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Sample records for casimir experiments showing

  1. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  2. The Casimir force between real materials: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2009-10-15

    The physical origin of the Casimir force is connected with the existence of zero-point and thermal fluctuations. The Casimir effect is very general and finds applications in various fields of physics. This review is limited to the rapid progress at the intersection of experiment and theory that has been achieved in the last few years. It includes a critical assessment of the proposed approaches to the resolution of the puzzles arising in the applications of the Lifshitz theory of the van der Waals and Casimir forces to real materials. All the primary experiments on the measurement of the Casimir force between macroscopic bodies and the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a wall that have been performed in the last decade are reviewed, including the theory needed for their interpretation. The methodology for the comparison between experiment and theory in the force-distance measurements is presented. The experimental and theoretical results described here provide a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of dispersion forces in real materials and offer guidance for the application of the Lifshitz theory to the interpretation of the measurement results.

  3. Theoretical ingredients of a Casimir analog computer

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    We derive a correspondence between the contour integration of the Casimir stress tensor in the complex-frequency plane and the electromagnetic response of a physical dissipative medium in a finite real-frequency bandwidth. The consequences of this correspondence are at least threefold: First, the correspondence makes it easier to understand Casimir systems from the perspective of conventional classical electromagnetism, based on real-frequency responses, in contrast to the standard imaginary-frequency point of view based on Wick rotations. Second, it forms the starting point of finite-difference time-domain numerical techniques for calculation of Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries. Finally, this correspondence is also key to a technique for computing quantum Casimir forces at micrometer scales using antenna measurements at tabletop (e.g., centimeter) scales, forming a type of analog computer for the Casimir force. Superficially, relationships between the Casimir force and the classical electromagnetic Green’s function are well known, so one might expect that any experimental measurement of the Green’s function would suffice to calculate the Casimir force. However, we show that the standard forms of this relationship lead to infeasible experiments involving infinite bandwidth or exponentially growing fields, and a fundamentally different formulation is therefore required. PMID:20460309

  4. On the use of the proximity force approximation for deriving limits to short-range gravitational-like interactions from sphere-plane Casimir force experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Onofrio, Roberto

    2009-09-15

    We discuss the role of the proximity force approximation in deriving limits to the existence of Yukawian forces--predicted in the submillimeter range by many unification models--from Casimir force experiments using the sphere-plane geometry. Two forms of this approximation are discussed, the first used in most analyses of the residuals from the Casimir force experiments performed so far, and the second recently discussed in this context in R. Decca et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 124021 (2009)]. We show that the former form of the proximity force approximation overestimates the expected Yukawa force and that the relative deviation from the exact Yukawa force is of the same order of magnitude, in the realistic experimental settings, as the relative deviation expected between the exact Casimir force and the Casimir force evaluated in the proximity force approximation. This implies both a systematic shift making the actual limits to the Yukawa force weaker than claimed so far, and a degree of uncertainty in the {alpha}-{lambda} plane related to the handling of the various approximations used in the theory for both the Casimir and the Yukawa forces. We further argue that the recently discussed form for the proximity force approximation is equivalent, for a geometry made of a generic object interacting with an infinite planar slab, to the usual exact integration of any additive two-body interaction, without any need to invoke approximation schemes. If the planar slab is of finite size, an additional source of systematic error arises due to the breaking of the planar translational invariance of the system, and we finally discuss to what extent this may affect limits obtained on power-law and Yukawa forces.

  5. Quantum coherence in the dynamical Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samos-Sáenz de Buruaga, D. N.; Sabín, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We propose to use quantum coherence as the ultimate proof of the quantum nature of the radiation that appears by means of the dynamical Casimir effect in experiments with superconducting microwave waveguides. We show that, unlike previously considered measurements such as entanglement and discord, quantum coherence does not require a threshold value of the external pump amplitude and is highly robust to thermal noise.

  6. Collective behaviors of the Casimir force in microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H. B.; Yelton, J.

    2013-01-23

    Our goal was to explore the strong dependence of the Casimir force on the shape of the interacting bodies. We made significant progress and measured the Casimir force on silicon surface with rectangular corrugation and showed that the results agree with theoretical calculations, provided that the optical properties of silicon are taken into account. Furthermore, we performed measurement of the Casimir force within a single chip for the first time, between a doubly clamped beam and a movable, on-chip electrode at liquid helium temperature. This experiment represents a new way of studying the Casimir effect, a significant advance from the conventional approach of placing an external surface close to a force transducer.

  7. Casimir force between hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ge; Xu, Jingping; Zhu, Chengjie; He, Pengfei; Yang, Yaping; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2017-02-01

    The Casimir force between two hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) constructed by alternative metal-dielectric layers is investigated. Due to the existence of the hyperbolic dispersion, the electromagnetic response of HMMs becomes extremely dramatic, which is embodied by the nearly total reflection in such frequency region. As a result, the Casimir force between HMMs is much greater than that between ordinary dielectrics. In addition, it is shown that the Casimir force is proportional to the bandwidth of this hyperbolic dispersion, which is dependent on the filling factor as well as the characteristic frequencies of ingredient materials. Therefore, the relations between the force and these parameters are discussed. We show that the Casimir force can be controlled by tuning the bandwidth possessing hyperbolic dispersion of the structures. This work provides promising applications of HMMs on microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems.

  8. Resource Letter CF-1: Casimir Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.

    1999-10-01

    This resource letter provides an introductory guide to the literature on the Casimir force. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: introductory articles and books, calculations, dynamical Casimir effect, mechanical analogs, applications, and experiments. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Association of Physics Teachers.}

  9. Critical Casimir forces from the equation of state of quantum critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rançon, Adam; Henry, Louis-Paul; Rose, Félix; Cardozo, David Lopes; Dupuis, Nicolas; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2016-10-01

    The mapping between a classical length and inverse temperature as imaginary time provides a direct equivalence between the Casimir force of a classical system in D dimensions and internal energy of a quantum system in d =D -1 dimensions. The scaling functions of the critical Casimir force of the classical system with periodic boundaries thus emerge from the analysis of the symmetry related quantum critical point. We show that both nonperturbative renormalization group and quantum Monte Carlo analysis of quantum critical points provide quantitative estimates for the critical Casimir force in the corresponding classical model, giving access to widely different aspect ratios for the geometry of confined systems. In light of these results, we propose protocols for the realization of critical Casimir forces for periodic boundaries through state-of-the-art cold-atom and solid-state experiments.

  10. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  11. Halving the Casimir force with Conductive Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Man, S.; Heeck, K.; Wijngaarden, R. J.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2009-07-01

    The possibility to modify the strength of the Casimir effect by tailoring the dielectric functions of the interacting surfaces is regarded as a unique opportunity in the development of micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. In air, however, one expects that, unless noble metals are used, the electrostatic force arising from trapped charges overcomes the Casimir attraction, leaving no room for exploitation of Casimir force engineering at ambient conditions. Here we show that, in the presence of a conductive oxide, the Casimir force can be the dominant interaction even in air, and that the use of conductive oxides allows one to reduce the Casimir force up to a factor of 2 when compared to noble metals.

  12. Fundamental optics: On-chip Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.

    2017-02-01

    Measurement of the forces that arise from quantum vacuum fluctuations between closely spaced surfaces typically requires large apparatus, making applications difficult. Now, an experiment on a silicon chip to measure the Casimir force has been realized.

  13. Thermal Fluctuations in Casimir Pistons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, M.; Villarreal, C.

    2012-07-01

    We present analytical and simple expressions to determine the free energy, internal energy, entropy, as well as the pressure acting at the interface of a perfectly conducting rectangular Casimir piston. We show that infrared divergencies linear in temperature become cancelled within the piston configuration, and show a continuous behavior consistent with intuitive expectations.

  14. Diamagnetic effect on the Casimir force

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Norio

    2011-03-15

    The Casimir force between a diamagnetic plate and a magnetodielectric plate at finite temperature is considered. Under the condition that the permittivity of the magnetodielectric plate is sufficiently small, we show that the diamagnetic property dominantly determines the asymptotic behavior of the repulsive Casimir force for large separations. On the basis of this simple property, we present numerical results showing that if an effective permeability of a superconductor is much less than one, its diamagnetic response can be indirectly detected by measuring the Casimir force.

  15. Casimir, gravitational, and neutron tests of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2015-03-01

    We investigate laboratory tests of dark energy theories which modify gravity in a way generalizing the inverse power law chameleon models. We make use of the tomographic description of such theories which captures f (R ) models in the large curvature limit, the dilaton and the symmetron. We consider their effects in various experiments where the presence of a new scalar interaction may be uncovered. More precisely, we focus on the Casimir, Eötvös-Washington and neutron experiments. We show that dilatons, symmetrons and generalized chameleon models are efficiently testable in the laboratory. For generalized chameleons, we revise their status in the light of forthcoming Casimir experiments like CANNEX in Amsterdam and show that they are within reach of detection.

  16. Gravitational Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quach, James Q.

    2015-02-01

    We derive the gravitonic Casimir effect with nonidealized boundary conditions. This allows the quantification of the gravitonic contribution to the Casimir effect from real bodies. We quantify the meagerness of the gravitonic Casimir effect in ordinary matter. We also quantify the enhanced effect produced by the speculated Heisenberg-Couloumb (HC) effect in superconductors, thereby providing a test for the validity of the HC theory, and, consequently, the existence of gravitons.

  17. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, C; Soto, R

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  18. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  19. Thermal Casimir interaction between two magnetodielectric plates

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the thermal Casimir interaction between two magnetodielectric plates made of real materials. On the basis of the Lifshitz theory, it is shown that for diamagnets and for paramagnets in the broad sense (with exception of ferromagnets) the magnetic properties do not influence the magnitude of the Casimir force. For ferromagnets, taking into account the realistic dependence of magnetic permeability on frequency, we conclude that the impact of magnetic properties on the Casimir interaction arises entirely from the contribution of the zero-frequency term in the Lifshitz formula. The computations of the Casimir free energy and pressure are performed for the configurations of two plates made of ferromagnetic metals (Co and Fe), for one plate made of ferromagnetic metal and the other of nonmagnetic metal (Au), for two ferromagnetic dielectric plates (on the basis of polystyrene), and for a ferromagnetic dielectric plate near a nonmagnetic metal plate. The dielectric permittivity of metals is described using both the Drude and the plasma model approaches. It is shown that the Casimir repulsion through the vacuum gap can be realized in the configuration of a ferromagnetic dielectric plate near a nonmagnetic metal plate described by the plasma model. In all cases considered, the respective analytical results in the asymptotic limit of large separations between the plates are obtained. The impact of the magnetic phase transition through the Curie temperature on the Casimir interaction is considered. In conclusion, we propose several experiments allowing to determine whether the magnetic properties really influence the Casimir interaction and to independently verify the Drude and plasma model approaches to the thermal Casimir force.

  20. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen Å.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.130405 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  1. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas; Mota, David F.

    2007-12-15

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models.

  2. Critical Casimir forces between homogeneous and chemically striped surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2013-11-01

    Recent experiments have measured the critical Casimir force acting on a colloid immersed in a binary liquid mixture near its continuous demixing phase transition and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. Motivated by these experiments, we study the critical behavior of a system, which belongs to the Ising universality class, for the film geometry with one planar wall chemically striped, such that there is a laterally alternating adsorption preference for the two species of the binary liquid mixture, which is implemented by surface fields. For the opposite wall we employ alternatively a homogeneous adsorption preference or homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions, which within a lattice model are realized by open boundary conditions. By means of mean-field theory, Monte Carlo simulations, and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the critical Casimir force acting on the two parallel walls and its corresponding universal scaling function. We show that in the limit of stripe widths small compared with the film thickness, on the striped surface the system effectively realizes Dirichlet boundary conditions, which generically do not hold for actual fluids. Moreover, the critical Casimir force is found to be attractive or repulsive, depending on the width of the stripes of the chemically patterned surface and on the boundary condition applied to the opposing surface.

  3. Experiments showing dynamics of materials interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1997-02-01

    The discipline of materials science and engineering often involves understanding and controlling properties of interfaces. The authors address the challenge of educating students about properties of interfaces, particularly dynamic properties and effects of unstable interfaces. A series of simple, inexpensive, hands-on activities about fluid interfaces provides students with a testbed to develop intuition about interface dynamics. The experiments highlight the essential role of initial interfacial perturbations in determining the dynamic response of the interface. The experiments produce dramatic, unexpected effects when initial perturbations are controlled and inhibited. These activities help students to develop insight about unstable interfaces that can be applied to analogous problems in materials science and engineering. The lessons examine ``Rayleigh-Taylor instability,`` an interfacial instability that occurs when a higher-density fluid is above a lower-density fluid.

  4. Three-dimensional Casimir piston for massive scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S.C. Teo, L.P.

    2009-08-15

    We consider Casimir force acting on a three-dimensional rectangular piston due to a massive scalar field subject to periodic, Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Exponential cut-off method is used to derive the Casimir energy. It is shown that the divergent terms do not contribute to the Casimir force acting on the piston, thus render a finite well-defined Casimir force acting on the piston. Explicit expressions for the total Casimir force acting on the piston is derived, which show that the Casimir force is always attractive for all the different boundary conditions considered. As a function of a - the distance from the piston to the opposite wall, it is found that the magnitude of the Casimir force behaves like 1/a{sup 4} when a{yields}0{sup +} and decays exponentially when a{yields}{infinity}. Moreover, the magnitude of the Casimir force is always a decreasing function of a. On the other hand, passing from massless to massive, we find that the effect of the mass is insignificant when a is small, but the magnitude of the force is decreased for large a in the massive case.

  5. Controlling the Casimir force via the electromagnetic properties of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yaping; Chen Hong; Zeng Ran; Zhu Shiyao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2010-02-15

    The control of the Casimir force between two parallel plates can be achieved through adjusting the frequency-dependent electromagnetic properties of materials of the two plates. We show that, for different plate separations, the main contribution to the Casimir force comes from different frequency regions: For smaller (larger) separation, it comes from the higher (lower) frequency region. When the separation of the plates increases, the Casimir force can vary from attractive to repulsive and/or vice versa, by selecting the two plates with suitable electromagnetic properties. We discuss how a restoring Casimir force, which varies from repulsive to attractive by increasing the separation, can be realized and that the stable equilibrium is formed at zero Casimir force.

  6. Nonequilibrium Tuning of the Thermal Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David S.; Lu, Bing-Sui; Maggs, A. C.; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    In net-neutral systems correlations between charge fluctuations generate strong attractive thermal Casimir forces and engineering these forces to optimize nanodevice performance is an important challenge. We show how the normal and lateral thermal Casimir forces between two plates containing Brownian charges can be modulated by decorrelating the system through the application of an electric field, which generates a nonequilibrium steady state with a constant current in one or both plates, reducing the ensuing fluctuation-generated normal force while at the same time generating a lateral drag force. This hypothesis is confirmed by detailed numerical simulations as well as an analytical approach based on stochastic density functional theory.

  7. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razmi, H.; Abdollahi, M.

    2008-11-01

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock!

  8. Noncontact gears. I. Next-to-leading order contribution to the lateral Casimir force between corrugated parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Cavero-Pelaez, Ines; Milton, Kimball A.; Parashar, Prachi; Shajesh, K. V.

    2008-09-15

    We calculate the lateral Casimir force between corrugated parallel plates, described by {delta}-function potentials, interacting through a scalar field, using the multiple scattering formalism. The contributions to the Casimir energy due to uncorrugated parallel plates is treated as a background from the outset. We derive the leading- and next-to-leading-order contribution to the lateral Casimir force for the case when the corrugation amplitudes are small in comparison to corrugation wavelengths. We present explicit results in terms of finite integrals for the case of the Dirichlet limit, and exact results for the weak-coupling limit, for the leading- and next-to-leading-orders. The correction due to the next-to-leading contribution is significant. In the weak coupling limit we calculate the lateral Casimir force exactly in terms of a single integral which we evaluate numerically. Exact results for the case of the weak limit allows us to estimate the error in the perturbative results. We show that the error in the lateral Casimir force, in the weak coupling limit, when the next-to-leading order contribution is included is remarkably low when the corrugation amplitudes are small in comparison to corrugation wavelengths. We expect similar conclusions to hold for the Dirichlet case. The analogous calculation for the electromagnetic case should reduce the theoretical error sufficiently for comparison with the experiments.

  9. Modal approach to Casimir forces in periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravaia, F.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Dalvit, D. A. R.

    2010-12-15

    We present a modal approach to calculate finite-temperature Casimir interactions between two periodically modulated surfaces. The scattering formula is used and the reflection matrices of the patterned surfaces are calculated by decomposing the electromagnetic field into the natural modes of the structures. The Casimir force gradient from a deeply etched silicon grating is evaluated using the modal approach and compared to experiment for validation. The Casimir force involving a two-dimensional periodic structure is computed and deviations from the proximity force approximation are examined.

  10. The holographic supersymmetric Casimir energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti Genolini, Pietro; Cassani, Davide; Martelli, Dario; Sparks, James

    2017-01-01

    We consider a general class of asymptotically locally AdS5 solutions of minimal gauged supergravity, which are dual to superconformal field theories on curved backgrounds S1×M3 preserving two supercharges. We demonstrate that standard holographic renormalization corresponds to a scheme that breaks supersymmetry. We propose new boundary terms that restore supersymmetry, and show that for smooth solutions with topology S1×R4 the improved on-shell action reproduces both the supersymmetric Casimir energy and the field theory supersymmetric relation between charges.

  11. Casimir-Polder shifts on quantum levitation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crépin, P.-P.; Dufour, G.; Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2017-03-01

    An ultracold atom above a horizontal mirror experiences quantum reflection from the attractive Casimir-Polder interaction, which holds it against gravity and leads to quantum levitation states. We analyze this system by using a Liouville transformation of the Schrödinger equation and a Langer coordinate adapted to problems with a classical turning point. Reflection on the Casimir-Polder attractive well is replaced by reflection on a repulsive wall, and the problem is then viewed as an ultracold atom trapped inside a cavity with gravity and Casimir-Polder potentials acting, respectively, as top and bottom mirrors. We calculate numerically Casimir-Polder shifts of the energies of the cavity resonances and propose an approximate treatment which is precise enough to discuss spectroscopy experiments aimed at tests of the weak-equivalence principle on antihydrogen. We also discuss the lifetimes by calculating complex energies associated with cavity resonances.

