% of children/adolescent problem-solving interventions have demonstrated significant improvement in HbA1c, while psychosocial outcomes have been more promising. The next phase of problem-solving intervention research should employ intervention characteristics found to have sufficient potency and intensity to reach therapeutic levels needed to demonstrate change. PMID:23312614

  11. Moral decision-making among assertive community treatment (ACT) case managers: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Lerbaek, Birgitte; Aagaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Mette Braendstrup; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The context of care in assertive community treatment (ACT) can be precarious and generate ethical issues involving the principles of autonomy and paternalism. This focus group study examined case managers' situated accounts of moral reasoning. Our findings show how they expressed strong moral obligation towards helping the clients. Their moral reasoning reflected a paternalistic position where, on different occasions, the potential benefits of their interventions would be prioritised at the expense of protecting the clients' personal autonomy. The case managers' reasoning emphasised situational awareness, but there was a risk of supporting paternalistic interventions and denying the clients' right to autonomy. PMID:26440868

  12. Differences in Osteoarthritis Self-Management Support Intervention Outcomes According to Race and Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperber, Nina R.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Coffman, Cynthia J.; Lindquist, Jennifer H.; Oddone, Eugene Z.; Weinberger, Morris; Allen, Kelli D.

    2013-01-01

    We explored whether the effects of a telephone-based osteoarthritis (OA) self-management support intervention differed by race and health literacy. Participants included 515 veterans with hip and/or knee OA. Linear mixed models assessed differential effects of the intervention compared with health education (HE) and usual care (UC) on pain…

  13. Parent and teacher perceptions of the impact of school nurse interventions on children's self-management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peery, Annette I; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S

    2012-08-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this relationship in a sample of 69 school-age children who received case management from school nurses. Our findings suggest that teachers and parents do not always agree on how well a child manages their illness. When school nurses provide more education and counseling, parents are more likely to perceive an improvement in their child's self-management. Teachers are more likely to perceive an improvement when the nurse provides more classroom visits and includes the physical education teacher and guidance counselor. These findings suggest that the roles of educator, counselor, and collaborator are important for school nurses who provide care to school-age children with diabetes.

  14. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related services that— (1) Include location, coordination, and monitoring of primary health care services; and (2... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services....

  15. Barriers to Implementation of Case Management for Patients With Dementia: A Systematic Mixed Studies Review

    PubMed Central

    Khanassov, Vladimir; Vedel, Isabelle; Pluye, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Results of case management designed for patients with dementia and their caregivers in community-based primary health care (CBPHC) were inconsistent. Our objective was to identify the relationships between key outcomes of case management and barriers to implementation. METHODS We conducted a systematic mixed studies review (including quantitative and qualitative studies). Literature search was performed in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, and Cochrane Library (1995 up to August 2012). Case management intervention studies were used to assess clinical outcomes for patients, service use, caregiver outcomes, satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness. Qualitative studies were used to examine barriers to case management implementation. Patterns in the relationships between barriers to implementation and outcomes were identified using the configurational comparative method. The quality of studies was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. RESULTS Forty-three studies were selected (31 quantitative and 12 qualitative). Case management had a limited positive effect on behavioral symptoms of dementia and length of hospital stay for patients and on burden and depression for informal caregivers. Interventions that addressed a greater number of barriers to implementation resulted in increased number of positive outcomes. Results suggested that high-intensity case management was necessary and sufficient to produce positive clinical outcomes for patients and to optimize service use. Effective communication within the CBPHC team was necessary and sufficient for positive outcomes for caregivers. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians and managers who implement case management in CBPHC should take into account high-intensity case management (small caseload, regular proactive patient follow-up, regular contact between case managers and family physicians) and effective communication between case managers and other CBPHC professionals and services. PMID:25354410

  16. Critical factors for successful hospital-based case management.

    PubMed

    Williams, F G; Warrick, L H; Christianson, J B; Netting, F E

    1993-01-01

    Six hospitals were funded to develop programs for long-term case management. Factors that should be considered when developing hospital-based case management are discussed within three areas: organizational placement, program management, and financial viability.

  17. Intervention for Infants at Risk of Developing Autism: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jonathan; Wan, Ming Wai; Guiraud, Jeanne; Holsgrove, Samina; McNally, Janet; Slonims, Vicky; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Charman, Tony; Pickles, Andrew; Johnson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Theory and evidence suggest the potential value of prodromal intervention for infants at risk of developing autism. We report an initial case series (n = 8) of a parent-mediated, video-aided and interaction-focused intervention with infant siblings of autistic probands, beginning at 8-10 months of age. We outline the theory and evidence base…

  18. The Understanding Words Reading Intervention: Evidence from a Case Series Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Craig; Conlon, Elizabeth G.; Wright, Michalle

    2012-01-01

    Using a case-series design with double baseline and 10-week maintenance phase, 5 struggling readers from middle- to high-income families (age range 6.4-7.9 years) completed a 5-times-weekly intervention (96 sessions) administered by a parent. All participants completed the intervention with phonological decoding, text-reading accuracy and reading…

  19. Implementing an Early Intervention Program for Residential Students Who Present with Suicide Risk: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Estela M.; Cimini, M. Dolores; Bernier, Joseph E.; Stanley, Judith A.; Murray, Andrea D.; Anderson, Drew A.; Wright, Heidi R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This case study examined the effects of an early intervention program designed to respond to residential college students demonstrating risk for suicide. Participants: Participants were 108 undergraduates at a large northeastern public university referred to an early intervention program subsequent to presenting with risk factors for…

  20. 28 CFR 0.21 - Authorizing intervention by the Government in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Authorizing intervention by the Government in certain cases. 0.21 Section 0.21 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Solicitor General § 0.21 Authorizing intervention by...

  1. 28 CFR 0.21 - Authorizing intervention by the Government in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Authorizing intervention by the Government in certain cases. 0.21 Section 0.21 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Solicitor General § 0.21 Authorizing intervention by...

  2. A Tale of 2 Teachers: A Preschool Physical Activity Intervention Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Brewer, Alisa E.; Dowda, Marsha; McIver, Kerry L.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Pate, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preschool settings vary greatly, and research has shown that interventions are more successful when they can be adapted to individual settings. This is a descriptive case study of how 2 teachers successfully adapted and implemented a preschool physical activity intervention. Methods: The Study of Health and Activity in Preschool…

  3. Developing Complex Interventions for Rigorous Evaluation--A Case Study from Rural Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, R.; Langhaug, L. F.; Nyamurera, T.; Wilson, D.; Bassett, M. T.; Cowan, F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Much attention has been placed on the need to develop and evaluate complex interventions targeting public health issues, such as reproductive health. However, and as has been the case in the recent past, even well-designed trials will be flawed unless meticulous attention is paid to ensuring the most appropriate intervention is designed and…

  4. The Family Check-Up in Early Childhood: A Case Study of Intervention Process and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Anne M.; Hyde, Luke W.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Wilson, Melvin N.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a case study in the use of the Family Check-Up (FCU), a family-based and ecological preventive intervention for children at risk for problem behavior. The FCU is an assessment-driven intervention that utilizes a health maintenance model; emphasizes motivation for change; and offers an adaptive, tailored approach to…

  5. Intervention for Infants and Toddlers Exposed to Methadone in Utero: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, M. Susan; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Three case studies describe intervention with infants/toddlers who were exposed to methadone in utero. Intervention included providing therapeutic nursery services and addressing developmental and mental health needs of the children and the high-risk family systems, including parents' knowledge of child development and parents' emotional support…

  6. Strategies for Data Collection in Social Skills Group Interventions: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goforth, Anisa N.; Rennie, Brandon J.; Hammond, Julia; Schoffer Closson, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    For many practitioners in schools and clinics, collecting data to show the effectiveness of an intervention is probably one of the most important yet challenging components of intervention implementation. This article provides practitioners with an example case study of how data can be organized and collected to determine the effectiveness of a…

  7. Use of new minimum intervention dentistry technologies in caries management.

    PubMed

    Tassery, H; Levallois, B; Terrer, E; Manton, D J; Otsuki, M; Koubi, S; Gugnani, N; Panayotov, I; Jacquot, B; Cuisinier, F; Rechmann, P

    2013-06-01

    Preservation of natural tooth structure requires early detection of the carious lesion and is associated with comprehensive patient dental care. Processes aiming to detect carious lesions in the initial stage with optimum efficiency employ a variety of technologies such as magnifying loupes, transillumination, light and laser fluorescence (QLF® and DIAGNOdent® ) and autofluorescence (Soprolife® and VistaCam®), electric current/impedance (CarieScan(®) ), tomographic imaging and image processing. Most fluorescent caries detection tools can discriminate between healthy and carious dental tissue, demonstrating different levels of sensitivity and specificity. Based on the fluorescence principle, an LED camera (Soprolife® ) was developed (Sopro-Acteon, La Ciotat, France) which combined magnification, fluorescence, picture acquisition and an innovative therapeutic concept called light-induced fluorescence evaluator for diagnosis and treatment (LIFEDT). This article is rounded off by a Soprolife® illustration about minimally or even non-invasive dental techniques, distinguishing those that preserve or reinforce the enamel and enamel-dentine structures without any preparation (MIT1- minimally invasive therapy 1) from those that require minimum preparation of the dental tissues (MIT2 - minimally invasive therapy 2) using several clinical cases as examples. MIT1 encompasses all the dental techniques aimed at disinfection, remineralizing, reversing and sealing the caries process and MIT2 involves a series of specific tools, including microburs, air abrasion devices, sonic and ultrasonic inserts and photo-activated disinfection to achieve minimal preparation of the tooth. With respect to minimally invasive treatment and prevention, the use of lasers is discussed. Furthermore, while most practices operate under a surgical model, Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CaMBRA) encourages a medical model of disease prevention and management to control the manifestation of the

  8. Use of new minimum intervention dentistry technologies in caries management.

    PubMed

    Tassery, H; Levallois, B; Terrer, E; Manton, D J; Otsuki, M; Koubi, S; Gugnani, N; Panayotov, I; Jacquot, B; Cuisinier, F; Rechmann, P

    2013-06-01

    Preservation of natural tooth structure requires early detection of the carious lesion and is associated with comprehensive patient dental care. Processes aiming to detect carious lesions in the initial stage with optimum efficiency employ a variety of technologies such as magnifying loupes, transillumination, light and laser fluorescence (QLF® and DIAGNOdent® ) and autofluorescence (Soprolife® and VistaCam®), electric current/impedance (CarieScan(®) ), tomographic imaging and image processing. Most fluorescent caries detection tools can discriminate between healthy and carious dental tissue, demonstrating different levels of sensitivity and specificity. Based on the fluorescence principle, an LED camera (Soprolife® ) was developed (Sopro-Acteon, La Ciotat, France) which combined magnification, fluorescence, picture acquisition and an innovative therapeutic concept called light-induced fluorescence evaluator for diagnosis and treatment (LIFEDT). This article is rounded off by a Soprolife® illustration about minimally or even non-invasive dental techniques, distinguishing those that preserve or reinforce the enamel and enamel-dentine structures without any preparation (MIT1- minimally invasive therapy 1) from those that require minimum preparation of the dental tissues (MIT2 - minimally invasive therapy 2) using several clinical cases as examples. MIT1 encompasses all the dental techniques aimed at disinfection, remineralizing, reversing and sealing the caries process and MIT2 involves a series of specific tools, including microburs, air abrasion devices, sonic and ultrasonic inserts and photo-activated disinfection to achieve minimal preparation of the tooth. With respect to minimally invasive treatment and prevention, the use of lasers is discussed. Furthermore, while most practices operate under a surgical model, Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CaMBRA) encourages a medical model of disease prevention and management to control the manifestation of the

  9. Telehealth interventions to reduce management complications in type 1 diabetes: A review.

    PubMed

    Balkhi, Amanda M; Reid, Adam M; Westen, Sarah C; Olsen, Brian; Janicke, David M; Geffken, Gary R

    2015-04-15

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic illness with a high burden of care. While effective interventions and recommendations for diabetes care exist, the intensive nature of diabetes management makes compliance difficult. This is especially true in children and adolescents as they have unique psychosocial and diabetes needs. Despite the development of effective in-person interventions targeting improving self-management and ameliorating psychosocial difficulties there are still a number of barriers to implementing these interventions, namely time, cost, and access. Telehealth interventions allow for the dissemination of these interventions to a broader audience. Self-management and psychosocial telehealth interventions are reviewed with a special emphasis on mobile phone and internet based technology use. While efficacy has been demonstrated in a number of telehealth interventions with improved cost effectiveness over in-person interventions, many challenges remain including high participant attrition and difficulties with receiving reimbursement for services rendered. These and other challenges are discussed with recommendations for researchers and telehealth providers provided.

  10. Case Management of Adolescents with Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankard, Bettina A.

    This training guide presents a model for optimum delivery of the primary duties, tasks, and steps required in the comprehensive case management of adolescents with chronic disease. Using a team approach to coordinated health care, the guide involves the patient and family as key members of the care team along with the physician, nurse, dietitian,…

  11. "Managing after the Merger" Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusella, Louis P.

    2000-01-01

    Responds to a case study for management communication classes (presented in this same issue) that focuses on issues of performance appraisals and employee feedback after a merger. Notes cultural differences between the companies; examines the supervisor's differential evaluations of his employees and his communicative dynamics; examines the…

  12. Linking case management and community development.

    PubMed

    Austin, Carol D; McClelland, Robert W; Gursansky, Di

    2006-01-01

    Case management, in various forms, is now institutionalized as a core part of policy and programs designed to deliver home- and community-based services to older adults. The case management role, in theory, requires attention to both client and system goals, although in practice the system goals that have received most attention have been gatekeeping and resource allocation. While case managers have been admonished to find and develop resources in the community, this has primarily taken the form of including informal services in individual client care plans. What has been missing is focused attention to the potential of the community as a nurturing environment with the capacity to support older adults and their caregivers. Sustainable care for older adults cannot be achieved by formal service and family support alone. This article proposes the creation of linkages between case managers, who build the service arrangements for older people, and community developers, who are responsible for building community capacity and social capital. It is argued that this linkage is essential for establishing the foundations of a caring community with the capacity to support older people.

  13. How Multiple Interventions Influenced Employee Turnover: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    A 3-year study of 46 textile industry workers identified causes of employee turnover (supervision, training, organizational communication) using performance analysis. A study of multiple interventions based on the analysis resulted in changes in orientation procedures, organizational leadership, and climate, reducing turnover by 24%. (SK)

  14. Response to Intervention in Middle School: A Case Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Evelyn S.; Smith, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RTI) is a tiered model of service delivery being implemented in many middle grades schools. The authors provide an overview of RTI and describe the experience and outcomes of RTI implementation at Cheyenne Mountain Junior High. A discussion of lessons learned and implications for other middle schools considering RTI…

  15. Progress and outcomes for children with autism receiving parent-managed intensive interventions.

    PubMed

    Bibby, Peter; Eikeseth, Svein; Martin, Neil T; Mudford, Oliver C; Reeves, David

    2002-01-01

    Parent-managed behavioral interventions for young children with autism are under-researched. We analysed data from 66 children served by 25 different early intervention consultants. After a mean of 31.6 months of intervention, IQ scores had not changed (N = 22). Vineland adaptive behavior scores had increased significantly by 8.9 points (N = 21). No children aged >72 months attained normal functioning, i.e., IQ > 85 and unassisted mainstream school placement (N = 42). Progress for 60 children across 12 months was found for mental age (5.4 months), adaptive behavior (9.7 months), and language (5.1 months). The interventions did not reproduce results from clinic-based professionally directed programs. The effectiveness of the parent-managed intervention model as it has developed and the adequacy of professional services in that model are discussed.

  16. Progress and outcomes for children with autism receiving parent-managed intensive interventions.

    PubMed

    Bibby, P; Eikeseth, S; Martin, N T; Mudford, O C; Reeves, D

    2001-01-01

    Parent-managed behavioral interventions for young children with autism are under-researched. We analyzed data from 66 children served by 25 different early intervention consultants. After a mean of 31.6 months of intervention IQ scores had not changed (N = 22). Vineland adaptive behavior scores had increased significantly by 8.9 points (N = 21). No children aged > 72 months attained normal functioning, i.e., IQ > 85 and unassisted mainstream school placement (N = 42). Progress for 60 children across 12 months was found for mental age (5.4 months), adaptive behavior (9.7 months), and language (5.1 months). The interventions did not reproduce results from clinic-based professionally directed programs. The effectiveness of the parent-managed intervention model as it has developed and the adequacy of professional services in that model are discussed.

  17. Nursing case management. Resolving the DRG paradox.

    PubMed

    Zander, K

    1988-09-01

    Nursing Case Management as described here was developed in less than ideal conditions: a full census, a 30 per cent increase in patient volume over five years, a nursing shortage, no grants or outside funding, no clinical specialists or clinical ladder, and no computerized documentation system. No more staff or salary was added as we focused our attention on the new tools, roles, and structures necessary to achieve cost and quality outcomes. However, nursing case management has worked because of some very key elements: 1. A firm commitment to the belief that staff nurses must be accountable for the outcomes of the care that they have planned, given, managed, and continuously evaluated. 2. A combination of top-down organizational development strategies with excellent staff nurse involvement at each juncture. 3. Negotiation and collaboration with physicians and hospital administration at key turning points. This includes the relentless articulation of patient-centered care. 4. A willingness to learn and risk together as a whole department--across levels, across specialties. This includes a constant balance of moving from concrete examples and problems to reconceptualizing the issues. 5. Listening, responsiveness, humor, and acknowledging contributions of everyone. More than any other principal, the case manager must be a central caregiver to a patient to ensure cost/quality outcomes. Otherwise case management only adds to the cost of health care by adding another level of bureaucracy. Nurses have always managed the care of patients, but to stay effective and committed, they need to take increased authority in their patients' entire episode of care and develop formal collaborative practice groups. In other words: "Prospective payment has changed the health care product from a day of care (or a visit) to an entire case or episode of illness. More than just a new way of paying for care, it has changed our way of planning, managing, and thinking about health care

  18. Telehealth technology in case/disease management.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Case managers can better coordinate and facilitate chronic illness care by adopting telehealth technology. This article overviews four major categories of telehealth technology based on patients' roles in self-management: surveillance, testing peripherals and messaging, decision support aids, and online support groups related to patients' subordinate, structured, collaborative, and autonomous roles, respectively. These various telehealth technologies should be selected on the basis of patients' care needs and preferences. Moreover, when they are integrated with other clinical information systems, case management practice can be better performed. However, the specific role functions and skill sets needed to be competent in telehealth environments have not yet been clearly identified. Considering role ambiguity and stress among telehealth clinicians, clarifying relevant roles is an urgent task.

  19. Management of Acute Patellar Dislocation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Enix, Dennis E.; Sudkamp, Kasey; Scali, Frank; Keating, Robbyn; Welk, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the evaluation and management of patellar dislocations and the different approaches used from providers in different countries. Clinical Features An individual dislocated her left patella while traveling abroad and received subsequent care in Thailand, China, and the United States. Intervention and Outcome Nonoperative treatment protocols including manual closed reduction of the patella, casting of the leg, and rehabilitation exercises were employed. Conclusion Receipt of care when abroad can be challenging. The patient’s knee range of motion and pain continued to improve when she was diligent about performing the home exercise program. This case highlights the importance of a thorough examination, a proper regimen of care, and patient counseling to ensure a full recovery and minimize the chance of re-injury. PMID:26778935

  20. Exposing the key functions of a complex intervention for shared care in mental health: case study of a process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Byng, Richard; Norman, Ian; Redfern, Sally; Jones, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Background Complex interventions have components which can vary in different contexts. Using the Realistic Evaluation framework, this study investigates how a complex health services intervention led to developments in shared care for people with long-term mental illness. Methods A retrospective qualitative interview study was carried out alongside a randomised controlled trial. The multi-faceted intervention supported by facilitators aimed to develop systems for shared care. The study was set in London. Participants included 46 practitioners and managers from 12 participating primary health care teams and their associated community mental health teams. Interviews focussed on how and why out comes were achieved, and were analysed using a framework incorporating context and intervening mechanisms. Results Thirty-one interviews were completed to create 12 case studies. The enquiry highlighted the importance of the catalysing, doing and reviewing functions of the facilitation process. Other facets of the intervention were less dominant. The intervention catalysed the allocation of link workers and liaison arrangements in nearly all practices. Case discussions between link workers and GPs improved individual care as well as helping link workers become part of the primary care team; but sustained integration into the team depended both on flexibility and experience of the link worker, and upon selection of relevant patients for the case discussions. The doing function of facilitators included advice and, at times, manpower, to help introduce successful systems for reviewing care, however time spent developing IT systems was rarely productive. The reviewing function of the intervention was weak and sometimes failed to solve problems in the development of liaison or recall. Conclusion Case discussions and improved liaison at times of crisis, rather than for proactive recall, were the key functions of shared care contributing to the success of Mental Health Link. This

  1. Managing Student Behavior with Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: An Observational Study in Early Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldarella, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive evidence-based interventions are needed to help early childhood educators manage challenging student behaviors. One such intervention, class-wide function-related intervention teams (CW-FIT), is a multi-tiered behavioral intervention program based on positive behavior support principles, including four main elements: (a) teaching…

  2. Can theory be embedded in visual interventions to promote self-management? A proposed model and worked example.

    PubMed

    Williams, B; Anderson, A S; Barton, K; McGhee, J

    2012-12-01

    Nurses are increasingly involved in a range of strategies to encourage patient behaviours that improve self-management. If nurses are to be involved in, or indeed lead, the development of such interventions then processes that enhance the likelihood that they will lead to evidence that is both robust and usable in practice are required. Although behavioural interventions have been predominantly based on written text or the spoken word increasing numbers are now drawing on visual media to communicate their message, despite only a growing evidence base to support it. The use of such media in health interventions is likely to increase due to technological advances enabling easier and cheaper production, and an increasing social preference for visual forms of communication. However, the development of such media is often highly pragmatic and developed intuitively rather than with theory and evidence informing their content and form. Such a process may be at best inefficient and at worst potentially harmful. This paper performs two functions. Firstly, it discusses and argues why visual based interventions may be a powerful media for behaviour change; and secondly, it proposes a model, developed from the MRC Framework for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions, to guide the creation of theory informed visual interventions. It employs a case study of the development of an intervention to motivate involvement in a lifestyle intervention among people with increased cardiovascular risk. In doing this we argue for a step-wise model which includes: (1) the identification of a theoretical basis and associated concepts; (2) the development of visual narrative to establish structure; (3) the visual rendering of narrative and concepts; and (4) the assessment of interpretation and impact among the intended patient group. We go on to discuss the theoretical and methodological limitations of the model.

  3. The use of functional and traditional mobilization interventions in a patient with chronic thoracic pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, David L; Vaughn, Dan

    2013-01-01

    There is little information in the literature regarding the efficacy of spinal manual therapy (SMT) interventions for patients with chronic thoracic spinal pain. In addition, information regarding the clinical decision-making associated with the application of SMT for this patient population is deficient. The purpose of this case report is to present the rationale for and results of applying specific SMT interventions on a patient with chronic spinal pain. A 51-year-old female with 9 months of significant thoracic, chest, sternal, and left shoulder pain was managed with both mobilization with movement and spinal manipulative procedures. The report offers insight into the decisions that guided the selection of these SMT techniques in this case. The outcome provides preliminary support for using these specific SMT procedures in patients with chronic thoracic spinal pain. PMID:24421624

  4. Impact of a Classroom Behavior Management Intervention on Teacher Risk Ratings for Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, William B.; Bishop, Dana C.; Jackson-Newsom, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Classroom behavior management interventions have been used successfully with drug prevention programs to prevent subsequent antisocial behavior and substance use among youth. This article presents results from implementation of the All Stars Challenge, a classroom-based behavior management component to a drug prevention program for fifth graders.…

  5. Classroom Management Strategies and Behavioral Interventions to Support Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Robin Sue Holzworth

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method project study identified the need for effective classroom management strategies to dissuade student noncompliant behavior and to ensure academic success for all students. Enhancing classroom management practices is vital to improved student achievement and teacher self-efficacy. Within a constructivist framework, it is critical…

  6. Rethinking Classroom Management: Strategies for Prevention, Intervention, and Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belvel, Patricia Sequeira; Jordan, Maya Marcia

    This book illustrates an approach to achieving a positive, harmonious classroom environment which enables educators to evolve effectively from managers to leaders by rethinking their roles as teachers, discussing how to create classrooms where students are more self-managing and demonstrate mutual respect, self-esteem, and responsibility. Key…

  7. Issues in health care: interventional pain management at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2007-03-01

    Emerging strategies in health care are extremely important for interventional pain physicians, as well as with the payors in various categories. While most Americans, including the US Congress and Administration, are looking for ways to provide affordable health care, the process of transformation and emerging health care strategies are troubling for physicians in general, and interventional pain physicians in particular. With the new Congress, only new issues rather than absolute solutions seem to emerge. Interventional pain physicians will continue to face the very same issues in the coming years that they have faced in previous years including increasing national health care spending, physician payment reform, ambulatory surgery center reform, and pay for performance. The national health expenditure data continue to extend the spending pattern that has characterized the 21st century, with US health spending continuing to outpace inflation and accounting for a growing share of the national economy. Health care spending in 2005 was $2.0 trillion or $6,697 per person and represented 16% of the gross domestic product. In 2005, Medicare spending reached $342 billion, while Medicaid spending was $315 billion. Physician and clinical services occupied approximately 21% of all US health care spending in 2005, reaching $421.2 billion. Overall, health spending in the US is expected to double to $4.1 trillion by 2016, then consuming 20% of the nation's gross domestic product, up from the current 16%. It is predicted that by 2016 the government will be paying 48.7% of the nation's health care bill, up from 38% in 1970 and 40% in 1990. The Medicare Physician Payment system based on the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula continues to be a major issue for physicians. The Congressional Budget Office has projected budget implications of change in the SGR mechanism, with consideration for allowing payment rates to increase by the amount of medical inflation, costing Medicare an

  8. Designing measurements to assess case management outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mateo, M A; Matzke, K; Newton, C

    1998-01-01

    Evaluating outcomes begins with determining the goals of case management. As the emphasis on the delivery of cost-effective patient care increases, comparing outcomes across settings is desirable and essential. A key component to comparing how an organization rates with similar institutions is to identify commonly used measures. Conducting a literature search, benchmarking, participating in initiatives of accrediting bodies, and establishing ways to collect and manage reliable and valid data are vital in laying the groundwork for an organization's ability to join evaluation projects across settings. PMID:9526390

  9. Designing measurements to assess case management outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Magdalena A; Matzke, Karen; Newton, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Evaluating outcomes begins with determining the goals of case management. As the emphasis on the delivery of cost-effective patient care increases, comparing outcomes across settings is desirable and essential. A key component to comparing how an organization rates with similar institutions is to identify commonly used measures. Conducting a literature search, benchmarking, participating in initiatives of accrediting bodies, and establishing ways to collect and manage reliable and valid data are vital in laying the groundwork for an organization's ability to join evaluation projects across settings. PMID:12478228

  10. Systematic review of paediatric weight management interventions delivered in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, B M; Moss, O A; Cerwinske, L A

    2016-10-01

    To increase their accessibility, paediatric weight management interventions are increasingly designed to be delivered in the home setting by trained staff. This systematic review summarizes the available evidence for interventions featuring home visitation and identifies key gaps in the literature. PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane and PsycINFO were searched for intervention studies that reported change in objectively measured adiposity outcomes in youth ages 2-18 years. Studies published between 1 January 1995 and 12 February 2016 were analysed. Of 15 eligible studies, nine reported that interventions with home visitation were either superior to a control/comparison condition or achieved significant within-subjects reductions in adiposity. Interventions in which professional staff (e.g. dietitians and exercise trainers) conducted home visits tended to be more efficacious than those delivered by paraprofessional or community-based staff, as were interventions with more frequent contact. Most studies were judged to have low or unclear risk of bias across various domains. As most studies compared interventions with home visits with less intensive and qualitatively different approaches, it remains unclear whether home visitation per se enhances weight loss efficacy. Overall, paediatric weight management interventions that feature home visitation are promising, but the incremental benefit of the home visitation treatment modality remains to be rigorously evaluated. © 2016 World Obesity.

  11. Systematic review of paediatric weight management interventions delivered in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, B M; Moss, O A; Cerwinske, L A

    2016-10-01

    To increase their accessibility, paediatric weight management interventions are increasingly designed to be delivered in the home setting by trained staff. This systematic review summarizes the available evidence for interventions featuring home visitation and identifies key gaps in the literature. PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane and PsycINFO were searched for intervention studies that reported change in objectively measured adiposity outcomes in youth ages 2-18 years. Studies published between 1 January 1995 and 12 February 2016 were analysed. Of 15 eligible studies, nine reported that interventions with home visitation were either superior to a control/comparison condition or achieved significant within-subjects reductions in adiposity. Interventions in which professional staff (e.g. dietitians and exercise trainers) conducted home visits tended to be more efficacious than those delivered by paraprofessional or community-based staff, as were interventions with more frequent contact. Most studies were judged to have low or unclear risk of bias across various domains. As most studies compared interventions with home visits with less intensive and qualitatively different approaches, it remains unclear whether home visitation per se enhances weight loss efficacy. Overall, paediatric weight management interventions that feature home visitation are promising, but the incremental benefit of the home visitation treatment modality remains to be rigorously evaluated. © 2016 World Obesity. PMID:27231126

  12. 75 FR 23582 - Annular Casing Pressure Management for Offshore Wells

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... published the proposed rule Annular Casing Pressure Management for Offshore Wells (74 FR 38147). The comment... the published proposed rule 1010-AD47 Annular Casing Pressure Management for Offshore Wells (74 FR... Minerals Management Service 30 CFR Part 250 RIN 1010-AD47 Annular Casing Pressure Management for...

  13. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts. PMID:26318797

  14. Evaluation of a complex, population-based injury claims management intervention for improving injury outcomes: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Collie, Alex; Gabbe, Belinda; Fitzharris, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injuries resulting from road traffic crashes are a substantial cause of disability and death worldwide. Injured persons receiving compensation have poorer recovery and return to work than those with non-compensable injury. Case or claims management is a critical component of injury compensation systems, and there is now evidence that claims management can have powerful positive impacts on recovery, but can also impede recovery or exacerbate mental health concerns in some injured people. This study seeks to evaluate the impact of a population-based injury claims management intervention in the State of Victoria, Australia, on the health of those injured in motor vehicle crashes, their experience of the compensation process, and the financial viability of the compensation system. Methods and analysis Evaluation of this complex intervention involves a series of linked but stand-alone research projects to assess the anticipated process changes, impacts and outcomes of the intervention over a 5-year time frame. Linkage and analysis of routine administrative and health system data is supplemented with a series of primary studies collecting new information. Additionally, a series of ‘action’ research projects will be undertaken to inform the implementation of the intervention. A program logic model designed by the state government Transport Accident Commission in conjunction with the research team provides the evaluation framework. Ethics and dissemination Relatively few studies have comprehensively examined the impact of compensation system processes on the health of injured persons, their satisfaction with systems processes, and impacts on the financial performance of the compensation scheme itself. The wholesale, population-based transformation of an injury claims management model is a rare opportunity to document impacts of system-level policy change on outcomes of injured persons. Findings will contribute to the evidence base of information on the

  15. A Randomized Trial of Probation Case Management for Drug-Involved Women Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guydish, Joseph; Chan, Monica; Bostrom, Alan; Jessup, Martha A.; Davis, Thomas B.; Marsh, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This article reports findings from a clinical trial of a probation case management (PCM) intervention for drug-involved women offenders. Participants were randomly assigned to PCM (n = 92) or standard probation (n = 91) and followed for 12 months using measures of substance abuse, psychiatric symptoms, social support, and service utilization.…

  16. Reframing tobacco dependency management in acute care: A case study.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Annette S H; Guzman, Randolph; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Thurmeier, Rick; Fedorowicz, Anna; Fulmore, Kaitlin

    2016-08-01

    Effective tobacco dependence treatment within acute care tends to be inadequate. The purpose of the Utilizing best practices to Manage Acute care patients Tobacco Dependency (UMAT) was to implement and evaluate an evidence-based intervention to support healthcare staff to effectively manage nicotine withdrawal symptoms of acute surgical patients. Data collection for this one-year longitudinal case study included: relevant patient experiences and staff reported practice, medication usage, and chart review. Over the year each data source suggested changes in tobacco dependence treatment. Key changes in patient survey responses (N=55) included a decrease in daily smoking and cigarette cravings. Of patients who used nicotine replacement therapy, they reported an increase in symptom relief. Staff (N=45) were surveyed at baseline, mid-point and end of study. Reported rates of assessing smoking status did not change over the year, but assessment of withdrawal symptoms emerged as daily practice and questions about cessation diminished. Also delivery of nicotine replacement therapy products increased over the year. Chart reviews showed a shift in content from documenting smoking behavior to withdrawal symptoms and administration of nicotine replacements; also frequency of comments increased. In summary, the evidence-based intervention influenced unit norms and reframed the culture related to tobacco dependence treatment. PMID:27392584

  17. The Science Manager's Guide to Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Kristi M.; Peffers, Melissa S.; Ruegg, Rosalie T.; Vallario, Robert W.

    2001-09-24

    This guide takes the science manager through the steps of planning, implementing, validating, communicating, and using case studies. It outlines the major methods of analysis, describing their relative merits and applicability while providing relevant examples and sources of additional information. Well-designed case studies can provide a combination of rich qualitative and quantitative information, offering valuable insights into the nature, outputs, and longer-term impacts of the research. An objective, systematic, and credible approach to the evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science programs adds value to the research process and is the subject of this guide.

  18. The role of pharmacotherapy and managed care pharmacy interventions in the treatment of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Dopheide, Julie A

    2009-05-01

    Pharmacotherapy plays a primary role in the management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), despite the availability of effective behavioral interventions. Psychostimulants are the most commonly prescribed form of pharmacotherapy for patients with ADHD and their benefits in managed care are severalfold, leading not only to symptom resolution and improved quality of life for patients, but also reduced costs for payers and purchasers. The use of these agents requires careful consideration and management by health plan stakeholders for optimal effectiveness. Concerns regarding medication adherence, in addition to the potential for diversion and abuse of psychostimulants, highlight the importance of effective pharmacotherapy management in patients with ADHD. Initiatives promoting medication adherence, such as patient/parent education, provider follow-up, and adverse effect management, are crucial for ensuring treatment success. Once-daily, extended-release formulations of stimulants may also contribute to improving medication adherence, as may managed care pharmacy interventions such as pharmacy database monitoring. PMID:19601689

  19. Geriatric case managers: integration into physician practices.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Williams, F G

    1999-01-01

    Integration of case management proved to be a key variable in a national demonstration at nine sites of alternative models designed to enhance primary care of frail elders. Numerous semistructured interviews of participants revealed a number of areas important to achieving successful integration. These areas include making favorable first impressions, building relationships, learning to collaborate, having proximity and contact, communicating, and demonstrating benefits to patients and physicians.

  20. Building and analyzing an innovative community-centered dengue-ecosystem management intervention in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Tana, Susilowati; Umniyati, SittiRahmah; Petzold, Max; Kroeger, Axel; Sommerfeld, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Dengue is an important public health problem in Yogyakarta city, Indonesia. The aim of this study was to build an innovative community-centered dengue-ecosystem management intervention in the city and to assess the process and results. Methods For describing the baseline situation, entomological surveys and household surveys were carried out in six randomly selected neighborhoods in Yogyakarta city, documents were analyzed and different stakeholders involved in dengue control and environmental management were interviewed. Then a community-centered dengue-ecosystem management intervention was built up in two of the neighborhoods (Demangan and Giwangan) whereas two neighborhoods served as controls with no intervention (Tahunan and Bener). Six months after the intervention follow up surveys (household interviews and entomological) were conducted as well as focus group discussions and key informant interviews. FIindings The intervention results included: better community knowledge, attitude and practices in dengue prevention; increased household and community participation; improved partnership including a variety of stakeholders with prospects for sustainability; vector control efforts refocused on environmental and health issues; increased community ownership of dengue vector management including broader community development activities such as solid waste management and recycling. Conclusion The community-centred approach needs a lot of effort at the beginning but has better prospects for sustainability than the vertical “top-down” approach. PMID:23318239

  1. Integrating the Principles of Effective Intervention into Batterer Intervention Programming: The Case for Moving Toward More Evidence-Based Programming.

