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Sample records for case study evaluating

  1. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  2. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  3. Evaluation -- Shanti: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, David J.; Mulcahy, Gene

    1975-01-01

    This newsletter comprises four sections: (1) the educational philosophy and objectives of Shanti, a public alternative school in Hartford, Connecticut; (2) Rosen's statements about the difficulties of finding an evaluation model for alternative schools and the implications of the methodology that he later used in evaluating the Shanti school in…

  4. A Case Study of Horizontal Teacher Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Trav D.

    Horizontal teacher evaluation increases understanding of teaching through the critical examination of educational goals and classroom practices. This examination includes teachers' classroom observations of one another coupled with in-depth teacher conversations or dialogue about teaching aims and practices. A qualitative case study of a…

  5. Social Studies Project Evaluation: Case Study and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and application of a model for social studies program evaluations. A case study showing how the model's three-step process was used to evaluate the Improving Citizenship Education Project in Fulton County, Georgia is included. (AM)

  6. Social Studies Project Evaluation: Case Study and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and application of a model for social studies program evaluations. A case study showing how the model's three-step process was used to evaluate the Improving Citizenship Education Project in Fulton County, Georgia is included. (AM)

  7. Home Start Evaluation Study. Interim Case Studies IIa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Robert

    This formative evaluation study of Home Start uses a case study approach. A brief case study focuses on the administrative structure and staff resources and responsibilities of National Home Start. Also included are reports on seven local programs developed after two field visits had been made to each program. In the first visit, objectives chosen…

  8. Revisioning the Process: A Case Study in Feminist Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardsley, Rebecca M.; Miller, Michelle Hughes

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a case study of the evaluation of a women's substance abuse prevention program and identified three key aspects of negotiated evaluation. Discusses the processes involved in feminist evaluation, including collaborative agenda setting and cooperative teamwork. (SLD)

  9. Revisioning the Process: A Case Study in Feminist Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardsley, Rebecca M.; Miller, Michelle Hughes

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a case study of the evaluation of a women's substance abuse prevention program and identified three key aspects of negotiated evaluation. Discusses the processes involved in feminist evaluation, including collaborative agenda setting and cooperative teamwork. (SLD)

  10. Learning with Multimedia Cases: An Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Den Berg, Ellen; Jansen, Leanne; Blijleven, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This article is about the relation between case-based learning and transfer in teacher education. Through a design research approach a multimedia case has been developed. The topic of the case is "outdoor activities in science education." The core of the case is a 17 minute video that is supplemented by all kinds of background information. Results…

  11. Investigating Heuristic Evaluation: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Kate Haley; Bendoly, Laura

    When museum professionals speak of evaluating a web site, they primarily mean formative evaluation, and by that they primarily mean testing the usability of the site. In the for-profit world, usability testing is a multi-million dollar industry, while non-profits often rely on far too few dollars to do too much. Hence, heuristic evaluation is one…

  12. Case Studies in the Evaluation of Educational Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Robert E., Ed.; And Others

    Ten brief case studies illustrate the types of arrangements which have been made between commissions and evaluators, and describe some of the subsequent problems. Each of the cases is a major evaluative study of a large-scale educational development or school operation. For the collection as a whole, the purpose was to illustrate how the…

  13. Evaluating the Evaluator: A Case Study Illustrating Three Critical Mistakes No Evaluator Should Make

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Most employees do not like to be evaluated because they fear the process and people involved. Although optimal performance evaluators can minimize people's anxieties about being assessed, actual performance evaluators can perpetuate employees' fears and, worse, lower their job performances and morale. A case study illustrates the actions of an…

  14. Evaluating the Evaluator: A Case Study Illustrating Three Critical Mistakes No Evaluator Should Make

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Most employees do not like to be evaluated because they fear the process and people involved. Although optimal performance evaluators can minimize people's anxieties about being assessed, actual performance evaluators can perpetuate employees' fears and, worse, lower their job performances and morale. A case study illustrates the actions of an…

  15. WMC Database Evaluation. Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Palounek, Andrea P. T

    2015-10-29

    The WMC Database is ultimately envisioned to hold a collection of experimental data, design information, and information from computational models. This project was a first attempt at using the Database to access experimental data and extract information from it. This evaluation shows that the Database concept is sound and robust, and that the Database, once fully populated, should remain eminently usable for future researchers.

  16. Inside the Black Box--An Implementation Evaluation Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rector, Patricia; Bakacs, Michele; Rowe, Amy; Barbour, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The case study presented in this article is an example of an implementation evaluation. The evaluation investigated significant components of the implementation of a long-term environmental educational program. Direct observation, evaluation-specific survey data, and historical data were used to determine program integrity as identified by…

  17. Formative Evaluation as a Social Process: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon-Cox, Leslie; Holzner, Burkart

    This paper reports the results of a case study of the process of formative evaluation in the development of one unit of Individualized Science (IS). It is an analytic description of the curriculum project's experiences in formative evaluation rather than an evaluative critique. Following an introductory explanation, the IS program and the IS…

  18. Inside the Black Box--An Implementation Evaluation Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rector, Patricia; Bakacs, Michele; Rowe, Amy; Barbour, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The case study presented in this article is an example of an implementation evaluation. The evaluation investigated significant components of the implementation of a long-term environmental educational program. Direct observation, evaluation-specific survey data, and historical data were used to determine program integrity as identified by…

  19. Evaluating Experiential Learning Programs: The Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates how case study evaluation concentrates on a single situation to present a holistic view of an experiential learning program and reveals unique and unanticipated features. Outlines steps of planning, gathering, analyzing, synthesizing, and reporting data and considers the advantages and disadvantages of the case study approach. (LFL)

  20. Evaluation of School Uniform Policy in Turkey: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinoglu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of current school uniform policies according to views of stakeholders. Descriptive case study method was used for this study to understand the concerns of the stakeholders about school uniforms. Data was collected through interviews with stakeholders and also reviewing the documents in TOKI…

  1. Evaluation of School Uniform Policy in Turkey: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinoglu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of current school uniform policies according to views of stakeholders. Descriptive case study method was used for this study to understand the concerns of the stakeholders about school uniforms. Data was collected through interviews with stakeholders and also reviewing the documents in TOKI…

  2. A Major Children's Educational Art Exhibit: An Evaluative Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenk, George W.; Shrock, Sharon A.

    Results of a case study of an exhibit of art and artifacts designed for children are presented. The focus of the study was to apply the principles of instructional-message design to the evaluation of the exhibit. The exhibit, "Art Inside Out: Exploring Art and Culture through Time," was displayed at the Art Institute of Chicago. Textual…

  3. Evaluation of Publications in Program Development--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, David L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A difficult aspect of continuing education is evaluation, especially of publications used for program development. This case study was undertaken to determine the usability of four publications in a 4-H forestry seedling planting program as rated by professionals and 4-Hers. The intent was to develop instrumentation that can be used in any program…

  4. The Efficacy of Math Coaching: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbins, C. Neelie

    2010-01-01

    There is a lack of implementation of instructional strategies to assist middle school teachers in improving mathematics education for their students. Coaching is one solution to this problem, but its impact on student achievement is unclear. This case study evaluated the relationship between coaching and teacher efficacy and the impact of these…

  5. Success case studies contribute to evaluation of complex research infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Hogle, Janice A; Moberg, D Paul

    2014-03-01

    The success case studies approach examines in depth what works well in a program by describing cases and examining factors leading to successful outcomes. In this article, we describe the use of success case studies as part of an evaluation of the transformation of a health sciences research support infrastructure. Using project-specific descriptions and the researchers' perceptions of the impact of improved research infrastructure, we added depth of understanding to the quantitative data required by funding agencies. Each case study included an interview with the lead researcher, along with review of documents about the research, the investigator, and their collaborators. Our analyses elucidated themes regarding contributions of the Clinical and Translational Science Awards program of the National Institutes of Health to scientific achievements and career advancement of investigators in one academic institution.

  6. Survey research methods in evaluation and case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Kalton, Graham; Piesse, Andrea

    2007-04-15

    Survey research methods are widely used in two types of analytic studies: evaluation studies that measure the effects of interventions; and population-based case-control studies that investigate the effects of various risk factors on the presence of disease. This paper provides a broad overview of some design and analysis issues related to such studies, illustrated with examples. The lack of random assignment to treatment and control groups in many evaluation studies makes controlling for confounders critically important. Confounder control can be achieved by matching in the design and by various alternative methods in the analysis. One popular analytic method of controlling for confounders is propensity scoring, which bears a close resemblance to survey weighting. The use of population-based controls has become common in case-control studies. For reasons of cost, population-based controls are often identified by telephone surveys using random digit dialling (RDD) sampling methods. However, RDD surveys are now experiencing serious problems with response rates. A recent alternative approach is to select controls from frames such as driver license lists that contain valuable demographic information for use in matching. Methods of analysis developed in the survey sampling literature are applicable, at least to some degree, in the analyses of evaluation and population-based case-control studies. In particular, the effects of complex sample designs can be taken into account using survey sampling variance estimation methods. Several survey analysis software packages are available for carrying out the computations.

  7. Performance Evaluation of NoSQL Databases: A Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Performance Evaluation of NoSQL Databases : A Case Study John Klein, Ian Gorton, Neil Ernst, Patrick Donohoe Software Engineering Institute...The choice of a particular NoSQL database imposes a specific distributed software architecture and data model, and is a major determinant of the...overall system throughput. NoSQL database performance is in turn strongly influenced by how well the data model and query capabilities fit the

  8. Encouraging Stakeholder Engagement: A Case Study of Evaluator Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poth, Cheryl-Anne; Shulha, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes evaluator behaviors revealed by the case analysis of a participatory and developmental evaluation. The analysis revealed that the evaluator paid specific attention to individual stakeholder cues. These cues were related to three elements of the evaluation: negotiating the design, monitoring individual stakeholder needs, and…

  9. Economic evaluations and diagnostic testing: an illustrative case study approach.

    PubMed

    Sanghera, Sabina; Orlando, Rosanna; Roberts, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a clear process of synthesizing test accuracy data when conducting economic evaluations of diagnostic tests for health technology assessment (HTA) assessors and health economists. We appraised the methods advocated for using diagnostic test accuracy data in economic evaluations. We used a case study of fetal anemia in which data from a screening test are used in combination with a confirmatory test. We developed a step-by-step guide and consider two scenarios: when data on test accuracy from several studies are based on (i) the same test threshold for positivity and (ii) different test thresholds. We conclude that each approach has its strengths and limitations. We show that the optimal operating point of the test should be identified to determine the true cost-effectiveness of the test. We advocate that these issues require a multidisciplinary team of health economists, decision modelers and statisticians.

  10. Adding New Dimensions to Case Study Evaluations: The Case of Evaluating Comprehensive Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; Davis, Darnella

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptation of the case study method to assessing increasingly complex, comprehensive reform initiatives that highlight the blurring of the boundaries between phenomenon and context and the concurrence of multiple interventions. Completed studies of two education reform programs illustrate the ongoing challenges of…

  11. Evaluation of National Adaptation Planning: A Case Study in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanishi, Masato; Ridwan, Nadia Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate national adaptation planning, using the National Action Plan for Climate Change Adaptation (RAN-API) in Indonesia as a case. In doing so, the current study applies the methodology used in Preston et al. (2011), where a set of 57 adaptation plans from three developed countries was evaluated against 19 planning processes. The same criteria and scoring system were applied to the current study to evaluate RAN-API, both as identified in its document and as viewed by the stakeholders. A desktop review and questionnaires were undertaken to this end. It was found that discrepancies exist between the status of RAN-API as documented and the stakeholders views of some criteria, suggesting that information or knowledge gaps may still exist despite the efforts made for stakeholder engagement. In some of the other criteria, the stakeholders views match the status as identified in the document. Most notably, they both agree that the weakness of RAN-API is related to limited consideration for non-climatic factors. While the development of RAN-API is a critical step taken in the country, the current study finds that there remains room for further improvement. The criteria or indicators to be used to assess the progress of RAN-API as a whole may need to be further elaborated.

  12. Teaching with Online Case Studies: Implementation and Evaluation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinaja, Robert; Raisinghani, Mahesh S.

    The case study is one of the most widely used tools in many disciplines including Information Management. At the same time the new Internet revolution has promoted online distance learning courses as never before. Many online courses are also incorporating the benefits of case studies into their course content. Case studies are now available…

  13. Applying GEP-HI for the planning of an evaluation study: a case study walkthrough (workshop).

    PubMed

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Brender, Jytte; Ammenwerth, Elske; Talmon, Jan; Rigby, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A Good evaluation practice in Health Informatics (GEP-HI) Evaluation Practice guideline has been developed through a consensus making process. The guideline lists a set of 60 issues that are relevant for planning, implementation and execution of an evaluation study in the health informatics domain. These issues cover the phases of an evaluation study: Study exploration, first study design, operationalization of methods, detailed study design, execution and finalization of an evaluation study. In this seminar we walk through a case study to present how to plan a health information system evaluation study applying the good evaluation practice guideline.

  14. Mark III Space Suit Mobility: A Reach Evaluation Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaxton, Sherry S.; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Onady, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the reach envelope and field of vision (FOV) for a subject wearing a Mark III space suit was requested for use in human-machine interface design of the Science Crew Operations and Utility Testbed (SCOUT) vehicle. The reach and view of two suited and unsuited subjects were evaluated while seated in the vehicle using 3-dimensional position data collected during a series of reaching motions. Data was interpolated and displayed in orthogonal views and cross-sections. Compared with unsuited conditions, medio-lateral reach was not strongly affected by the Mark III suit, whereas vertical and antero-posterior reach were inhibited by the suit. Lateral FOV was reduced by approximately 40 deg. in the suit. The techniques used in this case study may prove useful in human-machine interface design by providing a new means of developing and displaying reach envelopes.

  15. Case Study Methodology in Educational Evaluation. Proceedings of the Minnesota Evaluation Conference (May 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Wayne W., Ed.

    The four papers in these proceedings provide a comprehensive picture of the rationale, methodology, strengths, and limitations of case studies. In "Doing Justice in Evaluation Research," David Hamilton argues that the application of scientific methods to the study of social systems has given us a false illusion of certainty. He offers an…

  16. Family Assessment in Psychoeducational Evaluations: Case Studies with the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaughan, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Most recent articles on school psychologist involvement with families have been theoretical or conceptual in nature, and little has appeared regarding useful procedures. This article suggests an existing self-report measure that may be a useful addition to psychoeducational evaluations. Four case studies using the technique are presented, its…

  17. Evaluating a Tacit Knowledge Sharing Initiative: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, Claire; Corrigan, Siobhan; Garavan, Thomas N.; O'Connor, Christy; Leahy, Damien; Long, David; Murphy, Eamonn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present a case study illustrating the issues involved in the tacit knowledge conversion process and to determine whether such conversion delivers value to the organisation in terms of business value and return on investment (ROI). Design/methodology/approach: A single-case multiple baseline participants experimental…

  18. Developing, Implementing and Evaluating Case Studies in Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Claire; Wilcock, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The use of case studies to teach materials science undergraduates is an exciting and interesting educational approach. As well as helping learners to connect theory and practice, the case method is also useful for creating an active learning environment, developing key skills and catering for a range of different learning styles. This paper…

  19. Developing, Implementing and Evaluating Case Studies in Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Claire; Wilcock, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The use of case studies to teach materials science undergraduates is an exciting and interesting educational approach. As well as helping learners to connect theory and practice, the case method is also useful for creating an active learning environment, developing key skills and catering for a range of different learning styles. This paper…

  20. Evaluating a Tacit Knowledge Sharing Initiative: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, Claire; Corrigan, Siobhan; Garavan, Thomas N.; O'Connor, Christy; Leahy, Damien; Long, David; Murphy, Eamonn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present a case study illustrating the issues involved in the tacit knowledge conversion process and to determine whether such conversion delivers value to the organisation in terms of business value and return on investment (ROI). Design/methodology/approach: A single-case multiple baseline participants experimental…

  1. Online Continuing Professional Education: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullen, Darren L.

    2005-01-01

    An evaluation study, assessing the pedagogical and instructional design (e-pedagogy) effectiveness of online continuing professional education (CPE) courses offered by a large Australasian CPE provider to health care professionals (HCPs). The study used a naturalistic theory approach in conjunction with a multilevel evaluation to examine the…

  2. Evaluating Students' Beliefs in Problem Solving Process: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Tugba; Guven, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Problem solving is not simply a process that ends when an answer is found; it is a scientific process that evolves from understanding the problem to evaluating the solution. This process is affected by several factors. Among these, one of the most substantial is belief. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the beliefs of high school students…

  3. An assessment of goal-free evaluation: case studies of four goal-free evaluations.

    PubMed

    Youker, Brandon W; Ingraham, Allyssa; Bayer, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    This article provides a descriptive review of four goal-free program evaluations (GFE). GFE is an evaluation model where the independent evaluator is intentionally screened from the program's stated goals and objectives in hopes of reducing potential goal-related tunnel vision. The findings from these GFE case studies are focused in three areas: (1) elements of the programs that were evaluated and their existing evaluation contexts (e.g., pre-evaluation conditions, size of evaluation budget), (2) design of the GFEs (e.g., screening method, data collection methods), and (3) expertise of the goal-free evaluators (e.g., training, degrees attained). The findings indicate that, when employed, GFE is used as a qualitative data collection method; and the GFEs conducted have been relatively small in size and scope. The conclusions are that a more explicit operationalization of GFE is needed for increased use, and that systematic and empirical study comparing GFE with other evaluation models is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the Start Programme: Case-Study Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Shona; Sharp, Caroline; Weaving, Harriet; Smith, Robert; Wheater, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This report presents five case studies of long-term partnerships (over three years) between arts organisations and schools. The Start programme enables arts venues and schools to work together to offer disadvantaged young people opportunities to engage in creative activities that inspire them and enhance their experience of the arts. It is…

  5. A Case Study of Student Evaluation of Teaching in University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fah, Benjamin Chan Yin; Osman, Syuhaily

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine the factors (course characteristics, lecturer characteristics, and tutorial ratings) that affect student evaluation of teaching in university. A total of 88 undergraduates were selected and self-administered questionnaire was used as a tool for data collection. The study found that most of the respondents have high…

  6. Evaluating QR Code Case Studies Using a Mobile Learning Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikala, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Quick Response (QR) codes and mobile devices in the context of Finnish basic education. The feasibility was analyzed through a mobile learning framework, which includes the core characteristics of mobile learning. The study is part of a larger research where the aim is to develop a…

  7. Discovering the Future of the Case Study Method in Evaluation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    It is assumed that evaluators of the future will still be interested in case study methodology. Scenarios that ignore a case study method, that look back to a distinctive case study method, and that see the case study method as an integrating force in the qualitative-quantitative debate are explored. (SLD)

  8. Discovering the Future of the Case Study Method in Evaluation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    It is assumed that evaluators of the future will still be interested in case study methodology. Scenarios that ignore a case study method, that look back to a distinctive case study method, and that see the case study method as an integrating force in the qualitative-quantitative debate are explored. (SLD)

  9. Peaceful Uses Bona Fides: Criteria for Evaluation and Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ajemian, Chris K.; Hazel, Mike; Kessler, Carol E.; Mathews, Carrie E.; Morris, Fred A.; Seward, Amy M.; Peterson, Danielle J.; Smith, Brian W.

    2007-06-06

    This study applies a set of indicators to assess the peaceful nature of a state’s nuclear program. Evaluation of a country’s nuclear program relative to these indicators can help the international community to take appropriate actions to ensure that the growth of the global nuclear energy industry proceeds peacefully and to minimize nuclear proliferation risks.

  10. A framework and case studies for evaluation of enzyme ontogeny in children's health risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Gary; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Kancherla, Jayaram; Foos, Brenda; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the ontogeny of Phase I and Phase II metabolizing enzymes may be used to inform children's vulnerability based upon likely differences in internal dose from xenobiotic exposure. This might provide a qualitative assessment of toxicokinetic (TK) variability and uncertainty pertinent to early lifestages and help scope a more quantitative physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) assessment. Although much is known regarding the ontogeny of metabolizing systems, this is not commonly utilized in scoping and problem formulation stage of human health risk evaluation. A framework is proposed for introducing this information into problem formulation which combines data on enzyme ontogeny and chemical-specific TK to explore potential child/adult differences in internal dose and whether such metabolic differences may be important factors in risk evaluation. The framework is illustrated with five case study chemicals, including some which are data rich and provide proof of concept, while others are data poor. Case studies for toluene and chlorpyrifos indicate potentially important child/adult TK differences while scoping for acetaminophen suggests enzyme ontogeny is unlikely to increase early-life risks. Scoping for trichloroethylene and aromatic amines indicates numerous ways that enzyme ontogeny may affect internal dose which necessitates further evaluation. PBTK modeling is a critical and feasible next step to further evaluate child-adult differences in internal dose for a number of these chemicals.

  11. Case Studies in Evaluating the Benefits and Costs of Mediated Instruction and Distributed Learning: Synopses/Summaries of Eight Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank

    This report summarizes eight case studies undertaken to evaluate the benefits and costs of mediated instruction and distributed learning. The case studies included: (1) "The Master's Degree in Social Work at Cleveland State University and the University of Akron: A Case Study of the Benefits and Costs of a Joint Degree Program Offered via…

  12. Who Evaluates the Evaluator?--A Case Study of Evaluators Practicing Their Precepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drezek, Stan; And Others

    The Evaluation Services component of the Education Service Center, in San Antonio, Texas, evaluated nine Special Education programs conducted by the Center. It was decided to evaluate the actual impact of these reports, which examined the programs' major accomplishments. The thirty professional staff involved in the programs were surveyed. Fifty…

  13. Evaluating a case study using Bloom's Taxonomy of Education.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Brenda G; Burton, Karen J

    2008-09-01

    The joint commission recognizes effective communication among caregivers as an important factor for ensuring patient safety, especially at times when the patient's care is handed off from one caregiver or service to another. This case study reviews the course of treatment for one patient throughout the perioperative continuum, including the postoperative unit where a pre-arrest situation developed. A workshop using Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives enabled staff members to more clearly understand the patient's situation. It also allowed the participants to gain an increased understanding of significant data and has been strategic in preventing patient complications.

  14. A Basic Set of Criteria for Evaluation of Teaching Case Studies: Students' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havelka, Douglas; Neal, Catherine S.

    2015-01-01

    A study was performed to identify and evaluate characteristics, properties, and attributes of teaching cases that provide value to students. The items identified can be used to create an instrument to evaluate teaching cases during the review process for publication or by instructors to identify cases that would be most appropriate for courses.

  15. Evaluation of 3-D graphics software: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Chasen, S. H.; Garner, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient 3-D geometry graphics software package which is suitable for advanced design studies was developed. The advanced design system is called GRADE--Graphics for Advanced Design. Efficiency and ease of use are gained by sacrificing flexibility in surface representation. The immediate options were either to continue development of GRADE or to acquire a commercially available system which would replace or complement GRADE. Test cases which would reveal the ability of each system to satisfy the requirements were developed. A scoring method which adequately captured the relative capabilities of the three systems was presented. While more complex multi-attribute decision methods could be used, the selected method provides all the needed information without being so complex that it is difficult to understand. If the value factors are modestly perturbed, system Z is a clear winner based on its overall capabilities. System Z is superior in two vital areas: surfacing and ease of interface with application programs.

  16. Evaluating gene flow using selected markers: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Lenormand, T; Guillemaud, T; Bourguet, D; Raymond, M

    1998-01-01

    The extent to which an organism is locally adapted in an environmental pocket depends on the selection intensities inside and outside the pocket, on migration, and on the size of the pocket. When two or more loci are involved in this local adaptation, measuring their frequency gradients and their linkage disequilbria allows one to disentangle the forces-migration and selection-acting on the system. We apply this method to the case of a local adaptation to organophosphate insecticides in the mosquito Culex pipiens pipiens in southern France. The study of two different resistance loci allowed us to estimate with support limits gene flow as well as selection pressure on insecticide resistance and the fitness costs associated with each locus. These estimates permit us to pinpoint the conditions for the maintenance of this pocket of adaptation as well as the effect of the interaction between the two resistance loci. PMID:9649528

  17. Eternal Triangulation: Case Studies in the Evaluation of Educational Software by Classroom-Based Teacher Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David; Keep, Ros

    1988-01-01

    Reviews some of the problems involved in the evaluation of educational software, and describes a classroom-based case study approach to software evaluation intended for application by autonomous self-programming groups of teachers. (20 references) (Author/CLB)

  18. Organic dairy production systems in Pennsylvania: a case study evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A; Kamphuis, G H; Karsten, H D; Weaver, R D

    2007-08-01

    The current market demand and price for organic milk is encouraging dairy producers, particularly those on smaller farms, to consider organic production as a means for improving the economic viability of their operations. Organic production systems vary widely in scale, in practices, and across agroclimatic settings. Within this context, case studies of 4 actual organic dairy farms were used to characterize existing systems in Pennsylvania. Based on data from these farms, a whole-farm simulation model (Integrated Farm System Model) was used to compare 4 production systems representing organic grass, organic crop, conventional crop with grazing, and conventional confinement production. The performance of each of these systems was simulated over each year of 25 yr of central Pennsylvania weather data. Simulation results indicated that farm level accumulation of soil P and K may be a concern on organic farms that use poultry manure as a primary crop nutrient source, and that erosion and runoff loss of P may be of concern on organic farms producing annual crops because more tillage is required for weed control. Whole-farm budgets with prices that reflect recent conditions showed an economic advantage for organic over conventional production. A sensitivity analysis showed that this economic advantage depended on a higher milk price for producers of organic milk and was influenced by the difference in milk production maintained by herds using organic and conventional systems. Factors found to have little effect on the relative profitability of organic over conventional production included the differences between organic and conventional prices for seed, chemicals, forage, and animals and the overall costs or prices assumed for organic certification, machinery, pasture fencing, fuel, and labor. Thus, at the current organic milk price, relative to other prices, the case study organic production systems seem to provide an option for improving the economic viability of dairy

  19. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Intervention for Treatment of Inconsistent Phonological Disorder: Three Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Beth; Dodd, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Children with unintelligible speech differ in severity, underlying deficit, type of surface error patterns and response to treatment. Detailed treatment case studies, evaluating specific intervention protocols for particular diagnostic groups, can identify best practice for children with speech disorder. Three treatment case studies evaluated the…

  20. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Intervention for Treatment of Inconsistent Phonological Disorder: Three Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Beth; Dodd, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Children with unintelligible speech differ in severity, underlying deficit, type of surface error patterns and response to treatment. Detailed treatment case studies, evaluating specific intervention protocols for particular diagnostic groups, can identify best practice for children with speech disorder. Three treatment case studies evaluated the…

  1. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Intervention for Treatment of Inconsistent Phonological Disorder: Three Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Beth; Dodd, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Children with unintelligible speech differ in severity, underlying deficit, type of surface error patterns and response to treatment. Detailed treatment case studies, evaluating specific intervention protocols for particular diagnostic groups, can identify best practice for children with speech disorder. Three treatment case studies evaluated the…

  2. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Intervention for Treatment of Inconsistent Phonological Disorder: Three Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Beth; Dodd, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Children with unintelligible speech differ in severity, underlying deficit, type of surface error patterns and response to treatment. Detailed treatment case studies, evaluating specific intervention protocols for particular diagnostic groups, can identify best practice for children with speech disorder. Three treatment case studies evaluated the…

  3. Case studies evaluating the quality of synthetic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deisinger, Joachim; Blach, Roland; Simon, Andreas

    1999-03-01

    Multi wall stereo projection systems (MWSP) are an emerging display paradigm, promising a new quality in 3D-real-time interactions. Not much is known about the ergonomics of these systems. In this paper some basics of perception and approaches to improve the visual quality will be discussed and results of four experiments will be presented in order to obtain a better understanding of user interactions with existing projection technology. Due to the limited number of participants the experiments are considered as case-studies only. The first task was the estimation of absolute geometrical dimensions of simple objects. The second task was grabbing simple objects of different sizes. In order to classify MWSP, these tasks were compared to other display devices and compared to physical reality. We conducted two further experiments to compare different viewing devices for virtual reality (VR) like Head Mounted Displays (HMD), monitor, and the MWSP. For all of those experiments quantitative data was collected as a measure of interaction quality. The last two tests were supported by pre- and post questionnaires to obtain subjective judgement of the displays as well.

  4. Educator Evaluation: A Case Study of Massachusetts' Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Catherine; Partelow, Lisette; Konoske-Graf, Annette

    2016-01-01

    There has been a sea change in teacher evaluation over the past eight years. Inspired in part by President Barack Obama's policies, schools have instituted teacher evaluation systems that include multiple measures of teacher impact. Model systems are aligned to systems of continuous improvement, helping teachers identify areas of weakness in their…

  5. Developing a Culture of Evaluative Inquiry: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Happy Lee

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that few educational reform efforts have achieved significant, long-lasting improvement in student achievement. In order to accelerate growth in student achievement, many researchers have advocated the development of cultures of evaluative inquiry. In a culture of evaluative inquiry, teachers use data to identify instructional…

  6. Within the Teacher Evaluation Policies Black Box: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaillant, Denise; Gonzalez-Vaillant, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between teacher evaluation policies in Chile and Uruguay, teacher professional development, and teacher performance effectiveness. The analysis tries to understand the extent to which the existing processes for teacher evaluation stimulate an improvement in the quality of teaching. The comparison of two…

  7. Developing a Culture of Evaluative Inquiry: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Happy Lee

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that few educational reform efforts have achieved significant, long-lasting improvement in student achievement. In order to accelerate growth in student achievement, many researchers have advocated the development of cultures of evaluative inquiry. In a culture of evaluative inquiry, teachers use data to identify instructional…

  8. Part-Time Faculty Evaluation: A Campus Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James P.

    For the past 13 years, the Verde Valley Campus of Yavapai College, in Arizona, has used the same system to evaluate part-time faculty in an effort to both maintain quality control and provide feedback to part-time faculty and address their concerns. The system utilizes two instruments to gather evaluative data. The first is used to determine…

  9. Investigating the Needs for Measurement and Evaluation Course: A Case Study on English Language Teaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Memet; Türkkan, Buket Turhan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the needs related to the attainments, content, processes of teaching-learning and measurement-evaluation aspect of Measurement and Evaluation course. This research was designed as a case study which is one of the qualitative research designs. The most common problem in Measurement and Evaluation courses was found…

  10. Evaluation Policy in a Nonprofit Foundation: A Case Study Exploration of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillman, Lisa M.; Christie, Christina A.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between evaluation policies and evaluation practice. Through document analysis, interviews, and a multiple case study, the research examined the explicit and implicit policies overarching the evaluation work commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and explored how these policies are…

  11. Evaluation Policy in a Nonprofit Foundation: A Case Study Exploration of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillman, Lisa M.; Christie, Christina A.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between evaluation policies and evaluation practice. Through document analysis, interviews, and a multiple case study, the research examined the explicit and implicit policies overarching the evaluation work commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and explored how these policies are…

  12. The Road to Evaluation Capacity Building: A Case Study from Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Barbara; Englert, Pnina Elal

    2008-01-01

    We present an empirical case study of an Evaluation Capacity Building (ECB) initiative in a school in Israel. First, we tell the story of the school's 10-year journey toward the successful integration of evaluation through ECB. Then we examine the case according to King's (2002) four elements of ECB: teachers, students, the curriculum, and the…

  13. Automated evaluation of service oriented architecture systems: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouad, Hesham; Gilliam, Antonio; Guleyupoglu, Suleyman; Russell, Stephen M.

    2017-05-01

    The Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) model is fast gaining dominance in how software applications are built. They allow organizations to capitalize on existing services and share data amongst distributed applications. The automatic evaluation of SOA systems poses a challenging problem due to three factors: technological complexity, organizational incompatibility, and integration into existing development pipelines. In this paper we describe our experience in developing and deploying an automated evaluation capability for the Marine Corps' Tactical Service Oriented Architecture (TSOA). We outline the technological, policy, and operational challenges we face and how we are addressing them.

  14. Case study of an evaluation coaching model: exploring the role of the evaluator.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, David C; Kallemeyn, Leanne M; Rempert, Tania; Wade, James; Polanin, Megan

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the role of the external evaluator as a coach. More specifically, using an evaluative inquiry framework (Preskill & Torres, 1999a; Preskill & Torres, 1999b), it explored the types of coaching that an evaluator employed to promote individual, team and organizational learning. The study demonstrated that evaluation coaching provided a viable means for an organization with a limited budget to conduct evaluations through support of a coach. It also demonstrated how the coaching processes supported the development of evaluation capacity within the organization. By examining coaching models outside of the field of evaluation, this study identified two forms of coaching--results coaching and developmental coaching--that promoted evaluation capacity building and have not been previously discussed in the evaluation literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating the Impact of Leadership Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexter, Barbara; Prince, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The relevance of business education is coming under increasing challenge from many quarters, who argue that business schools are not delivering research and programmes that are relevant to the needs of business and society. The purpose of this paper is to test these claims by evaluating the impact of a leadership development programme on…

  16. Evaluating the Impact of Leadership Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexter, Barbara; Prince, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The relevance of business education is coming under increasing challenge from many quarters, who argue that business schools are not delivering research and programmes that are relevant to the needs of business and society. The purpose of this paper is to test these claims by evaluating the impact of a leadership development programme on…

  17. Case Studies in Job Analysis and Training Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, Jack

    2001-01-01

    An information technology certification program was evaluated by 1,671 systems engineers using job analysis that rated task importance. Professional librarians (n=527) rated importance of their tasks in similar fashion. Results of scatter diagrams provided evidence to enhance training effectiveness by focusing on job tasks significantly related to…

  18. A Case Study: Evaluating Faculty at Bowling Green State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partin, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    A system of evaluating faculty performance in research and scholarly activity, service, and teaching by awarding points for specific activities is outlined. The point system is used to distribute merit monies allotted by the university. Advantages of the system include predictability, specificity, and flexibility for faculty to develop individual…

  19. Evaluating Best Practices for Video Tutorials: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Thomas; Putnam Davis, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This article will explore one library's experience creating best practices for the creation of video tutorials. First, a literature review establishes the best practices other creators have used. Then, the authors apply these best practices to the creation of their first video tutorial. Finally, they evaluate the usefulness of each practice in…

  20. Evaluating growth models: A case study using PrognosisBC

    Treesearch

    Peter Marshall; Pablo Parysow; Shadrach Akindele

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the PrognosisBC (Version 3.0) growth model to predict tree and stand growth was assessed against a series of remeasured permanent sample plots, including some which had been precommercially thinned. In addition, the model was evaluated for logical consistency across a variety of stand structures using simulation. By the end of the...

  1. An Evaluative Case Study on Professional Competency of Preservice Information Technology Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabakci Yurdakul, Isil

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate preservice Information Technology (IT) teachers' professional competency in the teaching process. The study was designed on the basis of evaluative case study. The participants of the study consisted of seven preservice IT teachers attending the department of Computer Education and Instructional…

  2. Assessing Evaluation Studies: The Case of Bilingual Education Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Michael M., Ed.; Fienberg, Stephen E., Ed.

    Results of a National Research Council review of two major bilingual education studies are presented. The two studies were a national longitudinal study of the effectiveness of instruction of limited-English-proficient students and a study comparing three bilingual education program types (immersion, early exit, and late exit). The report contains…

  3. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Maye; Gerein, Nancy; Tarin, Ehsanullah; Butcher, Christopher; Pearson, Stephen; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2009-01-01

    Background The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. Methods The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Results Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least useful areas were those that dealt

  4. Learning from Action Evaluation of the Use of Multimedia Case Studies in Management Information Systems Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawulich, Barbara B.

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript shares lessons learned from conducting an action evaluation of the use of multimedia case studies in Management Information Systems (MIS) courses. Three undergraduate MIS classes took part in the study. The purpose for using case studies in these classes was to teach students about the role of MIS in business. An action evaluation…

  5. Learning from Action Evaluation of the Use of Multimedia Case Studies in Management Information Systems Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawulich, Barbara B.

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript shares lessons learned from conducting an action evaluation of the use of multimedia case studies in Management Information Systems (MIS) courses. Three undergraduate MIS classes took part in the study. The purpose for using case studies in these classes was to teach students about the role of MIS in business. An action evaluation…

  6. A Case Study of Youth Participatory Evaluation in Co-Curricular Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelson, Beth Lewis; Smith, Ross; Stevenson, Eleanor; Ryan, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the practice of participatory evaluation through an exploratory single case study of the Evaluation Team of Books & Beyond, a co-curricular service-learning program of the Global Village Living-Learning Center at Indiana University. The paper, which is authored by three undergraduate members of the evaluation team and their…

  7. [Evaluation by case managers dementia : An explorative practice based study on types and content].

    PubMed

    Ketelaar, Nicole A B M; Jukema, Jan S; van Bemmel, Marlies; Adriaansen, Marian J M; Smits, Carolien H M

    2017-06-01

    This practice based explorative study aims to provide insight into the ways in which case managers shape and fill up the evaluation phase of their support of the informal care network of persons with dementia. A combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods were used. A group of 57 case managers of persons with dementia in three different organisational networks took part in this study. Results from the quantitative and qualitative data are organized into four themes: (1) attitude towards evaluation, (2) forms of evaluation, (3) implementation of evaluation and (4) content of evaluation. There are different ways in shaping evaluation and the content of it. The importance of interim and final evaluation is recognized, but is difficult to realize in a methodical way. Barriers experienced by the case managers include various factors associated both with clients as professionals. Case managers evaluate continuously and in an informal way to assess whether the extent of their assistance is meeting the needs of the client and informal network. Case managers do not use systematic evaluation to measure the quality of care they offer to persons with dementia and their caregivers. The findings demand a discussion on the level of clients, as well as on the professional and societal level about the way case managers should evaluate their support.

  8. Factor selection for service quality evaluation: a hospital case study.

    PubMed

    Ameryoun, Ahmad; Najafi, Seyedvahid; Nejati-Zarnaqi, Bayram; Khalilifar, Seyed Omid; Ajam, Mahdi; Ansarimoghadam, Ahmad

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a systematic approach to predict service quality dimension's influence on service quality using a novel analysis based on data envelopment and SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach To assess hospital service quality in Tehran, expectation and perception of those who received the services were evaluated using SERVQUAL. The hospital service quality dimensions were found by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). To compare customer expectation and perception, perceived service quality index (PSQI) was measured using a new method based on common weights. A novel sensitivity approach was used to test the service quality factor's impact on the PSQI. Findings A new service quality dimension named "trust in services" was found using EFA, which is not an original SERVQUAL factor. The approach was applied to assess the hospital's service quality. Since the PSQI value was 0.76 it showed that improvements are needed to meet customer expectations. The results showed the factor order that affect PSQI. "Trust in services" has the strongest influence on PSQI followed by "tangibles," "assurance," "empathy," and "responsiveness," respectively. Practical implications This work gives managers insight into service quality by following a systematic method; i.e., measuring perceived service quality from the customer viewpoint and service factors' impact on customer perception. Originality/value The procedure helps managers to select the required service quality dimensions which need improvement and predict their effects on customer perception.

  9. Holistic versus Analytic Evaluation of EFL Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghalib, Thikra K.; Al-Hattami, Abdulghani A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of holistic and analytic scoring rubrics in the context of EFL writing. Specifically, the paper compares EFL students' scores on a writing task using holistic and analytic scoring rubrics. The data for the study was collected from 30 participants attending an English undergraduate program in a Yemeni…

  10. Evaluation and perceived results of moral case deliberation: A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Rien M J P A; van Zadelhoff, Ezra; van Loo, Ger; Widdershoven, Guy A M; Molewijk, Bert A C

    2015-12-01

    Moral case deliberation is increasingly becoming part of various Dutch healthcare organizations. Although some evaluation studies of moral case deliberation have been carried out, research into the results of moral case deliberation within aged care is scarce. How did participants evaluate moral case deliberation? What has moral case deliberation brought to them? What has moral case deliberation contributed to care practice? Should moral case deliberation be further implemented and, if so, how? Quantitative analysis of a questionnaire study among participants of moral case deliberation, both caregivers and team leaders. Qualitative analysis of written answers to open questions, interview study and focus group meetings among caregivers and team leaders. Caregivers and team leaders in a large organization for aged care in the Netherlands. A total of 61 moral case deliberation sessions, carried out on 16 care locations belonging to the organization, were evaluated and perceived results were assessed. Participants gave informed consent and anonymity was guaranteed. In the Netherlands, the law does not prescribe independent ethical review by an Institutional Review Board for this kind of research among healthcare professionals. Moral case deliberation was evaluated positively by the participants. Content and atmosphere of moral case deliberation received high scores, while organizational issues regarding the moral case deliberation sessions scored lower and merit further attention. Respondents indicated that moral case deliberation has the potential to contribute to care practice as relationships among team members improve, more openness is experienced and more understanding for different perspectives is fostered. If moral case deliberation is to be successfully implemented, top-down approaches should go hand in hand with bottom-up approaches. The relevance of moral case deliberation for care practice received wide acknowledgement from the respondents. It can contribute

  11. Evaluation of Multivariate Visualizations: A Case Study of Refinements and User Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Evaluation of Multivariate Visualizations: A Case Study of Refinements and User Experience Mark A. Livingston* and Jonathan W. Decker Naval...Visualizations: A Case Study of Refinements and User Experience 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  12. Evaluation of blood bisphenol A contents: a case study.

    PubMed

    Taskeen, A; Naeem, I; Atif, M

    2012-09-01

    It has been recently reported that Bisphenol A (BPA) may leach out into food, beverages and water samples from the plastic ware in which it is stored. Serious health hazards have been reported from BPA. The purpose of this study is to assess the BPA contents in blood and to assess the risk of cancer. A total of 100 individuals were selected for study according to the following five age groups: 5-10, 11-20, 21-30, 31-40 and 41-50 years. They were then further divided into normal and diseased. Age, gender, education, source of drinking water, type of food, smoking habit, any exposure to chemicals and history of cancer were elicited during interview. Blood samples were collected and processed for analysis using reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography (rp-HPLC) in isocratic mode. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water (1:1) at a flow-rate of 1 ml min-1. Bisphenol A contents found in blood samples of all age groups ranged from 1.53-3.98 (mean = 2.94, SD = 0.9). P-values, for the exposed people and those having a history of cancer, were < 0.05 showing a significant relationship between BPA and cancer The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has established a reference dose of 50 microg/L. Odd ratios and relative risk for smoking habit were < 1 while for all others they were > 1. It was concluded from the study that people using bottled water, packaged food, having a history of cancer and who had been exposed to any type of chemicals are at higher risk of disease.

  13. Hydrochemical evaluation of river water quality—a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qishlaqi, Afishin; Kordian, Sediqeh; Parsaie, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Rivers are one of the most environmentally vulnerable sources for contamination. Since the rivers pass through the cities, industrial and agricultural centers, these have been considered as place to dispose the sewages. This issue is more important when the river is one of the main sources of water supplying for drinking, agricultural and industrial utilizations. The goal of the present study was assessing the physicochemical characteristics of the Tireh River water. The Tireh River is the main river in the Karkheh catchment in the Iran. To this end, 14 sampling stations for measuring the physicochemical properties of Tireh River along the two main cities (Borujerd and Dorud) were measured. The results showed that (except SO4) Mg, Ca and other anions and cations have concentrations under WHO standard limitation. Almost all samples have suitable conditions for drinking with regard to the WHO standard and in comparison with agricultural standard (FAO Standard), and the potential of water is suitable for irrigation purposes. According to Wilcox diagram, 78 % of samples were at the C3-S1 and 21.5 % were at C2-S1 classes. The piper diagram shows that most of samples are bicarbonate and calcic facies.

  14. Hydrochemical evaluation of river water quality—a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qishlaqi, Afishin; Kordian, Sediqeh; Parsaie, Abbas

    2017-09-01

    Rivers are one of the most environmentally vulnerable sources for contamination. Since the rivers pass through the cities, industrial and agricultural centers, these have been considered as place to dispose the sewages. This issue is more important when the river is one of the main sources of water supplying for drinking, agricultural and industrial utilizations. The goal of the present study was assessing the physicochemical characteristics of the Tireh River water. The Tireh River is the main river in the Karkheh catchment in the Iran. To this end, 14 sampling stations for measuring the physicochemical properties of Tireh River along the two main cities (Borujerd and Dorud) were measured. The results showed that (except SO4) Mg, Ca and other anions and cations have concentrations under WHO standard limitation. Almost all samples have suitable conditions for drinking with regard to the WHO standard and in comparison with agricultural standard (FAO Standard), and the potential of water is suitable for irrigation purposes. According to Wilcox diagram, 78 % of samples were at the C3-S1 and 21.5 % were at C2-S1 classes. The piper diagram shows that most of samples are bicarbonate and calcic facies.

  15. Evaluating Decoupling Process in OECD Countries: Case Study of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Nazan; Şengün Ucal, Meltem; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is at the top of the present and future problems facing humanity. Climate change is now largely attributed to human activities and economic activities are the source of human activities that cause climate change by creating pressure on the environment. Providing the sustainability of resources for the future seems possible by reducing the pressure of these economic activities on the environment. Given the increasing population pressure and growth-focused economies, it is possible to say that achieving decoupling is not so easy on a global basis. It is known that there are some problems in developing countries especially in terms of accessing reliable data in transition and implementation process of decoupling. Developed countries' decoupling practices and proper calculation methods can also be a guide for developing countries. In this study, we tried to calculate the comparative decoupling index for OECD countries and Turkey in terms of data suitability, and we showed the differences between them. We tried to indicate the level of decoupling (weak, stable, strong) for each country. We think that the comparison of Turkey can be an example in terms of developing countries. Acknowledgement: This research has been supported by Bogazici University Research Fund Grant Number 12220.

  16. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  17. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  18. The Dilemma of Internal Evaluation in Higher Education: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehralizadeh, Yadollah; Pakseresht, Mohamad Jafar; Baradaran, Massoud; Shahi, Sakineh

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report the process and outcomes of a case study which introduced internal evaluation procedures into academic departments of a university in Iran. The purpose of the study was to identify what benefits could arise from using internal evaluation, and what obstacles existed to its successful introduction.…

  19. The Social Construction of a Digital Library: A Case Study Examining Implications for Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilker, Julian; Gay, Geri

    1998-01-01

    Describes the social construction of technology (SCOT) framework which encourages a focus on the multiple perspectives inherent in the development and evaluation of digital libraries. Relevant social groups, interpretive flexibility, and closure are used to examine an evaluation case study of the "Making of America" (MOA) digital library…

  20. Online and Paper Evaluations of Courses: A Literature Review and Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on comparing online and paper course evaluations in higher education and provides a case study of a very large randomised trial on the topic. It presents a mixed but generally optimistic picture of online course evaluations with respect to response rates, what they indicate, and how to increase them. The paper…

  1. Evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Local Course Improvement Program, Volume III: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, James A.; And Others

    This report is the third of three volumes describing the results of the evaluation of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Local Course Improvement (LOCI) program. This volume describes 12 project case studies undertaken as part of that evaluation. Three projects were designed to increase individualization of college science teaching; two…

  2. Auditing and Evaluating University-Community Engagement: Lessons from a UK Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Angie; Northmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The growing importance of community and public engagement activities in universities has led to an increasing emphasis on auditing and evaluating university-community partnerships. However, the development of effective audit and evaluation tools is still at a formative stage. This article presents a case study of the University of Brighton's…

  3. Auditing and Evaluating University-Community Engagement: Lessons from a UK Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Angie; Northmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The growing importance of community and public engagement activities in universities has led to an increasing emphasis on auditing and evaluating university-community partnerships. However, the development of effective audit and evaluation tools is still at a formative stage. This article presents a case study of the University of Brighton's…

  4. Online and Paper Evaluations of Courses: A Literature Review and Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on comparing online and paper course evaluations in higher education and provides a case study of a very large randomised trial on the topic. It presents a mixed but generally optimistic picture of online course evaluations with respect to response rates, what they indicate, and how to increase them. The paper…

  5. A Supplement to Understanding Evaluation: The Way to Better Prevention Programs. A College Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bryn

    This case study was developed as a supplement to the U. S. Department of Education publication Understanding Evaluation: The Way to Better Prevention Programs. Its purpose is to help readers get a feel for what is involved in setting up an evaluation of a college alcohol and other drug (AOD) prevention program. Although Understanding Evaluation…

  6. Implementing Curriculum Evaluation: Case Study of a Generic Undergraduate Degree in Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lynne; Driscoll, Peter; Lewis, Melinda; Matthews, Lynda; Russell, Cherry; Cumming, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This case study presents a longitudinal, evidence-based approach to health science curriculum reform and evaluation. Curriculum in higher education must meet the needs of diverse stakeholders and must respond to dynamic local, national and international contexts, and this creates challenges for evaluation. The long lead time prior to the…

  7. The Social Construction of a Digital Library: A Case Study Examining Implications for Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilker, Julian; Gay, Geri

    1998-01-01

    Describes the social construction of technology (SCOT) framework which encourages a focus on the multiple perspectives inherent in the development and evaluation of digital libraries. Relevant social groups, interpretive flexibility, and closure are used to examine an evaluation case study of the "Making of America" (MOA) digital library…

  8. A case study of evaluating informatics impact on diffusion of scientific knowledge.

    PubMed

    Katz, Susan B

    2008-11-06

    This case study poster uses a newly developed framework to evaluate an informatics effort in its public health context. The electronic clearance system being evaluated provides the potential for increasing the speed and quality of scientific diffusion of knowledge, and thus translation of research into practice. A graphical logic model and tabular results of the evaluation are presented. Public health history suggests potential benefits of more timely and coordinated diffusion of scientific information.