  12. An experimental apparatus for Casimir torque measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    We have developed an experiment to measure the Casimir torque. In our experiment, a solid birefringent crystal causes a nematic liquid crystal director to rotate such that the extraordinary axes are aligned. A transparent and isotropic dielectric spacer layer is used to separate the two birefringent materials and an all-optical technique is used for detection. In this talk, we report on the progress of this experiment. Department of Physics, Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics.

  13. An ``Anatomic approach" to study the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Haakh, Harald; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The Casimir effect, in its simplest definition, is a quantum mechanical force between two objects placed in vacuum. In recent years the Casimir force has been the object of an exponentially growing attention both from theorists and experimentalists. A new generation of experiments paved the way for new challenges and spotted some shadows in the comparison to theory. Here we are going to isolate different contributions to the Casimir interaction and perform a detailed study to shine new light on this phenomenon. As an example, the contributions of Foucault (eddy current) modes will be discussed in different configurations. This ``anatomic approach'' allows to clearly put into evidence special features and to explain unusual behaviors. This brings new physical understanding on the undergoing physical mechanisms and suggests new ways to engineer the Casimir effect.

  14. Casimir energy in Kerr space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, F.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the vacuum energy of a scalar massless field confined in a Casimir cavity moving in a circular equatorial orbit in the exact Kerr space-time geometry. We find that both the orbital motion of the cavity and the underlying space-time geometry conspire in lowering the absolute value of the (renormalized) Casimir energy ⟨ɛvac⟩ren , as measured by a comoving observer, with respect to whom the cavity is at rest. This, in turn, causes a weakening in the attractive force between the Casimir plates. In particular, we show that the vacuum energy density ⟨ɛvac⟩ren→0 when the orbital path of the Casimir cavity comes close to the corotating or counter-rotating circular null orbits (possibly geodesic) allowed by the Kerr geometry. Such an effect could be of some astrophysical interest on relevant orbits, such as the Kerr innermost stable circular orbits, being potentially related to particle confinement (as in some interquark models). The present work generalizes previous results obtained by several authors in the weak field approximation.

  15. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis.

  16. Magnetic anisotropy due to the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Metalidis, G.; Bruno, P.

    2010-02-15

    We consider the Casimir interaction between a ferromagnetic and a nonmagnetic mirror and show how the Casimir effect gives rise to a magnetic anisotropy in the ferromagnetic layer. The anisotropy is out of plane if the nonmagnetic plate is optically isotropic. If the nonmagnetic plate shows a uniaxial optical anisotropy (with optical axis in the plate plane), we find an in-plane magnetic anisotropy. In both cases, the energetically most favorable magnetization orientation is given by the competition between polar, longitudinal, and transverse contributions to the magneto-optical Kerr effect and will therefore depend on the interplate distance. Numerical results will be presented for a magnetic plate made out of Fe and nonmagnetic plates of Au (optically isotropic), quartz, calcite, and barium titanate (all uniaxially birefringent).

  17. Electromagnetic Casimir piston in higher-dimensional spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2011-05-15

    We consider the Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field in a higher-dimensional spacetime of the form MxN, where M is the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime and N is an n-dimensional compact manifold. The Casimir force acting on a planar piston that can move freely inside a closed cylinder is investigated. Different combinations of perfectly conducting boundary conditions and infinitely permeable boundary conditions are imposed on the cylinder and the piston. It is verified that if the piston and the cylinder have the same boundary conditions, the piston is always going to be pulled towards the closer end of the cylinder. However, if the piston and the cylinder have different boundary conditions, the piston is always going to be pushed to the middle of the cylinder. By taking the limit where one end of the cylinder tends to infinity, one obtains the Casimir force acting between two parallel plates inside an infinitely long cylinder. The asymptotic behavior of this Casimir force in the high temperature regime and the low temperature regime are investigated for the case where the cross section of the cylinder in M is large. It is found that if the separation between the plates is much smaller than the size of N, the leading term of the Casimir force is the same as the Casimir force on a pair of large parallel plates in the (4+n)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. However, if the size of N is much smaller than the separation between the plates, the leading term of the Casimir force is 1+h/2 times the Casimir force on a pair of large parallel plates in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime, where h is the first Betti number of N. In the limit the manifold N vanishes, one does not obtain the Casimir force in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime if h is nonzero. Therefore the data obtained from Casimir experiments suggest that the first Betti number of the extra dimensions should be zero.

  18. Measurement of the Temperature Dependence of the Casimir-Polder Force

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.; Antezza, M.; Stringari, S.; Pitaevskii, L. P.

    2007-02-09

    We report on the first measurement of a temperature dependence of the Casimir-Polder force. This measurement was obtained by positioning a nearly pure {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate a few microns from a dielectric substrate and exciting its dipole oscillation. Changes in the collective oscillation frequency of the magnetically trapped atoms result from spatial variations in the surface-atom force. In our experiment, the dielectric substrate is heated up to 605 K, while the surrounding environment is kept near room temperature (310 K). The effect of the Casimir-Polder force is measured to be nearly 3 times larger for a 605 K substrate than for a room-temperature substrate, showing a clear temperature dependence in agreement with theory.

  19. Gravitational Casimir effect, the Lifshitz theory, and the existence of gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    It has been predicted that, if gravitational wave reflectors exist, two such parallel plane gravitational mirrors separated by an empty gap will interact not only via the well-known Casimir effect of quantum electrodynamics but also because of an analogous gravitational Casimir force. It has been further claimed that this phenomenon would demonstrate the existence of gravitons. In this note, we discuss epistemological pitfalls of such a conclusion connected to the logical structure of the Lifshitz theory and we show such an experiment cannot prove gravity quantization. We also expose interpretative challenges of any future data due to extreme uncertainties on the spectrum of the predicted stochastic astrophysical and cosmological gravitational wave background.

  20. Nonequilibrium Casimir-Polder plasmonic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Messina, Riccardo; Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto; Intravaia, Francesco

    2016-04-18

    Here we investigate how the combination of nonequilibrium effects and material properties impacts on the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a surface. By addressing systems with temperature inhomogeneities and laser interactions, we show that nonmonotonous energetic landscapes can be produced where barriers and minima appear. Lastly, our treatment provides a self-consistent quantum theoretical framework for investigating the properties of a class of nonequilibrium atom-surface interactions.

  1. Effective Casimir conditions and group coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Tsobanjan, Artur

    2014-06-01

    Properties of group coherent states can be derived ‘effectively’ without knowing full wave functions. The procedure is detailed in this paper as an example of general methods for effective constraints. The role of constraints in the present context is played by a Casimir condition that puts states within an irreducible representation of a Lie group (or, equivalently, on a quantization of a co-adjoint orbit of the dual Lie algebra). Simplifications implied by a Casimir condition, compared with general first-class constraints, allows one to show that the correct number of degrees of freedom is obtained after imposing the condition. When combined with conditions to saturate uncertainty relations, moments of group coherent states can be derived. A detailed example in quantum cosmology (cosmic forgetfulness) illustrates the usefulness of the methods.

  2. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  3. Casimir effect, quantum fluctuations and related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hushwater, Velvel Shaia

    Casimir forces are the very long-range (retarded) forces between electrically neutral systems. Such forces may be thought of as arising from the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Contrary to popular opinion such forces need not be attractive. After giving a foundation of the method of the change in the 'zero-point energy' we show how other methods to compute Casimir forces follow from it. We consider the repulsion between electric and magnetic dipoles induced by vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field. The calculation are made by the use of the Heisenberg picture operators and by the stochastic electrodynamics approach. We present a purely geometrical proof of the image method, and use it to discuss the Casimir interaction between an atom and a plate. We study the Casimir repulsion between a perfectly conducting and an infinitely permeable plate with the radiation pressure approach. This example illustrates how a repulsive force arises as a consequence of the redistribution of vacuum-field modes corresponding to specific boundary conditions. We show that result is independent of a cutoff function. Discussing the connection with perturbation theory, we prove the negativity of the leading order shift in the ground state. The Casimir effect supports the reality of the 'zero- point energy.' To clarify this we present a novel approach to quantum theory, based on the principle of the quantization of the ensemble-averaged action variable. This quantization leads to the probabilistic description of coordinates and momentum as random variables, which satisfy the uncertainty relation. Using such variables we show that the 'quantum momentum function' must satisfy the Riccati differential equation, which can be converted to the Schrodinger equation for the Ψ function. We derive also the form of basic operators and the rule for probabilities in quantum mechanics. We show that the approach leads to a simple interpretation of gauge invariance, and discuss

  4. Does the transverse electric zero mode contribute to the Casimir effect for a metal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, J. S.; Brevik, I.; Aarseth, J. B.; Milton, K. A.

    2003-05-01

    The finite-temperature Casimir free energy, entropy, and internal energy are considered anew for a conventional parallel-plate configuration, in the light of current discussions in the literature. In the case of an “ideal” metal, characterized by a refractive index equal to infinity for all frequencies, we recover, via a somewhat unconventional method, conventional results for the temperature dependence, meaning that the zero-frequency transverse electric mode contributes the same as the transverse magnetic mode. For a real metal, however, approximately obeying the Drude dispersive model at low frequencies, we find that the zero-frequency transverse electric mode does not contribute at all. This would appear to lead to an observable temperature dependence and a violation of the third law of thermodynamics. It had been suggested that the source of the difficulty was the behavior of the reflection coefficient for perpendicular polarization but we show that this is not the case. By introducing a simplified model for the Casimir interaction, consisting of two harmonic oscillators interacting via a third one, we illustrate the behavior of the transverse electric field. Numerical results are presented based on the refractive index for gold. A linear temperature correction to the Casimir force between parallel plates is indeed found which should be observable in room-temperature experiments, but this does not entail any thermodynamic inconsistency.

  5. Casimir force phase transitions in the graphene family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2017-03-01

    The Casimir force is a universal interaction induced by electromagnetic quantum fluctuations between any types of objects. The expansion of the graphene family by adding silicene, germanene and stanene (2D allotropes of Si, Ge, and Sn), lends itself as a platform to probe Dirac-like physics in honeycomb staggered systems in such a ubiquitous interaction. We discover Casimir force phase transitions between these staggered 2D materials induced by the complex interplay between Dirac physics, spin-orbit coupling and externally applied fields. In particular, we find that the interaction energy experiences different power law distance decays, magnitudes and dependences on characteristic physical constants. Furthermore, due to the topological properties of these materials, repulsive and quantized Casimir interactions become possible.

  6. Casimir force phase transitions in the graphene family.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Dalvit, Diego A R; Woods, Lilia M

    2017-03-15

    The Casimir force is a universal interaction induced by electromagnetic quantum fluctuations between any types of objects. The expansion of the graphene family by adding silicene, germanene and stanene (2D allotropes of Si, Ge, and Sn), lends itself as a platform to probe Dirac-like physics in honeycomb staggered systems in such a ubiquitous interaction. We discover Casimir force phase transitions between these staggered 2D materials induced by the complex interplay between Dirac physics, spin-orbit coupling and externally applied fields. In particular, we find that the interaction energy experiences different power law distance decays, magnitudes and dependences on characteristic physical constants. Furthermore, due to the topological properties of these materials, repulsive and quantized Casimir interactions become possible.

  7. Transient Casimir Forces from Quenches in Thermal and Active Matter.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Christian M; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-01-06

    We compute fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces for classical systems after a temperature quench. Using a generic coarse-grained model for fluctuations of a conserved density, we find that transient forces arise even if the initial and final states are force free. In setups reminiscent of Casimir (planar walls) and van der Waals (small inclusions) interactions, we find comparable exact universal expressions for the force. Dynamical details only scale the time axis of transient force curves. We propose that such quenches can be achieved, for instance, in experiments on active matter, employing tunable activity or interaction protocols.

  8. Transient Casimir Forces from Quenches in Thermal and Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Christian M.; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We compute fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces for classical systems after a temperature quench. Using a generic coarse-grained model for fluctuations of a conserved density, we find that transient forces arise even if the initial and final states are force free. In setups reminiscent of Casimir (planar walls) and van der Waals (small inclusions) interactions, we find comparable exact universal expressions for the force. Dynamical details only scale the time axis of transient force curves. We propose that such quenches can be achieved, for instance, in experiments on active matter, employing tunable activity or interaction protocols.

  9. Casimir effect in the Kerr spacetime with quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Cunha, M. S.; Freitas, L. F. F.; Muniz, C. R.; Tahim, M. O.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the Casimir energy of a massless scalar field in a cavity formed by nearby parallel plates orbiting a rotating spherical body surrounded by quintessence, investigating the influence of the gravitational field on that energy, at zero temperature. This influence includes the effects due to the spacetime dragging caused by the source rotation as well as those ones due to the quintessence. We show that the energy depends on all the involved parameters, as source mass, angular momentum and quintessence state parameter, for any radial coordinate and polar angle. We show that at the north pole the Casimir energy is not influenced by the quintessential matter. At the equatorial plane, when the quintessence is canceled, the result obtained in the literature is recovered. Finally, constraints in the quintessence parameters are obtained from the uncertainty in the current measurements of Casimir effect.

  10. Dynamics of thermal Casimir-Polder forces on polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Simen Aadnoey; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Scheel, Stefan

    2009-05-15

    We study the influence of thermal Casimir-Polder forces on the near-surface trapping of cold polar molecules, with emphasis on LiH and YbF near a Au surface at room temperature. We show that even for a molecule initially prepared in its electronic and rovibrational ground state, the Casimir-Polder force oscillates with the molecule-wall separation. The nonresonant force and the evanescent part of the resonant force almost exactly cancel at high temperature which results in a saturation of the (attractive) force in this limit. This implies that the Casimir-Polder force on a fully thermalized molecule can differ dramatically from that obtained using a naive perturbative expansion of the Lifshitz formula based on the molecular ground-state polarizability. A dynamical calculation reveals how the spatial oscillations die out on a typical time scale of several seconds as thermalization of the molecule with its environment sets in.

  11. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  12. Single-interface Casimir torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Tiago A.; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2016-10-01

    A different type of Casimir-type interaction is theoretically predicted: a single-interface torque at a junction of an anisotropic material and a vacuum or another material system. The torque acts to reorient the polarizable microscopic units of the involved materials near the interface, and thus to change the internal structure of the materials. The single-interface torque depends on the zero-point energy of the interface localized and extended modes. Our theory demonstrates that the single-interface torque is essential to understand the Casimir physics of material systems with anisotropic elements and may influence the orientation of the director of nematic liquid crystals.

  13. Observability of the bulk Casimir effect: Can the dynamical Casimir effect be relevant to sonoluminescence?

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, K.A.; Jack Ng, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The experimental observation of intense light emission by acoustically driven, periodically collapsing bubbles of air in water (sonoluminescence) has yet to receive an adequate explanation. One of the most intriguing ideas is that the conversion of acoustic energy into photons occurs quantum mechanically, through a dynamical version of the Casimir effect. We have argued elsewhere that in the adiabatic approximation, which should be reliable here, Casimir or zero-point energies cannot possibly be large enough to be relevant. (About 10 MeV of energy is released per collapse.) However, there are sufficient subtleties involved that others have come to opposite conclusions. In particular, it has been suggested that bulk energy, that is, simply the naive sum of (1) /(2) {h_bar}{omega}, which is proportional to the volume, could be relevant. We show that this cannot be the case, based on general principles as well as specific calculations. In the process we further illuminate some of the divergence difficulties that plague Casimir calculations, with an example relevant to the bag model of hadrons. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Temperature dependence of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver; Høye, Johan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Casimir force—at first, a rather unexpected consequence of quantum electrodynamics—was discovered by Hendrik Casimir in Eindhoven in 1948. It predicts that two uncharged metal plates experience an attractive force because of the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The idea was tested experimentally in the 1950s and 1960s, but the results were not so accurate that one could make a definite conclusion regarding the existence of the effect. Evgeny Lifshitz expanded the theory in 1955 so as to deal with general dielectric media. Much experimental work was later done to test the theory’s predictions, especially with regards to the temperature dependence of the effect. The existence of the effect itself was verified beyond doubt by Sabisky and Anderson in 1973. Another quarter century had to pass before Lamoreaux and collaborators were able to confirm—or at least make plausible—the temperature dependence predicted by Lifshitz formula in combination with reasonable input data for the material’s dispersive properties. The situation is not yet clear-cut, however, there are recent experiments indicating results in disagreement with those of Lamoreaux. In this paper, a brief review is given of the status of this research field.

  15. Dynamical Casimir effect and minimal temperature in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenti, Giuliano; Strini, Giuliano

    2015-02-01

    We study the fundamental limitations of cooling to absolute zero for a qubit, interacting with a single mode of the electromagnetic field. Our results show that the dynamical Casimir effect, which is unavoidable in any finite-time thermodynamic cycle, forbids the attainability of the absolute zero of temperature, even in the limit of an infinite number of cycles.

  16. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  17. Three-dimensional Casimir force between absorbing multilayer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, Christian; Knöll, Ludwig; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar

    2003-09-01

    Recently the influence of dielectric and geometrical properties on the Casimir force between dispersing and absorbing multilayered plates in the zero-temperature limit has been studied within a one-dimensional (1D) quantization scheme for the electromagnetic field in the presence of causal media [R. Esquivel-Sirvent, C. Villarreal, and G.H. Cocoletzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 052108 (2001)]. In the present paper a rigorous 3D analysis is given, which shows that for complex heterostructures the 1D theory only roughly reflects the dependence of the Casimir force on the plate separation in general. Further, an extension of the very recently derived formula for the Casimir force at zero temperature [M.S. Tomaš, Phys. Rev. A 66, 052103 (2002)] to finite temperatures is given, and analytical expressions for specific distance laws in the zero-temperature limit are derived. In particular, it is shown that the Casimir force between two single-slab plates behaves asymptotically like d-6 instead of d-4 (d, plate separation).

  18. Impact of magnetic properties on the Casimir torque between anisotropic metamaterial plates

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Gang; Liu Zhongzhu; Luo Jun

    2009-12-15

    The quantized surface mode technique is used to calculate the Casimir torque between two parallel anisotropic metamaterial plates with in-plane optical axes, and our main concern is focused on the impact of the magnetic properties of the plates on the Casimir torque. Our result shows that at small separation, the Casimir torque between the two plates with frequency dependent permeabilities is larger than that between two nonmagnetic plates, while at large separation it is smaller. This can be explained as a result of the impact of both magnetic properties and material dispersion of the plates. The impact of the Drude background in connected metallic metamaterial is also discussed. These phenomena provide us with new understanding about the Casimir effect and show great potential in application.