    PubMed

    Radatz, Dana L; Wright, Emily M

    2016-01-01

    The majority of batterer intervention program (BIP) evaluations have indicated they are marginally effective in reducing domestic violence recidivism. Meanwhile, correctional programs used to treat a variety of offenders (e.g., substance users, violent offenders, and so forth) that adhere to the "principles of effective intervention" (PEI) have reported significant reductions in recidivism. This article introduces the PEI-the principles on which evidence-based practices in correctional rehabilitation are based-and identifies the degree to which they are currently integrated into BIPs. The case is made that batterer programs could be more effective if they incorporate the PEI. Recommendations for further integration of the principles into BIPs are also provided. PMID:25573844

  2. Case managers reorganize to challenge claims denials.

    PubMed

    1999-08-01

    A combination of diminished reimbursement, decreased funding for residency programs, an epidemic of claims denials, and the skilled nursing crisis has imperiled teaching hospitals across the country. Increasingly, these hospitals are looking to case management departments as potential saviors. In the short term, that could mean more staff and a beefier budget, but if your department can't produce, cuts later on could be drastic. The University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia lost $90 million in FY1998 and responded by cutting 1,100 positions--9% of its work force. The case management department lost eight positions and is trying to take up the slack with a massive reorganization of its care delivery system and a rigorous education program designed to reduce claims denials. At Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, DC, however, case management staff and resources have been increased for now. The department is using its new-found prosperity to thoroughly screen all incoming patients for appropriateness of admission, upgrade its discharge planning capabilities, and hire a full-time employee to appeal denied claims. PMID:10557727

  3. Chronic grief management for dementia caregivers in transition: intervention development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Paun, Olimpia; Farran, Carol J

    2011-12-01

    Research reveals that Alzheimer's disease (AD) caregivers do not relinquish their role after placing a family member in long-term care. Caregivers report increased emotional upset around the time of placement, with sustained losses over time leading to chronic grief. Chronic grief increases caregivers' risk for depression and suicide. There are no documented interventions designed to decrease caregivers' chronic grief post placement. The Chronic Grief Management Intervention (CGMI) builds on existing evidence to target caregivers' chronic grief in the transition of a family member into long-term care. The intervention is structured into three major components: (a) knowledge, (b) communication and conflict resolution skills, and (c) chronic grief management skills. The 12-week intervention was pilot tested with 34 caregivers for feasibility and preliminary effects on caregiver skill, knowledge, chronic grief, and depression. This article presents a general study description while focusing on the development and implementation of the CGMI. PMID:22084962

  4. Managing Loss and Change: Grief Interventions for Dementia Caregivers in a CBT-Based Trial.

    PubMed

    Meichsner, Franziska; Schinköthe, Denise; Wilz, Gabriele

    2016-05-01

    Dementia caregivers often experience loss and grief related to general caregiver burden, physical, and mental health problems. Through qualitative content analysis, this study analyzed intervention strategies applied by therapists in a randomized-controlled trial in Germany to assist caregivers in managing losses and associated emotions. Sequences from 61 therapy sessions that included interventions targeting grief, loss, and change were transcribed and analyzed. A category system was developed deductively, and the intercoder reliability was satisfactory. The identified grief intervention strategies were recognition and acceptance of loss and change,addressing future losses,normalization of grief, and redefinition of the relationship Therapists focused on identifying experienced losses, managing associated feelings, and fostering acceptance of these losses. A variety of cognitive-behavioral therapy-based techniques was applied with each strategy. The findings contribute to understanding how dementia caregivers can be supported in their experience of grief and facilitate the development of a manualized grief intervention. PMID:26311735

  5. Managing Loss and Change: Grief Interventions for Dementia Caregivers in a CBT-Based Trial.

    PubMed

    Meichsner, Franziska; Schinköthe, Denise; Wilz, Gabriele

    2016-05-01

    Dementia caregivers often experience loss and grief related to general caregiver burden, physical, and mental health problems. Through qualitative content analysis, this study analyzed intervention strategies applied by therapists in a randomized-controlled trial in Germany to assist caregivers in managing losses and associated emotions. Sequences from 61 therapy sessions that included interventions targeting grief, loss, and change were transcribed and analyzed. A category system was developed deductively, and the intercoder reliability was satisfactory. The identified grief intervention strategies were recognition and acceptance of loss and change,addressing future losses,normalization of grief, and redefinition of the relationship Therapists focused on identifying experienced losses, managing associated feelings, and fostering acceptance of these losses. A variety of cognitive-behavioral therapy-based techniques was applied with each strategy. The findings contribute to understanding how dementia caregivers can be supported in their experience of grief and facilitate the development of a manualized grief intervention.

  6. Comparing multifactorial lifestyle interventions and stress management in coronary risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Orjan; Lisspers, Jan; Hofman-Bang, Claes; Nygren, Ake; Rydén, Lars; Ohman, Arne

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of residential multifactorial cardiac rehabilitation, outpatient multifactorial rehabilitation, stress management, and standard coronary rehabilitation, on cardiac risk reduction. Out of 144 eligible male patients recently treated with percantaneous transluminal coronary angiography (PTCA), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), or acute myocardial infarction (AMI), 132 were randomized into this study. All interventions covered a 12-month active intervention, intense during the first months and subsequently leveled out. Main assessments were performed before randomization and after the intervention. Patients offered behavioral rehabilitation showed improved self-reported healthy diet habits and exercise frequency, and higher internal locus of control. Although blood lipids, exercise capacity, body mass, anxiety, depression, and Type A scores were changed in the expected direction, no significant difference emerged between active intervention and the standard care condition. Standard care of today appears to have great potential in particular if supplemented with some kind of stress management.

  7. Developing a Manualized Occupational Therapy Diabetes Management Intervention: Resilient, Empowered, Active Living With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Carandang, Kristine; Davis, Shain

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a manualized occupational therapy intervention for diabetes management. An initial theoretical framework and core content areas for a Stage 1 intervention manual were developed based on an in-depth needs assessment and review of existing literature. After evaluation by a panel of experts and completion of a feasibility study, the intervention was revised into a Stage 2 manual in preparation for a randomized study evaluating the intervention’s efficacy. In developing the initial manual, we delineated core theoretical principles to allow for flexible application and tailoring of the intervention’s content areas. Expert panel feedback and feasibility study results led to changes to the intervention structure and content as we developed the Stage 2 manual. Through describing this process, we illustrate the dynamic evolution of intervention manuals, which undergo revisions due to both theoretical and practical considerations at each stage of the research-to-clinical practice pipeline. PMID:26594741

  8. The effectiveness and practicality of occupational stress management interventions: a survey of subject matter expert opinions.

    PubMed

    Bellarosa, C; Chen, P Y

    1997-07-01

    Stress management (SM) subject matter experts (SMEs) evaluated 6 widely used occupational SM interventions (relaxation, physical fitness, cognitive restructuring, meditation, assertiveness training, and stress inoculation) on the basis of 10 practicality criteria and 7 effectiveness objectives. Relaxation was evaluated overall as the most practical intervention, while meditation and stress inoculation were judged as the least practical. Physical fitness was chosen to be the most effective intervention, while both meditation and assertiveness training were rated overall as the least effective. The findings also revealed that the SMEs considered history of success and duration of effect, rather than "relevance to program objectives," as the most important factors when selecting SM interventions. Incongruence between effectiveness ratings and actual choices of interventions are discussed.

  9. Targeting and Managing Behavioral Symptoms in Individuals with Dementia: A Randomized Trial of a Nonpharmacologic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Winter, Laraine; Dennis, Marie P.; Hodgson, Nancy; Hauck, Walter W.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Test effects of an intervention that helps families manage distressful behaviors. Design Two-group randomized trial Setting In-home Participants 272 caregivers and dementia patients Intervention Up to 11 home/telephone contacts over 16-weeks by health professionals who identified potential triggers of patient behaviors including communication, environment, patient undiagnosed medical conditions (by obtaining blood/urine samples), and trained caregivers in strategies to modify triggers and reduce caregiver upset. Between 16–24 weeks, 3 telephone contacts reinforced strategy use. Measurements Primary outcomes included frequency of targeted problem behavior, and caregiver upset with and confidence managing it at 16-weeks. Secondary outcomes included caregiver well-being and management skills at 16 and 24 weeks, and caregiver perceived benefits. Prevalence of medical conditions for intervention patients were also examined. Results At 16 weeks, 67.5% of intervention caregivers reported patient improvement in targeted problem behavior compared to 45.8% of caregivers in a no-treatment control group (p=.002), reduced upset with (p=.028) and enhanced confidence managing (p=.011) the behavior. Additionally, compared to controls, intervention caregivers reported less upset with all problem behaviors (p=.001), negative communication (p=.017), burden (p=.051), and improved well-being (p=.001). Fewer intervention caregivers had depressive symptoms (53.0%) than control group caregivers (67.8%, p=.020). Similar caregiver outcomes occurred at 24-weeks. Compared to controls, intervention caregivers perceived more study benefits (p values <.05) including ability to keep patients home. Blood/urine samples of intervention patients showed 40 (34.1%) had undiagnosed illnesses requiring physician follow-up. Conclusion Targeting behaviors upsetting to caregivers and modifying potential triggers improves patient symptomatology and caregiver well-being and skills. PMID:20662955

  10. Weight management interventions in adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity: a systematic review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of weight management interventions in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) and obesity using recommendations from current clinical guidelines for the first line management of obesity in adults. Full papers on lifestyle modification interventions published between 1982 to 2011 were sought by searching the Medline, Embase, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases. Studies were evaluated based on 1) intervention components, 2) methodology, 3) attrition rate 4) reported weight loss and 5) duration of follow up. Twenty two studies met the inclusion criteria. The interventions were classified according to inclusion of the following components: behaviour change alone, behaviour change plus physical activity, dietary advice or physical activity alone, dietary plus physical activity advice and multi-component (all three components). The majority of the studies had the same methodological limitations: no sample size justification, small heterogeneous samples, no information on randomisation methodologies. Eight studies were classified as multi-component interventions, of which one study used a 600 kilocalorie (2510 kilojoule) daily energy deficit diet. Study durations were mostly below the duration recommended in clinical guidelines and varied widely. No study included an exercise program promoting 225–300 minutes or more of moderate intensity physical activity per week but the majority of the studies used the same behaviour change techniques. Three studies reported clinically significant weight loss (≥ 5%) at six months post intervention. Current data indicate weight management interventions in those with ID differ from recommended practice and further studies to examine the effectiveness of multi-component weight management interventions for adults with ID and obesity are justified. PMID:24060348

  11. Rice management interventions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions: a review.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saddam; Peng, Shaobing; Fahad, Shah; Khaliq, Abdul; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2015-03-01

    Global warming is one of the gravest threats to crop production and environmental sustainability. Rice, the staple food of more than half of the world's population, is the most prominent cause of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in agriculture and gives way to global warming. The increasing demand for rice in the future has deployed tremendous concerns to reduce GHG emissions for minimizing the negative environmental impacts of rice cultivation. In this review, we presented a contemporary synthesis of existing data on how crop management practices influence emissions of GHGs in rice fields. We realized that modifications in traditional crop management regimes possess a huge potential to overcome GHG emissions. We examined and evaluated the different possible options and found that modifying tillage permutations and irrigation patterns, managing organic and fertilizer inputs, selecting suitable cultivar, and cropping regime can mitigate GHG emissions. Previously, many authors have discussed the feasibility principle and the influence of these practices on a single gas or, in particular, in the whole agricultural sector. Nonetheless, changes in management practices may influence more than one gas at the same time by different mechanisms or sometimes their effects may be antagonistic. Therefore, in the present attempt, we estimated the overall global warming potential of each approach to consider the magnitude of its effects on all gases and provided a comprehensive assessment of suitable crop management practices for reducing GHG emissions in rice culture. PMID:25354441

  12. Rice management interventions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions: a review.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saddam; Peng, Shaobing; Fahad, Shah; Khaliq, Abdul; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2015-03-01

    Global warming is one of the gravest threats to crop production and environmental sustainability. Rice, the staple food of more than half of the world's population, is the most prominent cause of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in agriculture and gives way to global warming. The increasing demand for rice in the future has deployed tremendous concerns to reduce GHG emissions for minimizing the negative environmental impacts of rice cultivation. In this review, we presented a contemporary synthesis of existing data on how crop management practices influence emissions of GHGs in rice fields. We realized that modifications in traditional crop management regimes possess a huge potential to overcome GHG emissions. We examined and evaluated the different possible options and found that modifying tillage permutations and irrigation patterns, managing organic and fertilizer inputs, selecting suitable cultivar, and cropping regime can mitigate GHG emissions. Previously, many authors have discussed the feasibility principle and the influence of these practices on a single gas or, in particular, in the whole agricultural sector. Nonetheless, changes in management practices may influence more than one gas at the same time by different mechanisms or sometimes their effects may be antagonistic. Therefore, in the present attempt, we estimated the overall global warming potential of each approach to consider the magnitude of its effects on all gases and provided a comprehensive assessment of suitable crop management practices for reducing GHG emissions in rice culture.

  13. Management of Retained Intervention Guide-wire: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moghairi, Abdulrahman M; Al-Amri, Hussein S

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary angioplasty is increasingly employed in the treatment of patients with complex coronary artery disease. Different steerable guide wires used to open occluded vessel and facilitate balloon and stent deployment. However, the guide-wire itself is not without hazard: it may perforate or dissect the vessel, but fracture or entrapment is uncommon. Its management depends on the clinical situation of the patient, as well as the position and length of the remnant. In this review we discuss the angioplasty guide-wire fracture and entrapment risk factors, potential risks and management. PMID:23116055

  14. Methods for Assessing Single-Case School-Based Intervention Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busse, R. T.; McGill, Ryan J.; Kennedy, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present various single-case outcome assessment methods for evaluating school-based intervention effectiveness. We present several outcome methods, including goal attainment scaling, visual analysis, trend analysis, percentage of non-overlapping data, single-case mean difference effect size, reliable change index,…

  15. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Intervention for Treatment of Inconsistent Phonological Disorder: Three Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Beth; Dodd, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Children with unintelligible speech differ in severity, underlying deficit, type of surface error patterns and response to treatment. Detailed treatment case studies, evaluating specific intervention protocols for particular diagnostic groups, can identify best practice for children with speech disorder. Three treatment case studies evaluated the…

  16. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Intervention for Treatment of Inconsistent Phonological Disorder: Three Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Beth; Dodd, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Children with unintelligible speech differ in severity, underlying deficit, type of surface error patterns and response to treatment. Detailed treatment case studies, evaluating specific intervention protocols for particular diagnostic groups, can identify best practice for children with speech disorder. Three treatment case studies evaluated the…

  17. Enhancing the Scientific Credibility of Single-Case Intervention Research: Randomization to the Rescue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Levin, Joel R.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, single-case designs have increasingly been used to establish an empirical basis for evidence-based interventions and techniques in a variety of disciplines, including psychology and education. Although traditional single-case designs have typically not met the criteria for a randomized controlled trial relative to conventional…

  18. Speech and Language Therapy Intervention in Schizophrenia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Judy; Brumfitt, Shelagh; Parks, Randolph W.; Woodruff, Peter W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is a significant body of evidence documenting the speech and language abnormalities found in adult psychiatric disorders. These speech and language impairments can create additional social barriers for the individual and may hinder effective communication in psychiatric treatment and management. However, the role of speech and…

  19. Preventing and Managing Cardiometabolic Risk: The Logic for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Mark A.; Kottke, Thomas E.; Jordan, Courtney; O’Connor, Patrick J.; Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Carreón, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Cardiometabolic risk (CMR), also known as metabolic syndrome or insulin resistance syndrome, comprises obesity (particularly central or abdominal obesity), high triglycerides, low HDL, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Leading to death from diabetes, heart disease, and stroke, the root cause of CMR is inadequate physical activity, a Western diet identified primarily by low intake of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and high in saturated fat, as well as a number of yet-to-be-identified genetic factors. While the pathophysiological pathways related to CMR are complex, the universal need for adequate physical activity and a diet that emphasizes fruits and vegetables and whole grains, while minimizing food high in added sugars and saturated fat suggests that these behaviors are the appropriate focus of intervention. PMID:20054455

  20. Nonpharmacological Interventions for Pain Management in Paramedicine and the Emergency Setting: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Sok Cheon; Micalos, Peter S.; Maria, Sonja J.; Lord, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Paramedicine and the emergency medical services have been moving in the direction of advancing pharmaceutical intervention for the management of pain in both acute and chronic situations. This coincides with other areas of advanced life support and patient management strategies that have been well researched and continue to benefit from the increasing evidence. Even though paramedic practice is firmly focused on pharmacological interventions to alleviate pain, there is emerging evidence proposing a range of nonpharmacological options that can have an important role in pain management. This review highlights literature that suggests that paramedicine and emergency medical services should be considering the application of complementary and alternative therapies which can enhance current practice and reduce the use of pharmacological interventions. PMID:25918548

  1. Psychosocial interventions for reducing vocal challenging behavior in persons with autistic disorder: a multilevel meta-analysis of single-case experiments.

    PubMed

    Vanderkerken, Lien; Heyvaert, Mieke; Maes, Bea; Onghena, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Vocal challenging behavior (VCB) forms a common problem in individuals with autistic disorder. Since VCB is associated with negative outcomes for the individual and his or her environment, it is important to know how to manage this type of CB. To evaluate the effectiveness of several psychosocial interventions applied to decrease VCB in individuals with autistic disorder, we conducted a meta-analysis of single-case experiments (SCEs). Fifty-two SCEs, including 74 participants, were combined using a multilevel meta-analysis. The overall treatment effect was large and statistically significant. However, the effect varied significantly over the included studies and participants. Examining this variance, evidence was found for a moderator effect of VCB type and intervention type, with, on average, the largest effects for interventions used to reduce VCB including stereotypical VCB and for interventions containing both antecedent and consequence components. Age, gender, primary treatment setting, publication year, and study quality did not significantly moderate the intervention effect.

  2. Case Series: Evaluation of Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Medicated Children With ADHD.

    PubMed

    Vetrayan, Jayachandran; Othman, Suhana; Victor Paulraj, Smily Jesu Priya

    2013-03-25

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness and feasibility of behavioral sleep intervention for medicated children with ADHD. Method: Six medicated children (five boys, one girl; aged 6-12 years) with ADHD participated in a 4-week sleep intervention program. The main behavioral strategies used were Faded Bedtime With Response Cost (FBRC) and positive reinforcement. Within a case-series design, objective measure (Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children [SDSC]) and subjective measure (sleep diaries) were used to record changes in children's sleep. Results: For all six children, significant decrease was found in the severity of children's sleep problems (based on SDSC data). Bedtime resistance and mean sleep onset latency were reduced following the 4-week intervention program according to sleep diaries data. Gains were generally maintained at the follow-up. Parents perceived the intervention as being helpful. Conclusion: Based on the initial data, this intervention shows promise as an effective and feasible treatment. (J. of Att. Dis. 2013; XX(X) 1-XX).

  3. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  4. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  5. Self-Management Support Interventions for Stroke Survivors: A Systematic Meta-Review

    PubMed Central

    Parke, Hannah L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Pearce, Gemma; Taylor, Stephanie J. C.; Sheikh, Aziz; Griffiths, Chris J.; Greenhalgh, Trish; Pinnock, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Background There is considerable policy interest in promoting self-management in patients with long-term conditions, but it remains uncertain whether these interventions are effective in stroke patients. Design Systematic meta-review of the evidence for self-management support interventions with stroke survivors to inform provision of healthcare services. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, BNI, Database of Abstracts of Reviews for Effectiveness, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for systematic reviews of self-management support interventions for stroke survivors. Quality was assessed using the R-AMSTAR tool, and data extracted using a customised data extraction form. We undertook a narrative synthesis of the reviews' findings. Results From 12,400 titles we selected 13 systematic reviews (published 2003-2012) representing 101 individual trials. Although the term ‘self-management’ was rarely used, key elements of self-management support such as goal setting, action planning, and problem solving were core components of therapy rehabilitation interventions. We found high quality evidence that supported self-management in the context of therapy rehabilitation delivered soon after the stroke event resulted in short-term (< 1 year) improvements in basic and extended activities of daily living, and a reduction in poor outcomes (dependence/death). There is some evidence that rehabilitation and problem solving interventions facilitated reintegration into the community. Conclusions Self-management terminology is rarely used in the context of stroke. However, therapy rehabilitation currently successfully delivers elements of self-management support to stroke survivors and their caregivers with improved outcomes. Future research should focus on managing the emotional, medical and social tasks of long-term survivorship. PMID:26204266

  6. A Systematic Review of Stress-Management Interventions for Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Alison K.; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to identify stress-management interventions used for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and systematically evaluate the efficacy of these interventions. Methods: Several strategies were used to search for studies reported in articles published up to 2013. Results: Our initial search retrieved 117 publications, of which 8 met our criteria for review. Of the eight studies, one provided Class I evidence, five provided Class III evidence, and two provided Class IV evidence for the efficacy of stress-management interventions according to the evidence classification established by the American Academy of Neurology. Most studies showed positive changes in outcomes assessed; however, the range of methodological quality among the published studies made it difficult to draw conclusions. Conclusions: The promising findings for stress-management interventions highlight the need for future studies. Additional large, prospective, multicenter studies will help to define the role of stress-management interventions in the treatment and course of MS. Furthermore, including outcome measures based on biological and clinical markers of disease will prove useful in understanding potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:25337056

  7. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P < 0.05). Time to reinitiation was significantly shorter in the intervention group, 59.5 (+/- 69.0) days vs. 107.4 (+/- 109) days for the control group (P < 0.05). This initiative demonstrated that a targeted disease management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a

  8. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Chylothorax: A Review of the Current Management of High Output Chylothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Stuart Mott, Nigel Koukounaras, Jim; Shoobridge, Jen; Hudson, Patricio Vargas

    2013-06-15

    Chylothorax is an uncommon type of pleural effusion whose etiology may be classified as traumatic or nontraumatic. Low-output chylothoraces usually respond well to conservative management, whereas high-output chylothoraces are more likely to require surgical or interventional treatment. Conservative management focuses on alleviation of symptoms, replacement of fluid and nutrient losses, and reduction of chyle output to facilitate spontaneous healing. Surgical management can be technically difficult due to the high incidence of variant anatomy and the high-risk patient population. Percutaneous treatments have rapidly developed and evolved during the past 14 years to represent a minimally invasive treatment compared with the more invasive nature of surgery. Percutaneous therapies provide a range of treatment options despite difficult or variant anatomy, with a reported high success rate coupled with low morbidity and mortality. This article is a review of etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of chylothorax, with a focus on interventional management techniques.

  9. Feasibility of a dyadic intervention for management of osteoarthritis: a pilot study with older patients and their spousal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Martire, L M; Schulz, R; Keefe, F J; Starz, T W; Osial, T A; Dew, M A; Reynolds, C F

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated a novel intervention for older osteoarthritis (OA) patients and their spousal caregivers that consisted of standard patient education supplemented by information related to effectively managing arthritis as a couple. Twenty-four female OA patients and their husbands were randomly assigned to either an educational intervention that was targeted at both patient and spouse or to a patient education intervention that was targeted at only the patient. Findings revealed that both interventions were evaluated favorably but the couple intervention was better attended than the patient intervention. In addition, patients in the couple intervention experienced greater increased efficacy in managing arthritis pain and other symptoms. The findings of this pilot study point to the utility of a dyadic intervention approach to management of OA in late life. PMID:12554315

  10. Case histories in pharmaceutical risk management.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Cynthia G; Henningfield, Jack E; Haddox, J David; Varughese, Sajan; Lindholm, Anders; Rosen, Susan; Wissel, Janne; Waxman, Deborah; Carter, Lawrence P; Seeger, Vickie; Johnson, Rolley E

    2009-12-01

    The development and implementation of programs in the U.S. to minimize risks and assess unintended consequences of new medications has been increasingly required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since the mid 1990s. This paper provides four case histories of risk management and post-marketing surveillance programs utilized recently to address problems associated with possible abuse, dependence and diversion. The pharmaceutical sponsors of each of these drugs were invited to present their programs and followed a similar template for their summaries that are included in this article. The drugs and presenting companies were OxyContin, an analgesic marketed by Purdue Pharma L.P., Daytrana and Vyvanse, ADHD medications marketed by Shire Pharmaceuticals, Xyrem for narcolepsy marketed by Jazz Pharmaceuticals, and Subutex and Suboxone for opioid dependence marketed by Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Inc. These case histories and subsequent discussions provide invaluable real-world examples and illustrate both the promise of risk management programs in providing a path to market and/or for keeping on the market drugs with serious potential risks. They also illustrate the limitations of such programs in actually controlling unintended consequences, as well as the challenge of finding the right balance of reducing risks without posing undue barriers to patient access. These experiences are highly relevant as the FDA increasingly requires pharmaceutical sponsors to develop and implement the more formalized and enforceable versions of the risk management term Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS). PMID:19767156

  11. Evaluation of a Family-Centred Children's Weight Management Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jinks, Annette; English, Sue; Coufopoulos, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in-depth quantitative and qualitative evaluation of a family-based weight loss and healthy life style programme for clinically obese children in England. Design/methodology/approach: The mixed method case study evaluation used included obtaining pre and post measurements of anthropometry and a…

  12. Improving management of type 2 diabetes in South Asian patients: a systematic review of intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Bhurji, N; Javer, J; Gasevic, D; Khan, N A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Optimal control of type 2 diabetes is challenging in many patient populations including in South Asian patients. We systematically reviewed studies on the effect of diabetes management interventions targeted at South Asian patients with type 2 diabetes on glycaemic control. Design Systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and pre-post-test studies (January 1990 to February 2014). Studies were stratified by where interventions were conducted (South Asia vs Western countries). Participants Patients originating from Pakistan, Bangladesh or India with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcome Change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Secondary end points included change in blood pressure, lipid levels, anthropomorphics and knowledge. Results 23 studies (15 RCTs) met criteria for analysis with 7 from Western countries (n=2532) and 16 from South Asia (n=1081). Interventions in Western countries included translated diabetes education, additional clinical care, written materials, visual aids, and bilingual community-based peers and/or health professionals. Interventions conducted in South Asia included yoga, meditation or exercise, community-based peers, health professionals and dietary education (cooking exercises). Among RCTs in India (5 trials; n=390), 4 demonstrated significant reductions in HbA1c in the intervention group compared with usual care (yoga and exercise interventions). Among the 4 RCTs conducted in Europe (n=2161), only 1 study, an education intervention of 113 patients, reported a significant reduction in HbA1c with the intervention. Lipids, blood pressure and knowledge improved in both groups with studies from India more often reporting reductions in body mass index and waist circumference. Conclusions Overall, there was little improvement in HbA1c level in diabetes management interventions targeted at South Asians living in Europe compared with usual care, although other outcomes did improve. The

  13. Pediatric neurofunctional intervention in agenesis of the corpus callosum: a case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Sheila Cristina da Silva; Queiroz, Ana Paula Adriano; Niza, Nathália Tiepo; da Costa, Letícia Miranda Resende; Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe a clinical report pre- and post-neurofunctional intervention in a case of agenesis of the corpus callosum. Case description: Preterm infant with corpus callosum agenesis and hypoplasia of the cerebellum vermis and lateral ventricles, who, at the age of two years, started the proposed intervention. Functional performance tests were used such as the neurofunctional evaluation, the Gross Motor Function Measure and the Gross Motor Function Classification System. In the initial evaluation, absence of equilibrium reactions, postural transfers, deficits in manual and trunk control were observed. The intervention was conducted with a focus on function, prioritizing postural control and guidance of the family to continue care in the home environment. After the intervention, there was an improvement of body reactions, postural control and movement acquisition of hands and limbs. The intervention also showed improvement in functional performance. Comments: Postural control and transfers of positions were benefited by the neurofunction intervention in this case of agenesis of the corpus callosum. The approach based on function with activities that involve muscle strengthening and balance reactions training, influenced the acquisition of a more selective motor behavior. PMID:25479858

  14. Case Management in Community Corrections: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Andrew; Hardcastle, Lesley; Birgden, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Case management is commonly regarded as the foundation of effective service provision across a wide range of human service settings. This article considers the case management that is offered to clients of community corrections, identifying the distinctive features of case management in this particular setting, and reviewing the empirical evidence…

  15. Case Management Takes Hold in Long-Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Stephen M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Empowering Case Management Clients" (Rose); "Case Management in Rural Japan" (Maeda, Takahashi); "Coordinated-Care Teams" (Brodsky, Sobol); "Comparing Practice in the United States and the United Kingdom" (Sturges); "Business of Case Management Flourishing in the U.S." (Cress); and "Community Options Bring Change to Long-Term Care in…

  16. A case study of a Canadian homelessness intervention programme for elderly people.

    PubMed

    Ploeg, Jenny; Hayward, Lynda; Woodward, Christel; Johnston, Riley

    2008-12-01

    The aims of this study were to describe: (1) how the Homelessness Intervention Programme addressed the needs of elderly people who were homeless or at risk of homelessness; and (2) the factors that influenced the ability of the programme to address client needs. The programme was offered by a multi-service non-profit agency serving low-income families and individuals in an urban neighbourhood in Ontario, Canada. Using a case study approach, we conducted 10 individual interviews and three focus groups with programme clients, programme providers, other service providers and programme funders. Programme providers completed intake forms, monthly follow-up forms and exit/housing change forms for each of the 129 clients served by the programme over a 28-month period. Approximately equal proportions of clients were between 54 years old and 65 years old (47%) and over 65 years (53%). There were equal proportions of women and men. In addition to being homeless or marginally housed, clients lived with multiple and complex issues including chronic illness, mental illness and substance abuse. Through the facilitation of continuity of care, the programme was able to meet the needs of this vulnerable group of elderly people. Three types of continuity of care were facilitated: relational, informational and management continuity. The study confirmed the value of a continuous caring relationship with an identified provider and the delivery of a seamless service through coordination, integration and information sharing between different providers. Study findings also highlighted the broader systemic factors that acted as barriers to the programme and its ability to meet the needs of elderly people. These factors included limited housing options available; limited income supports; and lack of coordinated, accessible community health and support services. The central findings stress the importance of continuity of care as a guiding concept for intervention programmes for homeless and

  17. Early intervention is key to successful management of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Because of the huge healthcare burden associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and the increased lifespan in many industrialized countries, the costs associated with AD are expected to reach astronomical proportions in the next 50 years. Diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of AD patients from the earliest stage possible will reduce healthcare costs and increase quality of life. Indeed, progress in our clinical knowledge of AD has led to more reliable diagnostic criteria and diagnostic accuracy, and research efforts are expanding to uncover the earliest manifestations and even the presymptomatic phases of the disease. The initiating and propagating pathologic processes and the anatomic location of the earliest changes will become new targets of research and therapeutic development. The proposed precursor to AD, mild cognitive impairment, is currently under investigation as a possible therapeutic starting point. This paper reviews our current understanding of the early pathology and clinical manifestations associated with mild cognitive impairment and early AD. A discussion of the latest diagnostic techniques as well as promising therapeutic targets for early intervention also will be included.

  18. Human Interventions versus Climate Change: Impacts on Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, M. R.; Acharya, K.

    2009-12-01

    Water availability and occurrence of water induced disasters are impacted by both natural and human centric drivers. Climate change is considered to be one of the noted drivers in this regard. Human interventions through land use/land cover change, stream and floodplain regulations via dams, weirs, and embankments could be other equally important group of drivers. Unlike developed countries that have both resources and capabilities to adapt and mitigate the impact of such drivers, developing countries are increasingly at more risk. Identifying roles of such drivers are fundamental to the formulation of any adaptation and mitigation plans for their impacts for developing countries. In this study, we present a few examples from three regions of Nepal- a developing country in South Asia generally considered as a water rich country. Through results of modeling and statistical analyses, we show which driver is in control in different watersheds. Preliminary results show that climate change impact appears to be more prominent in large snow-fed river basins. In the smaller non-snow-fed watersheds originating from the middle hill, the impacts are not explicit despite perception of local people about changes in the water availability. In the southern belt bordering India, the impacts of river regulation on downstream areas are found to be the principal cause of flooding/inundation.

  19. Early intervention is key to successful management of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Because of the huge healthcare burden associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and the increased lifespan in many industrialized countries, the costs associated with AD are expected to reach astronomical proportions in the next 50 years. Diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of AD patients from the earliest stage possible will reduce healthcare costs and increase quality of life. Indeed, progress in our clinical knowledge of AD has led to more reliable diagnostic criteria and diagnostic accuracy, and research efforts are expanding to uncover the earliest manifestations and even the presymptomatic phases of the disease. The initiating and propagating pathologic processes and the anatomic location of the earliest changes will become new targets of research and therapeutic development. The proposed precursor to AD, mild cognitive impairment, is currently under investigation as a possible therapeutic starting point. This paper reviews our current understanding of the early pathology and clinical manifestations associated with mild cognitive impairment and early AD. A discussion of the latest diagnostic techniques as well as promising therapeutic targets for early intervention also will be included. PMID:14512815

  20. Methods for Streamlining Intervention Fidelity Checklists: An Example from the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, SangNam; Smith, Matthew Lee; Altpeter, Mary; Belza, Basia; Post, Lindsey; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining intervention fidelity should be part of any programmatic quality assurance (QA) plan and is often a licensure requirement. However, fidelity checklists designed by original program developers are often lengthy, which makes compliance difficult once programs become widely disseminated in the field. As a case example, we used Stanford’s original Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) fidelity checklist of 157 items to demonstrate heuristic procedures for generating shorter fidelity checklists. Using an expert consensus approach, we sought feedback from active master trainers registered with the Stanford University Patient Education Research Center about which items were most essential to, and also feasible for, assessing fidelity. We conducted three sequential surveys and one expert group-teleconference call. Three versions of the fidelity checklist were created using different statistical and methodological criteria. In a final group-teleconference call with seven national experts, there was unanimous agreement that all three final versions (e.g., a 34-item version, a 20-item version, and a 12-item version) should be made available because the purpose and resources for administering a checklist might vary from one setting to another. This study highlights the methodology used to generate shorter versions of a fidelity checklist, which has potential to inform future QA efforts for this and other evidence-based programs (EBP) for older adults delivered in community settings. With CDSMP and other EBP, it is important to differentiate between program fidelity as mandated by program developers for licensure, and intervention fidelity tools for providing an “at-a-glance” snapshot of the level of compliance to selected program indicators. PMID:25964941

  1. Interventions to enhance adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Sophie; Lapointe, Annie; Ratté, Stéphane; Gravel, Karine; Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients, and greater adherence to dietary advice is a critical component in preventing and managing chronic diseases. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions for enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Search methods We searched the following electronic databases up to 29 September 2010: The Cochrane Library (issue 9 2010), PubMed, EMBASE (Embase.com), CINAHL (Ebsco) and PsycINFO (PsycNET) with no language restrictions. We also reviewed: a) recent years of relevant conferences, symposium and colloquium proceedings and abstracts; b) web-based registries of clinical trials; and c) the bibliographies of included studies. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated interventions enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Studies were eligible if the primary outcome was the client’s adherence to dietary advice. We defined ‘client’ as an adult participating in a chronic disease prevention or chronic disease management study involving dietary advice. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of the studies. They also assessed the risk of bias and extracted data using a modified version of the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group data extraction template. Any discrepancies in judgement were resolved by discussion and consensus, or with a third review author. Because the studies differed widely with respect to interventions, measures of diet adherence, dietary advice, nature of the chronic diseases and duration of interventions and follow-up, we conducted a qualitative analysis. We classified included studies according to the function of the intervention and present results in a narrative table using vote counting for each category of intervention. Main results

  2. Effect of educational and electronic medical record interventions on food allergy management

    PubMed Central

    Zelig, Ari; Harwayne-Gidansky, Ilana; Gault, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Background: The growing prevalence of food allergies indicates a responsibility among primary care providers to ensure that their patients receive accurate diagnosis and management. Objective: To improve physician knowledge and management of food allergies by implementing educational and electronic medical record interventions. Methods: Pre- and posttest scores of pediatric residents and faculty were analyzed to assess the effectiveness of an educational session designed to improve knowledge of food allergy management. One year later, a best practice advisory was implemented in the electronic medical record to alert providers to consider allergy referral whenever a diagnosis code for food allergy or epinephrine autoinjector prescription was entered. A review of charts 6 months before and 6 months after each intervention was completed to determine the impact of both interventions. Outcome measurements included referrals to an allergy clinic, prescription of self-injectable epinephrine, and documentation that written emergency action plans were provided. Results: There was a significant increase in test scores immediately after the educational intervention (mean, 56.2 versus 84.3%; p < 0.001). Posttest scores remained significantly higher than preintervention scores 6 months later (mean score, 68.0 versus 56.2%; p = 0.006). Although knowledge improved, there was no significant difference in the percentage of patients who were provided allergy referral, were prescribed an epinephrine autoinjector, or were given an emergency action plan before and after both interventions. Conclusion: Neither intervention resulted in improvements in the management of children with food allergies at our pediatrics clinic. Further studies are needed to identify effective strategies to improve management of food allergies by primary care physicians.