  9. [Use of evaluation by primary healthcare managers: a case study in southern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Nickel, Daniela Alba; Natal, Sonia; Hartz, Zulmira Maria de Araújo; Calvo, Maria Cristina Marino

    2014-12-01

    This article reports on a meta-evaluation, focused on utilization, in a state in southern Brazil. This was a single case study with primary data collection using semi-structured interviews with health department administrators and staff. Content analysis used categories defined in the evaluation matrix: political and organizational context and implementation of evaluation. The political and organizational context revealed weaknesses in the items on experience, evaluation team, and time and space for reflection. Technical autonomy was verified in the State and in one municipality. In the implementation of evaluation, evaluative quality met the established criteria, but there was no prior definition of the uses and users of evaluation. One report referred to use for planning actions and political use. The study concluded that evaluation produced important information for stakeholders, with the political and organizational context as the principal limiting factor for use.

  10. A Case Study of Group Processes and Student Evaluation of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortenson, Kristian G.; Sathe, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper documents a case study undertaken to understand the effect of group processes on student evaluation of teaching (SET). The study used interviews to investigate the experiences of students in a cohort model Master of Science in Accountancy degree program and how those experiences influenced SET. The cohort served as an extreme example in…

  11. A Case Study of Group Processes and Student Evaluation of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortenson, Kristian G.; Sathe, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper documents a case study undertaken to understand the effect of group processes on student evaluation of teaching (SET). The study used interviews to investigate the experiences of students in a cohort model Master of Science in Accountancy degree program and how those experiences influenced SET. The cohort served as an extreme example in…

  12. Criteria for Conducting and Evaluating Workplace Literacy Programs: Two Community College Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Pamela T.; Tollefson, Terrence A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of five workplace literacy programs operated by Wake Technical Community College in North Carolina. Presents criteria for evaluating workplace literacy programs in the areas of organizations involved, curriculum, structure and class, and recruitment/retention. Offers case studies of the most effective and least effective of the…

  13. Champion or Chump: Using a Book-Length Case Study to Evaluate a Mythical Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Nicholas J.; Gilson, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how 130 participants enrolled in the University of Northern Iowa (UNI) principalship program completed a standards-based evaluation after reading a book-length case study of a mythical principal. Application of the Iowa Standards for School Leaders (ISSL), which mirror the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium…

  14. Evaluating interactive technology for an evolving case study on learning and satisfaction of graduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Marjorie A; Schaffner, Barbara H

    2016-07-01

    Nursing education is challenged to prepare students for complex healthcare needs through the integration of teamwork and informatics. Technology has become an important teaching tool in the blended classroom to enhance group based learning experiences. Faculty evaluation of classroom technologies is imperative prior to adoption. Few studies have directly compared various technologies and their impact on student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate technology enhanced teaching methods on the learning and satisfaction of graduate students in an advanced pharmacology class using an unfolding case study. After IRB approval, students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blogging group, wiki group or webinar group. Students completed the evolving case study using the assigned interactive technology. Student names were removed from the case studies. Faculty evaluated the case study using a rubric, while blinded to the assigned technology method used. No significant difference was found on case study grades, the range of grades on the assignment demonstrated little differences between the methods used. Students indicated an overall positive impact related to networking and collaboration on a satisfaction survey. Impact of technology methods needs to be explored in other areas of graduate nursing education.

  15. Evaluating Creative Thinking of Rn-Bsn Students in the Course of Clinical Case Study and Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Ya-Lie

    2015-01-01

    This case study evaluated creative thinking of RN-BSN students in the course of clinical case study and practicum. Study design used quantitative and qualitative evaluations of creative thinking of RN-BSN students by triangulation method in the course of clinical case study and practicum. Sixty RN-BSN students self-perceived the changing levels of…

  16. Evaluating Creative Thinking of Rn-Bsn Students in the Course of Clinical Case Study and Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Ya-Lie

    2015-01-01

    This case study evaluated creative thinking of RN-BSN students in the course of clinical case study and practicum. Study design used quantitative and qualitative evaluations of creative thinking of RN-BSN students by triangulation method in the course of clinical case study and practicum. Sixty RN-BSN students self-perceived the changing levels of…

  17. Comprehensive evaluation of a community coalition: a case study of environmental tobacco smoke reduction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Mueller, Keith J; Harrop, Dianne

    2003-01-01

    Community coalitions have become an increasingly popular means for addressing community health issues, yet evaluating their effectiveness and performance has presented formidable challenges. To meet the community's need for health program evaluation, public health nurses will need to become better prepared to deal with the complexities of evaluating coalitions and their multifaceted organizational structures. This article presents the methodology and conceptual framework, Targeting Outcomes of Programs (TOP), used to evaluate the performance and impact of a local community coalition. The case study offered here focuses on a tobacco-prevention coalition composed of 15 public and private agencies and their 121 activities. The TOP evaluation model provided the coalition with formative evaluation, needed to improve the coalition's on-going program delivery, and summative evaluation, needed for annual reviews of the coalition's effectiveness and impact in the community. The methodological approach and instrument presented here provide the public health nurse with a solid conceptual framework for approaching such a task.

  18. Case studies on clinical evaluation of biosimilar monoclonal antibody: scientific considerations for regulatory approval.

    PubMed

    Kudrin, Alex; Knezevic, Ivana; Joung, Jeewon; Kang, Hye-Na

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide considerations based on comprehensive case studies important for regulatory evaluation of monoclonal antibodies as similar biotherapeutic products (SBPs) with a special emphasis on clinical aspects. Scientific principles from WHO Guidelines on SBPs were used as a basis for the exercise. Working groups consisted of regulators, manufacturers and academia. The following topics were discussed by the working groups: clinical criteria for biosimilarity, extrapolation approach and the overall regulatory decision making process. In order to determine typical pitfalls in the design of a SBP clinical programme and evaluate the gap of knowledge, amongst different industry and regulatory stakeholders on the appraisal of the data arising from SBP clinical studies, we have presented two fictional but realistic clinical case studies. The first case consists of the fictional development programme for an infliximab SBP candidate. The second case describes clinical studies proposed for a fictional rituximab SBP candidate. In the first scenario a highly similar quality profile has been taken forward into clinical studies whereas there was an important residual difference in functional attributes for the rituximab SBP candidate. These case studies were presented at the WHO implementation workshop for the WHO guidelines on evaluation of similar biotherapeutic products held in Seoul, Republic of Korea, in May 2014. The goal was to illustrate the interpretation of the clinical data arising from studies with SBP candidates and elicit knowledge gaps in clinical assessment. This paper reflects the outcome of the exercise and discussions held in Seoul and offers an analysis of the case studies as a learning opportunity on clinical development and evaluation of SBPs.

  19. An Evaluation Study of Youth Participation in Youth Work: A Case Study in Southern Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morciano, Daniele; Scardigno, Anna Fausta; Manuti, Amelia; Pastore, Serafina

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an evaluation study of a public programme financing a regional network of 157 youth centres in the South of Italy is presented. A theory-based evaluation model was adopted to explore the causal links between different types of participation experience. Evaluation questions focused on three main issues are: the perception of…

  20. An Evaluation Study of Youth Participation in Youth Work: A Case Study in Southern Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morciano, Daniele; Scardigno, Anna Fausta; Manuti, Amelia; Pastore, Serafina

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an evaluation study of a public programme financing a regional network of 157 youth centres in the South of Italy is presented. A theory-based evaluation model was adopted to explore the causal links between different types of participation experience. Evaluation questions focused on three main issues are: the perception of…

  1. Can Principals Promote Teacher Development as Evaluators? A Case Study of Principals' Views and Experiences.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Matthew A; Gilmour, Allison

    2016-12-01

    New teacher evaluation systems have expanded the role of principals as instructional leaders, but little is known about principals' ability to promote teacher development through the evaluation process. We conducted a case study of principals' perspectives on evaluation and their experiences implementing observation and feedback cycles to better understand whether principals feel as though they are able to promote teacher development as evaluators. We conducted interviews with a stratified random sample of 24 principals in an urban district that recently implemented major reforms to its teacher evaluation system. We analyzed these interviews by drafting thematic summaries, coding interview transcripts, creating data-analytic matrices, and writing analytic memos. We found that the evaluation reforms provided a common framework and language that helped facilitate principals' feedback conversations with teachers. However, we also found that tasking principals with primary responsibility for conducting evaluations resulted in a variety of unintended consequences which undercut the quality of evaluation feedback they provided. We analyze five broad solutions to these challenges: strategically targeting evaluations, reducing operational responsibilities, providing principal training, hiring instructional coaches, and developing peer evaluation systems. The quality of feedback teachers receive through the evaluation process depends critically on the time and training evaluators have to provide individualized and actionable feedback. Districts that task principals with primary responsibility for conducting observation and feedback cycles must attend to the many implementation challenges associated with this approach in order for next-generation evaluation systems to successfully promote teacher development.

  2. Alternative Learning Programs Evaluation: Part 3 Report. Case Studies of Alternative Schools and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Caronly; Brewer, Delores; Bauman, Amy; Groves, Paula; Rayle, Joesph; Noblit, George

    In 1996, North Carolina began a 5-year evaluation of alternative learning programs (ALPs). This report contains in-depth case studies of four ALPs during the 1996-97 school year. The ALPs were selected to represent different types of programs in the state, and include one middle school, two high school, and one elementary school programs. The case…

  3. An Evaluation of Learning Objects in Singapore Primary Education: A Case Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Tay Pei Lyn; Suan, Ng Peck; Wanzhen, Liaw

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the usability and interface design of e-learning portal developed for primary schools in Singapore. Design/methodology/approach: Using Singapore-based learning EDvantage (LEAD) portal as a case study, this paper reviews and analyses the usability and usefulness of embedded learning objects (LOs)…

  4. Pearls and Pitfalls in Evaluating a Student Assistance Program: A Five-Year Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilburn, Sharon T.; Wilburn, Kenneth T.; Weaver, Dax M.; Bowles, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This article presents data from a five-year evaluation-research case study of a large urban schools district's internal Student Assistance Program (SAP). The district employed specially trained and licensed school-based counselors to implement an internal SAP expanded to include tertiary prevention, and modeled after an employee assistance program…

  5. Pearls and Pitfalls in Evaluating a Student Assistance Program: A Five-Year Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilburn, Sharon T.; Wilburn, Kenneth T.; Weaver, Dax M.; Bowles, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This article presents data from a five-year evaluation-research case study of a large urban schools district's internal Student Assistance Program (SAP). The district employed specially trained and licensed school-based counselors to implement an internal SAP expanded to include tertiary prevention, and modeled after an employee assistance program…

  6. An Evaluation of Learning Objects in Singapore Primary Education: A Case Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Tay Pei Lyn; Suan, Ng Peck; Wanzhen, Liaw

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the usability and interface design of e-learning portal developed for primary schools in Singapore. Design/methodology/approach: Using Singapore-based learning EDvantage (LEAD) portal as a case study, this paper reviews and analyses the usability and usefulness of embedded learning objects (LOs)…

  7. Evaluation of Oral Performance in Outsourced Call Centres: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friginal, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This case study discusses the development and use of an oral performance assessment instrument intended to evaluate Filipino agents' customer service transactions with callers from the United States (US). The design and applications of the instrument were based on a longitudinal, qualitative observation of language training and customer service…

  8. Critical Evaluation as an Aid to Improved Report Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Mirabelle; Williams, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Report writing is an important employability skill for Engineers and Technologists, and this case study describes how a Technology degree module took a novel approach to developing students' report writing skills. Students learned how to use a criterion-referenced critical evaluation framework for reports and other technological documents. They…

  9. Evaluation of Oral Performance in Outsourced Call Centres: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friginal, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This case study discusses the development and use of an oral performance assessment instrument intended to evaluate Filipino agents' customer service transactions with callers from the United States (US). The design and applications of the instrument were based on a longitudinal, qualitative observation of language training and customer service…

  10. Organising, Providing and Evaluating Technical Training for Early Career Researchers: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Besouw, Rachel M.; Rogers, Katrine S.; Powles, Christopher J.; Papadopoulos, Timos; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the importance of providing technical training opportunities for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) worldwide through the case study of a MATLAB training programme, which was proposed, organised, managed and evaluated by a team of five ECRs at the University of Southampton. The effectiveness of the programme in terms of the…

  11. Organising, Providing and Evaluating Technical Training for Early Career Researchers: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Besouw, Rachel M.; Rogers, Katrine S.; Powles, Christopher J.; Papadopoulos, Timos; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the importance of providing technical training opportunities for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) worldwide through the case study of a MATLAB training programme, which was proposed, organised, managed and evaluated by a team of five ECRs at the University of Southampton. The effectiveness of the programme in terms of the…

  12. Collected Case Study Evaluations of the Appalachian Regional Commission's Educational Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartfai, Nicole; Kleiner, Brian; Nyre, Glenn; Plishker, Laurie; Silverstein, Gary; Snow, Kyle

    As part of an evaluation of educational projects funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) during the 1990s, case studies were conducted at eight sites in four Appalachian states. The sites reflected a range of project types, including school programs, adult literacy, distance education, and dropout prevention. Site visits allowed for a…

  13. Critical Evaluation as an Aid to Improved Report Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Mirabelle; Williams, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Report writing is an important employability skill for Engineers and Technologists, and this case study describes how a Technology degree module took a novel approach to developing students' report writing skills. Students learned how to use a criterion-referenced critical evaluation framework for reports and other technological documents. They…

  14. Web Site Projects Evaluation: A Case Study of Romanian Faculties of Economics Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    vultur, Sidonia Otilia; Marincas, Delia Adriana

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an evaluation of web sites regarded like projects is discussed. We give an overview of the Web Assessment Index (WAI), by presenting a web sites of Romanian Faculties of Economics case study. The WAI contains five categories: accessibility, access speed, navigability, content and reliability. We analyzed and presented a detailed…

  15. A qualitative case study of evaluation use in the context of a collaborative program evaluation strategy in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    D'Ostie-Racine, Léna; Dagenais, Christian; Ridde, Valéry

    2016-05-26

    Program evaluation is widely recognized in the international humanitarian sector as a means to make interventions and policies more evidence based, equitable, and accountable. Yet, little is known about the way humanitarian non-governmental organizations (NGOs) actually use evaluations. The current qualitative evaluation employed an instrumental case study design to examine evaluation use (EU) by a humanitarian NGO based in Burkina Faso. This organization developed an evaluation strategy in 2008 to document the implementation and effects of its maternal and child healthcare user fee exemption program. Program evaluations have been undertaken ever since, and the present study examined the discourses of evaluation partners in 2009 (n = 15) and 2011 (n = 17). Semi-structured individual interviews and one group interview were conducted to identify instances of EU over time. Alkin and Taut's (Stud Educ Eval 29:1-12, 2003) conceptualization of EU was used as the basis for thematic qualitative analyses of the different forms of EU identified by stakeholders of the exemption program in the two data collection periods. Results demonstrated that stakeholders began to understand and value the utility of program evaluations once they were exposed to evaluation findings and then progressively used evaluations over time. EU was manifested in a variety of ways, including instrumental and conceptual use of evaluation processes and findings, as well as the persuasive use of findings. Such EU supported planning, decision-making, program practices, evaluation capacity, and advocacy. The study sheds light on the many ways evaluations can be used by different actors in the humanitarian sector. Conceptualizations of EU are also critically discussed.

  16. A methodology for evaluating environmental planning systems: a case study of Canada.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Meghan; Gunton, Thomas; Rutherford, Murray

    2010-06-01

    Sustainable environmental management is contingent on having an effective environmental planning system. A new methodology for designing and evaluating environmental planning systems is described and applied to a case study evaluation of the Canadian environmental planning process. The methodology is based on eight international best practice principles for environmental planning and 45 indicators. The research illustrates the benefits of the evaluation methodology in identifying how to improve environmental planning systems to achieve desired results. The methodology is applicable to a wide variety of jurisdictions. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Towards standardised evaluative measurement of nature impacts: two spatial planning case studies for major Dutch lakes.

    PubMed

    van Puijenbroek, P J T M; Sijtsma, F J; Wortelboer, F G; Ligtvoet, W; Maarse, M

    2015-02-01

    In the assessment of complex spatial planning projects, the ecological impacts and socio-economic impacts are fundamental to the evaluation. The measurements of ecological impacts of spatial plans have to be integrated in a standardised way. In the present paper, we analyse two Dutch case studies and apply the standardised Threat-Weighted Ecological Quality Area measurement. This measurement is developed to evaluate projects with terrestrial impacts but has not yet been applied for water evaluations. We aim to show how the use of a common measurement tool incorporates both ecological quality and degree of threat on criteria in the EU Water Framework Directive and Nature 2000. The measurements discussed here derive from two cases of cost-benefit analysis: The first case is the Markermeer, the second largest lake of The Netherlands, and a study on water quality improvement and nature restoration; an artificial island will also be the setting for a new residential area. The second case study is on water level management carried out on the IJsselmeer, the largest lake in the country. Results of our analysis show the potential impacts with a standardised method to the spatial distribution and quality of the ecosystems.

  18. Individualized functional work evaluation and vision: a case study in reasonable accommodation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Dianna

    2011-01-01

    A case study is provided where functional capacity evaluation, work place assessment, and driver rehabilitation assessments were combined to produce an individualized functional work evaluation. A human rights complaint was launched by worker who alleged that her employer had determined that her vision impairment rendered her incapable of meeting her job demands, which could not be 'reasonably accommodated'. An evidence based practice approach and clinical reasoning process utilized by the assessor in developing an individualized evaluation is described. The individualized evaluation developed by the assessor is consistent with the clinical trend towards the inclusion of direct observation of actual occupational performance, in making a determination of work ability. The resulting individualized evaluation was integral to the Human Rights Tribunal in determining whether the worker's limitations could be "reasonably accommodated.''

  19. Evaluation of bioaugmentation using multiple life cycle assessment approaches: A case study of constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyue; Yang, Jixian; Zhang, Xuedong; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang

    2017-07-29

    Bioaugmentation is a promising technology to enhance the removal of specific pollutants; however, environmental impacts of implementing bioaugmentation have not been considered in most studies. Appropriate methodology is required for the evaluation from both in-depth and comprehensive perspectives, which leads to this study initiating the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) of bioaugmentation. Two LCA methods (CML and e-Balance) were applied to a bioaugmentation case with the aim of illustrating how to evaluate the environmental impacts of bioaugmentation from different perspectives based on the selection of different LCA methods. The results of the case study demonstrated that the LCA methods with different methodology emphasis produced different outcomes, which could lead to differentiated optimization strategies depending on the associated perspectives. Furthermore, three important aspects are discussed, including coverage of impact categories, the selection of characterization modeling for specific pollutants, and the requirement of including economic indicators for future investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating Pillar Industry's Transformation Capability: A Case Study of Two Chinese Steel-Based Cities.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhidong; Marinova, Dora; Guo, Xiumei; Gao, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Many steel-based cities in China were established between the 1950s and 1960s. After more than half a century of development and boom, these cities are starting to decline and industrial transformation is urgently needed. This paper focuses on evaluating the transformation capability of resource-based cities building an evaluation model. Using Text Mining and the Document Explorer technique as a way of extracting text features, the 200 most frequently used words are derived from 100 publications related to steel- and other resource-based cities. The Expert Evaluation Method (EEM) and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) techniques are then applied to select 53 indicators, determine their weights and establish an index system for evaluating the transformation capability of the pillar industry of China's steel-based cities. Using real data and expert reviews, the improved Fuzzy Relation Matrix (FRM) method is applied to two case studies in China, namely Panzhihua and Daye, and the evaluation model is developed using Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation (FCE). The cities' abilities to carry out industrial transformation are evaluated with concerns expressed for the case of Daye. The findings have policy implications for the potential and required industrial transformation in the two selected cities and other resource-based towns.

  1. Studying health information from a distance: refining an e-learning case study in the crucible of student evaluation.

    PubMed

    Booth, Andrew; Levy, Philippa; Bath, Peter A; Lacey, Terence; Sanderson, Mark; Diercks-O'Brien, Gabi

    2005-12-01

    To present a formative evaluation of the impact of a multimedia case study as a component of a masters course in health informatics delivered by distance learning. First and second year health informatics students undertaking four core modules of a masters programme at the University of Sheffield. Individual qualitative user surveys and interviews. Formative evaluation has played a significant role in refining the case study through its text-based, intermediate and CD-ROM based stages. Feedback from students has resulted in clarification of case study tasks, clearer definition of teaching roles and a revised approach to assessment. At the same time it has highlighted the importance of ongoing revision and maintenance in keeping the scenarios realistic and current. The multimedia case study has met many of its original aims in providing greater cohesion for core modules and encouraging greater levels of interaction and multidisciplinary collaboration.

  2. Case Teaching and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn; Patrizi, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Experience and reflection on experience are the best teachers, yet rich cases that capture experience for reflection have largely eluded professional training in evaluation. The absence of high-quality, readily available teaching cases has been an important gap in the field. This article reviews the benefits of case teaching, examines evaluation…

  3. Green and sustainable remediation (GSR) evaluation: framework, standards, and tool. A case study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Hung, Weiteng; Vu, Chi Thanh; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lai, Jhih-Wei; Lin, Chitsan

    2016-11-01

    Taiwan has a large number of poorly managed contaminated sites in need of remediation. This study proposes a framework, a set of standards, and a spreadsheet-based evaluation tool for implementing green and sustainable principles into remediation projects and evaluating the projects from this perspective. We performed a case study to understand how the framework would be applied. For the case study, we used a spreadsheet-based evaluation tool (SEFA) and performed field scale cultivation tests on a site contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). The site was divided into two lots: one treated by chemical oxidation and the other by bioremediation. We evaluated five core elements of green and sustainable remediation (GSR): energy, air, water resources, materials and wastes, and land and ecosystem. The proposed evaluation tool and field scale cultivation test were found to efficiently assess the effectiveness of the two remediation alternatives. The framework and related tools proposed herein can potentially be used to support decisions about the remediation of contaminated sites taking into account engineering management, cost effectiveness, and social reconciliation.

  4. Evaluation of a proposed expert system development methodology: Two case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilstrap, Lewey

    1990-01-01

    Two expert system development projects were studied to evaluate a proposed Expert Systems Development Methodology (ESDM). The ESDM was developed to provide guidance to managers and technical personnel and serve as a standard in the development of expert systems. It was agreed that the proposed ESDM must be evaluated before it could be adopted; therefore a study was planned for its evaluation. This detailed study is now underway. Before the study began, however, two ongoing projects were selected for a retrospective evaluation. They were the Ranging Equipment Diagnostic Expert System (REDEX) and the Backup Control Mode Analysis and Utility System (BCAUS). Both projects were approximately 1 year into development. Interviews of project personnel were conducted, and the resulting data was used to prepare the retrospective evaluation. Decision models of the two projects were constructed and used to evaluate the completeness and accuracy of key provisions of ESDM. A major conclusion reached from these case studies is that suitability and risk analysis should be required for all AI projects, large and small. Further, the objectives of each stage of development during a project should be selected to reduce the next largest area of risk or uncertainty on the project.

  5. An Evaluation of the Application of the Cost Accounting Standards: A case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    contract reviewers over the application of Cost Accounting Standards. The company, which for the sake of anonymity will be called American Electronics...AD-A245 271 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California DTIC ELECT. JAN 29 1992 D D THESIS AN EVALUATION OF THE APPLICATION OF THE COST ACCOUNTING ... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS: A CASE STUDY (UNCLASSIFIED) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lemler, Bruce Neil 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (year

  6. Quality Attribute-Guided Evaluation of NoSQL Databases: A Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-16

    Quality Attribute-Guided Evaluation of NoSQL Databases : A Case Study John Klein, Ian Gorton, Neil Ernst, Patrick Donohoe Architecture Practices...a specific distributed software architecture and data model, making the technology selection difficult to defer. NoSQL database technologies provide... databases for use in a large, distributed healthcare organization. We reflect on some of the fundamental difficulties of performing detailed technical

  7. Critical evaluation as an aid to improved report writing: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Mirabelle; Williams, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Report writing is an important employability skill for Engineers and Technologists, and this case study describes how a Technology degree module took a novel approach to developing students' report writing skills. Students learned how to use a criterion-referenced critical evaluation framework for reports and other technological documents. They were given opportunities to practise using the framework both through exemplars and through evaluating the work of their peers. They also carried out self-assessment. The authors' analysis of this novel approach shows that most students responded well to it and benefited from it. Lessons are drawn from this work for others who wish to improve their students' report writing skills.

  8. Case study of evaluations that go beyond clinical outcomes to assess quality improvement diabetes programmes using the Diabetes Evaluation Framework for Innovative National Evaluations (DEFINE).

    PubMed

    Paquette-Warren, Jann; Harris, Stewart B; Naqshbandi Hayward, Mariam; Tompkins, Jordan W

    2016-10-01

    Investments in efforts to reduce the burden of diabetes on patients and health care are critical; however, more evaluation is needed to provide evidence that informs and supports future policies and programmes. The newly developed Diabetes Evaluation Framework for Innovative National Evaluations (DEFINE) incorporates the theoretical concepts needed to facilitate the capture of critical information to guide investments, policy and programmatic decision making. The aim of the study is to assess the applicability and value of DEFINE in comprehensive real-world evaluation. Using a critical and positivist approach, this intrinsic and collective case study retrospectively examines two naturalistic evaluations to demonstrate how DEFINE could be used when conducting real-world comprehensive evaluations in health care settings. The variability between the cases and the evaluation designs are described and aligned to the DEFINE goals, steps and sub-steps. The majority of the theoretical steps of DEFINE were exemplified in both cases, although limited for knowledge translation efforts. Application of DEFINE to evaluate diverse programmes that target various chronic diseases is needed to further test the inclusivity and built-in flexibility of DEFINE and its role in encouraging more comprehensive knowledge translation. This case study shows how DEFINE could be used to structure or guide comprehensive evaluations of programmes and initiatives implemented in health care settings and support scale-up of successful innovations. Future use of the framework will continue to strengthen its value in guiding programme evaluation and informing health policy to reduce the burden of diabetes and other chronic diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Clinical evaluation of ridge augmentation using autogenous tooth bone graft material: case series study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yi, Yang-Jin; Choi, Joon-Ho

    2013-08-01

    Interest in bone graft material has increased with regard to restoration in cases of bone defect around the implant. Autogenous tooth bone graft material was developed and commercialized in 2008. In this study, we evaluated the results of vertical and horizontal ridge augmentation with autogenous tooth bone graft material. This study targeted patients who had vertical or horizontal ridge augmentation using AutoBT from March 2009 to April 2010. We evaluated the age and gender of the subject patients, implant stability, adjunctive surgery, additional bone graft material and barrier membrane, post-operative complication, implant survival rate, and crestal bone loss. We performed vertical and horizontal ridge augmentation using powder- or block-type autogenous tooth bone graft material, and implant placement was performed on nine patients (male: 7, female: 2). The average age of patients was 49.88±12.98 years, and the post-operative follow-up period was 35±5.31 months. Post-operative complications included wound dehiscence (one case), hematoma (one case), and implant osseointegration failure (one case; survival rate: 96%); however, there were no complications related to bone graft material, such as infection. Average marginal bone loss after one-year loading was 0.12±0.19 mm. Therefore, excellent clinical results can be said to have been obtained. Excellent clinical results can be said to have been obtained with vertical and horizontal ridge augmentation using autogenous tooth bone graft material.

  10. Case study of evaluations that go beyond clinical outcomes to assess quality improvement diabetes programmes using the Diabetes Evaluation Framework for Innovative National Evaluations (DEFINE)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Stewart B.; Naqshbandi Hayward, Mariam; Tompkins, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale, aims and objectives Investments in efforts to reduce the burden of diabetes on patients and health care are critical; however, more evaluation is needed to provide evidence that informs and supports future policies and programmes. The newly developed Diabetes Evaluation Framework for Innovative National Evaluations (DEFINE) incorporates the theoretical concepts needed to facilitate the capture of critical information to guide investments, policy and programmatic decision making. The aim of the study is to assess the applicability and value of DEFINE in comprehensive real‐world evaluation. Method Using a critical and positivist approach, this intrinsic and collective case study retrospectively examines two naturalistic evaluations to demonstrate how DEFINE could be used when conducting real‐world comprehensive evaluations in health care settings. Results The variability between the cases and the evaluation designs are described and aligned to the DEFINE goals, steps and sub‐steps. The majority of the theoretical steps of DEFINE were exemplified in both cases, although limited for knowledge translation efforts. Application of DEFINE to evaluate diverse programmes that target various chronic diseases is needed to further test the inclusivity and built‐in flexibility of DEFINE and its role in encouraging more comprehensive knowledge translation. Conclusions This case study shows how DEFINE could be used to structure or guide comprehensive evaluations of programmes and initiatives implemented in health care settings and support scale‐up of successful innovations. Future use of the framework will continue to strengthen its value in guiding programme evaluation and informing health policy to reduce the burden of diabetes and other chronic diseases. PMID:26804339

  11. Evaluating Bone Health in Egyptian Children with Forearm Fractures: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Elbatrawy, Salwa; Gobashy, Amr; Moreira, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the likelihood of vitamin D deficiency and low bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. Methods. A case control study of 46 children aged 3 to 10 years with or without forearm fractures. Validated questionnaires were used to assess calcium and vitamin D intake as well as sun exposure. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D were collected. Bone mineral density was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results. Compared to the Control group, calcium and vitamin D intake was lower in the Cases group (p = 0.03). Cases had higher Body Mass Index than Controls, p = 0.01. Children in the Cases group had lower mean serum calcium values 8.3 ± 1.4 compared to 9.3 ± 1.1 in Controls (p = 0.01). Alkaline phosphatase was higher in Cases 265 ± 65.8 than Controls 226 ± 54.6 (p = 0.03). Vitamin D and bone mineral density scores were significantly lower in the Cases group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our data shows an increased rate of vitamin D deficiency and decreased bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. PMID:27651803

  12. Economic evaluation of solar energy systems in commercial buildings: Methodology and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruegg, R. T.; Sav, G. T.; Powell, J. W.; Pierce, E. T.

    1982-07-01

    A comprehensive economic optimization model for evaluating the economic feasibility of active solar energy systems to provide service hot water and combined space heating and service hot water in commercial buildings is given. The model is demonstrated in a number of case studies for office buildings and retail stores. Data and assumptions for use in the model are compiled for the selected case studies. Using these data, the model is applied to estimate present value net savings (or net losses) of the solar energy systems over a 20 year life cycle. Break even values for hot water loads, solar energy systems costs, and current and future energy prices are also calculated to determine the minimum conditions under which the solar energy systems become cost effective for the selected buildings.

  13. [Application of nested case-control study on safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Zhao, Yubin; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The nested case-control study design (or the case-control in a cohort study) is described here as a new study design used in safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection. In the nested case-control study, cases of a disease that occur in a defined cohort are identified and, for each, a specified number of matched controls is selected from among those in the cohort who have not developed the disease by the time of disease occurrence in the case. For many research questions, the nested case-control design potentially offers impressive reductions in costs and efforts of data collection and analysis compared with the full cohort approach, with relatively minor loss in statistical efficiency. The nested case-control design is particularly advantageous for studies in safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection. Some examples of the application of nested case-control study were given.

  14. Ethics and animal welfare evaluations in South East Asian zoos: a case study of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy; Harrison, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Concern for zoo animals is palpable throughout society in many countries in South East Asia. It is important to understand problems of animal welfare in order for zoos to make significant improvement in maintaining high standards. With a case study of 3 zoos in Thailand, this article presents results for the first time on how ethics and welfare evaluations are conducted in South East Asian zoos. The study identified several major and minor welfare problems and provided constructive suggestions to zoo authorities, which in turn significantly improved the standards of animal welfare. Thus, the data presented in this article could serve as a model for other zoos to follow animal welfare evaluations locally, regionally, and globally.

  15. Evaluating psychiatric case-control studies using the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology) statement.

    PubMed

    Goi, Pedro Domingues; Goi, Julia Domingues; Cordini, Kariny Larissa; Ceresér, Keila Mendes; Rocha, Neusa Sica da

    2014-01-01

    Case-control studies are important in developing clinical and public health knowledge. The STROBE statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology) was developed to establish a checklist of items that should be included in articles reporting observational studies. Our aim was to analyze whether the psychiatric case-control articles published in Brazilian journals with CAPES Qualis rating B1/B2 in 2009 conformed with the STROBE statement. Descriptive study on psychiatric papers published in Brazilian journals, within the Postgraduate Medical Program on Psychiatry, at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. All psychiatric case-control studies from Brazilian Qualis B1/B2 journals of psychiatry, neurology and public health in 2009 were analyzed. The four most specific items of the STROBE statement were used to evaluate whether these studies fitted within the case-control parameters: 1) selection of cases and controls; 2) controlling for bias; 3) statistical analysis; and 4) presentation of results. Sixteen case-control studies were identified, of which eleven (68.75%) were in psychiatry-focused journals. From analysis using the STROBE statement, all of the articles conformed with item 1; two (12.5%) completely conformed with item 2; none completely conformed with item 3; and only three (18.8%) conformed with item 4. The case-control studies analyzed here did not completely conform with the four STROBE statement items for case-control design. In view of the inadequate methodology of the published studies, these findings justify focusing on research and methodology and expanding the investigations on adherence of studies to their designs.

  16. Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-09-01

    This case study focusing on a residence in northern California was undertaken as a demonstration of the potential of a systems approach to HVAC retrofits. The systems approach means that other retrofits that can affect the HVAC system are also considered. For example, added building envelope insulation reduces building loads so that smaller capacity HVAC system can be used. Secondly, we wanted to examine the practical issues and interactions with contractors and code officials required to accomplish the systems approach because it represents a departure from current practice. We identified problems in the processes of communication and installation of the retrofit that led to compromises in the final energy efficiency of the HVAC system. These issues must be overcome in order for HVAC retrofits to deliver the increased performance that they promise. The experience gained in this case study was used to optimize best practices guidelines for contractors (Walker 2003) that include building diagnostics and checklists as tools to assist in ensuring the energy efficiency of ''house as a system'' HVAC retrofits. The best practices guidelines proved to be an excellent tool for evaluating the eight existing homes in this study, and we received positive feedback from many potential users who reviewed and used them. In addition, we were able to substantially improve the energy efficiency of the retrofitted case study house by adding envelope insulation, a more efficient furnace and air conditioner, an economizer and by reducing duct leakage.

  17. Competence evaluation processes for nursing students abroad: Findings from an international case study.

    PubMed

    Tommasini, Cristina; Dobrowolska, Beata; Zarzycka, Danuta; Bacatum, Claudia; Bruun, Anne Marie Gran; Korsath, Dag; Roel, Siv; Jansen, Mette Bro; Milling, Tine; Deschamps, Anne; Mantzoukas, Stefanos; Mantzouka, Christine; Palese, Alvisa

    2017-04-01

    Assessing clinical competence in nursing students abroad is a challenge, and requires both methods and instruments capable of capturing the multidimensional nature of the clinical competences acquired. The aim of the study was to compare the clinical competence assessment processes and instruments adopted for nursing students during their clinical placement abroad. A case study design was adopted in 2015. A purposeful sample of eight nursing programmes located in seven countries (Belgium, Denmark, Greece, Norway, Poland, Portugal and Italy) were approached. Tools as instruments for evaluating competences developed in clinical training by international nursing students, and written procedures aimed at guiding the evaluation process, were scrutinised through a content analysis method. All clinical competence evaluation procedures and instruments used in the nursing programmes involved were provided in English. A final evaluation of the competences was expected by all nursing programmes at the end of the clinical placement, while only four provided an intermediate evaluation. Great variability emerged in the tools, with between five and 88 items included. Through content analysis, 196 items emerged, classified into 12 different core competence categories, the majority were categorised as 'Technical skills' (=60), 'Self-learning and critical thinking' (=27) and 'Nursing care process' (=25) competences. Little emphasis was given in the tools to competences involving 'Self-adaptation', 'Inter-professional skills', 'Clinical documentation', 'Managing nursing care', 'Patient communication', and 'Theory and practice integration'. Institutions signing Bilateral Agreements should agree upon the competences expected from students during their clinical education abroad. The tools used in the process, as well as the role expected by the student, should also be agreed upon. Intercultural competences should be further addressed in the process of evaluation, in addition to

  18. The evaluation of complex interventions in palliative care: an exploration of the potential of case study research strategies.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    Complex, incrementally changing, context dependent and variable palliative care services are difficult to evaluate. Case study research strategies may have potential to contribute to evaluating such complex interventions, and to develop this field of evaluation research. This paper explores definitions of case study (as a unit of study, a process, and a product) and examines the features of case study research strategies which are thought to confer benefits for the evaluation of complex interventions in palliative care settings. Ten features of case study that are thought to be beneficial in evaluating complex interventions in palliative care are discussed, drawing from exemplars of research in this field. Important features are related to a longitudinal approach, triangulation, purposive instance selection, comprehensive approach, multiple data sources, flexibility, concurrent data collection and analysis, search for proving-disproving evidence, pattern matching techniques and an engaging narrative. The limitations of case study approaches are discussed including the potential for subjectivity and their complex, time consuming and potentially expensive nature. Case study research strategies have great potential in evaluating complex interventions in palliative care settings. Three key features need to be exploited to develop this field: case selection, longitudinal designs, and the use of rival hypotheses. In particular, case study should be used in situations where there is interplay and interdependency between the intervention and its context, such that it is difficult to define or find relevant comparisons.

  19. Evaluation of Cirrus Cloud Simulations Using ARM Data - Development of a Case Study Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'C.Starr, David; Demoz, Belay; Lare, Andrew; Poellot, Michael; Sassen, Kenneth; Heymsfield, Andrew; Brown, Philip; Mace, Jay; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) provide an effective linkage in terms of parameters and scales between observations and the parametric treatments of clouds in global climate models (GCMs). They also represent the best understanding of the physical processes acting to determine cloud system lifecycle. The goal of this project is to improve state-of-the-art CRMs used for studies of cirrus clouds and to establish a relative calibration with GCMs through comparisons among CRMs, single column model (SCM) versions of the GCMs, and observations. This project will compare and evaluate a variety of CRMs and SCMs, under the auspices of the GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2), using ARM data acquired at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This poster will report on progress in developing a suitable WG2 case study data set based on the September 26, 1996 ARM IOP case - the Hurricane Nora outflow case. The environmental data (input) will be described as well as the wealth of validating cloud observations. We plan to also show results of preliminary simulations. The science questions to be addressed derive significantly from results of the GCSS WG2 cloud model comparison projects, which will be briefly summarized.

  20. Evaluation of Cirrus Cloud Simulations Using ARM Data - Development of a Case Study Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'C.Starr, David; Demoz, Belay; Lare, Andrew; Poellot, Michael; Sassen, Kenneth; Heymsfield, Andrew; Brown, Philip; Mace, Jay; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) provide an effective linkage in terms of parameters and scales between observations and the parametric treatments of clouds in global climate models (GCMs). They also represent the best understanding of the physical processes acting to determine cloud system lifecycle. The goal of this project is to improve state-of-the-art CRMs used for studies of cirrus clouds and to establish a relative calibration with GCMs through comparisons among CRMs, single column model (SCM) versions of the GCMs, and observations. This project will compare and evaluate a variety of CRMs and SCMs, under the auspices of the GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2), using ARM data acquired at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This poster will report on progress in developing a suitable WG2 case study data set based on the September 26, 1996 ARM IOP case - the Hurricane Nora outflow case. The environmental data (input) will be described as well as the wealth of validating cloud observations. We plan to also show results of preliminary simulations. The science questions to be addressed derive significantly from results of the GCSS WG2 cloud model comparison projects, which will be briefly summarized.

  1. Development of an environmental impact assessment evaluation model and its application: Taiwan case study

    SciTech Connect

    Leu, W.S.; Williams, W.P.; Bark, A.W.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes an environmental impact assessment (EIA) evaluation model that can be used to assess the completeness and effectiveness of EIA systems. This model is based on a consideration of the fundamental components of an EIA. The EIA system in Taiwan has been used as the case study to demonstrate how the proposed EIA evaluation model can be applied. Taiwan is demonstrated to have a comprehensive EIA system, which is clearly defined legally and with guidelines available to assist proponents in implementing the system. A particular strength is the requirement for compliance and enforcement monitoring. Important reservations are the lack of an appeals system and the failure to require the consideration of no-action or alternative-action strategies and the lack of public participation at some key points in the EIA process, particularly at the decision-making stage. Training programs could be more comprehensively available to expand national EIA capability. It is concluded that the proposed EIA evaluation model provides a useful tool for the evaluation of EIA systems. National authorities can apply this model to analyze strengths and weaknesses of their EIA systems.

  2. Building Evaluation Capacity in Spain: A Case Study of Rural Development and Empowerment in the European Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Puente, Jose M.; Yague, Jose L.; Afonso, Ana

    2008-01-01

    The development of European Community administrative authority has greatly influenced the development of an evaluation culture among the southern and central member states of the European Union. The present case study from Spain provides an example of this diffusion through the use of an empowerment evaluation approach to build evaluation capacity…

  3. Building Evaluation Capacity in Spain: A Case Study of Rural Development and Empowerment in the European Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Puente, Jose M.; Yague, Jose L.; Afonso, Ana

    2008-01-01

    The development of European Community administrative authority has greatly influenced the development of an evaluation culture among the southern and central member states of the European Union. The present case study from Spain provides an example of this diffusion through the use of an empowerment evaluation approach to build evaluation capacity…

  4. Evaluation of Feasibility for a Case-Control Study of Pituitary-Ovarian Function in Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    feasibility of a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation tests to evaluate sensitivity of the hypothalamic...determine the safety and feasibility of conducting a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnHR) stimulation tests to evaluate...women. The full-scale study will determine if: 1) the anterior pituitary of pre-menopausal women with breast cancer secretes more luteinizing hormone (LH

  5. Evaluation of outsourcing in nursing services: a case study of kashani hospital, isfahan in 2011.

    PubMed

    Ferdosi, Masoud; Farahabadi, Ehsan; Mofid, Maryam; Rejalian, Farzaneh; Haghighat, Maryam; Naghdi, Parnaz

    2013-03-01

    Hospitals need to focus on their core activities, thus outsourcing of services may be effective in some instances. However, monitoring and supervision is a vital mechanism to preserving and enhancing the quality of outsourced services, and to identify the benefits and losses occurred. The purpose of this study is evaluation of nursing services outsourced in a general hospital from different point of views. This is a descriptive and applied study done by case study (before and after) method. Outsourcing nursing services of clinical wards (ENT and Neurosurgery) of Kashani Hospital in 2011 has been studied. We extracted data from a handmade questionnaire about internal customer's satisfaction and semi-structured interviews with officials, and also survey of financial and administrative documents and records related to the topic. The findings indicate an increased number of graduated nurses per bed to fulfill the main objective of outsourcing in this case. But achieving this objective is accompanied with remarkable increased costs per bed after outsourcing. Besides, we noticed minor changes in internal customer satisfaction rate. While outsourcing should bring about staff and patients' satisfaction and increase the efficiency and effectiveness, outsourcing nursing workforce singly, leaded to a loss of efficiency. Therefore, the applied outsourcing has not met the productivity for the hospital.

  6. Evaluation of Outsourcing in Nursing Services: A Case Study of Kashani Hospital, Isfahan in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ferdosi, Masoud; Farahabadi, Ehsan; Mofid, Maryam; Rejalian, Farzaneh; Haghighat, Maryam; Naghdi, Parnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hospitals need to focus on their core activities, thus outsourcing of services may be effective in some instances. However, monitoring and supervision is a vital mechanism to preserving and enhancing the quality of outsourced services, and to identify the benefits and losses occurred. The purpose of this study is evaluation of nursing services outsourced in a general hospital from different point of views. Methods: This is a descriptive and applied study done by case study (before and after) method. Outsourcing nursing services of clinical wards (ENT and Neurosurgery) of Kashani Hospital in 2011 has been studied. We extracted data from a handmade questionnaire about internal customer’s satisfaction and semi-structured interviews with officials, and also survey of financial and administrative documents and records related to the topic. Results: The findings indicate an increased number of graduated nurses per bed to fulfill the main objective of outsourcing in this case. But achieving this objective is accompanied with remarkable increased costs per bed after outsourcing. Besides, we noticed minor changes in internal customer satisfaction rate. Conclusion: While outsourcing should bring about staff and patients’ satisfaction and increase the efficiency and effectiveness, outsourcing nursing workforce singly, leaded to a loss of efficiency. Therefore, the applied outsourcing has not met the productivity for the hospital. PMID:23678338

  7. Combining Methods in Evaluating Information Systems: Case Study of a Clinical Laboratory Information System

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bonnie; Duchon, Dennis

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports how quantitative and qualitative methods were combined in a case study of a clinical laboratory information system. The study assessed effects of the system on work in the laboratories, as reported by laboratory technologists seven months post implementation. Primary changes caused by the computer system were increases in the amount of paperwork performed by technologists and improvements in laboratory results reporting. Individual technologists, as well as laboratories, differed in their assessments of the system according to their perceptions of how it affected their jobs. The combination of qualitative and quantitative data led to the development of a theoretical explanatory model of these differences. The paper discusses methodological implications and the need for an approach to evaluating medical computer systems that takes into account the inter-relationships and processes of which the system is a part.

  8. Evaluating Social Media Networks in Medicines Safety Surveillance: Two Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Coloma, Preciosa M; Becker, Benedikt; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; van Mulligen, Erik M; Kors, Jan A

    2015-10-01

    There is growing interest in whether social media can capture patient-generated information relevant for medicines safety surveillance that cannot be found in traditional sources. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential contribution of mining social media networks for medicines safety surveillance using the following associations as case studies: (1) rosiglitazone and cardiovascular events (i.e. stroke and myocardial infarction); and (2) human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine and infertility. We collected publicly accessible, English-language posts on Facebook, Google+, and Twitter until September 2014. Data were queried for co-occurrence of keywords related to the drug/vaccine and event of interest within a post. Messages were analysed with respect to geographical distribution, context, linking to other web content, and author's assertion regarding the supposed association. A total of 2537 posts related to rosiglitazone/cardiovascular events and 2236 posts related to HPV vaccine/infertility were retrieved, with the majority of posts representing data from Twitter (98 and 85%, respectively) and originating from users in the US. Approximately 21% of rosiglitazone-related posts and 84% of HPV vaccine-related posts referenced other web pages, mostly news items, law firms' websites, or blogs. Assertion analysis predominantly showed affirmation of the association of rosiglitazone/cardiovascular events (72%; n = 1821) and of HPV vaccine/infertility (79%; n = 1758). Only ten posts described personal accounts of rosiglitazone/cardiovascular adverse event experiences, and nine posts described HPV vaccine problems related to infertility. Publicly available data from the considered social media networks were sparse and largely untrackable for the purpose of providing early clues of safety concerns regarding the prespecified case studies. Further research investigating other case studies and exploring other social media platforms are necessary to further characterise

  9. Evaluating institutional capacity for research ethics in Africa: a case study from Botswana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increase in the volume of research conducted in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC), has brought a renewed international focus on processes for ethical conduct of research. Several programs have been initiated to strengthen the capacity for research ethics in LMIC. However, most such programs focus on individual training or development of ethics review committees. The objective of this paper is to present an approach to institutional capacity assessment in research ethics and application of this approach in the form of a case study from an institution in Africa. Methods We adapted the Octagon model originally used by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency to assess an organization along eight domains in research ethics: basic values and identity; structure and organization; ability to carry out activities; relevance of activities to stated goals; capacity of staff and management; administrative, financing and accounting systems; its relations with target groups; and the national context. We used a mixed methods approach to collect empirical data at the University of Botswana from March to December 2010. Results The overall shape of the external evaluation Octagon suggests that strengths of the University of Botswana are in the areas of structure, relevance, production and identity; while the university still needs more work in the areas of systems of finance, target groups, and environment. The Octagons also show the similarities and discrepancies between the 'external' and 'internal' evaluations and provide an opportunity for exploration of these different assessments. For example, the discrepant score for 'identity' between internal and external evaluations allows for an exploration of what constitutes a strong identity for research ethics at the University of Botswana and how it can be strengthened. Conclusions There is a general lack of frameworks for evaluating research ethics capacity in LMICs. We presented an approach that

  10. Health evaluation indicator system for urban landscape rivers, case study of the Bailianjing River in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Yue; Yang, Haizhen; Lu, Zhibo; Xu, Xiaotian

    2010-11-01

    methodology and experience of the urban river health evaluation illustrated in the paper can be good case study materials for other cities with the similar situation.

  11. Evaluation of Cirrus Cloud Simulations using ARM Data-Development of Case Study Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David OC.; Demoz, Belay; Wang, Yansen; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Lare, Andrew; Mace, Jay; Poellot, Michael; Sassen, Kenneth; Brown, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are being increasingly used to develop parametric treatments of clouds and related processes for use in global climate models (GCMs). CRMs represent the integrated knowledge of the physical processes acting to determine cloud system lifecycle and are well matched to typical observational data in terms of physical parameters/measurables and scale-resolved physical processes. Thus, they are suitable for direct comparison to field observations for model validation and improvement. The goal of this project is to improve state-of-the-art CRMs used for studies of cirrus clouds and to establish a relative calibration with GCMs through comparisons among CRMs, single column model (SCM) versions of the GCMs, and observations. The objective is to compare and evaluate a variety of CRMs and SCMs, under the auspices of the GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2), using ARM data acquired at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This poster will report on progress in developing a suitable WG2 case study data set based on the September 26, 1996 ARM IOP case - the Hurricane Nora outflow case. Progress is assessing cloud and other environmental conditions will be described. Results of preliminary simulations using a regional cloud system model (MM5) and a CRM will be discussed. Focal science questions for the model comparison are strongly based on results of the idealized GCSS WG2 cirrus cloud model comparison projects (Idealized Cirrus Cloud Model Comparison Project and Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project), which will also be briefly summarized.