  19. Archimedes force on Casimir apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shevrin, Efim

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses a problem of Casimir apparatus in dense medium, put in weak gravitational field. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle with proper account for contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general expression for the corresponding force in metric with cylindrical symmetry. By way of example, we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  20. Archimedes force on Casimir apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V.; Shevrin, E.

    2016-11-01

    The talk addresses a problem of Casimir apparatus in weak gravitational field, surrounded by a dense medium. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle, taking into account proper contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general ex pression for the corresponding force in terms of the effective action. By way of example we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  1. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    PubMed Central

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  2. Casimir dynamics: Interactions of surfaces with codimension >1 due to quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Scardicchio, A.

    2005-09-15

    We study the Casimir force between defects (branes) of codimension larger than 1 due to quantum fluctuations of a scalar field {phi} living in the bulk. We show that the Casimir force is attractive and that it diverges as the distance between the branes approaches a critical value L{sub c}. Below this critical distance L{sub c} the vacuum state {phi}=0 of the theory is unstable, due to the birth of a tachyon, and the field condenses.

  3. Casimir effect for parallel plates involving massless Majorana fermions at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Hongbo

    2010-08-15

    We study the Casimir effect for parallel plates with massless Majorana fermions obeying the bag boundary conditions at finite temperature. The thermal influence will modify the effect. It is found that the sign of the Casimir energy remains negative if the product of the plate distance and the temperature is larger than a special value, otherwise the energy will change to positive. The Casimir energy rises with the stronger thermal influence. We show that the attractive Casimir force between two parallel plates becomes greater with increasing temperature. In the case of the piston system involving the same Majorana fermions with the same boundary conditions, the attractive force on the piston will be weaker in higher-temperature surroundings.

  4. Casimir effect on graphene resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigated the influence of the Casimir effect on mechanical properties of a graphene resonator, where a graphene sheet is located in parallel with a perfectly conducting plate. The Casimir force arising from this effect strongly attracts a graphene sheet to a perfectly conducting plate and increases the tension of a graphene sheet as the separation distance between them decreases. The maximum vertical displacement of a graphene sheet to the substrate increases obeying a power law of a separation distance with an exponent of 4/3 as the separation distance decreases. For small separation distances, the Casimir force is excessively strong for the graphene sheet to maintain a free-standing shape, consequently resulting in the adhesion of the sheet to the substrate below a critical separation distance. The resonant frequency increases over a wide range as the separation distance decreases for large separation distances. However, it then rapidly decreases for small separations and converges to zero at a critical separation. These various behaviors enable the control of a graphene resonator.

  5. Line contribution to the critical Casimir force between a homogeneous and a chemically stepped surface.

    PubMed

    Toldin, Francesco Parisen; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2015-06-03

    Recent experimental realizations of the critical Casimir effect have been implemented by monitoring colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture near demixing and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. In particular, critical Casimir forces have been measured for surfaces consisting of stripes with periodically alternating adsorption preferences, forming chemical steps between them. Motivated by these experiments, we analyze the contribution of such chemical steps to the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and within the Ising universality class. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, mean-field theory and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the universal scaling function associated with the contribution to the critical Casimir force due to individual, isolated chemical steps facing a surface with homogeneous adsorption preference or with Dirichlet boundary condition. In line with previous findings, these results allow one to compute the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and in the presence of arbitrarily shaped, but wide stripes. In this latter limit the force decomposes into a sum of the contributions due to the two homogeneous parts of the surface and due to the chemical steps between the stripes. We assess this decomposition by comparing the resulting sum with actual simulation data for the critical Casimir force in the presence of a chemically striped substrate.

  6. Casimir force in brane worlds: Coinciding results from Green's and zeta function approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, Roman; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Pedraza, Omar

    2010-06-15

    Casimir force encodes the structure of the field modes as vacuum fluctuations and so it is sensitive to the extra dimensions of brane worlds. Now, in flat spacetimes of arbitrary dimension the two standard approaches to the Casimir force, Green's function, and zeta function yield the same result, but for brane world models this was only assumed. In this work we show that both approaches yield the same Casimir force in the case of universal extra dimensions and Randall-Sundrum scenarios with one and two branes added by p compact dimensions. Essentially, the details of the mode eigenfunctions that enter the Casimir force in the Green's function approach get removed due to their orthogonality relations with a measure involving the right hypervolume of the plates, and this leaves just the contribution coming from the zeta function approach. The present analysis corrects previous results showing a difference between the two approaches for the single brane Randall-Sundrum; this was due to an erroneous hypervolume of the plates introduced by the authors when using the Green's function. For all the models we discuss here, the resulting Casimir force can be neatly expressed in terms of two four-dimensional Casimir force contributions: one for the massless mode and the other for a tower of massive modes associated with the extra dimensions.

  7. Casimir stress in an inhomogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, T.G. Xiong, C.; Leonhardt, U.

    2010-03-15

    The Casimir effect in an inhomogeneous dielectric is investigated using Lifshitz's theory of electromagnetic vacuum energy. A permittivity function that depends continuously on one Cartesian coordinate is chosen, bounded on each side by homogeneous dielectrics. The result for the Casimir stress is infinite everywhere inside the inhomogeneous region, a divergence that does not occur for piece-wise homogeneous dielectrics with planar boundaries. A Casimir force per unit volume can be extracted from the infinite stress but it diverges on the boundaries between the inhomogeneous medium and the homogeneous dielectrics. An alternative regularization of the vacuum stress is considered that removes the contribution of the inhomogeneity over small distances, where macroscopic electromagnetism is invalid. The alternative regularization yields a finite Casimir stress inside the inhomogeneous region, but the stress and force per unit volume diverge on the boundaries with the homogeneous dielectrics. The case of inhomogeneous dielectrics with planar boundaries thus falls outside the current understanding of the Casimir effect.

  8. Reply to "Comment on `Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the "Comment on `Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors.' " We believe the comment misrepresents our papers, and fails to provide a plausible resolution to the conflict between theory and experiment.

  9. Impact of surface imperfections on the Casimir force for lenses of centimeter-size curvature radii

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-02-15

    The impact of imperfections, which are always present on surfaces of lenses with centimeter-size curvature radii, on the Casimir force in the lens-plate geometry is investigated. It is shown that the commonly used formulation of the proximity force approximation is inapplicable for spherical lenses with surface imperfections, such as bubbles and pits. More general expressions for the Casimir force are derived that take surface imperfections into account. Using these expressions, we show that surface imperfections can both increase and decrease the magnitude of the Casimir force up to a few tens percent when compared with the case of a perfectly spherical lens. We demonstrate that the Casimir force between a perfectly spherical lens and a plate described by the Drude model can be made approximately equal to the force between a sphere with some surface imperfection and a plate described by the plasma model, and vice versa. In the case of a metallic sphere and a semiconductor plate, approximately the same Casimir forces are obtained for four different descriptions of charge carriers in the semiconductor if appropriate surface imperfections on the lens surface are present. The conclusion is made that there is a fundamental problem in the interpretation of measurement data for the Casimir force using spherical lenses of centimeter-size radii.

  10. Worldline approach for numerical computation of electromagnetic Casimir energies: Scalar field coupled to magnetodielectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackrory, Jonathan B.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Steck, Daniel A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a worldline method for the calculation of Casimir energies for scalar fields coupled to magnetodielectric media. The scalar model we consider may be applied in arbitrary geometries, and it corresponds exactly to one polarization of the electromagnetic field in planar layered media. Starting from the field theory for electromagnetism, we work with the two decoupled polarizations in planar media and develop worldline path integrals, which represent the two polarizations separately, for computing both Casimir and Casimir-Polder potentials. We then show analytically that the path integrals for the transverse-electric polarization coupled to a dielectric medium converge to the proper solutions in certain special cases, including the Casimir-Polder potential of an atom near a planar interface, and the Casimir energy due to two planar interfaces. We also evaluate the path integrals numerically via Monte Carlo path-averaging for these cases, studying the convergence and performance of the resulting computational techniques. While these scalar methods are only exact in particular geometries, they may serve as an approximation for Casimir energies for the vector electromagnetic field in other geometries.

  11. Casimir force at a knife's edge

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Shpunt, Alexander; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-03-15

    The Casimir force has been computed exactly for only a few simple geometries, such as infinite plates, cylinders, and spheres. We show that a parabolic cylinder, for which analytic solutions to the Helmholtz equation are available, is another case where such a calculation is possible. We compute the interaction energy of a parabolic cylinder and an infinite plate (both perfect mirrors), as a function of their separation and inclination, H and {theta}, and the cylinder's parabolic radius R. As H/R{yields}0, the proximity force approximation becomes exact. The opposite limit of R/H{yields}0 corresponds to a semi-infinite plate, where the effects of edge and inclination can be probed.

  12. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-30

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead of general relativity.

  13. Nonequilibrium Casimir Force with a Nonzero Chemical Potential for Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaifeng; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new class of nonequilibrium Casimir forces, where the deviation from equilibrium is achieved through the use of a nonzero chemical potential of photons. Such a force can be observed when two semiconductors are brought in close proximity to each other, and when at least one of the semiconductors is subject to an external voltage. By exact numerical calculations of a sphere-plate configuration, we show that in the total force the non-equilibrium component can dominate over its equilibrium counterpart with a relatively modest external voltage, even when the sphere-plate separation is in the nanoscale. As a result, repulsion can be achieved at the nanoscale even with a relatively modest applied voltage. The results here point to a pathway that can significantly advance the quest for observing and harnessing nonequilibrium Casimir forces in solid-state systems.

  14. Onsager-Casimir relations revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hubmer, G.F.; Titulaer, U.M.

    1987-10-01

    The authors study the fate of the Onsager-Casimir reciprocity relations for a continuous system when some of its variables are eliminated adiabatically. Just as for discrete systems, deviations appear in correction terms to the reduced evolution equation that are of higher order in the time scale ratio. The deviations are not removed by including correction terms to the coarse-grained thermodynamic potential. However, via a reformulation of the theory, in which the central role of the thermodynamic potential is taken over by an associated Lagrangian-type expression, they arrive at a modified form of the Onsager-Casimir relations that survives the adiabatic elimination procedure. There is a simple relation between the time evolution of the redefined thermodynamic forces and that of the basic thermodynamic variables; this relation also survives the adiabatic elimination. The formalism is illustrated by explicit calculations for the Klein-Kramers equation, which describes the phase space distribution of Brownian particles, and for the corrected Smoluchowski equation derived from it by adiabatic elimination of the velocity variable. The symmetry relation for the latter leads to a simple proof that the reality of the eigenvalues of the simple Smoluchowski equation is not destroyed by the addition of higher order corrections, at least not within the framework of a formal perturbation expansion in the time scale ratio.

  15. Strong Thermal and Electrostatic Manipulation of the Casimir Force in Graphene Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Chahine; Guizal, Brahim; Antezza, Mauro

    2017-03-01

    We show that graphene-dielectric multilayers give rise to an unusual tunability of the Casimir-Lifshitz forces and allow to easily realize completely different regimes within the same structure. Concerning thermal effects, graphene-dielectric multilayers take advantage of the anomalous features predicted for isolated suspended graphene sheets, even though they are considerably affected by the presence of the dielectric substrate. They can also achieve the anomalous nonmonotonic thermal metallic behavior by increasing the graphene sheets density and their Fermi level. In addition to a strong thermal modulation occurring at short separations, in a region where the force is orders of magnitude larger than the one occurring at large distances, the force can be also adjusted by varying the number of graphene layers as well as their Fermi levels, allowing for relevant force amplifications which can be tuned, very rapidly and in situ, by simply applying an electric potential. Our predictions can be relevant for both Casimir experiments and micro- or nanoelectromechanical systems and in new devices for technological applications.

  16. Fermionic Casimir effect with helix boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang-hua; Li, Xin-zhou; Feng, Chao-Jun

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the fermionic Casimir effect under a new type of space-time topology using the concept of quotient topology. The relation between the new topology and that in Feng and Li (Phys. Lett. B 691:167, 2010), Zhai et al. (Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:669, 2011) is something like that between a Möbius strip and a cylindric. We obtain the exact results of the Casimir energy and force for the massless and massive Dirac fields in the ( D+1)-dimensional space-time. For both massless and massive cases, there is a Z 2 symmetry for the Casimir energy. To see the effect of the mass, we compare the result with that of the massless one and we found that the Casimir force approaches the result of the force in the massless case when the mass tends to zero and vanishes when the mass tends to infinity.

  17. The Casimir Energy for the Riemann Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palesheva, E. V.; Pecheritsyn, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The Casimir energy of a massive scalar field on a Riemann cap with the Dirichlet boundary conditions is calculated. The problem is considered in the quasi-stationary approximation. Formulas are derived which are suitable for numerical calculations.

  18. Thermofield dynamics and Casimir effect for fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, H. . E-mail: hebe@fis.ufba.br; Silva, J.C. da . E-mail: jcsilva@cefetba.br; Khanna, F.C. . E-mail: khanna@phys.ualberta.ca; Malbouisson, J.M.C. . E-mail: jmalbou@phys.ualberta.ca; Revzen, M. . E-mail: revzen@physics.technion.ac.il; Santana, A.E. . E-mail: asantana@fis.unb.br

    2005-05-01

    A generalization of the Bogoliubov transformation is developed to describe a space compactified fermionic field. The method is the fermionic counterpart of the formalism introduced earlier for bosons [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 052101], and is based on the thermofield dynamics approach. We analyze the energy-momentum tensor for the Casimir effect of a free massless fermion field in a d-dimensional box at finite temperature. As a particular case the Casimir energy and pressure for the field confined in a three-dimensional parallelepiped box are calculated. It is found that the attractive or repulsive nature of the Casimir pressure on opposite faces changes depending on the relative magnitude of the edges. We also determine the temperature at which the Casimir pressure in a cubic box changes sign and estimate its value when the edge of the cube is of the order of the confining lengths for baryons.

  19. Casimir Energy Associated With Fractional Derivative Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S. C.

    2007-04-28

    Casimir energy associated with fractional derivative scalar massless field at zero and positive temperature can be obtained using the regularization based on generalized Riemann zeta function of Epstein-Hurwitz type.

  20. Casimir forces of metallic microstructures into cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenanakis, George; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical estimate of the Casimir force of a metallic structure embedded into a cubic cavity is proposed. We demonstrate that by calculating the eigenmodes of the system we can determine the Casimir force, which can be either attractive or repulsive, by simply changing the geometry of the structures relative to the walls of the cavity. In this analysis, several cases of structures are taken into account, from rectangular slabs to chiral "omega" particles, and the predicted data are consistent with recent literature. We demonstrate that the sidewalls of the studied cavity contribute decisively to the repulsive Casimir force between the system and the nearby top surface of the cavity. Finally, we provide evidence that the medium embedded into the studied cavity (and especially its permittivity) can change the intensity of the Casimir force, while its repulsive nature, once established (owing to favorable geometrical features), remains quite robust.

  1. Stability of suspended graphene under Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, E. M.; Zarzuela, R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a graphene sheet suspended above a conducting surface. Treating graphene as an elastic membrane subjected to Casimir force, we study its stability against sagging towards the conductor. There exists a critical elevation at the edges below which the central part of the suspended graphene nucleates a trunk that sinks under the action of the Casimir force. The dependence of the critical elevation on temperature, dimensions, and the elastic stress applied to the graphene sheet is computed.

  2. Possibility of measuring thermal effects in the Casimir force

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-09-15

    We analyze the possibility of measuring small thermal effects in the Casimir force between metal test bodies in configurations of a sphere above a plate and two parallel plates. For the sphere-plate geometry used in many experiments, we investigate the applicability of the proximity force approximation (PFA) to calculation of thermal effects in the Casimir force and its gradient. It is shown that for real metals the two formulations of the PFA used in the literature lead to relative differences in the results obtained being less than a small parameter equal to the ratio of separation distance to sphere radius. For ideal metals, PFA results for the thermal correction are obtained and compared with available exact results. It is emphasized that in the experimental region in the zeroth order of the small parameter already mentioned, the thermal Casimir force and its gradient calculated using the PFA (and thermal corrections in their own right) coincide with the respective exact results. For real metals, available exact results are outside the application region of the PFA. However, the exact results are shown to converge with the PFA results when the small parameter goes down to experimental values. We arrive at the conclusion that the large thermal effects predicted by the Drude-model approach, if they exist, could be measured in both static and dynamic experiments in sphere-plate and plate-plate configurations. As for the small thermal effects predicted by the plasma-model approach, the static experiment in the configuration of two parallel plates is found to be the best for their observation.

  3. Apparent Endless Extraction of Energy from the Vacuum by Cyclic Manipulation of Casimir Cavity Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1983, Ambjorn and Wolfram produced plots of the energy density of the quantum mechanical electromagnetic fluctuations in a volume of vacuum bounded by perfectly conducting walls in the shape of a rectangular cavity of dimensions a(1), a(2), and a(3), as a function of the ratios a(2)/a(1) and a(3)/a(1). Portions of these plots are double-valued, in that they allow rectangular cavities with the same, value of a(2)/a(1), but different values of a(3)/a(1), to have the saint total energy. Using these double-valued regions of the plots, I show that it is possible to define a "Casimir Vacuum Energy Extraction Cycle" which apparently would allow for the endless extraction of energy from the vacuum in the Casimir cavity by cyclic manipulation of the Casimir cavity dimensions.

  4. Results from electrostatic calibrations for measuring the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lombardo, F. C.; Mazzitelli, F. D.; Onofrio, R.

    2010-05-15

    We report on measurements performed on an apparatus aimed to study the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane configuration. The electrostatic calibrations evidence anomalous behaviors in the dependence of the electrostatic force and the minimizing potential upon distance. We discuss analogies and differences of these anomalies with respect to those already observed in the sphere-plane configuration. At the smallest explored distances we observe frequency shifts of non-Coulombian nature preventing the measurement of the Casimir force in the same range. We also report on measurements performed in the parallel-plane configuration, showing that the dependence on distance of the minimizing potential, if present at all, is milder than in the sphere-plane or cylinder-plane geometries. General considerations on the interplay between the distance-dependent minimizing potential and the precision of Casimir force measurements in the range relevant to detect the thermal corrections for all geometries are finally reported.

  5. Critical Casimir force in the presence of random local adsorption preference.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    We study the critical Casimir force for a film geometry in the Ising universality class. We employ a homogeneous adsorption preference on one of the confining surfaces, while the opposing surface exhibits quenched random disorder, leading to a random local adsorption preference. Disorder is characterized by a parameter p, which measures, on average, the portion of the surface that prefers one component, so that p=0,1 correspond to homogeneous adsorption preference. By means of Monte Carlo simulations of an improved Hamiltonian and finite-size scaling analysis, we determine the critical Casimir force. We show that by tuning the disorder parameter p, the system exhibits a crossover between an attractive and a repulsive force. At p=1/2, disorder allows to effectively realize Dirichlet boundary conditions, which are generically not accessible in classical fluids. Our results are relevant for the experimental realizations of the critical Casimir force in binary liquid mixtures.