  3. Effect of educational and electronic medical record interventions on food allergy management

    PubMed Central

    Zelig, Ari; Harwayne-Gidansky, Ilana; Gault, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Background: The growing prevalence of food allergies indicates a responsibility among primary care providers to ensure that their patients receive accurate diagnosis and management. Objective: To improve physician knowledge and management of food allergies by implementing educational and electronic medical record interventions. Methods: Pre- and posttest scores of pediatric residents and faculty were analyzed to assess the effectiveness of an educational session designed to improve knowledge of food allergy management. One year later, a best practice advisory was implemented in the electronic medical record to alert providers to consider allergy referral whenever a diagnosis code for food allergy or epinephrine autoinjector prescription was entered. A review of charts 6 months before and 6 months after each intervention was completed to determine the impact of both interventions. Outcome measurements included referrals to an allergy clinic, prescription of self-injectable epinephrine, and documentation that written emergency action plans were provided. Results: There was a significant increase in test scores immediately after the educational intervention (mean, 56.2 versus 84.3%; p < 0.001). Posttest scores remained significantly higher than preintervention scores 6 months later (mean score, 68.0 versus 56.2%; p = 0.006). Although knowledge improved, there was no significant difference in the percentage of patients who were provided allergy referral, were prescribed an epinephrine autoinjector, or were given an emergency action plan before and after both interventions. Conclusion: Neither intervention resulted in improvements in the management of children with food allergies at our pediatrics clinic. Further studies are needed to identify effective strategies to improve management of food allergies by primary care physicians. PMID:27657525

  4. Medical Management of Tumor Lysis Syndrome, Postprocedural Pain, and Venous Thromboembolism Following Interventional Radiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzalian, Ali; Armitage, Keith B.; Kapoor, Baljendra; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of minimally invasive image-guided procedures has led to their extensive use in the interdisciplinary management of patients with vascular, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, and oncologic diseases. Given the increased availability and breadth of these procedures, it is important for physicians to be aware of common complications and their management. In this article, the authors describe management of select common complications from interventional radiology procedures including tumor lysis syndrome, acute on chronic postprocedural pain, and venous thromboembolism. These complications are discussed in detail and their medical management is outlined according to generally accepted practice and evidence from the literature. PMID:26038627

  5. Medical management of tumor lysis syndrome, postprocedural pain, and venous thromboembolism following interventional radiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Faramarzalian, Ali; Armitage, Keith B; Kapoor, Baljendra; Kalva, Sanjeeva P

    2015-06-01

    The rapid expansion of minimally invasive image-guided procedures has led to their extensive use in the interdisciplinary management of patients with vascular, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, and oncologic diseases. Given the increased availability and breadth of these procedures, it is important for physicians to be aware of common complications and their management. In this article, the authors describe management of select common complications from interventional radiology procedures including tumor lysis syndrome, acute on chronic postprocedural pain, and venous thromboembolism. These complications are discussed in detail and their medical management is outlined according to generally accepted practice and evidence from the literature. PMID:26038627

  6. Lung squamous cell carcinoma metastasizing to the nasopharynx following bronchoscopy intervention therapies: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the nasopharynx is extremely rare, and few cases have been reported in the literature. In the present report, we describe the case of a patient with a mass in the nasopharynx found by bronchoscopy. Our patient was a 61-year-old man receiving multiple bronchoscopy intervention therapies for advanced lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which was histopathologically confirmed. The SCC metastasized to the nasopharynx following the bronchoscopy intervention therapies. The lesion was considered metastatic from lung cancer on the basis of clinical and histological clues. The exact mechanism of lung cancer metastasis to the nasopharynx in this case remains unclear because either implantation or hematogenous and lymphatic spread is possible. A thorough head and neck examination should be undertaken during bronchoscopic evaluation, especially in patients receiving bronchoscopy intervention therapies. The early detection of a silent nasopharyngeal metastasis is important to choosing from among the multiple treatment options available. PMID:24673971

  7. The Family Check-Up in early childhood: a case study of intervention process and change.

    PubMed

    Gill, Anne M; Hyde, Luke W; Shaw, Daniel S; Dishion, Thomas J; Wilson, Melvin N

    2008-10-01

    This article describes a case study in the use of the Family Check-Up (FCU), a family-based and ecological preventive intervention for children at risk for problem behavior. The FCU is an assessment-driven intervention that utilizes a health maintenance model; emphasizes motivation for change; and offers an adaptive, tailored approach to intervention. This case study follows one Caucasian family through their initial assessment and subsequent treatment for their toddler daughter's conduct problems over a 2-year period. Clinically meaningful improvements in child and family functioning were found despite the presence of child, parent, and neighborhood risk factors. The case is discussed with respect to the findings from a current multisite randomized control trial of the FCU and its application to other populations.

  8. Effects of management intervention on post-disturbance community composition: an experimental analysis using bayesian hierarchical models.

    PubMed

    Giovanini, Jack; Kroll, Andrew J; Jones, Jay E; Altman, Bob; Arnett, Edward B

    2013-01-01

    As human demand for ecosystem products increases, management intervention may become more frequent after environmental disturbances. Evaluations of ecological responses to cumulative effects of management interventions and natural disturbances provide critical decision-support tools for managers who strive to balance environmental conservation and economic development. We conducted an experiment to evaluate the effects of salvage logging on avian community composition in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests affected by beetle outbreaks in Oregon, USA, 1996-1998. Treatments consisted of the removal of lodgepole pine snags only, and live trees were not harvested. We used a bayesian hierarchical model to quantify occupancy dynamics for 27 breeding species, while accounting for variation in the detection process. We examined how magnitude and precision of treatment effects varied when incorporating prior information from a separate intervention study that occurred in a similar ecological system. Regardless of which prior we evaluated, we found no evidence that the harvest treatment had a negative impact on species richness, with an estimated average of 0.2-2.2 more species in harvested stands than unharvested stands. Estimated average similarity between control and treatment stands ranged from 0.82-0.87 (1 indicating complete similarity between a pair of stands) and suggested that treatment stands did not contain novel assemblies of species responding to the harvesting prescription. Estimated treatment effects were positive for twenty-four (90%) of the species, although the credible intervals contained 0 in all cases. These results suggest that, unlike most post-fire salvage logging prescriptions, selective harvesting after beetle outbreaks may meet multiple management objectives, including the maintenance of avian community richness comparable to what is found in unharvested stands. Our results provide managers with prescription alternatives to respond to severe

  9. Effects of management intervention on post-disturbance community composition: an experimental analysis using bayesian hierarchical models.

    PubMed

    Giovanini, Jack; Kroll, Andrew J; Jones, Jay E; Altman, Bob; Arnett, Edward B

    2013-01-01

    As human demand for ecosystem products increases, management intervention may become more frequent after environmental disturbances. Evaluations of ecological responses to cumulative effects of management interventions and natural disturbances provide critical decision-support tools for managers who strive to balance environmental conservation and economic development. We conducted an experiment to evaluate the effects of salvage logging on avian community composition in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests affected by beetle outbreaks in Oregon, USA, 1996-1998. Treatments consisted of the removal of lodgepole pine snags only, and live trees were not harvested. We used a bayesian hierarchical model to quantify occupancy dynamics for 27 breeding species, while accounting for variation in the detection process. We examined how magnitude and precision of treatment effects varied when incorporating prior information from a separate intervention study that occurred in a similar ecological system. Regardless of which prior we evaluated, we found no evidence that the harvest treatment had a negative impact on species richness, with an estimated average of 0.2-2.2 more species in harvested stands than unharvested stands. Estimated average similarity between control and treatment stands ranged from 0.82-0.87 (1 indicating complete similarity between a pair of stands) and suggested that treatment stands did not contain novel assemblies of species responding to the harvesting prescription. Estimated treatment effects were positive for twenty-four (90%) of the species, although the credible intervals contained 0 in all cases. These results suggest that, unlike most post-fire salvage logging prescriptions, selective harvesting after beetle outbreaks may meet multiple management objectives, including the maintenance of avian community richness comparable to what is found in unharvested stands. Our results provide managers with prescription alternatives to respond to severe

  10. Effects of Management Intervention on Post-Disturbance Community Composition: An Experimental Analysis Using Bayesian Hierarchical Models

    PubMed Central

    Giovanini, Jack; Kroll, Andrew J.; Jones, Jay E.; Altman, Bob; Arnett, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    As human demand for ecosystem products increases, management intervention may become more frequent after environmental disturbances. Evaluations of ecological responses to cumulative effects of management interventions and natural disturbances provide critical decision-support tools for managers who strive to balance environmental conservation and economic development. We conducted an experiment to evaluate the effects of salvage logging on avian community composition in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests affected by beetle outbreaks in Oregon, USA, 1996–1998. Treatments consisted of the removal of lodgepole pine snags only, and live trees were not harvested. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to quantify occupancy dynamics for 27 breeding species, while accounting for variation in the detection process. We examined how magnitude and precision of treatment effects varied when incorporating prior information from a separate intervention study that occurred in a similar ecological system. Regardless of which prior we evaluated, we found no evidence that the harvest treatment had a negative impact on species richness, with an estimated average of 0.2–2.2 more species in harvested stands than unharvested stands. Estimated average similarity between control and treatment stands ranged from 0.82–0.87 (1 indicating complete similarity between a pair of stands) and suggested that treatment stands did not contain novel assemblies of species responding to the harvesting prescription. Estimated treatment effects were positive for twenty-four (90%) of the species, although the credible intervals contained 0 in all cases. These results suggest that, unlike most post-fire salvage logging prescriptions, selective harvesting after beetle outbreaks may meet multiple management objectives, including the maintenance of avian community richness comparable to what is found in unharvested stands. Our results provide managers with prescription alternatives to respond to

  11. Integrating end-of-life care with disease management programs: a new role for case managers.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A

    2001-03-01

    Case managers are crucial to any well-designed disease management program. However, in the progressive course of serious illness, patients, their families, and MCOs need the skills of case manager more than ever to help them through end-of-life care choices. The author describes what case managers will need in their "toolbox" to provide insight to these health plan members.

  12. A systematic review of the effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions for chronic noncancer pain management

    PubMed Central

    Ospina, Maria B; Taenzer, Paul; Rashiq, Saifee; MacDermid, Joy C; Carr, Eloise; Chojecki, Dagmara; Harstall, Christa; Henry, James L

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reliable evidence detailing effective treatments and management practices for chronic noncancer pain exists. However, little is known about which knowledge translation (KT) interventions lead to the uptake of this evidence in practice. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of KT interventions for chronic noncancer pain management. METHODS: Comprehensive searches of electronic databases, the gray literature and manual searches of journals were undertaken. Randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and controlled before-and-after studies of KT interventions were included. Data regarding interventions and primary outcomes were categorized using a standard taxonomy; a risk-of-bias approach was adopted for study quality. A narrative synthesis of study results was conducted. RESULTS: More than 8500 titles and abstracts were screened, with 230 full-text articles reviewed for eligibility. Nineteen studies were included, of which only a small proportion were judged to be at low risk of bias. Interactive KT education for health care providers has a positive effect on patients’ function, but its benefits for other health provider- and patient-related outcomes are inconsistent. Interactive education for patients leads to improvements in knowledge and function. Little research evidence supports the effectiveness of structural changes in health systems and quality improvement processes or coordination of care. CONCLUSIONS: KT interventions incorporating interactive education in chronic noncancer pain led to positive effects on patients’ function and knowledge about pain. Future studies should provide implementation details and use consistent theoretical frameworks to better estimate the effectiveness of such interventions. PMID:24308029

  13. Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Maynak

    2015-01-01

    Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 10–15% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physician's armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical) can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life-expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence-based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision-making and quality of life (QoL) of the suffering patients. PMID:26009665

  14. Heart disease management by women: does intervention format matter?

    PubMed

    Clark, Noreen M; Janz, Nancy K; Dodge, Julia A; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R; Keteyian, Steven

    2014-10-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12, and 18 months. The formats produced different outcomes. At 18 months, the self-directed format was better than the control in reducing the number (p ≤ .02), frequency (p ≤ .03), and bothersomeness (p ≤ .02) of cardiac symptoms. The self-directed format was also better than the group format in reducing symptom frequency of all types (p ≤ .04). The group format improved ambulation at 12 months (p ≤ .04) and weight loss at 18 months (p ≤ .03), and group participants were more likely to complete the program (p ≤ .05). The availability of different learning formats could enhance management of cardiovascular disease by patients.

  15. Management case study: Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, Gerold; Greening, Holly; Yates, Kimberly K.; Wolanski, Eric; McLusky, Donald S.

    2011-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida, USA, is a shallow, subtropical estuary that experienced severe cultural eutrophication between the 1940s and 1980s, a period when the human population of its watershed quadrupled. In response, citizen action led to the formation of a public- and private-sector partnership (the Tampa Bay Estuary Program), which adopted a number of management objectives to support the restoration and protection of the bay’s living resources. These included numeric chlorophyll a and water-clarity targets, as well as long-term goals addressing the spatial extent of seagrasses and other selected habitat types, to support estuarine-dependent faunal guilds. Over the past three decades, nitrogen controls involving sources such as wastewater treatment plants, stormwater conveyance systems, fertilizer manufacturing and shipping operations, and power plants have been undertaken to meet these and other management objectives. Cumulatively, these controls have resulted in a 60% reduction in annual total nitrogen (TN) loads relative to earlier worse-case (latter 1970s) conditions. As a result, annual water-clarity and chlorophyll a targets are currently met in most years, and seagrass cover measured in 2008 was the highest recorded since 1950. Factors that have contributed to the observed improvements in Tampa Bay over the past several decades include the following: (1) Development of numeric, science-based water-quality targets to meet a long-term goal of restoring seagrass acreage to 1950s levels. Empirical and mechanistic models found that annual average chlorophyll a concentrations were a primary manageable factor affecting light attenuation. The models also quantified relationships between TN loads, chlorophyll a concentrations, light attenuation, and fluctuations in seagrass cover. The availability of long-term monitoring data, and a systematic process for using the data to evaluate the effectiveness of management actions, has allowed managers to track progress and

  16. Adapting and Testing Telephone Based Depression Care Management Intervention for Adolescent Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Pinto-Foltz, Melissa D.; Stein, Bradley; Usui, Wayne; Josephson, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose and Methods This Phase 1 clinical trial combined qualitative and quantitative methods to modify a collaborative care, telephone based, depression care management intervention for adolescent mothers, and to determine the acceptability, feasibility, and initial efficacy of the intervention in a sample of adolescent mothers (n=97) who were recruited from a Teen Parent Program. Outcomes included measures of depressive symptoms, functioning, and use of mental health services. Results Acceptability of the intervention was demonstrated, but feasibility issues related to the complex life challenges confronting the adolescent mother. Although only four adolescent mothers received mental health treatment, there was a trend for improved depressive symptoms over time. Conclusion Results of the study provide data for the need of further refinement of the intervention before a large clinical trial is conducted for adolescent mothers with symptoms of depression. PMID:20020164

  17. The role of nurse support within an Internet-delivered weight management intervention: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Sarah; Bradbury, Katherine; Yardley, Lucy; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored patients' experiences of nurse support for an Internet-delivered weight management intervention. Eighteen patients who had received either basic or regular nurse support (three or seven contacts, respectively) for the Internet intervention were interviewed. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. The findings suggest that more regular support for Internet interventions may have the potential to inhibit the development of autonomous motivation for weight loss, which might lead to problems in sustaining losses after support ends. Further research is now needed to confirm whether motivation is influenced by frequency of nurse support in Internet interventions in order to inform the development of optimal support which promotes sustained weight loss. PMID:25438990

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Anger Management in Children Diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofronoff, Kate; Attwood, Tony; Hinton, Sharon; Levin, Irina

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study described was to evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural intervention for anger management with children diagnosed with Asperger syndrome. Forty-five children and their parents were randomly assigned to either intervention or wait-list control conditions. Children in the intervention participated in six 2-h…

  19. Illustrating the multiple facets and levels of fidelity of implementation to a teacher classroom management intervention.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Wendy M; Herman, Keith C; Stormont, Melissa; Newcomer, Lori; David, Kimberly

    2013-11-01

    Many school-based interventions to promote student mental health rely on teachers as implementers. Thus, understanding the interplay between the multiple domains of fidelity to the intervention and intervention support systems such as coaching and teacher implementation of new skills is an important aspect of implementation science. This study describes a systematic process for assessing multiple domains of fidelity. Data from a larger efficacy trial of the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management (IY TCM) program are utilized. Data on fidelity to the IY TCM workshop training sessions and onsite weekly coaching indicate that workshop leaders and the IY TCM coach implemented the training and coaching model with adequate adherence. Further, workshop leaders' ratings of engagement were associated with teacher implementation of specific praise, following training on this content. Lastly, the IY TCM coach differentiation of teacher exposure to coaching was evaluated and found to be associated with teacher implementation of classroom management practices and student disruptive behavior.

  20. Blowout control: Response, intervention and management. Part 12

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.W.; Flak, L.H.

    1995-04-01

    This concluding article of the 12-part series discusses reasons why operators need to establish some type of Well Control Incident Management System (WCIMS). A proposed system is presented, including five major subsystems. For operators who find these intimidating, a minimum program is suggested. The section on blowout control alliances discusses the evolution of oilwell firefighting and how it has become extremely competitive while the number of incidents is less than it used to be. It is suggested that this situation is diluting the experience level within the oilwell firefighting industry and is, thus, generating a need for alliances between operators, contractors and subcontractors--even between operators--where one company`s problem could involve other operators.

  1. ART: a minimal intervention approach to manage dental caries.

    PubMed

    Frencken, Jo E; Holmgren, Christopher J

    2004-06-01

    The number of studies investigating aspects of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach has increased in recent years. This tissue preservative treatment approach appears to be less painful and is, therefore, more patient-friendly than conventional caries treatments. The investigations so far have shown that the ART approach is effective for the management of single-surface cavities in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. There appears to be no difference in survival results between single-surface ART restorations and comparable amalgam restorations in the permanent dentition after three years. The surface wear of ART restorations using high-viscosity glass-ionomers after two years is low. ART sealants using high-viscosity glass-ionomers are retained longer than ART sealants using low-viscosity glass-ionomers after three years. It is concluded that the ART approach is beneficial in improving the oral health of many, not only in developing but also in more advanced countries.

  2. Measuring impact of protected area management interventions: current and future use of the Global Database of Protected Area Management Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Coad, Lauren; Leverington, Fiona; Knights, Kathryn; Geldmann, Jonas; Eassom, April; Kapos, Valerie; Kingston, Naomi; de Lima, Marcelo; Zamora, Camilo; Cuardros, Ivon; Nolte, Christoph; Burgess, Neil D; Hockings, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are at the forefront of conservation efforts, and yet despite considerable progress towards the global target of having 17% of the world's land area within protected areas by 2020, biodiversity continues to decline. The discrepancy between increasing PA coverage and negative biodiversity trends has resulted in renewed efforts to enhance PA effectiveness. The global conservation community has conducted thousands of assessments of protected area management effectiveness (PAME), and interest in the use of these data to help measure the conservation impact of PA management interventions is high. Here, we summarize the status of PAME assessment, review the published evidence for a link between PAME assessment results and the conservation impacts of PAs, and discuss the limitations and future use of PAME data in measuring the impact of PA management interventions on conservation outcomes. We conclude that PAME data, while designed as a tool for local adaptive management, may also help to provide insights into the impact of PA management interventions from the local-to-global scale. However, the subjective and ordinal characteristics of the data present significant limitations for their application in rigorous scientific impact evaluations, a problem that should be recognized and mitigated where possible. PMID:26460133

  3. Measuring impact of protected area management interventions: current and future use of the Global Database of Protected Area Management Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Coad, Lauren; Leverington, Fiona; Knights, Kathryn; Geldmann, Jonas; Eassom, April; Kapos, Valerie; Kingston, Naomi; de Lima, Marcelo; Zamora, Camilo; Cuardros, Ivon; Nolte, Christoph; Burgess, Neil D; Hockings, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are at the forefront of conservation efforts, and yet despite considerable progress towards the global target of having 17% of the world's land area within protected areas by 2020, biodiversity continues to decline. The discrepancy between increasing PA coverage and negative biodiversity trends has resulted in renewed efforts to enhance PA effectiveness. The global conservation community has conducted thousands of assessments of protected area management effectiveness (PAME), and interest in the use of these data to help measure the conservation impact of PA management interventions is high. Here, we summarize the status of PAME assessment, review the published evidence for a link between PAME assessment results and the conservation impacts of PAs, and discuss the limitations and future use of PAME data in measuring the impact of PA management interventions on conservation outcomes. We conclude that PAME data, while designed as a tool for local adaptive management, may also help to provide insights into the impact of PA management interventions from the local-to-global scale. However, the subjective and ordinal characteristics of the data present significant limitations for their application in rigorous scientific impact evaluations, a problem that should be recognized and mitigated where possible.

  4. Measuring impact of protected area management interventions: current and future use of the Global Database of Protected Area Management Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Coad, Lauren; Leverington, Fiona; Knights, Kathryn; Geldmann, Jonas; Eassom, April; Kapos, Valerie; Kingston, Naomi; de Lima, Marcelo; Zamora, Camilo; Cuardros, Ivon; Nolte, Christoph; Burgess, Neil D.; Hockings, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are at the forefront of conservation efforts, and yet despite considerable progress towards the global target of having 17% of the world's land area within protected areas by 2020, biodiversity continues to decline. The discrepancy between increasing PA coverage and negative biodiversity trends has resulted in renewed efforts to enhance PA effectiveness. The global conservation community has conducted thousands of assessments of protected area management effectiveness (PAME), and interest in the use of these data to help measure the conservation impact of PA management interventions is high. Here, we summarize the status of PAME assessment, review the published evidence for a link between PAME assessment results and the conservation impacts of PAs, and discuss the limitations and future use of PAME data in measuring the impact of PA management interventions on conservation outcomes. We conclude that PAME data, while designed as a tool for local adaptive management, may also help to provide insights into the impact of PA management interventions from the local-to-global scale. However, the subjective and ordinal characteristics of the data present significant limitations for their application in rigorous scientific impact evaluations, a problem that should be recognized and mitigated where possible. PMID:26460133

  5. Telecare for diabetes mellitus: case managers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Ping; Lee, Ting-Ting; Chou, Chun-Chen; Mills, Mary Etta

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that, if not treated promptly and appropriately, can cause complex health complications and mortality. Changes in societal structure have fostered an increase in the incidence of diabetes and made the traditional hospital visit model less efficient for meeting the care needs of these patients. The care models that apply technology, such as telecare or so-called telehealth, may be useful in working with diabetes patients. The current study applied qualitative research methodology through interviews with nine diabetes case managers involved in telecare services. To identify the participants' acceptance and perceived effectiveness of telecare services, content analysis of the interview data was used. The following four major themes were identified in the study results: (1) improved case management, (2) setting appropriate expectations for care outcome, (3) acknowledging patients' sense of losing privacy, and (4) disease prevention and interdisciplinary cooperation. The study findings may serve as an indicator of the need for further promotion, appraisal, and validation of the telecare services model, to enhance the comprehensiveness of diabetes care.

  6. Assessment of Behavior Management and Behavioral Interventions in State Child Welfare Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    Official state program reviews of 204 substitute care facilities were assessed for the types of behavior management and behavioral interventions used and the extent to which agency practices were consistent with learning theory principles. Data were also collected on the type and number of professional staff available to implement and oversee…

  7. Preventive Interventions under Managed Care: Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Sharon L.

    Programs and services that prevent substance abuse and mental health disorders have the potential to lessen an enormous burden of suffering and to reduce both the cost of future treatment and lost productivity at work and home. The availability and accessibility of these interventions to Americans whose health care is provided by managed care…

  8. Definition of a COPD self-management intervention: International Expert Group consensus.

    PubMed

    Effing, Tanja W; Vercoulen, Jan H; Bourbeau, Jean; Trappenburg, Jaap; Lenferink, Anke; Cafarella, Paul; Coultas, David; Meek, Paula; van der Valk, Paul; Bischoff, Erik W M A; Bucknall, Christine; Dewan, Naresh A; Early, Frances; Fan, Vincent; Frith, Peter; Janssen, Daisy J A; Mitchell, Katy; Morgan, Mike; Nici, Linda; Patel, Irem; Walters, Haydn; Rice, Kathryn L; Singh, Sally; Zuwallack, Richard; Benzo, Roberto; Goldstein, Roger; Partridge, Martyn R; van der Palen, Job

    2016-07-01

    There is an urgent need for consensus on what defines a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) self-management intervention. We aimed to obtain consensus regarding the conceptual definition of a COPD self-management intervention by engaging an international panel of COPD self-management experts using Delphi technique features and an additional group meeting.In each consensus round the experts were asked to provide feedback on the proposed definition and to score their level of agreement (1=totally disagree; 5=totally agree). The information provided was used to modify the definition for the next consensus round. Thematic analysis was used for free text responses and descriptive statistics were used for agreement scores.In total, 28 experts participated. The consensus round response rate varied randomly over the five rounds (ranging from 48% (n=13) to 85% (n=23)), and mean definition agreement scores increased from 3.8 (round 1) to 4.8 (round 5) with an increasing percentage of experts allocating the highest score of 5 (round 1: 14% (n=3); round 5: 83% (n=19)).In this study we reached consensus regarding a conceptual definition of what should be a COPD self-management intervention, clarifying the requisites for such an intervention. Operationalisation of this conceptual definition in the near future will be an essential next step.

  9. Definition of a COPD self-management intervention: International Expert Group consensus.

    PubMed

    Effing, Tanja W; Vercoulen, Jan H; Bourbeau, Jean; Trappenburg, Jaap; Lenferink, Anke; Cafarella, Paul; Coultas, David; Meek, Paula; van der Valk, Paul; Bischoff, Erik W M A; Bucknall, Christine; Dewan, Naresh A; Early, Frances; Fan, Vincent; Frith, Peter; Janssen, Daisy J A; Mitchell, Katy; Morgan, Mike; Nici, Linda; Patel, Irem; Walters, Haydn; Rice, Kathryn L; Singh, Sally; Zuwallack, Richard; Benzo, Roberto; Goldstein, Roger; Partridge, Martyn R; van der Palen, Job

    2016-07-01

    There is an urgent need for consensus on what defines a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) self-management intervention. We aimed to obtain consensus regarding the conceptual definition of a COPD self-management intervention by engaging an international panel of COPD self-management experts using Delphi technique features and an additional group meeting.In each consensus round the experts were asked to provide feedback on the proposed definition and to score their level of agreement (1=totally disagree; 5=totally agree). The information provided was used to modify the definition for the next consensus round. Thematic analysis was used for free text responses and descriptive statistics were used for agreement scores.In total, 28 experts participated. The consensus round response rate varied randomly over the five rounds (ranging from 48% (n=13) to 85% (n=23)), and mean definition agreement scores increased from 3.8 (round 1) to 4.8 (round 5) with an increasing percentage of experts allocating the highest score of 5 (round 1: 14% (n=3); round 5: 83% (n=19)).In this study we reached consensus regarding a conceptual definition of what should be a COPD self-management intervention, clarifying the requisites for such an intervention. Operationalisation of this conceptual definition in the near future will be an essential next step. PMID:27076595

  10. Are Self-Management Interventions Suitable for All? Comparing Obese Versus Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroese, Floor M.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to compare obese and nonobese type 2 diabetes patients at baseline and after participating in an existing self-management intervention (i.e., "Beyond Good Intentions") on cognitive, self-care, and behavioral measures to examine whether both groups are equally prepared and able to adopt…

  11. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons with HIV Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K., Jr.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of…

  12. The Effects of Function-Based Self-Management Interventions on Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard P.; Kamps, Debra M.; Greenwood, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) struggle to achieve social and academic outcomes. Many studies have demonstrated self-management interventions to be effective at reducing problem behavior and increasing positive social and academic behaviors. Functional behavior assessment (FBA) information may be used in designing…

  13. Comparing Student Perceptions of Coping Strategies and School Interventions in Managing Bullying and Cyberbullying Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Simone; Smith, Peter K.; Blumberg, Herbert H.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 407 students in a central London secondary school participated in a survey of different approaches to managing traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Student perceptions of individual coping strategies and school interventions for traditional bullying and cyberbullying were measured. Rankings of the strategies for traditional bullying…

  14. Social Validity of the Critical Incident Stress Management Model for School-Based Crisis Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.

    2007-01-01

    The Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) model for crisis intervention was developed for use with emergency service personnel. Research regarding the use of the CISM model has been conducted among civilians and high-risk occupation groups with mixed results. The purpose of this study is to examine the social validity of the CISM model for…

  15. Mood Management Intervention for College Smokers with Elevated Depressive Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleicher, Holly E.; Harris, Kari Jo; Campbell, Duncan G.; Harrar, Solomon W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined smoking reduction and cessation among college smokers with elevated depressive symptomatology participating in a group-based behavioral counseling, mood management, and motivational enhancement combined intervention (CBT). Participants and Methods: Fifty-eight smokers (smoked 6 days in the past 30) were…

  16. Psychological Intervention in Portuguese College Students: Effects of Two Career Self-Management Seminars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Joana Carneiro; Loureiro, Nazaré; Taveira, Maria do Céu

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of a psychological intervention--the Career Self-Management Seminar, Version A, for undergraduate students, and Version B for postgraduate students--developed to support Portuguese college students in career exploration, goal setting, design and implementation of action plans, and decision-making. A total of…

  17. Analysis of Self-Recording in Self-Management Interventions for Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Jennifer N.; Iwata, Brian A.; Rolider, Natalie U.; Camp, Erin M.; Neidert, Pamela L.

    2012-01-01

    Most treatments for stereotypy involve arrangements of antecedent or consequent events that are imposed entirely by a therapist. By contrast, results of some studies suggest that self-recording, a common component of self-management interventions, might be an effective and efficient way to reduce stereotypy. Because the procedure typically has…

  18. Applying e-health to case management.

    PubMed

    Adams, J M

    2000-01-01

    The healthcare industry is only beginning to understand e-health. E-health can be defined as the use of technology to directly improve healthcare delivery-affording patients the opportunity to participate in their own healthcare management, provider, and institution. The market is changing rapidly, and innovations, partnerships, and mergers are taking place daily. For healthcare institutions, setting a long-term, yet adaptable e-health strategy is of vital importance for the continued success of the organization. For clinicians, an understanding of and familiarity with technologies can significantly improve workflow, organization, and patient interaction. For the patient, technology can be leveraged as a means to take initiative and responsibility for his/her own health. This article defines e-health and explains the implications and benefits of e-health to nurses and their patients. The article also identifies unique opportunities e-health/e-commerce can provide case managers in promoting patient connectivity, care management, and economy in cost of care. PMID:16397993

  19. Intervention for infants at risk of developing autism: a case series.

    PubMed

    Green, Jonathan; Wan, Ming Wai; Guiraud, Jeanne; Holsgrove, Samina; McNally, Janet; Slonims, Vicky; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Charman, Tony; Pickles, Andrew; Johnson, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Theory and evidence suggest the potential value of prodromal intervention for infants at risk of developing autism. We report an initial case series (n = 8) of a parent-mediated, video-aided and interaction-focused intervention with infant siblings of autistic probands, beginning at 8-10 months of age. We outline the theory and evidence base behind this model and present data on feasibility, acceptability and measures ranging from parent-infant social interaction, to infant atypical behaviors, attention and cognition. The intervention proves to be both feasible and acceptable to families. Measurement across domains was successful and on larger samples promise to be an effective test of whether such an intervention in infancy will modify emergent atypical developmental trajectories in infants at risk for autism.

  20. A Community "Hub" Network Intervention for HIV Stigma Reduction: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Prinsloo, Catharina D; Greeff, Minrie

    2016-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a community "hub" network intervention to reduce HIV stigma in the Tlokwe Municipality, North West Province, South Africa. A holistic case study design was used, focusing on community members with no differentiation by HIV status. Participants were recruited through accessibility sampling. Data analyses used open coding and document analysis. Findings showed that the HIV stigma-reduction community hub network intervention successfully activated mobilizers to initiate change; lessened the stigma experience for people living with HIV; and addressed HIV stigma in a whole community using a combination of strategies including individual and interpersonal levels, social networks, and the public. Further research is recommended to replicate and enhance the intervention. In particular, the hub network system should be extended, the intervention period should be longer, there should be a stronger support system for mobilizers, and the multiple strategy approach should be continued on individual and social levels.

  1. The Single-Case Reporting Guideline In BEhavioural Interventions (SCRIBE) 2016 statement: Énoncé concernant la Single-Case Reporting Guideline In BEhavioural Interventions (SCRIBE) 2016.

    PubMed

    Tate, Robyn L; Perdices, Michael; Rosenkoetter, Ulrike; Shadish, William; Vohra, Sunita; Barlow, David H; Horner, Robert; Kazdin, Alan; Kratochwill, Thomas; McDonald, Skye; Sampson, Margaret; Shamseer, Larissa; Togher, Leanne; Albin, Richard; Backman, Catherine; Douglas, Jacinta; Evans, Jonathan J; Gast, David; Manolov, Rumen; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Nickels, Lyndsey; Nikles, Jane; Ownsworth, Tamara; Rose, Miranda; Schmid, Christopher H; Wilson, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    We developed a reporting guideline to provide authors with guidance about what should be reported when writing a paper for publication in a scientific journal using a particular type of research design: the single-case experimental design. This report describes the methods used to develop the Single-Case Reporting guideline In BEhavioural interventions (SCRIBE) 2016. As a result of 2 online surveys and a 2-day meeting of experts, the SCRIBE 2016 checklist was developed, which is a set of 26 items that authors need to address when writing about single-case research. This article complements the more detailed SCRIBE 2016 Explanation and Elaboration article (Tate et al., 2016) that provides a rationale for each of the items and examples of adequate reporting from the literature. Both these resources will assist authors to prepare reports of single-case research with clarity, completeness, accuracy, and transparency. They will also provide journal reviewers and editors with a practical checklist against which such reports may be critically evaluated. We recommend that the SCRIBE 2016 is used by authors preparing manuscripts describing single-case research for publication, as well as journal reviewers and editors who are evaluating such manuscripts.Reporting guidelines, such as the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement, improve the reporting of research in the medical literature (Turner et al., 2012). Many such guidelines exist and the CONSORT Extension to Nonpharmacological Trials (Boutron et al., 2008) provides suitable guidance for reporting between-groups intervention studies in the behavioral sciences. The CONSORT Extension for N-of-1 Trials (CENT 2015) was developed for multiple crossover trials with single individuals in the medical sciences (Shamseer et al., 2015; Vohra et al., 2015), but there is no reporting guideline in the CONSORT tradition for single-case research used in the behavioral sciences. We developed the Single-Case

  2. Prevention for positives: challenges and opportunities for integrating prevention into HIV case management.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C G; Linsk, N L

    2001-10-01

    Despite nearly 20 years of HIV prevention efforts, rates of new HIV infection persist at an alarming rate. As successful antiretroviral medications enable many HIV infected persons to live longer, healthier lives, interventions are necessary to support ongoing prevention and reduced risk behaviors. This article describes a survey that was used to assess the opportunities and challenges related to the integration of prevention screening into the work of HIV/AIDS case managers. The article describes the survey, reports the findings (N = 101), and concludes with a discussion of issues that must be addressed prior to incorporating prevention screening into HIV/AIDS case management.

  3. Examining the Efficacy of a Time Management Intervention for High School Students. Research Report. ETS RR-13-25

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrus, Jeremy; Jackson, Teresa; Holtzman, Steven; Roberts, Richard D.; Mandigo, Terri

    2013-01-01

    The current paper reports the results of 2 quasiexperimental studies conducted to examine the efficacy of a new time management intervention designed for high school students. In both studies, there was no difference between the treatment and control groups in improvement in self-reported time management skills as a result of the intervention.…

  4. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    PubMed Central

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo JE; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    Background More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. Methods This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Results Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains “access to medical files” (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and “safeguarding patients’ interests” (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. “Formal patient involvement” remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and

  5. Culturally Sensitive Intervention for Latina Women with Eating Disorders: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Rodríguez, Mae Lynn; Baucom, Donald H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We describe cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa (CBT-BN) with a Latina woman that incorporates culturally relevant topics. Method A single case report of a 31-year-old monolingual Latina woman with BN describes the application of a couple-based intervention adjunctive to CBT-BN. Results The patient reported no binge and purge episodes by session 20 and remained symptom free until the end of treatment (session 26). Improvement was observed in the Eating Disorders Examination (EDE) comparing baseline (EDE=5.74) with post treatment (EDE=1.25). Conclusions The case illustrates how cultural adaptations such as including a family member, being flexible on topics and scheduling, and providing culturally relevant interventions can lead to successful completion of a course of therapy and facilitate ongoing interventions to ensure continued recovery. PMID:25598951

  6. Case management insider. The 2-midnight rule--a game-changer for case management.

    PubMed

    Cesta, Toni

    2014-04-01

    As a case manager or case management leader, it is important for you to stay in touch with how CMS continues to roll out the two-midnight rules as well as the manner of auditing on a go-forward basis. It is also important that your department continue to have a close working relationship with the billing department in your hospital to ensure that the hospital remains compliant with this new rule. Finally, it is also critical that your emergency department and its physicians are kept up to date on the rule and its implications for hospital admissions. Having a case management presence in the emergency department will help to ensure a sound review process at this important route of entry to the hospital. A working team should be created to review the cases that fall outside of the rule, and these cases should also be presented to the utilization review committee so that the hospital can continue to learn and move forward. Finally, listen to the CMS National Provider Calls (www.cms. gov/NPC) to gain additional and updated information as it becomes available! For additional information on the two-midnight rule go to www.cms.gov and search for CMS-1599-F. PMID:24697139

  7. Creating Qungasvik (a Yup'ik intervention "toolbox"): case examples from a community-developed and culturally-driven intervention.