  12. Evaluation of Cirrus Cloud Simulations using ARM Data-Development of Case Study Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David OC.; Demoz, Belay; Wang, Yansen; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Lare, Andrew; Mace, Jay; Poellot, Michael; Sassen, Kenneth; Brown, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are being increasingly used to develop parametric treatments of clouds and related processes for use in global climate models (GCMs). CRMs represent the integrated knowledge of the physical processes acting to determine cloud system lifecycle and are well matched to typical observational data in terms of physical parameters/measurables and scale-resolved physical processes. Thus, they are suitable for direct comparison to field observations for model validation and improvement. The goal of this project is to improve state-of-the-art CRMs used for studies of cirrus clouds and to establish a relative calibration with GCMs through comparisons among CRMs, single column model (SCM) versions of the GCMs, and observations. The objective is to compare and evaluate a variety of CRMs and SCMs, under the auspices of the GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS) Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2), using ARM data acquired at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This poster will report on progress in developing a suitable WG2 case study data set based on the September 26, 1996 ARM IOP case - the Hurricane Nora outflow case. Progress is assessing cloud and other environmental conditions will be described. Results of preliminary simulations using a regional cloud system model (MM5) and a CRM will be discussed. Focal science questions for the model comparison are strongly based on results of the idealized GCSS WG2 cirrus cloud model comparison projects (Idealized Cirrus Cloud Model Comparison Project and Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project), which will also be briefly summarized.

  13. Evaluation of PPGIS empowerment--a case study of Meinong Yellow Butterfly Valley in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Bor-Wen; Lu, Dau-Jye; Chung, Ming-Kuang; Lien, Mei-Chih

    2013-02-15

    As a tool of public policy making, PPGIS (public participation geographic information system) makes its biggest impact in regard to empowerment. Quite few methods are available for making a complete evaluation of the empowerment. Using the Meinong Yellow Butterfly Valley as a case study, this article analyzes how the processes and outcomes of the PPGIS make an impact on empowerment in terms of three aspects indicated by the questions: "What is empowered?" "Who are empowered?" and "How to empower?" The results show that we are able to completely grasp the impact of PPGIS empowerment by analyzing what, who and how aspects simultaneously. They also indicate that PPGIS empowerment involves mutual transfers of knowledge, capabilities and power among all of the stakeholders, which can't simply be given by outsiders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Toward a model of curriculum analysis and evaluation - Beka: a case study from Australia.

    PubMed

    Hall, Catherine E A

    2014-03-01

    All curricula vary in the way that it is constructed, implemented and experienced. Regardless of the context, ongoing evaluation of learning objectives, processes and content within curriculum is critical. Based primarily on the work of Glatthorn (1987), Print (1993) and Reid (2005), this paper describes a case study of an undergraduate nursing curriculum. The analysis described in this paper forms the basis of a process incorporating four key steps: benchmarking, evidencing, knowing and applying (BEKA). By critiquing the literature, and explaining the merge of others' processes and models of curriculum analysis, it is argued that the BEKA framework of curriculum analysis forms a useful and powerful tool enabling understanding of the actual process of teaching, coverage of curriculum content and assessment, and demonstrating linkages between theory and practice.

  15. Predictive validity of the Biomedical Admissions Test: an evaluation and case study.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C; Ferguson, Eamonn; Wakeford, Richard; Powis, David; James, David

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increase in the use of pre-admission selection tests for medicine. Such tests need to show good psychometric properties. Here, we use a paper by Emery and Bell [2009. The predictive validity of the Biomedical Admissions Test for pre-clinical examination performance. Med Educ 43:557-564] as a case study to evaluate and comment on the reporting of psychometric data in the field of medical student selection (and the comments apply to many papers in the field). We highlight pitfalls when reliability data are not presented, how simple zero-order associations can lead to inaccurate conclusions about the predictive validity of a test, and how biases need to be explored and reported. We show with BMAT that it is the knowledge part of the test which does all the predictive work. We show that without evidence of incremental validity it is difficult to assess the value of any selection tests for medicine.

  16. E-Service Quality Evaluation on E-Government Website: Case Study BPJS Kesehatan Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasyid, A.; Alfina, I.

    2017-01-01

    This research intends to develop a model to evaluate the quality of e-services on e-government. The proposed model consists of seven dimensions: web design, reliability, responsiveness, privacy and security, personalization, information, and ease of use. The model is used to measure the quality of the e-registration of BPJS Kesehatan, an Indonesian government health insurance program. The validation and reliability testing show that of the seven dimensions proposed, only four that suitable for the case study. The result shows that the BPJS Kesehatan e-registration service is good in reliability and responsiveness dimensions, while from web design and ease of use dimensions the e-service still needs to be optimized.

  17. Learning from Evaluation by Peer Team: A Case Study of a Family Counselling Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniute-Cobb, Eivina I.; Alfred, Mary V.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how employees learn from Team Primacy Concept-based employee evaluation and how they use the feedback in performing their jobs. Team Primacy Concept-based evaluation is a type of multirater evaluation. The distinctive characteristic of such evaluation is its peer feedback component during which the employee's…

  18. Learning from Evaluation by Peer Team: A Case Study of a Family Counselling Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniute-Cobb, Eivina I.; Alfred, Mary V.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how employees learn from Team Primacy Concept-based employee evaluation and how they use the feedback in performing their jobs. Team Primacy Concept-based evaluation is a type of multirater evaluation. The distinctive characteristic of such evaluation is its peer feedback component during which the employee's…

  19. A Qualitative Evaluation of the Use of Multimedia Case Studies in an Introductory Engineering Course at Two Southeastern Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huett, Kim C.; Kawulich, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Collaborating at two universities to improve teaching and learning in undergraduate engineering, an interdisciplinary team of researchers, instructors, and evaluators planned and implemented the use of multimedia case studies with students enrolled in an introductory engineering course. This qualitative action evaluation study focuses on results…

  20. A Qualitative Evaluation of the Use of Multimedia Case Studies in an Introductory Engineering Course at Two Southeastern Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huett, Kim C.; Kawulich, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Collaborating at two universities to improve teaching and learning in undergraduate engineering, an interdisciplinary team of researchers, instructors, and evaluators planned and implemented the use of multimedia case studies with students enrolled in an introductory engineering course. This qualitative action evaluation study focuses on results…

  1. [The development of evaluation capacity in primary healthcare management: a case study in Santa Catarina State, Brazil, 2008-2011].

    PubMed

    Nickel, Daniela Alba; Calvo, Maria Cristina Marino; Natal, Sonia; Freitas, Sérgio Fernando Torres de; Hartz, Zulmira Maria de Araújo

    2014-04-01

    This article analyzes evaluation capacity-building based on the case study of a State Health Secretariat participating in the Project to Strengthen the Technical Capacity of State Health Secretariats in Monitoring and Evaluating Primary Healthcare. The case study adopted a mixed design with information from documents, semi-structured interviews, and evaluation of primary care by the State Health Secretariat in 2008-2011. Process analysis was used to identify the logical events that contributed to evaluation capacity-building, with two categories: evaluation capacity-building events and events for building organizational structure. The logical chain of events was formed by negotiation and agreement on the decision-making levels for the continuity of evaluation, data collection and analysis by the State Health Secretariat, a change in key indicators, restructuring of the evaluation matrix, and communication of the results to the municipalities. The three-way analysis showed that the aim of developing evaluation capacity was achieved.

  2. Evaluation of a collaborative model: a case study analysis of watershed planning in the Intermountain West.

    PubMed

    Bentrup, G

    2001-05-01

    Collaborative planning processes have become increasingly popular for addressing environmental planning issues, resulting in a number of conceptual models for collaboration. A model proposed by Selin and Chavez suggests that collaboration emerges from a series of antecedents and then proceeds sequentially through problem-setting, direction-setting, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation phases. This paper summarizes an empirical study to evaluate if the Selin and Chavez model encompasses the range of factors important for the establishment and operation of collaboration in watershed planning from the perspective of the planning coordinator. Analysis of three case studies of watershed based planning efforts in the Intermountain West suggests the model realistically describes some of the fundamental collaborative elements in watershed planning. Particularly important factors include the involvement of stakeholders in data collection and analysis and the establishment of measurable objectives. Informal face-to-face dialog and watershed field tours were considered critical for identifying issues and establishing trust among stakeholders. Group organizational structure also seems to play a key role in facilitating collaboration. From this analysis, suggestions for refining the model are proposed.

  3. Development and Formative Evaluation of Multimedia Case Studies for Instructional Design and Technology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development of three case studies that included a combination of multimedia production and instructional design skills within a particular setting. These case studies incorporated real-life incidents from 47 professional instructional designers. These instructional designers described a total of 146 activities involving…

  4. Development and Formative Evaluation of Multimedia Case Studies for Instructional Design and Technology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development of three case studies that included a combination of multimedia production and instructional design skills within a particular setting. These case studies incorporated real-life incidents from 47 professional instructional designers. These instructional designers described a total of 146 activities involving…

  5. Evaluating Global Health Partnerships: A Case Study of a Gavi HPV Vaccine Application Process in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kamya, Carol; Shearer, Jessica; Asiimwe, Gilbert; Carnahan, Emily; Salisbury, Nicole; Waiswa, Peter; Brinkerhoff, Jennifer; Hozumi, Dai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Global health partnerships have grown rapidly in number and scope, yet there has been less emphasis on their evaluation. Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, is one such public-private partnership; in Gavi-eligible countries partnerships are dynamic networks of immunization actors who work together to support all stages and aspects of Gavi support. This paper describes a conceptual framework – the partnership framework – and analytic approach for evaluating the perceptions of partnerships’ added value as well as the results from an application to one case in Uganda. Methods: We used a mixed-methods case study design embedded in the Gavi Full Country Evaluations (FCE) to test the partnership framework on Uganda’s human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine application partnership. Data from document review, interviews, and social network surveys enabled the testing of the relationships between partnership framework domains (context, structure, practices, performance, and outcomes). Topic guides were based on the framework domains and network surveys identified working together relationships, professional trust, and perceptions of the effectiveness, efficiency, and legitimacy of the partnership’s role in this process. Results: Data from seven in-depth interviews, 11 network surveys and document review were analyzed according to the partnership framework, confirming relationships between the framework domains. Trust was an important contributor to the perceived effectiveness of the process. The network was structured around the EPI program, who was considered the leader of this process. While the structure and composition of the network was largely viewed as supporting an effective and legitimate process, the absence of the Ministry of Education (MoE) may have had downstream consequences if this study’s results had not been shared with the Ministry of Health (MoH) and acted upon. The partnership was not perceived to have increased the efficiency of the process

  6. Exploring Operational Test and Evaluation of Unmanned Aircraft Systems: A Qualitative Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliceti, Jose A.

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore and identify strategies that may potentially remedy operational test and evaluation procedures used to evaluate Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) technology. The sample for analysis consisted of organizations testing and evaluating UASs (e.g., U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard, and Customs Border Protection). A purposeful sampling technique was used to select 15 subject matter experts in the field of operational test and evaluation of UASs. A questionnaire was provided to participants to construct a descriptive and robust research. Analysis of responses revealed themes related to each research question. Findings revealed operational testers utilized requirements documents to extrapolate measures for testing UAS technology and develop critical operational issues. The requirements documents were (a) developed without the contribution of stakeholders and operational testers, (b) developed with vague or unrealistic measures, and (c) developed without a systematic method to derive requirements from mission tasks. Four approaches are recommended to develop testable operational requirements and assist operational testers: (a) use a mission task analysis tool to derive requirements for mission essential tasks for the system, (b) exercise collaboration among stakeholders and testers to ensure testable operational requirements based on mission tasks, (c) ensure testable measures are used in requirements documents, and (d) create a repository list of critical operational issues by mission areas. The preparation of operational test and evaluation processes for UAS technology is not uniform across testers. The processes in place are not standardized, thus test plan preparation and reporting are different among participants. A standard method to prepare and report UAS technology should be used when preparing and reporting on UAS technology. Using a systematic process, such as mission

  7. Designing, Prototyping and Evaluating Digital Mindfulness Applications: A Case Study of Mindful Breathing for Stress Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Hedman, Anders; Feng, Shuo; Li, Haibo; Osika, Walter

    2017-06-14

    During the past decade, there has been a rapid increase of interactive apps designed for health and well-being. Yet, little research has been published on developing frameworks for design and evaluation of digital mindfulness facilitating technologies. Moreover, many existing digital mindfulness applications are purely software based. There is room for further exploration and assessment of designs that make more use of physical qualities of artifacts. The study aimed to develop and test a new physical digital mindfulness prototype designed for stress reduction. In this case study, we designed, developed, and evaluated HU, a physical digital mindfulness prototype designed for stress reduction. In the first phase, we used vapor and light to support mindful breathing and invited 25 participants through snowball sampling to test HU. In the second phase, we added sonification. We deployed a package of probes such as photos, diaries, and cards to collect data from users who explored HU in their homes. Thereafter, we evaluated our installation using both self-assessed stress levels and heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) measures in a pilot study, in order to measure stress resilience effects. After the experiment, we performed a semistructured interview to reflect on HU and investigate the design of digital mindfulness apps for stress reduction. The results of the first phase showed that 22 of 25 participants (88%) claimed vapor and light could be effective ways of promoting mindful breathing. Vapor could potentially support mindful breathing better than light (especially for mindfulness beginners). In addition, a majority of the participants mentioned sound as an alternative medium. In the second phase, we found that participants thought that HU could work well for stress reduction. We compared the effect of silent HU (using light and vapor without sound) and sonified HU on 5 participants. Subjective stress levels were statistically improved with both

  8. Evaluating Drugs and Food Additives for Public Use: A Case Studies Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Sheridan V.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a case study used in an introductory college biology course that provides a basis for generating debate on an issue concerning the regulation of controversial food additives and prescription drugs. The case study contained within this article deals with drug screening, specifically with information related to thalidomide. (CS)

  9. Case Studies in a Physiology Course on the Autonomic Nervous System: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of case studies on the autonomic nervous system in a fourth-semester physiology course unit for Pharmacy students is described in this article. This article considers how these case studies were developed and presents their content. Moreover, it reflects on their implementation and, finally, the reception of such a transformation…

  10. Evaluating Drugs and Food Additives for Public Use: A Case Studies Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Sheridan V.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a case study used in an introductory college biology course that provides a basis for generating debate on an issue concerning the regulation of controversial food additives and prescription drugs. The case study contained within this article deals with drug screening, specifically with information related to thalidomide. (CS)

  11. Case Studies in a Physiology Course on the Autonomic Nervous System: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of case studies on the autonomic nervous system in a fourth-semester physiology course unit for Pharmacy students is described in this article. This article considers how these case studies were developed and presents their content. Moreover, it reflects on their implementation and, finally, the reception of such a transformation…

  12. Expert viewing protocol performance study: the case of subjective evaluation of HDR coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroncini, Vittorio; Baroncini, Giacomo; Topiwala, Pankaj

    2016-09-01

    This paper tries to examine the results of a subjective evaluation experiment, made by means of the new Expert Viewing Protocol, recently approved by ITU-R Study Group 6 [1]. The EVP subjective test was designed and performed to compare different HDR coding technologies during an MPEG meeting (San Diego, CA, February 2016) [2]. Thanks to the wide and enthusiastic participation of the MPEG experts to the subjective evaluation experiment, it was possible to collect data from a total of sixteen viewers; this allowed to perform a sort of "validation" of the performance of the EVP. The ITU-R Recommendation states that tests with nine viewers is sufficient to get acceptable results from an EVP experiment. In our case, having data from 16 viewers, it was possible to compute the MOS and the Confidence Interval data as if it were a standard subjective assessment experiment (which typically requires more viewers). This allowed a sort of "validation" of the results obtained using results from 9 experts only vs. the results obtained using the data from the 16 viewers. The analysis of the raw data showed a rather good conversion of the EVP results towards the results obtained using the full viewers' data set. The results of the EVP evaluation of MPEG HDR content was described in details in a previous paper [3], to which we defer for details on the EVP protocol procedure and rules. This paper instead tries to answer to a demand for further clarification on the "context" and "limitations of use" of the EVP when performed in alternative to a formal subjective experiment trial.

  13. Case study on risk evaluation of printed electronics using nanosilver ink.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ellen; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jin Kwon; Lee, Gun Ho; Ahn, Kangho; Park, Jung Duck; Yu, Il Je

    2016-01-01

    With the ever-increasing development of nanotechnology, our society is being surrounded by possible risks related to exposure to manufactured nanomaterials. The consumer market already includes many products that contain silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), including various household products, such as yoga mats, cutting boards, running shirts, and socks. There is a growing concern over the release of AgNPs in workplaces related to the manufacture and application of nanomaterials. This study investigated the release of AgNPs during the operation of a printed electronics printer. Using an exposure simulation chamber, a nanoparticle collector, scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), condensation particle counter (CPC), dust monitor, and mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filters are all connected to measure the AgNP exposure levels when operating a printed electronics printer. A very small amount of AgNPs was released during the operation of the printed electronics printer, and the number of AgNPs inside the exposure simulation chamber was lower than that outside background. In addition, when evaluating the potential risks for consumers and workers using a margin of exposure (MOE) approach and target MOE of 1000, the operational results far exceeded the target MOE in this simulation study and in a previous workplace exposure study. The overall results indicate a no-risk concern level in the case of printed electronics using nanosilver ink.

  14. Insights on Using Developmental Evaluation for Innovating: A Case Study on the Cocreation of an Innovative Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Chi Yan; Shulha, Lyn M.

    2015-01-01

    This article contributes to research on evaluation by examining the capacity and contribution of developmental evaluation for innovating. This case study describes the "preformative development" of an educational program (from conceptualization to pilot implementation) and analyzes the processes of innovation within a developmental…

  15. A Case Study of a Community-Based Participatory Evaluation Research (CBPER) Project: Reflections on Promising Practices and Shortcomings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Jini; Bennett, Laurie; Cutforth, Nick; Tombari, Chris; Stein, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This instrumental case study documents a community-based participatory evaluation research (CBPER) project that involved a community partner, two graduate students, a faculty member, and an external funder. It highlights the fact that a participatory evaluation model is a viable way to conduct community-based research (CBR) when a community…

  16. Insights on Using Developmental Evaluation for Innovating: A Case Study on the Cocreation of an Innovative Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Chi Yan; Shulha, Lyn M.

    2015-01-01

    This article contributes to research on evaluation by examining the capacity and contribution of developmental evaluation for innovating. This case study describes the "preformative development" of an educational program (from conceptualization to pilot implementation) and analyzes the processes of innovation within a developmental…

  17. Generation and collection of restaurant waste: Characterization and evaluation at a case study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tatàno, Fabio; Caramiello, Cristina; Paolini, Tonino; Tripolone, Luca

    2017-03-01

    Because restaurants (as a division of the hospitality sector) contribute to the generation of commercial and institutional waste, thus representing both a challenge and an opportunity, the objective of the present study was to deepen the knowledge of restaurant waste in terms of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of waste generation and the performance achievable by the implementation of a separate collection scheme. In this study, the generated waste was characterized and the implemented separate collection was evaluated at a relevant case study restaurant in a coastal tourist area of Central Italy (Marche Region, Adriatic Sea side). The qualitative (compositional) characterization of the generated total restaurant waste showed considerable incidences of, in decreasing order, food (28.2%), glass (22.6%), paper/cardboard (19.1%), and plastic (17.1%). The quantitative (parametric) characterization of the generated restaurant waste determined the unit generation values of total waste and individual fractions based on the traditional employee and area parameters and the peculiar meal parameter. In particular, the obtained representative values per meal were: 0.72kgmeal(-1) for total waste, and ranging, for individual fractions, from 0.20 (for food) to 0.008kgmeal(-1) (for textile). Based on the critical evaluation of some of the resulting unit waste generation values, possible influences of restaurant practices, conditions, or characteristics were pointed out. In particular, food waste generation per meal can likely be limited by: promoting and using local, fresh, and quality food; standardizing and limiting daily menu items; basing food recipes on consolidated cooking knowledge and experience; and limiting plate sizes. The evaluation of the monthly variation of the monitored separate collection, ranging from an higher level of 52.7% to a lower level of 41.4%, indicated the following: a reduction in the separate collection level can be expected at times

  18. Screening for Chemical Contributions to Breast Cancer Risk: A Case Study for Chemical Safety Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Janet M.; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Fenton, Suzanne E.; Johnson, Dale; Navarro, Kathleen M.; Osborne, Gwendolyn; Rudel, Ruthann A.; Solomon, Gina M.; Zeise, Lauren; Janssen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    . Screening for chemical contributions to breast cancer risk: a case study for chemical safety evaluation. Environ Health Perspect 123:1255–1264; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408337 PMID:26032647

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Multi-Institutional Case Studies-Based Course in Food Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleitner, Aaron M.; Chapin, Travis K.; Hammons, Susan R.; Stelten, Anna Van; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Wiedmann, Martin; Johnston, Lynette M.; Oliver, Haley F.

    2015-01-01

    Developing novel, engaging courses in food safety is necessary to train professionals in this discipline. Courses that are interactive and case-based encourage development of critical thinking skills necessary for identifying and preventing foodborne disease outbreaks. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a case study…

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Multi-Institutional Case Studies-Based Course in Food Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleitner, Aaron M.; Chapin, Travis K.; Hammons, Susan R.; Stelten, Anna Van; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Wiedmann, Martin; Johnston, Lynette M.; Oliver, Haley F.

    2015-01-01

    Developing novel, engaging courses in food safety is necessary to train professionals in this discipline. Courses that are interactive and case-based encourage development of critical thinking skills necessary for identifying and preventing foodborne disease outbreaks. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a case study…

  1. Assessment of multiple sustainability demands for wastewater treatment alternatives: a refined evaluation scheme and case study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Liu, Junxin; Ren, Nan-Qi; Yu, Han-Qing; Lee, Duu-Jong; Guo, Xuesong

    2012-05-15

    Current estimation schemes as decision support tools for the selection of wastewater treatment alternatives focus primarily on the treatment efficiency, effluent quality, and environmental consequences for receiving water bodies. However, these schemes generally do not quantify the potential to convert pollutants in wastewater to recoverable resources. This study proposes a refined evaluation scheme for choices of wastewater treatment processes that quantifies not only adverse environmental effects but also bioenergy and nutrient recovery indices. An original means of data processing was established and clear estimate indicators were consequently obtained to allow a smooth overall estimation. An array of wastewater treatment alternatives that meet three effluent limits were used as case studies to demonstrate how the present scheme works, simultaneously, to identify optimum choices. It is concluded in the overall estimation that the lower sustainability of wastewater treatment contributed by increasingly stringent discharge demands was offset and mitigated by the resource-recovery scenarios involved, and the scenario of recovering nutrients via excess-sludge composting was of more benefit. Thus, before tightening wastewater discharge requirements, one should bear in mind the situation of multiple sustainability by setting a goal to achieve not only the greatest reduction in environmental burden but also the maximum resource-recovery benefits.

  2. Evaluating bias due to population stratification in case-control association studies of admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiting; Localio, Russell; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2004-07-01

    The potential for bias from population stratification (PS) has raised concerns about case-control studies involving admixed ethnicities. We evaluated the potential bias due to PS in relating a binary outcome with a candidate gene under simulated settings where study populations consist of multiple ethnicities. Disease risks were assigned within the range of prostate cancer rates of African Americans reported in SEER registries assuming k=2, 5, or 10 admixed ethnicities. Genotype frequencies were considered in the range of 5-95%. Under a model assuming no genotype effect on disease (odds ratio (OR)=1), the range of observed OR estimates ignoring ethnicity was 0.64-1.55 for k=2, 0.72-1.33 for k=5, and 0.81-1.22 for k=10. When genotype effect on disease was modeled to be OR=2, the ranges of observed OR estimates were 1.28-3.09, 1.43-2.65, and 1.62-2.42 for k=2, 5, and 10 ethnicities, respectively. Our results indicate that the magnitude of bias is small unless extreme differences exist in genotype frequency. Bias due to PS decreases as the number of admixed ethnicities increases. The biases are bounded by the minimum and maximum of all pairwise baseline disease odds ratios across ethnicities. Therefore, bias due to PS alone may be small when baseline risk differences are small within major categories of admixed ethnicity, such as African Americans. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of nine candidate genes in patients with normal tension glaucoma: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Christiane; Gramer, Eugen; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Pasutto, Francesca; Reinthal, Eva; Wissinger, Bernd; Weisschuh, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Background Normal tension glaucoma is a major subtype of glaucoma, associated with intraocular pressures that are within the statistically normal range of the population. Monogenic forms following classical inheritance patterns are rare in this glaucoma subtype. Instead, multigenic inheritance is proposed for the majority of cases. The present study tested common sequence variants in candidate genes for association with normal tension glaucoma in the German population. Methods Ninety-eight SNPs were selected to tag the common genetic variation in nine genes, namely OPTN (optineurin), RDX (radixin), SNX16 (sorting nexin 16), OPA1 (optic atrophy 1), MFN1 (mitofusin 1), MFN2 (mitofusin 2), PARL (presenilin associated, rhomboid-like), SOD2 (superoxide dismutase 2, mitochondrial) and CYP1B1 (cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily B, polypeptide 1). These SNPs were genotyped in 285 cases and 282 fully evaluated matched controls. Statistical analyses comprised single polymorphism association as well as haplogroup based association testing. Results Results suggested that genetic variation in five of the candidate genes (RDX, SNX16, OPA1, SOD2 and CYP1B1) is unlikely to confer major risk to develop normal tension glaucoma in the German population. In contrast, we observed a trend towards association of single SNPs in OPTN, MFN1, MFN2 and PARL. The SNPs of OPTN, MFN2 and PARL were further analysed by multimarker haplotype-based association testing. We identified a risk haplotype being more frequent in patients and a vice versa situation for the complementary protective haplotype in each of the three genes. Conclusion Common variants of OPTN, PARL, MFN1 and MFN2 should be analysed in other cohorts to confirm their involvement in normal tension glaucoma. PMID:19754948

  4. The Danielson Evaluation System in Two Mid-South High Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Laura Bailey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to answer the question: How do pilot users of the Danielson Evaluation System perceive this model in two mid-south high schools? The study describes the perceptions of teachers and administrators who implemented the Danielson Teacher Evaluation Model. The primary focus was on teachers and administrators experience with…

  5. Using the Logsum as an Evaluation Measure. Literature and Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management was to: Gain experience and weigh the advantages and disadvantages in a case study using... Contents Preface........................................................................................................................ iii CHAPTER 1...1 1.3 Contents of this report ...................................................................................... 2

  6. Flow-type landslides magnitude evaluation: the case study of the Campania Region (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Antonio; De Falco, Melania; Di Crescenzo, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    In the last years studies concerning the triggering and the run-out susceptibility for different kind of landslides have become more and more precise. In the most of the cases the methodological approach involve the production of detailed thematic maps (at least 1:5000 scale) which represent a very useful tool for territorial planning, especially in urbanized areas. More recently these researches were accompanied by the growth of other studies dealing with landslide magnitude evaluation (especially in terms of volume and velocity estimate). In this paper the results of a flow-type landslides magnitude evaluation are presented. The study area is located in Southern Italy and is very wide (1,500 square kilometres) including all the Campania region. In this context flow type landslides represent the most frequent instabilities as shown by the large number of victims and the huge economic damage caused in the last few centuries. These shallow landslides involve thin cohesionless, unsaturated pyroclastic soils found over steep slopes around Somma-Vesuvio and Phlegrean district, affecting a wide area where over 100 towns are located. Since the potential volume of flow-type landslides is a measure of event magnitude we propose to estimate the potential volume at the scale of slope or basin for about 90 municipalities affecting 850 hierarchized drainage basins and 900 regular slopes. An empirical approach recently proposed in literature (De Falco et al., 2012), allows to estimate the volume of the pyroclastic cover that can be displaced along the slope. The method derives from the interpretation of numerous geological and geomorphological data gathered from a vast amount of case histories on landslides in volcanic and carbonatic contexts and it is based on determining the thickness of the pyroclastic cover and the width of the detachment and erosion-transport zone. Thickness can be evaluated with a good degree of approximation since, in these landslides, the failure

  7. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Cerebral Arterial and Venous Haemodynamics in Multiple Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Marchione, Pasquale; Morreale, Manuela; Giacomini, Patrizia; Izzo, Chiara; Pontecorvo, Simona; Altieri, Marta; Bernardi, Silvia; Frontoni, Marco; Francia, Ada

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although recent studies excluded an association between Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and Multiple Sclerosis (MS), controversial results account for some cerebrovascular haemodynamic impairment suggesting a dysfunction of cerebral autoregulation mechanisms. The aim of this cross-sectional, case-control study is to evaluate cerebral arterial inflow and venous outflow by means of a non-invasive ultrasound procedure in Relapsing Remitting (RR), Primary Progressive (PP) Multiple Sclerosis and age and sex-matched controls subjects. Material and Methods All subjects underwent a complete extra-intracranial arterial and venous ultrasound assessment with a color-coded duplex sonography scanner and a transcranial doppler equipment, in both supine and sitting position by means of a tilting chair. Basal arterial and venous morphology and flow velocities, postural changes in mean flow velocities (MFV) of middle cerebral arteries (MCA), differences between cerebral venous outflow (CVF) in clinostatism and in the seated position (ΔCVF) and non-invasive cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were evaluated. Results 85 RR-MS, 83 PP-MS and 82 healthy controls were included. ΔCVF was negative in 45/85 (52.9%) RR-MS, 63/83 (75.9%) PP-MS (p = 0.01) and 11/82 (13.4%) controls (p<0.001), while MFVs on both MCAs in sitting position were significantly reduced in RR-MS and PP-MS patients than in control, particularly in EDSS≥5 subgroup (respectively, 42/50, 84% vs. 66/131, 50.3%, p<0.01 and 48.3±2 cm/s vs. 54.6±3 cm/s, p = 0.01). No significant differences in CPP were observed within and between groups. Conclusions The quantitative evaluation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CVF and their postural dependency may be related to a dysfunction of autonomic nervous system that seems to characterize more disabled MS patients. It's not clear whether the altered postural control of arterial inflow and venous outflow is a specific MS condition or simply an

  8. Evaluating Hub and Spoke models of practice learning in Scotland, UK: a multiple case study approach.

    PubMed

    Roxburgh, Michelle; Conlon, Margaret; Banks, Debbie

    2012-10-01

    Most of UK students' practice learning experience is based on a rotational placement model which often leads to students lacking confidence and feeling anxious about the complexities of the care environment. To evaluate the impact of Hub and Spoke model(s) of clinical practice placement across geographically diverse locations, with a particular focus on enhancing the student practice learning experience. Multiple case study design. Comprised undergraduate student nurses from Adult, Learning Disability and Mental Health programmes from 3 Scottish Schools of Nursing. A mixed methods approach which included quantitative and qualitative date tools. All three Hub and Spoke models shared two broad findings: 1) In the three Hub and Spoke models detailed in this paper, there is a continuum of student led learning which supports the process with opportunities for individual students to be positively innovative and creative in their learning approaches. Depth of learning was achieved in two ways; a) the method in which Hub placements are organised, managed and structured and, b) the depth of empathy and sensitivity to the individual at the centre of the care. 2) Placement capacity is increased: The classification of placements is reviewed to produce broader categories, Engagement of mentors/enhanced student/mentor relationship. Practice Learning must be seen as an academic endeavour that promotes deep, meaningful, person-centred learning rather than superficial, compartmentalised placement-centred learning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Linking Assessment to Decision Making in Water Resources Planning - Decision Making Frameworks and Case Study Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broman, D.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Simes, J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate assessments have become an accepted and commonly used component of long term water management and planning. There is substantial variation in the methods used in these assessments; however, managers and decision-makers have come to value their utility to identify future system limitations, and to evaluate future alternatives to ensure satisfactory system performance. A new set of decision-making frameworks have been proposed, including robust decision making (RDM), and decision scaling, that directly address the deep uncertainties found in both future climate, and non-climatic factors. Promising results have been obtained using these new frameworks, offering a more comprehensive understanding of future conditions leading to failures, and identification of measures to address these failures. Data and resource constraints have limited the use of these frameworks within the Bureau of Reclamation. We present here a modified framework that captures the strengths of previously proposed methods while using a suite of analysis tool that allow for a 'rapid climate assessment' to be performed. A scalable approach has been taken where more complex tools can be used if project resources allow. This 'rapid assessment' is demonstrated through two case studies on the Santa Ana and Colorado Rivers where previous climate assessments have been completed. Planning-level measures are used to compare how decision making is affected when using this new decision making framework.

  10. Sensitivity of inferred climate model skill to evaluation decisions: a case study using CMIP5 evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, Christopher R.; Huntinzger, Deborah N.; Michalak, Anna M.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Kimball, John S.; Mueller, Brigitte; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Yongqiang

    2013-06-01

    Confrontation of climate models with observationally-based reference datasets is widespread and integral to model development. These comparisons yield skill metrics quantifying the mismatch between simulated and reference values and also involve analyst choices, or meta-parameters, in structuring the analysis. Here, we systematically vary five such meta-parameters (reference dataset, spatial resolution, regridding approach, land mask, and time period) in evaluating evapotranspiration (ET) from eight CMIP5 models in a factorial design that yields 68 700 intercomparisons. The results show that while model-data comparisons can provide some feedback on overall model performance, model ranks are ambiguous and inferred model skill and rank are highly sensitive to the choice of meta-parameters for all models. This suggests that model skill and rank are best represented probabilistically rather than as scalar values. For this case study, the choice of reference dataset is found to have a dominant influence on inferred model skill, even larger than the choice of model itself. This is primarily due to large differences between reference datasets, indicating that further work in developing a community-accepted standard ET reference dataset is crucial in order to decrease ambiguity in model skill.

  11. Evaluation of a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection: Implementation of CuP and Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Gustafson, William I.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Deng, Liping

    2013-01-01

    A new treatment for shallow clouds has been introduced into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The new scheme, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, replaces the ad-hoc trigger function used in the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization with a trigger function related to the distribution of temperature and humidity in the convective boundary layer via probability density functions (PDFs). An additional modification to the default version of WRF is the computation of a cumulus cloud fraction based on the time scales relevant for shallow cumuli. Results from three case studies over the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in north central Oklahoma are presented. These days were selected because of the presence of shallow cumuli over the ARM site. The modified version of WRF does a much better job predicting the cloud fraction and the downwelling shortwave irradiance thancontrol simulations utilizing the default Kain-Fritsch scheme. The modified scheme includes a number of additional free parameters, including the number and size of bins used to define the PDF, the minimum frequency of a bin within the PDF before that bin is considered for shallow clouds to form, and the critical cumulative frequency of bins required to trigger deep convection. A series of tests were undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity of the simulations to these parameters. Overall, the scheme was found to be relatively insensitive to each of the parameters.

  12. Evaluation of melatonin levels in saliva in gingivitis and periodontitis cases: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Karuna; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Khan, Mohammad Akhlaq; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the melatonin levels in saliva in gingivitis and periodontitis cases. Background: Melatonin has strong antioxidant, free radical scavenging, and immunomodulating properties, acts on osteoblasts directly to stimulate cell proliferation and synthesis of Type I collagen, and promotes bone formation. Materials and Methods: A total of thirty participants were selected and divided into three groups (control group, gingivitis group, and periodontitis group). In each group, ten participants were taken. Salivary melatonin was estimated in each of the three groups. Results: Results from this study showed that the mean levels of salivary melatonin increased as severity increased from control to periodontitis, i.e., the mean levels were highest in periodontitis followed by gingivitis and least in control group. The melatonin level of all participants was positively and significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with their gingival index (r = 0.85, P < 0.01) and probing depth (r = 0.72, P < 0.01). Conclusion: Salivary melatonin level varied with the severity of gingivitis and periodontitis. With increased severity of periodontal disease, the level of salivary melatonin also increased suggesting that salivary melatonin may act as a diagnostic biomarker for periodontal diseases. PMID:27994421

  13. Evaluating Cumulative OP Pesticide Body Burden of Children: A National Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Payne-Sturges, Devon; Cohen, Jonathan; Castorina, Rosemary; Axelrad, Daniel A.; Woodruff, Tracey J.

    2009-01-01

    Biomonitoring is a valuable tool for identifying exposures to chemicals that pose potential harm to human health. However, to date there has been little published on ways to evaluate the relative public health significance of biomonitoring data for different chemicals, and even less on cumulative assessment of multiple chemicals. The objectives of our study are to develop a methodology for a health risk interpretation of biomonitoring data, and to apply it using NHANES 1999–2002 body burden data for organophosphorus (OP) pesticides. OP pesticides present a particularly challenging case given the non-specificity of many metabolites monitored through NHANES. We back-calculate OP pesticide exposures from urinary metabolite data, and compare cumulative dose estimates with available toxicity information for a common mechanism of action (brain cholinesterase inhibition) using data from U.S. EPA. Our results suggest that approximately 40% of children in the United States may have had insufficient margins of exposure (MOEs) for neurological impacts from cumulative exposures to OP pesticides (MOE less than 1,000). Limitations include uncertainty related to assumptions about likely precursor pesticide compounds of the urinary metabolites, sources of exposure, and intra-individual and temporal variability. PMID:19921915

  14. Evaluation of Feasibility for a Case-Control Study of Pituitary-Ovarian Function in Premenopausal Women With Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist stimulation tests to compare pituitary -ovarian function in premenopausal women...in responsiveness of ovarian hormones to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation in healthy premenopausal women. GnRH stimulation was...determine the safety and feasibility of conducting a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation tests to evaluate

  15. Evaluating the use of friend or family controls in epidemiologic case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Charlie; Cockburn, Myles; Cozen, Wendy; Voutsinas, Jenna; Lacey, James V; Luo, Jianning; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Bernstein, Leslie; Wang, Sophia S

    2017-02-01

    Traditional methodologies for identifying and recruiting controls in epidemiologic case-control studies, such as random digit dialing or neighborhood walk, suffer from declining response rates. Here, we revisit the feasibility and comparability of using alternative sources of controls, specifically friend and family controls. We recruited from a recently completed case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) among women in Los Angeles County where controls from the parent study were ascertained by neighborhood walk. We calculated participation rates and compared questionnaire responses between the friend/family controls and the original matched controls from the parent study. Of the 182 NHL case patients contacted, 111 (61%) agreed to participate in our feasibility study. 70 (63%) provided contact information for potential friend and/or family member controls. We were able to successfully contact and recruit a friend/family member for 92% of the case patients. This represented 46 friend controls and 54 family controls. Family controls significantly differed from original matched controls by sex and household income. Other characteristics were similar between friend controls and the original study's neighborhood controls. The apparent comparability of neighborhood controls to friend and family controls among respondents in this study suggests that these alternative methods of control identification can serve as a complementary source of eligible controls in epidemiologic case-control studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Designing, Prototyping and Evaluating Digital Mindfulness Applications: A Case Study of Mindful Breathing for Stress Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Anders; Feng, Shuo; Li, Haibo; Osika, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Background During the past decade, there has been a rapid increase of interactive apps designed for health and well-being. Yet, little research has been published on developing frameworks for design and evaluation of digital mindfulness facilitating technologies. Moreover, many existing digital mindfulness applications are purely software based. There is room for further exploration and assessment of designs that make more use of physical qualities of artifacts. Objective The study aimed to develop and test a new physical digital mindfulness prototype designed for stress reduction. Methods In this case study, we designed, developed, and evaluated HU, a physical digital mindfulness prototype designed for stress reduction. In the first phase, we used vapor and light to support mindful breathing and invited 25 participants through snowball sampling to test HU. In the second phase, we added sonification. We deployed a package of probes such as photos, diaries, and cards to collect data from users who explored HU in their homes. Thereafter, we evaluated our installation using both self-assessed stress levels and heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) measures in a pilot study, in order to measure stress resilience effects. After the experiment, we performed a semistructured interview to reflect on HU and investigate the design of digital mindfulness apps for stress reduction. Results The results of the first phase showed that 22 of 25 participants (88%) claimed vapor and light could be effective ways of promoting mindful breathing. Vapor could potentially support mindful breathing better than light (especially for mindfulness beginners). In addition, a majority of the participants mentioned sound as an alternative medium. In the second phase, we found that participants thought that HU could work well for stress reduction. We compared the effect of silent HU (using light and vapor without sound) and sonified HU on 5 participants. Subjective stress levels were

  17. Project success: A methodological and evaluative case study of the early alert program interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkins, Randy James

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to methodologically examine the use of three types of focus groups 1), traditional face-to face, 2), online video and audio, and 3) online text only. Second, to examine the impact of academic intervention attempts offered by university and department support services. Methodologically, the three types of focus groups were compared in terms of ease of use, comfort, richness of data and ethical considerations. Contextually, support services for a general chemistry course taken primarily by new students were examined using an evaluation method involving effort, monitoring, process, component and treatment specification types of implementation. For this research, fourteen students enrolled in the general chemistry course at Rocky Mountain University in fall term 2014 participated in one of the three types of focus groups to discuss support services for the course. Since the increase of technological advances in the late twentieth century, the use of electronic focus groups has been viewed as a viable alternative to traditional in-person meetings. However, different methods within a methodology might produce different results for both students and researchers. This study inspected differences in ease of use for participants and the researcher, comfort in terms of using technology and in discussing academic issues and support services, richness of the data, and ethical issues surrounding privacy and confidentiality. For this case study, methodological findings were that in-person groups still had relevance in this age of advanced technology. Audio-video groups were more limited than in-person groups in terms of interaction and administration, while text-only groups were easiest to transcribe, but seemed to be the most limited in terms of all other aspects of the research. Finally, ethical concerns were not considered important by members in any group; therefore, it is incumbent on the researcher to provide the best ethical

  18. Evaluation of the Implementation of a Socio-Educational Program with Immigrant Families: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rego, Miguel Angel Santos; Otero, Agustin Godas; Moledo, M del Mar Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    There exist an increasing number of studies that demonstrate the necessity to evaluate the processes which characterize a program and guarantee its implementation and evaluation. This paper deals with the implementation of a program designed to improve the acculturation of immigrant families in Spain (EU). Implementation followed a process that…

  19. Assessing Teachers: A Mixed-Method Case Study of Comprehensive Teacher Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Donna

    2013-01-01

    A review of studies selected from the Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC) covering the years 1985 through 2011 revealed three key evaluation components to analyze within a comprehensive teacher evaluation program: (a) designing, planning, and implementing instruction; (b) learning environments; and (c) parent and peer surveys. In this…

  20. Exploring Graduate and Undergraduate Course Evaluations Administered on Paper and Online: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrett, Jamis J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the students' evaluations of the course and instructor for all statistics courses offered during fall semester 2009 at a large university in the southern United States. Data were collected and analysed for course evaluations administered both online and on paper to students in both undergraduate and…

  1. Assessing Teachers: A Mixed-Method Case Study of Comprehensive Teacher Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Donna

    2013-01-01

    A review of studies selected from the Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC) covering the years 1985 through 2011 revealed three key evaluation components to analyze within a comprehensive teacher evaluation program: (a) designing, planning, and implementing instruction; (b) learning environments; and (c) parent and peer surveys. In this…

  2. Ultrasound evaluation of intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia in hallux valgus: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lobo, César Calvo; Marín, Alejandro Garrido; Sanz, David Rodríguez; López, Daniel López; López, Patricia Palomo; Morales, Carlos Romero; Corbalán, Irene Sanz

    2016-11-01

    A cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness reduction of the abductor hallucis (AbH) is shown in subjects with hallux valgus (HV). To date, other soft-tissue structures have not been researched in relation with HV. The aim of this study was to compare the CSA and thickness of the intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia (PF) between feet with and without HV. Therefore, a cross-sectional and case-control study was performed using B-mode with an iU22 Philips ultrasound system and a 5 to 17-MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness were measured for the AbH, flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), and also the thickness for the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions. A convenience sample of 40 feet, 20 with HV and 20 without HV, was recruited from a clinical and research center. A multivariate regression analysis using linear regression was performed to evaluate the ultrasound imaging measurements (α = 0.05). Consequently, statistically significant differences were observed between the groups (P < 0.05) for the AbH and FHB thickness, and CSA reduction, and also the plantar fascia thickness increase in favor of the HV group. On the contrary, the FDB thickness and CSA did not show statistically significant differences (P ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, the CSA and thickness of the AbH and FHB intrinsic plantar muscles are reduced, whereas the thickness of the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions are increased, in subjects with HV compared with those without HV.

  3. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  4. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  5. Descriptive analysis of context evaluation instrument for technical oral presentation skills evaluation: A case study in English technical communication course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdullah-Adnan; Asmawi, Adelina; Hamid, Mohd Rashid Ab; Mustafa, Zainol bin

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a pilot study of Context Evaluation using a self-developed questionnaire distributed among engineering undergraduates at a university under study. The study aims to validate the self-developed questionnaires used in the Context evaluation, a component in the CIPP Model. The Context evaluation assesses background information for needs, assets, problems and opportunities relevant to beneficiaries of the study in a defined environment. Through the questionnaire, background information for the assessment of needs, assets and problems related to the engineering undergraduates' perceptions on the teaching and learning of technical oral presentation skills was collected and analysed. The questionnaire was developed using 5-points Likert scale to measure the constructs under study. They were distributed to 100 respondents with 79 returned. The respondents consisted of engineering undergraduates studied at various faculties at one technical university in Malaysia. The descriptive analysis of data for each item which makes up the construct for Context evaluation is found to be high. This implied that engineering undergraduates showed high interest in teaching and learning of technical oral presentation skills, thus their needs are met. Also, they agreed that assets and facilities are conducive to their learning. In conclusion, the context evaluation involving needs and assets factors are both considerably important; their needs are met and the assets and facilities do support their technical oral presentation skills learning experience.

  6. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of an Initiative to Develop Leadership among Women in Africa: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakahiu, Jane M.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study assesses the impact of a three-year Hilton Foundation-supported, Sisters Leadership Development Initiative (SLDI) in five African nations. The goal was to evaluate the SLDI program for increasing leadership capacities of 340 women in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Ghana and Nigeria. The purpose of this study was to determine…

  7. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of an Initiative to Develop Leadership among Women in Africa: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakahiu, Jane M.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study assesses the impact of a three-year Hilton Foundation-supported, Sisters Leadership Development Initiative (SLDI) in five African nations. The goal was to evaluate the SLDI program for increasing leadership capacities of 340 women in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Ghana and Nigeria. The purpose of this study was to determine…

  8. Case studies in a physiology course on the autonomic nervous system: design, implementation, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Martina

    2010-06-01

    The introduction of case studies on the autonomic nervous system in a fourth-semester physiology course unit for Pharmacy students is described in this article. This article considers how these case studies were developed and presents their content. Moreover, it reflects on their implementation and, finally, the reception of such a transformation among the students as well as the tutor's perception. Specifically, the following issues were addressed. First, how were the course unit and, within the course unit, case study components organized? Second, how was the transformation of the course unit from an originally interactive but rather teacher-centered lecture to an interactive course module achieved? Third, how were the case studies structured, what questions were asked, and what were the answers expected from the students; what additional information was provided by the tutor? Fourth, how did the implementation of these case studies work out in the actual course, i.e., how did the tutor guide the students in this interactive session and how did the students tackle the problems? Finally, how was the integration of interactive modules received by the students and what was their learning experience (as assessed by questionnaires) and learning success (as assessed through the final course exam)? Equally, the tutor's perception of this transformation and its implementation is described.

  9. Involving Employers in Training: Case Studies. Research and Evaluation Report Series 97-J.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbell, Kellie; Trutko, John W.; Barnow, Burt S.; Nightengale, Demetra; Pindus, Nancy

    This document contains in-depth descriptions and assessments of 17 exemplary employer-based training (EBT) programs that were studied as part of an examination of EBT programs. The case studies are based on site visits to each firm, during which interviews were conducted with company management, supervisors of workers in training, individuals…

  10. The JOBS Evaluation. Educating Welfare Recipients for Employment and Empowerment: Case Studies of Promising Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quint, Janet; DiMeo, Cristina

    Part of a much larger study of the JOBS (Job Opportunities and Basic Skills) program, profiles were developed of programs in four communities: San Diego (California); Brooklyn (New York); Philadelphia (Pennsylvania); and Tucson (Arizona), that served welfare clients in innovative and promising ways. The case studies were conducted through site…

  11. Labor Shortage Case Studies. Research and Evaluation Report Series 93-E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James Bell Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    A study assessed labor shortages in the United States by conducting case studies of four occupations: special education teachers, paraprofessional home care workers, electrical and electronic engineers, and tool and die makers. The research approach combined analysis of existing data sources and interviews with individuals knowledgeable about the…

  12. A comprehensive grid to evaluate case management's expected effectiveness for community-dwelling frail older people: results from a multiple, embedded case study.