  6. Edge effects in electrostatic calibrations for the measurement of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qun; Onofrio, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    We have performed numerical simulations to evaluate the effect on the capacitance of finite size boundaries realistically present in the parallel plane, sphere-plane, and cylinder-plane geometries. The potential impact of edge effects in assessing the accuracy of the parameters obtained in the electrostatic calibrations of Casimir force experiments is then discussed.

  7. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  8. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-27

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  9. Test of Zero-point Energy Emission from Gases Flowing Through Casimir Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga; Moddel, Garret

    A recently issued patent [1] describes a method by which vacuum energy is extracted from gas flowing through a Casimir cavity. According to stochastic electrodynamics, the electronic orbitals in atoms are supported by the ambient zero-point (ZP) field. When the gas atoms are pumped into a Casimir cavity, where long-wavelength ZP field modes are excluded, the electrons spin down into lower energy orbitals and release energy in the process. This energy is collected in a local absorber. When the electrons exit the Casimir cavity they are re-energized to their original orbitals by the ambient ZP fields. The process is repeated to produce continuous power. In this way, the device functions like a heat pump for ZP energy, extracting it globally from the electromagnetic quantum vacuum and collecting it in a local absorber. This energy can be used for heating, or converted to electric power. We carried out a series of experiments to test whether energy is, in fact, radiated from Casimir cavities when the appropriate gas flows through them. The Casimir cavity devices we tested were nanopore polycarbonate membranes with submicron pores having a density of 3x108pores/cm2. Gas was pumped through the membranes in a stainless steel vacuum system, and emitted energy was measured using a broadband pyroelectric detector and lock-in amplifier. Emission in the infrared was clearly observed. We analyzed the emission from different gases and cavities to determine its origin. None of the conventional thermodynamic models we applied to our data fully explain it, leaving open the possibility that it is due to Casimir-cavity-induced emission from ZP fields.

  10. Casimir effect on the lattice: U(1) gauge theory in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.; Goy, V. A.; Molochkov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a general numerical method to study the Casimir effect in lattice gauge theories. We illustrate the method by calculating the energy density of zero-point fluctuations around two parallel wires of finite static permittivity in Abelian gauge theory in two spatial dimensions. We discuss various subtle issues related to the lattice formulation of the problem and show how they can successfully be resolved. Finally, we calculate the Casimir potential between the wires of a fixed permittivity, extrapolate our results to the limit of ideally conducting wires and demonstrate excellent agreement with a known theoretical result.

  11. Critical Casimir forces along the isofields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubaszewska, M.; Maciołek, A.; Drzewiński, A.

    2013-11-01

    Using quasiexact numerical density-matrix renormalization-group techniques we calculate the critical Casimir force for a two-dimensional (2D) Ising strip with equal strong surface fields, along the thermodynamic paths corresponding to the fixed nonzero bulk field h≠0. Using the Derjaguin approximation we also determine the critical Casimir force and its potential for two disks. We find that varying the temperature along the isofields lying between the bulk coexistence and the capillary condensation critical point leads to a dramatic increase of the critical Casimir interactions with a qualitatively different functional dependence on the temperature than along h=0. These findings might be of relevance for biomembranes, whose heterogeneity is recently interpreted as being connected with a critical behavior belonging to the 2D Ising universality class.

  12. Gravitational Casimir-Polder effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    The interaction due to quantum gravitational vacuum fluctuations between a gravitationally polarizable object modelled as a two-level system and a gravitational boundary is investigated. This quantum gravitational interaction is found to be position-dependent, which induces a force in close analogy to the Casimir-Polder force in the electromagnetic case. For a Dirichlet boundary, the quantum gravitational potential for the polarizable object in its ground-state is shown to behave like z-5 in the near zone, and z-6 in the far zone, where z is the distance to the boundary. For a concrete example, where a Bose-Einstein condensate is taken as a gravitationally polarizable object, the relative correction to the radius of the BEC caused by fluctuating quantum gravitational waves in vacuum is found to be of order 10-21. Although the correction is far too small to observe in comparison with its electromagnetic counterpart, it is nevertheless of the order of the gravitational strain caused by a recently detected black hole merger on the arms of the LIGO.

  13. Casimir interaction of arbitrarily shaped conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straley, Joseph P.; Kolomeisky, Eugene B.

    2017-04-01

    We review a systematic practical implementation of the multiple scattering formalism due to Balian and Duplantier (1977 Ann. Phys. 104 300, 1978 Ann. Phys. 112 165) for the calculation of the Casimir interaction between arbitrarily shaped smooth conductors. The leading two-point scattering term of the expansion has a simple compact form, amenable to exact or accurate numerical evaluation. It is a general expression which improves upon the proximity force and pairwise summation approximations. We show that for many geometries it captures the bulk of the interaction effect. The inclusion of terms beyond the two-point approximation provides an accuracy check and explains screening. As an illustration of the power and versatility of the method we re-evaluate sphere–sphere and sphere–plane interactions and compared the results with previous findings that employed different methods. We also compute for the first time interaction of a hyperboloid (mimicking an atomic force microscope tip) and a plane. We also analyze the anomalous situations involving long cylindrical conductors where the two-point scattering approximation fails qualitatively. In such cases analytic summation of the entire scattering series is carried out and a topological argument is put forward as an explanation of the result. We give the extension of this theory to the case of finite temperatures where the two-point scattering approximation result has a simple compact form, also amenable to exact or accurate numerical evaluation.

  14. Geometrical investigations of the Casimir effect: Thickness and corrugation dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Prachi

    2011-12-01

    In the quantum theory the vacuum is not empty space. It is considered as a state of infinite energy arising due to zero point fluctuations of the vacuum. Calculation of any physically relevant process requires subtracting this infinite energy using a procedure called normalization. As such the vacuum energy is treated as an infinite constant. However, it has been established beyond doubt that mere subtraction of this infinite constant does not remove the effect of vacuum fluctuations and it cannot be treated just as a mathematical artifact. The presence of boundaries, which restricts the vacuum field, causes vacuum polarization. Any non-trivial space-time topology can cause similar effects. This is manifested as the Casimir effect, whereby the boundaries experience a force due to a change in the energy of the vacuum. To calculate the vacuum energy we treat the boundaries or other restrictive conditions as classical backgrounds, which impose boundary conditions on the solution of the vacuum field equations. Alternatively, we can incorporate the classical background in the Lagrangian of the system as classical potentials, which automatically include the boundary conditions in the field equations. Any change in the boundary conditions changes the vacuum energy and consequently the Casimir force is experienced by the boundaries. In this dissertation we study the geometric aspect of the Casimir effect. We consider both the scalar field and the physically relevant electromagnetic field. After a brief survey of the field in Chapter 1, we derive the energy expression using the Schwinger's quantum action principle in Chapter 2. We present the multiple scattering formalism for calculating the vacuum energy, which allows us to calculate the interaction energy between disjoint bodies and subtract out the divergent terms from the beginning. We then solve the Green's dyadic equation for the electromagnetic field interacting with the planar background surfaces, where we can

  15. Casimir forces in the time domain: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-07-15

    We present a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. The method involves the time evolution of electric and magnetic fields in response to a set of current sources, in a modified medium with frequency-independent conductivity. The advantage of this approach is that it allows one to exploit existing FDTD software, without modification, to compute Casimir forces. In this paper, we focus on the derivation, implementation choices, and essential properties of the time-domain algorithm, both considered analytically and illustrated in the simplest parallel-plate geometry.

  16. Critical Casimir effect in classical binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambassi, A.; Maciołek, A.; Hertlein, C.; Nellen, U.; Helden, L.; Bechinger, C.; Dietrich, S.

    2009-12-01

    If a fluctuating medium is confined, the ensuing perturbation of its fluctuation spectrum generates Casimir-like effective forces acting on its confining surfaces. Near a continuous phase transition of such a medium the corresponding order parameter fluctuations occur on all length scales and therefore close to the critical point this effect acquires a universal character, i.e., to a large extent it is independent of the microscopic details of the actual system. Accordingly it can be calculated theoretically by studying suitable representative model systems. We report on the direct measurement of critical Casimir forces by total internal reflection microscopy with femtonewton resolution. The corresponding potentials are determined for individual colloidal particles floating above a substrate under the action of the critical thermal noise in the solvent medium, constituted by a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its lower consolute point. Depending on the relative adsorption preferences of the colloid and substrate surfaces with respect to the two components of the binary liquid mixture, we observe that, upon approaching the critical point of the solvent, attractive or repulsive forces emerge and supersede those prevailing away from it. Based on the knowledge of the critical Casimir forces acting in film geometries within the Ising universality class and with equal or opposing boundary conditions, we provide the corresponding theoretical predictions for the sphere—planar wall geometry of the experiment. The experimental data for the effective potential can be interpreted consistently in terms of these predictions and a remarkable quantitative agreement is observed.

  17. Critical Casimir effect in classical binary liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gambassi, A; Maciołek, A; Hertlein, C; Nellen, U; Helden, L; Bechinger, C; Dietrich, S

    2009-12-01

    If a fluctuating medium is confined, the ensuing perturbation of its fluctuation spectrum generates Casimir-like effective forces acting on its confining surfaces. Near a continuous phase transition of such a medium the corresponding order parameter fluctuations occur on all length scales and therefore close to the critical point this effect acquires a universal character, i.e., to a large extent it is independent of the microscopic details of the actual system. Accordingly it can be calculated theoretically by studying suitable representative model systems. We report on the direct measurement of critical Casimir forces by total internal reflection microscopy with femtonewton resolution. The corresponding potentials are determined for individual colloidal particles floating above a substrate under the action of the critical thermal noise in the solvent medium, constituted by a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its lower consolute point. Depending on the relative adsorption preferences of the colloid and substrate surfaces with respect to the two components of the binary liquid mixture, we observe that, upon approaching the critical point of the solvent, attractive or repulsive forces emerge and supersede those prevailing away from it. Based on the knowledge of the critical Casimir forces acting in film geometries within the Ising universality class and with equal or opposing boundary conditions, we provide the corresponding theoretical predictions for the sphere-planar wall geometry of the experiment. The experimental data for the effective potential can be interpreted consistently in terms of these predictions and a remarkable quantitative agreement is observed.

  18. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy.

  19. Nonlocal microscopic theory of Casimir forces at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Despoja, V.; Marusic, L.

    2011-04-15

    The interaction energy between two metallic slabs in the retarded limit at finite temperature is expressed in terms of surface polariton propagators for separate slabs, avoiding the usual matching procedure, with both diamagnetic and paramagnetic excitations included correctly. This enables appropriate treatment of arbitrary electron density profiles and fully nonlocal electronic response, including both collective and single-particle excitations. The results are verified by performing the nonretarded and long-wavelength (local) limits and showing that they reduce to the previously obtained expressions. Possibilities for practical use of the theory are explored by applying it to calculation of various contributions to the Casimir energy between two silver slabs.

  20. A Light Sail Inspired Model to Harness Casimir Forces for Propellantless Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    DeBiase, R. L.

    2010-01-28

    The model used to calculate Casimir forces for variously shaped conducting plates in this paper assumes the vacuum energy pervades all space and that photons randomly pop into and out of existence. While they exist, they possess energy and momentum that can be transferred by reflection as in a light sail. Quantum mechanics in the model is entirely bound up in the Casimir equation of force per unit area. This model is compared with two different experiments: that of Chen and Mohideen demonstrating lateral Casimir forces for sinusoidally corrugated spherical and flat plates and Lamoreaux demonstrating normal Casimir forces between a conducting sphere and flat plate. The calculated forces using this model were compared to the forces obtained in these experiments as well as with calculations using the proximity force approximation. In both cases the results (when compared to the actual plates measured and calculated using non-corrected equations) were less than a few parts per thousand different for the range of separation distances used. When the model was used to calculate forces on the opposite plates, different force magnitudes were obtained seemingly indicating prospects for propellentless propulsion but requiring skeptical verification.

  1. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, C.; Helden, L.; Gambassi, A.; Dietrich, S.; Bechinger, C.

    2008-01-01

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  2. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, C; Helden, L; Gambassi, A; Dietrich, S; Bechinger, C

    2008-01-10

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  3. Scattering theory approach to electrodynamic Casimir forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2009-10-15

    We give a comprehensive presentation of methods for calculating the Casimir force to arbitrary accuracy, for any number of objects, arbitrary shapes, susceptibility functions, and separations. The technique is applicable to objects immersed in media other than vacuum, nonzero temperatures, and spatial arrangements in which one object is enclosed in another. Our method combines each object's classical electromagnetic scattering amplitude with universal translation matrices, which convert between the bases used to calculate scattering for each object, but are otherwise independent of the details of the individual objects. The method is illustrated by rederiving the Lifshitz formula for infinite half-spaces, by demonstrating the Casimir-Polder to van der Waals crossover, and by computing the Casimir interaction energy of two infinite, parallel, perfect metal cylinders either inside or outside one another. Furthermore, it is used to obtain new results, namely, the Casimir energies of a sphere or a cylinder opposite a plate, all with finite permittivity and permeability, to leading order at large separation.

  4. Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Varun

    2014-08-01

    I utilize effective field theory(EFT) techniques to calculate the Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear in the presence of a polarizable but neutral object and present results for the energy and torque as a function of angle for a gear with multiple cogs, as well as for the case of a concentric cylindrical gear.

  5. Possibility of measuring the thermal Casimir interaction between a plate and a cylinder attached to a micromachined oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-11-15

    We investigate the possibility of measuring the thermal Casimir force and its gradient in the configuration of a plate and a microfabricated cylinder attached to a micromachined oscillator. The Lifshitz-type formulas in this configuration are derived using the proximity force approximation. The accuracy of the obtained expressions is determined from a comparison with exact results available in ideal metal case. Computations of the thermal correction to both the Casimir force and its gradient are performed in the framework of different theoretical approaches proposed in the literature. The correction to the Casimir force and its gradient due to lack of parallelism of the plate and cylinder is determined using the nonmultiplicative approach. The error introduced in the theory due to the finite length of the cylinder is estimated. We propose that both static and dynamic experiments measuring the thermal Casimir interaction between a cylinder and a plate using a micromachined oscillator can shed additional light on the thermal Casimir force problem. Specifically, it is shown that the static experiment is better adapted for the measurement of thermal effects.

  6. Thermal noise limitations to force measurements with torsion pendulums: Applications to the measurement of the Casimir force and its thermal correction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.; Buttler, W.T.

    2005-03-01

    A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular we elaborate on the prospects for measuring the thermal correction.

  7. Thermal Casimir effect in closed Friedmann universe revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Romero, C.

    2011-05-01

    We reconsider Casimir free energy and internal energy at nonzero temperature in the static Einstein and closed Friedmann universe. It is shown that the Casimir free energy is given by the difference between the free energy of a topologically nontrivial manifold and a tangential Minkowski space-time. We derive exact expressions for the Casimir free energy, internal energy and pressure in Einstein and Friedmann universes in terms of single sums. The Casimir entropy is shown to satisfy the Nernst heat theorem. Exact expressions for corresponding total quantities in the Einstein universe are obtained from the Casimir ones by adding a contribution of the black-body radiation. The asymptotic expressions for the Casimir free energy and internal energy at both high and low temperature are shown to be in direct analogy with those for two ideal-metal plates and an ideal-metal spherical shell. Specifically, at high temperature the classical limit holds.

  8. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  9. Crossover from attractive to repulsive Casimir forces and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Felix M; Diehl, H W

    2008-09-05

    Systems described by an O(n) symmetrical varphi;{4} Hamiltonian are considered in a d-dimensional film geometry at their bulk critical points. The critical Casimir forces between the film's boundary planes B_{j}, j=1,2, are investigated as functions of film thickness L for generic symmetry-preserving boundary conditions partial differential_{n}phi=c[over composite function]_{j}phi. The L-dependent part of the reduced excess free energy per cross-sectional area takes the scaling form f_{res} approximately D(c_{1}L;{Phi/nu},c_{2}L;{Phi/nu})/L;{d-1} when d<4, where c_{i} are scaling fields associated with the variables c[over composite function]_{i} and Phi is a surface crossover exponent. Explicit two-loop renormalization group results for the function D(c_{1},c_{2}) at d=4- dimensions are presented. These show that (i) the Casimir force can have either sign, depending on c_{1} and c_{2}, and (ii) for appropriate choices of the enhancements c[over composite function]_{j}, crossovers from attraction to repulsion and vice versa occur as L increases.

  10. CasimirSim - A Tool to Compute Casimir Polder Forces for Nontrivial 3D Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Sedmik, Rene; Tajmar, Martin

    2007-01-30

    The so-called Casimir effect is one of the most interesting macro-quantum effects. Being negligible on the macro-scale it becomes a governing factor below structure sizes of 1 {mu}m where it accounts for typically 100 kN m-2. The force does not depend on gravity, or electric charge but solely on the materials properties, and geometrical shape. This makes the effect a strong candidate for micro(nano)-mechanical devices M(N)EMS. Despite a long history of research the theory lacks a uniform description valid for arbitrary geometries which retards technical application. We present an advanced state-of-the-art numerical tool overcoming all the usual geometrical restrictions, capable of calculating arbitrary 3D geometries by utilizing the Casimir Polder approximation for the Casimir force.

  11. Casimir interactions between graphene sheets and metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Drosdoff, D.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2011-12-15

    The Casimir force between graphene sheets and metamaterials is studied. Theoretical results based on the Lifshitz theory for layered, planar, two-dimensional systems in media are presented. We consider graphene-graphene, graphene-metamaterial, and metal-graphene-metamaterial configurations. We find that quantum effects of the temperature-dependent force are not apparent until the submicron range. In contrast to results with bulk dielectric and bulk metallic materials, no Casimir repulsion is found when graphene is placed on top of a magnetically active metamaterial substrate, regardless of the strength of the low-frequency magnetic response. In the case of the metal-graphene-metamaterial setting, repulsion between the metamaterial and the metal-graphene system is possible only when the dielectric response from the metal contributes significantly.