    PubMed

    Rasmus, Stacy M; Charles, Billy; Mohatt, Gerald V

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a Yup'ik Alaska Native approach to suicide and alcohol abuse prevention that resulted in the creation of the Qungasvik, a toolbox promoting reasons for life and sobriety among youth. The Qungasvik is made up of thirty-six modules that function as cultural scripts for creating experiences in Yup'ik communities that build strengths and protection against suicide and alcohol abuse. The Qungasvik manual represents the results of a community based participatory research intervention development process grounded in culture and local process, and nurtured through a syncretic blending of Indigenous and Western theories and practices. This paper will provide a description of the collaborative steps taken at the community-level to develop the intervention modules. This process involved university researchers and community members coming together and drawing from multiple sources of data and knowledge to inform the development of prevention activities addressing youth suicide and alcohol abuse. We will present case examples describing the development of three keystone modules; Qasgiq (The Men's House), Yup'ik Kinship Terms, and Surviving Your Feelings. These modules each are representative of the process that the community co-researcher team took to develop and implement protective experiences that: (1) create supportive community, (2) strengthen families, and (3) give individuals tools to be healthy and strong. PMID:24764018

  8. Understanding patients’ health and technology attitudes for tailoring self-management interventions

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Katie; Vizer, Lisa; Eschler, Jordan; Ralston, James; Pratt, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare providers are moving towards tailoring self-management interventions to include the communication technologies patients use in daily life. Accurate understanding of patients’ attitudes towards both technology and involvement in managing chronic conditions will be critical for informing effective self-management strategies. The tailoring of these interventions, however, could be undermined by providers’ implicit biases based on patient age, race, and education level that have been shown to negatively affect care. To inform the design and tailoring of self-management interventions, we elicited attitudes toward technology use and participation in care of 40 participants in a maximum variation sample. The analysis revealed three participant clusters—“Proactive Techies,” “Indie Self-Managers,” and “Remind Me! Non-Techies”—that represent varying attitudes toward health behaviors and technologies that were independent of race, education level, and age. Our approach provides insight into how people prioritize important values related to health participation and technology. PMID:26958236

  9. Working Together with Children and Families: Case Studies in Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, P. J., Ed.; Bailey, Donald B., Jr., Ed.

    This book presents 21 case studies of young children with disabilities in a variety of family situations and settings, for early interventionists to study in planning and applying recommended practices. Section I, "Defining and Delivering Quality Services in Early Intervention," provides two introductory chapters: "The Search for Quality…

  10. Hearing Voices: A Response to "Case Study of a Participatory Health-Promotion Intervention in School"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrist, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Venka Simovska's article "Case Study of a Participatory Health-Promotion Intervention in School" provides important insights regarding the active involvement of youths in service programs. This response essay extends Simovska's discussions and frames them within three key areas: positive youth development, youth voice, and meaningful…

  11. Case Study of a Participatory Health-Promotion Intervention in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simovska, Venka

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the findings from a case study focusing on processes involving pupils to bring about health-promotion changes. The study is related to an EU intervention project aiming to promote health and well-being among children (4-16 years). Qualitative research was carried out in a school in the Netherlands. Data sources include…

  12. A Case Study on Leadership for Secondary Response to Intervention Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Sherri A.

    2012-01-01

    There is currently little research to guide leaders implementing Response to Intervention (RTI) at the secondary level. The problem is that research that does exist focuses on limited settings and demographics. The focus of this multiple-case, qualitative study was to investigate leadership skills necessary for RTI implementation at a suburban…

  13. Literacy in Early Intervention for Children with Visual Impairments: Insights from Individual Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Karen A.; Hatton, Deborah; Roy, Vicky; Fox, DanaLee; Renne, Diane

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative case study design was used to investigate the ways in which two early interventionists supported emergent literacy development for infants and toddlers with visual impairment. Three themes are addressed: (1) the importance of a family-centered approach in addressing emergent literacy in early intervention; (2) the role of the early…

  14. Engaging Mexican Immigrant Families in Language and Literacy Interventions: Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummerer, Sharon E.; Lopez-Reyna, Norma A.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of three Mexican immigrant mothers and their young children who were participating in early intervention speech-language therapy. Mother interviews, children's therapy files, observation field notes, and parent journals contributed to the construction of instrumental case studies. Highlighting the potential…

  15. Incorporating AAC and General Instructional Strategies in Requesting Interventions: A Case Study in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanter, Elizabeth; Russell, Sharon D.; Kuriakose, Annu; Blevins, Kasey E.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides clinicians and educators a useful conceptualization of general instructional strategies often used to promote the performance of requests in children with developmental disabilities, and which can be applied in interventions that utilize augmentative and alternative communication. A case study illustrates the specialized…

  16. Meta-Analysis of Interventions for Basic Mathematics Computation in Single-Case Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Methe, Scott A.; Kilgus, Stephen P.; Neiman, Cheryl; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris

    2012-01-01

    This study examined interventions for addition and subtraction that were implemented through single-case design (SCD) research studies. We attempted to extend prior SCD meta-analyses by examining differences in effect sizes across several moderating variables and by including a novel index of effect, improvement rate difference (IRD). We also…

  17. Psychological Intervention: Case Studies in School Psychological Services. Volume 1, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Jeff, Ed.

    The case studies presented by seven school psychologists illustrate the nature and scope of psychological intervention with emotionally disturbed and otherwise handicapped students. Included are papers with the following titles and authors: "Desensitization--An Approach to the Elimination of Phobic Behavior" (E. Asmus); "Reduction of Classroom…

  18. Isolated Duodenal Crohn's Disease: A Case Report and a Review of the Surgical Management

    PubMed Central

    Karateke, Faruk; Menekşe, Ebru; Das, Koray; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirtürk, Pelin

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease may affect any segment of the gastrointestinal tract; however, isolated duodenal involvement is rather rare. It still remains a complex clinical entity with a controversial management of the disease. Initially, patients with duodenal Crohn' s disease (DCD) are managed with a combination of antiacid and immunosuppressive therapy. However, medical treatment fails in the majority of DCD patients, and surgical intervention is required in case of complicated disease. Options for surgical management of complicated DCD include bypass, resection, or stricturoplasty procedures. In this paper, we reported a 33-year-old male patient, who was diagnosed with isolated duodenal Crohn's diseases, and reviewed the surgical options in the literature. PMID:23781376

  19. [Promoting Self-Management in Primary Care - the Association of Motivation for Change, Self-Efficacy and Psychological Distress Prior to the Onset of Intervention].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Thomas; Puschmann, Egina; Porzelt, Sarah; Ebersbach, Martin; Ernst, Annette; Thomsen, Patricia; Scherer, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety, depressive and somatoform disorders are highly prevalent in primary care. Managing these disorders is time-consuming and requires strong commitment on behalf of the general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, the resources for the management of these patients are limited by the increasing workload in primary care practices, especially in the German health care system. In order to address the SMADS-study within psychenet - the Hamburg Network for Mental Health (NCT01726387) implements and evaluates a complex, low-threshold, nurse-led intervention using a goal-oriented set of case management and counseling techniques to promote self-management in these patients. This paper investigates the association of the patients' motivation for change and their perceived self-efficacy, the primary outcome - to get to know whether the intervention will target the appropriate population.

  20. [Promoting Self-Management in Primary Care - the Association of Motivation for Change, Self-Efficacy and Psychological Distress Prior to the Onset of Intervention].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Thomas; Puschmann, Egina; Porzelt, Sarah; Ebersbach, Martin; Ernst, Annette; Thomsen, Patricia; Scherer, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety, depressive and somatoform disorders are highly prevalent in primary care. Managing these disorders is time-consuming and requires strong commitment on behalf of the general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, the resources for the management of these patients are limited by the increasing workload in primary care practices, especially in the German health care system. In order to address the SMADS-study within psychenet - the Hamburg Network for Mental Health (NCT01726387) implements and evaluates a complex, low-threshold, nurse-led intervention using a goal-oriented set of case management and counseling techniques to promote self-management in these patients. This paper investigates the association of the patients' motivation for change and their perceived self-efficacy, the primary outcome - to get to know whether the intervention will target the appropriate population. PMID:26135280

  1. Internet Interventions to Support Lifestyle Modification for Diabetes Management: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cotterez, Alex; Durant, Nefertiti; Agne, April; Cherrington, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background The Internet presents a widely accessible, 24-hour means to promote chronic disease management. The objective of this review is to identify studies that used Internet based interventions to promote lifestyle modification among adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods We searched PubMed using the terms: [internet, computer, phone, smartphone, mhealth, mobile health, web based, telehealth, social media, text messages] combined with [diabetes management and diabetes control] through January 2013. Studies were included if they described an Internet intervention, targeted adults with type 2 diabetes, focused on lifestyle modification, and included an evaluation component with behavioral outcomes. Results Of the 2803 papers identified, nine met inclusion criteria. Two studies demonstrated improvements in diet and/or physical activity and two studies demonstrated improvements in glycemic control comparing web-based intervention with control. Successful studies were theory-based, included interactive components with tracking and personalized feedback, and provided opportunities for peer support. Website utilization declined over time in all studies that reported on it. Few studies focused on high risk, underserved populations. Conclusion Web-based strategies provide a viable option for facilitating diabetes self-management. Future research is needed on the use of web-based interventions in underserved communities and studies examining website utilization patterns and engagement over time. PMID:24332469

  2. Self-management interventions in stages 1 to 4 chronic kidney disease: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Welch, Janet L; Johnson, Michelle; Zimmerman, Lani; Russell, Cynthia L; Perkins, Susan M; Decker, Brian S

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence, effect on health outcomes, and economic impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have created interest in self-management interventions to help slow disease progression to kidney failure. Seven studies were reviewed to identify knowledge gaps and future directions for research. All studies were published between 2010 and 2013; no investigations were conducted in the United States. Knowledge gaps included the focus on medical self-management tasks with no attention to role or emotional tasks, lack of family involvement during intervention delivery, and an inability to form conclusions about the efficacy of interventions because methodological rigor was insufficient. Educational content varied across studies. Strategies to improve self-management skills and enhance self-efficacy varied and were limited in scope. Further development and testing of theory-based interventions are warranted. There is a critical need for future research using well-designed trials with appropriately powered sample sizes, well-tested instruments, and clear and consistent reporting of results.

  3. A qualitative examination of a spiritually-based intervention and self-management in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Richards, T Anne; Oman, Doug; Hedberg, John; Thoresen, Carl E; Bowden, Jeanne

    2006-07-01

    This qualitative study assesses the experience of an intervention that provided spiritually based self-management tools to hospital-based nurses. Drawing on wisdom traditions of the major world religions, the eight point program can be practiced by adherents to any religious faith, or those outside of all traditions. Five of eight program points were perceived as directly useful in improving the nurses' workplace interactions and enhancing fulfillment of compassionate caregiving missions. The findings suggest that this program can be an effective intervention among nurses in dealing with the demands of the healthcare environment and may be a resource for continuing education curricula.

  4. Are Behavioural Interventions Doomed to Fail? Challenges to Self-Management Support in Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Vallis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Self-management and self-management support are concepts very familiar to those of us in diabetes care. These concepts require openness to understanding the behaviours of persons with diabetes broadly, not only behaviours restricted to the biomedical perspective. Understanding the importance of health behaviour change and working within the Expanded Chronic Care Model define the context within which self-management support should occur. The purpose of this perspective is to identify a potential limitation in existing self-management support initiatives. This potential limitation reflects provider issues, not patient issues; that is, true self-management support might require changes by healthcare providers. Specifically, although behavioural interventions within the context of academic research studies are evidence based, behaviour change interventions implemented in general practice settings might prove less effective unless healthcare providers are able to shift from a practice based on the biomedical model to a practice based on the self-management support model. The purpose of this article is to facilitate effective self-management support by encouraging providers to switch from a model of care based on the expert clinician encountering the uninformed help seeker (the biomedical model) to one guided by collaboration grounded in the principles of description, prediction and choice. Key to understanding the value of making this shift are patient-centered communication principles and the tenets of complexity theory. PMID:25837809

  5. Are Behavioural Interventions Doomed to Fail? Challenges to Self-Management Support in Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Vallis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Self-management and self-management support are concepts very familiar to those of us in diabetes care. These concepts require openness to understanding the behaviours of persons with diabetes broadly, not only behaviours restricted to the biomedical perspective. Understanding the importance of health behaviour change and working within the Expanded Chronic Care Model define the context within which self-management support should occur. The purpose of this perspective is to identify a potential limitation in existing self-management support initiatives. This potential limitation reflects provider issues, not patient issues; that is, true self-management support might require changes by healthcare providers. Specifically, although behavioural interventions within the context of academic research studies are evidence based, behaviour change interventions implemented in general practice settings might prove less effective unless healthcare providers are able to shift from a practice based on the biomedical model to a practice based on the self-management support model. The purpose of this article is to facilitate effective self-management support by encouraging providers to switch from a model of care based on the expert clinician encountering the uninformed help seeker (the biomedical model) to one guided by collaboration grounded in the principles of description, prediction and choice. Key to understanding the value of making this shift are patient-centered communication principles and the tenets of complexity theory.

  6. Economic evaluations of interventions to manage hyperphosphataemia in adult haemodialysis patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Rana; Hiligsmann, Mickaël; Karavetian, Mirey; Evers, Silvia Maa

    2016-03-01

    Managing hyperphosphataemia in haemodialysis patients is resource-intensive. A search for cost-effective interventions in this field is needed to inform decisions on the allocation of healthcare resources. NHSEED, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were searched for full economic evaluations of hyperphosphataemia-managing interventions in adult haemodialysis patients, published between 2004 and 2014, in English, French, Dutch or German. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of the interventions were up-rated to 2013US$ using Purchasing Power Parity conversion rates and Consumer Price Indices. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Extended Consensus on Health Economic Criteria List. Twelve out of the 1681 retrieved records fulfilled the inclusion criteria. They reported only on one aspect of hyperphosphataemia management, which is the use of phosphate binders (calcium-based and calcium-free, in first-line and sequential use). No economic evaluations of other phosphorus-lowering interventions were found. The included articles derived from five countries and most of them were funded by pharmaceutical companies. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of phosphate binders ranged between US$11 461 and US$157 760 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Calcium-based binders (especially calcium acetate) appear to be the optimal cost-effective first- and second-line therapy in prevalent patients, while the calcium-free binder, lanthanum carbonate, might provide good value for money, as second-line therapy, in incident patients. The studies' overall quality was suboptimal. Drawing firm conclusions was not possible due to the quality heterogeneity and inconsistent results. Future high-quality economic evaluations are needed to confirm the findings of this review and to address other interventions to manage hyperphosphataemia in this population. PMID:26246269

  7. Economic evaluations of interventions to manage hyperphosphataemia in adult haemodialysis patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Rana; Hiligsmann, Mickaël; Karavetian, Mirey; Evers, Silvia Maa

    2016-03-01

    Managing hyperphosphataemia in haemodialysis patients is resource-intensive. A search for cost-effective interventions in this field is needed to inform decisions on the allocation of healthcare resources. NHSEED, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were searched for full economic evaluations of hyperphosphataemia-managing interventions in adult haemodialysis patients, published between 2004 and 2014, in English, French, Dutch or German. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of the interventions were up-rated to 2013US$ using Purchasing Power Parity conversion rates and Consumer Price Indices. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Extended Consensus on Health Economic Criteria List. Twelve out of the 1681 retrieved records fulfilled the inclusion criteria. They reported only on one aspect of hyperphosphataemia management, which is the use of phosphate binders (calcium-based and calcium-free, in first-line and sequential use). No economic evaluations of other phosphorus-lowering interventions were found. The included articles derived from five countries and most of them were funded by pharmaceutical companies. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of phosphate binders ranged between US$11 461 and US$157 760 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Calcium-based binders (especially calcium acetate) appear to be the optimal cost-effective first- and second-line therapy in prevalent patients, while the calcium-free binder, lanthanum carbonate, might provide good value for money, as second-line therapy, in incident patients. The studies' overall quality was suboptimal. Drawing firm conclusions was not possible due to the quality heterogeneity and inconsistent results. Future high-quality economic evaluations are needed to confirm the findings of this review and to address other interventions to manage hyperphosphataemia in this population.

  8. A Mood Management Intervention in an Internet Stop Smoking Randomized Controlled Trial Does Not Prevent Depression: A Cautionary Tale

    PubMed Central

    Schueller, Stephen M.; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Muñoz, Ricardo F.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking and depression are related, and mood management interventions included in smoking cessation interventions can increase smoking abstinence rates. Could a mood management intervention embedded in an Internet-based smoking cessation intervention prevent major depressive episodes? Spanish- and English-speaking smokers (N = 17,430) from 191 countries were randomized to one of four online self-help intervention conditions (two with mood management). We analyzed preventive effects among those participants without a major depressive episode at baseline. The mood management intervention did not reduce the incidence of major depressive episodes in the following 12 months. However, we found a mood management by depression risk interaction (OR = 1.77, p = .004), such that high-risk participants who received the mood management intervention had an increased occurrence of major depressive episodes (32.8% vs. 26.6%), but not low-risk participants (11.6% vs. 10.8%). Further research on whether mood management interventions may have deleterious effects on subsets of smokers appears warranted. PMID:25525565

  9. Evaluation of a practice-based intervention to improve the management of pediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Helen; Keller, Adrienne; Ehrensberger, Ryan; Irani, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric asthma remains a significant burden upon patients, families, and the healthcare system. Despite the availability of evidence-based best practice asthma management guidelines for over a decade, published studies suggest that many primary care physicians do not follow them. This article describes the Provider Quality Improvement (PQI) intervention with six diverse community-based practices. A pediatrician and a nurse practitioner conducted the year-long intervention, which was part of a larger CDC-funded project, using problem-based learning within an academic detailing model. Process and outcome assessments included (1) pre- and post-intervention chart reviews to assess eight indicators of quality care, (2) post-intervention staff questionnaires to assess contact with the intervention team and awareness of practice changes, and (3) individual semi-structured interviews with physician and nurse champions in five of the six practices. The chart review indicated that all six practices met predefined performance improvement criteria for at least four of eight indicators of quality care, with two practices meeting improvement criteria for all eight indicators. The response rate for the staff questionnaires was high (72%) and generally consistent across practices, demonstrating high staff awareness of the intervention team, the practice "asthma champions," and changes in practice patterns. In the semi-structured interviews, several respondents attributed the intervention's acceptability and success to the expertise of the PQI team and expressed the belief that sustaining changes would be critically dependent on continued contact with the team. Despite significant limitations, this study demonstrated that interventions that are responsive to individual practice cultures can successfully change practice patterns. PMID:21337050

  10. Evaluation of a practice-based intervention to improve the management of pediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Helen; Keller, Adrienne; Ehrensberger, Ryan; Irani, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric asthma remains a significant burden upon patients, families, and the healthcare system. Despite the availability of evidence-based best practice asthma management guidelines for over a decade, published studies suggest that many primary care physicians do not follow them. This article describes the Provider Quality Improvement (PQI) intervention with six diverse community-based practices. A pediatrician and a nurse practitioner conducted the year-long intervention, which was part of a larger CDC-funded project, using problem-based learning within an academic detailing model. Process and outcome assessments included (1) pre- and post-intervention chart reviews to assess eight indicators of quality care, (2) post-intervention staff questionnaires to assess contact with the intervention team and awareness of practice changes, and (3) individual semi-structured interviews with physician and nurse champions in five of the six practices. The chart review indicated that all six practices met predefined performance improvement criteria for at least four of eight indicators of quality care, with two practices meeting improvement criteria for all eight indicators. The response rate for the staff questionnaires was high (72%) and generally consistent across practices, demonstrating high staff awareness of the intervention team, the practice "asthma champions," and changes in practice patterns. In the semi-structured interviews, several respondents attributed the intervention's acceptability and success to the expertise of the PQI team and expressed the belief that sustaining changes would be critically dependent on continued contact with the team. Despite significant limitations, this study demonstrated that interventions that are responsive to individual practice cultures can successfully change practice patterns.

  11. Implementation and effects of an individual stress management intervention for family caregivers of an elderly relative living at home: a mixed research design.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Francine; Lebel, Paule; Lachance, Lise; Trudeau, Denise

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the implementation and effects of a stress management intervention for family caregivers of elderly persons. The intervention was implemented through an action research design with the collaboration of case managers working in community health centers. A total of 81 caregivers participated in the study. The quasi-experimental design used to test the effects of the intervention showed significant effects on perceived challenge associated with caregiver role, control by self, use of social support, and use of problem solving. Qualitative data demonstrate caregiver empowerment with respect to the caregiving role. This study illustrates the relevance of using a mixed research design in order to provide evidence for changes in practice.

  12. Case Studies for Management Development in Bangladesh. Second Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    These 15 case studies developed by faculty at institutions in Bangladesh are appropriate for use in a course in management development. The typical case describes a real business situation in which a real manager had to reach a decision. The case gives quantitative and qualitative information that is, or may be, relevant to that decision.…

  13. Prehospital airway management: A prospective case study.

    PubMed

    Wilbers, N E R; Hamaekers, A E W; Jansen, J; Wijering, S C; Thomas, O; Wilbers-van Rens, R; van Zundert, A A J

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a one-year prospective study involving a prehospital Emergency Medical Service in the Netherlands to investigate the incidence of failed or difficult prehospital endotracheal intubation. During the study period the paramedics were asked to fill in a registration questionnaire after every endotracheal intubation. Of the 26,271 patient contacts, 256 endotracheal intubations were performed by paramedics in one year. Endotracheal intubation failed in 12 patients (4.8%). In 12.0% of 249 patients, a Cormack and Lehane grade III laryngoscopy was reported and a grade IV laryngoscopy was reported in 10.4%. The average number of endotracheal intubations per paramedic in one year was 4.2 and varied from zero to a maximum of 12. The median time between arrival on the scene and a positive capnograph was 7 min.38 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade I laryngoscopy and 14 min.58 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade 4 laryngoscopy. The incidence of endotracheal intubations performed by Dutch paramedics in one year was low, but endotracheal intubation was successful in 95.2%, which is comparable with findings in international literature. Early capnography should be used consistently in prehospital airway management. PMID:21612142

  14. The effectiveness of a stress-management intervention program in the management of overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, Stavroula; Nicolaides, Nicolas C.; Papageorgiou, Ifigenia; Papadopoulou, Pinelopi; Terzioglou, Elena; Chrousos, George P; Darviri, Christina; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity in childhood and adolescence represents a major health problem of our century, and accounts for a significant increase in morbidity and mortality in adulthood. In addition to the increased consumption of calories and lack of exercise, accumulating evidence suggests that childhood obesity is strongly associated with prolonged and excessive activation of the stress system. Aim The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of a stress-management intervention program, which included progressive muscle relaxation, diaphragmatic breathing, guided imagery and cognitive restructuring, in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Methods Forty-nine children and adolescents (mean age ± SEM: 11.15 ± 1.48 years) were prospectively recruited to participate in this randomized controlled study. Of those, 23 participants were assigned into the intervention group, while 26 participants represented the control group. Anthropometric measurements were recorded at the beginning and at the end of the study, and participants were asked to complete the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (S.C.A.R.E.D.), the Child Depression Inventory (C.D.I.), the Child Behavior Checklist (C.B.C.L.) and the Youth Self Report (Y.S.R.). Results The applied stress-management methods resulted in a significant reduction in the body mass index (BMI) in the intervention group compared with the control group [ΔBMI=1.18 vs 0.10 kg/m2 (p<0.001)]. In addition to BMI, these methods ameliorated depression and anxiety, and reduced the internalizing and externalizing problems in the intervention group. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that the application of an 8-week stress management program could facilitate weight loss in Greek overweight and obese children and adolescents. Further larger studies are required to evaluate the effectiveness of stress-management methods in overweight and obese subjects. PMID:27570747

  15. Increasing the prevalence of successful children: The case for community intervention research

    PubMed Central

    Biglan, Anthony; Metzler, Carol W.; Ary, Dennis V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper makes a case for research on community interventions on child rearing. Sufficient evidence has accumulated about the development of children's problem behavior to justify evaluating efforts to reduce the prevalence of these problems in whole communities. The contextual risk factors for diverse child behavior problems are well understood, and interventions to ameliorate individual risk factors have been developed and evaluated. Because interventions with individual children have proven to be efficacious, it is now appropriate to direct energy toward reducing the prevalence of children with behavior problems. At the same time, existing interventions have limitations. Community interventions may be needed to modify the larger social context for families. This paper enumerates possible components of a community intervention to improve child-rearing outcomes. Existing evidence indicates that communities would benefit from making parent training and family support programs available to parents. Validated methods of identifying and remediating academic and behavioral problems in schools are available, but influencing schools to adopt them remains a problem. Community organizing could mobilize communities to allocate the resources necessary to support such parenting and schooling programs as well as encourage their adoption. Media campaigns could foster community support and directly influence parenting practices. Efforts to modify peer influences to use illicit substances have received empirical support; similar efforts may be relevant to preventing other problems. The development of a science of community interventions on child rearing is hampered by overreliance on randomized control trials. For this reason, two examples of time-series experimental evaluations of community intervention components are described here. PMID:22478196

  16. Impact of waste management training intervention on knowledge, attitude and practices of teaching hospital workers in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Somrongthong, Ratana; Ahmed, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the sustainability and effectiveness of training as an intervention to improve the knowledge, attitude and practices of hospital workers on health care waste management. Method: We conducted this quasi-experimental study in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Rawalpindi in October 2013. Training, practical demonstrations and reminders on standard waste management were given to 138 hospital workers in one hospital and compared with 137 workers from the control hospital. We collected data 18 months after intervention through a structured questionnaire to assess the impact of the intervention. We used paired t-test to compare the scores on knowledge, attitude and practices at baseline and first follow up and final impact assessment. Chi square test was used to compare group variables between intervention and control groups. Results: After 18 months since intervention the mean scores on knowledge attitude and practices differed statistically significantly since baseline and intervention group had statistically significantly better knowledge positive attitudes and good health care waste management practices (p < 0.001). Health care and sanitary workers in intervention group scored statistically significantly higher (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Trainings of health and sanitary workers on health care waste management guidelines were sustainable among the intervention group after 18 months which shows the positive impact of our intervention. It is recommended that the trainings as intervention be included in the overall policies of the public and private sector hospitals in Pakistan and other similar settings. PMID:27375718

  17. Evaluation of a modified contingency management intervention for consistent attendance in therapeutic workplace participants.

    PubMed

    Wong, Conrad J; Dillon, Erin M; Sylvest, Christine; Silverman, Kenneth

    2004-06-11

    In a therapeutic workplace business, drug abuse patients are hired as data entry operators and paid to perform data entry work contingent upon documented drug abstinence. Reliable attendance has been difficult to maintain despite the opportunity for operators to earn a living wage, 6 h per day, 5 days per week. A within-subject reversal design experiment evaluated a contingency management intervention that allowed for flexibility regarding when operators could arrive to work, yet maintained a contingency for reliable workplace attendance. Results from a within-subject reversal design experiment demonstrated the contingency management intervention to be effective in increasing the frequency of completed work shifts in four of five operators. Repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests of grouped data showed that the contingency management intervention significantly (P < 0.05) increased the mean percent of days that operators completed work shifts (5% baseline; 63% contingency management; 7% baseline). This study demonstrates an effective procedure for maintaining attendance in therapeutic workplace participants.

  18. Putting evidence into practice: evidence-based interventions to prevent and manage anorexia.

    PubMed

    Adams, Lynn A; Shepard, Nancy; Caruso, Rose Ann; Norling, Martha J; Belansky, Heather; Cunningham, Regina S

    2009-02-01

    Anorexia is defined as an involuntary loss of appetite.Approximately 50% of newly diagnosed patients with cancer experience the symptom, which often is accompanied by weight loss and most typically associated with advanced disease.Anorexia significantly affects the clinical course of cancer; it can lead to the development or exacerbation of disease- or treatment-related symptoms, decreased functional status, and diminished quality of life.As part of the Oncology Nursing Society's Putting Evidence Into Practice initiative, a team of oncology nurses examined and evaluated published research literature for the purpose of developing an evidence-based practice resource focused on the management of cancer-related anorexia.Even though anorexia is common among newly diagnosed patients and those with advanced disease, interventions to prevent, treat, and manage the symptom are limited.The evidence revealed that only two pharmacologic interventions, corticosteroids and progestins, can be recommended for use in clinical practice, and dietary counseling was identified as likely to be effective.This article summarizes selected empirical literature on interventions used to prevent and manage anorexia in patients with cancer.Familiarity with the literature will assist oncology nurses in proactively identifying and effectively managing patients experiencing this distressing symptom.

  19. Internet telehealth for pediatric asthma case management: integrating computerized and case manager features for tailoring a Web-based asthma education program.

    PubMed

    Wise, Meg; Gustafson, David H; Sorkness, Christine A; Molfenter, Todd; Staresinic, Anthony; Meis, Tracy; Hawkins, Robert P; Shanovich, Kathleen Kelly; Walker, Nola P

    2007-07-01

    This article reports on the development of a personalized, Web-based asthma-education program for parents whose 4- to 12-year-old children have moderate to severe asthma. Personalization includes computer-based tailored messages and a human coach to build asthma self-management skills. Computerized features include the Asthma Manager, My Calendar/Reminder, My Goals, and a tailored home page. These are integrated with monthly asthma-education phone calls from an asthma-nurse case manager. The authors discuss the development process and issues and describe the current randomized evaluation study to test whether the year-long integrated intervention can improve adherence to a daily asthma controller medication, asthma control, and parent quality of life to reduce asthma-related healthcare utilization. Implications for health education for chronic disease management are raised.

  20. Reductions in Transmission Risk Behaviors in HIV-Positive Clients Receiving Prevention Case Management Services: Findings from a Community Demonstration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasiorowicz, Mari; Llanas, Michelle R.; DiFranceisco, Wayne; Benotsch, Eric G.; Brondino, Michael J.; Catz, Sheryl L.; Hoxie, Neil J.; Reiser, William J.; Vergeront, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Prevention case management (PCM) for HIV-infected persons is an HIV risk reduction intervention designed to assist clients who are aware of their HIV infection and who continue to engage in risk transmission behaviors. PCM combines individual risk reduction counseling with case management to address the psychosocial factors affecting HIV…

  1. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  2. Impact of a social network-based intervention promoting diabetes self-management in socioeconomically deprived patients: a qualitative evaluation of the intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vissenberg, C; Stronks, K; Nijpels, G; Uitewaal, P J M; Middelkoop, B J C; Kohinor, M J E; Hartman, M A; Nierkens, V

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a need for effective interventions that improve diabetes self-management (DSM) among socioeconomically deprived patients with type 2 diabetes. The group-based intervention Powerful Together with Diabetes (PTWD) aimed to increase social support for DSM and decrease social influences hindering DSM (eg, peer pressure, social norms) in patients living in deprived neighbourhoods. Through a qualitative process evaluation, this paper aims to study whether this intervention changed social support and social influences, and which elements of the intervention contributed to this. Methods The intervention group (IG) was compared with a standard group-based educational intervention (control group, CG). 27 qualitative in-depth interviews with participants (multiethnic sample) and 24 interviews with group leaders were conducted. Interviews were coded and analysed using MAXQDA according to framework analysis. Results Patients in the IG experienced more emotional support from group members and more instrumental and appraisal support from relatives than those in the CG. Also, they were better able to recognise and cope with influences that hinder their DSM, exhibited more positive norms towards DSM and increased their priority regarding DSM and their adherence. Finally, the engagement in DSM by relatives of participants increased. Creating trust between group members, skills training, practising together and actively involving relatives through action plans contributed to these changes. Conclusions A group-based intervention aimed at creating trust, practising together and involving relatives has the potential to increase social support and diminish social influences hindering DSM in socioeconomically deprived patients with diabetes. Promising elements of the intervention were skills training and providing feedback using role-playing exercises in group sessions with patients, as well as the involvement of patients' significant others in self-management tasks, and

  3. Assessing Interventions to Manage West Nile Virus Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis with Risk Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Hongoh, Valerie; Campagna, Céline; Panic, Mirna; Samuel, Onil; Gosselin, Pierre; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Ravel, André; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America highlights vulnerability to climate sensitive diseases and stresses the importance of preventive efforts to reduce their public health impact. Effective prevention involves reducing environmental risk of exposure and increasing adoption of preventive behaviours, both of which depend on knowledge and acceptance of such measures. When making operational decisions about disease prevention and control, public health must take into account a wide range of operational, environmental, social and economic considerations in addition to intervention effectiveness. The current study aimed to identify, assess and rank possible risk reduction measures taking into account a broad set of criteria and perspectives applicable to the management of WNV in Quebec under increasing transmission risk scenarios, some of which may be related to ongoing warming in higher-latitude regions. A participatory approach was used to collect information on categories of concern to relevant stakeholders with respect to WNV prevention and control. Multi-criteria decision analysis was applied to examine stakeholder perspectives and their effect on strategy rankings under increasing transmission risk scenarios. Twenty-three preventive interventions were retained for evaluation using eighteen criteria identified by stakeholders. Combined evaluations revealed that, at an individual-level, inspecting window screen integrity, wearing light colored, long clothing, eliminating peridomestic larval sites and reducing outdoor activities at peak times were top interventions under six WNV transmission scenarios. At a regional-level, the use of larvicides was a preferred strategy in five out of six scenarios, while use of adulticides and dissemination of sterile male mosquitoes were found to be among the least favoured interventions in almost all scenarios. Our findings suggest that continued public health efforts aimed at reinforcing individual

  4. Assessing Interventions to Manage West Nile Virus Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis with Risk Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Hongoh, Valerie; Campagna, Céline; Panic, Mirna; Samuel, Onil; Gosselin, Pierre; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Ravel, André; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America highlights vulnerability to climate sensitive diseases and stresses the importance of preventive efforts to reduce their public health impact. Effective prevention involves reducing environmental risk of exposure and increasing adoption of preventive behaviours, both of which depend on knowledge and acceptance of such measures. When making operational decisions about disease prevention and control, public health must take into account a wide range of operational, environmental, social and economic considerations in addition to intervention effectiveness. The current study aimed to identify, assess and rank possible risk reduction measures taking into account a broad set of criteria and perspectives applicable to the management of WNV in Quebec under increasing transmission risk scenarios, some of which may be related to ongoing warming in higher-latitude regions. A participatory approach was used to collect information on categories of concern to relevant stakeholders with respect to WNV prevention and control. Multi-criteria decision analysis was applied to examine stakeholder perspectives and their effect on strategy rankings under increasing transmission risk scenarios. Twenty-three preventive interventions were retained for evaluation using eighteen criteria identified by stakeholders. Combined evaluations revealed that, at an individual-level, inspecting window screen integrity, wearing light colored, long clothing, eliminating peridomestic larval sites and reducing outdoor activities at peak times were top interventions under six WNV transmission scenarios. At a regional-level, the use of larvicides was a preferred strategy in five out of six scenarios, while use of adulticides and dissemination of sterile male mosquitoes were found to be among the least favoured interventions in almost all scenarios. Our findings suggest that continued public health efforts aimed at reinforcing individual

  5. Assessing Interventions to Manage West Nile Virus Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis with Risk Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Hongoh, Valerie; Campagna, Céline; Panic, Mirna; Samuel, Onil; Gosselin, Pierre; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Ravel, André; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America highlights vulnerability to climate sensitive diseases and stresses the importance of preventive efforts to reduce their public health impact. Effective prevention involves reducing environmental risk of exposure and increasing adoption of preventive behaviours, both of which depend on knowledge and acceptance of such measures. When making operational decisions about disease prevention and control, public health must take into account a wide range of operational, environmental, social and economic considerations in addition to intervention effectiveness. The current study aimed to identify, assess and rank possible risk reduction measures taking into account a broad set of criteria and perspectives applicable to the management of WNV in Quebec under increasing transmission risk scenarios, some of which may be related to ongoing warming in higher-latitude regions. A participatory approach was used to collect information on categories of concern to relevant stakeholders with respect to WNV prevention and control. Multi-criteria decision analysis was applied to examine stakeholder perspectives and their effect on strategy rankings under increasing transmission risk scenarios. Twenty-three preventive interventions were retained for evaluation using eighteen criteria identified by stakeholders. Combined evaluations revealed that, at an individual-level, inspecting window screen integrity, wearing light colored, long clothing, eliminating peridomestic larval sites and reducing outdoor activities at peak times were top interventions under six WNV transmission scenarios. At a regional-level, the use of larvicides was a preferred strategy in five out of six scenarios, while use of adulticides and dissemination of sterile male mosquitoes were found to be among the least favoured interventions in almost all scenarios. Our findings suggest that continued public health efforts aimed at reinforcing individual

  6. Self-Management Intervention for Long-Term Indwelling Urinary Catheter Users: Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Mary H.; McMahon, James M.; McDonald, Margaret V.; Tang, Wan; Wang, Wenjuan; Brasch, Judith; Fairbanks, Eileen; Shah, Shivani; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Ding-Geng (Din)

    2014-01-01

    Background People using long-term indwelling urinary catheters experience multiple recurrent catheter problems. Self-management approaches are needed to avoid catheter-related problems. Objectives The aim was to determine effectiveness of a self-management intervention in prevention of adverse outcomes (catheter-related urinary tract infection, blockage, and accidental dislodgement). Healthcare treatment associated with the adverse outcomes and catheter-related quality of life was also studied. Method A randomized clinical trial was conducted. The intervention involved learning catheter-related self-monitoring and self-management skills during home visits by a study nurse (twice during the first month and at four months—with a phone call at two months). The control group received usual care. Data were collected during an initial face-to-face home interview followed by bimonthly phone interviews. A total of 202 adult long-term urinary catheter users participated. Participants were randomized to treatment or control groups following collection of baseline data. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used for the analysis of treatment effect. Results In the intervention group, there was a significant decrease in reported blockage in the first six months (p = .02), but the effect did not persist. There were no significant effects for catheter-related urinary tract infection or dislodgment. Comparison of baseline rates of adverse outcomes with subsequent periods suggested that both groups improved over 12 months. Discussion A simple–to–use catheter problems calendar and the bimonthly interviews might have functioned as a modest self-monitoring intervention for persons in the control group. A simplified intervention using a self-monitoring calendar is suggested—with optimal and consistent fluid intake likely to add value. PMID:25502058

  7. Case management and the chronic care model: a multidisciplinary role.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Judith; Davis, Connie

    2004-01-01

    The core functions of case management, assessment, planning, linking, monitoring, advocacy, and outreach assume a new perspective in the context of systems that have adopted the Chronic Care Model. This article considers case management through the experience of three systems that have implemented the Chronic Care Model. A movement toward condition neutral case management, focused on care that is more wholly patient centric, is also examined.