    PubMed

    Van Durme, Thérèse; Schmitz, Olivier; Cès, Sophie; Anthierens, Sibyl; Maggi, Patrick; Delye, Sam; De Almeida Mello, Johanna; Declercq, Anja; Macq, Jean; Remmen, Roy; Aujoulat, Isabelle

    2015-06-18

    Case management is a type of intervention expected to improve the quality of care and therefore the quality of life of frail, community-dwelling older people while delaying institutionalisation in nursing homes. However, the heterogeneity, multidimensionality and complexity of these interventions make their evaluation by the means of classical approaches inadequate. Our objective was twofold: (i) to propose a tool allowing for the identification of the key components that explain the success of case management for this population and (ii) to propose a typology based on the results of this tool. The process started with a multiple embedded case study design in order to identify the key components of case management. Based on the results of this first step, data were collected among 22 case management interventions, in order to evaluate their expected effectiveness. Finally, multiple correspondence analyses was conducted to propose a typology of case management. The overall approach was informed by Wagner's Chronic Care Model and the theory of complexity. The study identified a total of 23 interacting key components. Based on the clustering of response patterns of the 22 case management projects included in our study, three types of case management programmes were evidenced, situated on a continuum from a more "socially-oriented" type towards a more "clinically-oriented" type of case management. The type of feedback provided to the general practitioner about both the global geriatric assessment and the result of the intervention turned out to be the most discriminant component between the types. The study design allowed to produce a tool that can be used to distinguish between different types of case management interventions and further evaluate their effect on frail older people in terms of the delaying institutionalisation, functional and cognitive status, quality of life and societal costs.

  13. Investigating Religion and Computing: A Case for Using Standpoint Theory in Technology Evaluation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyche, Susan Porter

    2010-01-01

    This research focuses on the development and study of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) that support religious practices and the use of standpoint theory in ICT evaluation studies. Three phases makeup this work: formative studies to understand how megachurches, their members and leaders use ICT in ways tied to their Protestant…

  14. Evaluation of Deep Vadose Zone Contaminant Flux into Groundwater: Approach and Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Last, George V.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2016-03-09

    For sites with a contaminant source located in the vadose zone, the nature and extent of groundwater contaminant plumes are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to groundwater. Especially for thick vadose zones, transport may be relatively slow making it difficult to directly measure contaminant flux. An integrated assessment approach, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, is presented to explain current vadose zone contaminant distributions and to estimate future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions. The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site (WA, USA) SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of a large existing contaminant inventory in its deep vadose zone, the presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount of available data for the site. A predictive quantitative analysis was applied to refine a baseline conceptual model through the completion of a series of targeted simulations. The analysis revealed that site recharge is the most important flux-controlling process for future contaminant flux. Tank leak characteristics and subsurface heterogeneities appear to have a limited effect on long-term contaminant flux into groundwater. The occurrence of the current technetium-99 groundwater plume was explained by taking into account a considerable historical water-line leak adjacent to one of the tanks. The analysis further indicates that the vast majority of technetium-99 is expected to migrate into the groundwater during the next century. The approach provides a template for use in evaluating contaminant flux to groundwater using existing site data and has elements that are relevant to other disposal sites with a thick vadose zone.

  15. Evaluation of deep vadose zone contaminant flux into groundwater: Approach and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostrom, M.; Truex, M. J.; Last, G. V.; Strickland, C. E.; Tartakovsky, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    For sites with a contaminant source located in the vadose zone, the nature and extent of groundwater contaminant plumes are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to groundwater. Especially for thick vadose zones, transport may be relatively slow making it difficult to directly measure contaminant flux. An integrated assessment approach, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, is presented to explain current vadose zone contaminant distributions and to estimate future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions. The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site (WA, USA) SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of a large existing contaminant inventory in its deep vadose zone, the presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount of available data for the site. A predictive quantitative analysis was applied to refine a baseline conceptual model through the completion of a series of targeted simulations. The analysis revealed that site recharge is the most important flux-controlling process for future contaminant flux. Tank leak characteristics and subsurface heterogeneities appear to have a limited effect on long-term contaminant flux into groundwater. The occurrence of the current technetium-99 groundwater plume was explained by taking into account a considerable historical water-line leak adjacent to one of the tanks. The analysis further indicates that the vast majority of technetium-99 is expected to migrate into the groundwater during the next century. The approach provides a template for use in evaluating contaminant flux to groundwater using existing site data and has elements that are relevant to other disposal sites with a thick vadose zone.

  16. Evaluation of municipal solid waste management performance by material flow analysis: Theoretical approach and case study.

    PubMed

    Zaccariello, Lucio; Cremiato, Raffaele; Mastellone, Maria Laura

    2015-10-01

    The main role of a waste management plan is to define which is the combination of waste management strategies and method needed to collect and manage the waste in such a way to ensure a given set of targets is reached. Objectives have to be sustainable and realistic, consistent with the environmental policies and regulations and monitored to verify the progressive achievement of the given targets. To get the aim, the setting up and quantification of indicators can allow the measurement of efficiency of a waste management system. The quantification of efficiency indicators requires the developing of a material flow analysis over the system boundary, from waste collection to secondary materials selling, processing and disposal. The material flow analysis has been carried out with reference to a case study for which a reliable, time- and site-specific database was available. The material flow analysis allowed the evaluation of the amount of materials sent to recycling, to landfilling and to waste-to-energy, by highlighting that the sorting of residual waste can further increase the secondary materials amount. The utilisation of energy recovery to treat the low-grade waste allows the maximisation of waste diversion from landfill with a low production of hazardous ash. A preliminary economic balance has been carried out to define the gate fee of the waste management system that was in the range of 84-145 € t(-1) without including the separate collection cost. The cost of door-by-door separate collection, designed to ensure the collection of five separate streams, resulted in 250 € t(-1) ±30%. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Evaluation of deep vadose zone contaminant flux into groundwater: Approach and case study.

    PubMed

    Oostrom, M; Truex, M J; Last, G V; Strickland, C E; Tartakovsky, G D

    2016-06-01

    For sites with a contaminant source located in the vadose zone, the nature and extent of groundwater contaminant plumes are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to groundwater. Especially for thick vadose zones, transport may be relatively slow making it difficult to directly measure contaminant flux. An integrated assessment approach, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, is presented to explain current vadose zone contaminant distributions and to estimate future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions. The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site (WA, USA) SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of a large existing contaminant inventory in its deep vadose zone, the presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount of available data for the site. A predictive quantitative analysis was applied to refine a baseline conceptual model through the completion of a series of targeted simulations. The analysis revealed that site recharge is the most important flux-controlling process for future contaminant flux. Tank leak characteristics and subsurface heterogeneities appear to have a limited effect on long-term contaminant flux into groundwater. The occurrence of the current technetium-99 groundwater plume was explained by taking into account a considerable historical water-line leak adjacent to one of the tanks. The analysis further indicates that the vast majority of technetium-99 is expected to migrate into the groundwater during the next century. The approach provides a template for use in evaluating contaminant flux to groundwater using existing site data and has elements that are relevant to other disposal sites with a thick vadose zone.

  18. Case study of preliminary cyclic load evaluation and triaxial soil testing in offshore wind farm planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Daniel; Ossig, Benjamin; Kreiter, Stefan; Kouery, Saed; Moerz, Tobias

    2010-05-01

    compared to literature results. The shown case study is intended to demonstrate a feasible procedure for evaluating cyclic loads, designing test procedures, presenting results and interpreting data in a so far unregulated field without common standards. The presented data has been produced within the framework of germanwind, a science industry partnership including RWE-Innogy, ENOVA and MARUM.

  19. Web-site evaluation tools: a case study in reproductive health information.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Azam; Pournik, Omid; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Internet forms an opportunity to inform, teach, and connect professionals and patients. However, much information on Internet is incomplete, inaccurate, or misleading, and not only in the medical domain. Because of the potential for damage from misleading and inaccurate health information, many organizations and individuals have published or implemented scoring tools for evaluating the appropriateness or quality of these resources. The objective of this study is to identify and summarize scoring tools that have evaluated web-sites providing reproductive health information in order to compare them and recommend an overarching evaluation tool. We searched Ovid MEDLINE(R) (1946 to July 2013) and OVID Embase (1980 to July 2013); and included English language studies that have evaluated the quality of websites providing reproductive health information. Studies only assessing the content of websites were excluded. We identified 5 scoring tools: 1-The HON (health on the net) Code of Conduct for medical and health Web sites, 2-Silberg scores, 3-Hogne Sandvik scale, 4-Jim Kapoun's Criteria for Evaluating Web Pages, and 5-The Health Information Technology Institute (HITI) criteria. We have compared these scales and identified 14 criteria: authorship, ownership, currency, objectivity/content, transparency/source, interactivity, privacy/ethics, financial disclosure, navigability/links, complementarity, advertising policy, design, quantity, and accessibility. We integrated these criteria and introduced a new tool with 10 criteria. Website evaluation tools differ in their evaluation criteria and there is a lack of consensus about which to use; therefore, an integrated easy to use set of criteria is needed.

  20. Engaging the private sector to increase tuberculosis case detection: an impact evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aamir J; Khowaja, Saira; Khan, Faisal S; Qazi, Fahad; Lotia, Ismat; Habib, Ali; Mohammed, Shama; Khan, Uzma; Amanullah, Farhana; Hussain, Hamidah; Becerra, Mercedes C; Creswell, Jacob; Keshavjee, Salmaan

    2012-08-01

    In many countries with a high burden of tuberculosis, most patients receive treatment in the private sector. We evaluated a multifaceted case-detection strategy in Karachi, Pakistan, targeting the private sector. A year-long communications campaign advised people with 2 weeks or more of productive cough to seek care at one of 54 private family medical clinics or a private hospital that was also a national tuberculosis programme (NTP) reporting centre. Community laypeople participated as screeners, using an interactive algorithm on mobile phones to assess patients and visitors in family-clinic waiting areas and the hospital's outpatient department. Screeners received cash incentives for case detection. Patients with suspected tuberculosis also came directly to the hospital's tuberculosis clinic (self-referrals) or were referred there (referrals). The primary outcome was the change (from 2010 to 2011) in tuberculosis notifications to the NTP in the intervention area compared with that in an adjacent control area. Screeners assessed 388,196 individuals at family clinics and 81,700 at Indus Hospital's outpatient department from January-December, 2011. A total of 2416 tuberculosis cases were detected and notified via the NTP reporting centre at Indus Hospital: 603 through family clinics, 273 through the outpatient department, 1020 from self-referrals, and 520 from referrals. In the intervention area overall, tuberculosis case notification to the NTP increased two times (from 1569 to 3140 cases) from 2010 to 2011--a 2·21 times increase (95% CI 1·93-2·53) relative to the change in number of case notifications in the control area. From 2010 to 2011, pulmonary tuberculosis notifications at Indus Hospital increased by 3·77 times for adults and 7·32 times for children. Novel approaches to tuberculosis case-finding involving the private sector and using laypeople, mobile phone software and incentives, and communication campaigns can substantially increase case

  1. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    In 2009, a 37-unit apartment complex located in Boulder, Colorado, underwent an energy retrofit to comply with Boulder SmartRegs Ordinance, a mandate that requires all rental properties to meet certain energy efficiency standards by 2018. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, worked with city planners and building owners to evaluate this program and recently completed a case study evaluating the effectiveness of a collection of retrofit measures.

  2. An Evaluation of a Constructivist Online Collaborative Learning Activity: A Case Study on Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Koo Ah; Eshaq, Ahmad Rafi Mohamed; Samsudin, Khairul Anuar; Guru, Balachandher Krishnan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a case study which involved 32 secondary school students participating in an online collaborative learning (OCL) activity known as Diary of Discovering Geometry. This activity aimed to explore the real contents in the learners' surrounding for discovering the spatial concepts and the applications of geometry. The purpose of the…

  3. Policy Research and Child Passenger Safety Legislation: A Case Study and Experimental Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Stephen B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Research findings have been used by states to formulate legislation to increase child passenger safety. Case studies from Kansas and Illinois are presented. The process is most successful when researchers are sensitive to the policy making process. The implications for the use of psychological research findings are discussed. (VM)

  4. Complementing Behavioral Measures with Electrophysiological Measures in Diagnostic Evaluation: A Case Study in Two Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jeffrey S.; Jerger, James F.; Ulatowska, Hanna K.; Mehta, Jyutika A.

    2006-01-01

    This case study focuses on a bilingual, older man who spoke Polish and English and showed weaknesses on clinical measures of dichotic listening in English. It was unclear whether these test results were influenced by the participant's facility with his second language or by other nonauditory factors. To elucidate the nature of this deficit, the…

  5. Challenges in the Evaluation of Cyberbullying Prevention--Insights from Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieschl, Stephanie; Kourteva, Penka; Stauf, Leonie

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays cyberbullying prevention programs such as Surf-Fair can significantly reduce cyberbullying but little is known about necessary and sufficient conditions of their effectiveness. Case Study 1 followed three successive waves of implementation of Surf-Fair in one German highest-track secondary school in a pre-post design. Results show no…

  6. A Case Study on the Use of Portfolios in Principal Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoux, Jennifer; Brown, Genevieve; Irby, Beverly J.; Lara-Alecio, Rafael

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the principal evaluation portfolio process as it had an impact on leadership effectiveness, student achievement, professional development of teachers, and the reflective practice of the principal. The school district chosen for the study was a rural consolidated pre-K-12 district in New…

  7. Evaluation of river water quality variations using multivariate statistical techniques: Sava River (Croatia): a case study.

    PubMed

    Marinović Ruždjak, Andrea; Ruždjak, Domagoj

    2015-04-01

    For the evaluation of seasonal and spatial variations and the interpretation of a large and complex water quality dataset obtained during a 7-year monitoring program of the Sava River in Croatia, different multivariate statistical techniques were applied in this study. Basic statistical properties and correlations of 18 water quality parameters (variables) measured at 18 sampling sites (a total of 56,952 values) were examined. Correlations between air temperature and some water quality parameters were found in agreement with the previous studies of relationship between climatic and hydrological parameters. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to explore the most important factors determining the spatiotemporal dynamics of the Sava River. PCA has determined a reduced number of seven principal components that explain over 75 % of the data set variance. The results revealed that parameters related to temperature and organic pollutants (CODMn and TSS) were the most important parameters contributing to water quality variation. PCA analysis of seasonal subsets confirmed this result and showed that the importance of parameters is changing from season to season. PCA of the four seasonal data subsets yielded six PCs with eigenvalues greater than one explaining 73.6 % (spring), 71.4 % (summer), 70.3 % (autumn), and 71.3 % (winter) of the total variance. To check the influence of the outliers in the data set whose distribution strongly deviates from the normal one, in addition to standard principal component analysis algorithm, two robust estimates of covariance matrix were calculated and subjected to PCA. PCA in both cases yielded seven principal components explaining 75 % of the total variance, and the results do not differ significantly from the results obtained by the standard PCA algorithm. With the implementation of robust PCA algorithm, it is demonstrated that the usage of standard algorithm is justified for data sets with small numbers of missing data

  8. Can Teaching Be Evaluated through Reflection on Student Performance in Continuous Assessment? A Case Study of Practical Engineering Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNabola, Aonghus; O'Farrell, Ciara

    2015-01-01

    Research and practice is presented on the use of student assessments as part of reflective practice to evaluate teaching. Case studies are presented in the delivery of Engineering modules across a number of years at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Both student performance in continuous assessment and student feedback on assessments…

  9. Problems Associated with Coordination and Role Definitions in Health Care Teams: A Hospice Program Evaluation and Intervention Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteotti, Carol R.; And Others

    Using an evaluation of a hospital-based hospice as a case study, this paper analyzes problematic issues surrounding health care teams (HCTs) in light of findings revealed in the literature concerning HCT structures and processes. The factors of coordination and role definitions in HCTs and their manifestations in a particular hospice HCT in terms…

  10. Evaluation of Feasibility for a Case-Control Study of Adrenal Androgen Production in Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    responsiveness of adrenal hormones to ACTH stimulation in healthy postmenopausal women. We also evaluated variation in natural killer cell cytotoxicity in...stimulation. Other hormones measured and natural killer cell cytotoxictiy did not change significantly after ACTH. Future analyses will attempt to...case-control study that uses adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation tests to determine if postmenopausal women who develop breast cancer secrete

  11. Case Study Evaluation of Training for ACCESS (Attractive Careers in Childhood Education for Second Language Speakers). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleby, Judith A.

    A California program to train childhood educators so they can, in turn, attract, train, and motivate limited-English-proficient (LEP) individuals for child care occupations is evaluated based on three participant case studies. In in-depth interviews, three of the 30 program participants discussed what they had learned during training, the…

  12. Evaluation for program decision making: a case study of the Oportunidades program in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Lynnette M; Steta, Concepción; Rivera, Juan; Valle, Adolfo Martinez; Grados, Rogelio; Uriega, Sara; López, Victor Hugo

    2011-11-01

    Although evaluation is now an integral part of the design and implementation of public programs in many countries, there is growing recognition that the utilization of evaluation results for improving implementation and decision making, particularly in developing countries, is limited. The objective of this paper is to describe the process by which the external impact evaluation has been used to increase the potential of Oportunidades to improve nutritional outcomes of the beneficiary population through modifications to its design and operation. We will summarize a series of studies that have guided this process and focus on key aspects that have facilitated the utilization of evaluation results for decision making in the program. Implementation of research to document the impact of programs and the publication of such findings in peer reviewed journals, although vital for improving our evidence base and for the advancement of researchers within the current academic system, is not enough to ensure that the program itself will benefit from the evaluation. The use of evaluation results as a basis for modifications to the design and implementation of the nutrition component of Oportunidades was favored by open dialogue among all sectors involved in the program and the evaluation team and a long-term commitment on the part of all those involved. We think that the lessons learnt from this process are relevant for other programs, even where resources may be limited.

  13. Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with conventional'' HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

  14. Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with ``conventional`` HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

  15. Missed opportunities in the evaluation of public health interventions: a case study of physical activity programmes.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sarah; Jones, Andy

    2017-08-22

    Evidence-based approaches are requisite in evaluating public health programmes. Nowhere are they more necessary than physical activity interventions where evidence of effectiveness is often poor, especially within hard to reach groups. Our study reports on the quality of the evaluation of a government funded walking programme in five 'Walking Cities' in England. Cities were required to undertake a simple but robust evaluation using the Standard Evaluation Framework (SEF) for physical activity interventions to enable high quality, consistent evaluation. Our aim was not to evaluate the outcomes of this programme but to evaluate whether the evaluation process had been effective in generating new and reliable evidence on intervention design and what had worked in 'real world' circumstances. Funding applications and final reports produced by the funder and the five walking cities were obtained. These totalled 16 documents which were systematically analysed against the 52 criteria in the SEF. Data were cross checked between the documents at the bid and reporting stage with reference to the SEF guidance notes. Generally, the SEF reporting requirements were not followed well. The rationale for the interventions was badly described, the target population was not precisely specified, and neither was the method of recruitment. Demographics of individual participants, including socio-economic status were reported poorly, despite being a key criterion for funding. Our study of the evaluations demonstrated a missed opportunity to confidently establish what worked and what did not work in walking programmes with particular populations. This limited the potential for evidence synthesis and to highlight innovative practice warranting further investigation. Our findings suggest a mandate for evaluability assessment. Used at the planning stage this may have ensured the development of realistic objectives and crucially may have identified innovative practice to implement and evaluate

  16. Utility in a Fallible Tool: A Multi-Site Case Study of Automated Writing Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Douglas; Warschauer, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Automated writing evaluation (AWE) software uses artificial intelligence (AI) to score student essays and support revision. We studied how an AWE program called MY Access![R] was used in eight middle schools in Southern California over a three-year period. Although many teachers and students considered automated scoring unreliable, and teachers'…

  17. Learning Online: A Case Study Exploring Student Perceptions and Experience of a Course in Economic Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Batura, Neha; Hughes, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions and experiences of a group of students enrolled in an online course in Economic Evaluation. A mixed methods approach was adopted for the data collection, and thematic analysis was used to synthesize the data collected and highlight key findings. The participants identified several positive and negative perceived…

  18. The Caring Child: An Evaluative Case Study of the Cornwall Young Carers Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Allister H.; Astbury, Gaynor

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the Cornwall Young Carers project (jointly funded by social services and the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Health Action Zone), conducted during the period 2000-2002. A diverse range of methodological approaches were adopted (comparative national statistics, local pilot study, monthly and quarterly data…

  19. Re-Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Learning System: A Comparative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psaromiligkos, Yannis; Retalis, Symeon

    2003-01-01

    Much is unknown about the effectiveness of networked technology in education. Although a great deal of research exists dealing with the effectiveness of various types of web-based learning systems, the focal question of most evaluation studies does not concern the innovation of the delivery model itself and the factors that contribute to its…

  20. A Case Study of a Different Approach to Planning, Management and Evaluation (PME).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Hugh L.

    1980-01-01

    Many small, private colleges lack the resources to develop a planning, management and evaluation (PME) system and the result is planning becomes a neglected function. An in-depth study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the Detroit Institute of Technology is described. (MLW)

  1. The Caring Child: An Evaluative Case Study of the Cornwall Young Carers Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Allister H.; Astbury, Gaynor

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the Cornwall Young Carers project (jointly funded by social services and the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Health Action Zone), conducted during the period 2000-2002. A diverse range of methodological approaches were adopted (comparative national statistics, local pilot study, monthly and quarterly data…

  2. Evaluation Criteria for Competency-Based Syllabi: A Chilean Case Study Applying Mixed Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerez, Oscar; Valenzuela, Leslier; Pizarro, Veronica; Hasbun, Beatriz; Valenzuela, Gabriela; Orsini, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, higher education institutions worldwide have been moving from knowledge-based to competence-based curricula. One of the greatest challenges in this transition is the difficulty in changing the knowledge-oriented practices of teachers. This study evaluates the consistency between syllabus design and the requirements imposed by a…

  3. EVALUATION OF ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS IN 17 NEW JERSEY SCHOOLS - A CASE STUDIES REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 1988 through 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (EPA-RREL) and the New Jersey Department of Health's Environmental Health Service (NJDOH-EHS) conducted studies in 17 schools in New Jersey to evaluate their asbestos manageme...

  4. Methodological Considerations in Evaluating Long-Term Systems Change: A Case Study From Eastern Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koleros, Andrew; Jupp, Dee; Kirwan, Sean; Pradhan, Meeta S.; Pradhan, Pushkar K.; Seddon, David; Tumbahangfe, Ansu

    2016-01-01

    This article presents discussion and recommendations on approaches to retrospectively evaluating development interventions in the long term through a systems lens. It is based on experiences from the implementation of an 18-month study to investigate the impact of development interventions on economic and social change over a 40-year period in the…

  5. Evaluating the Sustainability of SPARK Physical Education: A Case Study of Translating Research into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowda, Marsha; Sallis, James F.; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Rosengard, Paul; Kohl, Harold W., III

    2005-01-01

    Dissemination and sustainability of evidence-based physical education programs (PE) has been studied rarely. The sustainability of a health-related PE program (SPARK) was independently evaluated in 111 elementary schools in 7 states. Surveys were mailed to schools that had received SPARK curriculum books, training, and follow-up (response rate =…

  6. Cases Not Proven: An Evaluation of Two Studies of Teacher Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates two British ethnographic studies by Bruce Carrington and Edward Wood, and by Cecile Y. Wright claiming to find evidence of teachers' racist attitudes and behaviors toward Afro-Caribbean students that contributed to student underachievement. Delineates methodological flaws. Argues that Wright's findings that the source of racism is in…

  7. Methodological Considerations in Evaluating Long-Term Systems Change: A Case Study From Eastern Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koleros, Andrew; Jupp, Dee; Kirwan, Sean; Pradhan, Meeta S.; Pradhan, Pushkar K.; Seddon, David; Tumbahangfe, Ansu

    2016-01-01

    This article presents discussion and recommendations on approaches to retrospectively evaluating development interventions in the long term through a systems lens. It is based on experiences from the implementation of an 18-month study to investigate the impact of development interventions on economic and social change over a 40-year period in the…

  8. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Therapy for Deaf Children: Four Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Rosalind; Ford, Katie; Thomas, Jane; Oyebade, Natalie; Bennett, Danita; Dodd, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated whether core vocabulary intervention (CVT) improved single word speech accuracy, consistency and intelligibility in four 9-11-year-old children with profound sensori-neural deafness fitted with cochlear implants and/or digital hearing aids. Their speech was characterized by inconsistent production of different error forms for…

  9. Transfer Credit Evaluations at New York State Colleges: Comparative Case Studies of Process Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Alexander Paul

    2012-01-01

    For the nearly one third of students who transfer from 1 college to another, transfer credit represents time and money. Unfortunately, many colleges provide degree-specific transfer credit evaluations only after students financially commit to attend the institution. The purpose of this study was to investigate, analyze, and compare early and late…

  10. Evaluation of Core Vocabulary Therapy for Deaf Children: Four Treatment Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Rosalind; Ford, Katie; Thomas, Jane; Oyebade, Natalie; Bennett, Danita; Dodd, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated whether core vocabulary intervention (CVT) improved single word speech accuracy, consistency and intelligibility in four 9-11-year-old children with profound sensori-neural deafness fitted with cochlear implants and/or digital hearing aids. Their speech was characterized by inconsistent production of different error forms for…

  11. Evaluation Criteria for Competency-Based Syllabi: A Chilean Case Study Applying Mixed Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerez, Oscar; Valenzuela, Leslier; Pizarro, Veronica; Hasbun, Beatriz; Valenzuela, Gabriela; Orsini, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, higher education institutions worldwide have been moving from knowledge-based to competence-based curricula. One of the greatest challenges in this transition is the difficulty in changing the knowledge-oriented practices of teachers. This study evaluates the consistency between syllabus design and the requirements imposed by a…

  12. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  13. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  14. Case study: A case-series evaluation of a behavioral sleep intervention for three children with autism and primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Erin C; Corkum, Penny; Smith, Isabel M

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a manualized multi-component behavioral sleep intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and primary insomnia. Three children (2 males and 1 female, aged 8-9 years) participated. The intervention consisted of a treatment handbook for parents; a distance treatment approach was used in which parents had weekly telephone contact with a therapist. The main behavioral strategies employed were Faded Bedtime with Response Cost and positive reinforcement. Within a case-series design, both subjective (parent-report questionnaires and sleep diaries) and objective (actigraphy) measures were used to record changes in children's sleep and daytime behavior. For all 3 children, mean sleep onset latency was reduced following the intervention. These improvements were generally maintained at follow-up 12 weeks later. The current study provides preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of a manualized behavioral sleep intervention program for improving insomnia in children with ASD.

  15. Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation of Rural Information Poverty in China - - Case Study of Hebei Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guizhen; Wang, Shuanjun; Li, Yaqing; Wang, Huijun

    Information poverty is a new form of poverty in information society. With the growing information-gap between urban and rural areas, information poverty is prevailing in the vast rural areas in China. It is largely restricted the new rural construction and the social harmonious development of villages and towns and must be resolved. The evaluation of rural information poverty is the premise to resolve it. In order to estimate the problem, index system of rural informatization evaluation of Hebei province was designed by means of Delphi. Then, according to the survey of farmers' information demand, AHP and FCE were used to estimate rural information poverty of Hebei province. The purpose of this study is to provide a new operational approach in evaluating or solving rural information poverty and constructing rural informatization in China.

  16. Evaluation of risk factors for arytenoid dislocation after endotracheal intubation: a retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Le; Wang, Wu-tao; Yu, Xue-rong; Zhang, Xiu-hua; Huang, Yu-guang

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the risk factors for postoperative arytenoid dislocation. From September 2003 to August 2013, the records of 16 patients with a history of postoperative arytenoid dislocation were reviewed. Patients matched in terms of date and type of procedures were chosen as the controls (n=16). Recorded data for all patients were demographics, smoking status, alcoholic status, preoperative physical status, airway evaluation, intubation procedures, preoperative laboratory test results, anesthetic consumption and intensive care unit stay. For arytenoid dislocation cases, we further analyzed the incidences of the left and right arytenoid dislocation, and the outcomes of surgical repair and conservative treatment. Categorical variables were presented as frequencies and percentages, and were compared using the chi-squared test. Continuous variables were expressed as means±SD and compared using the Student's unpaired t-test. To determine the predictors of arytenoid dislocation, a logistic regression model was used for multivariate analysis. Sixteen patients with postoperative arytenoid dislocation were enrolled, with a median age of 52 years. Most postoperative arytenoid dislocation patients (15/16, 93.75%) received surgical repair, except one patient who recovered after conservative treatment. None of the postoperative arytenoid dislocation patients were smokers. Red blood cell (P=0.044) and hemoglobin (P=0.031) levels were significantly lower among arytenoid dislocation cases compared with the controls. Non-smoking and anemic patients may be susceptible to postoperative arytenoid dislocation. However, neither of them was independent risk factor for postoperative arytenoid dislocation.

  17. Evaluation for coastal reclamation feasibility using a comprehensive hydrodynamic framework: A case study in Haizhou Bay.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lan; He, Jia; Ai, Junyong; Sun, Xiang; Bian, Fangyuan; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2015-11-15

    Coastal reclamation (CR) is a prevailing approach to solve the contradiction between the land shortage and the growing demand of living space for human beings. In general, environmental impact assessment (EIA) focuses on evaluating the feasibility of individual coastal reclamation project (CRP). However, few studies have investigated the cumulative effect of multiple CRPs on surrounding environment. In this study, an integrated framework based on coastal hydrodynamics was established, and then applied to the feasibility evaluation of multiple CRPs for future coastal management in Haizhou Bay, China. The results indicated that three out of five reclamation projects were feasible and the remaining two were forbidden in the study area, whereas EIA approves of all the CRPs. It provides a scientific reference for effective management of coastal reclamation and future environmental impact researches when new CRPs are proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of an artificial intelligence guided inverse planning system: clinical case study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Yin, Fang-Fang; Willett, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    An artificial intelligence (AI) guided method for parameter adjustment of inverse planning was implemented on a commercial inverse treatment planning system. For evaluation purpose, four typical clinical cases were tested and the results from both plans achieved by automated and manual methods were compared. The procedure of parameter adjustment mainly consists of three major loops. Each loop is in charge of modifying parameters of one category, which is carried out by a specially customized fuzzy inference system. A physician prescribed multiple constraints for a selected volume were adopted to account for the tradeoff between prescription dose to the PTV and dose-volume constraints for critical organs. The searching process for an optimal parameter combination began with the first constraint, and proceeds to the next until a plan with acceptable dose was achieved. The initial setup of the plan parameters was the same for each case and was adjusted independently by both manual and automated methods. After the parameters of one category were updated, the intensity maps of all fields were re-optimized and the plan dose was subsequently re-calculated. When final plan arrived, the dose statistics were calculated from both plans and compared. For planned target volume (PTV), the dose for 95% volume is up to 10% higher in plans using the automated method than those using the manual method. For critical organs, an average decrease of the plan dose was achieved. However, the automated method cannot improve the plan dose for some critical organs due to limitations of the inference rules currently employed. For normal tissue, there was no significant difference between plan doses achieved by either automated or manual method. With the application of AI-guided method, the basic parameter adjustment task can be accomplished automatically and a comparable plan dose was achieved in comparison with that achieved by the manual method. Future improvements to incorporate case

  19. Contingency Management for Patients with Cooccurring Disorders: Evaluation of a Case Study and Recommendations for Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Claire E.; Rash, Carla J.; Burke, Randy S.; Parker, Jefferson D.

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that contingency management (CM) has potential to improve a number of outcomes (e.g. substance use, treatment attendance, quality of life) among individuals with substance use and cooccurring disorders. However, multiple factors must be considered on a case-by-case basis in order to promote optimal treatment effects. The present study describes an individualized CM protocol for a US Veteran with substance dependence and cooccurring severe mental illness. CM targeted attendance at outpatient appointments and appropriate use of hospital resources. Effects of CM were assessed by comparing the 3-month baseline and CM periods. The CM intervention marginally reduced unnecessary hospital admissions, resulting in cost savings to the medical center of over $5,000 in three months for this individual. However, CM did not affect outpatient attendance. Several complications arose, highlighting challenges in using CM in populations with substance use and cooccurring disorders. Practical suggestions are offered for maximizing the effects of CM. PMID:22937413

  20. Case study for the identification and evaluation of rainfall-runoff models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleris, Vassilios; Langousis, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the modeling assumptions used in two rainfall-runoff models, namely the model ENNS (Nachtnebel et al., 1993) and the model MIKE SHE (http://www.dhigroup.com/), and study how those assumptions affect the effectiveness and quality of model fitting and runoff simulation. To avoid artificial effects caused by simplifications in the equations used in ENNS for the calculation of the outflow from two-outlet linear reservoirs, a new version of the ENNS code is developed that is fully compatible with the corresponding equations used in MIKE SHE. The two models are applied in a real-word case study, using 19-year long historical time-series of daily precipitation, temperature and runoff from Glafkos river basin. The latter is located near the city of Patras, in Peloponnese, Greece. Both models are manually calibrated using five years of the available data, whereas the remaining part of the data is used for model validation. The effectiveness of the models to simulate the runoff process is evaluated using (a) the relative model bias, (b) the criterion of Nash and Sutcliffe (N-S) and (c) the modified N-S-criterion calculated using the logarithmically or square root transformed observed and simulated flows. While both models describe the base- and inter-flow hydrological processes using the same conceptual model of linear reservoirs, they use different modeling assumptions to describe surface runoff and infiltration through the unsaturated zone. To that extent, the presented comparison sheds light to (a) the effectiveness of each modeling assumption to describe surface runoff and infiltration through the unsaturated zone, (b) the quality of model calibration, and (c) the optimality and robustness of the estimated parameters, common to the two models (thickness of the unsaturated zone, water content, field capacity, wilting point etc.). Differences in the simulated surface runoff, the infiltration and other runoff components, are not caused solely by the different

  1. Ergonomic evaluation of the environment: a case study in a control room of the hydroelectric sector.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Christianne Soares; Soares, Marcelo Marcio

    2012-01-01

    Representative systematic evaluation studies of the workspace and the extent to which that space is suitable for performing tasks have been developed by professionals engaged on finding evidence as to the importance of users and designers being joint participants in drawing up projects. In this context, this paper sets out to evaluate the environment of a control room in the hydroelectric sector, based on a multidisciplinary method which integrates ergonomics, architecture and environmental psychology so as to assess the influence of space on the user, and thus to identify the user's level of satisfaction with it. It was observed that some adaptation strategies of the space for activities were not implemented satisfactorily, resulting in the need for further studies on making workspaces suitable.

  2. Evaluating Pillar Industry’s Transformation Capability: A Case Study of Two Chinese Steel-Based Cities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhidong; Marinova, Dora; Guo, Xiumei; Gao, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Many steel-based cities in China were established between the 1950s and 1960s. After more than half a century of development and boom, these cities are starting to decline and industrial transformation is urgently needed. This paper focuses on evaluating the transformation capability of resource-based cities building an evaluation model. Using Text Mining and the Document Explorer technique as a way of extracting text features, the 200 most frequently used words are derived from 100 publications related to steel- and other resource-based cities. The Expert Evaluation Method (EEM) and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) techniques are then applied to select 53 indicators, determine their weights and establish an index system for evaluating the transformation capability of the pillar industry of China’s steel-based cities. Using real data and expert reviews, the improved Fuzzy Relation Matrix (FRM) method is applied to two case studies in China, namely Panzhihua and Daye, and the evaluation model is developed using Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation (FCE). The cities’ abilities to carry out industrial transformation are evaluated with concerns expressed for the case of Daye. The findings have policy implications for the potential and required industrial transformation in the two selected cities and other resource-based towns. PMID:26422266

  3. Evaluating the cost effectiveness of environmental projects: Case studies in aerospace and defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shunk, James F.

    1995-01-01

    Using the replacement technology of high pressure waterjet decoating systems as an example, a simple methodology is presented for developing a cost effectiveness model. The model uses a four-step process to formulate an economic justification designed for presentation to decision makers as an assessment of the value of the replacement technology over conventional methods. Three case studies from major U.S. and international airlines are used to illustrate the methodology and resulting model. Tax and depreciation impacts are also presented as potential additions to the model.

  4. Osha`s 1974 vinyl chloride standard. Retrospective evaluation of the rulemaking`s feasibility/impact estimates. Case study

    SciTech Connect

    Boroush, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    This report documents a case study of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration`s (OSHA) permanent health standard of 1974 for workplace exposures to vinyl chloride (monomer). OSHA`s assessment of hazard control options and estimates of compliance costs and other regulatory impacts prepared as part of the rationale for the rulemaking are reviewed and then compared and contrasted with the actual post-promulgation outcomes as affected industries adjusted to the new compliance requirements. This case study has been prepared as part of a larger Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) evaluation of the control technology and regulatory impact analyses that OSHA prepares to support its rulemakings. Congress requested in May 1992 that OTA examine OSHA`s procedures and methods in these regards. The case reported here is one of eight OSHA health and safety standards that have been similarly studied on a pre- and post-promulgation basis.

  5. Osha`s 1984 ethylene oxide standard. Retrospective evaluation of the rulemaking`s feasibility/impact estimates. Case study

    SciTech Connect

    Boroush, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents a case study of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration`s (OSHA) permanent health standard of 1984 for workplace exposures to ethylene oxide. OSHA`s assessment of hazard control options and estimates of compliance costs and other regulatory impacts prepared as part of the rationale for the rulemaking are reviewed and then compared and contrasted with the actual post-promulgation outcomes as the hospital sector adjusted to the new compliance requirements. This case study has been prepared as part of a larger Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) evaluation of the control technology and regulatory impact analyses that OSHA prepares to support its rulemakings. Congress requested in May 1992 that OTA examine OSHA`s procedures and methods in these regards. The case reported here is one of eight OSHA health and safety standards that have been similarly studied on a pre- and post-promulgation basis.

  6. Evaluation of a flowchart-based EHR query system: a case study of RetroGuide

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Vojtech; Narus, Scott P.; Rocha, Roberto A.

    2010-01-01

    Provision of query systems which are intuitive for non-experts has been recognized as an important informatics challenge. We developed a prototype of a flowchart-based analytical framework called RetroGuide that enables non-experts to formulate query tasks using a step-based, patient-centered paradigm inspired by workflow technology. We present results of the evaluation of RetroGuide in comparison to Structured Query Language (SQL) in laboratory settings using a mixed method design. We asked 18 human subjects with limited database experience to solve query tasks in RetroGuide and SQL, and quantitatively compared their test scores. A follow-up questionnaire was designed to compare both technologies qualitatively and investigate RetroGuide technology acceptance. The quantitative comparison of test scores showed that the study subjects achieved significantly higher scores using the RetroGuide technology. Qualitative study results indicated that 94% of subjects preferred RetroGuide to SQL because RetroGuide was easier to learn, it better supported temporal tasks, and it seemed to be a more logical modeling paradigm. Additional qualitative evaluation results, based on a technology acceptance model, suggested that a fully developed RetroGuide-like technology would be well accepted by users. Our study is an example of a structure validation study of a prototype query system, results of which provided significant guidance in further development of a novel query paradigm for EHR data. We discuss the strengths and weakness of our study design and results, and their implication for future evaluations of query systems in general. PMID:19560553

  7. Evaluation of a flowchart-based EHR query system: a case study of RetroGuide.

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Narus, Scott P; Rocha, Roberto A

    2010-02-01

    Provision of query systems which are intuitive for non-experts has been recognized as an important informatics challenge. We developed a prototype of a flowchart-based analytical framework called RetroGuide that enables non-experts to formulate query tasks using a step-based, patient-centered paradigm inspired by workflow technology. We present results of the evaluation of RetroGuide in comparison to Structured Query Language (SQL) in laboratory settings using a mixed method design. We asked 18 human subjects with limited database experience to solve query tasks in RetroGuide and SQL, and quantitatively compared their test scores. A follow-up questionnaire was designed to compare both technologies qualitatively and investigate RetroGuide technology acceptance. The quantitative comparison of test scores showed that the study subjects achieved significantly higher scores using the RetroGuide technology. Qualitative study results indicated that 94% of subjects preferred RetroGuide to SQL because RetroGuide was easier to learn, it better supported temporal tasks, and it seemed to be a more logical modeling paradigm. Additional qualitative evaluation results, based on a technology acceptance model, suggested that a fully developed RetroGuide-like technology would be well accepted by users. Our study is an example of a structure validation study of a prototype query system, results of which provided significant guidance in further development of a novel query paradigm for EHR data. We discuss the strengths and weakness of our study design and results, and their implication for future evaluations of query systems in general.

  8. Contactless Abdominal Fat Reduction With Selective RF™ Evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Case Study.

    PubMed

    Downie, Jeanine; Kaspar, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive body shaping methods seem to be an ascending part of the aesthetics market. As a result, the pressure to develop reliable methods for the collection and presentation of their results has also increased. The most used techniques currently include ultrasound measurements of fat thickness in the treated area, caliper measurements, bioimpedance-based scale measurements or circumferential tape measurements. Although these are the most used techniques, almost all of them have some limitations in reproducibility and/or accuracy. This study shows Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as the new method for the presentation of results in the body shaping industry. Six subjects were treated by a contactless selective radiofrequency device (BTL Vanquish ME, BTL Industries Inc., Boston, MA). The MRI fat thickness was measured at the baseline and at 4-weeks following the treatment. In addition to MRI images and measurements, digital photographs and anthropometric evaluations such as weight, abdominal circumference, and caliper fat thickness measurements were recorded. Abdominal fat thickness measurements from the MRI were performed from the same slices determined by the same tissue artefacts. The MRI fat thickness difference between the baseline measurement and follow up visit showed an average reduction of 5.36 mm as calculated from the data of 5 subjects. One subject dropped out of study due to non-study related issues. The results were statistically significant based on the Student's T-test evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging abdominal fat thickness measurements seems to be the best method for the evaluation of fat thickness reduction after non-invasive body shaping treatments. In this study, this method shows average fat thickness reduction of 5.36 mm while the weight of the subjects didn't change significantly. A large spot size measuring 1317 cm(2) (204 square inches) covers the abdomen flank to flank. The average thickness of 5.36 mm of the fat layer reduced

  9. A case study evaluating the use of clozapine in depression with psychotic features

    PubMed Central

    Jeyapaul, Premkumar; Vieweg, Ray

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to use an evidence based medicine approach to work through an unusual way of treating a common problem. We looked at an example of an in-patient with severe refractory psychotic depression who had been resistant to treatment with a combination of antidepressant, antipsychotics, mood stabiliser, and concomitant ECT therapy. We then undertook a literature search for the use of clozapine in a patient with severe refractory depression. Although the resulting evidence was low level and thin, we felt on balance that a trial of clozapine was justified. We used a BPRS inventory to monitor her mood prior to commencing clozapine. Her mood and functional abilities were monitored as her clozapine was titrated upwards. Our patient showed a significant improvement in mood and functional abilities and a reduction in her BPRS score during this period. Her symptoms improved to the point where she was successfully discharged home on a combination of clozapine and an antidepressant. The improvement was sustained for a further two years. We thought this was an important case to highlight the limited evidence in using this successful form of treatment for a common clinical problem and that further research in this area was needed. PMID:17134508

  10. Statistical Evaluation of Turkey Earthquake Cataloque: A Case study (1900-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafat, Dogan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, Turkey earthquake catalog of the events within the time period of 1900-2015 prepared by Boǧaziçi University Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute is analyzed. The catalog consists of earthquakes occurred in Turkey and surrounding area (32o-45oN/23o-48oE). The current earthquake catalog data has been checked in two aspects; the time dependent variation and compliance for different regions. Specifically the data set prior to 1976 was found deficient. In total, 7 regions were evaluated according to the tectonic specifications and data set. In this study for every region original data were used without any change; b- values, a- values, Magnitude of completeness (Mc) were calculated. For the calculation of b- values focal depth was selected as h= 0-50 km. One of the important complications for the seismic catalogs is discriminating real (natural) seismic events from artificial (unnatural) seismic events. Therefore within the original current catalog events especially artificial quarry blasts and mine blasts have been separated by declustering and dequarry methods. Declustering process eliminates induced earthquakes especially occurred in thermal regions, large water basins, mine regions from the original catalogs. Current moment tensor catalog prepared by Kalafat, 2015 the faulting type map of the region was prepared. As a result, for each region it is examined if there is a relation between fault type and b- values. In this study, the hypothesis of the relation between previously evaluated and currently ongoing extensional, compression, strike-slip fault regimes in Turkey and b- values are tested one more time. This study was supported by the Department of Science Fellowship and Grant programs (2014-2219) of TUBITAK (The Scientific and Technological Research Councilof Turkey). It also encourages the conduct of the study and support the constructive contributionthat Prof.Dr. Nafi TOKSÖZ to offer my eternal gratitude.

  11. A case-control study evaluating relative risk factors for decompression sickness: a research report.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoko; Yagishita, Kazuyosi; Togawa, Seiichiro; Okazaki, Fumihiro; Shibayama, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Mano, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Factors contributing to the pathogenesis of decompression sickness (DCS) in divers have been described in many studies. However, relative importance of these factors has not been reported. In this case-control study, we compared the diving profiles of divers experiencing DCS with those of a control group. The DCS group comprised 35 recreational scuba divers who were diagnosed by physicians as having DCS. The control group consisted of 324 apparently healthy recreational divers. All divers conducted their dives from 2009 to 2011. The questionnaire consisted of 33 items about an individual's diving profile, physical condition and activities before, during and just after the dive. To simplify dive parameters, the dive site was limited to Izu Osezaki. Odds ratios and multiple logistic regression were used for the analysis. Odds ratios revealed several items as dive and health factors associated with DCS. The major items were as follows: shortness of breath after heavy exercise during the dive (OR = 12.12), dehydration (OR = 10.63), and maximum dive depth > 30 msw (OR = 7.18). Results of logistic regression were similar to those by odds ratio analysis. We assessed the relative weights of the surveyed dive and health factors associated with DCS. Because results of several factors conflict with previous studies, future studies are needed.

  12. [The influence of intellectual capital in performance evaluation: a case-study in the hospital sector].

    PubMed

    Bonacim, Carlos Alberto Grespan; Araújo, Adriana Maria Procópio de

    2010-06-01

    This paper contributes to public institutions with the adaptation of a performance evaluation tool based on private companies. The objective is to demonstrate how the impact of an educational activity might be measured in the economic value added for the society of a public university hospital. The paper was divided in four parts, despite the introductory and methodological aspects and the final remarks. First, the hospital sector is explained, specifically in the context of the public university hospitals. Then, the definitions, the nature and measure of the intellectual capital are presented, followed by the disclosure of the main economic performance evaluation models. Finally, an adapted model is presented, under the approach of the value based management, considering adjustments of the return and the respective investment measures, showing the impacts of the intellectual capital management and the education activity on the economic result of those institutions. The study was developed based on a methodology supported by a bibliographical research, using a comparative method procedure in the descriptive modality. At last, it is highlighted the importance of accountability for the society regarding the use of public resources and how this study can help in this way.

  13. SARS and hospital priority setting: a qualitative case study and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jennifer AH; Hyland, Sylvia; DePellegrin, Tania; Upshur, Ross EG; Bernstein, Mark; Martin, Douglas K

    2004-01-01

    Background Priority setting is one of the most difficult issues facing hospitals because of funding restrictions and changing patient need. A deadly communicable disease outbreak, such as the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Toronto in 2003, amplifies the difficulties of hospital priority setting. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting in a hospital in response to SARS using the ethical framework 'accountability for reasonableness'. Methods This study was conducted at a large tertiary hospital in Toronto, Canada. There were two data sources: 1) over 200 key documents (e.g. emails, bulletins), and 2) 35 interviews with key informants. Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation. Results Participants described the types of priority setting decisions, the decision making process and the reasoning used. Although the hospital leadership made an effort to meet the conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness', they acknowledged that the decision making was not ideal. We described good practices and opportunities for improvement. Conclusions 'Accountability for reasonableness' is a framework that can be used to guide fair priority setting in health care organizations, such as hospitals. In the midst of a crisis such as SARS where guidance is incomplete, consequences uncertain, and information constantly changing, where hour-by-hour decisions involve life and death, fairness is more important rather than less. PMID:15606924

  14. Evaluation of different agronomic managements on rice mesofauna: a case study in Piedmont (North Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Silvia; d'Errico, Giada; Gagnarli, Elena; Barzanti, Gian Paolo; Cito, Annarita; Papini, Rossella; Simoni, Sauro; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2014-05-01

    Rice is the most important cereal crop in the developing world and, in Europe, Italy is leader in rice production. The intensive cultivation of rice leads to continuous inputs chemicals as fertilizers, weeding and pesticides. The intensification of sustainable rice production by minimizing the impact on the environment of cultivation is a main issue . In this context this study, supported by the Italian National Project POLORISO (MIPAAF), aims to afford preliminary indications about the evaluation of ecological impact by different managements on soil mesofauna biodiversity. Biomonitoring of soil mesofauna, in particular nematodes and microarthropods, allows to determine the effects of crop management on the communities; the lack and/or reduction of these organisms can allow inference on the soil quality. This preliminary study aims at evaluate the different influence of conventional, integrated and biological managements on mesofauna communities. The samplings were conducted in Summer and Autumn 2013 near Vercelli (North Italy) in three study sites with similar pedologic characteristics but different in control strategies (conventional, organic farming, Integrated Pest Management (IPM)). The extraction of nematodes and microarthropods was performed by Bermann method and the Berlese-Tullgren selector, respectively. All specimens were counted and determined up to the order level. The biological soil quality was evaluated by Maturity Index (MI) for nematodes, BSQar and the soil Biological Classes (sBC)(range I-VII) for microarthropods. Regarding nematodes, Rhabditidae, Dorylamidae, Mononchidae, Tylenchidae and Heteroderidae were the most represented families. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) evidenced that the trophic group of plant parasites was favored in organic farming, while groups of omnivores and predators were abundant in the other managements. The lowest nematodes' abundance was found in submerged rice soil with dominance of omnivores and plant

  15. Evaluating the use of citizens' juries in food policy: a case study of food regulation.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Julie; House, Elizabeth; Coveney, John; Meyer, Samantha; Ankeny, Rachel; Ward, Paul; Calnan, Michael

    2013-06-19

    Deliberative engagement techniques and citizens' juries are touted as means of incorporating the public into policy decision-making, managing community expectations and increasing commitment to public health policy. This paper reports a study to examine the feasibility of citizens' juries as a means of collecting data to inform public health policy related to food regulation through evaluation of the conduct of a citizens' jury. A citizens' jury was conducted with a representative sample of 17 South Australians to explore their willingness to consider the proposition that food and drink advertising and/or sponsorship should be banned at children's sporting events. The results showed that, in relation to the central proposition and evaluation data from the jury, opinion on the proposition remained comparatively stable. Most jurors indicated that they thought that food and drink sponsorship and/or advertising at children's sporting events would have little or no effect on altering children's diet and eating habits, with the proportion increasing during the jury process. Jurors were given evaluation sheets about the content of the jury and the process of the citizens' jury to complete at the end of the session. The evaluation of the citizens' jury process revealed positive perceptions. The majority of jurors agreed that their knowledge of the issues of food and drink sponsorship in children's sport had increased as a result of participation in the citizens' jury. The majority also viewed the decision-making process as fair and felt that their views were listened to. One important response in the evaluation was that all jurors indicated that, if given the opportunity, they would participate in another citizens' jury. The findings suggest that the citizens' jury increased participant knowledge of the issue and facilitated reflective discussion of the proposition. Citizens' juries are an effective means of gaining insight into public views of policy and the circumstances

  16. Evaluating New Skill Sets for Performance Improvement: Human Factors as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Day, T Eugene; Henrickson Parker, Sarah; Lederman, Virginia; McKetta, Debbie; Spraycar, Anna

    2017-04-07

    New skill sets and improvement disciplines are constantly arising across the vast industrial and academic landscape of modern economies. Prescient hospital administrators are routinely searching for new and innovative ways to improve care, care delivery, safety, quality, and access. But, it can be challenging to identify those emerging skill sets, which will likely have lasting effect and will provide strong return on investment, from passing fads with little capacity to move performance benchmarks for a hospital. Here, we present a rubric for investigating new skill sets, using The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's investigation into human factors engineering as a case study, and determining whether they can support hospital operations and improvements while providing sufficient return to justify the expense and challenge of incorporating ideas and methods into a quality and performance improvement environment.