  12. Casimir forces in the time domain: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-15

    Our previous article [Phys. Rev. A 80, 012115 (2009)] introduced a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials that was based on a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. In this article, we focus on the efficient implementation of our method for geometries of practical interest and extend our previous proof-of-concept algorithm in one dimension to problems in two and three dimensions, introducing a number of new optimizations. We consider Casimir pistonlike problems with nonmonotonic and monotonic force dependence on sidewall separation, both for previously solved geometries to validate our method and also for new geometries involving magnetic sidewalls and/or cylindrical pistons. We include realistic dielectric materials to calculate the force between suspended silicon waveguides or on a suspended membrane with periodic grooves, also demonstrating the application of perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries and/or periodic boundaries. In addition, we apply this method to a realizable three-dimensional system in which a silica sphere is stably suspended in a fluid above an indented metallic substrate. More generally, the method allows off-the-shelf FDTD software, already supporting a wide variety of materials (including dielectric, magnetic, and even anisotropic materials) and boundary conditions, to be exploited for the Casimir problem.

  13. Quantum spring from the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2010-07-01

    The Casimir effect arises not only in the presence of material boundaries but also in space with nontrivial topology. In this Letter, we choose a topology of the flat (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime, which causes the helix boundary condition for a Hermitian massless scalar field. Especially, Casimir effect for a massless scalar field on the helix boundary condition is investigated in two and three dimensions by using the zeta function techniques. The Casimir force parallel to the axis of the helix behaves very much like the force on a spring that obeys the Hooke's law when the ratio r of the pitch to the circumference of the helix is small, but in this case, the force comes from a quantum effect, so we would like to call it quantum spring. When r is large, this force behaves like the Newton's law of universal gravitation in the leading order. On the other hand, the force perpendicular to the axis decreases monotonously with the increasing of the ratio r. Both forces are attractive and their behaviors are the same in two and three dimensions.

  14. Measurement of the Casimir force between dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Decca, R S; López, D; Fischbach, E; Krause, D E

    2003-08-01

    The first precise measurement of the Casimir force between dissimilar metals is reported. The attractive force, between a Cu layer evaporated on a microelectromechanical torsional oscillator and an Au layer deposited on an Al2O3 sphere, was measured dynamically with a noise level of 6 fN/sqrt[Hz]. Measurements were performed for separations in the 0.2-2 micro m range. The results agree to better than 1% in the 0.2-0.5 micro m range with a theoretical model that takes into account the finite conductivity and roughness of the two metals. The observed discrepancies, which are much larger than the experimental precision, can be attributed to a lack of a complete characterization of the optical properties of the specific samples used in the experiment.

  15. Role of surface plasmons in the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.; Lambrecht, A.

    2007-09-15

    In this paper we study the role of surface plasmon modes in the Casimir effect. The Casimir energy can be written as a sum over the modes of a real cavity and one may identify two sorts of modes, two evanescent surface plasmon modes and propagative modes. As one of the surface plasmon modes becomes propagative for some choice of parameters we adopt an adiabatic mode definition where we follow this mode into the propagative sector and count it together with the surface plasmon contribution, calling this contribution 'plasmonic'. We evaluate analytically the contribution of the plasmonic modes to the Casimir energy. Surprisingly we find that this becomes repulsive for intermediate and large mirror separations. The contribution of surface plasmons to the Casimir energy plays a fundamental role not only at short but also at large distances. This suggests possibilities to tailor the Casimir force via a manipulation of the surface plasmons properties.

  16. Measurement of non-monotonic Casimir forces between silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, L.; Wang, M.; Ng, C. Y.; Nikolic, M.; Chan, C. T.; Rodriguez, A. W.; Chan, H. B.

    2017-01-01

    Casimir forces are of fundamental interest because they originate from quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Apart from controlling this force via the optical properties of materials, a number of novel geometries have been proposed to generate repulsive and/or non-monotonic Casimir forces between bodies separated by vacuum gaps. Experimental realization of these geometries, however, is hindered by the difficulties in alignment when the bodies are brought into close proximity. Here, using an on-chip platform with integrated force sensors and actuators, we circumvent the alignment problem and measure the Casimir force between two surfaces with nanoscale protrusions. We demonstrate that the force depends non-monotonically on the displacement. At some displacements, the Casimir force leads to an effective stiffening of the nanomechanical spring. Our findings pave the way for exploiting the Casimir force in nanomechanical systems using structures of complex and non-conventional shapes.

  17. The Casimir Effect in Biology: The Role of Molecular Quantum Electrodynamics in Linear Aggregations of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradonjić, K.; Swain, J. D.; Widom, A.; Srivastava, Y. N.

    2009-04-01

    Despite the fact that red blood cells carry negative charges, under certain conditions they form cylindrical stacks, or "rouleaux". It is shown here that a form of the Casimir effect, generalizing the more well-known van der Waals forces, can provide the necessary attractive force to balance the electrostatic repulsion. Erythrocytes in plasma are modelled as negatively charged dielectric disks in an ionic solution, allowing predictions to be made about the conditions under which rouleaux will form. The results show qualitative agreement with observations which suggest that the basic idea is worth further pursuit. In addition to revealing a mechanism which may be widespread in biology at the cellular level, it also suggest new experiments and further applications to other biological systems, colloid chemistry and nanotechnology.

  18. Thickness dependence of the Casimir force between a magnetodielectric plate and a diamagnetic plate

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Norio

    2011-11-15

    This paper examines the repulsive Casimir force between a magnetodielectric plate, with static permeability greater than static permittivity, and a diamagnetic plate. As the thickness of the magnetodielectric plate is decreased, the attractive component of the Casimir force decreases more than the repulsive one. This effect makes the net Casimir force repulsive, and a larger repulsive Casimir force is generated compared to the Casimir force between the plates with infinite thickness.

  19. Critical Casimir forces between defects in the 2D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, P.; Maciołek, A.; Dietrich, S.

    2016-12-01

    An exact statistical mechanical derivation is given of the critical Casimir interactions between two defects in a planar lattice-gas Ising model. Each defect is a finite group of nearest-neighbor spins with modified coupling constants. Such a system can be regarded as a model of a binary liquid mixture with the molecules confined to a membrane and the defects mimicking protein inclusions embedded into the membrane. As suggested by recent experiments, certain cellular membranes appear to be tuned to the proximity of a critical demixing point belonging to the two-dimensional Ising universality class. Therefore one can expect the emergence of critical Casimir forces between membrane inclusions. These forces are governed by universal scaling functions, which we derive for simple defects. We prove that the scaling law appearing at criticality is the same for all types of defects considered here.

  20. Constraints on Stable Equilibria with Fluctuation-Induced (Casimir) Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten

    2010-08-13

    We examine whether fluctuation-induced forces can lead to stable levitation. First, we analyze a collection of classical objects at finite temperature that contain fixed and mobile charges and show that any arrangement in space is unstable to small perturbations in position. This extends Earnshaw's theorem for electrostatics by including thermal fluctuations of internal charges. Quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are responsible for Casimir or van der Waals interactions. Neglecting permeabilities, we find that any equilibrium position of items subject to such forces is also unstable if the permittivities of all objects are higher or lower than that of the enveloping medium, the former being the generic case for ordinary materials in vacuum.

  1. Ultrastrong optomechanics incorporating the dynamical Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, P. D.; Suh, J.; Blencowe, M. P.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit comprising a dc superconducting quantum interference device with a mechanically compliant arm embedded in a coplanar microwave cavity that realizes an optomechanical system with a degenerate or nondegenerate parametric interaction generated via the dynamical Casimir effect. For experimentally feasible parameters, this setup is capable of reaching the single-photon ultrastrong-coupling regime while simultaneously possessing a parametric coupling strength approaching the renormalized cavity frequency. This opens up the possibility of observing the interplay between these two fundamental nonlinearities at the single-photon level.

  2. Sign and other aspects of semiclassical Casimir energies

    SciTech Connect

    Schaden, Martin

    2006-04-15

    The Casimir energy of a massless scalar field is semiclassically given by contributions due to classical periodic rays. The required subtractions in the spectral density are determined explicitly. The semiclassical Casimir energies so defined coincide with those of zeta function regularization in the cases studied. Poles in the analytic continuation of zeta function regularization are related to nonuniversal subtractions in the spectral density. The sign of the Casimir energy of a scalar field on a smooth manifold is estimated by the sign of the contribution due to the shortest periodic rays only. Demanding continuity of the Casimir energy under small deformations of the manifold, the method is extended to integrable systems. The Casimir energy of a massless scalar field on a manifold with boundaries includes contributions due to periodic rays that lie entirely within the boundaries. These contributions in general depend on the boundary conditions. Although the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field may be sensitive to the physical dimensions of manifolds with boundary. In favorable cases its sign can, contrary to conventional wisdom, be inferred without calculation of the Casimir energy.

  3. Advance and prospects in constraining the Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-03-01

    We report stronger constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from measurements of the lateral Casimir force between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces of a sphere and a plate. In the interaction range from 1.6 to 14 nm the strengthening of previously known high confidence constraints up to a factor of 2.4x10{sup 7} is achieved using these measurements. It is shown that the replacement of a plane plate with a corrugated one in the measurements of the normal Casimir force by means of an atomic force microscope would result in the strengthening of respective high confidence constraints on the Yukawa-type interaction by a factor of 1.1x10{sup 12}. The use of a corrugated plate instead of a plane plate in the experiment by means of a micromachined oscillator also leads to strengthening of the obtained constraints. We further obtain constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type interaction from the data of experiments measuring the gradient of the Casimir pressure between two parallel plates and the gradient of the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a plate. The obtained results are compared with the previously known constraints. The possibilities of how to further strengthen the constraints on non-Newtonian gravity are discussed.

  4. Searching the UVSP database and a list of experiments showing mass motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William

    1986-01-01

    Since the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite was launched, a large database has been built up of experiments using the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument. Access to this database can be gained through the SMM Vax 750 computer at Goddard Space Flight Center. One useful way to do this is with a program called USEARCH. This program allows one to make a listing of different types of UVSP experiments. It is evident that this program is useful to those who would wish to make use of UVSP data, but who don't know what data is available. Therefore it was decided to include a short description of how to make use of the USEARCH program. Also described, but not included, is a listing of all UVSP experiments showing mass motions in prominences and filaments. This list was made with the aid of the USEARCH program.

  5. Contactless experiments on individual DNA molecules show no evidence for molecular wire behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Navarro, C.; Moreno-Herrero, F.; de Pablo, P. J.; Colchero, J.; Gómez-Herrero, J.; Baró, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental requirement for a molecule to be considered a molecular wire (MW) is the ability to transport electrical charge with a reasonably low resistance. We have carried out two experiments that measure first, the charge transfer from an electrode to the molecule, and second, the dielectric response of the MW. The latter experiment requires no contacts to either end of the molecule. From our experiments we conclude that adsorbed individual DNA molecules have a resistivity similar to mica, glass, and silicon oxide substrates. Therefore adsorbed DNA is not a conductor, and it should not be considered as a viable candidate for MW applications. Parallel studies on other nanowires, including single-walled carbon nanotubes, showed conductivity as expected. PMID:12070346

  6. Degeneration of Trigonometric Dynamical Difference Equations for Quantum Loop Algebras to Trigonometric Casimir Equations for Yangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagović, Martina

    2015-03-01

    We show that, under Drinfeld's degeneration (Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians. American Mathematical Society, Providence, pp 798-820, 1987) of quantum loop algebras to Yangians, the trigonometric dynamical difference equations [Etingof and Varchenko (Adv Math 167:74-127, 2002)] for the quantum affine algebra degenerate to the trigonometric Casimir differential equations [Toledano Laredo (J Algebra 329:286-327, 2011)] for Yangians.

  7. Casimir energies and special dimensions in a toy model for branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Isaac

    1988-12-01

    We consider a generalization to branes of the old action for the strings without reparamentrization invariance. These actions admit natural supplementary mass-shell conditions. By regularizing the Casimir energies we calculate the special dimensions at which these toy branes show vector massless states in its spectrum. They all turn out to be non-integers. On sabbatical leave from Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado Postal 66961, Caracas 1061A, Venezuela.

  8. Effect of hydrogen-switchable mirrors on the Casimir force

    PubMed Central

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Lisanti, Mariangela; Capasso, Federico

    2004-01-01

    We present systematic measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated plate and a sphere coated with a hydrogen-switchable mirror. Hydrogen-switchable mirrors are shiny metals that can become transparent upon hydrogenation. Despite such a dramatic change of the optical properties of the sphere, we did not observe any significant decrease of the Casimir force after filling the experimental apparatus with hydrogen. This counterintuitive result can be explained by the Lifshitz theory that describes the Casimir attraction between metallic and dielectric materials. PMID:15024111

  9. Tunable polarity of the Casimir force based on saturated ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Ran; Yang Yaping

    2011-01-15

    We study the polarity of the Casimir force between two different parallel slabs separated by vacuum when the saturated ferrite materials under the influence of an external magnetic field are taken into consideration. Between the ordinary dielectric slab and the ferrite slab, repulsive Casimir force may be observed by adjusting the applied magnetic field. For the ferrite material, we consider the frequency dependence of the permeability modified by the external magnetic field to analyze the formation of the repulsive Casimir force. The restoring force, which means the transition of the force polarity from repulsion to attraction with the increasing slab separation, can also be obtained between two different ferrite slabs.

  10. Casimir effect for regions with broken symmetry of boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zayaev, Yu.B.; Kazakov, A.Ya.; Mostepanenko, V.M.; Trunov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed for computing corrections to the Casimir force caused by a broken symmetry of the boundaries. The values of these corrections are obtained for a parallelepiped in the case of scalar and electromagnetic fields.

  11. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    PubMed Central

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  12. Quantum field theory of the Casimir effect for real media

    SciTech Connect

    Mostepanenko, V.M.; Trunov, N.N.

    1985-11-01

    The quantum field theory is developed for the corrections to the Casimir force arising when the field penetrates the material of the plates. A new type of divergence arising from the corresponding modification of the boundary conditions is analyzed. General expressions are obtained for the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in the space between nonideal plates, and the actual corrections to the Casimir force are calculated in first-order perturbation theory in the penetration depth.

  13. Casimir scaling and string breaking in G{sub 2} gluodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wellegehausen, Bjoern H.; Wipf, Andreas; Wozar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We study the potential energy between static charges in G{sub 2} gluodynamics in three and four dimensions. Our work is based on an efficient local hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm and a multilevel Luescher-Weisz algorithm with exponential error reduction to accurately measure expectation values of Wilson and Polyakov loops. Both in three and four dimensions we show that at intermediate scales the string tensions for charges in various G{sub 2} representations scale with the second order Casimir. In three dimensions Casimir scaling is confirmed within 4% for charges in representations of dimensions 7, 14, 27, 64, 77, 77{sup '}, 182, and 189 and in four dimensions within 5% for charges in representations of dimensions 7, 14, 27, and 64. In three dimensions we detect string breaking for charges in the two fundamental representations. The scale for string breaking agrees very well with the mass of the created pair of glue lumps. Close to the string breaking distance Casimir scaling between adjoint and defining representation is violated by 2.5%. The analytical prediction for the continuum string tension is confirmed for the defining representation in three dimensions.

  14. Dynamical casimir effect in braneworlds.

    PubMed

    Durrer, Ruth; Ruser, Marcus

    2007-08-17

    In braneworld cosmology the expanding Universe is realized as a brane moving through a warped higher-dimensional spacetime. Like a moving mirror causes the creation of photons out of vacuum fluctuations, a moving brane leads to graviton production. We show that, very generically, Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles scale like stiff matter with the expansion of the Universe and can therefore not represent the dark matter in a warped braneworld. We present results for the production of massless and KK gravitons for bouncing branes in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. We find that for a realistic bounce the back reaction from the generated gravitons will be most likely relevant. This Letter summarizes the main results and conclusions from numerical simulations which are presented in detail in a long paper [M. Ruser and R. Durrer, arXiv:0704.0790].

  15. A field experiment shows that subtle linguistic cues might not affect voter behavior.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Alan S; Huber, Gregory A; Biggers, Daniel R; Hendry, David J

    2016-06-28

    One of the most important recent developments in social psychology is the discovery of minor interventions that have large and enduring effects on behavior. A leading example of this class of results is in the work by Bryan et al. [Bryan CJ, Walton GM, Rogers T, Dweck CS (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(31):12653-12656], which shows that administering a set of survey items worded so that subjects think of themselves as voters (noun treatment) rather than as voting (verb treatment) substantially increases political participation (voter turnout) among subjects. We revisit these experiments by replicating and extending their research design in a large-scale field experiment. In contrast to the 11 to 14% point greater turnout among those exposed to the noun rather than the verb treatment reported in the work by Bryan et al., we find no statistically significant difference in turnout between the noun and verb treatments (the point estimate of the difference is approximately zero). Furthermore, when we benchmark these treatments against a standard get out the vote message, we estimate that both are less effective at increasing turnout than a much shorter basic mobilization message. In our conclusion, we detail how our study differs from the work by Bryan et al. and discuss how our results might be interpreted.

  16. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This L-shaped probe mounted on the forward fuselage of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft was the focus of an air data collection experiment flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip information as well as traditional airspeed and altitude data from a single system. For the experiment, the probes--one mounted on either side of the F-18's forward fuselage--were hooked to a series of four transducers, which relayed pressure measurements to an on-board research computer.

  17. Calculation of nonzero-temperature Casimir forces in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kai; Reid, M. T. Homer; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob K.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-04-15

    We show how to compute Casimir forces at nonzero temperatures with time-domain electromagnetic simulations, for example, using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Compared to our previous zero-temperature time-domain method, only a small modification is required, but we explain that some care is required to properly capture the zero-frequency contribution. We validate the method against analytical and numerical frequency-domain calculations, and show a surprising high-temperature disappearance of a nonmonotonic behavior previously demonstrated in a pistonlike geometry.

  18. Casimir forces in multilayer magnetodielectrics with both gain and loss

    SciTech Connect

    Amooghorban, Ehsan; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kheirandish, Fardin

    2011-07-15

    A path-integral approach to the quantization of the electromagnetic field in a linearly amplifying magnetodielectric medium is presented. Two continua of inverted harmonic oscillators are used to describe the polarizability and magnetizability of the amplifying medium. The causal susceptibilities of the amplifying medium, with negative imaginary parts in finite frequency intervals, are identified and their relationships to microscopic coupling functions are determined. By carefully relating the two-point functions of the field theory to the optical Green functions, we calculate the Casimir energy and Casimir forces for a multilayer magnetodielectric medium with both gain and loss. We point out the essential differences with a purely passive layered medium. For a single layer, we find different bounds on the Casimir force for fully amplifying and for lossy media. The force is attractive in both cases, even if the medium exhibits negative refraction. From our Lagrangian we also derive by canonical quantization the postulates of the phenomenological theory of amplifying magnetodielectrics.