  8. Recalcitrant Hidradenitis Suppurativa: An Investigation of Demographics, Surgical Management, Bacterial Isolates, Pharmacologic Intervention, and Patient-reported Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cristina; Rodby, Katherine A; Thomas, Jessina; Shay, Elizabeth; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-04-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is characterized by chronic inflammation, recurrent abscesses, and scarring. Surgery is performed when medical management and antibiotic therapy fails. This study sought to evaluate the demographics, surgical procedures, bacteriology, pharmacologic intervention, and quality of life of patients with recalcitrant HS requiring surgical intervention. A retrospective chart review was performed of 76 recalcitrant HS patients at the University of Illinois Medical Center. Patient demographics, bacterial culture, and surgery data were reviewed. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-item short-form health survey. Patients were mostly female (73.7%) and African American (81.6%) with a mean duration of symptoms of 8.6 years before surgery. Patients underwent at least one surgical procedure, most often to the axillae (57.6%) and 73.7 per cent received antibiotics. The most common culture isolates were Corynebacterium species (14.0%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (13.1%), and Staphylococcus aureus (10.4%) with varying resistance patterns. Surveyed patients had depressed 36-item short-form health survey physical functioning and social functioning scores. Recalcitrant HS patients with progressive symptomology over approximately nine years before surgical intervention were more likely to be African American women with axillary HS. Quality of life was diminished. We recommend initial treatment of HS with clindamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in clindamycin refractory cases.

  9. Effects of Diabetic Case Management on Knowledge, Self-Management Abilities, Health Behaviors, and Health Service Utilization for Diabetes in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soon Ae; Lee, Kunsei; Lin, Vivian; Liu, George; Shin, Eunyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a case management program for diabetics, using a pre-post comparison design. Materials and Methods The study population comprised 6007 diabetics who received case management intervention in 2006 and were sampled nationwide in Korea. Before and after the intervention, the study population answered questions regarding their knowledge of diabetes, self-management ability, and health behaviors. Body mass index (BMI) was also calculated. Healthcare service utilization for diabetes was extracted from health insurance claim data from 2005 to 2007. Results The case management program significantly improved the study population's knowledge of diabetes and ability to self-manage nutrition, blood glucose monitoring, foot and oral care, and medications. This program also significantly changed the study population's health behaviors regarding smoking, alcohol drinking, and exercise, and BMI was positively affected. In the over-serviced subgroup, there was a significant decrease in the number of consultations (mean=7.0; SD=19.5) after intervention. Conversely, in the under-serviced subgroup, there was a significant increase in the number of consultations (mean=3.2; SD=7.9) and the days of prescribed medication (mean=66.4; SD=120.3) after intervention. Conclusion This study showed that the case management program led the study population to improve their knowledge, self-management ability, health behaviors, and utilization of health care. It is necessary in future studies to evaluate the appropriateness of healthcare usage and clinical outcome by using a control group to determine the direct effectiveness of this case management program. PMID:25510771

  10. Gender differences in recovery outcomes after an early recovery symptom management intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Lani; Barnason, Susan; Hertzog, Melody; Young, Lufei; Nieveen, Janet; Schulz, Paula; Tu, Chunhao

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite known gender differences in recovery, few studies have examined symptom management (SM) interventions or responses by gender after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABS). Objective The purpose of this subanalysis was to describe and evaluate differences in response by gender to an SM intervention on the presence and burden of symptoms, physical activity, and physical functioning in elderly CABS patients during the early discharge period (3 and 6 weeks after CABS, and 3 and 6 months after CABS). Methods The parent study whose data were analyzed to examine gender differences involved a two-group, randomized clinical trial design. The 6-week early recovery SM telehealth intervention was delivered by the Health Buddy. Measures included the Cardiac Symptom Survey, a Modified 7-Day Activity Interview, an RT3 accelerometer, an Activity Diary, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36. This study was not powered for a gender × group analysis, and we used descriptive statistics, χ2 tests, t tests, and analysis of variance for statistical analyses. Results Subjects (n = 232) included 192 men and 40 women, with a mean age of 71.2 SD, 7 years. The intervention group consisted of 86 men and 23 women, and the usual care (UC) group consisted of 106 men and 17 women. Data trends suggest that the SM intervention exerted greater impact on women than on men for symptoms such as fatigue, depression, sleep problems, and pain. Again, men exhibited higher levels of physical activity than did women. However, women in the SM group generally had higher scores than did women in the UC group. Conclusion Although the parent study found no effect of an early recovery SM intervention, this exploratory secondary analysis indicated that women in the intervention group demonstrated more improvement in measures of physical activity than did those in the UC group. Further study, using a larger sample, is necessary to test these preliminary results. PMID:21501872

  11. A Scoping Review of Tailored Self-management Interventions among Adults with Mobility Impairing Neurological and Musculoskeletal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Plow, Matthew; Mangal, Sabrina; Geither, Kathryn; Golding, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    A critical public health objective is to optimize and disseminate self-management interventions for the 56.7 million adults living with chronic disabling conditions in the United States. A possible strategy to optimize the effectiveness of self-management interventions is to understand how best to tailor self-management interventions to the needs and circumstances of each participant. Thus, the purpose of this scoping review was to describe randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of tailored self-management interventions in adults with neurological and musculoskeletal conditions that characteristically result in mobility impairments. The 13 RCTs included in the scoping review typically compared tailored interventions to non-tailored interventions or usual care among adults with chronic pain, stroke, and/or arthritis. The tailored interventions were diverse in their delivery formats, dosing, behavior change techniques, and tailoring strategies. We identified 13 personal characteristics (e.g., preferences and theoretical constructs) and 4 types of assessment formats (i.e., oral history, self-report questionnaires, provider-reported assessments, and medical records) that were used to tailor the self-management interventions. It was common to tailor intervention content using self-report questionnaires that assessed personal characteristics pertaining to impairments and preferences. Content was matched to personal characteristics using clinical judgment or computer algorithms. However, few studies adequately described the decision rules for matching content. To advance the science of tailoring self-management interventions, we recommend conducting comparative effectiveness research and further developing a taxonomy to standardize descriptions of tailoring. We discuss the opportunities that are now coalescing to optimize tailored self-management. We also provide examples of how to merge concepts from the self-management literature with conceptual frameworks of tailoring

  12. A Scoping Review of Tailored Self-management Interventions among Adults with Mobility Impairing Neurological and Musculoskeletal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Plow, Matthew; Mangal, Sabrina; Geither, Kathryn; Golding, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    A critical public health objective is to optimize and disseminate self-management interventions for the 56.7 million adults living with chronic disabling conditions in the United States. A possible strategy to optimize the effectiveness of self-management interventions is to understand how best to tailor self-management interventions to the needs and circumstances of each participant. Thus, the purpose of this scoping review was to describe randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of tailored self-management interventions in adults with neurological and musculoskeletal conditions that characteristically result in mobility impairments. The 13 RCTs included in the scoping review typically compared tailored interventions to non-tailored interventions or usual care among adults with chronic pain, stroke, and/or arthritis. The tailored interventions were diverse in their delivery formats, dosing, behavior change techniques, and tailoring strategies. We identified 13 personal characteristics (e.g., preferences and theoretical constructs) and 4 types of assessment formats (i.e., oral history, self-report questionnaires, provider-reported assessments, and medical records) that were used to tailor the self-management interventions. It was common to tailor intervention content using self-report questionnaires that assessed personal characteristics pertaining to impairments and preferences. Content was matched to personal characteristics using clinical judgment or computer algorithms. However, few studies adequately described the decision rules for matching content. To advance the science of tailoring self-management interventions, we recommend conducting comparative effectiveness research and further developing a taxonomy to standardize descriptions of tailoring. We discuss the opportunities that are now coalescing to optimize tailored self-management. We also provide examples of how to merge concepts from the self-management literature with conceptual frameworks of tailoring

  13. A Scoping Review of Tailored Self-management Interventions among Adults with Mobility Impairing Neurological and Musculoskeletal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Plow, Matthew; Mangal, Sabrina; Geither, Kathryn; Golding, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    A critical public health objective is to optimize and disseminate self-management interventions for the 56.7 million adults living with chronic disabling conditions in the United States. A possible strategy to optimize the effectiveness of self-management interventions is to understand how best to tailor self-management interventions to the needs and circumstances of each participant. Thus, the purpose of this scoping review was to describe randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of tailored self-management interventions in adults with neurological and musculoskeletal conditions that characteristically result in mobility impairments. The 13 RCTs included in the scoping review typically compared tailored interventions to non-tailored interventions or usual care among adults with chronic pain, stroke, and/or arthritis. The tailored interventions were diverse in their delivery formats, dosing, behavior change techniques, and tailoring strategies. We identified 13 personal characteristics (e.g., preferences and theoretical constructs) and 4 types of assessment formats (i.e., oral history, self-report questionnaires, provider-reported assessments, and medical records) that were used to tailor the self-management interventions. It was common to tailor intervention content using self-report questionnaires that assessed personal characteristics pertaining to impairments and preferences. Content was matched to personal characteristics using clinical judgment or computer algorithms. However, few studies adequately described the decision rules for matching content. To advance the science of tailoring self-management interventions, we recommend conducting comparative effectiveness research and further developing a taxonomy to standardize descriptions of tailoring. We discuss the opportunities that are now coalescing to optimize tailored self-management. We also provide examples of how to merge concepts from the self-management literature with conceptual frameworks of tailoring

  14. Analysis of self-recording in self-management interventions for stereotypy.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jennifer N; Iwata, Brian A; Rolider, Natalie U; Camp, Erin M; Neidert, Pamela L

    2012-01-01

    Most treatments for stereotypy involve arrangements of antecedent or consequent events that are imposed entirely by a therapist. By contrast, results of some studies suggest that self-recording, a common component of self-management interventions, might be an effective and efficient way to reduce stereotypy. Because the procedure typically has included instructions to refrain from stereotypy, self-recording of the absence of stereotypy, and differential reinforcement of accurate recording, it is unclear which element or combination of elements produces reductions in stereotypy. We conducted a component analysis of a self-management intervention and observed that decreases in stereotypy might be attributable to instructional control or to differential reinforcement, but that self-recording per se had little effect on stereotypy.

  15. ANALYSIS OF SELF-RECORDING IN SELF-MANAGEMENT INTERVENTIONS FOR STEREOTYPY

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jennifer N; Iwata, Brian A; Rolider, Natalie U; Camp, Erin M; Neidert, Pamela L

    2012-01-01

    Most treatments for stereotypy involve arrangements of antecedent or consequent events that are imposed entirely by a therapist. By contrast, results of some studies suggest that self-recording, a common component of self-management interventions, might be an effective and efficient way to reduce stereotypy. Because the procedure typically has included instructions to refrain from stereotypy, self-recording of the absence of stereotypy, and differential reinforcement of accurate recording, it is unclear which element or combination of elements produces reductions in stereotypy. We conducted a component analysis of a self-management intervention and observed that decreases in stereotypy might be attributable to instructional control or to differential reinforcement, but that self-recording per se had little effect on stereotypy. PMID:22403449

  16. Hospital-based case management: results from a demonstration.

    PubMed

    Warrick, L H; Netting, F E; Christianson, J B; Williams, F G

    1992-12-01

    The Flinn Foundation Hospital-based Coordinated Care case management demonstration was designed to help patients discharged from six participating hospitals be linked to community services by a case manager. One unexpected result was that about half of the clients served were referred from the community, not from the hospital. We examine the characteristics of hospital-based case management clients, the predictors of their continuation in case management, and their health status over 1 year, focusing on the differences between hospital- and community-referred clients.

  17. Strategies for reducing morbidity and mortality from diabetes through health-care system interventions and diabetes self-management education in community settings. A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.

    PubMed

    2001-09-28

    Reducing morbidity and mortality and improving quality of life for persons with diabetes is an ongoing challenge for health-care providers and organizations and public health practitioners. Interventions are available that focus on persons with diabetes, health-care systems, families, and public policies. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of seven population-oriented interventions that can be implemented by health-care organizations and communities. Two of these interventions focus on health-care systems (disease and case management), and five focus on persons with diabetes (diabetes self-management education delivered in community settings). On the basis of these reviews, the Task Force has made recommendations regarding use of these seven interventions. The Task Force strongly recommends disease and case management in health-care systems for persons with diabetes. Diabetes self-management education is recommended in community gathering places (e.g., community centers or faith institutions) for adults and in the home for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Evidence was insufficient to recommend diabetes self-management education interventions in other settings (i.e., schools, work sites, and recreational camps) or in the home for adults with type 2 diabetes. This report provides additional information regarding these recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, provides sources of full reviews of interventions and information to assist in applying the interventions locally, and describes additional diabetes-related work in progress.

  18. Knowledge Management Analysis: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mecha, Ezi I.; Desai, Mayur S.; Richards, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    It is imperative for businesses to manage knowledge and stay competitive in the marketplace. Knowledge management is critical and is a key to prevent organizations from duplicating their efforts with a subsequent improvement in their efficiency. This study focuses on overview of knowledge management, analyzes the current knowledge management in…

  19. Management of recalcitrant Trichomonas vaginalis in pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Sarup

    2016-02-01

    A case report of a pregnant woman with recalcitrant Trichomonas vaginalis is described. This case was managed with suppressive treatment with metronidazole during pregnancy and cleared with paromomycin vaginal treatment after delivery.

  20. Troubled interventions: public policy, vectors of disease, and the rhetoric of diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jeffrey A

    2013-03-01

    This essay examines the debate surrounding New York City's controversial diabetes registry program. Exploring the tensions between public health officials and privacy advocates, the article explores how diabetes is imagined in the public sphere. Although rhetorics underscoring privacy may seem the more progressive discourse, I argue New York City's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has the more forward-looking plan, attempting to reconstitute diabetes not as a chronic condition necessitating individual management but as a disease that requires systemic intervention.

  1. Testing a peer-based symptom management intervention for women living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Webel, Allison R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the impact of participation in a peer-based intervention for symptom management for women living with HIV infection on selected outcome measures including, symptom intensity, medication adherence, viral control, and quality of life. Design Randomized clinical trial. Methods Participants were recruited using a convenient, consecutive sampling method. Those participants randomized to the experimental condition attended seven, peer-led sessions over seven weeks. Participants randomized to the control condition received a copy of HIV Symptom Management Strategies: A Manual for People Living with HIV/AIDS. Participants completed four surveys assessing change over time in the aforementioned outcome variables. Results Eighty-nine HIV-infected women followed over 14 weeks and there were no differences between the two groups on baseline demographic variables. Mixed-effects regression indicated no significant difference between groups across time in total symptom intensity score and medication adherence. There was a significant difference between groups across time for two of the nine quality of life scales – HIV Mastery (χ2 = 25.08; p < 0.005) and Disclosure Worries (χ2 = 24.67; p < 0.005). Conclusions In urban-dwelling women living with HIV/AIDS, results suggest that a peer-based symptom management intervention may not decrease symptom intensity or increase medication adherence. There is positive evidence that suggests that the intervention may increase some important aspects of quality of life. However, further research is warranted to elucidate the effect of peer-based interventions in achieving positive self-management outcomes. PMID:20146111

  2. Community Health Workers Versus Nurses as Counselors or Case Managers in a Self-Help Diabetes Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kim B.; Kim, Miyong T.; Lee, Hochang B.; Nguyen, Tam; Bone, Lee R.; Levine, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To confirm the effectiveness of community health workers’ involvement as counselors or case managers in a self-help diabetes management program in 2009 to 2014. Methods Our open-label, randomized controlled trial determined the effectiveness of a self-help intervention among Korean Americans aged 35 to 80 years in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. We measured and analyzed physiological and psychobehavioral health outcomes of the community health worker–counseled (n = 54) and registered nurse (RN)–counseled (n = 51) intervention groups in comparison with the control group (n = 104). Results The community health workers’ performance was comparable to that of the RNs for both psychobehavioral outcomes (e.g., self-efficacy, quality of life) and physiological outcomes. The community health worker–counseled group showed hemoglobin A1C reductions from baseline (−1.2%, −1.5%, −1.3%, and −1.6%, at months 3, 6, 9, and 12, respectively), all of which were greater than reductions in the RN-counseled (−0.7%, −0.9%, −0.9%, and −1.0%) or the control (−0.5%, −0.5%, −0.6%, and −0.7%) groups. Conclusions Community health workers performed as well as or better than nurses as counselors or case managers in a self-help diabetes management program in a Korean American community. PMID:26985607

  3. Case management used to optimize cancer care pathways: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Christian N; Thygesen, Marianne; Søndergaard, Jens; Vedsted, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Reports of inadequate cancer patient care have given rise to various interventions to support cancer care pathways which, overall, seem poorly studied. Case management (CM) is one method that may support a cost-effective, high-quality patient-centred treatment and care. The purpose of this article was to summarise intervention characteristics, outcomes of interest, results, and validity components of the published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining CM as a method for optimizing cancer care pathways. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched for RCTs published all years up to August 2008. Identified papers were included if they passed the following standards. Inclusion criteria: 1) The intervention should meet the criteria for CM which includes multidisciplinary collaboration, care co-ordination, and it should include in-person meetings between patient and the case manager aimed at supporting, informing and educating the patient. 2) The intervention should focus on cancer patient care. 3) The intervention should aim to improve subjective or objective quality outcomes, and effects should be reported in the paper. Exclusion criteria: Studies centred on cancer screening or palliative cancer care. Data extraction was conducted in order to obtain a descriptive overview of intervention characteristics, outcomes of interest and findings. Elements of CONSORT guidelines and checklists were used to assess aspects of study validity. Results The searches identified 654 unique papers, of which 25 were retrieved for scrutiny. Seven papers were finally included. Intervention characteristics, outcomes studied, findings and methodological aspects were all very diverse. Conclusion Due to the scarcity of papers included (seven), significant heterogeneity in target group, intervention setting, outcomes measured and methodologies applied, no conclusions can be drawn about the

  4. The Basics of Interventional Radiology Management in a Large Radiology Group: A Bird's-Eye View.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gregory Q; Bob Smouse, H

    2006-12-01

    Through nearly 6 decades of growth we have enjoyed and suffered under many different types of management structures. From these experiences we have become believers in a central committee structure that advances our agenda with hospital administrators and third-party payers. The best way to illustrate what we think is a winning solution is by describing our present management system. Herein we describe what we do and what works for our large radiology group as well as our interventional practice. Although this structure works well for our large medical group, it will likely work equally well for a smaller medical group. PMID:21326780

  5. Nonsurgical scar management of the face: does early versus late intervention affect outcome?

    PubMed

    Parry, Ingrid; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina; Greenhalgh, David

    2013-01-01

    Special emphasis is placed on the clinical management of facial scarring because of the profound physical and psychological impact of facial burns. Noninvasive methods of facial scar management include pressure therapy, silicone, massage, and facial exercises. Early implementation of these scar management techniques after a burn injury is typically accepted as standard burn rehabilitation practice, however, little data exist to support this practice. This study evaluated the timing of common noninvasive scar management interventions after facial skin grafting in children and the impact on outcome, as measured by scar assessment and need for facial reconstructive surgery. A retrospective review of 138 patients who underwent excision and grafting of the face and subsequent noninvasive scar management during a 10-year time frame was conducted. Regression analyses were used to show that earlier application of silicone was significantly related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale scores, specifically in the subscales of vascularity and pigmentation. Early use of pressure therapy and implementation of facial exercises were also related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale vascularity scores. No relationship was found between timing of the interventions and facial reconstructive outcome. Early use of silicone, pressure therapy, and exercise may improve scar outcome and accelerate time to scar maturity. PMID:23816994

  6. Case study: applying management policies to manage distributed queuing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumair, Bernhard; Wies, René

    1996-06-01

    The increasing deployment of workstations and high performance endsystems in addition to the operation of mainframe computers leads to a situation where many companies can no longer afford for their expensive workstations to run idle for long hours during the night or with little load during daytime. Distributed queuing systems and batch systems (DQSs) provide an efficient basis to make use of these unexploited resources and allow corporations to replace expensive supercomputers with clustered workstations running DQSs. To employ these innovative DQSs on a large scale, the management policies for scheduling jobs, configuring queues, etc must be integrated in the overall management process for the IT infrastructure. For this purpose, the concepts of application management and management policies are introduced and discussed. The definition, automatic transformation, and implementation of policies on management platforms to effectively manage DQSs will show that policy-based application management is already possible using the existing management functionality found in today's systems.

  7. A pragmatic approach to measuring, monitoring and evaluating interventions for improved tuberculosis case detection

    PubMed Central

    Blok, Lucie; Creswell, Jacob; Stevens, Robert; Brouwer, Miranda; Ramis, Oriol; Weil, Olivier; Klatser, Paul; Sahu, Suvanand; Bakker, Mirjam I.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to detect all individuals with active tuberculosis has led to a growing interest in new approaches to improve case detection. Policy makers and program staff face important challenges measuring effectiveness of newly introduced interventions and reviewing feasibility of scaling-up successful approaches. While robust research will continue to be needed to document impact and influence policy, it may not always be feasible for all interventions and programmatic evidence is also critical to understand what can be expected in routine settings. The effects of interventions on early and improved tuberculosis detection can be documented through well-designed program evaluations. We present a pragmatic framework for evaluating and measuring the effect of improved case detection strategies using systematically collected intervention data in combination with routine tuberculosis notification data applying historical and contemporary controls. Standardized process evaluation and systematic documentation of program implementation design, cost and context will contribute to explaining observed levels of success and may help to identify conditions needed for success. Findings can then guide decisions on scale-up and replication in different target populations and settings. PMID:25100402

  8. Behavioural interventions for weight management in pregnancy: A systematic review of quantitative and qualitative data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a rising prevalence of excessive weight gain in pregnancy and an increasing number of pregnant women who are overweight or obese at the start of the pregnancy. Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal consequences and increases the risk of long-term obesity. Pregnancy therefore may be a key time to prevent excessive weight gain and improve the health of women and their unborn child. This systematic review sought to assess the effectiveness of behavioural interventions to prevent excessive weight gain in pregnancy and explore the factors that influence intervention effectiveness. Methods We undertook a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative evidence. This included a meta-analysis of controlled trials of diet and physical activity interventions to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy and a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies that investigated the views of women on weight management during pregnancy. A thorough search of eleven electronic bibliographic databases, reference lists of included studies, relevant review articles and experts in the field were contacted to identify potentially relevant studies. Two independent reviewers extracted data. RevMan software was used to perform the meta-analyses. Qualitative data was subject to thematic analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative data were aligned using a matrix framework. Results Five controlled trials and eight qualitative studies were included. The overall pooled effect size found no significant difference in gestational weight gain amongst participants in the intervention group compared with the control group (mean difference -0.28 95% CI -0.64 to 0.09). The study designs, participants and interventions all varied markedly and there was significant heterogeneity within this comparison in the meta-analysis (I2 67%). Subgroup and sensitivity analysis did not identify contextual elements that influenced the effectiveness

  9. The School Counselors' Ideas on Features, Determinant and Intervention on Child Negligence and Abuse Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usakli, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    It is sad to know that many of the child negligence and child abuse cases, which are being frequently encountered in the society today, still remains unknown. This perhaps is due to lack of information on the part of the administrators, school counselors and other related bodies in the management of such cases. In this study, 50 school counselors…

  10. Formative research for the development of an interactive web-based sexually transmitted disease management intervention for young women.

    PubMed

    Royer, Heather R; Fernandez-Lambert, Katherin M; Moreno, Megan A

    2013-09-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are common among young women and effective self-management is foundational to improving health outcomes and preventing negative sequelae. Advances in technology create the opportunity for innovative delivery methods of self-management interventions. However, it is essential to conduct formative research with the target population to identify both the needs and the preferences for the content and delivery method of a sexually transmitted disease self-management intervention prior to intervention development. Eight focus groups were conducted with 35 young women between 18 and 24 years of age. We found that young women strongly support the use of a Web-based intervention to provide sexually transmitted disease self-management guidance. Women were interested in receiving comprehensive management information from the perspective of both clinicians and other women who have experienced a sexually transmitted disease. There was a clear interest in incorporating new media into the Web-based intervention to allow for communication with providers as well as to create opportunities for social networking between women. This formative research provides critical information about the content and delivery method of a self-management intervention and gives direction for intervention development that is inclusive of varying types of new media to allow for connectivity among users, their peers, and clinicians.

  11. Occupational Stress Management and Burnout Interventions in Nursing and Their Implications for Healthy Work Environments: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Behdin; Lightfoot, Nancy; Larivière, Michael; Carter, Lorraine; Rukholm, Ellen; Schinke, Robert; Belanger-Gardner, Diane

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on a literature review of workplace interventions (i.e., creating healthy work environments and improving nurses' quality of work life [QWL]) aimed at managing occupational stress and burnout for nurses. A literature search was conducted using the keywords nursing, nurses, stress, distress, stress management, burnout, and intervention. All the intervention studies included in this review reported on workplace intervention strategies, mainly individual stress management and burnout interventions. Recommendations are provided to improve nurses' QWL in health care organizations through workplace health promotion programs so that nurses can be recruited and retained in rural and northern regions of Ontario. These regions have unique human resources needs due to the shortage of nurses working in primary care. PMID:26084675

  12. Monitoring and evaluation of soil bioengineering interventions for watershed management, disaster mitigation and environmental restoration in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Alessandro; Preti, Federico

    2013-04-01

    In recent decades the institutions responsible for land management and civil protection have showed a great interest in relation to the use of more environmentally friendly techniques to mitigate the risk of landslides and floods. Soil bioengineering has responded to this need and several research groups are carrying out experimentations using the techniques of this discipline in the countries in the developing world. The Deistaf from University of Florence has concentrated its activities in this area over the past decade promoting the use of the techniques of Soil bioengineering in Latin America through the implementation of training and experimentation programmes. Numerous works have been completed both in riverbanks and on slopes in Nicaragua, Guatemala, Ecuador and Colombia. It was decided to make a census of interventions in Latin America from different institutions that may be related to Soil bioengineering in order to obtain an overview of the state of the art in the specific context taking into account also environmental and socio-economic issues. Taking advantage of its network of contacts, DEISTAF has collected dozens of sheets that describe interventions. These sheets describe, among other fields focused on the environment in which the work has been carried out, the materials and techniques used, and the impact of the intervention. In the sheets we present also the monitoring that has been realized for some of these works in the months of October and November 2012; we include the identification of the current condition and functionality of the intervention and, in the case of the presence of some damages, the formulation of instructions to fix them as well as the economic quantification of the repairs to be carried out.

  13. Training Corporate Managers to Adopt a More Autonomy-Supportive Motivating Style toward Employees: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2009-01-01

    Management style is treated in a variety of ways across the training and development literature. Yet few studies have tested the training-based malleability of management style in a for-profit, authentic work context. The present research tested whether or not training intervention would help managers adopt a more autonomy-supportive motivating…

  14. Design and Methods of a Synchronous Online Motivational Interviewing Intervention for Weight Management

    PubMed Central

    DiLillo, Vicki; Ingle, Krista; Harvey, Jean Ruth; West, Delia Smith

    2016-01-01

    Background While Internet-based weight management programs can facilitate access to and engagement in evidence-based lifestyle weight loss programs, the results have generally not been as effective as in-person programs. Furthermore, motivational interviewing (MI) has shown promise as a technique for enhancing weight loss outcomes within face-to-face programs. Objective This paper describes the design, intervention development, and analysis of a therapist-delivered online MI intervention for weight loss in the context of an online weight loss program. Methods The MI intervention is delivered within the context of a randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of an 18-month, group-based, online behavioral weight control program plus individually administered, synchronous online MI sessions relative to the group-based program alone. Six individual 30-minute MI sessions are conducted in private chat rooms over 18 months by doctoral-level psychologists. Sessions use a semistructured interview format for content and session flow and incorporate core MI components (eg, collaborative agenda setting, open-ended questions, reflective listening and summary statements, objective data, and a focus on evoking and amplifying change talk). Results The project was funded in 2010 and enrollment was completed in 2012. Data analysis is currently under way and the first results are expected in 2016. Conclusions This is the first trial to test the efficacy of a synchronous online, one-on-one MI intervention designed to augment an online group behavioral weight loss program. If the addition of MI sessions proves to be successful, this intervention could be disseminated to enhance other distance-based weight loss interventions. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01232699; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01232699 PMID:27095604

  15. Integrating Transgenic Vector Manipulation with Clinical Interventions to Manage Vector-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kenichi W.; Gould, Fred; Lloyd, Alun L.

    2016-01-01

    Many vector-borne diseases lack effective vaccines and medications, and the limitations of traditional vector control have inspired novel approaches based on using genetic engineering to manipulate vector populations and thereby reduce transmission. Yet both the short- and long-term epidemiological effects of these transgenic strategies are highly uncertain. If neither vaccines, medications, nor transgenic strategies can by themselves suffice for managing vector-borne diseases, integrating these approaches becomes key. Here we develop a framework to evaluate how clinical interventions (i.e., vaccination and medication) can be integrated with transgenic vector manipulation strategies to prevent disease invasion and reduce disease incidence. We show that the ability of clinical interventions to accelerate disease suppression can depend on the nature of the transgenic manipulation deployed (e.g., whether vector population reduction or replacement is attempted). We find that making a specific, individual strategy highly effective may not be necessary for attaining public-health objectives, provided suitable combinations can be adopted. However, we show how combining only partially effective antimicrobial drugs or vaccination with transgenic vector manipulations that merely temporarily lower vector competence can amplify disease resurgence following transient suppression. Thus, transgenic vector manipulation that cannot be sustained can have adverse consequences—consequences which ineffective clinical interventions can at best only mitigate, and at worst temporarily exacerbate. This result, which arises from differences between the time scale on which the interventions affect disease dynamics and the time scale of host population dynamics, highlights the importance of accounting for the potential delay in the effects of deploying public health strategies on long-term disease incidence. We find that for systems at the disease-endemic equilibrium, even modest

  16. Problems in Office Management: Cases in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemby, K. Virginia; Smith, Vincent W.

    2006-01-01

    Office managers face an increasing array of job responsibilities in today's business environment. To prepare new office administration employees and managers, educational institutions must maintain a progressive curriculum to meet position demands. Using a population of members of the Association of Professional Office Managers, this study was…

  17. Effectiveness of a primary care based complex intervention to promote self-management in patients presenting psychiatric symptoms: study protocol of a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety, Depression and Somatoform (ADSom) disorders are highly prevalent in primary care. Managing these disorders is time-consuming and requires strong commitment on behalf of the General Practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, the management of these patients is restricted by the high patient turnover rates in primary care practices, especially in the German health care system. In order to address this problem, we implement a complex, low-threshold intervention by an Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) using a mixture of case management and counseling techniques to promote self-management in these patients. Here we present the protocol of the “Self-Management Support for Anxiety, Depression and Somatoform Disorders in Primary Care” (SMADS)-Study. Methods/Design The study is designed as a cluster-randomized controlled trial, comparing an intervention and a control group of 10 primary care practices in each case. We will compare the effectiveness of the intervention applied by an APN with usual GP-care. A total of 340 participants will be enrolled in the study, 170 in either arm. We use the Patient Health Questionnaire-German version (PHQ-D) as a screening tool for psychiatric symptoms, including patients with a score above 5 on any of the three symptom scales. The primary outcome is self-efficacy, measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE), here used as a proxy for self-management. As secondary outcomes we include the PHQ-D symptom load and questionnaires regarding coping with illness and health related quality of life. Outcome assessments will be applied 8 weeks and 12 months after the baseline assessment. Discussion The SMADS-study evaluates a complex, low threshold intervention for ambulatory patients presenting ADSom-symptoms, empowering them to better manage their condition, as well as improving their motivation to engage in self-help and health-seeking behaviour. The benefit of the intervention will be substantiated, when patients can enhance

  18. Effective Case Study Methodologies in the Management of IT Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffington, James R.; Harper, Jeffrey S.

    Many Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited schools require undergraduate Management Information Systems (MIS) majors to take a course in the management of information technology. Over half of these schools utilize case studies in the teaching of this course. Case studies are an important vehicle for teaching…

  19. 34 CFR 303.23 - Service coordination (case management).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., the system of payments for services in the State, and other pertinent information. (Authority: 20 U.S... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Service coordination (case management). 303.23 Section... Service coordination (case management). (a) General. (1) As used in this part, except in §...

  20. Case Management: Effects of Improved Risk and Value Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissert, William G.; Hirth, Richard A.; Chernew, Michael E.; Diwan, Sadhna; Kim, Jinkyung

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact on resource use of providing case managers with information on the potential for patients to benefit from home care services. Design and Methods: Twenty-four case managers working in the Arizona Long Term Care System (ALTCS) were randomized into treatment and control groups. Members of…

  1. Identifying costs for capitation in psychiatric case management.

    PubMed

    Baker, J J; Chiverton, P; Hines, V

    1998-01-01

    This article presents an example of how one hospital identified costs for capitation in psychiatric case management. An 18-month postacute case management pilot project collected data on a nurse-specific and patient-specific basis. Costs were identified using activity-based costing methodology. PMID:9502055

  2. Case management for special populations. Moving beyond categorical distinctions.

    PubMed

    Falik, M; Lipson, D; Lewis-Idema, D; Ulmer, C; Kaplan, K; Robinson, G; Hickey, E; Veiga, R

    1993-01-01

    Case management has evolved as a flexible, pragmatic, and compassionate strategy for improving client access and care continuity within fragmented systems of health and social services. The first-generation case management programs have been designed for various settings that serve different "target" populations with varying social, medical, and psychological needs. This proliferation of categorical case management programs is a mixed blessing. While a categorical focus reflects both historical and public financing priorities, it creates a potentially duplicative and inefficient system in an era of limited resources. As the federal government assumes a more substantial role in supporting case management, greater attention is being given to accountability--demonstrating value-added benefits and identifying best practices for structuring case management. The essential first step is reaching agreement on two critical dimensions of case management, major goals and essential services. This article, based on a review of the literature, examines the extent to which seemingly disparate programs for special populations share common attributes, and thus present opportunities for structuring client-focused rather than categorical case management programs. The authors seek to stimulate a dialogue that would lead to specification of common goals and essential services, and a cross-cutting framework for designing client-focused case management programs. PMID:8130742

  3. Complications of laparoscopic versus open bariatric surgical interventions in obesity management.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Hou, Xuhui

    2014-11-01

    With the epidemic of obesity fast spreading its grasp throughout the world, the medical professionals of diverse facilities need to be called on for better management to prevent its further progression. In particular, the gastroenterologists have a major role to play in all aspects of obese patient care. They should be able to recognize and treat obesity and associated disorders through the understanding and assessment of the various benefits and risks linked with a particular type of obesity treatment option. While treating these problems, a better understanding of the physiologic and anatomic alterations that might be associated with the treatment procedure and the weight loss-linked problems in association with the method of surgical intervention need to be weighed. Morbid obesity has been efficaciously treated by bariatric surgery promoting weight loss considerably and reducing the obesity-associated risks such as certain cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Bariatric surgery has been performed traditionally through open method or, the more recent and popular form, laparoscopically that involves only a small incision in the abdomen. The laparoscopic bariatric surgery has become the surgical method of choice since its introduction in 1993 and has immediately crossed open surgery in terms of popularity. Drastic numbers came out when the two methods were compared for their applicability during a 3-year period in the United States. Only 6,000 reported open gastric bypass surgeries were recorded, but the number soared to nearly 16,000 for laparoscopic gastric bypass surgeries. The laparoscopic method has been found to be associated with much reduced complications and hospital stay along with lower cases of mortality as suggested by small randomized controlled trials and observational studies. However, these facts need to be reassessed through large-sized controlled trials and population-based studies. In addition, the previously

  4. How does change occur following a theoretically based self-management intervention for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Steed, Liz; Barnard, Maria; Hurel, Steven; Jenkins, Catherine; Newman, Stanton

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the extent that constructs from two theoretical models (self-regulatory theory and social cognitive theory) mediated change in outcomes following a self-management intervention. One hundred and twenty four individuals with type 2 diabetes who had participated in a randomised controlled trial of a diabetes self-management programme were analysed for the extent that illness beliefs and self-efficacy mediated change in self-management behaviours and illness specific quality of life. Exercise specific self-efficacy significantly mediated change in exercise at three months (B = .03; .01, p < .05) while monitoring specific self-efficacy mediated change in monitoring behaviour at both three (B = .04; .01, p < .01) and nine months follow-up (B = 5.97; 1.01, p < .01). Belief in control over diabetes mediated change in illness specific quality of life at three months (B = -.07; .28, p < .05) and nine months (B = .79; .28, p < .01) follow-ups, as well as change in exercise behaviour at immediately post-intervention (B = -.12; .17, p < .05). Behaviour-specific self-efficacy may have a stronger role in mediating self-management behaviours than illness beliefs; however, belief in control over diabetes may be important to manipulate for change in quality of life. This suggests different theoretical constructs may mediate change dependent on outcome.