  17. Case study: a novel biomechanical approach for evaluating extended body armor systems.

    PubMed

    Selinger, Jessica C; Gooyers, Chad E; Stevenson, Joan M; Costigan, Patrick A; Chafe, Gabrielle S

    2010-11-01

    To combat the devastating effects of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), body armor that provides extended coverage has been developed. However, this extended coverage increases the armor's weight and may restrict movement. Throughout this case study, a novel technique to assess several armor systems was investigated. Four soldiers performed shoulder and trunk movements while wearing each of the six different armor inserts. Electromyography (EMG) was used to quantify muscular activity and inertial motion sensors were used to determine joint range of motion (ROM). Outcome measures included maximum ROM, integrated EMG, and the soldiers' subjective rankings. For the shoulder tasks, objective ROM and EMG measures were related to each other as well as to subjective rankings and armor material properties. Conversely, little agreement was found between measures for the trunk tasks. Results of this preliminary investigation indicate that combining shoulder ROM and EMG measures has the potential to provide an objective assessment of body armor systems.

  18. Evaluating Nurses Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems: A Case Study of a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating hospital information systems (HIS) acceptance factors among nurses, in order to provide suggestions for successful HIS implementation. The study used mainly quantitative survey methods to collect data directly from nurses through a questionnaire. The availability of computers in the hospital was one of the most influential factors, with a special emphasis on the unavailability of laptop computers and computers on wheels to facilitate immediate data entry and retrieval when nurses are at the point of care. Nurses believed that HIS might frequently slow down the process of care delivery and increase the time spent by patients inside the hospital especially during slow performance and responsiveness phases. Recommendations were classified into three main areas; improving system performance and availability of computers in the hospital, increasing organizational support in the form of providing training and protected time for nurses' to learn and enhancing users' feedback by listening to their complaints and considering their suggestions.

  19. Evaluating cumulative risk assessment for environmental justice: a community case study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary A

    2002-01-01

    A key feature of cumulative risk assessment (CRA) is the ability to estimate differential health risks from environmental exposures within populations. Identifying populations at increased risk from environmental exposures is the first step toward mitigating such risks as required by the fair treatment mandate of environmental justice. CRA methods remain under development except for a limited application in pesticide regulations. The goals of this research were to advance CRA methods and to test their application in a community case study. We compared cumulative risk and health assessments for South and Southwest Philadelphia communities. The analysis found positive correlations between cumulative risk and mortality measurements for total mortality in Whites and non-Whites when we conducted the risk assessment using a multi-end point toxicological database developed for this project. Cumulative risk scores correlated positively with cause-specific mortality in non-Whites. Statistically significant increases in total and respiratory mortality rates were associated with incremental increases in the hazard ratio cumulative risk scores, with ranges of 2-6% for total and 8-23% for respiratory. Regression analyses controlled for percent non-White population and per capita income, indicating that risk scores represent an environmental effect on health independent of race and income. This case study demonstrated the successful application of CRA at the community level. CRA adds a health dimension to pollutant concentrations to produce a more comprehensive understanding of environmental inequities that can inform decision making. CRA is a viable tool to identify high-risk areas and to guide surveillance, research, or interventions. PMID:11929729

  20. Evaluation of multivariate visualizations: a case study of refinements and user experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, Mark A.; Decker, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Multivariate visualization (MVV) aims to provide insight into complex data sets with many variables. The analyst's goal may be to understand how one variable interacts with another, to identify potential correlations between variables, or to understand patterns of a variable's behavior over the domain. Summary statistics and spatially abstracted plots of statistical measures or analyses are unlikely to yield insights into spatial patterns. Thus we focus our efforts on MVVs, which we hope will express key properties of the data within the original data domain. Further narrowing the problem space, we consider how these techniques may be applied to continuous data variables. One difficulty of MVVs is that the number of perceptual channels may be exceeded. We embarked on a series of evaluations of MVVs in an effort to understand the limitations of attributes that are used in MVVs. In a follow-up study to previously published results, we attempted to use our past results to inform refinements to the design of the MVVs and the study itself. Some changes improved performance, whereas others degraded performance. We report results from the follow-up study and a comparison of data collected from subjects who participated in both studies. On the positive end, we saw improved performance with Attribute Blocks, a MVV newly introduced to our on-going evaluation, relative to Dimensional Stacking, a technique we were examining previously. On the other hand, our refinement to Data-driven Spots resulted in greater errors on the task. Users' previous exposure to the MVVs enabled them to complete the task significantly faster (but not more accurately). Previous exposure also yielded lower ratings of subjective workload. We discuss these intuitive and counter-intuitive results and the implications for MVV design.

  1. Use of genomic data in risk assessment case study: II. Evaluation of the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data set

    SciTech Connect

    Euling, Susan Y.; White, Lori D.; Kim, Andrea S.; Sen, Banalata; Wilson, Vickie S.; Keshava, Channa; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Hester, Susan; Ovacik, Meric A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Gaido, Kevin W.

    2013-09-15

    An evaluation of the toxicogenomic data set for dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and male reproductive developmental effects was performed as part of a larger case study to test an approach for incorporating genomic data in risk assessment. The DBP toxicogenomic data set is composed of nine in vivo studies from the published literature that exposed rats to DBP during gestation and evaluated gene expression changes in testes or Wolffian ducts of male fetuses. The exercise focused on qualitative evaluation, based on a lack of available dose–response data, of the DBP toxicogenomic data set to postulate modes and mechanisms of action for the male reproductive developmental outcomes, which occur in the lower dose range. A weight-of-evidence evaluation was performed on the eight DBP toxicogenomic studies of the rat testis at the gene and pathway levels. The results showed relatively strong evidence of DBP-induced downregulation of genes in the steroidogenesis pathway and lipid/sterol/cholesterol transport pathway as well as effects on immediate early gene/growth/differentiation, transcription, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling and apoptosis pathways in the testis. Since two established modes of action (MOAs), reduced fetal testicular testosterone production and Insl3 gene expression, explain some but not all of the testis effects observed in rats after in utero DBP exposure, other MOAs are likely to be operative. A reanalysis of one DBP microarray study identified additional pathways within cell signaling, metabolism, hormone, disease, and cell adhesion biological processes. These putative new pathways may be associated with DBP effects on the testes that are currently unexplained. This case study on DBP identified data gaps and research needs for the use of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment. Furthermore, this study demonstrated an approach for evaluating toxicogenomic data in human health risk assessment that could be applied to future chemicals

  2. A quality improvement evaluation case study: impact on public health outcomes and agency culture.

    PubMed

    Livingood, William C; Sabbagh, Radwan; Spitzfaden, Steve; Hicks, Angela; Wells, Lucy; Puigdomenech, Suzannah; Kramer, Dale F; Butterfield, Ryan; Riley, William; Wood, David L

    2013-05-01

    Quality improvement (QI) is increasingly recognized as an important strategy to improve healthcare services and health outcomes, including reducing health disparities. However, there is a paucity of evidence documenting the value of QI to public health agencies and services. The purpose of this project was to support and assess the impact on the outcomes and organizational culture of a QI project to increase immunization rates among children aged 2 years (4:3:1:3:3:1 series) within a large public health agency with a major pediatric health mission. The intervention consisted of the use of a model-for-improvement approach to QI for the delivery of immunization services in public health clinics, utilizing plan-do-study-act cycles and multiple QI techniques. A mixed-method (qualitative and quantitative) model of evaluation was used to collect and analyze data from June 2009 to July 2011 to support both summative and developmental evaluation. The Florida Immunization Registry (Florida SHOTS [State Health Online Tracking System]) was used to monitor and analyze changes in immunization rates from January 2009 to July 2012. An interrupted time-series application of covariance was used to assess significance of the change in immunization rates, and paired comparison using parametric and nonparametric statistics were used to assess significance of pre- and post-QI culture items. Up-to-date immunization rates increased from 75% to more than 90% for individual primary care clinics and the overall county health department. In addition, QI stakeholder scores on ten key items related to organizational culture increased from pre- to post-QI intervention. Statistical analysis confirmed significance of the changes. The application of QI combined with a summative and developmental evaluation supported refinement of the QI approach and documented the potential for QI to improve population health outcomes and improve public health agency culture. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of

  3. Method of evaluating the impact of ERP implementation critical success factors - a case study in oil and gas industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajic, Gordana; Stankovski, Stevan; Ostojic, Gordana; Tesic, Zdravko; Miladinovic, Ljubomir

    2014-01-01

    The so far implemented enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems have in many cases failed to meet the requirements regarding the business process control, decrease of business costs and increase of company profit margin. Therefore, there is a real need for an evaluation of the influence of ERP on the company's performance indicators. Proposed in this article is an advanced model for the evaluation of the success of ERP implementation on organisational and operational performance indicators in oil-gas companies. The recommended method establishes a correlation between a process-based method, a scorecard model and ERP critical success factors. The method was verified and tested on two case studies in oil-gas companies using the following procedure: the model was developed, tested and implemented in a pilot gas-oil company, while the results were implemented and verified in another gas-oil company.

  4. Evaluation of pituitary function in cases with the diagnosis of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury: Cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Aylanç, Hakan; Tütüncüler, Filiz; Süt, Necdet

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was to determine whether pituitary dysfunction occurs after head trauma in children or not and which axis is affected more; to define the association of pituitary dysfunction with the severity of head trauma and duration time after the diagnosis of head trauma. Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 children who were diagnosed with head trauma were evaluated regarding pituitary dysfunction. In all cases, after 12 h fasting, serum cortisol, fT3, fT4, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, insulin-like growth factor-1, serum sodium, urine density, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, in female cases E2, in male cases, TT levels were determined. Results: Mean age of children was 9.5 ± 3.1 years, 14 children (58.3%) had mild, 9 children (37.5%) had moderate, and 1 children (4.2%) had severe head trauma according to the Glasgow coma scale. Mean duration time after head trauma was 29.4 ± 9.8 months. In all cases, no pathologic condition was determined in the pituitary hormonal axis. In one children (4.2%), low basal cortisol level was found. There were no children with hormonal deficiency in this study. Conclusion: Although pituitary dysfunction after head trauma may develop in the early period, some may present in the late period; therefore, all cases should be followed up at outpatient clinics for a longer period. PMID:27695233

  5. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Natura 2000 Network for Wolf Conservation: A Case-Study in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votsi, Nefta-Eleftheria P.; Zomeni, Maria S.; Pantis, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    The wolf ( Canis lupus) is used as a case study to rate Natura 2000 sites in Greece based on preferred wolf habitat characteristics and test whether the network is suitable for their conservation. Road density, agricultural area, site area, connectivity, food availability (i.e., presence of natural prey), and elevation in 237 sites are combined in a logistic regression model. The occurrence of the wolf's natural prey was the most prevalent factor determining wolf presence, followed by agricultural cover. Considering the current status of these features at N2K site level, most sites currently hosting wolves (85.7 %) have good or excellent prospects for the long-term presence of the wolf. On the contrary, 11 sites which now have wolves are predicted to be ineffective in keeping them in the future due to the absence of wild ungulates and their high agricultural coverage. Four sites with no wolf presence currently have excellent prospects to host wolves in the future. Roadless sites are a priority for protection and retaining their current condition is strongly suggested. The proposed approach aims to detect gaps in protection for the wolf and identify priority sites in need of mitigation actions. It can also assist the assessment of conservation policies in Greece and elsewhere toward accomplishing set goals in protected areas. By focusing on wolf protection, we hope to increase agencies' attention to deal with conservation effectiveness, especially in cases like Greece, where a number of sites are insufficiently known and protected and management measures are not properly implemented.

  6. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Natura 2000 Network for Wolf Conservation: A Case-Study in Greece.

    PubMed

    Votsi, Nefta-Eleftheria P; Zomeni, Maria S; Pantis, J D

    2016-02-01

    The wolf (Canis lupus) is used as a case study to rate Natura 2000 sites in Greece based on preferred wolf habitat characteristics and test whether the network is suitable for their conservation. Road density, agricultural area, site area, connectivity, food availability (i.e., presence of natural prey), and elevation in 237 sites are combined in a logistic regression model. The occurrence of the wolf's natural prey was the most prevalent factor determining wolf presence, followed by agricultural cover. Considering the current status of these features at N2K site level, most sites currently hosting wolves (85.7%) have good or excellent prospects for the long-term presence of the wolf. On the contrary, 11 sites which now have wolves are predicted to be ineffective in keeping them in the future due to the absence of wild ungulates and their high agricultural coverage. Four sites with no wolf presence currently have excellent prospects to host wolves in the future. Roadless sites are a priority for protection and retaining their current condition is strongly suggested. The proposed approach aims to detect gaps in protection for the wolf and identify priority sites in need of mitigation actions. It can also assist the assessment of conservation policies in Greece and elsewhere toward accomplishing set goals in protected areas. By focusing on wolf protection, we hope to increase agencies' attention to deal with conservation effectiveness, especially in cases like Greece, where a number of sites are insufficiently known and protected and management measures are not properly implemented.

  7. Evaluation of a new semiautomated external defibrillator technology: a live cases video recording study.

    PubMed

    Maes, Frédéric; Marchandise, Sébastien; Boileau, Laurianne; Le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Scavée, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    To determine the effect of a new automated external defibrillator (AED) system connected by General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) to an external call centre in assisting novices in a sudden cardiac arrest situation. Prospective, interventional study. Layperson volunteers were first asked to complete a survey about their knowledge and ability to give cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use an AED. A simulated cardiac arrest scenario using a CPR manikin was then presented to volunteers. A telephone and semi-AED were available in the same room. The AED was linked to a call centre, which provided real-time information to 'bystanders' and emergency services via GPRS/GPS technology. The scene was videotaped to avoid any interaction with examiners. A standardised check list was used to record correct actions. 85 volunteers completed questionnaires and were recorded. Mean age was 44±16, and 49% were male; 38 (45%) had prior CPR training or felt comfortable intervening in a sudden cardiac arrest victim; 40% felt they could deliver a shock using an AED. During the scenarios, 56 (66%) of the participants used the AED and 53 (62%) successfully delivered an electrical shock. Mean time to defibrillation was 2 min 29 s. Only 24 (28%) participants dialled the correct emergency response number (112); the live-assisted GPRS AED allowed alerted emergency services in 38 other cases. CPR was initiated in 63 (74%) cases, 26 (31%) times without prompting and 37 (44%) times after prompting by the AED. Although knowledge of the general population appears to be inadequate with regard to AED locations and recognition, live-assisted devices with GPS-location may improve emergency care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. QALY weights for neurosensory impairments in pediatric economic evaluations: case studies and a critique.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Scott D; Prosser, Lisa A; Asakawa, Keiko; Feeny, David

    2010-06-01

    The use of utility weights for the calculation of quality-adjusted life years is particularly problematic for pediatric health states. This article reviews variability in utility weights for intellectual disability and permanent hearing loss in economic evaluations of newborn screening and childhood immunizations. Utility weights for severe intellectual disability ranged from 0.06 to 0.74. Most studies either did not vary these utility weights in sensitivity analyses or assumed low variability; consequently, the robustness of cost-effectiveness estimates was not fully assessed. Two recently published catalogs of utility weights for pediatric health states also show wide divergences in estimates. More work is needed to establish measures of health utilities for childhood health states in order to allow for comparable assessments of pediatric interventions.

  9. Fraser syndrome: a clinical study of 59 cases and evaluation of diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    van Haelst, Mieke M; Scambler, Peter J; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2007-12-15

    Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive congenital malformation syndrome characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and urogenital defects. We studied the clinical features in 59 affected individuals from 40 families (25 consanguineous), and compared our findings to data from previous reviews. We found a higher frequency of abnormalities of the skull, larynx, umbilicus, urinary tract, and anus in our series of patients, and mental retardation and cleft lip with or without cleft palate were observed less frequently than previously reported. Clinical features in probands and sibs were remarkably similar. As can be expected prenatally diagnosed patients had more manifestations that gave rise to a pathological amount of amniotic fluid. Otherwise patients diagnosed before and after birth had similar frequencies of symptoms. Based on the present results we suggest an adaptation of diagnostic criteria for FS, including adding airway tract and urinary tract anomalies as major criteria. The specificity of the proposed diagnostic criteria was evaluated using the London Medical Database as a search tool.

  10. Evaluation of system quality of hospital information system: a case study on nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Kimiafar, Khalil; Sarbaz, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed at measuring the nurses' experiences on the system quality of the hospital information system (HIS). This applied, cross-sectional study was conducted in a case hospital in Iran. We developed a three part questionnaire including demographic information, nurses' experiences and satisfaction about different factors of system quality of a HIS. We asked the participants to rate their responses using five-point Likert scale. A total of 120 questionnaires were sent out for all 120 eligible nurses, with 80 completed copies returned. The data was finally analyzed using descriptive statistics. Regarding the interface quality, the most of nurses (37.5%) stated that data entry through input devices was somewhat quick. We found that HIS developers should pay more attention to the technical aspects of HIS and their correspondence with the nurses' needs, especially in terms of documentation, online assistance, response time, system reliability and flexibility, integration with current and new duties, as well as ability of the system to prevent data lose and handle bugs.

  11. Evaluation of Critical Infrastructure in the Event of Earthquake: A Case Study of Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    prasad, Suraj

    2016-04-01

    With changing paradigms of disaster preparedness, the safety and security of critical infrastructure in the event of a geo-hazard has become increasingly important. In a developing and densely populated country like India, which is vulnerable to many different geo-hazards, a lack of clear policy directive regarding safety of such infrastructure could be especially damaging both in terms of life and property. The problem is most acute in India's mega cities, where inefficient infrastructure means that facilities like transportation, communication, and electricity generation are obsolete and vulnerable to sudden disruptions. The present study takes the case of the National Capital Territory of Delhi and attempts to examine the critical infrastructures of the city in the event of an earthquake. Delhi lies in a very active seismic zone with various faults in and around the city. The Government of India has classified Delhi in Zone 4 (High Risk Zone) based on past and expected seismic activities in the Indo-Gangetic Plains. With a population of over 20 Million in the Urban Agglomeration of Delhi, any major earthquake in an already overstretched infrastructure could have a devastating impact. This study will test the critical infrastructures of the city in terms of their disaster preparedness and suggest ways and measures to increase the same. Keywords: Geo-hazards, Critical Infrastructure, vulnerable, Earthquakes, Delhi

  12. A unified method for evaluating real-time computer controllers: A case study. [aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Krishna, C. M.; Lee, Y. H.

    1982-01-01

    A real time control system consists of a synergistic pair, that is, a controlled process and a controller computer. Performance measures for real time controller computers are defined on the basis of the nature of this synergistic pair. A case study of a typical critical controlled process is presented in the context of new performance measures that express the performance of both controlled processes and real time controllers (taken as a unit) on the basis of a single variable: controller response time. Controller response time is a function of current system state, system failure rate, electrical and/or magnetic interference, etc., and is therefore a random variable. Control overhead is expressed as a monotonically nondecreasing function of the response time and the system suffers catastrophic failure, or dynamic failure, if the response time for a control task exceeds the corresponding system hard deadline, if any. A rigorous probabilistic approach is used to estimate the performance measures. The controlled process chosen for study is an aircraft in the final stages of descent, just prior to landing. First, the performance measures for the controller are presented. Secondly, control algorithms for solving the landing problem are discussed and finally the impact of the performance measures on the problem is analyzed.

  13. A Community-Based, Case-Control Study Evaluating Mortality Reduction from Gastric Cancer by Endoscopic Screening in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato; Ogoshi, Kazuei; Okamoto, Mikizo; Shabana, Michiko; Kishimoto, Takuji; Fukao, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Aims Although the incidence of gastric cancer has decreased in the last 3 decades, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. In Asian countries, the burden of gastric cancer has remained, and cancer screening is normally expected to reduce gastric cancer death. We conducted a community-based, case-control study to evaluate the reduction of mortality from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening. Methods Case subjects were defined as individuals who had died of gastric cancer between 2003 and 2006 in 4 cities in Tottori Prefecture, and between 2006 and 2010 in Niigata City, Japan. Up to 6 control subjects were matched by sex, birth year (±3 years), and the residence of each corresponding case subject from the population lists in the study areas. Control subjects were required to be disease-free at the time when the corresponding case subjects were diagnosed as having gastric cancer. The odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for those who had participated in endoscopic or radiographic screening before the reference date when the case subjects were diagnosed as having gastric cancer, compared with subjects who had never participated in any screening. Conditional logistic-regression models for matched sets were used to estimate the ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The case subjects consisted of 288 men and 122 women for case subjects, with 2,292 matched control subjects. Compared with those who had never been screened before the date of diagnosis of gastric cancer in the case subjects, the ORs within 36 months from the date of diagnosis were 0.695 (95% CI: 0.489–0.986) for endoscopic screening and 0.865 (95% CI : 0.631–1.185) for radiographic screening. Conclusions The results suggest a 30% reduction in gastric cancer mortality by endoscopic screening compared with no screening within 36 months before the date of diagnosis of gastric cancer. PMID:24236091

  14. A comprehensive evaluation of various sensitivity analysis methods: A case study with a hydrological model

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yanjun; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Tong, Charles; Sun, Yunwei; Chu, Wei; Ye, Aizhong; Miao, Chiyuan; Di, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behaviors. We use a newly developed software package, a Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE), to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of ten widely used SA methods, including seven qualitative and three quantitative ones. All SA methods are tested using a variety of sampling techniques to screen out the most sensitive (i.e., important) parameters from the insensitive ones. The Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, which has thirteen tunable parameters, is used for illustration. The South Branch Potomac River basin near Springfield, West Virginia in the U.S. is chosen as the study area. The key findings from this study are: (1) For qualitative SA methods, Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), and Gaussian Process (GP) screening methods are shown to be not effective in this example. Morris One-At-a-Time (MOAT) screening is the most efficient, needing only 280 samples to identify the most important parameters, but it is the least robust method. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), Delta Test (DT) and Sum-Of-Trees (SOT) screening methods need about 400–600 samples for the same purpose. Monte Carlo (MC), Orthogonal Array (OA) and Orthogonal Array based Latin Hypercube (OALH) are appropriate sampling techniques for them; (2) For quantitative SA methods, at least 2777 samples are needed for Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) to identity parameter main effect. McKay method needs about 360 samples to evaluate the main effect, more than 1000 samples to assess the two-way interaction effect. OALH and LPτ (LPTAU) sampling techniques are more appropriate for McKay method. For the Sobol' method, the minimum samples needed are 1050 to compute the first-order and total sensitivity indices correctly. These comparisons show that qualitative SA methods are more efficient

  15. A comprehensive evaluation of various sensitivity analysis methods: A case study with a hydrological model

    DOE PAGES

    Gan, Yanjun; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; ...

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behaviors. We use a newly developed software package, a Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE), to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of ten widely used SA methods, including seven qualitative and three quantitative ones. All SA methods are tested using a variety of sampling techniques to screen out the most sensitive (i.e., important) parameters from the insensitive ones. The Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, which has thirteen tunable parameters, is used for illustration. The South Branch Potomac River basin nearmore » Springfield, West Virginia in the U.S. is chosen as the study area. The key findings from this study are: (1) For qualitative SA methods, Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), and Gaussian Process (GP) screening methods are shown to be not effective in this example. Morris One-At-a-Time (MOAT) screening is the most efficient, needing only 280 samples to identify the most important parameters, but it is the least robust method. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), Delta Test (DT) and Sum-Of-Trees (SOT) screening methods need about 400–600 samples for the same purpose. Monte Carlo (MC), Orthogonal Array (OA) and Orthogonal Array based Latin Hypercube (OALH) are appropriate sampling techniques for them; (2) For quantitative SA methods, at least 2777 samples are needed for Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) to identity parameter main effect. McKay method needs about 360 samples to evaluate the main effect, more than 1000 samples to assess the two-way interaction effect. OALH and LPτ (LPTAU) sampling techniques are more appropriate for McKay method. For the Sobol' method, the minimum samples needed are 1050 to compute the first-order and total sensitivity indices correctly. These comparisons show that qualitative SA methods are more

  16. Evaluation of oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with chronic renal failure: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress is related to several diseases, including chronic renal insufficiency. The disequilibrium in the oxidant-antioxidant balance is the result of several metabolic changes. The majority of studies to-date have evaluated the grade of oxidative stress with a single biomarker, or a very limited number of them. Findings The present study used several important biomarkers to establish a score relating to oxidative stress status (glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, reduced and oxidized glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hemolysis test). The score of oxidative stress (SOS) was then applied to a group of patients with renal insufficiency not on hemodialysis, and compared to healthy control individuals. The score for patients with chronic renal insufficiency was significantly different from that of the healthy control group (0.62 ± 1.41 vs. -0.05 ± 0.94; p < 0.001). The comparison between patients with chronic renal insufficiency and control individuals showed significant differences with respect to changes in the enzymatic antioxidant systems (glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase), non-enzymatic antioxidant system (oxidized glutathione) and oxidizability (hemolysis test) indicating significant oxidative stress associated with chronic renal insufficiency. Conclusions Patients with chronic renal insufficiency not on hemodialysis are susceptible to oxidative stress. The mechanisms that underlie this status are the consequence of changes in glutathione and related enzymes. The SOS scoring system is a useful biochemical parameter to evaluate the influence of oxidative stress on the clinical status of these patients. PMID:20181004

  17. Guiding the design of evaluations of innovations in health informatics: a framework and a case study of the SMArt SHARP evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ramly, Edmond; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2012-01-01

    Development of health information systems innovations is necessary to create a better future for health and health care, but evaluating them is challenging. This paper examines the problem of evaluating health IT projects in which innovation is agile, adaptive, and emergent, and in which innovation diffusion and production are interlinked. We introduce a typology of mindsets for evaluation design that are typically used in health informatics: optimality, contingency, and usefulness, and make the case for a modularity mindset. We propose a model that shifts the unit of analysis from an evaluation as a whole, to specific modules of an evaluation, such as purpose, target, and methods. We then use retrospective participant observation to illustrate the approach using a case study: the ONC SHARP Harvard project developing the SMArt platform (smartplaforms.org). We find that the proposed modular approach to evaluation design provides a balanced alternative to standard archetypical designs on the one hand, and fully custom-made designs, on the other hand.

  18. Guiding the Design of Evaluations of Innovations in Health Informatics: a Framework and a Case Study of the SMArt SHARP Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ramly, Edmond; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2012-01-01

    Development of health information systems innovations is necessary to create a better future for health and health care, but evaluating them is challenging. This paper examines the problem of evaluating health IT projects in which innovation is agile, adaptive, and emergent, and in which innovation diffusion and production are interlinked. We introduce a typology of mindsets for evaluation design that are typically used in health informatics: optimality, contingency, and usefulness, and make the case for a modularity mindset. We propose a model that shifts the unit of analysis from an evaluation as a whole, to specific modules of an evaluation, such as purpose, target, and methods. We then use retrospective participant observation to illustrate the approach using a case study: the ONC SHARP Harvard project developing the SMArt platform (smartplaforms.org). We find that the proposed modular approach to evaluation design provides a balanced alternative to standard archetypical designs on the one hand, and fully custom-made designs, on the other hand. PMID:23304417

  19. Course Evaluation in Open and Distance Learning: A Case Study from Indira Gandhi National Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaba, Ashok K.; Dash, Nirod K.

    2004-01-01

    The success of any open and distance learning course depends on how well it is designed, executed, and evaluated. Evaluation of a course not only demonstrates its strengths, but also points out any inherent shortcomings in the course. This is why course evaluation constitutes an important function in an open and distance learning system. The…

  20. Course Evaluation in Open and Distance Learning: A Case Study from Indira Gandhi National Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaba, Ashok K.; Dash, Nirod K.

    2004-01-01

    The success of any open and distance learning course depends on how well it is designed, executed, and evaluated. Evaluation of a course not only demonstrates its strengths, but also points out any inherent shortcomings in the course. This is why course evaluation constitutes an important function in an open and distance learning system. The…

  1. Management Development of Internal Evaluation in the Islamic Republic of Iran (Case Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    During the last two decades, many higher education systems in the world have attempted to evaluate and improve the quality of education, research and services at the university and higher education level. Countries which have been successful in these attempts have initiated continuous evaluation and applied internal evaluation as a basis for…

  2. Management Development of Internal Evaluation in the Islamic Republic of Iran (Case Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    During the last two decades, many higher education systems in the world have attempted to evaluate and improve the quality of education, research and services at the university and higher education level. Countries which have been successful in these attempts have initiated continuous evaluation and applied internal evaluation as a basis for…

  3. Evaluating Open Source Software for Use in Library Initiatives: A Case Study Involving Electronic Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Ruth Gallegos; Griffy, Henry

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses best practices for evaluating open source software for use in library projects, based on the authors' experience evaluating electronic publishing solutions. First, it presents a brief review of the literature, emphasizing the need to evaluate open source solutions carefully in order to minimize Total Cost of Ownership. Next,…

  4. Substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants or nurses in nursing homes: protocol for a realist evaluation case study.

    PubMed

    Lovink, Marleen Hermien; Persoon, Anke; van Vught, Anneke Jah; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Koopmans, Raymond Tcm; Laurant, Miranda Gh

    2017-06-08

    In developed countries, substituting physicians with nurse practitioners, physician assistants and nurses (physician substitution) occurs in nursing homes as an answer to the challenges related to the ageing population and the shortage of staff, as well as to guarantee the quality of nursing home care. However, there is great diversity in how physician substitution in nursing homes is modelled and it is unknown how it can best contribute to the quality of healthcare. This study aims to gain insight into how physician substitution is modelled and whether it contributes to perceived quality of healthcare. Second, this study aims to provide insight into the elements of physician substitution that contribute to quality of healthcare. This study will use a multiple-case study design that draws upon realist evaluation principles. The realist evaluation is based on four concepts for explaining and understanding interventions: context, mechanism, outcome and context-mechanism-outcome configuration. The following steps will be taken: (1) developing a theory, (2) conducting seven case studies, (3) analysing outcome patterns after each case and a cross-case analysis at the end and (4) revising the initial theory. The research ethics committee of the region Arnhem Nijmegen in the Netherlands concluded that this study does not fall within the scope of the Dutch Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO) (registration number 2015/1914). Before the start of the study, the Board of Directors of the nursing home organisations will be informed verbally and by letter and will also be asked for informed consent. In addition, all participants will be informed verbally and by letter and will be asked for informed consent. Findings will be disseminated by publication in a peer-reviewed journal, international and national conferences, national professional associations and policy partners in national government. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  5. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  6. A Lesson in Carefully Managing Resources: A Case Study from an Evaluation of a Music Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Kristin A.; Burkhardt, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A music education program with a goal of enhancing cognitive development of preschool-aged children enrolled in local preschools is evaluated by The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University. The budget for the evaluation was small, and therefore presented several challenges to the evaluation team. Purpose: Through a case study…

  7. A Lesson in Carefully Managing Resources: A Case Study from an Evaluation of a Music Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Kristin A.; Burkhardt, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A music education program with a goal of enhancing cognitive development of preschool-aged children enrolled in local preschools is evaluated by The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University. The budget for the evaluation was small, and therefore presented several challenges to the evaluation team. Purpose: Through a case study…

  8. A case study evaluation of a Critical Care Information System adoption using the socio-technical and fit approach.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Maryati Mohd

    2015-07-01

    Clinical information systems have long been used in intensive care units but reports on their adoption and benefits are limited. This study evaluated a Critical Care Information System implementation. A case study summative evaluation was conducted, employing observation, interview, and document analysis in operating theatres and 16-bed adult intensive care units in a 400-bed Malaysian tertiary referral centre from the perspectives of users (nurses and physicians), management, and information technology staff. System implementation, factors influencing adoption, fit between these factors, and the impact of the Critical Care Information System were evaluated after eight months of operation. Positive influences on system adoption were associated with technical factors, including system ease of use, usefulness, and information relevancy; human factors, particularly user attitude; and organisational factors, namely clinical process-technology alignment and champions. Organisational factors such as planning, project management, training, technology support, turnover rate, clinical workload, and communication were barriers to system implementation and use. Recommendations to improve the current system problems were discussed. Most nursing staff positively perceived the system's reduction of documentation and data access time, giving them more time with patients. System acceptance varied among doctors. System use also had positive impacts on timesaving, data quality, and clinical workflow. Critical Care Information Systems is crucial and has great potentials in enhancing and delivering critical care. However, the case study findings showed that the system faced complex challenges and was underutilised despite its potential. The role of socio-technical factors and their fit in realizing the potential of Critical Care Information Systems requires continuous, in-depth evaluation and stakeholder understanding and acknowledgement. The comprehensive and specific evaluation

  9. Evaluation of the Relationship Between Coral Damage and Tsunami Dynamics; Case Study: 2009 Samoa Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilmen, Derya I.; Titov, Vasily V.; Roe, Gerard H.

    2015-12-01

    On September 29, 2009, an Mw = 8.1 earthquake at 17:48 UTC in Tonga Trench generated a tsunami that caused heavy damage across Samoa, American Samoa, and Tonga islands. Tutuila island, which is located 250 km from the earthquake epicenter, experienced tsunami flooding and strong currents on the north and east coasts, causing 34 fatalities (out of 192 total deaths from this tsunami) and widespread structural and ecological damage. The surrounding coral reefs also suffered heavy damage. The damage was formally evaluated based on detailed surveys before and immediately after the tsunami. This setting thus provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the relationship between tsunami dynamics and coral damage. In this study, estimates of the maximum wave amplitudes and coastal inundation of the tsunami are obtained with the MOST model (T itov and S ynolakis, J. Waterway Port Coast Ocean Eng: pp 171, 1998; T itov and G onzalez, NOAA Tech. Memo. ERL PMEL 112:11, 1997), which is now the operational tsunami forecast tool used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The earthquake source function was constrained using the real-time deep-ocean tsunami data from three DART® (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting for Tsunamis) systems in the far field, and by tide-gauge observations in the near field. We compare the simulated run-up with observations to evaluate the simulation performance. We present an overall synthesis of the tide-gauge data, survey results of the run-up, inundation measurements, and the datasets of coral damage around the island. These data are used to assess the overall accuracy of the model run-up prediction for Tutuila, and to evaluate the model accuracy over the coral reef environment during the tsunami event. Our primary findings are that: (1) MOST-simulated run-up correlates well with observed run-up for this event ( r = 0.8), it tends to underestimated amplitudes over coral reef environment around Tutuila (for 15 of 31 villages, run

  10. Evaluation of Surface Fluxes in the WRF Model: Case Study for Irrigated Farmland in Rolling Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Osibanjo, O.; Holmes, H.; Sun, Y.; Xiao, H.; Yuan, L.

    2016-12-01

    during the relatively stable nighttime (0300 LST) than that at 0900 and 1500 LST for all WRF configurations. In conclusion, that the optimal WRF configurations with regard to predictions of surface heat and momentum fluxes are dependent on the study region and require flux tower data for model evaluation.

  11. Evaluating National Weather Service Seasonal Forecast Products in Reservoir Operation Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, A.; Guihan, R.; Polebistki, A.; Palmer, R. N.; Werner, K.; Wood, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasts of future weather and streamflow can provide valuable information for reservoir operations and water management. A challenge confronting reservoir operators today is how to incorporate both climate and streamflow products into their operations and which of these forecast products are most informative and useful for optimized water management. This study incorporates several reforecast products provided by the Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (CBRFC) which allows a complete retrospective analysis of climate forecasts, resulting in an evaluation of each product's skill in the context of water resources management. The accuracy and value of forecasts generated from the Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) are compared to the accuracy and value of using an Ensemble Streamflow Predictions (ESP) approach. Using the CFSv2 may offer more insight when responding to climate driven extremes than the ESP approach because the CFSv2 incorporates a fully coupled climate model into its forecasts rather than using all of the historic climate record as being equally probable. The role of forecast updating frequency will also be explored. Decision support systems (DSS) for both Salt Lake City Parley's System and the Snohomish County Public Utility Department's (SnoPUD) Jackson project will be used to illustrate the utility of forecasts. Both DSS include a coupled simulation and optimization model that will incorporate system constraints, operating policies, and environmental flow requirements. To determine the value of the reforecast products, performance metrics meaningful to the managers of each system are to be identified and quantified. Without such metrics and awareness of seasonal operational nuances, it is difficult to identify forecast improvements in meaningful ways. These metrics of system performance are compared using the different forecast products to evaluate the potential benefits of using CFSv2 seasonal forecasts in systems decision making.

  12. Evaluation of landfill leachate in arid climate-a case study.

    PubMed

    Al-Yaqout, A F; Hamoda, M F

    2003-08-01

    Generation of leachate from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill in arid regions has long been neglected on the assumption that minimal leachate could be formed in the absence of precipitation. Therefore, a case study was conducted at two unlined MSW landfills, of different ages, in the state of Kuwait in order to determine the chemical characteristics of leachate and examine the mechanism of leachate formation. Leachate quality data were collected from both active and old (closed) landfills where co-disposal of MSW and other solid and liquid wastes is practiced. The analysis of data confirms that leachates from both landfills are severely contaminated with organics, salts and heavy metals. However, the organic strength of the leachate collected from the old landfill was reduced due to waste decomposition and continuous gas flaring. A significant degree of variability was encountered and factors which may influence leachate quality were identified and discussed. A water balance at the landfill site was assessed and a conceptual model was presented which accounts for leachate generation due to rising water table, capillary water and moisture content of the waste.

  13. Do expert assessments converge? An exploratory case study of evaluating and managing a blood supply risk

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Examining professional assessments of a blood product recall/withdrawal and its implications for risk and public health, the paper introduces ideas about perceptions of minimal risk and its management. It also describes the context of publicly funded blood transfusion in Canada and the withdrawal event that is the basis of this study. Methods Interviews with 45 experts from administration, medicine, blood supply, laboratory services and risk assessment took place using a multi-level sampling framework in the aftermath of the recall. These experts either directly dealt with the withdrawal or were involved in the management of the blood supply at the national level. Data from these interviews were coded in NVivo for analysis and interpretation. Analytically, data were interpreted to derive typifications to relate interview responses to risk management heuristics. Results While all those interviewed agreed on the importance of patient safety, differences in the ways in which the risk was contextualized and explicated were discerned. Risk was seen in terms of patient safety, liability or precaution. These different risk logics are illustrated by selected quotations. Conclusions Expert assessments did not fully converge and it is possible that these different risk logics and discourses may affect the risk management process more generally, although not necessarily in a negative way. Patient safety is not to be compromised but management of blood risk in publicly funded systems may vary. We suggest ways of managing blood risk using formal and safety case approaches. PMID:21864330

  14. Evaluation of village piped water: a case study in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chongsuvivatwong, V; Mo-suwan, L

    1993-12-01

    This study was conducted in a district of southern Thailand to evaluate village piped water (VPW) systems with respect to the process of planning and operation. Of 67 villages in the district, 31 were installed with one or more VPW systems using water obtained from artesian wells and distributed through the pipe with neither prior filtering nor chlorination. Seven systems were found to have stopped functioning for more than 6 months. The direct causes of failure were lack of participation from the villagers, mechanical problems and serious conflicts among the leaders. Of the running systems, only 4 were operating with meters for individual households. The charge rates were probably too low to cope with sustainable maintenance costs. The water had rust, unpleasant odors, slightly salty taste and oily surface in 50, 33, 29 and 4% of the systems respectively. Among VPW users, 8% drank water from shallow wells and 77% drank unboiled water. It was concluded that VPW in the study area was not effective for several reason. Prior assessment of management feasibility and proper community education were lacking. The running costs were probable too high, not well recognized and not covered. This led to failure in gaining participation from the villagers, which eventually led to failure or potential failure of the system and waste of capital investment. These pitfalls should be prevented prior to installation of any VPW system in the future.

  15. Prospective performance evaluation of selected common virtual screening tools. Case study: Cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Kaserer, Teresa; Temml, Veronika; Kutil, Zsofia; Vanek, Tomas; Landa, Premysl; Schuster, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods can be applied in drug development for the identification of novel lead candidates, but also for the prediction of pharmacokinetic properties and potential adverse effects, thereby aiding to prioritize and identify the most promising compounds. In principle, several techniques are available for this purpose, however, which one is the most suitable for a specific research objective still requires further investigation. Within this study, the performance of several programs, representing common virtual screening methods, was compared in a prospective manner. First, we selected top-ranked virtual screening hits from the three methods pharmacophore modeling, shape-based modeling, and docking. For comparison, these hits were then additionally predicted by external pharmacophore- and 2D similarity-based bioactivity profiling tools. Subsequently, the biological activities of the selected hits were assessed in vitro, which allowed for evaluating and comparing the prospective performance of the applied tools. Although all methods performed well, considerable differences were observed concerning hit rates, true positive and true negative hits, and hitlist composition. Our results suggest that a rational selection of the applied method represents a powerful strategy to maximize the success of a research project, tightly linked to its aims. We employed cyclooxygenase as application example, however, the focus of this study lied on highlighting the differences in the virtual screening tool performances and not in the identification of novel COX-inhibitors. PMID:25916906

  16. Evaluation of the environmental impact of portion bag for food packaging: a case study of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruangrit, Chaniporn; Usapein, Parnuwat; Limphitakphong, Nantamol; Chavalparit, Orathai

    2017-05-01

    This study applied life cycle assessment methodology in evaluating environmental impact of portion bag. The objective of this study was to identify the hotspot of environmental impact through life cycle of portion bag. The options were proposed for improving environmental performance of the product. The system boundary was defined as cradle-to-grave which included the ethylene production, LDPE and LLDPE resins production, portion bag production, disposal, and transportation. All materials and emissions were calculated based on 1 piece of portion bag which weighed 2.49 g. IMPACT 2002+ was used for assessing environmental impact on SimaPro V8.2 software. The result found that the most of environmental impact was generated from LDPE and LLDPE resins which was used as raw material for producing portion bag. After normalization, non-renewable energy showed the highest potential to concern. This impact related directly to the natural gas drilling, ethane production, ethylene production, resin productions, and energy in all process. In conclusion, it should be suggested that the selection of bio-material for producing portion bag can play an important role to reduce the environmental impact. The research demonstrates the possible way and benefits in improving cleaner raw material and suitable way of product's end-of-life for producing green portion bag in the future.

  17. Evaluation of reported cases of pertussis: epidemiological study in a large city in Spain.

    PubMed

    Solano, Rubén; Rius, Cristina; Simón, Pere; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Ros, Miriam; Toledo, Diana; Domíngez, Àngela; Caylà, Joan A

    2014-12-01

    We retrospectively analysed the incidence rate of reported cases of pertussis in Barcelona during 2009-2012 according to age, sex, type of medical centre and vaccination status. We included 748 confirmed or suspected cases, 613 (82.0 %) of which were confirmed by laboratory testing and the remaining 135 (18.0 %) by epidemiological evidence. The highest reported incidence of pertussis was amongst <1 year olds [96.1 per 100,000 person-years, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 84.3-109.1]. The majority of confirmed and suspected cases were reported in 2011 and 2012, and the total incidence (confirmed or suspected) was 6.3 (95 % CI: 5.6-6.9) and 4.2 (95 % CI: 3.6-4.7) per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Incidence increased significantly (P = 0.001) in 2011-2012 compared with 2009. Most confirmed cases occurred in children <1 year old (87.9 %). Cases were confirmed by real-time (RT)-PCR (87.5 %; 95 % CI: 81.3-87.6) and bacterial culture (13.7 %; 95 % CI: 11.0-17.1). We recommend performing RT-PCR in suspected cases with no epidemiological link to a confirmed case.

  18. Developing a service user facilitated, interactive case study--a reflective and evaluative account of a teaching method.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lisa J; Padgett, Kath

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the development and ongoing evaluation of a method of service user facilitated case study in health and social care education in a U.K. University. An action research approach (Norton 2009) has been used in which the aim of the work is to improve personal practice with the aim of enhancing the student experience. The paper is written from the perspective of the service user with support from an academic colleague. The paper describes how a narrative monologue, over time is developed into an interactive case study. In draws upon literature from service user involvement, case study and pedagogic action research. The research group are health and social care students both under and post-graduates. Analysis is via a session evaluation form. Thematic analysis draws out key themes. Firstly that first person accounts have a reasonance and interest with students. Secondly that the built in thinking time helps students to develop their reflection and critical thinking skills. Furthermore a theme emerges on how the technique supports students with their future careers. Finally the author reflects on how the approach enables the development of teaching practice and enhanced student learning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of a behaviour analysis and treatment of progressive myoclonus epilepsy, type Unverricht-Lundborg: a case study.

    PubMed

    Wicksell, Rikard K; Olerud, JoAnne Dahl

    2003-01-01

    This case study evaluates the clinical effectiveness of a psychological treatment within a behaviour medicine approach to epilepsy of a subject with progressive myoclonic epilepsy. The pattern of seizure behaviour was identified in the behaviour analysis. Self-management skills were taught to the client and in vivo exposure was subsequently used in a desensitization process. The main findings in this study were that the debilitating effects of the myclonic jerks can be reduced and functioning level improved when fear of seizures is reduced. These results indicate that psychological treatment can increase the level of functioning in clients with progressive myoclonic epilepsy.

  20. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  1. CASE STUDY CRITIQUE; UPPER CLINCH CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case study critique: Upper Clinch case study (from Research on Methods for Integrating Ecological Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment: A Trade-off Weighted Index Approach to Integrating Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment). This critique answers the questions: 1) does ...

  2. Collection Evaluation through Citation Analysis Techniques: A Case Study of the Ministry of Education, Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Joanna Tan Yeok; Chennupati, K. R.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of evaluation methods to determine how a library's collection is being used focuses on use of citation analysis to evaluate the collection of the Ministry of Education library in Singapore. Highlights include compiling lists of citations from users; and an analysis of interlibrary loan records. (LRW)

  3. Introducing Reflexivity to Evaluation Practice: An In-Depth Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Draanen, Jenna

    2017-01-01

    There is currently a paucity of literature in the field of evaluation regarding the practice of reflection and reflexivity and a lack of available tools to guide this practice--yet using a reflexive model can enhance evaluation practice. This paper focuses on the methods and results of a reflexive inquiry that was conducted during a participatory…

  4. Using EPAS[TM] to Evaluate School-Based Intervention Programs: GEAR UP. Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2007

    2007-01-01

    This brief examines how the ACT's EPAS[TM] (Educational Planning and Assessment System) can be used to evaluate school-based intervention programs. Specific evaluation considered is that of the federal government's Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP), an initiative designed to increase the college awareness…

  5. Evaluating Electronic Resources: Personal Development Planning Resources at the Open University, a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelfs, Anne; Kelly, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation of Web-based tools to support Personal Development Planning (PDP) in order to illustrate issues associated with the introduction and assessment of the effectiveness of online resources. The aims of the evaluation were based on concerns about the very complex situation that offering online resources including PDP…

  6. Project Care Phase II: A Case Study in the Evaluation of Communication and Learning Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Frederick; And Others

    Phase II was a field evaluation of a communication and learning system package of films, simulation games, discussion questions, and posters designed to promote career awareness in junior high school children. It was proposed that this evaluation serves as a prototype for the assessment of the effects of learning systems on the affective and…

  7. Case Study No. 3: Building an Evaluation Process At The Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frees, Ann M.

    1972-01-01

    The establishment of a performance evaluation system at Los Meganos Intermediate School in the San Ramon Valley Unified School District has resulted, at this time, not in a full evaluation system, but instead in a series of guidelines which might be of use to others pursuing similar objectives. (Author)

  8. Case Study No. 3: Building an Evaluation Process At The Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frees, Ann M.