  19. Topological Casimir effect in compactified cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the Wightman function, the vacuum expectation values of the field squared and the energy-momentum tensor for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling in the generalized cosmic string geometry with a compact dimension along its axis. The boundary condition along the compactified dimension is taken in general form with an arbitrary phase. The vacuum expectation values are decomposed into two parts. The first one corresponds to the uncompactified cosmic string geometry and the second one is the correction induced by the compactification. The asymptotic behavior of the vacuum expectation values of the field squared, energy density and stresses is investigated near the string and at large distances. We show that the nontrivial topology due to the cosmic string enhances the vacuum polarization effects induced by the compactness of spatial dimension for both the field squared and the vacuum energy density. A simple formula is given for the part of the integrated topological Casimir energy induced by the planar angle deficit. The results are generalized for a charged scalar field in the presence of a constant gauge field. In this case, the vacuum expectation values are periodic functions of the component of the vector potential along the compact dimension.

  20. Lullaby Light Shows: Everyday Musical Experience among Under-Two-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on information gathered from a set of interviews carried out with 88 mothers of under-two-year-olds. The interviews enquired about the everyday musical experiences of their babies and very young children in the home. From the process of analysis, the responses to the interviews were grouped into three main areas: musical…

  1. Constraints on non-Newtonian gravity from measuring the Casimir force in a configuration with nanoscale rectangular corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-04-01

    We report constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from measurements of the gradient of the Casimir force in the configuration of an Au-coated sphere above a Si plate covered with corrugations of trapezoidal shape. For this purpose, the exact expression for the gradient of Yukawa force in the experimental configuration is derived and compared with that obtained using the proximity force approximation. The reported constraints are of almost the same strength as those found previously from several different experiments on the Casimir force and extend over a wide interaction range from 30 to 1260 nm. It is discussed how to make them stronger by replacing the material of the plate.

  2. Critical Casimir forces in colloidal suspensions on chemically patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Florian; Zvyagolskaya, Olga; Hertlein, Christopher; Helden, Laurent; Bechinger, Clemens

    2008-11-14

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine in the presence of a chemically patterned substrate. Close to the critical point of the mixture, the particles are subjected to critical Casimir interactions with force components normal and parallel to the surface. Because the strength and sign of these interactions can be tuned by variations in the surface properties and the mixtures temperature, critical Casimir forces allow the formation of highly ordered monolayers but also extend the use of colloids as model systems.

  3. Critical Casimir Forces in Colloidal Suspensions on Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyka, Florian; Zvyagolskaya, Olga; Hertlein, Christopher; Helden, Laurent; Bechinger, Clemens

    2008-11-01

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine in the presence of a chemically patterned substrate. Close to the critical point of the mixture, the particles are subjected to critical Casimir interactions with force components normal and parallel to the surface. Because the strength and sign of these interactions can be tuned by variations in the surface properties and the mixtures temperature, critical Casimir forces allow the formation of highly ordered monolayers but also extend the use of colloids as model systems.

  4. A design manual for micromachines using Casimir forces: Preliminary considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclay, G. Jordan

    2000-01-01

    General properties of the Casimir force are reviewed, with particular attention to the effects of geometry. Using the conservation of energy, the forces in several simple idealized structures are derived, including the lateral forces on partially overlapping parallel plates, the force in a Casimir ``comb'' drive with several interleaved surfaces, and the average force when a plate is inserted into a rectangular cavity. The properties of rectangular cavities with a moveable piston are discussed, and illustrated with numerical computations. An oscillating structure is proposed. .

  5. Casimir switch: steering optical transparency with vacuum forces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xi-fang; Li, Yong; Jing, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Casimir force, originating from vacuum zero-point energy, is one of the most intriguing purely quantum effects. It has attracted renewed interests in current field of nanomechanics, due to the rapid size decrease of on-chip devices. Here we study the optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) with a tunable Casimir force. We find that the optical output rate can be significantly altered by the vacuum force, even terminated and then restored, indicating a highly-controlled optical switch. Our result addresses the possibility of designing exotic optical nano-devices by harnessing the power of vacuum. PMID:27256630

  6. "Binge" drinking experience in adolescent mice shows sex differences and elevated ethanol intake in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Strong, Moriah N; Yoneyama, Naomi; Fretwell, Andrea M; Snelling, Chris; Tanchuck, Michelle A; Finn, Deborah A

    2010-06-01

    Binge drinking, defined as achieving blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) of 80 mg%, has been increasing in adolescents and was reported to predispose later physical dependence. The present experiments utilized an animal model of binge drinking to compare the effect of ethanol "binge" experience during adolescence or adulthood on subsequent ethanol intake in male and female C57BL/6 mice. Adolescent and adult mice were initially exposed to the scheduled high alcohol consumption procedure, which produces BECs that exceed the levels for binge drinking following a 30-min ethanol session every third day. Ethanol intake and BECs were significantly higher in the adolescent ( approximately 3 g/kg, 199 mg%) versus adult ( approximately 2 g/kg, 135 mg%) mice during the first three ethanol sessions, but were more equivalent during the final two ethanol sessions (1.85-2.0 g/kg, 129-143 mg%). Then, separate groups of the ethanol-experienced mice were tested with ethanol naïve adolescent and adult mice for 2-h limited access (10% and 20% solutions) or 24-h (5%, 10% and 20% solutions) ethanol preference drinking. Limited access ethanol intake was significantly higher in female versus male mice, but was not altered by age or ethanol experience. In contrast, 24-h ethanol intake was significantly higher in the adolescent versus adult mice and in female versus male mice. Furthermore, binge drinking experience in the adolescent mice significantly increased subsequent ethanol intake, primarily due to intake in female mice. Thus, adolescent binge drinking significantly increased unlimited ethanol intake during adulthood, with female mice more susceptible to this effect.

  7. Real Science: MIT Reality Show Tracks Experiences, Frustrations of Chemistry Lab Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    A reality show about a college course--a chemistry class no less? That's what "ChemLab Boot Camp" is. The 14-part series of short videos is being released one episode at a time on the online learning site of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The novel show follows a diverse group of 14 freshmen as they struggle to master the…

  8. The Casimir energy in a dispersive and absorptive medium in the Fano diagonalization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the Casimir energy of the electromagnetic field in the one-dimensional space between two metallic plates filled with a dispersive and absorptive dielectric in the framework of a microscopic approach in which the medium is modeled by a set of oscillators with continuously distributed frequencies. We analyze the treatment of singular expressions used in other papers and show that with appropriate regularization and omission of certain infinite terms, the results coincide with those obtained in an approach without such singularities. We study the asymptotic behavior at large distances and conclude that it always corresponds to attraction, but the influence of the dielectric can lead to repulsion at finite distances.

  9. Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the conditions of validity for the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic plane mirrors. As in the previously studied case of nonmagnetic materials [Guérout et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 042125 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.042125], we recover the usual expression for the lossy model of optical response, but not for the lossless plasma model. We also show that the modes associated with the Foucault currents play a crucial role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to expectations.

  10. A common anterior insula representation of disgust observation, experience and imagination shows divergent functional connectivity pathways.

    PubMed

    Jabbi, Mbemba; Bastiaansen, Jojanneke; Keysers, Christian

    2008-08-13

    Similar brain regions are involved when we imagine, observe and execute an action. Is the same true for emotions? Here, the same subjects were scanned while they (a) experience, (b) view someone else experiencing and (c) imagine experiencing gustatory emotions (through script-driven imagery). Capitalizing on the fact that disgust is repeatedly inducible within the scanner environment, we scanned the same participants while they (a) view actors taste the content of a cup and look disgusted (b) tasted unpleasant bitter liquids to induce disgust, and (c) read and imagine scenarios involving disgust and their neutral counterparts. To reduce habituation, we inter-mixed trials of positive emotions in all three scanning experiments. We found voxels in the anterior Insula and adjacent frontal operculum to be involved in all three modalities of disgust, suggesting that simulation in the context of social perception and mental imagery of disgust share a common neural substrates. Using effective connectivity, this shared region however was found to be embedded in distinct functional circuits during the three modalities, suggesting why observing, imagining and experiencing an emotion feels so different.

  11. Integrative Analysis of Disease Signatures Shows Inflammation Disrupts Juvenile Experience-Dependent Cortical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Milo R.; Burman, Poromendro

    2016-01-01

    Throughout childhood and adolescence, periods of heightened neuroplasticity are critical for the development of healthy brain function and behavior. Given the high prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, identifying disruptors of developmental plasticity represents an essential step for developing strategies for prevention and intervention. Applying a novel computational approach that systematically assessed connections between 436 transcriptional signatures of disease and multiple signatures of neuroplasticity, we identified inflammation as a common pathological process central to a diverse set of diseases predicted to dysregulate plasticity signatures. We tested the hypothesis that inflammation disrupts developmental cortical plasticity in vivo using the mouse ocular dominance model of experience-dependent plasticity in primary visual cortex. We found that the administration of systemic lipopolysaccharide suppressed plasticity during juvenile critical period with accompanying transcriptional changes in a particular set of molecular regulators within primary visual cortex. These findings suggest that inflammation may have unrecognized adverse consequences on the postnatal developmental trajectory and indicate that treating inflammation may reduce the burden of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:28101530

  12. Why do people show minimal knowledge updating with task experience: inferential deficit or experimental artifact?

    PubMed

    Hertzog, Christopher; Price, Jodi; Burpee, Ailis; Frentzel, William J; Feldstein, Simeon; Dunlosky, John

    2009-01-01

    Students generally do not have highly accurate knowledge about strategy effectiveness for learning, such as that imagery is superior to rote repetition. During multiple study-test trials using both strategies, participants' predictions about performance on List 2 do not markedly differ for the two strategies, even though List 1 recall is substantially greater for imagery. Two experiments evaluated whether such deficits in knowledge updating about the strategy effects were due to an experimental artifact or to inaccurate inferences about the effects the strategies had on recall. Participants studied paired associates on two study-test trials--they were instructed to study half using imagery and half using rote repetition. Metacognitive judgements tapped the quality of inferential processes about the strategy effects during the List 1 test and tapped gains in knowledge about the strategies across lists. One artifactual explanation--noncompliance with strategy instructions--was ruled out, whereas manipulations aimed at supporting the data available to inferential processes improved but did not fully repair knowledge updating.

  13. Why Do People Show Minimal Knowledge Updating with Task Experience: Inferential Deficit or Experimental Artifact?

    PubMed Central

    Hertzog, Christopher; Price, Jodi; Burpee, Ailis; Frentzel, William J.; Feldstein, Simeon; Dunlosky, John

    2008-01-01

    Students generally do not have highly accurate knowledge about strategy effectiveness for learning, such as that imagery is superior to rote repetition. During multiple study-test trials using both strategies, participants’ predictions about performance on List 2 do not markedly differ for the two strategies, even though List 1 recall is substantially greater for imagery. Two experiments evaluated whether such deficits in knowledge updating about the strategy effects were due to an experimental artifact or to inaccurate inferences about the effects the strategies had on recall. Participants studied paired associates on two study-test trials—they were instructed to study half using imagery and half using rote repetition. Metacognitive judgments tapped the quality of inferential processes about the strategy effects during the List 1 test and tapped gains in knowledge about the strategies across lists. One artifactual explanation –noncompliance with strategy instructions -- was ruled out, whereas manipulations aimed at supporting the data available to inferential processes improved but did not fully repair knowledge updating. PMID:18609379

  14. Comment on 'Casimir energies: Temperature dependence, dispersion, and anomalies'

    SciTech Connect

    Ravndal, Finn

    2009-05-15

    It is pointed out that the Casimir energy in a medium can be obtained most directly from the zero-point energy of the electromagnetic field because of its reduced propagation velocity. This brings to the fore again the old problem related to how the principle of relativity is combined with the Maxwell field equations in a continuous medium.

  15. Casimir force between a microfabricated elliptic cylinder and a plate

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the Casimir force between a microfabricated elliptic cylinder (cylindrical lens) and a plate made of real materials. After a brief discussion of the fabrication procedure, which typically results in elliptic rather than circular cylinders, the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir force and for its gradient are derived. In the specific case of equal semiaxes, the resulting formulas coincide with those derived previously for circular cylinders. The nanofabrication procedure may also result in asymmetric cylindrical lenses obtained from parts of two different cylinders, or rotated through some angle about the axis of the cylinder. In these cases, the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir force between a lens and a plate and for its gradient are also derived, and the influence of lens asymmetry is determined. Additionally, we obtain an expression for the shift of the natural frequency of a micromachined oscillator with an attached elliptic cylindrical lens interacting with a plate via the Casimir force in a nonlinear regime.

  16. Materials perspective on Casimir and van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, L. M.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Tkatchenko, A.; Rodriguez-Lopez, P.; Rodriguez, A. W.; Podgornik, R.

    2016-10-01

    Interactions induced by electromagnetic fluctuations, such as van der Waals and Casimir forces, are of universal nature present at any length scale between any types of systems. Such interactions are important not only for the fundamental science of materials behavior, but also for the design and improvement of micro- and nanostructured devices. In the past decade, many new materials have become available, which has stimulated the need for understanding their dispersive interactions. The field of van der Waals and Casimir forces has experienced an impetus in terms of developing novel theoretical and computational methods to provide new insights into related phenomena. The understanding of such forces has far reaching consequences as it bridges concepts in materials, atomic and molecular physics, condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, chemistry, and biology. This review summarizes major breakthroughs and emphasizes the common origin of van der Waals and Casimir interactions. Progress related to novel ab initio modeling approaches and their application in various systems, interactions in materials with Dirac-like spectra, force manipulations through nontrivial boundary conditions, and applications of van der Waals forces in organic and biological matter are examined. The outlook of the review is to give the scientific community a materials perspective of van der Waals and Casimir phenomena and stimulate the development of experimental techniques and applications.

  17. Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a cavity wall under the influence of real conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Babb, J.F.; Klimchitskaya, G.L.; Mostepanenko, V.M.

    2004-10-01

    The Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a metal wall is investigated under the influence of real conditions including the dynamic polarizability of the atom, finite conductivity of the wall metal, and nonzero temperature of the system. Both analytical and numerical results for the free energy and force are obtained over a wide range of atom-wall distances. Numerical computations are performed for an Au wall and metastable He*, Na, and Cs atoms. For the He* atom we demonstrate, as an illustration, that at short separations of about the Au plasma wavelength at room temperature the free energy deviates up to 35% and the force up to 57% from the classical Casimir-Polder result. Accordingly, such large deviations should be taken into account in precision experiments on atom-wall interactions. The combined account of different corrections to the Casimir-Polder interaction leads to the conclusion that at short separations the corrections due to the dynamic polarizability of an atom play a more important role than--and suppress--the corrections due to the nonideality of the metal wall. By comparison of the exact atomic polarizabilities with those in the framework of the single oscillator model, it is shown that the obtained asymptotic expressions enable calculation of the free energy and force for the atom-wall interaction under real conditions with a precision of 1%.

  18. Brain regions that show repetition suppression and enhancement: A meta-analysis of 137 neuroimaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongkeun

    2017-04-01

    Repetition suppression and enhancement refer to the reduction and increase in the neural responses for repeated rather than novel stimuli, respectively. This study provides a meta-analysis of the effects of repetition suppression and enhancement, restricting the data used to that involving fMRI/PET, visual stimulus presentation, and healthy participants. The major findings were as follows. First, the global topography of the repetition suppression effects was strikingly similar to that of the "subsequent memory" effects, indicating that the mechanism for repetition suppression is the reduced engagement of an encoding system. The lateral frontal cortex effects involved the frontoparietal control network regions anteriorly and the dorsal attention network regions posteriorly. The left fusiform cortex effects predominantly involved the dorsal attention network regions, whereas the right fusiform cortex effects mainly involved the visual network regions. Second, the category-specific meta-analyses and their comparisons indicated that most parts of the alleged category-specific regions showed repetition suppression for more than one stimulus category. In this regard, these regions may not be "dedicated cortical modules," but are more likely parts of multiple overlapping large-scale maps of simple features. Finally, the global topography of the repetition enhancement effects was similar to that of the "retrieval success" effects, suggesting that the mechanism for repetition enhancement is voluntary or involuntary explicit retrieval during an implicit memory task. Taken together, these results clarify the network affiliations of the regions showing reliable repetition suppression and enhancement effects and contribute to the theoretical interpretations of the local and global topography of these two effects. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1894-1913, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Critical adsorption and critical Casimir forces in the canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Markus; Vasilyev, Oleg; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, S.

    2016-08-01

    Critical properties of a liquid film between two planar walls are investigated in the canonical ensemble, within which the total number of fluid particles, rather than their chemical potential, is kept constant. The effect of this constraint is analyzed within mean-field theory (MFT) based on a Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional as well as via Monte Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional Ising model with fixed total magnetization. Within MFT and for finite adsorption strengths at the walls, the thermodynamic properties of the film in the canonical ensemble can be mapped exactly onto a grand canonical ensemble in which the corresponding chemical potential plays the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. However, due to a nonintegrable divergence of the mean-field order parameter profile near a wall, the limit of infinitely strong adsorption turns out to be not well-defined within MFT, because it would necessarily violate the constraint. The critical Casimir force (CCF) acting on the two planar walls of the film is generally found to behave differently in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles. For instance, the canonical CCF in the presence of equal preferential adsorption at the two walls is found to have the opposite sign and a slower decay behavior as a function of the film thickness compared to its grand canonical counterpart. We derive the stress tensor in the canonical ensemble and find that it has the same expression as in the grand canonical case, but with the chemical potential playing the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. The different behavior of the CCF in the two ensembles is rationalized within MFT by showing that, for a prescribed value of the thermodynamic control parameter of the film, i.e., density or chemical potential, the film pressures are identical in the two ensembles, while the corresponding bulk pressures are not.

  20. Semiclassical estimates of electromagnetic Casimir self-energies of spherical and cylindrical metallic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Schaden, Martin

    2010-08-15

    The leading semiclassical estimates of the electromagnetic Casimir stresses on a spherical and a cylindrical metallic shell are within 1% of the field theoretical values. The electromagnetic Casimir energy for both geometries is given by two decoupled massless scalars that satisfy conformally covariant boundary conditions. Surface contributions vanish for smooth metallic boundaries, and the finite electromagnetic Casimir energy in leading semiclassical approximation is due to quadratic fluctuations about periodic rays in the interior of the cavity only. Semiclassically, the nonvanishing Casimir energy of a metallic cylindrical shell is almost entirely due to Fresnel diffraction.