  5. Planning a multilevel intervention to prevent hearing loss among farmworkers and managers: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M E; Bartholomew, L K; Alterman, T

    2009-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the second most prevalent self-reported occupational illness or injury in the U.S., and agricultural workers experience high rates of hearing loss. This article uses Intervention Mapping (IM), a systematic approach to intervention development, to make recommendations for a program to improve hearing loss protection among farmworkers and managers. Final recommendations, based on previous work in the literature on hearing loss prevention, qualitative formative research, and theoretical considerations, include a specification of a multilevel theory- and evidence-based hearing protection program for farmworkers and farm managers. Twelve performance objectives (e.g., "monitor hearing and hearing loss with regular hearing testing") are specified and crossed with six relevant determinants (knowledge and behavioral capability; perceived exposure and susceptibility and noise annoyance; outcome expectations; barriers; social influence; skills and self-efficacy) to create a highly detailed matrix of change objectives for farmworkers and for their managers. These change objectives are then grouped into five categories: two for both farmworkers and their managers (noticing exposures, taking action) and three only for the latter (surveying and planning, implementation and evaluation, and communication). Theoretical methods and practical strategies, including program materials and activities, are then delineated. PMID:19266884

  6. Web-Based and Mobile Stress Management Intervention for Employees: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Dirk; Ebert, David Daniel; Berking, Matthias; Riper, Heleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Work-related stress is highly prevalent among employees and is associated with adverse mental health consequences. Web-based interventions offer the opportunity to deliver effective solutions on a large scale; however, the evidence is limited and the results conflicting. Objective This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of guided Web- and mobile-based stress management training for employees. Methods A total of 264 employees with elevated symptoms of stress (Perceived Stress Scale-10, PSS-10≥22) were recruited from the general working population and randomly assigned to an Internet-based stress management intervention (iSMI) or waitlist control group. The intervention (GET.ON Stress) was based on Lazarus’s transactional model of stress, consisted of seven sessions, and applied both well-established problem solving and more recently developed emotion regulation strategies. Participants also had the opportunity to request automatic text messages on their mobile phone along with the iSMI. Participants received written feedback on every completed session from an e-coach. The primary outcome was perceived stress (PSS-10). Web-based self-report assessments for both groups were scheduled at baseline, 7 weeks, and 6 months. At 12 months, an extended follow-up was carried out for the iSMI group only. Results An intention-to-treat analysis of covariance revealed significantly large effect differences between iSMI and waitlist control groups for perceived stress at posttest (F 1,261=58.08, P<.001; Cohen’s d=0.83) and at the 6-month follow-up (F 1,261=80.17, P<.001; Cohen’s d=1.02). The effects in the iSMI group were maintained at 12-month follow-up. Conclusions This Web- and mobile-based intervention has proven effective in reducing stress in employees in the long term. Internet-based stress management interventions should be further pursued as a valuable alternative to face-to-face interventions. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials

  7. Combined interventional and surgical treatment for a rare case of double patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    SHANG, XIAO-KE; ZHANG, GANG-CHENG; ZHONG, LIANG; ZHOU, XIN; LIU, MEI; LU, RONG

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the case of a 2.5-year-old girl with double patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) that was successfully treated following interventional and surgical treatment. Bilateral ductus arteriosus is a very rare condition, which is assumed to occur when the branchial-type arterial system transforms into the mammalian-type arterial system during the development of the aorta and its branches. This case was misdiagnosed as ordinary PDA by echocardiography prior to the first surgery and the surgery was not successful because of poor accessibility. Enhanced computed tomography subsequently showed situs solitus, atrial situs, levocardia, right-sided aortic arch with right-sided descending aorta, an isolated left subclavian artery and double PDA. Interventional treatment was performed and intraoperative aortic arch angiography showed that the descending aorta was the origin of the first funnel-type PDA (PDA-1). The left subclavian artery was not connected to the aorta but was connected to the pulmonary artery with a very narrow winding duct, which was PDA-2. Interventional treatment via PDA-2 also failed because passing a guidewire through the twisted PDA-2 was difficult. The child was immediately transferred to the surgical operation room for double PDA ligation and left subclavian artery reconstruction under median thoracotomy. The surgical procedure succeeded and the patient recovered quickly. The failure of the interventional treatment may be attributed to the difficulty in establishing a path. The soft tip of the hardened guidewire was relatively long. If the hardened part of the wire was sent to the appropriate place to support the pathway, the soft tip would be forced to enter the vertebrobasilar artery system. A similar problem was encountered when the left subclavian artery was selected for intervention. Shortening the length of the soft tip of the hardened guidewire may have enabled smooth completion of the establishment of the pathway. However

  8. Deriving Requirements for Pervasive Well-Being Technology From Work Stress and Intervention Theory: Framework and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Koldijk, Saskia; Kraaij, Wessel

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress in office environments is a big concern, often leading to burn-out. New technologies are emerging, such as easily available sensors, contextual reasoning, and electronic coaching (e-coaching) apps. In the Smart Reasoning for Well-being at Home and at Work (SWELL) project, we explore the potential of using such new pervasive technologies to provide support for the self-management of well-being, with a focus on individuals' stress-coping. Ideally, these new pervasive systems should be grounded in existing work stress and intervention theory. However, there is a large diversity of theories and they hardly provide explicit directions for technology design. Objective The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive and concise framework that can be used to design pervasive technologies that support knowledge workers to decrease stress. Methods Based on a literature study we identify concepts relevant to well-being at work and select different work stress models to find causes of work stress that can be addressed. From a technical perspective, we then describe how sensors can be used to infer stress and the context in which it appears, and use intervention theory to further specify interventions that can be provided by means of pervasive technology. Results The resulting general framework relates several relevant theories: we relate “engagement and burn-out” to “stress”, and describe how relevant aspects can be quantified by means of sensors. We also outline underlying causes of work stress and how these can be addressed with interventions, in particular utilizing new technologies integrating behavioral change theory. Based upon this framework we were able to derive requirements for our case study, the pervasive SWELL system, and we implemented two prototypes. Small-scale user studies proved the value of the derived technology-supported interventions. Conclusions The presented framework can be used to systematically develop theory

  9. Effect of a Consumer-Directed Voucher and a Disease-Management-Health-Promotion Nurse Intervention on Home Care Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Mukamel, Dana; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the impact of two interventions, a consumer-directed voucher for in-home supportive services and a chronic disease self-management-health-promotion nurse intervention, on the probability of use of two types of home care-skilled home health care and personal assistance services-received by functionally impaired Medicare…

  10. A study protocol: a community pharmacy-based intervention for improving the management of sleep disorders in the community settings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep disorders are very common in the community and are estimated to affect up to 45% of the world’s population. Pharmacists are in a position to give advice and provide appropriate services to individuals who are unable to easily access medical care. The purpose of this study is to develop an intervention to improve the management of sleep disorders in the community. The aims are– (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of a community pharmacy-based intervention in managing sleep disorders, (2) to evaluate the role of actigraph as an objective measure in monitoring certain sleep disorders and (3) to evaluate the extended role of community pharmacists in managing sleep disorders. This intervention is developed to monitor individuals undergoing treatment and overcome the difficulties in validating self-reported feedback. Method/design This is a community-based intervention, prospective, controlled trial, with one intervention group and one control group, comparing individuals receiving a structured intervention with those receiving usual care for sleep-related disorders at community pharmacies. Discussion This study will demonstrate the utilisation and efficacy of community pharmacy-based intervention to manage sleep disorders in the community, and will assess the possibility of implementing this intervention into the community pharmacy workflow. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12612000825853 PMID:24533916

  11. Development of a Multisystemic Parent Management Training Intervention for Incarcerated Parents, Their Children and Families

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, J. Mark; Martinez, Charles R.; Schiffmann, Tracy; Newton, Rex; Olin, Laura; Leve, Leslie; Foney, Dana M.; Shortt, Joann Wu

    2008-01-01

    The majority of men and women prison inmates are parents. Many lived with children prior to incarceration, and most have at least some contact with their children and families while serving their sentences. As prison populations have increased in the United States, there has been a renewed interest in finding ways not only to reduce recidivism, but also to prevent incarceration in the first place, particularly amongst the children of incarcerated parents. Positive family interaction is related to both issues. The ongoing development of a multisystemic intervention designed to increase positive family interaction for parents and families involved in the criminal justice system is described. The intervention package currently includes a prison-based parent management training program called Parenting Inside Out (PIO); a prison-based therapeutic visitation program; and complimentary versions of PIO designed for jail and probation and parole settings. Work on other components designed for justice-involved parents, children and for caregivers during reunification from prison is ongoing. Program development has occurred within the context of strong support from the state department of corrections and other key governmental and non-profit sector groups, and support systems have been established to help maintain the interventions as well as to develop complimentary interventions, policies and procedures. PMID:19885365

  12. Adherence challenges in the management of type 1 diabetes in adolescents: prevention and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Borus, Joshua S.; Laffel, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite the availability of effective therapies, adolescents with type 1 diabetes demonstrate poorer adherence to treatment regimens compared with other pediatric age groups. Nonadherence is tightly linked to suboptimal glycemic control, increasing morbidity, and risk for premature mortality. This article will review barriers to adherence and discuss interventions that have shown promise in improving outcomes for this population. Recent findings Adolescents face numerous obstacles to adherence, including developmental behaviors, flux in family dynamics, and perceived social pressures, which compound the relative insulin resistance brought on by pubertal physiology. Some successful interventions have relied on encouraging nonjudgmental family support in the daily tasks of blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration. Other interventions overcome these barriers through the use of motivational interviewing and problem-solving techniques, flexibility in dietary recommendations, and extending provider outreach and support with technology. Summary Effective interventions build on teens' internal and external supports (family, technology, and internal motivation) in order to simplify their management of diabetes and provide opportunities for the teens to share the burdens of care. Although such strategies help to minimize the demands placed upon teens with diabetes, suboptimal glycemic control will likely persist for the majority of adolescents until technological breakthroughs allow for automated insulin delivery in closed loop systems. PMID:20489639

  13. Endovascular intervention for acute stroke due to infective endocarditis: case report.

    PubMed

    Dababneh, Haitham; Hedna, V Shushrutha; Ford, Jenna; Taimeh, Ziad; Peters, Keith; Mocco, J; Waters, Michael F

    2012-02-01

    The overall incidence of neurological complications due to infective endocarditis is as high as 40%, with embolic infarcts more common than hemorrhagic strokes. The standard of care for typical strokes does not apply to infective endocarditis because there is a substantial risk of hemorrhage with thrombolysis. In the last decade there have been multiple case reports of intravenous and intraarterial thrombolysis with successful outcomes for acute strokes with related infective endocarditis, but successful endovascular interventions for acute strokes associated with infective endocarditis are rarely reported. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first case in the literature to use a mechanical retrieval device in successful vegetation retrieval in an infective endocarditis acute stroke. Although an interventional approach for treatment of acute stroke related to infective endocarditis is a promising option, it is controversial and a cautious clinical decision should be made on a case-by-case basis. The authors conclude that this approach can be tested in a case series with matched controls, because this condition is rare and a randomized clinical trial is not a realistic option.

  14. Improving safety in small enterprises through an integrated safety management intervention.

    PubMed

    Kines, Pete; Andersen, Dorte; Andersen, Lars Peter; Nielsen, Kent; Pedersen, Louise

    2013-02-01

    This study tests the applicability of a participatory behavior-based injury prevention approach integrated with safety culture initiatives. Sixteen small metal industry enterprises (10-19 employees) are randomly assigned to receive the intervention or not. Safety coaching of owners/managers result in the identification of 48 safety tasks, 85% of which are solved at follow-up. Owner/manager led constructive dialogue meetings with workers result in the prioritization of 29 tasks, 79% of which are accomplished at follow-up. Intervention enterprises have significant increases on six of eight safety-perception-survey factors, while comparisons increase on only one factor. Both intervention and comparison enterprises demonstrate significant increases in their safety observation scores. Interview data validate and supplement these results, providing some evidence for behavior change and the initiation of safety culture change. Given that over 95% of enterprises in most countries have less than 20 employees, there is great potential for adapting this integrated approach to other industries. PMID:23398709

  15. Interventional pain management skills competency in pain medicine fellows: a method for development and assessment.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Kevin; Cuccurullo, Sara J; Perret-Karimi, Danielle; Hata, Justin; Ferrer, Steven M; Demesmin, Didier; Petagna, Ann Marie

    2014-08-01

    The purposes of this project were to propose an educational module to instruct pain medicine fellows in the appropriate performance of interventional pain management techniques and to verify procedural competency through objective evaluation methodology. Eight board-certified pain medicine physicians spanning two fellowship programs trained seven fellows using a standardized competency-based module. Assessment tools address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (American Board of Anesthesiology Pain Medicine Content Outline). The seven fellows demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the evaluation module. Objective measures compared the fellows' performance on standardized procedure checklists administered 9 mos into training; fellows in the 2012-2013 academic year also received testing at the 3-mo mark. Support for the assessment module is demonstrated by appropriate performance of interventional procedures, with improvement noted from 3-mo to 9-mo testing, successful completion of chart-stimulated oral examinations, proper performance of relevant physical examination maneuvers, and completion of program-specific medical knowledge written tests. The fellows were evaluated via patient surveys and 360-degree global rating scales, maintained procedure logs, and completed two patient-care reports; these were reviewed by program directors to ensure adequate completion. The standardized educational module and evaluation methodology presented provide a potential framework for the definition of baseline competency in the clinical skill area of interventional pain management. PMID:25033098

  16. Is there sufficient evidence to support intervention to manage shoulder arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Tai Kie, Andrew; Hanusch, Birgit; Kulkarni, Rohit; Rees, Jonathan; Rangan, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Background We explore the nature, extent and validity of research studies concerning the management of shoulder arthritis to identify whether current management recommendations are adequate. Methods A full electronic search for relevant studies published between 2002 and 2012 was performed. The search focused on level 1 and level 2 studies. Full texts of selected articles were retrieved and assessed for quality against validated criteria. Results Four hundred and eleven studies were identified on the initial search and screened. Sixteen studies were selected for inclusion in the review. The studies identified were unable to provide a clear indication of best intervention for shoulder arthritis. The inclusion of a range of shoulder pathologies in some studies and the diversity in outcome measures used made it difficult for systematic reviews to effectively pool data. Better outcomes have been shown with total shoulder replacement over hemiarthroplasty for shoulder osteoarthritis; however, primary studies were often of limited quality. Sparse evidence is available for all other interventions, regardless of whether operative or non-operative. Conclusions The present review highlights the need for standardization of outcome assessment following treatment of shoulder arthritis. More rigorous and robust primary studies are needed to guide clinical practice on the best interventions for arthritis of the shoulder. PMID:27583004

  17. An educational intervention to promote self-management and professional socialization in graduate nurse anesthesia students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Debra A.

    Traditionally, nurse anesthesia educators have utilized prior academic achievement to predict student success. However, research has indicated that prior academic achievement offers an inadequate assessment of student success in graduate healthcare programs with extensive clinical residencies. The educational literature has identified many non-cognitive factors, such as self-efficacy and locus of control, that may provide a more holistic prediction model of student success. An experimental study with pretest-posttest design and stratified random assignment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention to promote self-management, professional socialization, and academic achievement among first semester graduate nurse anesthesia students. Participants (N = 66) were demographically similar to the national graduate nurse anesthesia student body, though Hispanics and younger students were a little over-represented in the sample (56% female, 75.8% White, 15.2% Hispanic, 6% Other, 59% ≤ 30-years-old, 67% ≤ 3 years of ICU). The results showed that most graduate anesthesia students had strong self-management and professional socialization characteristics on admission. The results did not support the effectiveness of this educational intervention. Thus, ceiling effect may have accounted in part for statistically non-significant results regarding self-efficacy (p = .190, o2 = .03), locus of control (p = .137, o2 = .04), professional socialization (p = .819, o2 = .001), and academic achievement (p = .689, o2 = .003). Future researchers may need to expand the scope of the intervention, use a more powerful and sensitive instrument, and utilize a larger sample.

  18. Implementing computer information systems for hospital-based case management.

    PubMed

    Williams, F G; Netting, F E; Engstrom, K M

    1991-01-01

    Like all health care services, case management is a process that relies on information. Based on the experiences in implementing computer information systems in six hospital-based case management programs, several financial, technical, and management issues are reviewed. These issues, which are also relevant for other specialized hospital-based programs, include information priorities, user acceptance, quantifying data, data entry methods, data security, and systems integration. The lessons learned regarding these issues are discussed, and categories of software alternatives are presented.

  19. Qualitative evaluation of a self-management intervention for people in the early stage of dementia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Faith; Turner, Andrew; Wallace, Louise M; Stanley, Damian; Jesuthasan, Jana; Bradbury, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    Self-management programs are effective for people living with chronic illnesses. However, there has been little research addressing self-management for people with dementia in the early stages. This study presents a qualitative evaluation of the experiences of attending a novel self-management program and initial process evaluation. The program was designed with and for people with dementia. It addresses: (a) relationship with family, (b) maintenance of an active lifestyle, (c) psychological well-being, (d) techniques to cope with memory changes and (e) information about dementia. Six participants with early stage dementia completed the intervention that was co-delivered by lay and clinical professional tutors. Participants and tutors attended focus group and interviews at the end of the program to explore their perceptions of the intervention. These were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Participants reported enjoyment and benefits from the intervention. This was despite some reporting concerns relating to their memory difficulties. The program's flexible nature, focus on strengths and the opportunity to spend time with other people living with dementia were particularly well received. Participants and tutors outlined areas for further improvement. The program was feasible and its flexible delivery appeared to facilitate participant benefit. Emphasis should be placed on maintaining activity and relationships, improving positive well-being and social interaction during the program. Memory of the pleasant experience and strengths focus was evidenced, which may impact positively on quality of life. The results highlight the usefulness and acceptability of self-management for people with early stage dementia and provide initial support for the program's structure and content.

  20. Narrowing the treatment gap with equitable access: mid-term outcomes of a community case management program in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Littrell, Megan; Moukam, Laure Vartan; Libite, Roger; Youmba, Jean Christian; Baugh, Gunther

    2013-10-01

    Coverage of case management interventions remains low and inadequate to achieve millennium development goal (MDG) target reductions in child mortality. Children living in the poorest households are particularly disadvantaged. Community case management (CCM) uses trained and supervised community health workers to improve access to, quality of and demand for effective case management. Evidence that CCM programs can achieve equitable improvements in coverage is limited. This cross-sectional study uses a quasi-experimental design with intervention and comparison areas. Outcomes of a CCM program for malaria and diarrhoea operating in two districts of Cameroon were measured after 1 year of implementation. A household census (N = 16 954) provided measurement of treatment-seeking behaviour for recent episodes of fever and diarrhoea. Results were compared between areas using chi-square tests. Intervention-area children with fever or diarrhoea were nearly nine times more likely to receive treatment with artemisinin combination therapy or oral rehydration salts, respectively, vs neighbouring comparison-area children. High levels of effective treatment were equitable across socioeconomic status in intervention areas, whereas disparities were observed in neighbouring comparison areas. CCM can achieve rapid and equitable improvements in coverage of case management for malaria and diarrhoea, and is a promising strategy for achieving MDG 4. Improved access to treatment, quality of care and caregiver demand were achieved in two districts of Cameroon. CCM must be scaled up to demonstrate outcomes and impact at scale.

  1. First-Birth Outcomes and Timing of Second Births: A Statewide Case Management Program for Adolescent Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangalang, Bernadette B.; Barth, Richard P.; Painter, John S.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines a case management intervention for first-time pregnant and parenting adolescents. It compares a sample of 1,260 first-time adolescent mothers in the Adolescent Parenting Program (APP) in North Carolina with 1,260 first-time adolescent mothers who did not participate in the program (non-APP). Using birth certificate data,…

  2. Comparison of a Mindful Eating Intervention to a Diabetes Self-Management Intervention among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla K.; Kristeller, Jean L.; Headings, Amy; Nagaraja, Haikady

    2014-01-01

    Mindful eating may be an effective intervention for increasing awareness of hunger and satiety cues, improving eating regulation and dietary patterns, reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and promoting weight loss. Diabetes self-management education (DSME), which addresses knowledge, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations for improving…

  3. Efficacy of Interventions for Improving Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in HIV/AIDS Cases at PIMS, Islamabad.

    PubMed

    Uzma, Qudsia; Emmanuel, Faran; Ather, Uzma; Zaman, Shakila

    2011-01-01

    It is imperative to prove efficacy of tailored interventions and translate the efficacious ones into clinical strategies for achieving good ART adherence. ART adherence among registered HIV/AIDS cases at HIV treatment centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad was assessed through RCT. Study duration was 10 weeks; eligible subjects (N = 76) were randomly halved; Intervention Group (IG) received trial interventions i.e. subject involvement, weekly phone reminders in addition to routine counselling, while Comparison group received routine counselling only. Self-reported adherence (SRA) questionnaire and pill identification test (PIT) conducted at both baseline and follow-up in addition to CD4 count and viral load. ITT using ANOVA; McNemar's test for variables with before-after assessments within a group. Results showed significant differences in ≥95% SRA, ≥95% Adherence on PIT, Viral load test of <50 copies per cubic mm. These interventions should be included in the overall treatment strategy for HIV/AIDS in Pakistan.

  4. What is the role of a case manager in community aged care? A qualitative study in Australia.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-07-01

    and ongoing development, as well as facilitate case managers to set professional boundaries in the delivery of case management interventions to their clients.

  5. CASE MANAGEMENT INSIDER. The Top 10 Mistakes You May Be Making In Your Case Management Department! Part 4.

    PubMed

    Cesta, Toni

    2015-10-01

    We have now completed our review of the top 10 mistakes you may be making in your case management department. I've included tips and strategies for correcting these mistakes if you are facing them in your organization. If you follow these suggestions, you will help to keep your case management practice and your department on track and moving forward!

  6. System dynamics-based evaluation of interventions to promote appropriate waste disposal behaviors in low-income urban areas: A Baltimore case study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaqing; Hobbs, Benjamin F; Lasater, Molly E; Parker, Cindy L; Winch, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    Inappropriate waste disposal is a serious issue in many urban neighborhoods, exacerbating environmental, rodent, and public health problems. Governments all over the world have been developing interventions to reduce inappropriate waste disposal. A system dynamics model is proposed to quantify the impacts of interventions on residential waste related behavior. In contrast to other models of municipal solid waste management, the structure of our model is based on sociological and economic studies on how incentives and social norms interactively affect waste disposal behavior, and its parameterization is informed by field work. A case study of low-income urban neighborhoods in Baltimore, MD, USA is presented. The simulation results show the effects of individual interventions, and also identify positive interactions among some potential interventions, especially information and incentive-based policies, as well as their limitations. The model can help policy analysts identify the most promising intervention packages, and then field test those few, rather than having to pilot test all combinations. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate large uncertainties about behavioral responses to some interventions, showing where information from survey research and social experiments would improve policy making. PMID:27260985

  7. System dynamics-based evaluation of interventions to promote appropriate waste disposal behaviors in low-income urban areas: A Baltimore case study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaqing; Hobbs, Benjamin F; Lasater, Molly E; Parker, Cindy L; Winch, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    Inappropriate waste disposal is a serious issue in many urban neighborhoods, exacerbating environmental, rodent, and public health problems. Governments all over the world have been developing interventions to reduce inappropriate waste disposal. A system dynamics model is proposed to quantify the impacts of interventions on residential waste related behavior. In contrast to other models of municipal solid waste management, the structure of our model is based on sociological and economic studies on how incentives and social norms interactively affect waste disposal behavior, and its parameterization is informed by field work. A case study of low-income urban neighborhoods in Baltimore, MD, USA is presented. The simulation results show the effects of individual interventions, and also identify positive interactions among some potential interventions, especially information and incentive-based policies, as well as their limitations. The model can help policy analysts identify the most promising intervention packages, and then field test those few, rather than having to pilot test all combinations. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate large uncertainties about behavioral responses to some interventions, showing where information from survey research and social experiments would improve policy making.

  8. Integrating between-session interventions (homework) in therapy: the importance of the therapeutic relationship and cognitive case conceptualization.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Timothy J; Lawrence, Katherine A; Taylor, Kate; Norton, Peter J; Kazantzis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-01

    Between-session interventions, or homework, are crucial to a range of psychological therapies, including cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Therapeutic interventions often involve experiencing emotions and situations, or examining strongly held views about their problems, that clients can find distressing. Hence, the clinician faces a particular challenge in collaborating with the client to carry out these interventions between sessions. In this article, we convey how this process in CBT requires not only a consideration of the theoretically meaningful determinants of adherence behavior but also a sophisticated cognitive case conceptualization. Using case material, we illustrate the interplay between in-session design, planning, and review of between-session interventions and the conceptualization. We also include a distinction between generic elements of the therapeutic relationship and CBT-specific elements. The case material also attends to the person of the therapist, and his or her own cognitive and emotional reactions occurring throughout the process of discussing between-session interventions. PMID:25809713

  9. Mycobacterium avium complex olecranon bursitis resolves without antimicrobials or surgical intervention: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Working, Selene; Tyser, Andrew; Levy, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nontuberculous mycobacteria are an uncommon cause of septic olecranon bursitis, though cases have increasingly been described in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. Guidelines recommend a combination of surgical resection and antimicrobials for treatment. This case is the first reported case of nontuberculous mycobacterial olecranon bursitis that resolved without medical or surgical intervention. Case presentation A 67-year-old female developed a painless, fluctuant swelling of the olecranon bursa following blunt trauma to the elbow. Due to persistent bursal swelling, she underwent three separate therapeutic bursal aspirations, two involving intrabursal steroid injection. After the third aspiration, the bursa became erythematous and severely swollen, and bursal fluid grew Mycobacterium avium complex. Triple-drug antimycobacterial therapy was initiated, but discontinued abruptly due to a rash. Surgery was not performed. The patient was observed off antimicrobials, and gradually clinically improved with a compressive dressing. By 14 months after initial presentation, clinical exam revealed complete resolution of the previously erythematous bursal mass. Discussion This is the first reported case of nontuberculous mycobacterial olecranon bursitis managed successfully without surgery or antimicrobials. Musculoskeletal nontuberculous mycobacterial infections are challenging given the lack of clinical data about optimal duration and choice of antimicrobials or the role of surgery. Additionally, the potential toxicity and drug interactions of antimycobacterials are not insignificant and warrant close monitoring if treatment is pursued. Conclusion This case raises an important clinical question of whether close observation off antimicrobials is appropriate in select cases of immunocompetent patients with localized atypical mycobacterial disease of soft tissue and skeletal structures. PMID:26793457

  10. School nurse case management for children with chronic illness: health, academic, and quality of life outcomes.

    PubMed

    Keehner Engelke, Martha; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B; Swanson, Melvin

    2008-08-01

    More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with asthma, diabetes, severe allergies, seizures, or sickle-cell anemia in 5 different school districts who were provided case management by school nurses. The children ranged in age from 5 to 19 years. At the end of the school year, children experienced an improvement in quality of life and gained skills and knowledge to manage their illness more effectively. Classroom participation, grades, and participation in extracurricular activities also increased for many children. The study provides evidence of the positive impact school nurses have on children with chronic illness and suggests ways they can measure the outcomes of their interventions. PMID:18757353

  11. Managing Depression Among Homeless Mothers: Pilot Testing an Adapted Collaborative Care Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, Linda; Upshur, Carole C.; Fletcher-Blake, Debbian; Reed, George; Frisard, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although depression is common among homeless mothers, little progress has been made in testing treatment strategies for this group. We describe pilot test results of an adapted collaborative care model for homeless mothers with depression. Method We conducted a pilot intervention study of mothers screening positive for depression in 2 randomly selected shelter-based primary care clinics in New York over 18 months in 2010–2012. Study participants completed a psychosocial, health, and mental health assessment at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Results One-third of women screened positive for depression (123 of 328 women). Sixty-seven women (63.2% of the eligible sample) enrolled in the intervention. At 6 months, compared to usual-care women, intervention group women were more likely to be receiving depression treatment (40.0% vs 5.9%, P = .01) and antidepressant medication (73.3% vs 5.9%, P = .001, respectively) and had more primary care physician and care manager visits at both 3 months (74.3% vs 53.3%, P = .009 and 91.4% vs 26.7%, P < .001, respectively) and 6 months (46.7% vs 23.5%, P = .003 and 70% vs 17.7%, P = .001, respectively). More women in the intervention group compared to usual-care women reported ≥ 50% improvement in depression symptoms at 6 months (30% vs 5.9%, P = .07). Conclusions This pilot study found that implementing an adapted collaborative care intervention was feasible in a shelter-based primary care clinic and had promising results that require further testing. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02723058 PMID:27486545

  12. Incorporating Prototyping and Iteration Into Intervention Development: A Case Study of a Dining Hall-Based Intervention

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Arianna D.; Hekler, Eric B.; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research from the fields of computer science and engineering highlight the importance of an iterative design process (IDP) to create more creative and effective solutions. Objective This study describes IDP as a new method for developing health behavior interventions and evaluates the effectiveness of a dining hall-based intervention developed using IDP on college students’ eating behavior and values. Participants 458 students (52.6% Female, age M=19.6±1.5). Methods The intervention was developed via an IDP parallel-process. A cluster-randomized controlled study compared differences in eating behavior among student in 4 university dining halls (2 intervention, 2 control). Results The final intervention was a multi-component, point-of-selection marketing campaign. Students in the intervention dining halls consumed significantly less junk food and high-fat meat and increased their perceived importance of eating a healthful diet relative to the control group. Conclusion IDP may be valuable for the development of behavior change interventions. PMID:23409862

  13. Interdependency Management in Universities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Dietmar; Benninghoff, Martin; Ramuz, Raphaël; Gorga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    There remains uncertainty in scientific discussions regarding the governance of universities in new public management regimes in terms of who actually "rules" in the university. Apparently, a strengthened management leadership is confronted with continuing elements of academic self-regulation and professional autonomy in knowledge…

  14. Diabetes Nurse Case Management and Motivational Interviewing for Change (DYNAMIC): Results of a 2-year Randomized Controlled Pragmatic Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gabbay, Robert A.; Añel-Tiangco, Raquel M.; Dellasega, Cheryl; Mauger, David T.; Adelman, Alan; Van Horn, Deborah H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine if the addition of nurse case managers (NCMs) trained in motivational interviewing (MI) to usual care would result in improved outcomes in high risk type 2 diabetes patients. Methods A 2-year randomized controlled pragmatic trial randomized 545 patients to usual care control (n=313) or those who received the intervention (n= 232) with additional practice embedded NCM care, including MI-guided behavior change counseling. NCMs received intensive MI training with ongoing fidelity assessment. Results Systolic BP was better in the intervention group (131±15.9 vs. 135±18.2, p < 0.05). HbA1c, LDL, and diastolic BP improved in both groups: HbA1c (control group 9.1% to 8.0%, intervention group 8.8% to 7.8%), LDL (control group 127 to 100 mg/dL, intervention group 128 to 102 mg/dL), diastolic BP (control group 78 to 74 mm Hg, intervention group 80 to 74 mm Hg). Depression symptom scores were better in the intervention group. The reduction in diabetes-related distress approached statistical significance. Conclusions NCMs and MI improved systolic BP and complications screening. The large decrease in HbA1C and LDL in the control group may have obscured any further intervention effect. Although nurses prompted providers for medication titration, strategies to reduce provider clinical inertia might also be needed. Significant findings of the study In patients with type 2 diabetes, an intervention with nurse case management and motivational interviewing improves systolic blood pressure, depression, and screening for complications. What this study adds First study to look at the benefit of the addition of motivational interviewing to nurse case management in the care of the high-risk adult with type 2 diabetes. Particular attention was given to ensuring fidelity to the motivational interviewing approach. PMID:23368423

  15. Developing advanced clinical skills in the management of breathlessness: evaluation of an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Froggatt, Katherine; Walford, Carole

    2005-09-01

    The dissemination of knowledge regarding care interventions is often supported through educational initiatives. However, the efficacy of education to make a difference to practice is not always demonstrated. An educational course has been developed and piloted that aimed to educate nurses about skills for the management of breathlessness. The course was developed with, and utilised the expertise of, researchers, practitioners and educators experienced in the management of breathlessness. Twelve clinical nurse specialists, from Scotland and South East England, working in oncology and palliative care, participated in the first course. A longitudinal evaluation was undertaken to consider the impact of the course upon the participants' practice and the care of people who are breathless. Interviews were conducted at two time points and a self-rated familiarity and confidence tool was completed by the participants at three time points. The participants rated themselves as improving their familiarity and confidence with the different aspects of the intervention. Attendance on the course also impacted upon the care of people who were breathless, improving their ability to self-manage their condition. Recommendations for future educational developments of this type are provided. PMID:16112528

  16. Management of patient and staff radiation dose in interventional radiology: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Bartal, Gabriel; Vano, Eliseo; Paulo, Graciano; Miller, Donald L

    2014-04-01

    The increasing complexity and numbers of interventional fluoroscopy procedures have led to increasing patient doses of radiation and to increasing concern over staff doses. Hybrid rooms incorporate multiple imaging modalities and are used by multidisciplinary teams in interventional fluoroscopy suites and operating theaters. These rooms present additional radiation protection challenges. The new low annual exposure limit for the lens of the eye also requires specific measures to prevent cataracts in operators. The traditional attitude of radiation protection must be changed to one of proactive management of radiation dose and image quality. Incorporation of a comprehensive dose management program into the departmental quality assurance program is now essential. Physicians, radiographers, and medical physicists play an essential role in the safe use of fluoroscopy in medical practice. Efficient use of all imaging modalities (e.g., fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography, cone-beam CT) requires knowledge of the effects of different equipment settings on patient and staff doses as well as the skill and competence to optimize these settings for each procedure and patient. Updates and recommendations on radiation protection and dose management programs, including aspects of education and training, are presented.

  17. Using Design Thinking to Improve Psychological Interventions: The Case of the Growth Mindset during the Transition to High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, David S.; Romero, Carissa; Paunesku, Dave; Hulleman, Christopher S.; Schneider, Barbara; Hinojosa, Cintia; Lee, Hae Yeon; O'Brien, Joseph; Flint, Kate; Roberts, Alice; Trott, Jill; Greene, Daniel; Walton, Gregory M.; Dweck, Carol S.

    2016-01-01

    There are many promising psychological interventions on the horizon, but there is no clear methodology for preparing them to be scaled up. Drawing on design thinking, the present research formalizes a methodology for redesigning and tailoring initial interventions. We test the methodology using the case of fixed versus growth mindsets during the…

  18. Practicing What We Teach: Using Case Studies from 9/11 to Teach Crisis Intervention from a Generalist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelman, Caroline Rosenthal; Mirabito, Diane M.