    1972-01-01

    The establishment of a performance evaluation system at Los Meganos Intermediate School in the San Ramon Valley Unified School District has resulted, at this time, not in a full evaluation system, but instead in a series of guidelines which might be of use to others pursuing similar objectives. (Author)

  9. Mobile Therapy: Case Study Evaluations of a Cell Phone Application for Emotional Self-Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Kathawala, Qusai; Leen, Todd K; Gorenstein, Ethan E; Guilak, Farzin; Labhard, Michael; Deleeuw, William

    2010-01-01

    Background Emotional awareness and self-regulation are important skills for improving mental health and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Cognitive behavioral therapy can teach these skills but is not widely available. Objective This exploratory study examined the potential of mobile phone technologies to broaden access to cognitive behavioral therapy techniques and to provide in-the-moment support. Methods We developed a mobile phone application with touch screen scales for mood reporting and therapeutic exercises for cognitive reappraisal (ie, examination of maladaptive interpretations) and physical relaxation. The application was deployed in a one-month field study with eight individuals who had reported significant stress during an employee health assessment. Participants were prompted via their mobile phones to report their moods several times a day on a Mood Map—a translation of the circumplex model of emotion—and a series of single-dimension mood scales. Using the prototype, participants could also activate mobile therapies as needed. During weekly open-ended interviews, participants discussed their use of the device and responded to longitudinal views of their data. Analyses included a thematic review of interview narratives, assessment of mood changes over the course of the study and the diurnal cycle, and interrogation of this mobile data based on stressful incidents reported in interviews. Results Five case studies illustrate participants' use of the mobile phone application to increase self-awareness and to cope with stress. One example is a participant who had been coping with longstanding marital conflict. After reflecting on his mood data, particularly a drop in energy each evening, the participant began practicing relaxation therapies on the phone before entering his house, applying cognitive reappraisal techniques to cope with stressful family interactions, and talking more openly with his wife. His mean anger, anxiety and sadness

  10. Mobile therapy: case study evaluations of a cell phone application for emotional self-awareness.

    PubMed

    Morris, Margaret E; Kathawala, Qusai; Leen, Todd K; Gorenstein, Ethan E; Guilak, Farzin; Labhard, Michael; Deleeuw, William

    2010-04-30

    Emotional awareness and self-regulation are important skills for improving mental health and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Cognitive behavioral therapy can teach these skills but is not widely available. This exploratory study examined the potential of mobile phone technologies to broaden access to cognitive behavioral therapy techniques and to provide in-the-moment support. We developed a mobile phone application with touch screen scales for mood reporting and therapeutic exercises for cognitive reappraisal (ie, examination of maladaptive interpretations) and physical relaxation. The application was deployed in a one-month field study with eight individuals who had reported significant stress during an employee health assessment. Participants were prompted via their mobile phones to report their moods several times a day on a Mood Map-a translation of the circumplex model of emotion-and a series of single-dimension mood scales. Using the prototype, participants could also activate mobile therapies as needed. During weekly open-ended interviews, participants discussed their use of the device and responded to longitudinal views of their data. Analyses included a thematic review of interview narratives, assessment of mood changes over the course of the study and the diurnal cycle, and interrogation of this mobile data based on stressful incidents reported in interviews. Five case studies illustrate participants' use of the mobile phone application to increase self-awareness and to cope with stress. One example is a participant who had been coping with longstanding marital conflict. After reflecting on his mood data, particularly a drop in energy each evening, the participant began practicing relaxation therapies on the phone before entering his house, applying cognitive reappraisal techniques to cope with stressful family interactions, and talking more openly with his wife. His mean anger, anxiety and sadness ratings all were lower in the second half

  11. Evaluating risk factors for endemic human Salmonella Enteritidis infections with different phage types in Ontario, Canada using multinomial logistic regression and a case-case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying risk factors for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Ontario will assist public health authorities to design effective control and prevention programs to reduce the burden of SE infections. Our research objective was to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various phage types (PT) in Ontario, Canada. We hypothesized that certain PTs (e.g., PT8 and PT13a) have specific risk factors for infection. Methods Our study included endemic SE cases with various PTs whose isolates were submitted to the Public Health Laboratory-Toronto from January 20th to August 12th, 2011. Cases were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire that included questions pertaining to demographics, travel history, clinical symptoms, contact with animals, and food exposures. A multinomial logistic regression method using the Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model procedure and a case-case study design were used to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various PTs in Ontario, Canada. In the multinomial logistic regression model, the outcome variable had three categories representing human infections caused by SE PT8, PT13a, and all other SE PTs (i.e., non-PT8/non-PT13a) as a referent category to which the other two categories were compared. Results In the multivariable model, SE PT8 was positively associated with contact with dogs (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.01-4.68) and negatively associated with pepper consumption (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.94), after adjusting for age categories and gender, and using exposure periods and health regions as random effects to account for clustering. Conclusions Our study findings offer interesting hypotheses about the role of phage type-specific risk factors. Multinomial logistic regression analysis and the case-case study approach are novel methodologies to evaluate associations among SE infections with different PTs and various risk factors. PMID:23057531

  12. Evaluation of coastal waters receiving fish processing waste: Lota Bay as a case study.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Ramón; Rudolph, Anny; Contreras, Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Liquid wastes from the fish meal and oil processing industries produce serious environmental impacts in coastal embayments on the coasts of Chile and Peru. This article presents an analysis of an environmental monitoring program at Lota Bay, a shallow coastal indentation in central Chile (37 degrees S) exposed to industrial fishing activity. The study of the environmental impact produced by waste effluents permitted making an evaluation of the bay's capacity for seasonal recovery from this impact. Seasonal cruises were carried out during 1994 and in 1996, 1997, and 1998. Variables analyzed included salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, ammonium concentration and surface oil and grease. The hydrographic regime of Lota Bay follows a seasonal pattern, where, typical of most SE pacific embayments, waters from subsuperficial oxygen minimum zones moved into the bay. The percentages of dissolved oxygen were critical in the area of organic waste discharge. The impact of wastewater is related to the type and status of the fishery, including: (i) overloads of plant production lines, (ii) maintenance and cleaning of installations, and (iii) degree of shipboard fishing conservation. Major alterations were observed in summer, when the highest discharge of organic load occurred. In winter, an improvement in the re-aeration conditions reduced the impact. Remedial measures implemented beginning in 1997 arose from the monitoring program and had to be separated into two recovery factors including (a) internal management of plants and (b) treatment of plant effluents.

  13. Geotechnical evaluation of Turkish clay deposits: a case study in Northern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Ekrem; Bayraktutan, M. Salih

    2008-09-01

    Clay deposits in Oltu-Narman basins (Erzurum, northern Turkey) have been studied to determine their engineering properties and to evaluate their uses for geotechnical applications. These deposits are concentrated in two different stratigraphic horizons namely the Late Oligocene and the Early Miocene sequences. Clay-rich fine-grained sedimentary units are deposited in shallow marine and lagoonar mixed environments. Their clay minerals originated by the alteration of Eocene calc-alkaline island-arc volcanics, preferably from pyroclastics (trachite and andesite flow), which form the basement for the Oltu depression. Smectite group clay minerals are found abundant in clay deposits. The experimental results show that the clay soils have high plasticity behaviors and low hydraulic conductivity properties. The optimum water content, the free swell, and the swelling pressure of clay samples decreased and the maximum dry unit weight of clay samples increased under high temperature. Consequently, it is concluded that the expanding of clay soils is an important soil problem that cannot be avoided in the significant parts of Oltu city and its villages. However, the soils of clay-rich layers in the outcrops-section of clay deposits can be successfully used to build compacted clay liners for landfill systems and to construct vertical and horizontal barriers for protection of ground water and for preventing soil pollution in geotechnical applications.

  14. Evaluation of the cervical cancer screening programme in Mexico: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Avila, M; Lazcano-Ponce, E C; de Ruíz, P A; Romieu, I

    1998-06-01

    This study presents the evaluation of the Mexico City Cervical Cancer Screening Programme (CCSP). Uterine cervical cancer (CC) is still a major public health problem in Mexico. Various actions aimed at reducing mortality from CC have been unsuccessful with an estimated 62000 deaths reported between 1980 and 1995. The authors performed a study of cases and controls chosen on a population basis that included a sample of 233 cases of cancer in situ, and 397 cases of invasive cervical cancer obtained from eight hospitals, and a sample of 1005 controls representative of the general population. The results are presented stratified by case type, classified according to whether the cancer is invasive or not. The results show low impact of the cervical cancer screening programme in Mexico. Women who had a history of use of the Papanicolaou smear (PAP), who did not seek testing due to gynaecological symptoms and who had received their PAP results, had a 2.63 times lower risk of developing invasive cervical cancer (OR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.28-0.52). The principal findings of this study in relation to the low impact of the screening programme in Mexico, are the low level of existing coverage and late use of health services by women at risk.

  15. An evaluation of soil erosion hazard: A case study in Southern Africa using geomatics technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiswerth, Barbara Alice

    Accelerated soil erosion in Malawi, Southern Africa, increasingly threatens agricultural productivity, given current and projected population growth trends. Previous attempts to document soil erosion potential have had limited success, lacking appropriate information and diagnostic tools. This study utilized geomatics technologies and the latest available information from topography, soils, climate, vegetation, and land use of a watershed in southern Malawi. The Soil Loss Estimation Model for Southern Africa (SLEMSA), developed for conditions in Zimbabwe, was evaluated and used to create a soil erosion hazard map for the watershed under Malawi conditions. The SLEMSA sub-models of cover, soil loss, and topography were computed from energy interception, rainfall energy, and soil erodibility, and slope length and steepness, respectively. Geomatics technologies including remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provided the tools with which land cover/land use, a digital elevation model, and slope length and steepness were extracted and integrated with rainfall and soils spatial information. Geomatics technologies enable rapid update of the model as new and better data sets become available. Sensitivity analyses of the SLEMSA model revealed that rainfall energy and slope steepness have the greatest influence on soil erosion hazard estimates in this watershed. Energy interception was intermediate in sensitivity level, whereas slope length and soil erodibility ranked lowest. Energy interception and soil erodibility were shown by parameter behavior analysis to behave in a linear fashion with respect to soil erosion hazard, whereas rainfall energy, slope steepness, and slope length exhibit non-linear behavior. When SLEMSA input parameters and results were compared to alternative methods of soil erosion assessment, such as drainage density and drainage texture, the model provided more spatially explicit information using 30 meter grid cells. Results of this

  16. Evaluation of the effect of porous check dam location on fine sediment retention (a case study).

    PubMed

    Hassanli, A M; Nameghi, A Esmaeli; Beecham, S

    2009-05-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the influence of porous check dam location on the retention of fine sediments in the Droodzan watershed in Southern Iran. Five long streams with several porous check dams that were more than 27 years old were studied. In each stream three check dams: at the very upstream section, at the middle section and at the far downstream section were selected for analysis. A number of samples from trapped sediments and from the undisturbed soils in the stream banks (adjacent to the check dams) were collected. Laboratory analysis showed that the soil samples taken from undisturbed banks have smaller particle sizes compared to the trapped sediments. The results indicated that the check dams located at the far downstream sections were more efficient at trapping fine sediment than those located at the middle sections. Also the check dams located at the middle sections were more effective than those located at the upstream sections. Comparison of sediment texture also showed that the portion of clay and silt trapped by the check dams decreased from the downstream sections toward the upstream sections. Hence, whenever, the retention of fine sediments is the primary function of the check dams, it appears that they should be located in the far downstream sections of a stream. The experimental analysis indicated that using broken and angular rocks instead of rounded rocks in porous check dam's construction improves the effectiveness of the check dams for the retention of fine sediments. The analysis of the failed check dams also showed that erosion of the bank sides underneath the check dams is the primary cause of dam collapse.

  17. Evaluating sex and gender competencies in the medical curriculum: a case study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Virginia M; Flynn, Priscilla M; Lindor, Keith D

    2012-06-01

    Sex and gender differences exist in the manifestation and prevalence of many conditions and diseases. Yet many clinician training programs neglect to integrate this information across their curricula. This study aimed to measure the sex and gender medical knowledge of medical students enrolled in a program without an explicit directive to integrate sex and gender differences across a block system of core subjects. A forced-choice instrument consisting of 35 multiple-choice and true or false questions was adapted from an evaluation tool used in the European Curriculum in Gender Medicine held at Charité Hospital, Berlin, in September 2010. Fourth-year (response rate 93%) and second-year (response rate 70%) students enrolled in Mayo Medical School completed the instrument. More than 50% of students in both classes indicated that topics related to sex and gender were covered in gynecology, cardiology, and pediatrics, and <20% of students indicated inclusion of such topics in nephrology, neurology, and orthopedics. More than twice as many second-year students indicated that topics dealing with sex and gender were included in immunology course material compared with fourth-year students. A consensus of written comments indicated that concepts of sex and gender-based medicine need to be embedded into existing curriculum, with an emphasis on clinically relevant information. Although this study represents only one medical school in the United States, information regarding sex and gender aspects of medicine is not consistently included in this curriculum without an explicit directive. These results can provide guidance for curriculum improvement to train future physicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Crosswell electromagnetic and magnetotelluric imaging of geothermal reservoirs - evaluation and case studies from Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samrock, F.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy resources are considered important contributors to any future energy mix, as they are renewable and can potentially provide a constant (i.e., baseload) and long-term energy output. However, most regions worldwide are lacking natural, convective hydrothermal resources. As a result, when relatively high subsurface temperatures exist in low-permeability rocks ("hot-dry" rocks), it has been suggested to artificially increase permeability to enable deep fluid circulation and associated advective heat transfer to a production well. One technique to enhance permeability, and thus the ability to extract geothermal heat, is hydraulic stimulation, creating (permeability) enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). In the "Deep Underground Geothermal (DUG)" laboratory in Switzerland, a meso-scale field experiment is planned, where pre-existing fault systems are hydraulically sheared. The aim of this experiment is to better understand the processes occurring during artificial reservoir creation. We present our 3D numerical modeling study evaluating the capability of low-frequency crosswell electromagnetic (EM) tomography using magnetic dipole sources to map stimulation-induced changes in electrical conductivity. This geophysical parameter is affected by several subsurface properties including temperature, interconnected porosity, permeability, and the presence of fluids. Electrical conductivity thus provides important information on the effectiveness of geothermal reservoir creation. Besides numerical modeling studies, we report on the current status of instrumentation and realization of crosswell EM measurements at the DUG laboratory. Furthermore, we present preliminary results of a magnetotelluric (MT) survey conducted at a prominent heat flow anomaly in Northern Switzerland. Here, we test methods to improve data quality of MT measurements in regions that exhibit substantial electromagnetic noise. We also discuss how information on the electrical conductivity

  19. Evaluation of artificial groundwater recharge effects with MIKE-SHE: a case study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, M.; Martínez-García, I.; Carreño, F.; de Bustamante, I.; Lillo, J.

    2012-04-01

    In many areas where the technical and financial resources are limited, the treatment and disposal of wastewater comprise a problem. With increasing frequency, the wastewater reuse is considered as another alternative for water management alternative. In this way, the wastewater is converted into an added value resource. Treated wastewater infiltration into the soil could be a viable tertiary treatment, especially for small communities where the availability of land is not a problem and the wastewater has not industrial waste contribution and is highly biodegradable. The Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes (Seville, Spain) develops non-conventional wastewater treatments for small villages. Currently, a project regarding wastewater reutilization for aquifer recharge through a horizontal permeable reactive barrier and a subsequent soil infiltration is being carried out. One of the aspects to be evaluated within this context is the impact on aquifer. Consequently, the main goal of the present study is to assess the effects on the water flow derived from the future recharge activities by using the MIKE-SHE hydrological code. The unsaturated and saturated zones have been integrated in the model, which requires geological, land use, topography, piezometric head, soil and climate data to build up the model. The obtained results from the model show that with the annual recharge volume contributed by the experimental plant (3 m3 or 0.19 L/s) there is no effect in the groundwater flow. A volume of 400 m3/year (25 L/s) would be required to yield a variation in the piezometric head and therefore, in the groundwater flow i.e. a volume about 100 times larger than the estimated is necessary. To calibrate the model, simulated piezometric head values have been compared to the measured field data at a number of locations. In the calibration, the percent error had to be lower than 15 % at each location. Future works concerning groundwater quality and reactive transport

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF FEMORAL SHAFT FRACTURES: STUDY OF 200 CASES

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; da Silva, Luciano Lucindo; Ferreira, Fábio Vieira; Ferro, Ademar Martins; da Rocha, Valney Luís; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate epidemiological and radiological characteristics of the femoral shaft fractures, surgically treated from 1990 to 2005 at Hospital de Acidentados – Clínica Santa Isabel – in Goiânia, Goiás, aiming to contribute to better preventive and therapeutic measures planning to adopt on those fractures. Methods: 200 patients' files and x-rays with femoral shaft fractures have been retrospectively evaluated. Patients below the age of 10 years were not included because the treatment for this group was conservative. 25 files have been discarded for not supplying all the necessary data to the study. The patients were assessed for sex, age, side of the fracture, bone exposure, mechanisms of trauma, classification of the fractures, associated trauma, time for bone healing and types of surgical devices. Statistic analyses were made by chi-squared, Fisher and Student's-t tests, adopting as a significance level p<0.05. Results: significant results (p < 0.05) were found in: 70% of men, 80% closed fractures and 65% of women above the age of 60. Fractures resulting from simple falls were more frequent in women, above 60 years old, with simpler traces, and the ones caused by projectiles of firearm in men, from 20 to 60 years, with unstable traces. Trampling accidents were prevalent among youngsters between 10 and 19 years old. Car accidents showed all the types of fractures, mostly associated to other traumas, reaching its peak incidence in the age group of 20-30 years. The treatment with Küntscher Nail resulted in a longer mean consolidation time, as well as fractures with unstable traces (B3,C1,C2,C3). Conclusion: we found a bi-modal characteristic the femoral shaft fractures, consistently to literature data, where the high energy mechanisms (traffic accidents, high falls and wounds from firearms), have been more frequent in young adults, men, generating unstable traces of fractures, with more serious associated trauma, while the other group with low

  1. Multicriteria analysis to evaluate wave energy converters based on their environmental impact: an Italian case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzellino, Arianna; Contestabile, Pasquale; Lanfredi, Caterina; Vicinanza, Diego

    2010-05-01

    harbour protection, and installed at -10m depth (length=300 m) may produce about 2.7 GWh/y with a total costs of about 12,000,000 €, where only the 50% of the amount are the costs of the SSG device. Obviously the environmental impact of the two solutions is quite different. Aim of this study is to provide a multicriteria decision support framework to evaluate the best WEC typology and location in the perspective of the environmental cost-benefit analysis. The general environmental aspects generated by wave power projects will be described. Colonisation patterns and biofouling will be discussed with particular reference to changes of the seabed and alterations due to new substrates. In addition, impacts for fish, fishery and marine mammals will be also considered. We suggest that wave power projects should be evaluated also on the basis of their environmental impacts in the perspective of the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) analysis, as implemented by the European Commission (SEA Directive 2001/42/EC). The early incorporation of the environmental aspects involved in the evaluation of wave power projects will give the opportunity for early mitigations or design modifications, most likely making wave projects more acceptable in the long run and more suitable for the marine environment.

  2. Evaluation of surveillance case definition in the diagnosis of leptospirosis, using the Microscopic Agglutination Test: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Dinesh L B; Wimalaratna, Harith; Agampodi, Suneth B; Liyanapathirana, Veranja C; Piyarathna, Thibbotumunuwe A C L; Goonapienuwala, Bimba L

    2009-04-22

    Leptospirosis is endemic in both urban and rural areas of Sri Lanka and there had been many out breaks in the recent past. This study was aimed at validating the leptospirosis surveillance case definition, using the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). The study population consisted of patients with undiagnosed acute febrile illness who were admitted to the medical wards of the Teaching Hospital Kandy, from 1st July 2007 to 31st July 2008. The subjects were screened to diagnose leptospirosis according to the leptospirosis case definition. MAT was performed on blood samples taken from each patient on the 7th day of fever. Leptospirosis case definition was evaluated in regard to sensitivity, specificity and predictive values, using a MAT titre >or= 1:800 for confirming leptospirosis. A total of 123 patients were initially recruited of which 73 had clinical features compatible with the surveillance case definition. Out of the 73 only 57 had a positive MAT result (true positives) leaving 16 as false positives. Out of the 50 who didn't have clinical features compatible with the case definition 45 had a negative MAT as well (true negatives), therefore 5 were false negatives. Total number of MAT positives was 62 out of 123. According to these results the test sensitivity was 91.94%, specificity 73.77%, positive predictive value and negative predictive values were 78.08% and 90% respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of the test was 82.93%. This study confirms that the surveillance case definition has a very high sensitivity and negative predictive value with an average specificity in diagnosing leptospirosis, based on a MAT titre of >or= 1: 800.

  3. Evaluating the Impact of the U.S. National Toxicology Program: A Case Study on Hexavalent Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yun; Holmgren, Stephanie; Andrews, Danica M. K.; Wolfe, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the impact of federally funded research with a broad, methodical, and objective approach is important to ensure that public funds advance the mission of federal agencies. Objectives: We aimed to develop a methodical approach that would yield a broad assessment of National Toxicology Program’s (NTP’s) effectiveness across multiple sectors and demonstrate the utility of the approach through a case study. Methods: A conceptual model was developed with defined activities, outputs (products), and outcomes (proximal, intermediate, distal) and applied retrospectively to NTP’s research on hexavalent chromium (CrVI). Proximal outcomes were measured by counting views of and requests for NTP’s products by external stakeholders. Intermediate outcomes were measured by bibliometric analysis. Distal outcomes were assessed through Web and LexisNexis searches for documents related to legislation or regulation changes. Results: The approach identified awareness of NTP’s work on CrVI by external stakeholders (proximal outcome) and citations of NTP’s research in scientific publications, reports, congressional testimonies, and legal and policy documents (intermediate outcome). NTP’s research was key to the nation’s first-ever drinking water standard for CrVI adopted by California in 2014 (distal outcome). By applying this approach to a case study, the utility and limitations of the approach were identified, including challenges to evaluating the outcomes of a research program. Conclusions: This study identified a broad and objective approach for assessing NTP’s effectiveness, including methodological needs for more thorough and efficient impact assessments in the future. Citation: Xie Y, Holmgren S, Andrews DMK, Wolfe MS. 2017. Evaluating the impact of the U.S. National Toxicology Program: a case study on hexavalent chromium. Environ Health Perspect 125:181–188; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP21 PMID:27483499

  4. Evaluating the Impact of the U.S. National Toxicology Program: A Case Study on Hexavalent Chromium.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun; Holmgren, Stephanie; Andrews, Danica M K; Wolfe, Mary S

    2017-02-01

    Evaluating the impact of federally funded research with a broad, methodical, and objective approach is important to ensure that public funds advance the mission of federal agencies. We aimed to develop a methodical approach that would yield a broad assessment of National Toxicology Program's (NTP's) effectiveness across multiple sectors and demonstrate the utility of the approach through a case study. A conceptual model was developed with defined activities, outputs (products), and outcomes (proximal, intermediate, distal) and applied retrospectively to NTP's research on hexavalent chromium (CrVI). Proximal outcomes were measured by counting views of and requests for NTP's products by external stakeholders. Intermediate outcomes were measured by bibliometric analysis. Distal outcomes were assessed through Web and LexisNexis searches for documents related to legislation or regulation changes. The approach identified awareness of NTP's work on CrVI by external stakeholders (proximal outcome) and citations of NTP's research in scientific publications, reports, congressional testimonies, and legal and policy documents (intermediate outcome). NTP's research was key to the nation's first-ever drinking water standard for CrVI adopted by California in 2014 (distal outcome). By applying this approach to a case study, the utility and limitations of the approach were identified, including challenges to evaluating the outcomes of a research program. This study identified a broad and objective approach for assessing NTP's effectiveness, including methodological needs for more thorough and efficient impact assessments in the future. Citation: Xie Y, Holmgren S, Andrews DMK, Wolfe MS. 2017. Evaluating the impact of the U.S. National Toxicology Program: a case study on hexavalent chromium. Environ Health Perspect 125:181-188; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP21.

  5. Evaluation of Oxidant-Antioxidant Balance in Children with Atopic Dermatitis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Pınar; Avcil, Sibelnur; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yenisey, Çiğdem

    2016-10-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress (OS) has been reported in many allergic and inflammatory skin diseases, including urticaria, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis (AD). Melatonin is a hormone secreted from the pineal gland and is a potent antioxidant. The aim of the study was to measure serum antioxidant melatonin, oxidants of nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde levels to calculate the serum oxidant-antioxidant balance based on the NO/melatonin and malondialdehyde/melatonin ratios and to determine the correlation with the disease severity in children with AD. Seventy-three children with AD and 67 healthy controls were included in the study. The clinical diagnosis of AD was based on the diagnostic criteria of Hanifin-Rajka. The severity of AD was evaluated by the scoring AD (SCORAD) index, and atopy was determined by skin prick tests (SPTs) with commercial extracts. The OS-related parameters of serum melatonin, NO, malondialdehyde, and the NO/melatonin and malondialdehyde/melatonin ratios were calculated and compared with the results of healthy controls. Serum melatonin levels were higher (p < 0.0001) and serum NO levels and the NO/melatonin and malondialdehyde/melatonin ratios were lower in children with AD than in healthy controls (p = 0.045, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, respectively). There was no difference between children with AD and healthy controls in terms of serum malondialdehyde levels (p = 0.119). Serum melatonin levels were significantly lower in severe AD than in mild AD (p = 0.012). However, in terms of serum melatonin levels, there was no difference between mild and moderate AD (p = 0.742) and moderate to severe AD (p = 0.301). There was no significant difference in serum NO and malondialdehyde levels and NO/melatonin and malondialdehyde/melatonin ratios among children with mild, moderate, and severe AD (p > 0.05). A negative correlation was found between serum melatonin levels and the SCORAD index (r = -0

  6. Home Start Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High/Scope Educational Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI.

    Case studies of eight Home Start programs are given as the third section of an evaluation study. Communities involved are Binghamton, New York; Franklin, North Carolina; Cleveland, Ohio; Harrogate, Tennessee; Houston, Texas; Weslaco, Texas; Millville, Utah; Parkersburg, West Virginia. Although each study varies in format, each describes in detail…

  7. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  8. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  9. Case study for the evaluation and selection of man-machine interface (MMI) software

    SciTech Connect

    Nekimken, H.; Pope, N.; Macdonald, J.; Bibeau, R.; Gomez, B.; Sellon, D.

    1996-06-01

    The authors evaluated three of the top man-machine interface (MMI) software systems. The main categories upon which they based their evaluation on were the following: operator interface; network and data distribution; input/output (I/O) interface; application development; alarms; real-time and historical trending; support, documentation, and training; processing tools (batch, recipe, logic); reports; custom interfacing; start-up/recovery; external database; and multimedia. They also present their MMI requirements and guidelines for the selection and evaluation of these MMI systems.

  10. Evaluation of reproductive health and sexual behaviors of university students: case study from Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Rathfisch, Gulay; Aydin, Merve; Pehlivan, Meral Dereli; Bozurt, Begum Sivik; Kaplica, Isil

    2012-12-01

    Young people are affected to a higher extent by early and unprotected sexual relations in Turkey. They do not have healthy sexual attitudes, are ignorant about reproductive health and engage in risky practices and behavior. It is therefore necessary to provide effective and confidential reproductive health services to young people. This study was designed to evaluate the reproductive health behaviors of male and female university students. This descriptive study was conducted between January and May 2008. The study population was composed of university students from Istanbul University, Florence Nightingale Nursing High School, Faculty of Forestry and Department of Science Teachers' Training, as well as students residing at the Students Dormitory of the Regional Directory of Forestry. Questionnaires were distributed in envelopes during the breaks in the university buildings, cafeterias and in the dormitories. Completed questionnaires were also collected under cover in envelopes. The data were collected by four students from the nursing school. A total of 647 students were enrolled. Among the participants, 75% (N = 490) were female students and 24.3% (N = 157) were male students. The mean age was 21.38 (SD = 1.92). The rate of sexually active participants was 26% (N = 169) and the rate of participants who masturbated was 36% (N = 233). The rate of using a family planning method was determined as 25% (N = 163) and the most frequently used family planning method was use of condoms (67.4%). The rate of pregnancy was determined as 1.5% and the rate of abortion was 1.4%. In 69% of the students, the main source of knowledge on sexuality was the internet. The rate of students stating that sexually transmitted diseases are transmitted by sexual intercourse and via blood was 72.6%, and the percentage of students who were vaccinated against Hepatitis B was 61.8%. Twenty-six percent of the students are sexually active and students are unable to reach information on

  11. Evaluating climate variables, indexes and thresholds governing Arctic urban sustainability: case study of Russian permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, O. A.; Kokorev, V.

    2013-12-01

    , infrastructure and society in the Arctic cities. We use CMIP-5 ensemble projection to evaluate future changes in these parameters and identify regions where immediate attention is needed to develop appropriate adaptation strategies. Acknowledgement. This study is supported by the German-Russian Otto Schmidt Laboratory, project OSL-13-02, and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 13-05-0072 and 13-05-91171.

  12. Recurrent hyperparathyroidism: a study of 3 cases with evaluation of some pathogenetic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuoli, G.; Minisola, S.; Scarda, A.; De Matteis, A.; Tabolli, S.; Bigi, F.; Valtorta, C.; D'Erasmo, E.

    1987-01-01

    Three patients with recurrent hyperparathyroidism (15, 8 and 3 years respectively, after the first operation) are described in order to establish the causes and define the clinical characteristics of the disease. The observation that in the present series recurrent hyperparathyroidism was associated either with an adenoma (two cases) or a carcinoma (one case), appears to stress the possibility of the pathological involvement of one gland even though recurrent hyperparathyroidism should be considered due to the chronic extrinsic stimulation of the parathyroid glands. The severity of the clinical and metabolic picture observed at the time of the first diagnosis and/or at the time of recurrence together with the simultaneous presence of bone and stone disease in the patients described is of particular interest. The cases reported underline the importance of carrying out careful metabolic investigations in patients with hyperparathyroidism not only before but also for a prolonged period of time after operation. PMID:3671259

  13. Evaluation of Salivary and Serum Antioxidant and Oxidative Stress Statuses in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Goodarzi, Mohammad T.; Jamshidi, Zohreh; Kebriaei, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Local bacteria stimulate polymorphonuclear neutrophils to release reactive oxygen species in periodontitis. Increased levels of oxidative stress play a significant role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate total salivary and serum antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods: Fifty-five healthy subjects and 55 patients with chronic periodontitis, with an age range of 30–50 years, were evaluated. After clinical examination and case selection, unstimulated whole saliva was collected in the morning. Blood samples were taken from the antecubital vein. Total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde levels were evaluated by spectrophotometric assay. Data were analyzed with t-test, using Stata.11 software program. Results: The periodontitis group exhibited lower salivary (0.16) and serum (0.36) total antioxidant capacity (P = 0.11) compared to the control group. Mean salivary malondialdehyde levels in the case and control groups were 0.80 ± 0.09 and 0.42 ± 0.08, respectively. The results showed significantly higher levels of salivary and serum malondialdehyde in the periodontitis group. Gender did not have any effect on antioxidant and oxidative stress levels. Conclusion: This study indicated increased levels of salivary and serum oxidative stresses in patients with chronic periodontitis. Total antioxidant capacity was mildly lower in the saliva and serum of these patients. Higher malondialdehyde levels with no changes in antioxidant status can result in systemic and local complications in these patients. PMID:28408887

  14. The Case for Evaluating Student Outcomes and Equity Gaps to Improve Pathways and Programs of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.

    2017-01-01

    When linked to program review and improvement, program evaluation can help practitioners to ensure that career-technical education (CTE) and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs offer equitable access and outcomes for underserved student groups.

  15. Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation System (MCCRES). Three Case Studies for Use in Providing for a More Effective Evaluator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    determination and explana- tion of the degree of success, and recommendations for further program activity." [Suchman, 1967, p. 23] Stufflebeam , (1971...decisions. [ Stufflebeam , 1971] Given this, Wheeler states that one should, "look at evalua- tion as a judgement of some program with the purpose of con...2) adequacy, (3) process, (4) effectiveness, and (5) efficiency. Stufflebeam , et al. (1971) on the other hand defines four types of evaluation: (1

  16. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer Fans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-01

    In this project, Building America team IBACOS performed field testing in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to evaluate heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) distribution systems during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. The team evaluated a market-available through-wall air transfer fan system that provides air to the bedrooms.The relative ability of this system was considered with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability.

  17. Evaluation of Medical Expert Systems: A Case Study in Performance Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Reggia, James A.

    1985-01-01

    A number of methods for critically evaluating the performance of medical expert systems in practice are surveyed. To illustrate the concepts involved, clinical evaluation of the performance of a computer-based decision aid for patients having transient ischemic attacks is discussed in some detail. Two factors are identified as crucial in the rapid development and testing of this system: the availability of a domain-independent expert system generator, and the existence of a database of relevant patient records.

  18. Evaluating sampling designs by computer simulation: A case study with the Missouri bladderpod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, L.W.; Smith, D.R.; Young, C.C.; Nichols, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    To effectively manage rare populations, accurate monitoring data are critical. Yet many monitoring programs are initiated without careful consideration of whether chosen sampling designs will provide accurate estimates of population parameters. Obtaining accurate estimates is especially difficult when natural variability is high, or limited budgets determine that only a small fraction of the population can be sampled. The Missouri bladderpod, Lesquerella filiformis Rollins, is a federally threatened winter annual that has an aggregated distribution pattern and exhibits dramatic interannual population fluctuations. Using the simulation program SAMPLE, we evaluated five candidate sampling designs appropriate for rare populations, based on 4 years of field data: (1) simple random sampling, (2) adaptive simple random sampling, (3) grid-based systematic sampling, (4) adaptive grid-based systematic sampling, and (5) GIS-based adaptive sampling. We compared the designs based on the precision of density estimates for fixed sample size, cost, and distance traveled. Sampling fraction and cost were the most important factors determining precision of density estimates, and relative design performance changed across the range of sampling fractions. Adaptive designs did not provide uniformly more precise estimates than conventional designs, in part because the spatial distribution of L. filiformis was relatively widespread within the study site. Adaptive designs tended to perform better as sampling fraction increased and when sampling costs, particularly distance traveled, were taken into account. The rate that units occupied by L. filiformis were encountered was higher for adaptive than for conventional designs. Overall, grid-based systematic designs were more efficient and practically implemented than the others. ?? 2008 The Society of Population Ecology and Springer.

  19. A case study for evaluating potential soil sensitivity in aridland systems.

    PubMed

    Peterman, Wendy L; Ferschweiler, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Globally, ecosystems are subjected to prolonged droughts and extreme heat events, leading to forest die-offs and dominance shifts in vegetation. Some scientists and managers view soil as the main resource to be considered in monitoring ecosystem responses to aridification. As the medium through which precipitation is received, stored, and redistributed for plant use, soil is an important factor in the sensitivity of ecosystems to a drying climate. This study presents a novel approach to evaluating where on a landscape soils may be most sensitive to drying, making them less resilient to disturbance, and where potential future vegetation changes could lead to such disturbance. The drying and devegetation of arid lands can increase wind erosion, contributing to aerosol and dust emissions. This has implications for air quality, human health, and water resources. This approach combines soil data with vegetation simulations, projecting future vegetation change, to create maps of potential areas of concern for soil sensitivity and dust production in a drying climate. Consistent with recent observations, the projections show shifts from grasslands and woodlands to shrublands in much of the southwestern region. An increase in forested area occurs, but shifts in the dominant types and spatial distribution of the forests also are seen. A net increase in desert ecosystems in the region and some changes in alpine and tundra ecosystems are seen. Approximately 124,000 km(2) of soils flagged as "sensitive" are projected to have vegetation change between 2041 and 2050, and 82,927 km(2) of soils may become sensitive because of future vegetation changes. These maps give managers a way to visualize and identify where soils and vegetation should be investigated and monitored for degradation in a drying climate, so restoration and mitigation strategies can be focused in these areas.

  20. Case study on the evaluation of the ground reinforcement with complex resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J.; Kim, J.; Park, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recently complex resistivity (CR) method is applied to the various engineering purpose mainly due to the development of measurement instruments, which enables the detection of small IP effect in the subsurface. CR method is one of frequency-domain IP method, and it measures the amplitude and absolute phase with respect to the transmitted current. It is known as a spectral IP (SIP) method. With the recent development of instrument, the modeling and analysis algorithm for the CR method were already developed and nearly completed. In this study, we applied CR method to characterize the effect of ground reinforcement which uses grouting with the injection of cement mortar material. As curing the injected cement mortar, the electric conductivity changes, and average conductivity of it is very high. Because of it, we used the DC resistivity monitoring as the way of evaluating the grouting performance. In addition to this, we applied the CR method after that the ground reinforcement with grouting was completed because we thought that cement mortar may show a strong IP effect. For the DC monitoring, we acquired the surface resistivity data before, during and after grouting. Total six data sets were acquired and processed with the recently developed 4D inversion algorithm. CR data is also processed with the developed two-dimensional inversion algorithm and then inverted sections from CR method were compared to the results of DC monitoring data. The area which was identified by 4D DC monitoring as the region where the cement mortar was injected and infiltrated were well matched the anomalous area shown in the phase section of CR method. Resistivity change was not clear with the injection of cement mortar, but phase change was clearly noticeable in the inverted section. From this, we hoped that CR method could provide a way of the quantitative estimation of ground improvement.

  1. Using case study within a sequential explanatory design to evaluate the impact of specialist and advanced practice roles on clinical outcomes: the SCAPE study.

    PubMed

    Lalor, Joan G; Casey, Dympna; Elliott, Naomi; Coyne, Imelda; Comiskey, Catherine; Higgins, Agnes; Murphy, Kathy; Devane, Declan; Begley, Cecily

    2013-04-08

    The role of the clinical nurse/midwife specialist and advanced nurse/midwife practitioner is complex not least because of the diversity in how the roles are operationalised across health settings and within multidisciplinary teams. This aim of this paper is to use The SCAPE Study: Specialist Clinical and Advanced Practitioner Evaluation in Ireland to illustrate how case study was used to strengthen a Sequential Explanatory Design. In Phase 1, clinicians identified indicators of specialist and advanced practice which were then used to guide the instrumental case study design which formed the second phase of the larger study. Phase 2 used matched case studies to evaluate the effectiveness of specialist and advanced practitioners on clinical outcomes for service users. Data were collected through observation, documentary analysis, and interviews. Observations were made of 23 Clinical Specialists or Advanced Practitioners, and 23 matched clinicians in similar matched non-postholding sites, while they delivered care. Forty-one service users, 41 clinicians, and 23 Directors of Nursing or Midwifery were interviewed, and 279 service users completed a survey based on the components of CS and AP practice identified in Phase 1. A coding framework, and the generation of cross tabulation matrices in NVivo, was used to make explicit how the outcome measures were confirmed and validated from multiple sources. This strengthened the potential to examine single cases that seemed 'different', and allowed for cases to be redefined. Phase 3 involved interviews with policy-makers to set the findings in context. Case study is a powerful research strategy to use within sequential explanatory mixed method designs, and adds completeness to the exploration of complex issues in clinical practice. The design is flexible, allowing the use of multiple data collection methods from both qualitative and quantitative paradigms. Multiple approaches to data collection are needed to evaluate the impact

  2. Evaluation of biological stability and corrosion potential in drinking water distribution systems: a case study.

    PubMed

    Chien, C C; Kao, C M; Chen, C W; Dong, C D; Chien, H Y

    2009-06-01

    The appearance of assimilable organic carbon (AOC), microbial regrowth, disinfection by-products (DBPs), and pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems are among those major safe drinking water issues in many countries. The water distribution system of Cheng-Ching Lake Water Treatment Plant (CCLWTP) was selected in this study to evaluate the: (1) fate and transport of AOC, DBPs [e.g., trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs)], and other organic carbon indicators in the selected distribution system, (2) correlations between AOC (or DBPs) and major water quality parameters [e.g. dissolved oxygen (DO), free residual chlorine, and bacteria, and (3) causes and significance of corrosion problems of the water pipes in this system. In this study, seasonal water samples were collected from 13 representative locations in the distribution system for analyses of AOC, DBPs, and other water quality indicators. Results indicate that residual free chlorine concentrations in the distribution system met the drinking water standards (0.2 to 1 mg l(-1)) established by Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (TEPA). Results show that AOC measurements correlated positively with total organic carbon (TOC) and UV-254 (an organic indicator) values in this system. Moreover, AOC concentrations at some locations were higher than the 50 microg acetate-C l(-1) standard established by Taiwan Water Company. This indicates that the microbial regrowth might be a potential water quality problem in this system. Higher DO measurements (>5.7 mg l(-1)) might cause the aerobic biodegradation of THMs and HAAs in the system, and thus, low THMs (<0.035 mg l(-1)) and HAAs (<0.019 mg l(-1)) concentrations were observed at all sampling locations. Results from the observed negative Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) values, higher Ryznar Stability Index (RSI) values, and high Fe3+ concentrations at some pipe-end locations indicate that highly oxidative and corrosive conditions occurred

  3. Using Visual Analysis to Evaluate and Refine Multilevel Models of Single-Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Eun Kyeng; Petit-Bois, Merlande; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Ferron, John M.

    2016-01-01

    In special education, multilevel models of single-case research have been used as a method of estimating treatment effects over time and across individuals. Although multilevel models can accurately summarize the effect, it is known that if the model is misspecified, inferences about the effects can be biased. Concern with the potential for model…

  4. Using Visual Analysis to Evaluate and Refine Multilevel Models of Single-Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Eun Kyeng; Petit-Bois, Merlande; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Ferron, John M.

    2016-01-01

    In special education, multilevel models of single-case research have been used as a method of estimating treatment effects over time and across individuals. Although multilevel models can accurately summarize the effect, it is known that if the model is misspecified, inferences about the effects can be biased. Concern with the potential for model…

  5. Performance Evaluation and Analysis of Rural Drinking Water Safety Project——A Case Study in Jiangsu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaorong

    2017-04-01

    Water is the basic condition for human survival and development. As China is the most populous country, rural drinking water safety problems are most conspicuous. Therefore, the Chinese government keeps increasing investment and has built a large number of rural drinking water safety projects. Scientific evaluation of project performance is of great significance to promote the sustainable operation of the project and the sustainable development of rural economy. Previous studies mainly focus on the economic benefits of the project, while ignoring the fact that the rural drinking water safety project is quasi-public goods, which has economic, social and ecological benefits. This paper establishes a comprehensive evaluation model for rural drinking water safety performance, which adapts the rules of "5E" (economy, efficiency, effectiveness, equity and environment) as the value orientation, and selects a rural drinking water safety project as object in case study at K District, which is in the north of Jiangsu Province, China. The results shows: 1) the comprehensive performance of K project is in good condition; 2) The performance of every part shows that the scores of criteria "efficiency", "environment" and "effect" are higher than the mean performance, while the "economy" is slightly lower than the mean and the "equity" is the lowest. 3) The performance of indicator layer shows that: the planned completion rate of project, the reduction rate of project cost and the penetration rate of water-use population are significantly lower than other indicators. Based on the achievements of previous studies and the characteristics of rural drinking water safety project, this study integrates the evaluation dimensions of equity and environment, which can contribute to a more comprehensive and systematic assessment of project performance and provide empirical data for performance evaluation and management of rural drinking water safety project. Key Words: Rural drinking water

  6. When to be skeptical of negative studies: pitfalls in evaluating occupational risks using population-based case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Hu, S W; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Siemiatycki, J

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated arsenic and lung cancer incidence in a community setting in the Montreal area. Job histories and sociodemographic factors were collected by interview from 857 lung cancer cases, 533 general population controls, and 1,360 controls with other cancers. Chemist-hygienists assessed each subject's life-time occupational exposure to 294 substances. Logistic regressions yielded arsenic/lung cancer odds ratios of 1.1 (95% confidence interval = 0.60, 1.7) based on cancer controls, and 0.82 (95% confidence interval = 0.41, 1.6) based on population controls. Risk did not rise with increasing level or probability of exposure. Worksite studies consistently show lung carcinogenicity from arsenic. Since confounding from other chemicals was well controlled, the most likely explanation is substantially lower exposures than in previous studies. The lack of association in this study demonstrates the need for caution in interpreting negative findings from population-based case-control studies, particularly when exposures are low or rare, as well as the difficulty in generating hypotheses from such studies.

  7. Exposing the key functions of a complex intervention for shared care in mental health: case study of a process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Byng, Richard; Norman, Ian; Redfern, Sally; Jones, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Background Complex interventions have components which can vary in different contexts. Using the Realistic Evaluation framework, this study investigates how a complex health services intervention led to developments in shared care for people with long-term mental illness. Methods A retrospective qualitative interview study was carried out alongside a randomised controlled trial. The multi-faceted intervention supported by facilitators aimed to develop systems for shared care. The study was set in London. Participants included 46 practitioners and managers from 12 participating primary health care teams and their associated community mental health teams. Interviews focussed on how and why out comes were achieved, and were analysed using a framework incorporating context and intervening mechanisms. Results Thirty-one interviews were completed to create 12 case studies. The enquiry highlighted the importance of the catalysing, doing and reviewing functions of the facilitation process. Other facets of the intervention were less dominant. The intervention catalysed the allocation of link workers and liaison arrangements in nearly all practices. Case discussions between link workers and GPs improved individual care as well as helping link workers become part of the primary care team; but sustained integration into the team depended both on flexibility and experience of the link worker, and upon selection of relevant patients for the case discussions. The doing function of facilitators included advice and, at times, manpower, to help introduce successful systems for reviewing care, however time spent developing IT systems was rarely productive. The reviewing function of the intervention was weak and sometimes failed to solve problems in the development of liaison or recall. Conclusion Case discussions and improved liaison at times of crisis, rather than for proactive recall, were the key functions of shared care contributing to the success of Mental Health Link. This

  8. A Probability Model for Evaluating the Bias and Precision of Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates from Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Haber, M.; An, Q.; Foppa, I. M.; Shay, D. K.; Ferdinands, J. M.; Orenstein, W. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary As influenza vaccination is now widely recommended, randomized clinical trials are no longer ethical in many populations. Therefore, observational studies on patients seeking medical care for acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) are a popular option for estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE). We developed a probability model for evaluating and comparing bias and precision of estimates of VE against symptomatic influenza from two commonly-used case-control study designs: the test-negative design and the traditional case-control design. We show that when vaccination does not affect the probability of developing non-influenza ARI then VE estimates from test-negative design studies are unbiased even if vaccinees and non-vaccinees have different probabilities of seeking medical care against ARI, as long as the ratio of these probabilities is the same for illnesses resulting from influenza and non-influenza infections. Our numerical results suggest that in general, estimates from the test-negative design have smaller bias compared to estimates from the traditional case-control design as long as the probability of non-influenza ARI is similar among vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. We did not find consistent differences between the standard errors of the estimates from the two study designs. PMID:25147970

  9. Evaluating oversight of human drugs and medical devices: a case study of the FDA and implications for nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Paradise, Jordan; Tisdale, Alison W; Hall, Ralph F; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2009-01-01

    This article evaluates the oversight of drugs and medical devices by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) using an integration of public policy, law, and bioethics approaches and employing multiple assessment criteria, including economic, social, safety, and technological. Criteria assessment and expert elicitation are combined with existing literature, case law, and regulations in an integrative historical case studies approach. We then use our findings as a tool to explore possibilities for effective oversight and regulatory mechanisms for nanobiotechnology. Section I describes oversight mechanisms for human drugs and medical devices and presents current nanotechnology products. Section II describes the results of expert elicitation research. Section III highlights key criteria and relates them to the literature and larger debate. We conclude with broad lessons for the oversight of nanobiotechnology informed by Sections I-III in order to provide useful analysis from multiple disciplines and perspectives to guide discussions regarding appropriate FDA oversight.

  10. Interoperability evaluation case study: an Obstetrics-Gynecology Department and related Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Blobel, Bernd; Bernad, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the steps and metrics for evaluating the interoperability of an Obstetrics-Gynecology Department Information System applied on Bega Clinic Timisoara regarding its readiness for interoperability in relation with similar systems. The developed OGD IS was modeled starting from the Generic Component Model and sends information to other medical units using the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture and Continuity of Care Document standards. The data for evaluation are real, collected between 2009 and 2010 from Bega Clinic Timisoara. The results were relatively good for the investigated data and structure.