  1. Numerical calculation of the Casimir forces between a gold sphere and a nanocomposite sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio; Miura, Kouji; Akamatsu, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2010-11-01

    The repulsive Casimir force is expected as a force which enables to levitate small objects such as machine parts used in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), and superlubricity in MEMS may be realized by this levitation. We study the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a nanocomposite sheet containing many nickel nanoparticles. In particular, we focus on the dependence of the Casimir force on the separation between the gold sphere and the surface of the nanocomposite sheet. The Casimir force changes from the attractive force to the repulsive force as the separation increases. The strength of the repulsive force is, however, too small to levitate MEMS parts.

  2. Casimir interaction between spheres in ( D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-05-01

    We consider the Casimir interaction between two spheres in ( D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime due to the vacuum fluctuations of scalar fields. We consider combinations of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The TGTG formula of the Casimir interaction energy is derived. The computations of the T matrices of the two spheres are straightforward. To compute the two G matrices, known as translation matrices, which relate the hyper-spherical waves in two spherical coordinate frames differ by a translation, we generalize the operator approach employed in [39]. The result is expressed in terms of an integral over Gegenbauer polynomials. In contrast to the D=3 case, we do not re-express the integral in terms of 3 j-symbols and hyper-spherical waves, which in principle, can be done but does not simplify the formula. Using our expression for the Casimir interaction energy, we derive the large separation and small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energy. In the large separation regime, we find that the Casimir interaction energy is of order L -2 D+3, L -2 D+1 and L -2 D-1 respectively for Dirichlet-Dirichlet, Dirichlet-Neumann and Neumann-Neumann boundary conditions, where L is the center-to-center distance of the two spheres. In the small separation regime, we confirm that the leading term of the Casimir interaction agrees with the proximity force approximation, which is of order , where d is the distance between the two spheres. Another main result of this work is the analytic computations of the next-to-leading order term in the small separation asymptotic expansion. This term is computed using careful order analysis as well as perturbation method. In the case the radius of one of the sphere goes to infinity, we find that the results agree with the one we derive for sphere-plate configuration. When D=3, we also recover previously known results. We find that when D is large, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading

  3. Virtual photons in imaginary time: Computing exact Casimir forces via standard numerical electromagnetism techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2007-09-15

    We describe a numerical method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries, for arbitrary dielectric and metallic materials, with arbitrary accuracy (given sufficient computational resources). Our approach, based on well-established integration of the mean stress tensor evaluated via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, is designed to directly exploit fast methods developed for classical computational electromagnetism, since it only involves repeated evaluation of the Green's function for imaginary frequencies (equivalently, real frequencies in imaginary time). We develop the approach by systematically examining various formulations of Casimir forces from the previous decades and evaluating them according to their suitability for numerical computation. We illustrate our approach with a simple finite-difference frequency-domain implementation, test it for known geometries such as a cylinder and a plate, and apply it to new geometries. In particular, we show that a pistonlike geometry of two squares sliding between metal walls, in both two and three dimensions with both perfect and realistic metallic materials, exhibits a surprising nonmonotonic ''lateral'' force from the walls.

  4. Discontinuous bundling transition in semiflexible polymer networks induced by Casimir interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin; Müller, Kei W.; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Levine, Alex J.

    2016-09-01

    Fluctuation-induced interactions are an important organizing principle in a variety of soft matter systems. We investigate the role of fluctuation-based or thermal Casimir interactions between cross linkers in a semiflexible network. One finds that, by integrating out the polymer degrees of freedom, there is an attractive logarithmic potential between nearest-neighbor cross linkers in a bundle, with a significantly weaker next-nearest-neighbor interaction. Here we show that a one-dimensional gas of these strongly interacting linkers in equilibrium with a source of unbound ones admits a discontinuous phase transition between a sparsely and a densely bound bundle. This discontinuous transition induced by the long-ranged nature of the Casimir interaction allows for a similarly abrupt structural transition in semiflexible filament networks between a low cross linker density isotropic phase and a higher cross link density bundle network. We support these calculations with the results of finite element Brownian dynamics simulations of semiflexible filaments and transient cross linkers.

  5. Casimir effect for a scalar field via Krein quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Pejhan, H.; Tanhayi, M.R.; Takook, M.V.

    2014-02-15

    In this work, we present a rather simple method to study the Casimir effect on a spherical shell for a massless scalar field with Dirichlet boundary condition by applying the indefinite metric field (Krein) quantization technique. In this technique, the field operators are constructed from both negative and positive norm states. Having understood that negative norm states are un-physical, they are only used as a mathematical tool for renormalizing the theory and then one can get rid of them by imposing some proper physical conditions. -- Highlights: • A modification of QFT is considered to address the vacuum energy divergence problem. • Casimir energy of a spherical shell is calculated, through this approach. • In this technique, it is shown, the theory is automatically regularized.

  6. Chern-Simons potential in models of Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pis'mak, Yury M.; Pis'mak, Daria Yu.

    2014-07-23

    In the model constructed in the framework of the proposed by Symanzik approach for description of interaction of a macroscopic material body with quantum fields the interaction of thin material film with photon field is presented by the Chern-Simons potential. All the effects of this interaction with can by described in the framework of one model. In this way, the Casimir energy for two parallel infinite planes and sphere, the Casimir-Polder potential, and characteristics of other physical phenomena have been calculated for non-ideal conducting material of film. The specific of regularization and renormalization procedures used by calculations and the physical meaning of obtained results are discussed. In the limit of infinite coupling constant one obtains the known results of models with boundary conditions. By finite value of coupling constants the model predicts unusual effects which could be important for micro-mechanics, nano-photonics, constructing of new materials.

  7. On the static Casimir effect with parity-breaking mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosco, C. D.; Remaggi, M. L.

    2017-03-01

    We study the Casimir interaction energy due to the vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic (EM) field in the presence of two mirrors, described by 2+1-dimensional, generally nonlocal actions, which may contain both parity-conserving and parity-breaking terms. We compare the results with the ones corresponding to Chern-Simons boundary conditions and evaluate the interaction energy for several particular situations.

  8. The Casimir effect for fields with arbitrary spin

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, Adam; Bennett, Robert

    2015-09-15

    The Casimir force arises when a quantum field is confined between objects that apply boundary conditions to it. In a recent paper we used the two-spinor calculus to derive boundary conditions applicable to fields with arbitrary spin in the presence of perfectly reflecting surfaces. Here we use these general boundary conditions to investigate the Casimir force between two parallel perfectly reflecting plates for fields up to spin-2. We use the two-spinor calculus formalism to present a unified calculation of well-known results for spin-1/2 (Dirac) and spin-1 (Maxwell) fields. We then use our unified framework to derive new results for the spin-3/2 and spin-2 fields, which turn out to be the same as those for spin-1/2 and spin-1. This is part of a broader conclusion that there are only two different Casimir forces for perfectly reflecting plates—one associated with fermions and the other with bosons.

  9. La force de Casimir et les plasmons de surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2004-11-01

    La présence de fluctuations irréductibles de champ dans le vide est une prédiction importante de la théorie quantique. Ces fluctuations ont de nombreux effets bien connus, dont l'archétype est la force de Casimir apparaîssant entre deux miroirs placés dans le vide par suite de la pression de radiation du vide. Elle a été récemment mesurée avec une précision de l'ordre du %. De nombreux travaux sont consacrés à l'évaluation théorique de cette force en visant une précision du même ordre. Ici nous étudions la force de Casimir dans la configuration de deux miroirs métalliques plans parallèles à température nulle. En supposant les miroirs décrits par un modèle plasma nous interprétons la force de Casimir comme le résultat de l'interaction entre les plasmons de surface des deux miroirs.

  10. Finite-temperature Casimir force between perfectly metallic corrugated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sarabadani, Jalal; Miri, MirFaez

    2011-09-15

    We study the Casimir force between two corrugated plates due to thermal fluctuations of a scalar field. For arbitrary corrugations and temperature T, we provide an analytical expression for the Casimir force, which is exact to second order in the corrugation amplitude. We study the specific case of two sinusoidally corrugated plates with corrugation wavelength {lambda}, lateral displacement b, and mean separation H. We find that the lateral Casimir force is F{sub l}(T,H)sin(2{pi}b/{lambda}). In other words, at all temperatures, the lateral force is a sinusoidal function of the lateral shift. In the limit {lambda}>>H, F{sub l}(T{yields}{infinity},H){proportional_to}k{sub B}TH{sup -4}{lambda}{sup -1}. In the opposite limit {lambda}<

  11. Critical Casimir effect for colloids close to chemically patterned substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Troendle, M.; Kondrat, S.; Harnau, L.; Dietrich, S.; Gambassi, A.

    2010-08-21

    Colloids immersed in a critical or near-critical binary liquid mixture and close to a chemically patterned substrate are subject to normal and lateral critical Casimir forces of dominating strength. For a single colloid, we calculate these attractive or repulsive forces and the corresponding critical Casimir potentials within mean-field theory. Within this approach we also discuss the quality of the Derjaguin approximation and apply it to Monte Carlo simulation data available for the system under study. We find that the range of validity of the Derjaguin approximation is rather large and that it fails only for surface structures which are very small compared to the geometric mean of the size of the colloid and its distance from the substrate. For certain chemical structures of the substrate, the critical Casimir force acting on the colloid can change sign as a function of the distance between the particle and the substrate; this provides a mechanism for stable levitation at a certain distance which can be strongly tuned by temperature, i.e., with a sensitivity of more than 200 nm/K.

  12. Thermodynamic Casimir effect in films: the exchange cluster algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hasenbusch, Martin

    2015-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic Casimir force for films with various types of boundary conditions and the bulk universality class of the three-dimensional Ising model. To this end, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of the improved Blume-Capel model on the simple cubic lattice. In particular, we employ the exchange or geometric cluster cluster algorithm [Heringa and Blöte, Phys. Rev. E 57, 4976 (1998)]. In a previous work, we demonstrated that this algorithm allows us to compute the thermodynamic Casimir force for the plate-sphere geometry efficiently. It turns out that also for the film geometry a substantial reduction of the statistical error can achieved. Concerning physics, we focus on (O,O) boundary conditions, where O denotes the ordinary surface transition. These are implemented by free boundary conditions on both sides of the film. Films with such boundary conditions undergo a phase transition in the universality class of the two-dimensional Ising model. We determine the inverse transition temperature for a large range of thicknesses L(0) of the film and study the scaling of this temperature with L(0). In the neighborhood of the transition, the thermodynamic Casimir force is affected by finite size effects, where finite size refers to a finite transversal extension L of the film. We demonstrate that these finite size effects can be computed by using the universal finite size scaling function of the free energy of the two-dimensional Ising model.

  13. Nonmonotonic Casimir interaction: The role of amplifying dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Morteza; Sarabadani, Jalal; Zakeri, S. Peyman

    2017-02-01

    The normal and the lateral Casimir interactions between corrugated ideal metallic plates in the presence of an amplifying or an absorptive dielectric slab is studied by the path-integral quantization technique. The effect of the amplifying slab, which is located between corrugated conductors, is to increase the normal and lateral Casimir interactions, while the presence of the absorptive slab diminishes the interactions. These effects are more pronounced if the thickness of the slab increases and, also, if the slab comes closer to one of the bounding conductors. When both bounding ideal conductors are flat, the normal Casimir force is nonmonotonic in the presence of the amplifying slab and the system has a stable mechanical equilibrium state, while the force is attractive and is weakened by intervening the absorptive dielectric slab in the cavity. Upon replacing one of the flat conductors with a flat ideal permeable plate the force becomes nonmonotonic and the system has an unstable mechanical equilibrium state in the presence of either an amplifying or an absorptive slab. When the left-side plate is a conductor and the right one is permeable, the force is nonmonotonic in the presence of a double-layer dissipative-amplifying dielectric slab with a stable mechanical equilibrium state, while it is purely repulsive in the presence of a double-layer amplifying-dissipative dielectric slab.

  14. Quantum Field Energy Sensor based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thorsten

    The Casimir effect converts vacuum fluctuations into a measurable force. Some new energy technologies aim to utilize these vacuum fluctuations in commonly used forms of energy like electricity or mechanical motion. In order to study these energy technologies it is helpful to have sensors for the energy density of vacuum fluctuations. In today's scientific instrumentation and scanning microscope technologies there are several common methods to measure sub-nano Newton forces. While the commercial atomic force microscopes (AFM) mostly work with silicon cantilevers, there are a large number of reports on the use of quartz tuning forks to get high-resolution force measurements or to create new force sensors. Both methods have certain advantages and disadvantages over the other. In this report the two methods are described and compared towards their usability for Casimir force measurements. Furthermore a design for a quantum field energy sensor based on the Casimir force measurement will be described. In addition some general considerations on extracting energy from vacuum fluctuations will be given.

  15. Casimir bag energy in the stochastic approximation to the pure QCD vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, C. D.; Oxman, L. E.

    2007-01-15

    We study the Casimir contribution to the bag energy coming from gluon field fluctuations, within the context of the stochastic vacuum model of pure QCD. After formulating the problem in terms of the generating functional of field strength cumulants, we argue that the resulting predictions about the Casimir energy are compatible with the phenomenologically required bag energy term.

  16. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2015-05-01

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over 4He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  17. Eigenvalues of Casimir invariants for U{sub q}[osp(m vertical bar n)

    SciTech Connect

    Dancer, K.A.; Gould, M.D.; Links, J.

    2005-12-15

    For each quantum superalgebra U{sub q}[osp(m vertical bar n)] with m>2, an infinite family of Casimir invariants is constructed. This is achieved by using an explicit form for the Lax operator. The eigenvalue of each Casimir invariant on an arbitrary irreducible highest weight module is also calculated.

  18. Casimir-Polder potential in a dielectric medium out of thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Justo J.; Salam, A.

    2010-12-15

    The Casimir-Polder potential between a pair of atoms or molecules, either one of which may be excited, in a dielectric medium out of thermal equilibrium is obtained using a field operator that accounts for the attenuation or amplification of the radiation. Two contributions to the intermolecular potential are identified. One term is that induced by the excitations and relaxations that the interacting molecules experience due to the thermal bath, obtained using the resonance energy transfer rate and the Wigner-Weisskopf model. The second contribution arises as a consequence of the polarization induced in the interacting molecules by vacuum and thermal radiation. A number of disagreements between the present theory and several previously reported formulations examining this intermolecular potential are revealed.

  19. PREFACE: International Workshop '60 Years of the Casimir Effect'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Carugno, Giovanni; Dodonov, Victor; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-07-01

    In 1948 Hendrick Casimir published a short article predicting that (neutral) ideal metallic plates attract each other. This attraction is widely ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field (even though away from the limit of ideal metals it depends demonstrably on the physics of the charge carriers vanishing when they cease to carry). Casimir's remarkable discovery, nowadays called the Casimir effect, has charmed several generations of physicists. In the last decade alone, more than a thousand publications have addressed its many consequences, generalizations, and possible applications in different areas from particle physics to cosmology. Interest in the field is still growing driven by impressive progress in experimental skills and its importance for the recently opened-up area of micro- and nano-electromechanical systems: according to the Thompson ISI Web of Science database, in 2005 the number of papers related to the Casimir effect or to Casimir forces jumped to over 125, compared to approximately 60 in 2000 and 30 in 1995. The increase continues, with more than 170 papers in 2008. The International Workshop '60 Years of the Casimir Effect' took place on 23-27June 2008, in Brasilia (Brazil) organized by the International Center for Condensed Matter Physics (ICCMP). The purpose was to celebrate this anniversary of Casimir's pioneering paper by inviting the leading specialists in the area, both theorists and experimentalists, together with young researchers and post-graduate students interested in hearing about the most recent achievements in the field. The Workshop was attended by 65 participants from 14 countries, who presented 41 talks and 12 posters. These Proceedings contain extended versions of almost all the talks and some posters, plus several papers by authors who had planned to attend but for various reasons could not. The contributions are divided (with some inevitable arbitrariness) into four groups. The largest one

  20. Virtual photons in imaginary time: Computing Casimir forces in new geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-03-01

    One of the most dramatic manifestations of the quantum nature of light in the past half-century has been the Casimir force: a force between neutral objects at close separations caused by quantum vacuum fluctuations in the electromagnetic fields. In classical photonics, wavelength-scale structures can be designed to dramatically alter the behavior of light, so it is natural to consider whether analogous geometry-based effects occur for Casimir forces. However, this problem turns out to be surprisingly difficult for all but the simplest planar geometries. (The deceptively simple case of an infinite plate and infinite cylinder, for perfect metals, was first solved in 2006.) Many formulations of the Casimir force, indeed, correspond to impossibly hard numerical problems. We will describe how the availability of large-scale computing resources in NSF's Teragrid, combined with reformulations of the Casimir-force problem oriented towards numerical computation, are enabling the exploration of Casimir forces in new regimes of geometry and materials.

  1. Hide It to See It Better: A Robust Setup to Probe the Thermal Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    We describe a Casimir setup consisting of two aligned sinusoidally corrugated Ni surfaces, one of which is "hidden" by a thin opaque layer of gold with a flat exposed surface. The gold layer acts as a low-pass filter that allows for a clean observation of the controversial thermal Casimir force between the corrugations, with currently available Casimir apparatuses. The proposed scheme of measurement, based on the phase-dependent modulation of the Casimir force, requires no electrostatic calibrations of the apparatus, and is unaffected by uncertainties in the knowledge of the optical properties of the surfaces. This scheme should allow for an unambiguous discrimination between alternative theoretical prescriptions that have been proposed in the literature for the thermal Casimir effect.