    2005-01-01

    Populations traditionally served by social workers are experiencing increasingly severe psychosocial stressors, necessitating that students be trained in crisis intervention. This paper provides educators with a theoretical framework integrating generalist practice and crisis intervention, which is applied to compelling case studies from September…

  19. Participatory ergonomic intervention for prevention of low back pain: assembly line redesign case.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, João Marcos; Wanderck, Claudia; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a participatory ergonomic intervention aimed at reducing low back pain cases in the dispatch department of a catalogue and e-commerce retail company. Based on the findings of the ergonomic analysis and design committee, the company's own employees redesigned the assembly line's layout. As a result of these changes two job tasks that involved manual material handling of boxes, identified by the revised NIOSH equation as posing an increased risk for lifting-related low back pain, were totally eliminated, and the employees responsible for moving boxes from the end of the assembly line to pallets on the ground were given more control over their jobs, and these jobs were also enriched with a new, less heavy task. These results demonstrate that participatory ergonomic interventions are a viable and effective strategy to reduce the exposure to work-related physical and psychosocial risk factors for low back pain. PMID:22317739

  20. Patient perspectives of managing fatigue in Ankylosing Spondylitis, and views on potential interventions: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a major component of living with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), though it has been largely over-looked, and currently there are no specific agreed management strategies. Methods This qualitative exploratory study involved participants who are members of an existing population-based ankylosing spondylitis (PAS) cohort. Participants residing in South West Wales were invited to participate in a focus group to discuss; (1) effects of fatigue, (2) self-management strategies and (3) potential future interventions. The focus groups were audio-recorded and the transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Participants consisted of 3 males/4 females (group 1) and 4 males/3 females (group 2), aged between 35 and 73 years (mean age 53 years). Three main themes were identified: (1) The effects of fatigue were multi-dimensional with participants expressing feelings of being ‘drained’ (physical), ‘upset’ (emotional) and experiencing ‘low-mood’ (psychological); (2) The most commonly reported self-management strategy for fatigue was a balanced combination of activity (exercise) and rest. Medication was reluctantly taken due to side-effects and worries over dependency; (3) Participants expressed a preference for psychological therapies rather than pharmacological for managing fatigue. Information on Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) was received with interest, with recommendations for delivery in a group format with the option of distance-based delivery for people who were not able to attend a group course. Conclusions Patients frequently try and manage their fatigue without any formal guidance or support. Our research indicates there is a need for future research to focus on psychological interventions to address the multi-faceted aspects of fatigue in AS. PMID:23659344

  1. [Potential for intervention of private health insurers in discharge management using the example of stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Sterl, E; Böhme, J

    2016-06-01

    The study reveals that stroke patients today can still experience gaps in the provision of healthcare and fragmented therapy. This is often the case on transferral from the inpatient to outpatient sector, causing complications that could be avoided by means of good discharge management across all sectors. Private health insurance can actively support and positively influence the treatment process in the form of case management. Individual contact with stroke patients and their relatives allows for early planning and organisation of the next steps, and offers patients the support they need during a difficult phase of life. PMID:27483688

  2. Review of Medical Dispute Cases in the Pain Management in Korea: A Medical Malpractice Liability Insurance Database Study

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyun Seog

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain medicine often requires medico-legal involvement, even though diagnosis and treatments have improved considerably. Multiple guidelines for pain physicians contain many recommendations regarding interventional treatment. Unfortunately, no definite treatment guidelines exist because there is no complete consensus among individual guidelines. Pain intervention procedures are widely practiced and highly associated with adverse events and complications. However, a comprehensive, systemic review of medical-dispute cases (MDCs) in Korea has not yet been reported. The purpose of this article is to analyze the frequency and type of medical dispute activity undertaken by pain specialists in Korea. Methods Data on medical disputes cases were collected through the Korea Medical Association mutual aid and through a private medical malpractice liability insurance company. Data regarding the frequency and type of MDCs, along with brief case descriptions, were obtained. Results Pain in the lumbar region made up a major proportion of MDCs and compensation costs. Infection, nerve injury, and diagnosis related cases were the most major contents of MDCs. Only a small proportion of cases involved patient death or unconsciousness, but compensation costs were the highest. Conclusions More systemic guidelines and recommendations on interventional pain management are needed, especially those focused on medico-legal cases. Complications arising from pain management procedures and treatments may be avoided by physicians who have the required knowledge and expertise regarding anatomy and pain intervention procedures and know how to recognize procedural aberrations as soon as they occur. PMID:26495080

  3. Benefits from an uncertainty management intervention for African-American and Caucasian older long-term breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Mishel, Merle H; Germino, Barbara B; Gil, Karen M; Belyea, Michael; Laney, Iris Carlton; Stewart, Janet; Porter, Laura; Clayton, Margaret

    2005-11-01

    In a randomized controlled design, this study tested the efficacy of a theoretically based uncertainty management intervention delivered to older long-term breast cancer survivors. The sample included 509 recurrence-free women (360 Caucasian, 149 African-American women) with a mean age of 64 years (S.D.=8.9 years) who were 5-9 years post-treated for breast cancer. Women were randomly assigned to either the intervention or usual care control condition. The intervention was delivered during four weekly telephone sessions, in which study nurses guided cancer survivors in the use of audiotaped cognitive-behavioral strategies to manage uncertainty about recurrence, and a self-help manual designed to help women understand and manage long-term treatment side effects and other symptoms. Treatment outcome data on uncertainty management were gathered at pre-intervention and 10-months afterward. Repeated measures MANOVA evaluating treatment group, ethnic group, and treatment by ethnic interaction effects indicated that training in uncertainty management resulted in improvements in cognitive reframing, cancer knowledge, patient-health care provider communication, and a variety of coping skills. Results are discussed in terms of the importance of theory-based interventions for cancer survivors that target triggers of uncertainty about recurrence and in terms of ethnic differences in response to the intervention. PMID:15712339

  4. Desired attributes and skills of program managers in translation of evidence-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rhonda; Woodell, Carol; McCarville, Erin; Damitz, Maureen; Banks, Tinesha; Montoya, Jorge; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Peretz, Patricia; Lara, Marielena

    2011-11-01

    Successful chronic disease project management, especially of multiyear initiatives using evidence-based interventions (EBIs), is of great importance to funders, health care decision makers, and researchers, particularly in light of limited funding. However, a gap in knowledge may exist regarding which attributes and skills are most desirable in a program manager to help him or her ensure successful implementation of EBIs. Although some literature examines the dynamics contributing to the success of community coalitions, public health leadership, and community health education, there is minimal literature exploring the significance of a program manager's role in the conceptualization, implementation, and sustainability of initiatives to improve patient and community health. The authors present their experiences as participants in a large-scale asthma initiative implemented in priority communities, as well as results of a survey distributed among all personnel of the program sites. The survey aimed to assess the key skills and attributes, in addition to contextual factors, that contribute to the strength of a program manager overseeing EBIs in asthma initiatives. The results suggest that certain attributes and skills are desirable in recruiting and hiring of a program manager, especially when augmented by ongoing skill-building training, and can help ensure program and research success.

  5. Sankofa pediatric HIV disclosure intervention cyber data management: building capacity in a resource-limited setting and ensuring data quality

    PubMed Central

    Catlin, Ann Christine; Fernando, Sumudinie; Gamage, Ruwan; Renner, Lorna; Antwi, Sampson; Tettey, Jonas Kusah; Amisah, Kofi Aikins; Kyriakides, Tassos; Cong, Xiangyu; Reynolds, Nancy R.; Paintsil, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of pediatric HIV disclosure is low in resource-limited settings. Innovative, culturally sensitive, and patient-centered disclosure approaches are needed. Conducting such studies in resource-limited settings is not trivial considering the challenges of capturing, cleaning, and storing clinical research data. To overcome some of these challenges, the Sankofa pediatric disclosure intervention adopted an interactive cyber infrastructure for data capture and analysis. The Sankofa Project database system is built on the HUBzero cyber infrastructure (https://hubzero.org), an open source software platform. The hub database components support: (1) data management – the “databases” component creates, configures, and manages database access, backup, repositories, applications, and access control; (2) data collection – the “forms” component is used to build customized web case report forms that incorporate common data elements and include tailored form submit processing to handle error checking, data validation, and data linkage as the data are stored to the database; and (3) data exploration – the “dataviewer” component provides powerful methods for users to view, search, sort, navigate, explore, map, graph, visualize, aggregate, drill-down, compute, and export data from the database. The Sankofa cyber data management tool supports a user-friendly, secure, and systematic collection of all data. We have screened more than 400 child–caregiver dyads and enrolled nearly 300 dyads, with tens of thousands of data elements. The dataviews have successfully supported all data exploration and analysis needs of the Sankofa Project. Moreover, the ability of the sites to query and view data summaries has proven to be an incentive for collecting complete and accurate data. The data system has all the desirable attributes of an electronic data capture tool. It also provides an added advantage of building data management capacity in resource-limited settings

  6. Sankofa pediatric HIV disclosure intervention cyber data management: building capacity in a resource-limited setting and ensuring data quality.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Ann Christine; Fernando, Sumudinie; Gamage, Ruwan; Renner, Lorna; Antwi, Sampson; Tettey, Jonas Kusah; Amisah, Kofi Aikins; Kyriakides, Tassos; Cong, Xiangyu; Reynolds, Nancy R; Paintsil, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of pediatric HIV disclosure is low in resource-limited settings. Innovative, culturally sensitive, and patient-centered disclosure approaches are needed. Conducting such studies in resource-limited settings is not trivial considering the challenges of capturing, cleaning, and storing clinical research data. To overcome some of these challenges, the Sankofa pediatric disclosure intervention adopted an interactive cyber infrastructure for data capture and analysis. The Sankofa Project database system is built on the HUBzero cyber infrastructure ( https://hubzero.org ), an open source software platform. The hub database components support: (1) data management - the "databases" component creates, configures, and manages database access, backup, repositories, applications, and access control; (2) data collection - the "forms" component is used to build customized web case report forms that incorporate common data elements and include tailored form submit processing to handle error checking, data validation, and data linkage as the data are stored to the database; and (3) data exploration - the "dataviewer" component provides powerful methods for users to view, search, sort, navigate, explore, map, graph, visualize, aggregate, drill-down, compute, and export data from the database. The Sankofa cyber data management tool supports a user-friendly, secure, and systematic collection of all data. We have screened more than 400 child-caregiver dyads and enrolled nearly 300 dyads, with tens of thousands of data elements. The dataviews have successfully supported all data exploration and analysis needs of the Sankofa Project. Moreover, the ability of the sites to query and view data summaries has proven to be an incentive for collecting complete and accurate data. The data system has all the desirable attributes of an electronic data capture tool. It also provides an added advantage of building data management capacity in resource-limited settings due to its

  7. Interventions for the treatment, management and rehabilitation of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Duncan; Bagnall, Anne-Marie; Hempel, Susanne; Forbes, Carol

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether any particular intervention or combination of interventions is effective in the treatment, management and rehabilitation of adults and children with a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome / myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). Design Substantive update of a systematic review published in 2002. Randomized (RCTs) and non-randomized controlled trials of any intervention or combination of interventions were eligible for inclusion. Study participants could be adults or children with a diagnosis of CFS/ME based on any criteria. We searched eleven electronic databases, reference lists of articles and reviews, and textbooks on CFS/ME. Additional references were sought by contact with experts. Results Seventy studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies on behavioural, immunological, pharmacological and complementary therapies, nutritional supplements and miscellaneous other interventions were identified. Graded exercise therapy and cognitive behaviour therapy appeared to reduce symptoms and improve function based on evidence from RCTs. For most other interventions, evidence of effectiveness was inconclusive and some interventions were associated with significant adverse effects. Conclusions Over the last five years, there has been a marked increase in the size and quality of the evidence base on interventions for CFS/ME. Some behavioural interventions have shown promising results in reducing the symptoms of CFS/ME and improving physical functioning. There is a need for research to define the characteristics of patients who would benefit from specific interventions and to develop clinically relevant objective outcome measures. PMID:17021301

  8. The Single-Case Reporting Guideline In BEhavioural Interventions (SCRIBE) 2016 Statement.

    PubMed

    Tate, Robyn L; Perdices, Michael; Rosenkoetter, Ulrike; Shadish, William; Vohra, Sunita; Barlow, David H; Horner, Robert; Kazdin, Alan; Kratochwill, Thomas; McDonald, Skye; Sampson, Margaret; Shamseer, Larissa; Togher, Leanne; Albin, Richard; Backman, Catherine; Douglas, Jacinta; Evans, Jonathan J; Gast, David; Manolov, Rumen; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Nickels, Lyndsey; Nikles, Jane; Ownsworth, Tamara; Rose, Miranda; Schmid, Christopher H; Wilson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Reporting guidelines, such as the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement, improve the reporting of research in the medical literature (Turner et al., 2012). Many such guidelines exist, and the CONSORT Extension to Nonpharmacological Trials (Boutron et al., 2008) provides suitable guidance for reporting between-groups intervention studies in the behavioral sciences. The CONSORT Extension for N-of-1 Trials (CENT 2015) was developed for multiple crossover trials with single individuals in the medical sciences (Shamseer et al., 2015; Vohra et al., 2015), but there is no reporting guideline in the CONSORT tradition for single-case research used in the behavioral sciences. We developed the Single-Case Reporting guideline In Behavioral interventions (SCRIBE) 2016 to meet this need. This Statement article describes the methodology of the development of the SCRIBE 2016, along with the outcome of 2 Delphi surveys and a consensus meeting of experts. We present the resulting 26-item SCRIBE 2016 checklist. The article complements the more detailed SCRIBE 2016 Explanation and Elaboration article (Tate et al., 2016) that provides a rationale for each of the items and examples of adequate reporting from the literature. Both these resources will assist authors to prepare reports of single-case research with clarity, completeness, accuracy, and transparency. They will also provide journal reviewers and editors with a practical checklist against which such reports may be critically evaluated. PMID:27294998

  9. The Single-Case Reporting Guideline In BEhavioural Interventions (SCRIBE) 2016 Statement.

    PubMed

    Tate, Robyn L; Perdices, Michael; Rosenkoetter, Ulrike; Shadish, William; Vohra, Sunita; Barlow, David H; Horner, Robert; Kazdin, Alan; Kratochwill, Thomas; McDonald, Skye; Sampson, Margaret; Shamseer, Larissa; Togher, Leanne; Albin, Richard; Backman, Catherine; Douglas, Jacinta; Evans, Jonathan J; Gast, David; Manolov, Rumen; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Nickels, Lyndsey; Nikles, Jane; Ownsworth, Tamara; Rose, Miranda; Schmid, Christopher H; Wilson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Reporting guidelines, such as the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement, improve the reporting of research in the medical literature (Turner et al., 2012). Many such guidelines exist, and the CONSORT Extension to Nonpharmacological Trials (Boutron et al., 2008) provides suitable guidance for reporting between-groups intervention studies in the behavioral sciences. The CONSORT Extension for N-of-1 Trials (CENT 2015) was developed for multiple crossover trials with single individuals in the medical sciences (Shamseer et al., 2015; Vohra et al., 2015), but there is no reporting guideline in the CONSORT tradition for single-case research used in the behavioral sciences. We developed the Single-Case Reporting guideline In Behavioral interventions (SCRIBE) 2016 to meet this need. This Statement article describes the methodology of the development of the SCRIBE 2016, along with the outcome of 2 Delphi surveys and a consensus meeting of experts. We present the resulting 26-item SCRIBE 2016 checklist. The article complements the more detailed SCRIBE 2016 Explanation and Elaboration article (Tate et al., 2016) that provides a rationale for each of the items and examples of adequate reporting from the literature. Both these resources will assist authors to prepare reports of single-case research with clarity, completeness, accuracy, and transparency. They will also provide journal reviewers and editors with a practical checklist against which such reports may be critically evaluated.

  10. Is your staffing ratio appropriate for your case management model?

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    Case managers may be working longer hours and have more responsibilities to help their hospital comply with health care reform initiatives, but before rushing to the C-suite to ask for more staff, case management directors should take a hard look at the roles and responsibilities of the department, experts say. They recommend: Look at your staffing ratio and determine if it is appropriate for your case management model and if it is in line with staffing ratios at similar hospitals with similar models. Make a list of all the tasks that case managers are asked to do and break out those that don't affect outcomes or cost of care and those that don't require licensure. Get these assigned to other employees. Before you approach management to ask for more staff, do your homework and have hard data to back up your request. Consider hiring case management extenders to take over clerical tasks and free up case managers to work at the top of their licenses. PMID:25730955

  11. Is your staffing ratio appropriate for your case management model?

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    Case managers may be working longer hours and have more responsibilities to help their hospital comply with health care reform initiatives, but before rushing to the C-suite to ask for more staff, case management directors should take a hard look at the roles and responsibilities of the department, experts say. They recommend: Look at your staffing ratio and determine if it is appropriate for your case management model and if it is in line with staffing ratios at similar hospitals with similar models. Make a list of all the tasks that case managers are asked to do and break out those that don't affect outcomes or cost of care and those that don't require licensure. Get these assigned to other employees. Before you approach management to ask for more staff, do your homework and have hard data to back up your request. Consider hiring case management extenders to take over clerical tasks and free up case managers to work at the top of their licenses.

  12. Using student-managed interventions to increase homework completion and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Olympia, D E; Sheridan, S M; Jenson, W R; Andrews, D

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of self-managed individual and group contingency procedures in improving the completion and accuracy rates of daily mathematics homework assignments. A group of sixth-grade students having homework difficulties in mathematics were selected for the study. There was substantial improvement in the amount of homework completed over baseline for a majority of the students, whereas the results for accuracy were mixed. Students who participated in the self-management training made significant gains on standardized measures of academic achievement and curriculum-based measures of classroom performance. Parents also reported significantly fewer problems associated with homework completion following the intervention. Students who were allowed to select their own performance goals made superior improvements in the number of homework assignments returned compared to students who were given a specified goal by the classroom teacher. Parents, subjects, and the classroom teacher responded positively on consumer satisfaction measures following termination of the study. PMID:16795827

  13. Proposed Medicare Physician Payment Schedule for 2017: Impact on Interventional Pain Management Practices.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan D; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the proposed 2017 Medicare physician fee schedule on July 7, 2016, addressing Medicare payments for physicians providing services either in an office or facility setting, which also includes payments for office expenses and quality provisions for physicians. This proposed rule occurs in the context of numerous policy changes, most notably related to the Medicare Access & CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) and its Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). The proposed rule affects interventional pain management specialists in reimbursement for evaluation and management services, as well as procedures performed in a facility or in-office setting.Changes in the proposed fee schedule impacting interventional pain management practices include adjustments to the meaningful use (MU) program, care management in patient-centered services, identification and review of potentially misvalued services, evaluation of moderate sedation services, Medicare telehealth services, updated geographic practice cost index, data collection on resources used in furnishing global services, reporting of modifier 25 for zero day global services, Medicare Advantage Part C provider and supplier enrollment, appropriate use criteria (AUC) for advanced imaging services, and Medicare shared savings programs. The proposed schedule has provided rates for new epidural codes with or without imaging (fluoroscopy or computed tomography [CT]) and a fee schedule for a new code covering endoscopic spinal decompression. Review of payment rates show major discrepancies in payment schedules with high payments for hospitals, 2,156% higher than in-office procedures. Some procedures which were converted from in-office settings to ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are being reimbursed at 1,366% higher than ASCs. The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) recommendation on avoiding the discrepancies and site-of-service differentials in in

  14. Proposed Medicare Physician Payment Schedule for 2017: Impact on Interventional Pain Management Practices.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan D; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the proposed 2017 Medicare physician fee schedule on July 7, 2016, addressing Medicare payments for physicians providing services either in an office or facility setting, which also includes payments for office expenses and quality provisions for physicians. This proposed rule occurs in the context of numerous policy changes, most notably related to the Medicare Access & CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) and its Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). The proposed rule affects interventional pain management specialists in reimbursement for evaluation and management services, as well as procedures performed in a facility or in-office setting.Changes in the proposed fee schedule impacting interventional pain management practices include adjustments to the meaningful use (MU) program, care management in patient-centered services, identification and review of potentially misvalued services, evaluation of moderate sedation services, Medicare telehealth services, updated geographic practice cost index, data collection on resources used in furnishing global services, reporting of modifier 25 for zero day global services, Medicare Advantage Part C provider and supplier enrollment, appropriate use criteria (AUC) for advanced imaging services, and Medicare shared savings programs. The proposed schedule has provided rates for new epidural codes with or without imaging (fluoroscopy or computed tomography [CT]) and a fee schedule for a new code covering endoscopic spinal decompression. Review of payment rates show major discrepancies in payment schedules with high payments for hospitals, 2,156% higher than in-office procedures. Some procedures which were converted from in-office settings to ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are being reimbursed at 1,366% higher than ASCs. The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) recommendation on avoiding the discrepancies and site-of-service differentials in in

  15. mHealth self-care interventions: managing symptoms following breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei R.; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A.; Rampertaap, Kavita; El-Shammaa, Nardin; Hiotis, Karen; Scagliola, Joan; Yu, Gary; Wang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background Many women suffer from daily distressing symptoms related to lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. Lymphedema, an abnormal accumulation of lymph fluid in the ipsilateral body area or upper limb, remains an ongoing major health problem affecting more than 40% of 3.1 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. Patient-centered care related to lymphedema symptom management is often inadequately addressed in clinical research and practice. mHealth plays a significant role in improving self-care, patient-clinician communication, and access to health information. The-Optimal-Lymph-Flow health IT system (TOLF) is a patient-centered, web-and-mobile-based educational and behavioral mHealth interventions focusing on safe, innovative, and pragmatic electronic assessment and self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and test of TOLF system. Methods The development of TOLF was guided by the Model of Self-Care for Lymphedema Symptom Management and designed based on principles fostering accessibility, convenience, and efficiency of mHealth system to enhance training and motivating assessment of and self-care for lymphedema symptoms. Test of TOLF was accomplished by conducting a psychometric study to evaluate reliability, validity, and efficiency of the electronic version of Breast Cancer and Lymphedema Symptom Experience Index (BCLE-SEI), a usability testing and a pilot feasibility testing of mHealth self-care interventions. Results Findings from the psychometric study with 355 breast cancer survivors demonstrated high internal consistency of the electronic version of the instrument: a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.959 for the total scale, 0.919 for symptom occurrence, and 0.946 for symptom distress. Discriminant validity of the instrument was supported by a significant difference in symptom occurrence (z=−6.938, P<0.000), symptom distress (z=−5.894, P<0.000), and total

  16. Parent and Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of School Nurse Interventions on Children's Self-Management of Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peery, Annette I.; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this…

  17. The Role of Teacher Behavior Management in the Development of Disruptive Behaviors: An Intervention Study with the Good Behavior Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leflot, Geertje; van Lier, Pol A. C.; Onghena, Patrick; Colpin, Hilde

    2010-01-01

    The role of teacher behavior management for children's disruptive behavior development (hyperactive and oppositional behavior) was investigated using a universal classroom preventive intervention study. Five-hundred seventy children were followed from second to third grade of elementary school. Observations of teacher behavior management and…

  18. Utility of Percutaneous Intervention in the Management of Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, John F.; Shilling, Alfred T.; Schenk, Worthington G.; Bissonette, Eric A.; Stadtlander, Kevin S.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; Leung, Daniel A.; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2003-02-15

    A variety of interventional techniques have been developed to restore function to dysfunctional tunneled hemodialysis catheters (THC). The relative efficacies of these techniques were evaluated retrospectively to determine which therapy might be most beneficial. The records of malfunctioning THCs referred to interventional radiology between November 1995 and December 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Dysfunctional THCs were studied using DSA images obtained while injecting contrast through the lumens of the THCs. The interventions performed were categorized into 1 of 5 groups:no treatment or conservative measures such as vigorous flushing;advancing a guidewire through the THC to reposition the catheter tip or to dislodge a small thrombus; catheter exchange over a guidewire; fibrin stripping of the THC using a loop snare; or prolonged (4 or more hr) direct thrombolytic infusion. A Cox Proportional Hazards model was developed to compare the rate of failure among the procedures. There were 340 THC studies. The catheters were managed as follows: 93 patients received conservative management only, 15 had a guidewire advanced through the catheter, 147 underwent catheter exchange, 62 were treated with a fibrin stripping procedure, and 23 received athrombolytic infusion. Estimated 30-day patency rates for THCs were 38.2% for conservative management, 30.9% for guidewire manipulation of catheter tip, 53.6% for catheter exchange, 76.1% for fibrin stripping, and 69.8% for thrombolytic infusion. Differences among the treatments were observed (p < 0.01) and pairwise comparisons were made among the treatment groups. Failure rates were significantly higher in the catheter exchange(p <0.01) and guidewire manipulation at catheter tip (p <0.01) groups when compared with the fibrin stripping group. The catheter exchange and guidewire manipulation groups also experienced higher rates of failure when compared with the thrombolytic infusion group, although the differences were not

  19. Value-based interventional pain management: a review of medicare national and local coverage determination policies.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Helm, Standiford; Singh, Vijay; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2013-01-01

    Major policies, regulations, and practice patterns related to interventional pain management are dependent on Medicare policies which include national coverage policies - national coverage determinations (NCDs), and local coverage policies - local coverage determinations (LCDs). The NCDs are Medicare coverage policies issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The process used by the CMS in deciding what is and what is not medically necessary is lengthy, involving a review of evidence-based literature on the subject, expert opinion, and public comments. In contrast, LCDs are rules and Medicare coverage that are issued by regional contractors and fiscal intermediaries when an NCD has not addressed the policy at issue. The evidence utilized in preparing LCDs includes the highest level of evidence which is based on published authoritative evidence derived from definitive randomized clinical trials or other definitive studies, and general acceptance by the medical community (standard of practice), as supported by sound medical evidence. In addition, the intervention must be safe and effective and appropriate including duration and frequency that is considered appropriate for the item or service in terms of whether it is furnished in accordance with accepted standards of medical practice for the diagnosis or treatment of the patient's condition or to improve the function. In addition, the safe and effective provision includes that service must be furnished in a setting appropriate to the patient's medical needs and condition, ordered and furnished by qualified personnel, the service must meet, but does not exceed, the patient's medical need, and be at least as beneficial as an existing and available medically appropriate alternative. The LCDs are prepared with literature review, state medical societies, and carrier advisory committees (CACs) of which interventional pain management is a member. The LCDs may be appealed by beneficiaries. The NCDs are

  20. Findings from a pilot Randomised trial of an Asthma Internet Self-management Intervention (RAISIN)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D; Wyke, S; Saunderson, K; McConnachie, A; Agur, K; Chaudhuri, R; Thomas, M; Thomson, N C; Yardley, L; Mair, F S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a phase 3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a website (Living Well with Asthma) to support self-management. Design and setting Phase 2, parallel group, RCT, participants recruited from 20 general practices across Glasgow, UK. Randomisation through automated voice response, after baseline data collection, to website access for minimum 12 weeks or usual care. Participants Adults (age≥16 years) with physician diagnosed, symptomatic asthma (Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score ≥1). People with unstable asthma or other lung disease were excluded. Intervention ‘Living Well with Asthma’ is a desktop/laptop compatible interactive website designed with input from asthma/ behaviour change specialists, and adults with asthma. It aims to support optimal medication management, promote use of action plans, encourage attendance at asthma reviews and increase physical activity. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were recruitment/retention, website use, ACQ and mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). Secondary outcomes included patient activation, prescribing, adherence, spirometry, lung inflammation and health service contacts after 12 weeks. Blinding postrandomisation was not possible. Results Recruitment target met. 51 participants randomised (25 intervention group). Age range 16–78 years; 75% female; 28% from most deprived quintile. 45/51 (88%; 20 intervention group) followed up. 19 (76% of the intervention group) used the website, for a mean of 18 min (range 0–49). 17 went beyond the 2 ‘core’ modules. Median number of logins was 1 (IQR 1–2, range 0–7). No significant difference in the prespecified primary efficacy measures of ACQ scores (−0.36; 95% CI −0.96 to 0.23; p=0.225), and mini-AQLQ scores (0.38; −0.13 to 0.89; p=0.136). No adverse events. Conclusions Recruitment and retention confirmed feasibility; trends to improved outcomes suggest use of Living Well with Asthma may improve

  1. In Search of the Elusive "Hobbit": A Family Intervention Case with a Psychoeducational Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erchul, William P.; Scott, Susan Smith

    This case study concerns an attempt to help a 15-year-old with the completion of written assignments and the development of time management and study skills. The document first presents the problem of the girl, Lisa, who could not complete longer written assignments due to an obsessive-compulsive anxiety disorder. The relevant history to the case…

  2. Preparing health care organizations for successful case management programs.

    PubMed

    Bonvissuto, C A; Kastens, J M; Atwell, S R

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of four hospital-based providers in varying stages of implementing case management programs. Three of the providers had most of the necessary elements in place to ensure success, such as a mix of reimbursement sources, an effective and integrated information management system, a full range of clinical services, and continuous quality improvement programs. The authors make several suggestions for key activities that must be pursued by any health care organization seeking to implement a case management program in an era of managed care, tightening reimbursement, and consumer demand for quality care. These include the need to (a) organize essential case management functions under a centralized structure; (b) set realistic, quantifiable targets, and (c) design a communications plan for the program. PMID:9335724

  3. Preparing health care organizations for successful case management programs.

    PubMed

    Bonvissuto, C A; Kastens, J M; Atwell, S R

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of four hospital-based providers in varying stages of implementing case management programs. Three of the providers had most of the necessary elements in place to ensure success, such as a mix of reimbursement sources, an effective and integrated information management system, a full range of clinical services, and continuous quality improvement programs. The authors make several suggestions for key activities that must be pursued by any health care organization seeking to implement a case management program in an era of managed care, tightening reimbursement, and consumer demand for quality care. These include the need to (a) organize essential case management functions under a centralized structure; (b) set realistic, quantifiable targets, and (c) design a communications plan for the program.

  4. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Interventions Among Immigrants, Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Schepisi, Monica Sañé; Gualano, Gina; Piselli, Pierluca; Mazza, Marta; D’Angelo, Donatella; Fasciani, Francesca; Barbieri, Alberto; Rocca, Giorgia; Gnolfo, Filippo; Olivani, Piefranco; Ferrarese, Maurizio; Codecasa, Luigi Ruffo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In Italy tuberculosis (TB) is largely concentrated in vulnerable groups such as migrants and in urban settings. We analyzed three TB case finding interventions conducted at primary centers and mobile clinics for regular/irregular immigrants and refugees/asylum seekers performed over a four-year period (November 2009-March 2014) at five different sites in Rome and one site in Milan, Italy. TB history and presence of symptoms suggestive of active TB were investigated by verbal screening through a structured questionnaire in migrants presenting for any medical condition to out-patient and mobile clinics. Individuals reporting TB history or symptoms were referred to a TB clinic for diagnostic workup. Among 6347 migrants enrolled, 891 (14.0%) reported TB history or symptoms suggestive of active TB and 546 (61.3%) were referred to the TB clinic. Of them, 254 (46.5%) did not present for diagnostic evaluation. TB was diagnosed in 11 individuals representing 0.17% of those screened and 3.76% of those evaluated. The overall yield of this intervention was in the range reported for other TB screening programs for migrants, although we recorded an unsatisfactory adherence to diagnostic workup. Possible advantages of this intervention include low cost and reduced burden of medical procedures for the screened population. PMID:27403270

  5. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Interventions Among Immigrants, Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Italy.

    PubMed

    Schepisi, Monica Sañé; Gualano, Gina; Piselli, Pierluca; Mazza, Marta; D'Angelo, Donatella; Fasciani, Francesca; Barbieri, Alberto; Rocca, Giorgia; Gnolfo, Filippo; Olivani, Piefranco; Ferrarese, Maurizio; Codecasa, Luigi Ruffo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-06-24

    In Italy tuberculosis (TB) is largely concentrated in vulnerable groups such as migrants and in urban settings. We analyzed three TB case finding interventions conducted at primary centers and mobile clinics for regular/irregular immigrants and refugees/asylum seekers performed over a four-year period (November 2009-March 2014) at five different sites in Rome and one site in Milan, Italy. TB history and presence of symptoms suggestive of active TB were investigated by verbal screening through a structured questionnaire in migrants presenting for any medical condition to out-patient and mobile clinics. Individuals reporting TB history or symptoms were referred to a TB clinic for diagnostic workup. Among 6347 migrants enrolled, 891 (14.0%) reported TB history or symptoms suggestive of active TB and 546 (61.3%) were referred to the TB clinic. Of them, 254 (46.5%) did not present for diagnostic evaluation. TB was diagnosed in 11 individuals representing 0.17% of those screened and 3.76% of those evaluated. The overall yield of this intervention was in the range reported for other TB screening programs for migrants, although we recorded an unsatisfactory adherence to diagnostic workup. Possible advantages of this intervention include low cost and reduced burden of medical procedures for the screened population. PMID:27403270

  6. Case III: Managing Conflict--The Case of the Faculty Stuck in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trombly, Robert M.; Comer, Robert W.; Villamil, Juanita E.

    2002-01-01

    Explores techniques of conflict management as well as the positive and negative factors that may exert progressive or detrimental influences. Presents a case scenario, drawn from a faculty development workshop, involving a dental school faculty member, and highlights central issues of the case and relevant management concepts. (EV)

  7. Improving the Efficacy of Appearance-Based Sun Exposure Interventions with the Terror Management Health Model

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kasey Lynn; Cooper, Douglas P.; Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Arndt, Jamie; Gibbons, Frederick X.

    2014-01-01

    The terror management health model (TMHM) suggests that when thoughts of death are accessible people become increasingly motivated to bolster their self-esteem relative to their health, because doing so offers psychological protection against mortality concerns. Two studies examined sun protection intentions as a function of mortality reminders and an appearance-based intervention. In Study 1, participants given a sun protection message that primed mortality and shown a UV-filtered photo of their face reported greater intentions to use sun protection on their face, and took more sunscreen samples than participants shown a regular photo of their face. In Study 2, reminders of mortality increased participants’ intentions to use facial sun protection when the UV photo was specifically framed as revealing appearance consequences of tanning, compared to when the photo was framed as revealing health consequences, or when no photo was shown. These findings extend the terror management health model, and provide preliminary evidence that appearance-based tanning interventions have a greater influence on sun protection intentions under conditions that prime thoughts of death. We discuss implications of the findings, and highlight the need for additional research examining the applicability to long-term tanning behavior. PMID:24811049

  8. Intervention mapping protocol for developing a theory-based diabetes self-management education program.

    PubMed

    Song, Misoon; Choi, Suyoung; Kim, Se-An; Seo, Kyoungsan; Lee, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Development of behavior theory-based health promotion programs is encouraged with the paradigm shift from contents to behavior outcomes. This article describes the development process of the diabetes self-management program for older Koreans (DSME-OK) using intervention mapping (IM) protocol. The IM protocol includes needs assessment, defining goals and objectives, identifying theory and determinants, developing a matrix to form change objectives, selecting strategies and methods, structuring the program, and planning for evaluation and pilot testing. The DSME-OK adopted seven behavior objectives developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators as behavioral outcomes. The program applied an information-motivation-behavioral skills model, and interventions were targeted to 3 determinants to change health behaviors. Specific methods were selected to achieve each objective guided by IM protocol. As the final step, program evaluation was planned including a pilot test. The DSME-OK was structured as the 3 determinants of the IMB model were intervened to achieve behavior objectives in each session. The program has 12 weekly 90-min sessions tailored for older adults. Using the IM protocol in developing a theory-based self-management program was beneficial in terms of providing a systematic guide to developing theory-based and behavior outcome-focused health education programs.

  9. Intervention mapping protocol for developing a theory-based diabetes self-management education program.

    PubMed

    Song, Misoon; Choi, Suyoung; Kim, Se-An; Seo, Kyoungsan; Lee, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Development of behavior theory-based health promotion programs is encouraged with the paradigm shift from contents to behavior outcomes. This article describes the development process of the diabetes self-management program for older Koreans (DSME-OK) using intervention mapping (IM) protocol. The IM protocol includes needs assessment, defining goals and objectives, identifying theory and determinants, developing a matrix to form change objectives, selecting strategies and methods, structuring the program, and planning for evaluation and pilot testing. The DSME-OK adopted seven behavior objectives developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators as behavioral outcomes. The program applied an information-motivation-behavioral skills model, and interventions were targeted to 3 determinants to change health behaviors. Specific methods were selected to achieve each objective guided by IM protocol. As the final step, program evaluation was planned including a pilot test. The DSME-OK was structured as the 3 determinants of the IMB model were intervened to achieve behavior objectives in each session. The program has 12 weekly 90-min sessions tailored for older adults. Using the IM protocol in developing a theory-based self-management program was beneficial in terms of providing a systematic guide to developing theory-based and behavior outcome-focused health education programs. PMID:26062288

  10. Clinical experience with management of "near-miss" cases in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Sivalingam, N; Looi, K W

    1999-12-01

    Near-miss cases in life-threatening obstetric patients occurring over a one year period are analysed retrospectively with regards to morbidity measured in terms of hospital stay, utilisation of high dependency ward and intensive care beds and adequacy of clinical management. One-hundred and twenty two cases occurred among 9932 deliveries. Massive obstetric haemorrhage (54.2%) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (36.9%) were the two main diagnostic groups. Seventy one (58.2%) cases were referred from peripheral centres for obstetric management and 77 (63.1%) were not booked at this hospital for antenatal care. A majority were not ill-looking (92 cases) at the time of admission but turned for the worse in the course of labour. Interventional measures taken in clinical management were considered appropriate in all cases. Delay in instituting treatment was present in 6 cases. Remediable measures were recognised in 15 (12.3%). This study, apart from supplementing mortality audits, demonstrates that high risk obstetric patients can be triaged at the time of admission to labour wards by trained midwives and junior doctors in busy obstetric units without compromising standards of care.

  11. Case management and clinical pathways for the pediatric orthopaedic patient.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S P

    1997-01-01

    Clinical pathways are for predictable, routine, high volume kinds of patients and procedures. Case management is a strategy that is for unpredictable, complex, high cost/high risk kinds of patients. PMID:9155432

  12. Nurse's Breakout Session Injury/Illness Case Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselgesser, Connie

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the work related injury and illness case management model developed at the Johnson Space Center was presented. The major accomplishments and the challenges of implementation were discussed.

  13. Idiopathic Gingival Fibromatosis: Case Report and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Prashant P.; Desai, Ankit; Desai, Rajiv S.; Jaju, Sushma P.