  11. Evaluating the Economic Impact of Smart Care Platforms: Qualitative and Quantitative Results of a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Vannieuwenborg, Frederic; Van der Auwermeulen, Thomas; Van Ooteghem, Jan; Jacobs, An; Verbrugge, Sofie; Colle, Didier

    2016-10-31

    In response to the increasing pressure of the societal challenge because of a graying society, a gulf of new Information and Communication Technology (ICT) supported care services (eCare) can now be noticed. Their common goal is to increase the quality of care while decreasing its costs. Smart Care Platforms (SCPs), installed in the homes of care-dependent people, foster the interoperability of these services and offer a set of eCare services that are complementary on one platform. These eCare services could not only result in more quality care for care receivers, but they also offer opportunities to care providers to optimize their processes. The objective of the study was to identify and describe the expected added values and impacts of integrating SCPs in current home care delivery processes for all actors. In addition, the potential economic impact of SCP deployment is quantified from the perspective of home care organizations. Semistructured and informal interviews and focus groups and cocreation workshops with service providers, managers of home care organizations, and formal and informal care providers led to the identification of added values of SCP integration. In a second step, process breakdown analyses of home care provisioning allowed defining the operational impact for home care organization. Impacts on 2 different process steps of providing home care were quantified. After modeling the investment, an economic evaluation compared the business as usual (BAU) scenario versus the integrated SCP scenario. The added value of SCP integration for all actors involved in home care was identified. Most impacts were qualitative such as increase in peace of mind, better quality of care, strengthened involvement in care provisioning, and more transparent care communication. For home care organizations, integrating SCPs could lead to a decrease of 38% of the current annual expenses for two administrative process steps namely, care rescheduling and the billing for

  12. Evaluating the Economic Impact of Smart Care Platforms: Qualitative and Quantitative Results of a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Van der Auwermeulen, Thomas; Van Ooteghem, Jan; Jacobs, An; Verbrugge, Sofie; Colle, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Background In response to the increasing pressure of the societal challenge because of a graying society, a gulf of new Information and Communication Technology (ICT) supported care services (eCare) can now be noticed. Their common goal is to increase the quality of care while decreasing its costs. Smart Care Platforms (SCPs), installed in the homes of care-dependent people, foster the interoperability of these services and offer a set of eCare services that are complementary on one platform. These eCare services could not only result in more quality care for care receivers, but they also offer opportunities to care providers to optimize their processes. Objective The objective of the study was to identify and describe the expected added values and impacts of integrating SCPs in current home care delivery processes for all actors. In addition, the potential economic impact of SCP deployment is quantified from the perspective of home care organizations. Methods Semistructured and informal interviews and focus groups and cocreation workshops with service providers, managers of home care organizations, and formal and informal care providers led to the identification of added values of SCP integration. In a second step, process breakdown analyses of home care provisioning allowed defining the operational impact for home care organization. Impacts on 2 different process steps of providing home care were quantified. After modeling the investment, an economic evaluation compared the business as usual (BAU) scenario versus the integrated SCP scenario. Results The added value of SCP integration for all actors involved in home care was identified. Most impacts were qualitative such as increase in peace of mind, better quality of care, strengthened involvement in care provisioning, and more transparent care communication. For home care organizations, integrating SCPs could lead to a decrease of 38% of the current annual expenses for two administrative process steps namely

  13. Evaluating the impact of fires on slope instability processes: a case study in Central Italy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M.; Torri, D.; Bacaro, G.; Mondini, A.; Reichenbach, P.; Fiorucci, F.; Marchesini, I.

    2013-12-01

    Fires can change significantly the characteristics of slopes. Their effect on vegetation, soil properties, and fauna can influence slope instability processes, including channeled erosion and mass movements. Even if in the literature attempts to estimate these effects were made using mostly empirical approaches, evaluating quantitatively the impact of fires on slope instability processes remain challenging. In a small basin in Central Italy, where an intense arson occurred in July 2012, we estimated the effects of fire on the hazard posed by different type of instability processes. For the purpose we modelled separately channeled erosion phenomena and rock falls, for which a significant impact of fires was expected. For the former we exploited the LANDPLANER (LANDscape, Plants, LANdslides and ERosion) model, which is able to simulate the hydrological response of a slope, and their effect on instability processes, under human-induced or natural changing scenarios, including climatic, land use, and slope morphology changes. For the latter we exploited two different modeling approaches considering directly (Rockyfor3D model) or indirectly (STONE model) the effect of the vegetation on the movement of rock masses along the slope. All the model simulations were repeated considering land use scenarios before and after the fire. Those were derived through field surveys and though the supervised classification of high resolution satellite images acquired inthe study area before and after the fire. The analysis of the effect of the fire on channeled phenomena included the estimation of (i) the overland flow on the basin, (ii) the location of the gully head, (iii) the channel eroded volume, and (iii) the change of the connectivity inside the basin. The analysis of the effect of the fire on rock fall phenomena included the estimation of (i) the increase of rock fall source areas, (ii) the increase of distances travelled by rock masses along the slopes, and (iii) the spatial

  14. Spore trap analysis and MSQPCR in evaluating mold burden: a flooded gymnasium case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    A school gymnasium was accidentally flooded by the fire-suppression sprinkler system. The surface water was removed but after 25 days, the school decided to evaluate whether there was any mold growth in the gymnasium. Thirty, five-minute air samples (75 m3 air) were collected w...

  15. Evaluating Educational Interventions That Induce Service Receipt: A Case Study Application of "City Connects"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, A. Brooks; Shand, Robert; Belfield, Clive R.; Wang, Anyi; Levin, Henry M.

    2017-01-01

    Educational interventions are complex: Often they combine a diagnostic component (identifying student need) with a service component (ensuring appropriate educational resources are provided). This complexity raises challenges for program evaluation. These interventions, which we refer to as "service mediation interventions," affect…

  16. CASE STUDY 6.26: UNSUCCESSFUL TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATIONS MANIPULATIONS: SEAWATER BUFFERS AND STERILIZATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes several unsuccessful attempts to develop Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) manipulations for aqueous samples during the first 5 years of our research. The first part of the paper explores irradiation as a sterilization technique to discern if sam...

  17. Health economic evaluation in Japan: a case study of one aspect of health technology assessment.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Adam

    2003-02-01

    There is a burgeoning literature in health economic evaluation, with this form of analysis becoming increasingly influential at the health policy making level in a number of countries. However, a search of the literature reveals that in Japan, the world's second largest health care market, very little health economic evaluation has been undertaken. The main reason for the lack of interest in economic evaluation is that the fee-for-service and strict price regulation that characterises the system of health care financing in Japan is not conducive to this form of analysis. Moreover, the government and many researchers are satisfied that the current organisation of health care has given long life and low infant mortality at low cost. Even if it is accepted that low health care costs and good health prevail in Japan, slower economic growth rates, an ageing population and the development of new medical technologies will place increasing pressure on health care resources and will necessitate a more rational use of these resources. Good economic evaluation, by weighing benefits against costs, has an important role to play.

  18. Automated Essay Evaluation for English Language Learners: A Case Study of "MY Access"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Giang Thi Linh; Kunnan, Antony John

    2016-01-01

    Computer technology made its way into writing instruction and assessment with spelling and grammar checkers decades ago, but more recently it has done so with automated essay evaluation (AEE) and diagnostic feedback. And although many programs and tools have been developed in the last decade, not enough research has been conducted to support or…

  19. Evaluation of economic loss from energy-related environmental pollution: a case study of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Su, Meirong; Liu, Gengyuan; Yang, Zhifeng

    2013-09-01

    With the growth of energy consumption, energy-related environmental pollution has become increasingly serious, which in turn causes enormous economic loss because of public health damage, corrosion of materials, crop yield reduction, and other factors. Evaluating economic loss caused by energy-related environmental pollution can contribute to decision making in energy management. A framework for evaluating economic loss from environmental pollution produced during energy production, transportation, and consumption is proposed in this paper. Regarding SO2, PM10, and solid waste as the main pollutants, economic losses from health damage, materials corrosion, crop yield reduction, and solid waste pollution are estimated based on multiple concentration-response relationships and dose-response functions. The proposed framework and evaluation methods are applied to Beijing, China. It is evident that total economic loss attributable to energy-related environmental pollution fluctuated during 2000-2011 but had a general growth trend, with the highest value reaching 2.3 × 108 CNY (China Yuan) in 2006. Economic loss caused by health damage contributes most to the total loss among the four measured damage types. The total economic loss strongly correlates with the amount of energy consumption, especially for oil and electricity. Our evaluation framework and methods can be used widely to measure the potential impact of environmental pollution in the energy lifecycle.

  20. Case Study: Structural Evaluation of Steel Truss Aircraft Hangars at Corpus Christi Army Depot, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    information essential for improving future reports. 1. Does this report satisfy a need? (Comment on purpose, related project, or other area of interest...AND BENDING STRESSES: HOTE THAT EVALUATION ALLOWABLE STRESSES ARE EQUAL TO DESIGN ALLOWABLE STRESSES DIVIDED BT THE FACTORS OF SAFETY ORIGINALLY

  1. Evaluating Automatic Speech Recognition-Based Language Learning Systems: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Doremalen, Joost; Boves, Lou; Colpaert, Jozef; Cucchiarini, Catia; Strik, Helmer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate a prototype of an automatic speech recognition (ASR)-based language learning system that provides feedback on different aspects of speaking performance (pronunciation, morphology and syntax) to students of Dutch as a second language. We carried out usability reviews, expert reviews and user tests to…

  2. Exploring the Articulation and Evaluation of the Learning Outcomes of Instructor Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macfarlane, Jack P.

    2014-01-01

    The definition of clear goals is essential to the effectiveness of training intended for the advancement of professional development. Properly articulated instructional goals also facilitate the evaluation of the intended outcomes of the learning event. Although outcomes-based instruction is prevalent in K-12 settings as well as in post-secondary…

  3. Methodology for Evaluating a Novel Education Technology: A Case Study of Handheld Video Games in Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Jesse L.; Nussbaum, Miguel; Rodriguez, Patricio; Rosas, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Many school systems, in both the developed and developing world, are implementing educational technology to assist in student learning. However, there is no clear consensus on how to evaluate these new technologies. This paper proposes a comprehensive methodology for estimating the value of a new educational technology in three steps: benefit…

  4. CASE STUDY 6.26: UNSUCCESSFUL TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATIONS MANIPULATIONS: SEAWATER BUFFERS AND STERILIZATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes several unsuccessful attempts to develop Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) manipulations for aqueous samples during the first 5 years of our research. The first part of the paper explores irradiation as a sterilization technique to discern if sam...

  5. Infusing Two Models of Evaluation into a Military Environment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaberg, Wayne; Thompson, Carla J.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the worth and effectiveness of training used within a military environment is the same accountability responsibility that educational organizations, businesses, and social agencies are charged with for improving programs and services to society. The need for accountability implies the process of evaluation, particularly in governmental…

  6. Multi-Dimensional Evaluation for Module Improvement: A Mathematics-Based Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellery, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Due to a poor module evaluation, mediocre student grades and a difficult teaching experience in lectures, the Data Analysis section of a first year core module, Research Methods for Social Sciences (RMSS), offered at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, was completely revised. In order to review the effectiveness of these changes in…

  7. Exploring the Articulation and Evaluation of the Learning Outcomes of Instructor Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macfarlane, Jack P.

    2014-01-01

    The definition of clear goals is essential to the effectiveness of training intended for the advancement of professional development. Properly articulated instructional goals also facilitate the evaluation of the intended outcomes of the learning event. Although outcomes-based instruction is prevalent in K-12 settings as well as in post-secondary…

  8. Spore trap analysis and MSQPCR in evaluating mold burden: a flooded gymnasium case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    A school gymnasium was accidentally flooded by the fire-suppression sprinkler system. The surface water was removed but after 25 days, the school decided to evaluate whether there was any mold growth in the gymnasium. Thirty, five-minute air samples (75 m3 air) were collected w...

  9. From Theory to Practice in the Design and Evaluation of Youth Development Programs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cato, Bertha

    2007-01-01

    The growing interest in youth development, prevention, and assessment has challenged professional practices relative to the design, implementation, and evaluation of youth development programs. This article sheds light on the need for continuous training and staff development in the areas of program development and documentation, using the…

  10. Self Evaluation: A Case Study of a School in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokeyo, Carolyne Adhiambo; Oluoch, John

    2015-01-01

    External evaluation of schools purpose to monitor delivery of education with a view to ensuring adherence to stipulated curriculum and set standards as well as efficient and effective quality education. However, school improvement scholars in developed economies now argue that schools must take their own initiative to assess the extent to which…

  11. Infusing Two Models of Evaluation into a Military Environment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaberg, Wayne; Thompson, Carla J.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the worth and effectiveness of training used within a military environment is the same accountability responsibility that educational organizations, businesses, and social agencies are charged with for improving programs and services to society. The need for accountability implies the process of evaluation, particularly in governmental…

  12. Integrating Qualitative Methods in a Predominantly Quantitative Evaluation: A Case Study and Some Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Melvin M.; Feller, Irwin; Button, Scott B.

    1997-01-01

    A review of qualitative methods used in a predominantly quantitative evaluation indicates a variety of roles for such a mixing of methods, including framing and revising research questions, assessing the validity of measures and adaptations to program implementation, and gauging the degree of uncertainty and generalizability of conclusions.…

  13. Automated Essay Evaluation for English Language Learners: A Case Study of "MY Access"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Giang Thi Linh; Kunnan, Antony John

    2016-01-01

    Computer technology made its way into writing instruction and assessment with spelling and grammar checkers decades ago, but more recently it has done so with automated essay evaluation (AEE) and diagnostic feedback. And although many programs and tools have been developed in the last decade, not enough research has been conducted to support or…

  14. Direct Loan Evaluation. Case Study Summary Report: Academic Year 1995-96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macro International, Inc., Calverton, MD.

    As part of a 5-year evaluation of the Direct Loan and the Federal Family Education Loan programs, 19 institutions of higher education participating in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program were visited to examine the diversity of approaches used by schools in planning for and implementing the Direct Loan program. The schools included…

  15. Evaluating Automatic Speech Recognition-Based Language Learning Systems: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Doremalen, Joost; Boves, Lou; Colpaert, Jozef; Cucchiarini, Catia; Strik, Helmer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate a prototype of an automatic speech recognition (ASR)-based language learning system that provides feedback on different aspects of speaking performance (pronunciation, morphology and syntax) to students of Dutch as a second language. We carried out usability reviews, expert reviews and user tests to…

  16. Evaluating the Reliability of EHR-Generated Clinical Outcomes Reports: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Kanger, Chatrian; Brown, Lisanne; Mukherjee, Snigdha; Xin, Haichang; Diana, Mark L; Khurshid, Anjum

    2014-01-01

    Quality incentive programs, such as Meaningful Use, operate under the assumption that clinical quality measures can be reliably extracted from EHRs. Safety Net providers, particularly Federally Qualified Health Centers and Look-Alikes, tend to be high adopters of EHRs; however, recent reports have shown that only about 9% of FQHCs and Look-Alikes were demonstrating meaningful use as of 2013. Our experience working with the Crescent City Beacon Community (CCBC) found that many health centers relied on chart audits to report quality measures as opposed to electronically generating reports directly from their EHRs due to distrust in the data. This paper describes a step-by-step process for improving the reliability of data extracted from EHRs to increase reliability of quality measure reports, to support quality improvement, and to achieve alignment with national clinical quality reporting requirements. Lack of standardization in data capture and reporting within EHRs drives distrust in EHR-reported data. Practices or communities attempting to achieve standardization may look to CCBC's experience for guidance on where to start and the level of resources required in order to execute a data standardization project. During the time of this data standardization project, CCBC was launching an HIE. Lack of trust in EHR data was a driver for distrust in the HIE data. We present a case study where a five-step process was used to harmonize measures, reduce data errors, and increase trust in EHR clinical outcomes reports among a community of Safety Net providers using a common EHR. Primary outcomes were the incidence of reporting errors and the potential effect of error types on quality measure percentages. The activities and level of resources required to achieve these results were also documented by the CCBC program. Implementation of a community-wide data reporting project resulted in measure harmonization, reduced reporting burden, and error reduction in EHR

  17. Evaluating the Reliability of EHR-Generated Clinical Outcomes Reports: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanger, Chatrian; Brown, Lisanne; Mukherjee, Snigdha; Xin, Haichang; Diana, Mark L.; Khurshid, Anjum

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Quality incentive programs, such as Meaningful Use, operate under the assumption that clinical quality measures can be reliably extracted from EHRs. Safety Net providers, particularly Federally Qualified Health Centers and Look-Alikes, tend to be high adopters of EHRs; however, recent reports have shown that only about 9% of FQHCs and Look-Alikes were demonstrating meaningful use as of 2013. Our experience working with the Crescent City Beacon Community (CCBC) found that many health centers relied on chart audits to report quality measures as opposed to electronically generating reports directly from their EHRs due to distrust in the data. This paper describes a step-by-step process for improving the reliability of data extracted from EHRs to increase reliability of quality measure reports, to support quality improvement, and to achieve alignment with national clinical quality reporting requirements. Background: Lack of standardization in data capture and reporting within EHRs drives distrust in EHR-reported data. Practices or communities attempting to achieve standardization may look to CCBC’s experience for guidance on where to start and the level of resources required in order to execute a data standardization project. During the time of this data standardization project, CCBC was launching an HIE. Lack of trust in EHR data was a driver for distrust in the HIE data. Methods: We present a case study where a five-step process was used to harmonize measures, reduce data errors, and increase trust in EHR clinical outcomes reports among a community of Safety Net providers using a common EHR. Primary outcomes were the incidence of reporting errors and the potential effect of error types on quality measure percentages. The activities and level of resources required to achieve these results were also documented by the CCBC program. Findings: Implementation of a community-wide data reporting project resulted in measure harmonization, reduced reporting

  18. Case Studies Reveal Camper Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Steve; Fullerton, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Case studies in the National Camp Evaluation Project and National Inclusive Camp Practices project used interviews with counselors and parents about camper's growth to yield qualitative data for camp program evaluation. The importance, methods, and benefits of case studies are described. Sidebars give examples of comments on perceived camper…

  19. Evaluating social media's capacity to develop engaged audiences in health promotion settings: use of Twitter metrics as a case study.

    PubMed

    Neiger, Brad L; Thackeray, Rosemary; Burton, Scott H; Giraud-Carrier, Christophe G; Fagen, Michael C

    2013-03-01

    Use of social media in health promotion and public health continues to grow in popularity, though most of what is reported in literature represents one-way messaging devoid of attributes associated with engagement, a core attribute, if not the central purpose, of social media. This article defines engagement, describes its value in maximizing the potential of social media in health promotion, proposes an evaluation hierarchy for social media engagement, and uses Twitter as a case study to illustrate how the hierarchy might function in practice. Partnership and participation are proposed as culminating outcomes for social media use in health promotion. As use of social media in health promotion moves toward this end, evaluation metrics that verify progress and inform subsequent strategies will become increasingly important.

  20. Evaluating the aquatic toxicity of complex organic chemical mixtures: lessons learned from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and petroleum hydrocarbon case studies.

    PubMed

    Landrum, Peter F; Chapman, Peter M; Neff, Jerry; Page, David S

    2012-04-01

    Experimental designs for evaluating complex mixture toxicity in aquatic environments can be highly variable and, if not appropriate, can produce and have produced data that are difficult or impossible to interpret accurately. We build on and synthesize recent critical reviews of mixture toxicity using lessons learned from 4 case studies, ranging from binary to more complex mixtures of primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and petroleum hydrocarbons, to provide guidance for evaluating the aquatic toxicity of complex mixtures of organic chemicals. Two fundamental requirements include establishing a dose-response relationship and determining the causative agent (or agents) of any observed toxicity. Meeting these 2 requirements involves ensuring appropriate exposure conditions and measurement endpoints, considering modifying factors (e.g., test conditions, test organism life stages and feeding behavior, chemical transformations, mixture dilutions, sorbing phases), and correctly interpreting dose-response relationships. Specific recommendations are provided. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  1. Conversion from robotic surgery to laparotomy: a case-control study evaluating risk factors for conversion.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nate; Fleming, Nicole D; Nick, Alpa M; Munsell, Mark F; Rallapalli, Vijayashri; Westin, Shannon N; Meyer, Larissa A; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Ramirez, Pedro T; Soliman, Pamela T

    2014-08-01

    To determine risk factors associated with conversion to laparotomy for women undergoing robotic gynecologic surgery. The medical records of 459 consecutive robotic surgery cases performed between December 2006 and October 2011 by 8 different surgeons at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Cases converted to laparotomy were compared to those completed robotically. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the demographic and clinical characteristics. Forty of 459 (8.7%, 95% CI 6.3%-11.7%) patients had conversion to open surgery. Reason for conversion included poor visualization due to adhesions (13), inability to tolerate Trendelenburg (7), enlarged uterus (7), extensive peritoneal disease (5), bowel injury (2), ureteral injury (1), vascular injury (1), bladder injury (1), technical difficulty with the robot (2), and inability to access abdominal cavity (1). 5% of cases were converted prior to docking the robot. On univariate analysis, preoperative diagnosis (p=0.012), non-White race (p=0.004), history of asthma (p=0.027), ASA score (p=0.032), bowel injury (p=0.012), greater BMI (p<0.001), need for blood transfusion (p<0.001), and expected blood loss (p<0.001) were associated with conversion. On multivariate analysis, non-White race (OR 2.88, 95% CI 1.39-5.96, p=0.004), bowel injury (OR 35.40, 95% CI 3.00-417.28, p=0.005), and increasing BMI (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.09, p<0.001) were significantly associated with increased risk for conversion. Prior surgery was not associated with conversion to open surgery (p=0.347). Conversion to laparotomy was required for 8.7% of patients undergoing robotic surgery for a gynecologic indication. Increasing BMI and non-white race were identified as the two preoperative risk factors associated with conversion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A case study for the real-time experimental evaluation of the VIPER microprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreno, Victor A.; Angellatta, Rob K.

    1991-09-01

    An experiment to evaluate the applicability of the Verifiable Integrated Processor for Enhanced Reliability (VIPER) microprocessor to real time control is described. The VIPER microprocessor was invented by the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), U.K., and is an example of the use of formal mathematical methods for developing electronic digital systems with a high degree of assurance on the system design and implementation correctness. The experiment consisted of selecting a control law, writing the control law algorithm for the VIPER processor, and providing real time, dynamic inputs into the processor and monitoring the outputs. The control law selected and coded for the VIPER processor was the yaw damper function of an automatic landing program for a 737 aircraft. The mechanisms for interfacing the VIPER Single Board Computer to the VAX host are described. Results include run time experiences, performance evaluation, and comparison of VIPER and FORTRAN yaw damper algorithm output for accuracy estimation.

  3. A case study for the real-time experimental evaluation of the VIPER microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carreno, Victor A.; Angellatta, Rob K.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment to evaluate the applicability of the Verifiable Integrated Processor for Enhanced Reliability (VIPER) microprocessor to real time control is described. The VIPER microprocessor was invented by the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), U.K., and is an example of the use of formal mathematical methods for developing electronic digital systems with a high degree of assurance on the system design and implementation correctness. The experiment consisted of selecting a control law, writing the control law algorithm for the VIPER processor, and providing real time, dynamic inputs into the processor and monitoring the outputs. The control law selected and coded for the VIPER processor was the yaw damper function of an automatic landing program for a 737 aircraft. The mechanisms for interfacing the VIPER Single Board Computer to the VAX host are described. Results include run time experiences, performance evaluation, and comparison of VIPER and FORTRAN yaw damper algorithm output for accuracy estimation.

  4. Use of live interactive webcasting for an international postgraduate module in ehealth: case study evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ray B; Maramba, Inocencio; Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Alexander, Tara

    2009-11-13

    Producing "traditional" e-learning can be time consuming, and in a topic such as eHealth, it may have a short shelf-life. Students sometimes report feeling isolated and lacking in motivation. Synchronous methods can play an important part in any blended approach to learning. The aim was to develop, deliver, and evaluate an international postgraduate module in eHealth using live interactive webcasting. We developed a hybrid solution for live interactive webcasting using a scan converter, mixer, and digitizer, and video server to embed a presenter-controlled talking head or copy of the presenter's computer screen (normally a PowerPoint slide) in a student chat room. We recruited 16 students from six countries and ran weekly 2.5-hour live sessions for 10 weeks. The content included the use of computers by patients, patient access to records, different forms of e-learning for patients and professionals, research methods in eHealth, geographic information systems, and telehealth. All sessions were recorded-presentations as video files and the student interaction as text files. Students were sent an email questionnaire of mostly open questions seeking their views of this form of learning. Responses were collated and anonymized by a colleague who was not part of the teaching team. Sessions were generally very interactive, with most students participating actively in breakout or full-class discussions. In a typical 2.5-hour session, students posted about 50 messages each. Two students did not complete all sessions; one withdrew from the pressure of work after session 6, and one from illness after session 7. Fourteen of the 16 responded to the feedback questionnaire. Most students (12/14) found the module useful or very useful, and all would recommend the module to others. All liked the method of delivery, in particular the interactivity, the variety of students, and the "closeness" of the group. Most (11/14) felt "connected" with the other students on the course. Many

  5. Evaluation of the clinical process in a critical care information system using the Lean method: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are numerous applications for Health Information Systems (HIS) that support specific tasks in the clinical workflow. The Lean method has been used increasingly to optimize clinical workflows, by removing waste and shortening the delivery cycle time. There are a limited number of studies on Lean applications related to HIS. Therefore, we applied the Lean method to evaluate the clinical processes related to HIS, in order to evaluate its efficiency in removing waste and optimizing the process flow. This paper presents the evaluation findings of these clinical processes, with regards to a critical care information system (CCIS), known as IntelliVue Clinical Information Portfolio (ICIP), and recommends solutions to the problems that were identified during the study. Methods We conducted a case study under actual clinical settings, to investigate how the Lean method can be used to improve the clinical process. We used observations, interviews, and document analysis, to achieve our stated goal. We also applied two tools from the Lean methodology, namely the Value Stream Mapping and the A3 problem-solving tools. We used eVSM software to plot the Value Stream Map and A3 reports. Results We identified a number of problems related to inefficiency and waste in the clinical process, and proposed an improved process model. Conclusions The case study findings show that the Value Stream Mapping and the A3 reports can be used as tools to identify waste and integrate the process steps more efficiently. We also proposed a standardized and improved clinical process model and suggested an integrated information system that combines database and software applications to reduce waste and data redundancy. PMID:23259846

  6. Evaluation of the clinical process in a critical care information system using the Lean method: a case study.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Maryati Mohd; Khodambashi, Soudabeh; Mokhtar, Ariffin Marzuki

    2012-12-21

    There are numerous applications for Health Information Systems (HIS) that support specific tasks in the clinical workflow. The Lean method has been used increasingly to optimize clinical workflows, by removing waste and shortening the delivery cycle time. There are a limited number of studies on Lean applications related to HIS. Therefore, we applied the Lean method to evaluate the clinical processes related to HIS, in order to evaluate its efficiency in removing waste and optimizing the process flow. This paper presents the evaluation findings of these clinical processes, with regards to a critical care information system (CCIS), known as IntelliVue Clinical Information Portfolio (ICIP), and recommends solutions to the problems that were identified during the study. We conducted a case study under actual clinical settings, to investigate how the Lean method can be used to improve the clinical process. We used observations, interviews, and document analysis, to achieve our stated goal. We also applied two tools from the Lean methodology, namely the Value Stream Mapping and the A3 problem-solving tools. We used eVSM software to plot the Value Stream Map and A3 reports. We identified a number of problems related to inefficiency and waste in the clinical process, and proposed an improved process model. The case study findings show that the Value Stream Mapping and the A3 reports can be used as tools to identify waste and integrate the process steps more efficiently. We also proposed a standardized and improved clinical process model and suggested an integrated information system that combines database and software applications to reduce waste and data redundancy.

  7. Building America Case Study: Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer Fans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    In this project, Building America team IBACOS performed field testing in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to evaluate heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) distribution systems during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. Four air-based HVAC distribution systems were assessed:-a typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a system with transfer fans to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedrooms. The relative ability of each system was considered with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively.

  8. A case study of the evaluation, completion, and testing of a Devonian shale gas well

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.E.; Guldry, F.K.; Graham, R.L.; Curtis, J.B.; Shaw, J.S.

    1989-05-01

    This paper summarizes the operational procedures, geochemical analyses, well-log-interpretation techniques, perforation selection methodology, production-log interpretation, well-test analysis, and stimulation evaluation for a Devonian shale gas well in Pike County, KY. Contractors collected well-log, core, geochemical, and well-test data in addition to those which the operator would have routinely collected on this well. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the data collected on the well, to present the data analyses, and to demonstrate how the various analyses are being integrated to form a better overall understanding of Devonian shale gas reservoirs.

  9. Evaluating Quality of Life in Urban Areas (Case Study: Noorabad City, Iran)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezvani, Mohammad Reza; Mansourian, Hossain; Sattari, Mohammad Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Quality of urban life (QOUL) has become an important field within urban studies. The increased level of attention to this topic is due to the increasing importance of QoL studies in monitoring public policies and in the role they can play as effective tools in urban management and planning. The main objective of this study is to measure the QOUL…

  10. Evaluating Quality of Life in Urban Areas (Case Study: Noorabad City, Iran)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezvani, Mohammad Reza; Mansourian, Hossain; Sattari, Mohammad Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Quality of urban life (QOUL) has become an important field within urban studies. The increased level of attention to this topic is due to the increasing importance of QoL studies in monitoring public policies and in the role they can play as effective tools in urban management and planning. The main objective of this study is to measure the QOUL…

  11. Evaluating oversight systems for emerging technologies: a case study of genetically engineered organisms.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Najmaie, Pouya; Larson, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. oversight system for genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) was evaluated to develop hypotheses and derive lessons for oversight of other emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology. Evaluation was based upon quantitative expert elicitation, semi-standardized interviews, and historical literature analysis. Through an interdisciplinary policy analysis approach, blending legal, ethical, risk analysis, and policy sciences viewpoints, criteria were used to identify strengths and weaknesses of GEOs oversight and explore correlations among its attributes and outcomes. From the three sources of data, hypotheses and broader conclusions for oversight were developed. Our analysis suggests several lessons for oversight of emerging technologies: the importance of reducing complexity and uncertainty in oversight for minimizing financial burdens on small product developers; consolidating multi-agency jurisdictions to avoid gaps and redundancies in safety reviews; consumer benefits for advancing acceptance of GEO products; rigorous and independent pre- and post-market assessment for environmental safety; early public input and transparency for ensuring public confidence; and the positive role of public input in system development, informed consent, capacity, compliance, incentives, and data requirements and stringency in promoting health and environmental safety outcomes, as well as the equitable distribution of health impacts. Our integrated approach is instructive for more comprehensive analyses of oversight systems, developing hypotheses for how features of oversight systems affect outcomes, and formulating policy options for oversight of future technological products, especially nanotechnology products.

  12. Evaluating near highway air pollutant levels and estimating emission factors: Case study of Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Nayeb Yazdi, Mohammad; Delavarrafiee, Maryam; Arhami, Mohammad

    2015-12-15

    A field sampling campaign was implemented to evaluate the variation in air pollutants levels near a highway in Tehran, Iran (Hemmat highway). The field measurements were used to estimate road link-based emission factors for average vehicle fleet. These factors were compared with results of an in tunnel measurement campaign (in Resalat tunnel). Roadside and in-tunnel measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and size-fractionated particulate matter (PM) were conducted during the field campaign. The concentration gradient diagrams showed exponential decay, which represented a substantial decay, more than 50-80%, in air pollutants level in a distance between 100 and 150meters (m) of the highway. The changes in particle size distribution by distancing from highway were also captured and evaluated. The results showed particle size distribution shifted to larger size particles by distancing from highway. The empirical emission factors were obtained by using the roadside and in tunnel measurements with a hypothetical box model, floating machine model, CALINE4, CT-EMFAC or COPERT. Average CO emission factors were estimated to be in a range of 4 to 12g/km, and those of PM10 were 0.1 to 0.2g/km, depending on traffic conditions. Variations of these emission factors under real working condition with speeds were determined.

  13. A Methodology to Evaluate Ecological Resources and Risk Using Two Case Studies at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Bunn, Amoret; Downs, Janelle; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Salisbury, Jennifer; Kosson, David

    2017-03-01

    An assessment of the potential risks to ecological resources from remediation activities or other perturbations should involve a quantitative evaluation of resources on the remediation site and in the surrounding environment. We developed a risk methodology to rapidly evaluate potential impact on ecological resources for the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southcentral Washington State. We describe the application of the risk evaluation for two case studies to illustrate its applicability. The ecological assessment involves examining previous sources of information for the site, defining different resource levels from 0 to 5. We also developed a risk rating scale from non-discernable to very high. Field assessment is the critical step to determine resource levels or to determine if current conditions are the same as previously evaluated. We provide a rapid assessment method for current ecological conditions that can be compared to previous site-specific data, or that can be used to assess resource value on other sites where ecological information is not generally available. The method is applicable to other Department of Energy's sites, where its development may involve a range of state regulators, resource trustees, Tribes and other stakeholders. Achieving consistency across Department of Energy's sites for valuation of ecological resources on remediation sites will assure Congress and the public that funds and personnel are being deployed appropriately.

  14. A Methodology to Evaluate Ecological Resources and Risk Using Two Case Studies at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Bunn, Amoret; Downs, Janelle; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Salisbury, Jennifer; Kosson, David

    2017-03-01

    An assessment of the potential risks to ecological resources from remediation activities or other perturbations should involve a quantitative evaluation of resources on the remediation site and in the surrounding environment. We developed a risk methodology to rapidly evaluate potential impact on ecological resources for the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southcentral Washington State. We describe the application of the risk evaluation for two case studies to illustrate its applicability. The ecological assessment involves examining previous sources of information for the site, defining different resource levels from 0 to 5. We also developed a risk rating scale from non-discernable to very high. Field assessment is the critical step to determine resource levels or to determine if current conditions are the same as previously evaluated. We provide a rapid assessment method for current ecological conditions that can be compared to previous site-specific data, or that can be used to assess resource value on other sites where ecological information is not generally available. The method is applicable to other Department of Energy's sites, where its development may involve a range of state regulators, resource trustees, Tribes and other stakeholders. Achieving consistency across Department of Energy's sites for valuation of ecological resources on remediation sites will assure Congress and the public that funds and personnel are being deployed appropriately.

  15. A rapid equity focused health impact assessment of a policy implementation plan: An Australian case study and impact evaluation.

    PubMed

    Harris-Roxas, Ben F; Harris, Patrick J; Harris, Elizabeth; Kemp, Lynn A

    2011-01-30

    Equity focused health impact assessments (EFHIAs), or health equity impact assessments, are being increasingly promoted internationally as a mechanism for enhancing the consideration of health equity in the development of policies, programs and projects. Despite this there are relatively few examples of examples of completed EFHIAs available. This paper presents a case study of a rapid EFHIA that was conducted in Australia on a health promotion policy implementation plan. It briefly describes the process and findings of the EFHIA and evaluates the impact on decision-making and implementation. The rapid EFHIA was undertaken in four days, drawing on an expert panel and limited review of the literature. A process evaluation was undertaken by email one month after the EFHIA was completed. An impact evaluation was undertaken two years later based on five semi-structured interviews with members of the EFHIA working group and policy officers and managers responsible for implementing the plan. A cost estimation was conducted by the EFHIA working group. The EFHIA made both general and specific recommendations about how the health equity impacts of the policy implementation plan could be improved. The impact evaluation identified changes to development and implementation that occurred as a result of the EFHIA, though there was disagreement about the extent to which changes could be attributed solely to the EFHIA. Those responsible considered the recommendations of the EFHIA in the next versions of their ABHI implementation plans. Factors that influenced the impact of the EFHIA included consolidating understandings of equity, enabling discussion of alternatives, and differing understandings of the purpose of the EFHIA. The EFHIA cost US$4,036 to undertake. This EFHIA was conducted in a short timeframe using relatively few resources. It had some reported impacts on the development of the implementation plan and enhanced overall consideration of health equity. This case

  16. A rapid equity focused health impact assessment of a policy implementation plan: An Australian case study and impact evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Equity focused health impact assessments (EFHIAs), or health equity impact assessments, are being increasingly promoted internationally as a mechanism for enhancing the consideration of health equity in the development of policies, programs and projects. Despite this there are relatively few examples of examples of completed EFHIAs available. This paper presents a case study of a rapid EFHIA that was conducted in Australia on a health promotion policy implementation plan. It briefly describes the process and findings of the EFHIA and evaluates the impact on decision-making and implementation. Methods The rapid EFHIA was undertaken in four days, drawing on an expert panel and limited review of the literature. A process evaluation was undertaken by email one month after the EFHIA was completed. An impact evaluation was undertaken two years later based on five semi-structured interviews with members of the EFHIA working group and policy officers and managers responsible for implementing the plan. A cost estimation was conducted by the EFHIA working group. Findings The EFHIA made both general and specific recommendations about how the health equity impacts of the policy implementation plan could be improved. The impact evaluation identified changes to development and implementation that occurred as a result of the EFHIA, though there was disagreement about the extent to which changes could be attributed solely to the EFHIA. Those responsible considered the recommendations of the EFHIA in the next versions of their ABHI implementation plans. Factors that influenced the impact of the EFHIA included consolidating understandings of equity, enabling discussion of alternatives, and differing understandings of the purpose of the EFHIA. The EFHIA cost US$4,036 to undertake. Conclusions This EFHIA was conducted in a short timeframe using relatively few resources. It had some reported impacts on the development of the implementation plan and enhanced overall

  17. Life-cycle-based multicriteria sustainability evaluation of industrial parks: a case study in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Chen, Bin; Qi, Jing; Zhou, Shiyi; Jiang, Meiming

    2012-01-01

    Along with increasing concerns on environmental protection and global warming mitigation, new industrial organization modes such as "Ecoindustrial Park" and "Low Carbon Industrial Park" are emerging. Since ecoindustrial parks and low carbon industrial parks may offer multifaceted benefits to the users, it naturally follows that the sustainability assessment of the industrial parks ought to adopt a multicriteria methodology. In this paper, a multicriteria sustainable evaluation framework is proposed in combination with the life cycle analysis and applied to a low carbon and high end industrial park (LCHE) in Beijing, China. Results show that the LCHE industrial park can contribute to both energy-saving and greenhouse gas emission mitigations compared with other industrial parks. In terms of economic performance, although the economic profits are considerable, the investment per constructed area is relatively high. The results of sustainable analysis of the LCHE industrial park can thus shed light on future upgrading of industrial parks.

  18. Application of a methodology for evaluation of intertechnology tradeoffs: an illustrative case study

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G.; Buehring, W.A.; Jusko, M.J.; Wolsko, T.D.

    1980-11-01

    The problem is to select the best R and D strategy for developing long-term energy technologies that use coal. Best is defined in terms of 11 attributes, or measures of performance. Uncertainties were determined for the many, complex outcomes that may result from each strategy, and the information was systematically structured for evaluation. Preferences for the various outcomes were quantified by assessing a multi-attribute utility function over the 11 single attributes. The best alternative was chosen using maximization of expected utility as a guide. Extensive sensitivity analyses showed that one strategy, evolutionary development, was best over a wide range of plausible assumptions. This is partly because the alternative coal technologies are quite similar. However, the insights gained justify the extra effort spent in doing the utility analysis.

  19. Life-Cycle-Based Multicriteria Sustainability Evaluation of Industrial Parks: A Case Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Chen, Bin; Qi, Jing; Zhou, Shiyi; Jiang, Meiming

    2012-01-01

    Along with increasing concerns on environmental protection and global warming mitigation, new industrial organization modes such as “Ecoindustrial Park” and “Low Carbon Industrial Park” are emerging. Since ecoindustrial parks and low carbon industrial parks may offer multifaceted benefits to the users, it naturally follows that the sustainability assessment of the industrial parks ought to adopt a multicriteria methodology. In this paper, a multicriteria sustainable evaluation framework is proposed in combination with the life cycle analysis and applied to a low carbon and high end industrial park (LCHE) in Beijing, China. Results show that the LCHE industrial park can contribute to both energy-saving and greenhouse gas emission mitigations compared with other industrial parks. In terms of economic performance, although the economic profits are considerable, the investment per constructed area is relatively high. The results of sustainable analysis of the LCHE industrial park can thus shed light on future upgrading of industrial parks. PMID:23304091

  20. Evaluation of rock mass classification schemes: a case study from the Bowen Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Martin; Hebblewhite, Bruce; Mitra, Rudrajit

    2016-04-01

    The development of an accurate engineering geological model and adequate knowledge of spatial variation in rock mass conditions are important prerequisites for slope stability analyses, tunnel design, mine planning and risk management. Rock mass classification schemes such as Rock Mass Rating (RMR), Coal Mine Roof Rating (CMRR), Q-system and Roof Strength Index (RSI) have been used for a range of engineering geological applications, including transport tunnels, "hard rock" mining and underground and open-cut coal mines. Often, rock mass classification schemes have been evaluated on subaerial exposures, where weathering has affected joint characteristics and intact strength. In contrast, the focus of this evaluation of the above classification schemes is an underground coal mine in the Bowen Basin, central Queensland, Australia, 15 km east of the town of Moranbah. Rock mass classification was undertaken at 68 sites across the mine. Both the target coal seam and overlying rock show marked spatial variability in terms of RMR, CMRR and Q, but RSI showed limited sensitivity to changes in rock mass condition. Relationships were developed between different parameters with varying degrees of success. A mine-wide analysis of faulting was undertaken, and compared with in situ stress field and local-scale measurements of joint and cleat. While there are no unequivocal relationships between rock mass classification parameters and faulting, a central graben zone shows heterogeneous rock mass properties. The corollary is that if geological features can be accurately defined by remote sensing technologies, then this can assist in predicting rock mass conditions and risk management ahead of development and construction.

  1. Environmental and economic evaluation of pre-disaster plans for disaster waste management: Case study of Minami-Ise, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Tomohiro; Wakabayashi, Yohei; Tsai, Peii; Saeki, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    Although it is important that disaster waste be demolished and removed as soon as possible after a natural disaster, it is also important that its treatment is environmentally friendly and economic. Local municipalities do not conduct environmental and economic feasibility studies of pre-disaster waste management; nevertheless, pre-disaster waste management is extremely important to promote treatment of waste after natural disasters. One of the reasons that they cannot conduct such evaluations is that the methods and inventory data required for the environmental and economic evaluation does not exist. In this study, we created the inventory data needed for evaluation and constructed evaluation methods using life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle cost (LCC) methodologies for future natural disasters. We selected the Japanese town of Minami-Ise for the related case study. Firstly, we estimated that the potential disaster waste generation derived from dwellings would be approximately 554,000t. Based on this result, the land area required for all the temporary storage sites for storing the disaster waste was approximately 55ha. Although the public domain and private land area in this case study is sufficient, several sites would be necessary to transport waste to other sites with enough space because local space is scarce. Next, we created inventory data of each process such as waste transportation, operation of the temporary storage sites, and waste treatment. We evaluated the environmental burden and cost for scenarios in which the disaster waste derived from specified kinds of home appliances (refrigerators, washing machines, air-conditioners and TV sets) was transported, stored and recycled. In the scenario, CO2, SOx, NOX and PM emissions and total cost were 142t, 7kg, 257kg, 38kg and 1772 thousand USD, respectively. We also focused on SOx emission as a regional pollution source because transportation and operation of the temporary storage sites generates air

  2. An Evaluation of the Undergraduate TEFL Program in Iran: A Multi-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimnia, Amin; Kay, Elham

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of Islamic Azad University TEFL program at B.A. (undergraduate) level in Iran. To do so, five IAU branches were selected through cluster sampling. Within each branch selected, twenty senior students were randomly sampled as the participants of the study. In addition to the students, five…

  3. Special Feature: Epistemological Paradigms in Evaluation: Implications for Practice. Section 1: "Paradigm Contrast" Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Tom; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This section presents two pragmatic studies focusing on a real-life situation and specific applications in managerial decision making. One study deals with improving occupational safety in a bedding manufacturing plant, whereas the other concentrates on managing a state mental health program. (SLD)

  4. A Case Study Evaluation of the Flex Time Program in a South Jersey Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Griffin, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on students' responses toward an experimental instructional program called Flex-time that was offered in grades three through five in a Southeast NJ school district. The study aimed to determine: (1) if the Flex program motivated and/or engaged students to have a love for learning and (2) if characteristics, such as grade level,…

  5. Adverse Changes in Faculty Behavior Resulting from Use of Student Evaluations of Teaching: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Robert E.; Potter, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a detailed literature review and longitudinal analysis, this paper explores the possible underlying causes of the decline in the number of hours per week graduating business seniors indicated they studied during their senior year. The study was conducted at an AACSB accredited college of business at a regional university. The study…

  6. Adverse Changes in Faculty Behavior Resulting from Use of Student Evaluations of Teaching: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Robert E.; Potter, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a detailed literature review and longitudinal analysis, this paper explores the possible underlying causes of the decline in the number of hours per week graduating business seniors indicated they studied during their senior year. The study was conducted at an AACSB accredited college of business at a regional university. The study…

  7. Student Workload: A Case Study of Its Significance, Evaluation and Management at the Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelock, Denise; Thorpe, Mary; Galley, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Distance students are time poor and some drop out of their studies because they fall behind with coursework. This raises the issue of how course teams decide upon how many study hours should be included in a course. This article presents a number of Open University projects that have addressed student workload management and relates how learning…

  8. A Qualitative Case Study of Strategies for Choosing and Evaluating Alternative Assessments in Online Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streff, Robert James

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that not all students are assessed effectively using standard testing formats. However, it is unclear what alternative methodology would be useful to determine whether students have acquired the skills necessary for today's global market. This research study's purpose was to understand the processes instructors use when choosing…

  9. Student Workload: A Case Study of Its Significance, Evaluation and Management at the Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelock, Denise; Thorpe, Mary; Galley, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Distance students are time poor and some drop out of their studies because they fall behind with coursework. This raises the issue of how course teams decide upon how many study hours should be included in a course. This article presents a number of Open University projects that have addressed student workload management and relates how learning…

  10. Special Feature: Epistemological Paradigms in Evaluation: Implications for Practice. Section 1: "Paradigm Contrast" Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Tom; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This section presents two pragmatic studies focusing on a real-life situation and specific applications in managerial decision making. One study deals with improving occupational safety in a bedding manufacturing plant, whereas the other concentrates on managing a state mental health program. (SLD)

  11. A Qualitative Case Study of Strategies for Choosing and Evaluating Alternative Assessments in Online Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streff, Robert James

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that not all students are assessed effectively using standard testing formats. However, it is unclear what alternative methodology would be useful to determine whether students have acquired the skills necessary for today's global market. This research study's purpose was to understand the processes instructors use when choosing…

  12. Performance Evaluation of Wearable Sensor Systems: A Case Study in Moderate-Scale Deployment in Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Ge, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wong, Wai-Choong

    2015-09-25

    A wearable sensor system enables continuous and remote health monitoring and is widely considered as the next generation of healthcare technology. The performance, the packet error rate (PER) in particular, of a wearable sensor system may deteriorate due to a number of factors, particularly the interference from the other wearable sensor systems in the vicinity. We systematically evaluate the performance of the wearable sensor system in terms of PER in the presence of such interference in this paper. The factors that affect the performance of the wearable sensor system, such as density, traffic load, and transmission power in a realistic moderate-scale deployment case in hospital are all considered. Simulation results show that with 20% duty cycle, only 68.5% of data transmission can achieve the targeted reliability requirement (PER is less than 0.05) even in the off-peak period in hospital. We then suggest some interference mitigation schemes based on the performance evaluation results in the case study.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Wearable Sensor Systems: A Case Study in Moderate-Scale Deployment in Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wen; Ge, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wong, Wai-Choong

    2015-01-01

    A wearable sensor system enables continuous and remote health monitoring and is widely considered as the next generation of healthcare technology. The performance, the packet error rate (PER) in particular, of a wearable sensor system may deteriorate due to a number of factors, particularly the interference from the other wearable sensor systems in the vicinity. We systematically evaluate the performance of the wearable sensor system in terms of PER in the presence of such interference in this paper. The factors that affect the performance of the wearable sensor system, such as density, traffic load, and transmission power in a realistic moderate-scale deployment case in hospital are all considered. Simulation results show that with 20% duty cycle, only 68.5% of data transmission can achieve the targeted reliability requirement (PER is less than 0.05) even in the off-peak period in hospital. We then suggest some interference mitigation schemes based on the performance evaluation results in the case study. PMID:26426015

  14. Evaluation of mitigation measures to reduce hydropeaking impacts on river ecosystems - a case study from the Swiss Alps.

    PubMed

    Tonolla, Diego; Bruder, Andreas; Schweizer, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    New Swiss legislation obligates hydropower plant owners to reduce detrimental impacts on rivers ecosystems caused by hydropeaking. We used a case study in the Swiss Alps (hydropower company Kraftwerke Oberhasli AG) to develop an efficient and successful procedure for the ecological evaluation of such impacts, and to predict the effects of possible mitigation measures. We evaluated the following scenarios using 12 biotic and abiotic indicators: the pre-mitigation scenario (i.e. current state), the future scenario with increased turbine capacity but without mitigation measures, and future scenarios with increased turbine capacity and four alternative mitigation measures. The evaluation was based on representative hydrographs and quantitative or qualitative prediction of the indicators. Despite uncertainties in the ecological responses and the future operation mode of the hydropower plant, the procedure allowed the most appropriate mitigation measure to be identified. This measure combines a basin and a cavern at a total retention volume of 80,000m(3), allowing for substantial dampening in the flow falling and ramping rates and in turn considerable reduction in stranding risk for juvenile trout and in macroinvertebrate drift. In general, this retention volume had the greatest predicted ecological benefit and can also, to some extent, compensate for possible modifications in the hydropower operation regime in the future, e.g. due to climate change, changes in the energy market, and changes in river morphology. Furthermore, it also allows for more specific seasonal regulations of retention volume during ecologically sensitive periods (e.g. fish spawning seasons). Overall experience gained from our case study is expected to support other hydropeaking mitigation projects.

  15. Standardization of SOPs to Evaluations: Impacts on Regulatory Decisions using Learning and Memory as Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an era of global trade and regulatory cooperation, consistent and scientifically based interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) studies is essential, particularly for non­ standard assays and variable endpoints. Because there is flexibility in the selection of ...

  16. Standardization of SOPs to Evaluations: Impacts on Regulatory Decisions using Learning and Memory as Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an era of global trade and regulatory cooperation, consistent and scientifically based interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) studies is essential, particularly for non­ standard assays and variable endpoints. Because there is flexibility in the selection of ...

  17. Evaluating solar radiation on a tilted surfaces - a study case in Timis (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasar, C.; Prostean, O.; Prostean, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the last years the usage of solar energy has grown considerably in Romania, as well as in Europe, stimulated by various factors as government programs, green pricing policies, decreasing of photovoltaic components cost etc. Also, the rising demand of using Solar Energy Conversion Systems (SECS) is driven by the desire of individuals or companies to obtain energy from a clean renewable source. In many applications, remote consumers far from other energetic grids can use solar systems more cost-effectively than extending the grid to reach the location. Usually the solar energy is measured or forecast on horizontal surface, but in SECS there is needed the total solar radiation incident on the collector surface, that is oriented in a position that maximize the harvested energy. There are many models that convert the solar radiation from horizontal surface to a tilted surface, but they use empirical coefficients and the accuracy is influenced by different facts as geographical location or sky conditions. Such models were used considering measured values for solar radiation on horizontal plane, in the western part of Romania. Hourly values measured for global solar irradiation on the horizontal plane, diffuse solar irradiation on the horizontal plane and reflected solar irradiation by ground are used to compute the total solar radiation incident on different tilted surfaces. The calculated incident radiation is then compared with the real radiation measured on tilted surface in order to evaluate the performance of the considered conversion models.

  18. Carbon dioxide mineralization process design and evaluation: concepts, case studies, and considerations.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Yeo Tze; Sharratt, Paul N; Jie, Bu

    2016-11-01

    Numerous carbon dioxide mineralization (CM) processes have been proposed to overcome the slow rate of natural weathering of silicate minerals. Ten of these proposals are mentioned in this article. The proposals are described in terms of the four major areas relating to CM process design: pre-treatment, purification, carbonation, and reagent recycling operations. Any known specifics based on probable or representative operating and reaction conditions are listed, and basic analysis of the strengths and shortcomings associated with the individual process designs are given in this article. The processes typically employ physical or chemical pseudo-catalytic methods to enhance the rate of carbon dioxide mineralization; however, both methods have its own associated advantages and problems. To examine the feasibility of a CM process, three key aspects should be included in the evaluation criteria: energy use, operational considerations as well as product value and economics. Recommendations regarding the optimal level of emphasis and implementation of measures to control these aspects are given, and these will depend very much on the desired process objectives. Ultimately, a mix-and-match approach to process design might be required to provide viable and economic proposals for CM processes.

  19. Evaluating indoor exposure modeling alternatives for LCA: A case study in the vehicle repair industry

    SciTech Connect

    Demou, Evangelia; Hellweg, Stefanie; Wilson, Michael P.; Hammond, S. Katharine; McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated three exposure models with data obtained from measurements among workers who use"aerosol" solvent products in the vehicle repair industry and with field experiments using these products to simulate the same exposure conditions. The three exposure models were the: 1) homogeneously-mixed-one-box model, 2) multi-zone model, and 3) eddy-diffusion model. Temporally differentiated real-time breathing zone volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration measurements, integrated far-field area samples, and simulated experiments were used in estimating parameters, such as emission rates, diffusivity, and near-field dimensions. We assessed differences in model input requirements and their efficacy for predictive modeling. The One-box model was not able to resemble the temporal profile of exposure concentrations, but it performed well concerning time-weighted exposure over extended time periods. However, this model required an adjustment for spatial concentration gradients. Multi-zone models and diffusion-models may solve this problem. However, we found that the reliable use of both these models requires extensive field data to appropriately define pivotal parameters such as diffusivity or near-field dimensions. We conclude that it is difficult to apply these models for predicting VOC exposures in the workplace. However, for comparative exposure scenarios in life-cycle assessment they may be useful.

  20. Evaluating indoor exposure modeling alternatives for LCA: a case study in the vehicle repair industry.

    PubMed

    Demou, Evangelia; Hellweg, Stefanie; Wilson, Michael P; Hammond, S Katharine; Mckone, Thomas E

    2009-08-01

    We evaluated three exposure models with data obtained from measurements among workers who use "aerosol" solvent products in the vehicle repair industry and with field experiments using these products to simulate the same exposure conditions. The three exposure models were the (1) homogeneously mixed-one-box model, (2) multizone model, and (3) eddy-diffusion model. Temporally differentiated real-time breathing zone volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration measurements, integrated far-field area samples, and simulated experiments were used in estimating parameters, such as emission rates, diffusivity, and near-field dimensions. We assessed differences in model input requirements and their efficacy for predictive modeling. The One-box model was not able to resemble the temporal profile of exposure concentrations, but it performed well concerning time-weighted exposure over extended time periods. However, this model required an adjustment for spatial concentration gradients. Multizone models and diffusion-models may solve this problem. However, we found that the reliable use of both these models requires extensive field data to appropriately define pivotal parameters such as diffusivity or near-field dimensions. We conclude that it is difficult to apply these models for predicting VOC exposures in the workplace. However, for comparative exposure scenarios in life-cycle assessment they may be useful.

  1. Speech-language evaluation and rehabilitation treatment in Floating-Harbor syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Angelillo, Nicola; Di Costanzo, Brigida; Barillari, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by specific facial features, short stature associated with significantly delayed bone age and language impairment. Although language delay is a cardinal manifestation of this syndrome, few reports describe the specific language difficulties of these patients, particularly the development of language abilities in the long run. This paper reports on an Italian boy with Floating-Harbor syndrome and discusses his language evaluation at presentation (age 48 months) and development and progress of his language abilities after 4 years of rehabilitation treatment. At presentation he exhibited borderline mental retardation, with verbal abilities lower than performance abilities. He showed significant impairment of both expressive and receptive language, and also exhibited phonologic and articulations problems that lowered speech intelligibility. Neuropsychological assessment revealed cognitive problems. After speech-language rehabilitation treatment, he achieved significant improvement in language function. The reader will learn about (1) the distinctive clinical characteristics and (2) the speech-language abilities and their development after speech-language therapy in Floating-Harbor syndrome. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spore trap analysis and MSQPCR in evaluating mold burden: a flooded gymnasium case study.

    PubMed

    Lin, King-Teh; Schrantz, Michael; Sandagdorj, Oyungerel; Keng, Yen-Fang; Boothe, Gregory; Vesper, Stephen Joseph

    2011-01-01

    A school gymnasium was accidentally flooded by the fire-suppression sprinkler system. The surface water was removed immediately and, after 10 days, a professional firm engaged to dry the environment. Twenty five days after the flooding, the school decided to evaluate whether there was any mold growth in the gymnasium. The inspector used two approaches, traditional air samples or a DNA-based analysis of dust samples. Thirty five-minute air samples (for total of 75 L of air each sample) were collected with Air-O-Cell™ (AOC) cassettes and the mold structures (MS) were quantified by microscopy. These samples were compared to two identical outdoor air samples. As an alternative, two dust samples were collected and quantified by mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR). Comparisons of indoor to outdoor mold concentrations in air samples were inconclusive, but applying MSQPCR to the investigation of this water-damaged environment provided a more reliable and useful answer to the extent of mold contamination than did the spore trap analysis.

  3. Multicentre evaluation of multidisciplinary team meeting agreement on diagnosis in diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Simon L F; Wells, Athol U; Desai, Sujal R; Poletti, Venerino; Piciucchi, Sara; Dubini, Alessandra; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique; Brillet, Pierre Y; Kambouchner, Marianne; Morais, António; Pereira, José M; Moura, Conceição Souto; Grutters, Jan C; van den Heuvel, Daniel A; van Es, Hendrik W; van Oosterhout, Matthijs F; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Finn; Madsen, Line B; Gooptu, Bibek; Pomplun, Sabine; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nicholson, Andrew G; Sayer, Charlie; Edmunds, Lilian; Jacob, Joseph; Kokosi, Maria A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Flaherty, Kevin R; Hansell, David M

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease represents a diverse and challenging group of pulmonary disorders. A consistent diagnostic approach to diffuse parenchymal lung disease is crucial if clinical trial data are to be applied to individual patients. We aimed to evaluate inter-multidisciplinary team agreement for the diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. We did a multicentre evaluation of clinical data of patients who presented to the interstitial lung disease unit of the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust (London, UK; host institution) and required multidisciplinary team meeting (MDTM) characterisation between March 1, 2010, and Aug 31, 2010. Only patients whose baseline clinical, radiological, and, if biopsy was taken, pathological data were undertaken at the host institution were included. Seven MDTMs, consisting of at least one clinician, radiologist, and pathologist, from seven countries (Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, and the UK) evaluated cases of diffuse parenchymal lung disease in a two-stage process between Jan 1, and Oct 15, 2015. First, the clinician, radiologist, and pathologist (if lung biopsy was completed) independently evaluated each case, selected up to five differential diagnoses from a choice of diffuse lung diseases, and chose likelihoods (censored at 5% and summing to 100% in each case) for each of their differential diagnoses, without inter-disciplinary consultation. Second, these specialists convened at an MDTM and reviewed all data, selected up to five differential diagnoses, and chose diagnosis likelihoods. We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreements on patient first-choice diagnoses using Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ). We then estimated inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreement on the probability of diagnosis using weighted kappa coefficient (κw). We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM confidence of patient first-choice diagnosis. Finally, we evaluated the prognostic significance of a

  4. Evidence of gender bias in legal insanity evaluations: a case vignette study of clinicians, judges and students.

    PubMed

    Yourstone, Jenny; Lindholm, Torun; Grann, Martin; Svenson, Ola

    2008-01-01

    Forensic psychiatric decision-making plays a key role in the legal process of homicide cases. Research show that women defendants have a higher likelihood of being declared legally insane and being diverted to hospital. This study attempted to explore if this gender difference is explained by biases in the forensic psychiatric assessments. Participants were 45 practicing forensic psychiatric clinicians, 46 chief judges and 80 psychology students. Participants received a written vignette describing a homicide case, with either a female or a male perpetrator. The results suggested strong gender effects on legal insanity judgements. Forensic psychiatric clinicians and psychology students assessed the case information as more indicative of legal insanity if the perpetrator was a woman than a man. Judges assessed offenders of their own gender, as they were more likely to be declared legally insane than a perpetrator of the opposite gender. Implications of and possible ways to minimize such gender biases in forensic psychiatric evaluations need to be thoroughly considered by the legal system.

  5. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  6. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  7. Evaluation of organic matter concentration in winery wastewater: a case study from Australia.

    PubMed

    Quayle, Wendy C; Fattore, Alison; Zandona, Roy; Christen, Evan W; Arienzo, Michele

    2009-01-01

    The 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD(5)) remains a key indicator for proof of compliance with environmental regulators in the monitoring and management of winery effluent. Inter-conversion factors from alternative tests that are more rapid, accurate and simpler to perform have been determined that allow prediction of BOD(5) in winery wastewaters, generally, and at different stages of production and treatment. Mean values obtained from this dataset offer rule of thumb inter-conversion factors: BOD(5) = 0.7 Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), BOD(5) = 2.3 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and BOD(5) = 2.7 Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). Specific predictive linear relationships are also provided. Out of the relationships between BOD(5) vs COD, TOC and DOC, in winery wastewater, irrespective of vintage or non-vintage production periods and stage of treatment, TOC offered the most reliable prediction of BOD(5). Ethanol, glucose and fructose were evaluated in untreated wastewater as predictors of BOD(5) due to their high specificity in winery effluent. A significant relationship was determined between BOD(5) and (ethanol + glucose + fructose; R(2) = 0.64, n = 19; p<0.05), but relationships between BOD(5) and ethanol and BOD(5) vs (glucose + fructose) were weak (R(2) = 0.45 and 0.34; n = 19; p<0.05 respectively,). There was a very strong linear correlation (y = 0.9767x + 52.8; R(2) = 0.97; n = 23; p<0.05) in COD data in winery effluents when using a commercially available mercury free test kit compared with using a traditional COD test kit that contained mercury. This suggests that mercury free COD test kits could be used by the wine industry for organic pollution assessment with associated reductions to user and environmental risk, as well as reducing the costs of kit waste disposal.

  8. Multicenter evaluation of different target volume delineation concepts in pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma. A case study.

    PubMed

    Lütgendorf-Caucig, C; Fotina, I; Gallop-Evans, E; Claude, L; Lindh, J; Pelz, T; Knäusl, B; Georg, D; Pötter, R; Dieckmann, K

    2012-11-01

    In pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma (PHL) improvements in imaging and multiagent chemotherapy have allowed for a reduction in target volume. The involved-node (IN) concept is being tested in several treatment regimens for adult Hodgkin's lymphoma. So far there is no consensus on the definition of the IN. To improve the reproducibility of the IN, we tested a new involved-node-level (INL) concept, using defined anatomical boundaries as basis for target delineation. The aim was to evaluate the feasibility of IN and INL concepts for PHL in terms of interobserver variability. The INL concept was defined for the neck and mediastinum by the PHL Radiotherapy Group based on accepted concepts for solid tumors. Seven radiation oncologists from six European centers contoured neck and mediastinal clinical target volumes (CTVs) of 2 patients according to the IN and the new INL concepts. The median CTVs, coefficient of variation (COV), and general conformity index (CI) were assessed. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for reliability of delineations was calculated. All observers agreed that INL is a feasible and practicable delineation concept resulting in stronger interobserver concordance than the IN (mediastinum CI(INL) = 0.39 vs. CI(IN) = 0.28, neck left CI(INL) = 0.33; CI(IN) = 0.18; neck right CI(INL) = 0.24, CI(IN) = 0.14). The COV showed less dispersion and the ICC indicated higher reliability of contouring for INL (ICC(INL) = 0.62, p < 0.05) as for IN (ICC(IN) = 0.40, p < 0.05). INL is a practical and feasible alternative to IN resulting in more homogeneous target delineation, and it should be therefore considered as a future target volume concept in PHL.

  9. Microbiological evaluation of chronic blepharitis among Iranian veterans exposed to mustard gas: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Farid; Zarei-Ghanavati, Siamak; A, Baradaran-Rafii; Jadidi, Khosrow; Lotfi-Kian, Alireza

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the microbiological characteristics of eyelid margin flora in chronic blepharitis in mustard gas-exposed individuals and compare the results with those in age- and sex-matched unexposed people. In this comparative case series, 289 patients with ocular manifestations of mustard gas exposure (case) were evaluated for signs of chronic blepharitis. Additionally, microbiological evaluation of eyelid margins was conducted in these patients and compared with results of 100 unexposed patients with chronic blepharitis (control). One-hundred fifty (52.0%) of 289 mustard gas casualties had signs of chronic blepharitis. Microbiological evaluation revealed higher isolation rates of Staphylococcus epidermidis (78%) and Staphylococcus aureus (57%) in the case in comparison to control group (P < 0.01). Moreover, S. aureus isolated from the cases exhibited greater resistance to common antibiotics compared with control group. Fungi were isolated more frequent in the case compared with controls (30% vs. 4%, P < 0.01), with Cladosporium and Candida species being most common in the case group. Exposure to mustard gas seems to alter the microbiological flora of the eyelid margin. Staphylococcus spp., including antibiotic-resistant strains, and fungi were more frequently isolated in these patients. The relationship between microbial culture results and the severity of ocular surface manifestations in mustard gas-injured cases warrant further investigation.

  10. Evaluating the Effects of Programs for Reducing Achievement Gaps: A Case Study in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Yao-Ting; Tseng, Fen-Lan; Kuo, Nien-Ping; Chang, Tien-Ying; Chiou, Jia-Min

    2014-01-01

    Considering that achievement gaps have become a serious educational problem worldwide, the Ministry of Education in Taiwan has been addressing a series of policies to reduce achievement gaps, but the effect of these policies has not yet been carefully examined. Therefore, the present study investigated current educational policies, achievement gap…

  11. Evaluating Corpus Literacy Training for Pre-Service Language Teachers: Six Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heather, Julian; Helt, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Corpus literacy is the ability to use corpora--large, principled databases of spoken and written language--for language analysis and instruction. While linguists have emphasized the importance of corpus training in teacher preparation programs, few studies have investigated the process of initiating teachers into corpus literacy with the result…

  12. Question-Posing Capability as an Alternative Evaluation Method: Analysis of an Environmental Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit J.; Herscovitz, Orit

    1999-01-01

    Presents research on the scientific question-posing capabilities of 10th-grade students (n=127) who were studying air quality in a cooperative way using the jigsaw method. Finds that the difference between students at high and low academic levels to the extent of increase in both number and complexity of posed questions was significant. Contains…

  13. A Case Study of Design and Usability Evaluation of the Collaborative Problem Solving Instructional Platform System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Jen-Yi; Chao, Shu-Jen; Yao, Lo-Yi; Liu, Chuan-His

    2016-01-01

    This study used Focus Group to analyze user requirements for user interface so as to understand what capabilities of the Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) Instructional Platform were expected by users. After 12 focus group interviews, the following four functions had been identified as essential to the CPS Instructional Platform: CPS…

  14. A Case Study of Design and Usability Evaluation of the Collaborative Problem Solving Instructional Platform System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Jen-Yi; Chao, Shu-Jen; Yao, Lo-Yi; Liu, Chuan-His

    2016-01-01

    This study used Focus Group to analyze user requirements for user interface so as to understand what capabilities of the Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) Instructional Platform were expected by users. After 12 focus group interviews, the following four functions had been identified as essential to the CPS Instructional Platform: CPS…

  15. Using of Spatial multi criteria evaluation for landslide zoning Case study Malach Aram basin -north of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi-Nezamabad, A.; Hoseini Sarrafi, N.; Sadat Mousavi, S. H.

    2009-04-01

    Land slide is one of the major disasters which usually happens in specific area and causes different kinds of financial damage and loss of lives. Different places in IRAN are susceptible for occurring landslide. The study area, Malach Aram basin in Ramian County which is located in north part of Iran, is extended about 3500 hectare. Ever different methods are using for zoning and evaluation this natural disaster. Spatial multi criteria evaluation (SMCE) is a structure that implements statistical analysis of multi criteria evaluation on the Georefrence data. This model can be implemented on the GIS software, Ilwis and ArcGIS are major software for running this study. With defining criterion and sub criteria that are effective in occurring landslide and also specifying in groups and inter groups weight of values on the data layers and defining objectives in this classification and with using different effective criteria that are related to this issue, landslide zoning in the case study area has been prepared. The most important criteria that have been used for running this model are Topography, Slope, Aspect, Hillshade,landuse, climate (mouthy, seasonal and annual precipitation during 15 years ago from 2001 until 2007), state of earth dynamic ( earthquake density, distance of faults and others factors), state of existing flora ( density and percentage flora, kind of specious) geomorphology (geomorphology unit , landforms and fancies geomorphologic). After running the this model, output of this model is classification and part of area defined with height potential of landslide occurring. Output of classification landslide zoning with survey GPS pointes that defined real position landslide used in artificial neural network with supervised learning (Multi-Layer Perceptions) . Recently have defined that 5 area of total of suitable area with height potential landslide occurring are important areas with highly positional landslide occurring. Key words: Land slide- Natural

  16. Evaluation of Spatial and Temporal Distribution Changes of LST Using Landsat Images (case STUDY:TEHRAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachar, H.; Vafsian, A. R.; Modiri, M.; Enayati, H.; Safdari Nezhad, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    In traditional approach, the land surface temperature (LST) is estimated by the permanent or portable ground-based weather stations. Due to the lack of adequate distribution of weather stations, a uniform LST could not be achieved. Todays, With the development of remote sensing from space, satellite data offer the only possibility for measuring LST over the entire globe with sufficiently high temporal resolution and with complete spatially averaged rather than point values. the remote sensing imageries with relatively high spatial and temporal resolution are used as suitable tools to uniformly LST estimation. Time series, generated by remote sensed LST, provide a rich spatial-temporal infrastructure for heat island's analysis. in this paper, a time series was generated by Landsat8 and Landsat7 satellite images to analysis the changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of the Tehran's LST. In this process, The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) threshold method was applied to extract the LST; then the changes in spatial and temporal distribution of LST over the period 1999 to 2014 were evaluated by the statistical analysis. Finally, the achieved results show the very low temperature regions and the middle temperature regions were reduced by the rate of 0.54% and 5.67% respectively. On the other hand, the high temperature and the very high temperature regions were increased by 3.68% and 0.38% respectively. These results indicate an incremental procedure on the distribution of the hot regions in Tehran in this period. To quantitatively compare urban heat islands (UHI), an index called Urban Heat Island Ratio Index(URI) was calculated. It can reveal the intensity of the UHI within the urban area. The calculation of the index was based on the ratio of UHI area to urban area. The greater the index, the more intense the UHI was. Eventually, Considering URI between 1999 and 2014, an increasing about 0.03 was shown. The reasons responsible for the changes

  17. The evaluation of pain in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Victoria C J; Ellis, Cathy M; Burman, Rachel; Knights, Catherine; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder leading to progressive paralysis. ALS is complicated by a number of non-motor symptoms including pain. Pain in ALS has been poorly studied and poorly managed. This study aimed to collate information regarding pain in ALS using standardized pain questionnaires. Forty-two patients with ALS participated in the study. Control subjects included 41 age-matched healthy volunteers and 42 age-matched patients with neurological conditions other than ALS. Data on pain were collected using the The Brief Pain Inventory and The painDetect Questionnaire. Eighty-five percent of subjects with ALS reported pain versus 50% of neurology clinic controls and 35% of healthy controls (p < 0.01). Pain in ALS included cramping, aching, tiring, sharp and tender, and was non-neuropathic. Pain impacted significantly on mood, general activity, relationships and general enjoyment of life. Fifty-four percent of people with painful ALS used regular analgesia and 29% regular opioids. Other non-motor symptoms suffered included tiredness, constipation, urinary problems, itching and drowsiness. In conclusion, these data support the fact that pain is a significant symptom in ALS which impacts on quality of life. These data can be used to educate clinicians and patients to promote better multidisciplinary management of ALS symptoms and a better quality of life.

  18. Evaluation of wet indices using standard precipitation index: A case study of Terengganu states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi, M. F.; Rauf, U. F. Abdul; Din, W. R. Wan; Hussin, A. G.

    2017-09-01

    In line with the current climate conditions, the study of prolonged precipitation is imperative as it may predict the flood events in the future. In 2014, Terengganu is amongst the state in Peninsular Malaysia was affected by floods and it experienced three waves of floods during the monsoon seasons. In this research study, Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) is used to analyse the monthly precipitation data for two selected rain gauge stations in Terengganu over the period of forty-five years from 1970 to 2014. The objective of this study is to monitor the extreme wet conditions that eventually could cause the occurrence of floods. Comparisons were made using 3-month, 6-month, 24-month and 48-month time scales. SPI time series is calculated from precipitation index data for two rain-gauge stations in Terengganu. The shortest of time scales of SPI indicate the condition of moisture in short and medium terms, which is then used to estimate the seasonal precipitation. The longest time scales reveal patterns of long-term precipitation before the flood events. The result clearly shows that the annual trends of the wet events for longest periods are regularly experienced in wet conditions compare to drought conditions and predicted to have a higher probability of flood disaster. SK Kuala Telemong station has recorded the highest SPI values for the wet event in the entire periods, which the shortest time scales is 3.43 and longest term of time scales closer to three (2.90) in this analysis.

  19. Avoiding verification bias in screening test evaluation in resource poor settings: a case study from Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Gaffikin, Lynne; McGrath, John; Arbyn, Marc; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Verification bias occurs when the percentage of subjects receiving disease verification differs according to the test result. Statistical adjustment yields unbiased sensitivity and specificity under a missing at random (MAR) assumption. To use an example from an international study to show how the assumptions needed for unbiased statistical adjustment for verification bias can be undermined by conditions on the ground, and that accuracy of estimates is also compromised by too low a sampling fraction of subjects who test negative. A study in Zimbabwe assessed the accuracy of a screening test for cervical cancer screening, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA). The study was conducted in two phases, Phase I, where only 10% of subjects with negative tests received verification, and Phase II, in which nearly all subjects were verified. Unadjusted, simple- and covariate-adjusted estimates were compared to investigate factors affecting differences. Bootstrap simulations were used to illustrate the effect of varying test negative sampling fractions. Phase I unadjusted sensitivity and specificity were 0.66 (0.61-0.70) and 0.34 (0.31-0.36), respectively. Simple-weighted adjusted estimators accounting only for VIA status were 0.20 (0.17-0.23) and 0.80 (0.78-0.81), respectively, suggesting the test to be useless. It was found that verification (colposcopy) capacity in-country had been exceeded, and that random selection of test negative patients for colposcopy had been compromised. Phase II estimates of sensitivity and specificity were 0.77 and 0.64, respectively. With 9% disease prevalence, a VIA test-negative sampling fraction >50% was necessary for the confidence intervals for sensitivity to have more than a 90% probability of including the true value. Phase I statistical adjustment was not made for MAR deviations unexplained by the two auxiliary factors, Pap results and STD history. Adjustment was not possible for other unmeasured co-factors. While there are standard

  20. A modelling case study to evaluate control strategies for ozone reduction in Southwestern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castell, N.; Mantilla, E.; Salvador, R.; Stein, A. F.; Millán, M.

    2009-09-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidant and when certain concentrations are reached it has adverse effects on health, vegetation and materials. With the aim of protecting human health and ecosystems, European Directive 2008/50/EC establishes target values for ozone concentrations, to be achieved from 2010 onwards. In our study area, located in southwestern Spain, ozone levels regularly exceed the human health protection threshold defined in the European Directive. Indeed, this threshold was exceeded on 92 days in 2007, despite the fact that the Directive stipulates that it should not be exceeded on more than 25 days per calendar year averaged over three years. It is urgent, therefore, to reduce the current ozone levels, but because ozone is a secondary pollutant, this reduction must necessarily involve limiting the emission of its precursors, primarily nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC). During the central months of the year, southwestern Spain is under strong insolation and weak synoptic forcing, promoting the development of sea breezes and mountain-induced winds and creating re-circulations of pollutants. The complex topography of the area induces the formation of vertical layers, into which the pollutants are injected and subjected to long distance transport and compensatory subsidence. The characteristics of these highly complex flows have important effects on the pollutant dispersion. In this study two ozone pollution episodes have been selected to assess the ozone response to reductions in NOx and VOC emissions from industry and traffic. The first corresponds to a typical summer episode, with the development of breezes in an anticyclonic situation with low gradient pressure and high temperatures, while the second episode presents a configuration characteristic of spring or early summer, with a smooth westerly flow and more moderate temperatures. Air pollution studies in complex terrain require the use of high-resolution models to resolve the complex

  1. Identifying species at coextinction risk when detection is imperfect: Model evaluation and case study.

    PubMed

    Plein, Michaela; Morris, William K; Moir, Melinda L; Vesk, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Losing a species from a community can cause further extinctions, a process also known as coextinction. The risk of being extirpated with an interaction partner is commonly inferred from a species' host-breadth, derived from observing interactions between species. But observational data suffers from imperfect detection, making coextinction estimates highly unreliable. To address this issue and to account for data uncertainty, we fit a hierarchical N-mixture model to individual-level interaction data from a mutualistic network. We predict (1) with how many interaction partners each species interacts (to indicate their coextinction risk) and (2) how completely the community was sampled. We fit the model to simulated interactions to investigate how variation in sampling effort, interaction probability, and animal abundances influence model accuracy and apply it to an empirical dataset of flowering plants and their insect visitors. The model performed well in predicting the number of interaction partners for scenarios with high abundances, but indicated high parameter uncertainty for networks with many rare species. Yet, model predictions were generally closer to the true value than the observations. Our mutualistic plant-insect community most closely resembled the scenario of high interaction rates with low abundances. Median estimates of interaction partners were frequently much higher than the empirical data indicate, but uncertainty was high. Our analysis suggested that we only detected 14-59% of the flower-visiting insect species, indicating that our study design, which is common for pollinator studies, was inadequate to detect many species. Imperfect detection strongly affects the inferences from observed interaction networks and hence, host specificity, specialisation estimates and network metrics from observational data may be highly misleading for assessing a species' coextinction risks. Our study shows how models can help to estimate coextinction risk, but

  2. Evaluation of tert-butyl isosteres: case studies of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties, efficacies, and activities.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Matthias V; Wolfstädter, Bernd T; Plancher, Jean-Marc; Gatfield, John; Carreira, Erick M

    2015-03-01

    The tert-butyl group is a common motif in medicinal chemistry. Its incorporation into bioactive compounds is often accompanied by unwanted property modulation, such as increased lipophilicity and decreased metabolic stability. Several alternative substituents are available for the drug discovery process. Herein, physicochemical data of two series of drug analogues of bosentan and vercirnon are documented as part of a comparative study of tert-butyl, pentafluorosulfanyl, trifluoromethyl, bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanyl, and cyclopropyl-trifluoromethyl substituents. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. [Evaluation of a new infusion kit. A study of cases and controls].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, José Luis; Ferrandis Campos, Vicente; Ruiz Hontangas, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Since prevention and control of hospital-generated infections comprises one of the priorities in today's hospitals, the authors analyze how two infusion kits function; one kit is the classical version normally used in the hospital where this study took place and the other is a new kit which incorporates a security system. After carrying out a statistical and cost analysis, the authors conclude that the new perfusion system is cost effective, providing, among other factors, a savings of 62.083 Euro per hospitalized patient.

  4. [Evaluation of public drug provision policies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Argentina: a case study].

    PubMed

    Elorza, María Eugenia; Moscoso, Nebel Silvana; Ripari, Nadia Vanina

    2012-01-01

    In Argentina, the provision of drugs for patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus who lack health insurance is carried out through public programs. In the Province of Buenos Aires, the national program Remediar and the provincial program PRODIABA (from the Spanish Programa de Prevención, Diagnóstico y Tratamiento del Paciente Diabético) coexist. This study estimates the percentage of adults in the municipality of Bahia Blanca (Province of Buenos Aires) who suffer from type 2 diabetes mellitus and lack health insurance, thus satisfying their need for oral antidiabetic treatments within the public sector. It is a quantitative study that assesses the need and demand for public provision. The results indicate that: 1) the greatest percentage of demand is satisfied at the primary health care level; 2) the province of Buenos Aires funds the largest share of the pills, followed by the municipal and the national levels; 3) the local government intervenes to satisfy the demand and 4) the total public provision covers approximately 25% of the overall need in relation to the average consumption. This shows that despite the presence of these public programs, the provision is insufficient and thus requires the intervention of the local government even though economic theory does not recommend the decentralization of drug purchases.

  5. Training the next generation of global health advocates through experiential education: A mixed-methods case study evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Steven J; Silverberg, Sarah L

    2015-10-15

    This case study evaluates a global health education experience aimed at training the next generation of global health advocates. Demand and interest in global health among Canadian students is well documented, despite the difficulty in integrating meaningful experiences into curricula. Global health advocacy was taught to 19 undergraduate students at McMaster University through an experiential education course, during which they developed a national advocacy campaign on global access to medicines. A quantitative survey and an analysis of social network dynamics were conducted, along with a qualitative analysis of written work and course evaluations. Data were interpreted through a thematic synthesis approach. Themes were identified related to students' learning outcomes, experience and class dynamics. The experiential education format helped students gain authentic, real-world experience in global health advocacy and leadership. The tangible implications for their course work was a key motivating factor. While experiential education is an effective tool for some learning outcomes, it is not suitable for all. As well, group dynamics and evaluation methods affect the learning environment. Real-world global health issues, public health practice and advocacy approaches can be effectively taught through experiential education, alongside skills like communication and professionalism. Students developed a nuanced understanding of many strategies, challenges and barriers that exist in advocating for public health ideas. These experiences are potentially empowering and confidence-building despite the heavy time commitment they require. Attention should be given to how such experiences are designed, as course dynamics and grading structure significantly influence students' experience.

  6. Who Is Afraid of Evaluation? Ethics in Evaluation Research as a Way to Cope with Excessive Evaluation Anxiety: Insights from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechar, Shlomit; Mero-Jaffe, Irit

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we share our reflections, as evaluators, on an evaluation where we encountered Excessive Evaluation Anxiety (XEA). The signs of XEA which we discerned were particularly evident amongst the program head and staff who were part of a new training program. We present our insights on the evaluation process and its difficulties, as well as…

  7. Who Is Afraid of Evaluation? Ethics in Evaluation Research as a Way to Cope with Excessive Evaluation Anxiety: Insights from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechar, Shlomit; Mero-Jaffe, Irit

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we share our reflections, as evaluators, on an evaluation where we encountered Excessive Evaluation Anxiety (XEA). The signs of XEA which we discerned were particularly evident amongst the program head and staff who were part of a new training program. We present our insights on the evaluation process and its difficulties, as well as…

  8. Ten-year evaluation of conservative and surgical treatment of gingival recession. A case series study.

    PubMed

    Jorgić-Srdjak, K; Bosnjak, A; Plancak, D; Maricević, T

    2000-12-01

    In the last years the treatment of non-inflammatory periodontal diseases has greatly changed. Apico-coronal dimension of gingival tissue is not considered to be of utmost importance, but significance of tissue thickness over each tooth is stressed. Purpose of this study was to show results of conservative and surgical treatment of gingival recession. Sample consisted of two groups of subjects, which have been treated in one of stated ways during ten years. The data was obtained on the beginning and after ten years of recall. Both groups showed increased dimension of keratinized gingiva during observed time with decrease of gingival recession, plaque- and gingival index. It is considered that treatment should start with conservative measures with necessary motivation of the patients. If it does not show improvement, one should consider best surgical method available for each patient. Clinical results show success in both groups, meaning that treatment was properly decided on.

  9. A case study evaluation of edible plants curriculum implemented in an elementary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Leila

    The main purpose of this study was to describe elementary teachers' attitudes and perceptions toward plant science. The secondary purpose was to create an edible plant curriculum as a vehicle for integrating STEM and 21st Century skills into Common Core Content. Results indicate that teachers and STEM coordinators did find the curriculum to be effective in teaching the interdisciplinary standard-based and inquiry based content and skills targeted. Additionally, the curriculum development process produced a hybrid design framework that facilitated the creation of life science content as a vehicle for integrating STEM into common core content. However, several significant barriers will need to be overcome with regard to the teachers', STEM coordinators' and administrators' perception that plant science and nutrition literacy are "special" content activities versus important STEM content. Keywords; STEM, Curriculum development, 21st Century skills, Common Core Content, Plant Science and Nutrition Literacy, Interdisciplinary Standard-based and inquiry based.

  10. Municipal solid waste composition: sampling methodology, statistical analyses, and case study evaluation.

    PubMed

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Jensen, Morten Bang; Götze, Ramona; Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Petersen, Claus; Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-02-01

    Sound waste management and optimisation of resource recovery require reliable data on solid waste generation and composition. In the absence of standardised and commonly accepted waste characterisation methodologies, various approaches have been reported in literature. This limits both comparability and applicability of the results. In this study, a waste sampling and sorting methodology for efficient and statistically robust characterisation of solid waste was introduced. The methodology was applied to residual waste collected from 1442 households distributed among 10 individual sub-areas in three Danish municipalities (both single and multi-family house areas). In total 17 tonnes of waste were sorted into 10-50 waste fractions, organised according to a three-level (tiered approach) facilitating comparison of the waste data between individual sub-areas with different fractionation (waste from one municipality was sorted at "Level III", e.g. detailed, while the two others were sorted only at "Level I"). The results showed that residual household waste mainly contained food waste (42 ± 5%, mass per wet basis) and miscellaneous combustibles (18 ± 3%, mass per wet basis). The residual household waste generation rate in the study areas was 3-4 kg per person per week. Statistical analyses revealed that the waste composition was independent of variations in the waste generation rate. Both, waste composition and waste generation rates were statistically similar for each of the three municipalities. While the waste generation rates were similar for each of the two housing types (single-family and multi-family house areas), the individual percentage composition of food waste, paper, and glass was significantly different between the housing types. This indicates that housing type is a critical stratification parameter. Separating food leftovers from food packaging during manual sorting of the sampled waste did not have significant influence on the proportions of food waste

  11. Evaluating the metallic pollution of riverine water and sediments: a case study of Aras River.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, F; Hassani, A H; Monavvari, M; Karbassi, A R; Khorasani, N

    2013-01-01

    Metallic pollution caused by elements Zn, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, Cd, and Hg in water and sediments of Aras River within a specific area in Ardabil province of Iran is considered. Water and sediment samples were collected seasonally and once respectively from the five selected stations. Regarding WHO published permissible values, only Ni concentration in spring and summer water samples has exceeded the acceptable limit up to four times greater than the limit. The concentration of metals Ni, Pb, and Fe in river water shows a direct relationship with river water discharge and the amount of precipitation. Enhanced soil erosion, bed load dissolution, and runoffs may play a key role in remarkable augmentation of metallic ions concentration. Furthermore, excessive use of pesticides which contain a variety of metallic ions (mainly Cu) in spring and summer may also result in an increase in the metals' concentration. The potential risk of Ni exposure to the water environment of the study area is assigned to juice, dairy products, edible oil, and sugar cane factories as well as soybean crop lands which are located within the sub-basin of Aras River in the study area. Regarding the sediment samples, the bioavailable metal concentrations indicate an ascending order from the first station towards the last one. In comparison with earth crust, sedimental and igneous rocks the reported metallic concentration values, except for Cd, lie within the low-risk status. Regarding Cd, the reported values in some stations (S2, S4, and S5) are up to ten times greater than that of shale which may be considered as a remarkable risk potential. The industrial and municipal wastewater generated by Parsabad moqan industrial complex and residential areas, in addition to the discharges of animal husbandry centers, may be addressed as the key factors in the sharp increase of metallic pollution potential in stations 4 and 5.

  12. Evaluation of hepatitis C virus intrafamilial transmission among families with one index case, a pilot study from Fars province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Lankarani, Kamran B.; Ardebili, Maryam; Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Nejabat, Maryam; Hemmati Rad, Mohammad Amir; Hosseini, Seyed Younes

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to survey the rate and risk factors for Hepatitis C virus interfamilial transmission among families with one index case. Background: The role of intrafamilial transmission in Hepatitis C virus epidemiology is still debated. Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 34 families (236 members) of HCV infected patients from Fars province, spring to summer 2013. All subjects were first evaluated for the risk factors of exposure and then their serum was checked for the presence of HCV antibody and the genome, using ELISA and PCR. The genotype of all PCR positive cases was also determined by a commercial assay. Two independent sample t test and Chi-Square test were used to compare groups together. Results: In 18 out of 34 families, HCV antibody was detected (52.9%) in new members. Among them, HCV transmission in 11 families (32%) was also confirmed by PCR. Having a history of intravenous drug abuse (P=0.006) and incarceration (P=0.01) showed to be important risk factors for interfamilial transmission. Hence, blade/needle sharing (P=0.016) just following molecular assay and sex (P=036) only in the serologic analysis were also determined as significant risk factors. Furthermore, based on serologic results, medium socioeconomic state was further associated with this manner of transmission (P=0.019 and P=0.328). Interestingly, among relatives, 13 cases were brothers while just 5 cases were couples. The genotypes 3a and 1a were more prevalent among the population. Conclusion: In conclusion, our finding highlighted a noticeable role of interfamilial transmission for HCV spread and supports the significant role of close relatives, especially brother relationship in this spread. Hence, the socioeconomic state was associated with the transmission rate of virus in the family. PMID:27895850

  13. Evaluation of Two Globigerinoides ruber (white) Morphotypes in Paleoceanographic Reconstruction: A Gulf of Mexico Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. A.; Flower, B. P.; Williams, C.

    2012-12-01

    Globigerinoides ruber is a relatively abundant low-latitude planktic foraminiferal species widely used as a geochemical proxy to reconstruct modern and past oceanographic conditions. In addition to the two color variants (pink and white), G. ruber (white) can be further subdivided into morphological variants. G. ruber sensu stricto (s.s.) has three increasingly large spherical chambers in the final whorl each forming symmetrically over the previous suture, high-arched apertures, and a relatively thin CaCO3 test. G. ruber sensu lato (s.l.) has compressed subspherical chambers forming asymmetrically over the previous suture, with compressed apertures, and thick test walls. These morphological differences indicate that G. ruber s.s. and G. ruber s.l. may occupy different ecological niches. Previous plankton tow and sediment trap studies show that G. ruber s.s. generally inhabits the upper 30 m of the water column, while G. ruber s.l. calcifies at depths up to 50 m. Core-top studies from the South China Sea reveal statistically significant differences in δ18O and Mg/Ca ratios between morphotypes, suggesting that modern G. ruber s.l. calcifies at cooler temperatures (0.8° to 2°C) and/or deeper depths than G. ruber s.s. One previous study further hypothesized that the difference in δ18O diminished to near 0‰ during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a result of greater mixing in the upper water column due to intensified monsoon activity. Geochemical differences between G. ruber (white) morphotypes may therefore have important implications for paleoceanographic reconstructions. Here we present new stable isotope and trace element (δ18O and Mg/Ca) data from modern and fossil G. ruber (white) morphotypes, and compare our results with previously reported homogenized G. ruber (s.s.+ s.l.) data from core-tops and LGM (23 to 19 ka) sediments in Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico . Analyses were conducted on Orca Basin core MD02-2550 (26°56.78' N, 91°20.74' W; 2248 m water depth

  14. Municipal solid waste composition: Sampling methodology, statistical analyses, and case study evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Jensen, Morten Bang; Götze, Ramona; Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Petersen, Claus; Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Tiered approach to waste sorting ensures flexibility and facilitates comparison of solid waste composition data. • Food and miscellaneous wastes are the main fractions contributing to the residual household waste. • Separation of food packaging from food leftovers during sorting is not critical for determination of the solid waste composition. - Abstract: Sound waste management and optimisation of resource recovery require reliable data on solid waste generation and composition. In the absence of standardised and commonly accepted waste characterisation methodologies, various approaches have been reported in literature. This limits both comparability and applicability of the results. In this study, a waste sampling and sorting methodology for efficient and statistically robust characterisation of solid waste was introduced. The methodology was applied to residual waste collected from 1442 households distributed among 10 individual sub-areas in three Danish municipalities (both single and multi-family house areas). In total 17 tonnes of waste were sorted into 10–50 waste fractions, organised according to a three-level (tiered approach) facilitating comparison of the waste data between individual sub-areas with different fractionation (waste from one municipality was sorted at “Level III”, e.g. detailed, while the two others were sorted only at “Level I”). The results showed that residual household waste mainly contained food waste (42 ± 5%, mass per wet basis) and miscellaneous combustibles (18 ± 3%, mass per wet basis). The residual household waste generation rate in the study areas was 3–4 kg per person per week. Statistical analyses revealed that the waste composition was independent of variations in the waste generation rate. Both, waste composition and waste generation rates were statistically similar for each of the three municipalities. While the waste generation rates were similar for each of the two housing types (single

  15. Understanding and Evaluating Assurance Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John; Xu, Xidong; Rangarajan, Murali; Weaver, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Assurance cases are a method for providing assurance for a system by giving an argument to justify a claim about the system, based on evidence about its design, development, and tested behavior. In comparison with assurance based on guidelines or standards (which essentially specify only the evidence to be produced), the chief novelty in assurance cases is provision of an explicit argument. In principle, this can allow assurance cases to be more finely tuned to the specific circumstances of the system, and more agile than guidelines in adapting to new techniques and applications. The first part of this report (Sections 1-4) provides an introduction to assurance cases. Although this material should be accessible to all those with an interest in these topics, the examples focus on software for airborne systems, traditionally assured using the DO-178C guidelines and its predecessors. A brief survey of some existing assurance cases is provided in Section 5. The second part (Section 6) considers the criteria, methods, and tools that may be used to evaluate whether an assurance case provides sufficient confidence that a particular system or service is fit for its intended use. An assurance case cannot provide unequivocal "proof" for its claim, so much of the discussion focuses on the interpretation of such less-than-definitive arguments, and on methods to counteract confirmation bias and other fallibilities in human reasoning.

  16. Evaluation of hydrochemical changes due to intensive aquifer exploitation: case studies from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Esteller, M V; Rodríguez, R; Cardona, A; Padilla-Sánchez, L

    2012-09-01

    The impact of intensive aquifer exploitation has been observed in numerous places around the world. Mexico is a representative example of this problem. In 2010, 101 out of the 653 aquifers recognized in the country, showed negative social, economic, and environmental effects related to intensive exploitation. The environmental effects include, among others, groundwater level decline, subsidence, attenuation, and drying up of springs, decreased river flow, and deterioration of water quality. This study aimed at determining the hydrochemical changes produced by intensive aquifer exploitation and highlighting water quality modifications, taking as example the Valle de Toluca, Salamanca, and San Luis Potosi aquifers in Mexico's highlands. There, elements such as fluoride, arsenic, iron, and manganese have been detected, resulting from the introduction of older groundwater with longer residence times and distinctive chemical composition (regional flows). High concentrations of other elements such as chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and vanadium, as well as pathogens, all related to anthropogenic pollution sources (wastewater infiltration, irrigation return flow, and atmospheric pollutants, among others) were also observed. Some of these elements (nitrate, fluoride, arsenic, iron, and manganese) have shown concentrations above Mexican and World Health Organization drinking water standards.

  17. Distributional Analysis in Educational Evaluation: A Case Study from the New York City Voucher Program

    PubMed Central

    Domina, Thurston; Penner, Emily; Hoynes, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    We use quantile treatment effects estimation to examine the consequences of the random-assignment New York City School Choice Scholarship Program (NYCSCSP) across the distribution of student achievement. Our analyses suggest that the program had negligible and statistically insignificant effects across the skill distribution. In addition to contributing to the literature on school choice, the paper illustrates several ways in which distributional effects estimation can enrich educational research: First, we demonstrate that moving beyond a focus on mean effects estimation makes it possible to generate and test new hypotheses about the heterogeneity of educational treatment effects that speak to the justification for many interventions. Second, we demonstrate that distributional effects can uncover issues even with well-studied datasets by forcing analysts to view their data in new ways. Finally, such estimates highlight where in the overall national achievement distribution test scores of children exposed to particular interventions lie; this is important for exploring the external validity of the intervention’s effects. PMID:26207158

  18. Evaluating anthropogenic N inputs to diverse lake basins: A case study of three Chinese lakes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Swaney, Dennis P; Hong, Bongghi; Howarth, Robert W; Liu, Yong; Guo, Huaicheng

    2015-11-01

    The environmental degradation of lakes in China has become increasingly serious over the last 30 years and eutrophication resulting from enhanced nutrient inputs is considered a top threat. In this study, a quasi-mass balance method, net anthropogenic N inputs (NANI), was introduced to assess the human influence on N input into three typical Chinese lake basins. The resultant NANI exceeded 10,000 kg N km(-2) year(-1) for all three basins, and mineral fertilizers were generally the largest sources. However, rapid urbanization and shrinking agricultural production capability may significantly increase N inputs from food and feed imports. Higher percentages of NANI were observed to be exported at urban river outlets, suggesting the acceleration of NANI transfer to rivers by urbanization. Over the last decade, the N inputs have declined in the basins dominated by the fertilizer use but have increased in the basins dominated by the food and feed import. In the foreseeable future, urban areas may arise as new hotspots for nitrogen in China while fertilizer use may decline in importance in areas of high population density.

  19. Evaluation of counseling environmental alteration on pharmacy-patient communication qualifications: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongyan; Sun, Lulu; Jin, Rui; Li, Fang; Wei, Yuanyuan; Xie, Zhengzheng

    2016-12-01

    The closed pharmaceutical counseling room was so hard to be established for most of hospitals in China since limited space in the out-patient lobby, which dramatically affected the qualification of medication consultant. Few reports studied the importance of closed pharmaceutical counseling room construction.To investigate the necessary of closed pharmaceutical counseling room construction in the outpatient lobby.The closed pharmaceutical counseling room was established and equipped with hospital electronic information system, patient education flashes, and we-Chat in web. We collected the pharmaceutical counseling records before and after counseling room establishment and analyzed the results systematically.After the consulting venue transferred to the closed space, methods adopted by pharmacists in patient educations were diversification. Numbers of counseling people were increasing 4 folds after room establishment and questions were transferred from drug information supply to high professional pharmaceutical relation such as the usage of respiratory devices, drug-drug interaction, and so on.The alterations of consultant space provided a powerful platform on security, properly and suitable of patients' medication usage, keep the medication errors and poor compliance out of the serious consequence, and improve hospital satisfaction. Therefore, it is necessary in outpatient lobby to develop the independent room for medication service.

  20. Evaluation of coastal management: Study case in the province of Alicante, Spain.

    PubMed

    Palazón, A; Aragonés, L; López, I

    2016-12-01

    The beaches are complex systems that can be studied from different points of view and meet more than a mission to protect the coast. Their management consists of assigning solutions to problems and for this to be correct all factors involved have to be taken into account. In order to understand how management is done on the coast of the province of Alicante, surveys have been conducted among the managers of the 19 coastal municipalities of Alicante coast, covering the 91 beaches. The aim of the surveys is to try to know the problems and situations relating to the management, depending on different factors such as the level of urbanization and type of sediment. In addition, it has been investigated whether this management is aimed to protect the coastline, maintain the flora and fauna or is just a recreational management since the main economic activity is tourism. The beaches are conceived of as products offered to the user, which is what most concerns its economic importance in an area where the sun and beach tourism has a special share of the GDP. The ignorance as to the major problems regarding their physical functioning and the inability to solve them is due to a complex administrative system with which the coastal system is regulated inefficiently. The integral approach is essential for a complete and effective management of the coastal environment.