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis is a rare condition. We present a case of idiopathic gingival fibromatosis with its multidisciplinary approach of management. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathological features have been described in detail. PMID:20339448

  14. A Pilot Study of Self-Management-based Nutrition and Physical Activity Intervention in Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle; Zrim, Stephanie; Lawn, Sharon; Woodman, Richard; Leggett, Stephanie; Jones, Lynnette; Karapetis, Christos; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Sukumaran, Shawgi; Roy, Amitesh C; Koczwara, Bogda

    2016-07-01

    Exercise and a healthy diet are beneficial after cancer, but are not uniformly adopted by cancer survivors. This study reports on the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a self-management-based nutrition and exercise intervention for Australian cancer survivors. Adult survivors (n  =  25) during curative chemotherapy (stratum 1[S1]; n  =  11) or post-treatment (stratum 2 [S2]; n  =  14) were recruited prospectively from a single center. The Flinders Living Well Self-Management Program™ (FLW Program) was utilized to establish patient-led nutrition and exercise goals and develop a tailored 12-wk intervention plan. Fortnightly reviews occurred with assessments at baseline, 6 and 12 wk. A recruitment and retention rate of 38% and 84% were observed. Both strata maintained total skeletal muscle mass. Small reductions in body mass index, hip circumference, and percentage body fat, and small increases in hand grip strength and exercise capacity among subjects in both strata were observed. No significant differences were observed between strata; however, significant increases in exercise capacity and global health status for S2 were observed from baseline to 12 wk. FLW Program is a feasible mode of delivering nutrition and exercise intervention to cancer survivors and it appears that there are no barriers to implementing this program early during chemotherapy. Hence, the additive effect of gains achieved over a longer duration is promising and this should be explored in randomized controlled trials adequately powered to observe clinically and statistically significant improvements in relevant outcomes. PMID:27176450

  15. Long-term maintenance of increased exercise involvement following a self-management intervention for housebound older adults with arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Kareen; Laforest, Sophie; Gauvin, Lise; Gignac, Monique

    2007-01-01

    Background Sustained maintenance of health behaviors is a determinant of successful symptom reduction strategies for older adults with arthritis. This study examined whether or not short-term improvements in exercise involvement were maintained 8 months following a home-based arthritis self-management intervention as well as the moderating role of individual characteristics in the maintenance of behavior change. Methods Of the 113 housebound older adult participants at pre-intervention, 97 completed the post-intervention interview, and 80 completed the 8-month post-intervention interview. Results Some post-intervention improvements in exercise involvement were maintained 8 months later. More specifically, weekly exercise frequency, particularly regarding walking frequency, and variety of exercise activities were still significantly greater in the experimental group than in the control group 8 months following the completion of the intervention. No moderating influences were observed for any of the individual characteristics. Conclusion We conclude that gains in exercise involvement achieved through a self-management intervention can be maintained 8 months following the intervention. PMID:17547757

  16. Effectiveness of multidisciplinary team case management: difference-in-differences analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Søren Rud; Checkland, Kath; Bower, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate a multidisciplinary team (MDT) case management intervention, at the individual (direct effects of intervention) and practice levels (potential spillover effects). Design Difference-in-differences design with multiple intervention start dates, analysing hospital admissions data. In secondary analyses, we stratified individual-level results by risk score. Setting Single clinical commissioning group (CCG) in the UK's National Health Service (NHS). Participants At the individual level, we matched 2049 intervention patients using propensity scoring one-to-one with control patients. At the practice level, 30 practices were compared using a natural experiment through staged implementation. Intervention Practice Integrated Care Teams (PICTs), using MDT case management of high-risk patients together with a summary record of care versus usual care. Direct and indirect outcome measures Primary measures of intervention effects were accident and emergency (A&E) visits; inpatient non-elective stays, 30-day re-admissions; inpatient elective stays; outpatient visits; and admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions. Secondary measures included inpatient length of stay; total cost of secondary care services; and patient satisfaction (at the practice level only). Results At the individual level, we found slight, clinically trivial increases in inpatient non-elective admissions (+0.01 admissions per patient per month; 95% CI 0.00 to 0.01. Effect size (ES): 0.02) and 30-day re-admissions (+0.00; 0.00 to 0.01. ES: 0.03). We found no indication that highest risk patients benefitted more from the intervention. At the practice level, we found a small decrease in inpatient non-elective admissions (−0.63 admissions per 1000 patients per month; −1.17 to −0.09. ES: −0.24). However, this result did not withstand a robustness check; the estimate may have absorbed some differences in underlying practice trends. Conclusions The intervention does not meet its

  17. Safety management by walking around (SMBWA): a safety intervention program based on both peer and manager participation.

    PubMed

    Luria, Gil; Morag, Ido

    2012-03-01

    "Management by walking around" (MBWA) is a practice that has aroused much interest in management science and practice. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate adaptation of this practice to safety management. We describe a three-year long case study that collected empirical data in which a modified MBWA was practiced in order to improve safety in a semiconductor fabrication facility. The main modification involved integrating an information system with the MBWA in order to create a practice that would generate safety leadership development and an organizational safety learning mechanism, while promoting employee safety participation. The results of the case study demonstrate that the SMBWA practice facilitated thousands of tours in which safety leadership behaviors were practiced by managers and by employees (employees performed five times as many tours as managers). The information system collected information about safety behaviors and safety conditions that could not otherwise be obtained. Thus, this study presents a new organizational safety practice SMBWA, and demonstrates the ways in which SMBWA may improve safety in organizations.

  18. Assessing the impact of fisheries co-management interventions in developing countries: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Louisa; Cherrett, Nia; Pemsl, Diemuth

    2011-08-01

    Co-management is now established as a mainstream approach to small-scale fisheries management across the developing world. A comprehensive review of 204 potential cases reveals a lack of impact assessments of fisheries co-management. This study reports on a meta-analysis of the impact of fisheries co-management in developing countries in 90 sites across 29 case-studies. The top five most frequently measured process indicators are participation, influence, rule compliance, control over resources, and conflict. The top five most frequently measured outcome indicators are access to resources, resource well-being, fishery yield, household well-being, and household income. To deal with the diversity of the 52 indicators measured and the different ways these data are collected and analysed, we apply a coding system to capture change over time. The results of the meta-analysis suggest that, overall fisheries co-management delivers benefits to end-users through improvements in key process and outcome indicators. However, the dataset as a whole is constituted primarily of data from the Philippines. When we exclude this body of work, few generalisations can be made about the impact of fisheries co-management. The lack of comparative data suitable for impact assessment and the difficulties in comparing data and generalising across countries and regions reiterates calls in other fields for more systematic approaches to understanding and evaluating governance frameworks.

  19. Draugen HSE-case - occupational health risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Glas, J.J.P.; Kjaer, E.

    1996-12-31

    The Draugen HSE-Case serves as a risk management tool. Originally, risk management included only major safety hazards to personnel, environment and assets. Work Environment risks such as ergonomics, psycho-social factors and exposure to chemicals and noise, was not given the same attention. The Draugen HSE-Case addresses this weakness and extends all work environment risks. In order to promote line responsibility and commitment, relevant personnel is involved in the Case development. {open_quotes}THESIS{degrees}, a software application, is used to systematize input and to generate reports. The Draugen HSE-case encompasses: HSE risk analyses related to specific activities; Control of risk related to work environment; Established tolerability criteria; Risk reducing measures; Emergency contingency measures; and Requirements for Competence and Follow-up. The development of Draugen HSE-Case is a continuous process. It will serve to minimize the potential of occupational illnesses, raise general awareness, and make occupational health management more cost-effective.

  20. Chronic Disease Management: A Residency-Led Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Angela N.; Pettit, Ryan C.; Sorscher, Jonathan; Stephens, Lorraine; Drake, Betsy; Welling, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Background When quality improvement processes are integrated into resident education, many opportunities are created for improved outcomes in patient care. For Bethesda Family Medicine (BFM), integrating quality improvement into resident education is paramount in fulfilling the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Practice-Based Learning and Improvement core competency requirements. Methods A resident-developed diabetes management treatment protocol that targeted 11 evidence-based measures recommended for successful diabetes management was implemented within the BFM residency and all physician practices under its parent healthcare system. This study compares diabetes management at BFM and at 2 other family medicine practices at timepoints before and after protocol implementation. We measured hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in adult diabetics and compared patient outcomes for these measures for the first and third quarters of 2009 and 2010. Results In BFM patients, HbA1c, LDL, and SBP levels decreased, but only HbA1c improvement persisted long term. For the comparison groups, in general levels were lower than those of BFM patients but not significantly so after the first measurement period. Conclusions A resident-led treatment protocol can improve HbA1c outcomes among residents' diabetic patients. Periodic educational interventions can enhance residents' focus on diabetes management. Residents in graduate medical education can initiate treatment protocols to improve patient care in a large healthcare system. PMID:23267258

  1. Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) Criteria: A 7M Management Approach to Developing a Stroke Interventional Laboratory in the Era of Stroke Thrombectomy for Large Vessel Occlusions.

    PubMed

    Shams, Tanzila; Zaidat, Osama; Yavagal, Dileep; Xavier, Andrew; Jovin, Tudor; Janardhan, Vallabh

    2016-06-01

    Brain attack care is rapidly evolving with cutting-edge stroke interventions similar to the growth of heart attack care with cardiac interventions in the last two decades. As the field of stroke intervention is growing exponentially globally, there is clearly an unmet need to standardize stroke interventional laboratories for safe, effective, and timely stroke care. Towards this goal, the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Writing Committee has developed the Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) criteria using a 7M management approach for the development and standardization of each stroke interventional laboratory within stroke centers. The SILC criteria include: (1) manpower: personnel including roles of medical and administrative directors, attending physicians, fellows, physician extenders, and all the key stakeholders in the stroke chain of survival; (2) machines: resources needed in terms of physical facilities, and angiography equipment; (3) materials: medical device inventory, medications, and angiography supplies; (4) methods: standardized protocols for stroke workflow optimization; (5) metrics (volume): existing credentialing criteria for facilities and stroke interventionalists; (6) metrics (quality): benchmarks for quality assurance; (7) metrics (safety): radiation and procedural safety practices. PMID:27610118

  2. Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) Criteria: A 7M Management Approach to Developing a Stroke Interventional Laboratory in the Era of Stroke Thrombectomy for Large Vessel Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Tanzila; Zaidat, Osama; Yavagal, Dileep; Xavier, Andrew; Jovin, Tudor; Janardhan, Vallabh

    2016-01-01

    Brain attack care is rapidly evolving with cutting-edge stroke interventions similar to the growth of heart attack care with cardiac interventions in the last two decades. As the field of stroke intervention is growing exponentially globally, there is clearly an unmet need to standardize stroke interventional laboratories for safe, effective, and timely stroke care. Towards this goal, the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Writing Committee has developed the Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) criteria using a 7M management approach for the development and standardization of each stroke interventional laboratory within stroke centers. The SILC criteria include: (1) manpower: personnel including roles of medical and administrative directors, attending physicians, fellows, physician extenders, and all the key stakeholders in the stroke chain of survival; (2) machines: resources needed in terms of physical facilities, and angiography equipment; (3) materials: medical device inventory, medications, and angiography supplies; (4) methods: standardized protocols for stroke workflow optimization; (5) metrics (volume): existing credentialing criteria for facilities and stroke interventionalists; (6) metrics (quality): benchmarks for quality assurance; (7) metrics (safety): radiation and procedural safety practices. PMID:27610118

  3. Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) Criteria: A 7M Management Approach to Developing a Stroke Interventional Laboratory in the Era of Stroke Thrombectomy for Large Vessel Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Tanzila; Zaidat, Osama; Yavagal, Dileep; Xavier, Andrew; Jovin, Tudor; Janardhan, Vallabh

    2016-01-01

    Brain attack care is rapidly evolving with cutting-edge stroke interventions similar to the growth of heart attack care with cardiac interventions in the last two decades. As the field of stroke intervention is growing exponentially globally, there is clearly an unmet need to standardize stroke interventional laboratories for safe, effective, and timely stroke care. Towards this goal, the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Writing Committee has developed the Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) criteria using a 7M management approach for the development and standardization of each stroke interventional laboratory within stroke centers. The SILC criteria include: (1) manpower: personnel including roles of medical and administrative directors, attending physicians, fellows, physician extenders, and all the key stakeholders in the stroke chain of survival; (2) machines: resources needed in terms of physical facilities, and angiography equipment; (3) materials: medical device inventory, medications, and angiography supplies; (4) methods: standardized protocols for stroke workflow optimization; (5) metrics (volume): existing credentialing criteria for facilities and stroke interventionalists; (6) metrics (quality): benchmarks for quality assurance; (7) metrics (safety): radiation and procedural safety practices.

  4. Essentials of Enrollment Management: Cases in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jim

    2004-01-01

    In AACRAO's new publication Essentials of Enrollment Management: Cases in the Field experts in enrollment management representing all types of institutions reveal the evolution of the enrollment strategies implemented at their institutions, the results, and the lessons learned. The introductory chapter provides an overview of themes and models…

  5. Management of diabetic foot ulcers: evaluation of case studies.

    PubMed

    Torkington-Stokes, Rachel; Metcalf, Daniel; Bowler, Philip

    2016-08-11

    This article explores local barriers to diabetic foot ulcer healing, and describes the use of a dressing designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm (AQUACEL® Ag+ dressing (AQAg+)) on recalcitrant diabetic foot ulcers. The authors consider four case studies that demonstrate how managing local barriers to wound healing with antimicrobial and anti-biofilm dressings in protocols of care can improve outcomes for patients.

  6. Data management for genomic mapping applications: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, V.M.; Lewis, S.; McCarthy, J.; Olken, F.; Zorn, M.

    1992-05-01

    In this paper we describe a new approach to the construction of data management systems for genomic mapping applications in molecular biology, genetics, and plant breeding. We discuss the architecture of such systems and propose an incremental approach to the development of such systems. We illustrate the proposed approach and architecture with a case study of a prototype data management system for genomic maps.

  7. Quality of Inpatient Pediatric Case Management for Four Leading Causes of Child Mortality at Six Government-Run Ugandan Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Sears, David; Mpimbaza, Arthur; Kigozi, Ruth; Sserwanga, Asadu; Chang, Michelle A.; Kapella, Bryan K.; Yoon, Steven; Kamya, Moses R.; Dorsey, Grant; Ruel, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Background A better understanding of case management practices is required to improve inpatient pediatric care in resource-limited settings. Here we utilize data from a unique health facility-based surveillance system at six Ugandan hospitals to evaluate the quality of pediatric case management and the factors associated with appropriate care. Methods All children up to the age of 14 years admitted to six district or regional hospitals over 15 months were included in the study. Four case management categories were defined for analysis: suspected malaria, selected illnesses requiring antibiotics, suspected anemia, and diarrhea. The quality of case management for each category was determined by comparing recorded treatments with evidence-based best practices as defined in national guidelines. Associations between variables of interest and the receipt of appropriate case management were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Results A total of 30,351 admissions were screened for inclusion in the analysis. Ninety-two percent of children met criteria for suspected malaria and 81% received appropriate case management. Thirty-two percent of children had selected illnesses requiring antibiotics and 89% received appropriate antibiotics. Thirty percent of children met criteria for suspected anemia and 38% received appropriate case management. Twelve percent of children had diarrhea and 18% received appropriate case management. Multivariable logistic regression revealed large differences in the quality of care between health facilities. There was also a strong association between a positive malaria diagnostic test result and the odds of receiving appropriate case management for comorbid non-malarial illnesses - children with a positive malaria test were more likely to receive appropriate care for anemia and less likely for illnesses requiring antibiotics and diarrhea. Conclusions Appropriate management of suspected anemia and diarrhea occurred infrequently

  8. The management of premolar supernumeraries in three orthodontic cases.

    PubMed

    McNamara, C M; Foley, T F; Wright, G Z; Sandy, J R

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the incidence, etiology and location of supernumerary teeth with emphasis on premolar supernumeraries and examines the management of supernumerary premolars of three patients undergoing orthodontics. These cases demonstrate that the management of premolars is assessed individually and treatments based on potential complications, which may occur during the orthodontic and surgical management of the dentition. Progress and posttreatment radiographs are recommended for the assessment of late forming supernumerary teeth. PMID:9643197

  9. Law enforcement-applied tourniquets: a case series of life-saving interventions.

    PubMed

    Callaway, David W; Robertson, Joshua; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Although the epidemiology of civilian trauma is distinct from that encountered in combat, in both settings, extremity hemorrhage remains a major preventable cause of potential mortality. The current paper describes the largest case series in the literature in which police officers arriving prior to emergency medical services applied commercially available field tourniquets to civilian victims of violent trauma. Although all 3 patients with vascular injury arrived at the receiving emergency department in extremis, they were successfully resuscitated and survived to discharge without major morbidity. While this outcome is likely multifactorial and highlights the exceptional care delivered by the modern trauma system, tourniquet application appears to have kept critically injured patients alive long enough to reach definitive trauma care. No patient had a tourniquet-related complication. This case series suggests that law enforcement officers can effectively identify indications for tourniquets and rapidly apply such life-saving interventions.

  10. The Single-Case Reporting Guideline In BEhavioural Interventions (SCRIBE) 2016 Statement

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Robyn L.; Perdices, Michael; Rosenkoetter, Ulrike; Shadish, William; Vohra, Sunita; Barlow, David H.; Horner, Robert; Kazdin, Alan; Kratochwill, Thomas; McDonald, Skye; Sampson, Margaret; Shamseer, Larissa; Togher, Leanne; Albin, Richard; Backman, Catherine; Douglas, Jacinta; Evans, Jonathan J.; Gast, David; Manolov, Rumen; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Nickels, Lyndsey; Nikles, Jane; Ownsworth, Tamara; Rose, Miranda; Schmid, Christopher H.; Wilson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    We developed a reporting guideline to provide authors with guidance about what should be reported when writing a paper for publication in a scientific journal using a particular type of research design: the single-case experimental design. This report describes the methods used to develop the Single-Case Reporting guideline In BEhavioural interventions (SCRIBE) 2016. As a result of 2 online surveys and a 2-day meeting of experts, the SCRIBE 2016 checklist was developed, which is a set of 26 items that authors need to address when writing about single-case research. This article complements the more detailed SCRIBE 2016 Explanation and Elaboration article (Tate et al., 2016) that provides a rationale for each of the items and examples of adequate reporting from the literature. Both these resources will assist authors to prepare reports of single-case research with clarity, completeness, accuracy, and transparency. They will also provide journal reviewers and editors with a practical checklist against which such reports may be critically evaluated. We recommend that the SCRIBE 2016 is used by authors preparing manuscripts describing single-case research for publication, as well as journal reviewers and editors who are evaluating such manuscripts. PMID:27279674

  11. Safety Events during an Automated Telephone Self-Management Support Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lyles, Courtney R.; Schillinger, Dean; Lopez, Andrea; Handley, Margaret; Ratanawongsa, Neda; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2013-01-01

    Background Interactive health information technology (HIT) can support the complex self-management tasks for diabetes. However, less is known about between-visit interactions and patient safety among chronic illness patients treated in the outpatient setting. Methods We classified 13 categories for safety events and potential safety events within a larger trial evaluating a multilingual automated telephone self-management support system for diabetes using interactive voice response. Participants could trigger safety concerns by reporting hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, inability to obtain medications, medication nonadherence and side effects, and needing appointments and/or supplies. We then examined these triggers across patient demographic and health characteristics to determine which patients were most likely to experience safety events. Results Overall, there were 360 safety triggers that occurred among 155 participants, which represented 53% of individuals and 7.6% of all automated calls over the 27-week intervention. The most common triggers were for pain or medication side effects (22%) and not checking blood sugars (13%). In adjusted models, race/ethnicity and language were related to safety triggers; Spanish-speaking participants were significantly (p = .02) more likely than English-speaking participants to experience a safety trigger, and black participants were marginally more likely (p =.09) than white participants to experience a safety trigger. Conclusion About half of patients enrolled in a self-management technology intervention triggered at least one potential safety event over the course of the trial, and this was more frequent among some patients. Systems implementing HIT strategies to improve self-care and remote monitoring should consider specific program design elements to address these potential safety events. PMID:23759391

  12. Incorporating Prototyping and Iteration into Intervention Development: A Case Study of a Dining Hall-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Arianna D.; Hekler, Eric B.; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous research from the fields of computer science and engineering highlight the importance of an iterative design process (IDP) to create more creative and effective solutions. Objective: This study describes IDP as a new method for developing health behavior interventions and evaluates the effectiveness of a dining hall--based…

  13. Design and feasibility of a memory intervention with focus on self-management for cognitive impairment in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Caller, Tracie A; Secore, Karen L; Ferguson, Robert J; Roth, Robert M; Alexandre, Faith P; Henegan, Patricia L; Harrington, Jessica J; Jobst, Barbara C

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a self-management intervention targeting cognitive dysfunction to improve quality of life and reduce memory-related disability in adults with epilepsy. The intervention incorporates (1) education on cognitive function in epilepsy, (2) self-awareness training, (3) compensatory strategies, and (4) application of these strategies in day-to-day life using problem-solving therapy. In addition to the behavioral modification, formal working memory training was conducted by utilizing a commercially available program in a subgroup of patients. Our findings suggest that a self-management intervention targeting cognitive dysfunction was feasible for delivery to a rural population with epilepsy, with 13 of 16 enrolled participants completing the 8-session program. Qualitative data indicate high satisfaction and subjective improvement in cognitive functioning in day-to-day life. These findings provide support for further evaluation of the efficacy of this intervention through a randomized controlled trial.

  14. Evaluating Intervention Programs Targeting Parents to Manage Childhood Overweight and Obesity: A Systematic Review Using the RE-AIM Framework.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoungock; Chao, Ariana; Whittemore, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Intervention programs targeting parents to manage childhood overweight and obesity have emerged based on parents influence on the health behaviors of their children. The purpose of this review was to systematically evaluate intervention programs targeting parents to manage childhood overweight and obesity using the Reach, Efficacy, Adopt, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. There was a moderate risk of bias across all studies. The overall proportion of studies (n=7) reporting on each dimension of the RE-AIM framework ranged from 78.6% (reach) to 23.8% (maintenance). The majority of intervention programs demonstrated improvement in child BMI. However intervention programs did not reach families of diverse race/ethnicity, were provided by highly trained professionals, and demonstrated high attrition, thus limiting generalizability.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Individualized Preoperative Education Intervention for Symptom Management After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rosemary A; Watt-Watson, Judith; Hodnett, Ellen; Tranmer, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Pain and nausea limit recovery after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a preoperative educational intervention on postsurgical pain-related interference in activities, pain, and nausea. Participants (n = 143) were randomized to intervention or standard care. The standard care group received the usual teaching. The intervention group received the usual teaching, a booklet containing symptom management after TKA, an individual teaching session, and a follow-up support call. Outcome measures assessed pain, pain interference, and nausea. There were no differences between groups in patient outcomes. There were no group differences for pain at any time point. Respondents had severe postoperative pain and nausea and received inadequate doses of analgesia and antiemetics. Individualizing education content was insufficient to produce a change in symptoms for patients. Further research involving the modification of system factors affecting the provision of symptom management interventions is warranted. PMID:26814004

  16. A CASE STUDY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to support our ongoing research in watershed ecology and global climate change, we gather and analyze environmental data from several government agencies. This case study demonstrates a researcher’s approach to accessing, organizing, and using intersectoral data. T...

  17. Management of traumatic macular holes: case report.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Oswaldo Ferreira Moura; Brasil, Oswaldo Moura

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic macular hole is a disease whose pathogenesis is not fully understood and the best treatment guideline is controversial. We report 2 cases of traumatic macular hole with different treatment approaches. In the first case, a 9-year-old boy presented with a traumatic macular hole secondary to blunt ocular trauma with a stone, and initial vision of 20/300. He underwent surgical repair and his final vision was 20/70 with hole closure after a 1 year follow-up. In the second case, a 20-year-old woman suffered a penetrating bullet wound on the left side of her forehead. The injury caused optic nerve head avulsion in the left eye with loss of light perception. The right eye had a traumatic macular hole and signs suggestive of sclopetaria chorioretinitis, with 20/60 vision. This case was initially observed and vision improved to 20/30 with reduction of the hole diameter. Vision and hole diameter remained stable after 8 months.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Case Management in Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Shadi S.; Vaughn, Thomas; Levey, Samuel; Fuortes, Laurence; Uden-Holmen, Tanya; Hall, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study, which is part of a larger clinical trial, was to examine the cost-effectiveness of case management for individuals treated for substance abuse in a residential setting. Method: Clients who agreed to participate were randomly assigned to one of four study groups. Two groups received face-to-face case management…

  19. 42 CFR 440.169 - Case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Case management services. 440.169 Section 440.169 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.169 Case...

  20. 42 CFR 440.169 - Case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Case management services. 440.169 Section 440.169 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.169 Case...

  1. 42 CFR 440.169 - Case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Case management services. 440.169 Section 440.169 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.169 Case...

  2. 42 CFR 440.169 - Case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Case management services. 440.169 Section 440.169 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.169 Case...

  3. Covert Conditioning: Case Studies in Self-Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Geoffrey G.

    The self-management of thoughts and mental images was used in a series of empirical case studies to influence behavior changes. The target behaviors in the cases reported were smoking, overeating, fingernail biting, thinking self-depreciative thoughts, and responding assertively. Self-monitoring, covert positive reinforcement, covert…

  4. CASE MANAGEMENT INSIDER. Re-Engineering Your Case Management Department: It's Simple, It's Just Not Easy, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Cesta, Toni

    2016-07-01

    This month, we have begun our discussion of the reasons why this is a very good time for hospitals to review and re-engineer their case management models and departments, including the Affordable Care Act and value-based purchasing, among others. Next time, we will discuss the elements you need to review when re-engineering your own case management department. PMID:27434941

  5. Development of a health-related lifestyle self-management intervention for patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ritin Santiago; Davidson, Patricia; Griffiths, Rhonda; Juergens, Craig; Salamonson, Yenna

    2009-01-01

    Risk-factor modification after an acute coronary event is imperative, and intervention strategies are continuously being developed to assist patients with behavioral change and, consequently, decreasing the risk of further coronary episodes. This article describes the development of the health-related lifestyle self-management (HeLM) intervention, which is a brief structured intervention embedded within the transtheoretical model of behavioral change. The HeLM intervention was developed by undertaking three discrete yet interrelated studies and consisted of the following components: goal-setting, the HeLM booklet, feedback regarding personal risk, team-building and communication with the patient's family physician, three supportive telephone calls, trained interviewers, a refrigerator magnet, and a health diary for self-monitoring. The HeLM intervention has been successfully implemented in 50 patients with acute coronary syndrome after discharge from hospital and has been demonstrated to be feasible and practical and could easily be delivered by health care professionals.

  6. Tackling risky alcohol consumption in sport: a cluster randomised controlled trial of an alcohol management intervention with community football clubs

    PubMed Central

    Kingsland, Melanie; Wolfenden, Luke; Tindall, Jennifer; Rowland, Bosco C; Lecathelinais, Christophe; Gillham, Karen E; Dodds, Pennie; Sidey, Maree N; Rogerson, John C; McElduff, Patrick; Crundall, Ian; Wiggers, John H

    2015-01-01

    Background An increased prevalence of risky alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm has been reported for members of sporting groups and at sporting venues compared with non-sporting populations. While sports clubs and venues represent opportune settings to implement strategies to reduce such risks, no controlled trials have been reported. The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of an alcohol management intervention in reducing risky alcohol consumption and the risk of alcohol-related harm among community football club members. Method A cluster randomised controlled trial of an alcohol management intervention was undertaken with non-elite, community football clubs and their members in New South Wales, Australia. Risky alcohol consumption (5+ drinks) at the club and risk of alcohol-related harm using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) were measured at baseline and postintervention. Results Eighty-eight clubs participated in the trial (n=43, Intervention; n=45, Control) and separate cross-sectional samples of club members completed the baseline (N=1411) and postintervention (N=1143) surveys. Postintervention, a significantly lower proportion of intervention club members reported: risky alcohol consumption at the club (Intervention: 19%; Control: 24%; OR: 0.63 (95% CI 0.40 to 1.00); p=0.05); risk of alcohol-related harm (Intervention: 38%; Control: 45%; OR: 0.58 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.87); p<0.01); alcohol consumption risk (Intervention: 47%; Control: 55%; OR: 0.60 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.87); p<0.01) and possible alcohol dependence (Intervention: 1%; Control: 4%; OR: 0.20 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.65); p<0.01). Conclusions With large numbers of people worldwide playing, watching and sports officiating, enhancing club-based alcohol management interventions could make a substantial contribution to reducing the burden of alcohol misuse in communities. Trial registration number ACTRN12609000224224. PMID:26038252

  7. Interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This reference gives a step-by-step presentation of the elements of interventional radiology. CONTENTS: Introduction; Radiation protection; Embolotherapy; Interventional techniques in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding; Transluminal angioplasty; Thrombolytic therapy; Foreign body removal; Inferior vena cava filter placement; Percutaneous uroradiologic techniques; Interventional techniques in the biliary tract; Nonvascular gastrointestinal tract dilations; Percutaneous biopsy techniques; Drainage of abscess fluid collections in the abdomen.

  8. Adapters, strugglers, and case managers: a typology of spouse caregivers.

    PubMed

    Davis, Linda Lindsey; Chestnutt, Deborah; Molloy, Margory; Deshefy-Longhi, Tess; Shim, Bomin; Gilliss, Catherine L

    2014-11-01

    Although family home care problems are frequently described in the health care literature, the ways in which families and other informal caregivers manage those problems are not often addressed. We conducted a descriptive analysis of interviews in which spouses caring for a partner with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease were asked to describe difficult home care problems and how they managed those problems. Analysis of these interviews indicated three recurring management styles. Adapters told stories about applying pre-existing skills to manage home care problems. Strugglers told stories of reoccurring home care problems for which they had few or no management strategies. Case managers' interview stories focused on the challenges of finding and coordinating home care services. These findings suggest that caregiving burden might be influenced more by the caregiver's management style than the demands of the care situation. Suggestions for tailoring support programs for the three types of caregivers are proposed.

  9. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Pregnancy Managed by Resection and Primary Anastomosis: Case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Machado, Norman O; Machado, Lovina S M

    2009-04-01

    Sigmoid volvulus is an extremely rare cause of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy. The rarity of the condition and the fact that pregnancy itself clouds the clinical picture invariably leads to a delay in diagnosis with an increased risk of gangrene of the gut. The majority of these patients would then require resection and colostomy. However, an early diagnosis and intervention as in our patient, which would require a high index of clinical suspicion, could significantly improve the outcome of the foetus and the mother. A case of sigmoid volvulus in pregnancy is reported which was managed by resection and primary anastomosis. A review of literature revealed no previous reports of sigmoid volvulus in pregnancy managed by primary anastomosis following resection of the sigmoid volvulus. The literature is also reviewed regarding predisposing factors, management options and the outcome of sigmoid volvulus complicating pregnancy.

  10. The influence of scale preferences on the design of a water innovation: a case in Dutch river management.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, Heleen; Vreudenhil, Heleen; Slinger, Jill; Kater, Emiel; Thissen, Wil

    2010-07-01

    The debate on scale use in river management focuses primarily on the (lack of) fit between the bio-geophysical and institutional systems. However, in this article we focus on the 'subjective' aspect of scale preferences in water governance. We apply an adapted version of the Integrated Scale Hierarchy for Rivers to determine the degree of fit between the scale preferences of the actors involved in a Dutch case study and the scale requirements of the innovative river management concept. This allows us to understand which riverine processes and characteristics are regarded as important by the different actors and to identify mismatches in scale perspectives as they manifest themselves in water management practice. We discover that inflexibility in scale use on the part of the involved actors places bounds on the design and quality of interventions and demonstrate that a more flexible use of scales in the design phase of a river management intervention has the potential to lead to more effective solutions.

  11. Management of dentinogenesis imperfecta: a review of two case reports.

    PubMed

    Rafeek, Reisha N; Paryag, Amit; Al-Bayaty, Haytham

    2013-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is an inherited disorder that affects dentin and often manifests as tooth discoloration; in addition, the dentition is also extremely susceptible to wear. Treatment of DI focuses primarily on protecting affected dentin, reducing sensitivity, and improving esthetics. Routine restorative materials, such as amalgams and composites, may be used. In more severe cases, the treatment of choice is full coverage crowns, while bonding of veneers may be used to improve the esthetics of the anterior teeth. This study presents two cases of Type II DI in the same family and the management of each case. Restorative management included amalgams, composite veneers, crowns, bridges, and overdentures.

  12. Integration of case tools for software project management

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.; Shinagawa, Y.; Khan, M.F.

    1996-12-31

    Building and maintenance of high quality large software projects is a complex and difficult process. Tools employing software metrics are becoming an effective aid for management of such large projects. In this paper, we briefly trace the evolution of such tools from their beginnings up until the current trends of integrated CASE tools. We present a generic integrated CASE environment incorporating a formal set of software metrics with a suite of advanced analytic techniques. The proposed integrated CASE environment is an enhancement of currently used tools, and can enable more efficient and cost-effective management of large and complex software projects.

  13. Putting evidence into practice: evidence-based interventions to prevent, manage, and treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Janelle M; McDaniel, Roxanne W; Barbour, Laurel; Johnston, Mary Pat; Kayne, Marilyn; LeRoy, Patricia; Ripple, Marita L

    2007-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) continues to have a considerable effect on the physical and psychological well-being of patients with cancer, despite significant advances in antiemetic drugs since the 1990s. This article reviews and summarizes past and current empirical evidence related to interventions for CINV. A resource that summarizes evidence-based interventions for CINV is critical for effective management of this distressing symptom. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions are appraised. Finally, gaps in the literature and opportunities for research, education, and practice changes are discussed.

  14. Management case study: Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, G.; Greening, H.S.; Yates, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida,USA, is a shallow,subtropical estuary that experienced severe cultural eutrophication between the 1940s and 1980s, a period when the human population of its watershed quadrupled. In response, citizen action led to the formation of a public- and private-sector partnership (the Tampa Bay Estuary Program), which adopted a number of management objectives to support the restoration and protection of the bay’s living resources. These included numeric chlorophyll a and water-clarity targets, as well as long-term goals addressing the spatial extent of sea grasses and other selected habitat types, to support estuarine-dependent faunal guilds.

  15. Species Conservation and Management: Case Studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akcakaya, H.R.; Burgman, M.A.; Kindvall, O.; Wood, C.C.; Sjogren-Gulve, P.; Hatfield, J.S.; McCarthy, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    This edited volume is a collection of population and metapopulation models for a wide variety of species, including plants, invertebrates, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Each chapter of the book describes the application of RAMAS GIS 4.0 to one species, with the aim of demonstrating how various life history characteristics of the species are incorporated into the model, and how the results of the model has been or can be used in conservation and management of the species. The book comes with a CD that includes a demo version of the program, and the data files for each species.

  16. Myasthenia crisis following percutaneous coronary intervention in a patient with late onset myasthenia gravis: successful treatment of a unique case.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Singh, Ajit Pal; Srinivas, B C; Manjunath, C N

    2013-07-01

    A 70-year-old female, known case of late onset myasthenia gravis for last 1 year was admitted with effort angina. Coronary angiogram revealed presence of significant lesion in the proximal part of right coronary artery. She had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention. Following angioplasty she developed recurrent ventricular tachycardia and respiratory distress. She developed myasthenia crisis and was put on ventilator. She had undergone through plasmapheresis thrice as anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titres were very high. Medline search revealed no previous report of similar case. We are reporting the first case where myasthenia crisis was triggered by percutaneous coronary intervention and was treated successfully.

  17. Comparing Single Case Design Overlap-Based Effect Size Metrics from Studies Examining Speech Generating Device Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mo; Hyppa-Martin, Jolene K.; Reichle, Joe E.; Symons, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Meaningfully synthesizing single case experimental data from intervention studies comprised of individuals with low incidence conditions and generating effect size estimates remains challenging. Seven effect size metrics were compared for single case design (SCD) data focused on teaching speech generating device use to individuals with…

  18. Self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: can they successfully prevent and treat diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D Patnoe

    2011-05-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes.

  19. Minimal intervention dentistry for managing dental caries - a review: report of a FDI task group.

    PubMed

    Frencken, Jo E; Peters, Mathilde C; Manton, David J; Leal, Soraya C; Gordan, Valeria V; Eden, Ece

    2012-10-01

    This publication describes the history of minimal intervention dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries and presents evidence for various carious lesion detection devices, for preventive measures, for restorative and non-restorative therapies as well as for repairing rather than replacing defective restorations. It is a follow-up to the FDI World Dental Federation publication on MID, of 2000. The dental profession currently is faced with an enormous task of how to manage the high burden of consequences of the caries process amongst the world population. If it is to manage carious lesion development and its progression, it should move away from the 'surgical' care approach and fully embrace the MID approach. The chance for MID to be successful is thought to be increased tremendously if dental caries is not considered an infectious but instead a behavioural disease with a bacterial component. Controlling the two main carious lesion development related behaviours, i.e. intake and frequency of fermentable sugars, to not more than five times daily and removing/disturbing dental plaque from all tooth surfaces using an effective fluoridated toothpaste twice daily, are the ingredients for reducing the burden of dental caries in many communities in the world. FDI's policy of reducing the need for restorative therapy by placing an even greater emphasis on caries prevention than is currently done, is therefore, worth pursuing. PMID:23106836

  20. Minimal intervention dentistry for managing dental caries - a review: report of a FDI task group.

    PubMed

    Frencken, Jo E; Peters, Mathilde C; Manton, David J; Leal, Soraya C; Gordan, Valeria V; Eden, Ece

    2012-10-01

    This publication describes the history of minimal intervention dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries and presents evidence for various carious lesion detection devices, for preventive measures, for restorative and non-restorative therapies as well as for repairing rather than replacing defective restorations. It is a follow-up to the FDI World Dental Federation publication on MID, of 2000. The dental profession currently is faced with an enormous task of how to manage the high burden of consequences of the caries process amongst the world population. If it is to manage carious lesion development and its progression, it should move away from the 'surgical' care approach and fully embrace the MID approach. The chance for MID to be successful is thought to be increased tremendously if dental caries is not considered an infectious but instead a behavioural disease with a bacterial component. Controlling the two main carious lesion development related behaviours, i.e. intake and frequency of fermentable sugars, to not more than five times daily and removing/disturbing dental plaque from all tooth surfaces using an effective fluoridated toothpaste twice daily, are the ingredients for reducing the burden of dental caries in many communities in the world. FDI's policy of reducing the need for restorative therapy by placing an even greater emphasis on caries prevention than is currently done, is therefore, worth pursuing.