  2. Casimir force between a half-space and a plate of finite thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Johan S.; Brevik, Iver

    2016-05-01

    Zero-frequency Casimir theory is analyzed from different viewpoints, with the aim of obtaining further insight into the delicate Drude-plasma issue that turns up when one considers thermal corrections to the Casimir force. The problem is essentially that the plasma model, physically inferior in comparison to the Drude model since it leaves out dissipation in the material, apparently gives the best results when comparing with recent experiments. Our geometric setup is quite conventional, namely, a dielectric plate separated from a dielectric half-space by a vacuum gap, both media being made of the same material. Our investigation is divided into the following categories: (1) Making use of the statistical-mechanical method developed by J. S. Høye and I. Brevik [Physica A (Amsterdam, Neth.) 259, 165 (1998), 10.1016/S0378-4371(98)00249-0], implying that the quantized electromagnetic field is replaced by interaction between dipole moments oscillating in harmonic potentials, we first verify that the Casimir force is in agreement with the Drude prediction. No use of Fresnel's reflection coefficients is made at this stage. (2) Then turning to the field-theoretic description implying use of the reflection coefficients, we derive results in agreement with the forgoing when first setting the frequency equal to zero, before letting the permittivity become large. With the plasma relation the reflection coefficient for TE zero-frequency modes depends on the component of the wave vector parallel to the surfaces and lies between 0 and 1. This contradicts basic electrostatic theory. (3) Turning to high-permeability magnetic materials, the TE zero-frequency mode describes the static magnetic field in the same way the TM zero-frequency modes describe the static electric fields in electrostatics. With the plasma model magnetic fields, except for a small part, cannot pass through metals; that is, metals effectively become superconductors. However, recent experimental results clearly

  3. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing L-Probe experiment and standard air data sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This under-the-nose view of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows three critical components of the aircraft's air data systems which are mounted on both sides of the forward fuselage. Furthest forward are two L-probes that were the focus of the recent Advanced L-probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment. Behind the L-probes are angle-of-attack vanes, while below them are the aircraft's standard pitot-static air data probes. The ALADIN experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip air data as well as traditional airspeed and altitude information, all from a single system. Once fully developed, the new L-probes have the potential to give pilots more accurate air data information with less hardware.

  4. Dynamics of the Vacuum and Casimir Analogs to the Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold; Vera, Jerry; Bailey, Paul; March, Paul; Lawrence, Tim; Sylvester, Andre; Brady, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss the current viewpoint of the vacuum state and explore the idea of a "natural" vacuum as opposed to immutable, non-degradable vacuum. This concept will be explored for all primary quantum numbers to show consistency with observation at the level of Bohr theory. A comparison with the Casimir force per unit area will be made, and an explicit function for the spatial variation of the vacuum density around the atomic nucleus will be derived. This explicit function will be numerically modeled using the industry multi-physics tool, COMSOL(trademark), and the eigenfrequencies for the n = 1 to n = 7 states will be found and compared to expectation.

  5. Sphere-plate Casimir interaction in (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we derive the formula for the Casimir interaction energy between a sphere and a plate in (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. It is assumed that the scalar field satisfies the Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the sphere and the plate. As in the D = 3 case, the formula is of TGTG type. One of our main contributions is deriving the translation matrices which express the change of bases between plane waves and spherical waves for general D. Using orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials, it turns out that the final TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy can be simplified to one that is similar to the D = 3 case. To illustrate the application of the formula, both large separation and small separation asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir interaction energy are computed. The large separation leading term is proportional to L{sup −D+1} if the sphere is imposed with Dirichlet boundary condition, and to L{sup −D−1} if the sphere is imposed with Neumann boundary condition, where L is distance from the center of the sphere to the plane. For the small separation asymptotic behavior, it is shown that the leading term is equal to the one obtained using proximity force approximation. The next-to-leading order term is also computed using perturbation method. It is shown that when the space dimension D is larger than 5, the next-to-leading order has sign opposite to the leading order term. Moreover, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading order term is linear in D, indicating a larger correction at higher dimensions.

  6. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, P. R.; Ford, G. W.; Milonni, P. W.

    2014-10-28

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r{sup −4}, a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called “remarkable formula” for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. O’Connell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  7. Electromagnetic energy, absorption, and Casimir forces: Uniform dielectric media in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, F. S. S.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Milonni, P. W.

    2010-03-01

    The derivation of Casimir forces between dielectrics can be simplified by ignoring absorption, calculating energy changes due to displacements of the dielectrics, and only then admitting absorption by allowing permittivities to be complex. As a first step toward a better understanding of this situation we consider in this article the model of a dielectric as a collection of oscillators, each of which is coupled to a reservoir giving rise to damping and Langevin forces on the oscillators and a noise polarization acting as a source of a fluctuating electromagnetic field in the dielectric. The model leads naturally to expressions for the quantized electric and magnetic fields that are consistent with those obtained in approaches that diagonalize the coupled system of oscillators for the dielectric medium, the reservoir, and the electromagnetic field. It also results in a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the noise polarization and the imaginary part of the permittivity; comparison with the Rytov fluctuation-dissipation relation employed in the well-known Lifshitz theory for the van der Waals (or Casimir) force shows that the Lifshitz theory is actually a classical stochastic electrodynamical theory. The approximate classical expression for the energy density in a band of frequencies at which absorption in a dielectric is negligible is shown to be exact as a spectral thermal equilibrium expectation value in quantum electrodynamic theory. Our main result is the derivation of an expression for the QED energy density of a uniform dispersive, absorbing media in thermal equilibrium. The spectral density of the energy is found to have the same form with or without absorption. We also show how the fluctuation-dissipation theorem ensures a detailed balance of energy exchange between the (absorbing) medium, the reservoir, and the electromagnetic field in thermal equilibrium.

  8. Direct Measurement of Intermediate-Range Casimir-Polder Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Marzok, C.; Zimmermann, C.; Slama, S.

    2010-02-26

    We present the first direct measurements of Casimir-Polder forces between solid surfaces and atomic gases in the transition regime between the electrostatic short-distance and the retarded long-distance limit. The experimental method is based on ultracold ground-state Rb atoms that are reflected from evanescent wave barriers at the surface of a dielectric glass prism. Our novel approach does not require assumptions about the potential shape. The experimental data are compared to the theoretical predictions valid in the different regimes. They agree best with a full QED calculation.

  9. Structural Anisotropy and Orientation-Induced Casimir Repulsion in Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    Physics , Lecture Notes in Physics , edited by D. A. R. Dalvit, P. W. Milonni, D. C. Roberts, and F. S. S. Rosa (Springer, New York) (in press). [53] A... PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 052503 (2011) Structural anisotropy and orientation-induced Casimir repulsion in fluids Alexander P. McCauley,1 F. S. S. Rosa...2,3 Alejandro W. Rodriguez,4,5 John D. Joannopoulos,1 D. A. R. Dalvit,3 and Steven G. Johnson4 1Department of Physics , Massachusetts Institute of

  10. Casimir force between δ -δ' mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Alessandra N.; Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac δ -δ' point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified δ -δ' point interaction that enables full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified δ -δ' model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  11. Casimir interactions of an object inside a spherical metal shell

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the electromagnetic Casimir interactions of an object contained within an otherwise empty, perfectly conducting spherical shell. For a small object we present analytical calculations of the force, which is directed away from the center of the cavity, and the torque, which tends to align the object opposite to the preferred alignment outside the cavity. For a perfectly conducting sphere as the interior object, we compute the corrections to the proximity force approximation (PFA) numerically. In both cases the results for the interior configuration match smoothly onto those for the corresponding exterior configuration.

  12. Hill-type muscle model parameters determined from experiments on single muscles show large animal-to-animal variation.

    PubMed

    Blümel, Marcus; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia; Hooper, Scott L; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Models built using mean data can represent only a very small percentage, or none, of the population being modeled, and produce different activity than any member of it. Overcoming this "averaging" pitfall requires measuring, in single individuals in single experiments, all of the system's defining characteristics. We have developed protocols that allow all the parameters in the curves used in typical Hill-type models (passive and active force-length, series elasticity, force-activation, force-velocity) to be determined from experiments on individual stick insect muscles (Blümel et al. 2012a). A requirement for means to not well represent the population is that the population shows large variation in its defining characteristics. We therefore used these protocols to measure extensor muscle defining parameters in multiple animals. Across-animal variability in these parameters can be very large, ranging from 1.3- to 17-fold. This large variation is consistent with earlier data in which extensor muscle responses to identical motor neuron driving showed large animal-to-animal variability (Hooper et al. 2006), and suggests accurate modeling of extensor muscles requires modeling individual-by-individual. These complete characterizations of individual muscles also allowed us to test for parameter correlations. Two parameter pairs significantly co-varied, suggesting that a simpler model could as well reproduce muscle response.

  13. Optical Modification of Casimir Forces for Improved Function of Micro-and Nano-Scale Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been a considerable effort to study the Casimir and van der Waals forces, enabled by the improved ability to measure small forces near surfaces. Because of the continuously growing role of micro- and nanomechanical devices, the focus of this activity has shifted towards the ability to control these forces. Possible approaches to manipulating the Casimir force include development of composite materials, engineered nanostructures, mixed-phase materials, or active elements. So far, practical success has been limited. The role of geometrical factors in the Casimir force is significant. It is known, for example, that the Casimir force between two spherical shells enclosed one into the other is repulsive instead of normal attractive. Unfortunately, nanosurfaces with this topology are very difficult to make. A more direct approach to manipulating and neutralizing the Casimir force is using external mechanical or electromagnetic forces. Unfortunately, the technological overhead of such an approach is quite large. Using electromagnetic compensation instead of mechanical will considerably reduce this overhead and at the same time provide the degree of control over the Casimir force that mechanical springs cannot provide. A mechanical analog behind Casimir forces is shown.

  14. The role of the "Casimir force analogue" at the microscopic processes of crystallization and melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvildeev, V. N.; Semenycheva, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Melting (crystallization), a phase transition from a crystalline solid to a liquid state, is a common phenomenon in nature. We suggest a new factor, "the Casimir force analogue", to describe mechanisms of melting and crystallization. The Casimir force analogue is a force occurring between the surfaces of solid and liquid phases of metals caused by different energy density of phonons of these phases. It explains abrupt changes in geometry and thermodynamic parameters at a melting point. "The Casimir force analogue" helps to estimate latent melting heat and to gain an insight into a solid-liquid transition problem.

  15. Internally labeled Cy3/Cy5 DNA constructs show greatly enhanced photo-stability in single-molecule FRET experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonbae; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA constructs labeled with cyanine fluorescent dyes are important substrates for single-molecule (sm) studies of the functional activity of protein–DNA complexes. We previously studied the local DNA backbone fluctuations of replication fork and primer–template DNA constructs labeled with Cy3/Cy5 donor–acceptor Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) chromophore pairs and showed that, contrary to dyes linked ‘externally’ to the bases with flexible tethers, direct ‘internal’ (and rigid) insertion of the chromophores into the sugar-phosphate backbones resulted in DNA constructs that could be used to study intrinsic and protein-induced DNA backbone fluctuations by both smFRET and sm Fluorescent Linear Dichroism (smFLD). Here we show that these rigidly inserted Cy3/Cy5 chromophores also exhibit two additional useful properties, showing both high photo-stability and minimal effects on the local thermodynamic stability of the DNA constructs. The increased photo-stability of the internal labels significantly reduces the proportion of false positive smFRET conversion ‘background’ signals, thereby simplifying interpretations of both smFRET and smFLD experiments, while the decreased effects of the internal probes on local thermodynamic stability also make fluctuations sensed by these probes more representative of the unperturbed DNA structure. We suggest that internal probe labeling may be useful in studies of many DNA–protein interaction systems. PMID:24627223

  16. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  17. Observation of the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C M; Johansson, G; Pourkabirian, A; Simoen, M; Johansson, J R; Duty, T; Nori, F; Delsing, P

    2011-11-16

    One of the most surprising predictions of modern quantum theory is that the vacuum of space is not empty. In fact, quantum theory predicts that it teems with virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. Although initially a curiosity, it was quickly realized that these vacuum fluctuations had measurable consequences--for instance, producing the Lamb shift of atomic spectra and modifying the magnetic moment of the electron. This type of renormalization due to vacuum fluctuations is now central to our understanding of nature. However, these effects provide indirect evidence for the existence of vacuum fluctuations. From early on, it was discussed whether it might be possible to more directly observe the virtual particles that compose the quantum vacuum. Forty years ago, it was suggested that a mirror undergoing relativistic motion could convert virtual photons into directly observable real photons. The phenomenon, later termed the dynamical Casimir effect, has not been demonstrated previously. Here we observe the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit consisting of a coplanar transmission line with a tunable electrical length. The rate of change of the electrical length can be made very fast (a substantial fraction of the speed of light) by modulating the inductance of a superconducting quantum interference device at high frequencies (>10 gigahertz). In addition to observing the creation of real photons, we detect two-mode squeezing in the emitted radiation, which is a signature of the quantum character of the generation process.

  18. Casimir force for a scalar field in warped brane worlds

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, Roman; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Pedraza, Omar

    2008-03-15

    In looking for imprints of extra dimensions in braneworld models one usually builds these so that they are compatible with known low energy physics and thus focuses on high energy effects. Nevertheless, just as submillimeter Newton's law tests probe the mode structure of gravity other low energy tests might apply to matter. As a model example, in this work we determine the 4D Casimir force corresponding to a scalar field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on two parallel planes lying within the single brane of a Randall-Sundrum scenario extended by one compact extra dimension. Using the Green's function method such a force picks the contribution of each field mode as if it acted individually but with a weight given by the square of the mode wave functions on the brane. In the low energy regime one regains the standard 4D Casimir force that is associated to a zero mode in the massless case or to a quasilocalized or resonant mode in the massive one while the effect of the extra dimensions gets encoded as an additional term.

  19. Pressurized laboratory experiments show no stable carbon isotope fractionation of methane during gas hydrate dissolution and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Lapham, Laura L; Wilson, Rachel M; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-15

    The stable carbon isotopic ratio of methane (δ(13)C-CH(4)) recovered from marine sediments containing gas hydrate is often used to infer the gas source and associated microbial processes. This is a powerful approach because of distinct isotopic fractionation patterns associated with methane production by biogenic and thermogenic pathways and microbial oxidation. However, isotope fractionations due to physical processes, such as hydrate dissolution, have not been fully evaluated. We have conducted experiments to determine if hydrate dissolution or dissociation (two distinct physical processes) results in isotopic fractionation. In a pressure chamber, hydrate was formed from a methane gas source at 2.5 MPa and 4 °C, well within the hydrate stability field. Following formation, the methane source was removed while maintaining the hydrate at the same pressure and temperature which stimulated hydrate dissolution. Over the duration of two dissolution experiments (each ~20-30 days), water and headspace samples were periodically collected and measured for methane concentrations and δ(13)C-CH(4) while the hydrate dissolved. For both experiments, the methane concentrations in the pressure chamber water and headspace increased over time, indicating that the hydrate was dissolving, but the δ(13)C-CH(4) values showed no significant trend and remained constant, within 0.5‰. This lack of isotope change over time indicates that there is no fractionation during hydrate dissolution. We also investigated previous findings that little isotopic fractionation occurs when the gas hydrate dissociates into gas bubbles and water due to the release of pressure. Over a 2.5 MPa pressure drop, the difference in the δ(13)C-CH(4) was <0.3‰. We have therefore confirmed that there is no isotope fractionation when the gas hydrate dissociates and demonstrated that there is no fractionation when the hydrate dissolves. Therefore, measured δ(13)C-CH(4) values near gas hydrates are not affected

  20. Investigating the Role of Ferromagnetic Materials on the Casimir Force & Investigation of the Van Der Waals/Casimir Force with Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Mohideen, Umar

    2015-04-14

    Duration of award was from 4/15/10-4/14/15. In this grant period our contributions to the field of VdW/Casimir forces are 24 refereed publications in journals such as Physical Review Letters (4) [1-4], Physical Review B (10) [5-14], Physical Review D (2) [15,16], Applied Physics Letters (1) [17], Review of Scientific Instruments (1) [18] and the International Journal of Modern Physics A (5) [19-23] and B(1) (invited review article [24]). We presented 2 plenary conference talks, 3 lectures at the Pan American School on Frontiers in Casimir Physics, 2 conferences, 1 colloquium and 11 APS talks. If publications are restricted to only those with direct connection to the aims proposed in the prior grant period, then it will be a total of 12: Physical Review Letters (3) [2-4], Physical Review B (6) [6-8,12,13,25], Review of Scientific Instruments (1) [18], International Journal of Modern Physics A (1) [19] and B(1) [169]. A brief aggregated description of the directly connected accomplishments is below. The following topics are detailed: dispersion force measurements with graphene, dispersion force from ferromagnetic metals, conclusion on role of electrostatic patches, UV radiation induced modification of the Casimir force, low temperature measurement of the Casimir force, and Casimir force from thin fluctuating membranes.

  1. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2015-05-15

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over {sup 4}He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  2. Nernst heat theorem for the thermal Casimir interaction between two graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Romero, C.

    2016-10-01

    We find analytic asymptotic expressions at low temperature for the Casimir free energy, entropy, and pressure of two parallel graphene sheets in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. The reflection coefficients of electromagnetic waves on graphene are described on the basis of first principles of quantum electrodynamics at nonzero temperature using the polarization tensor in (2+1)-dimensional space-time. The leading contributions to the Casimir entropy and to the thermal corrections to the Casimir energy and pressure are given by the thermal correction to the polarization tensor at nonzero Matsubara frequencies. It is shown that the Casimir entropy for two graphene sheets goes to zero when the temperature vanishes, i.e., the third law of thermodynamics (the Nernst heat theorem) is satisfied. At low temperature, the magnitude of the thermal correction to the Casimir pressure between two graphene sheets is shown to vary inversely proportional to the separation. The Nernst heat theorem for graphene is discussed in the context of problems occurring in Casimir physics for both metallic and dielectric plates.

  3. Dynamical Casimir effect with δ -δ' mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Braga, Alessandra N.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2016-11-01

    We calculate the spectrum and the total rate of created particles for a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions, in the presence of a partially transparent moving mirror simulated by a Dirac δ -δ' point interaction. We show that, for this model, a partially reflecting mirror can produce a larger number of particles in comparison with a perfect one. In the limit of a perfect mirror, our formulas recover those found in the literature for the particle creation by a moving mirror with a Robin boundary condition.

  4. Casimir effect: running Newton constant or cosmological term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonyi, Janos; Regos, Eniko

    2006-01-01

    We argue that the instability of Euclidean Einstein gravity is an indication that the vacuum is non-perturbative and contains a condensate of the metric tensor in a manner reminiscent of Yang Mills theories. As a simple step toward the characterization of such a vacuum the value of the 1-loop effective action is computed for Euclidean de Sitter spaces as a function of the curvature when the unstable conformal modes are held fixed. Two phases are found, one where the curvature is large and gravitons should be confined and another one which appears to be weakly coupled and tends to be flat. The induced cosmological constant is positive or negative in the strongly or weakly curved phase, respectively. The relevance of the Casimir effect in understanding the UV sensitivity of gravity is pointed out.

  5. Rotation of a liquid crystal by the Casimir torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-03-01

    We present a calculation of the Casimir torque acting on a liquid crystal near a birefringent crystal. In this system, a liquid crystal bulk is uniformly aligned at one surface and is twisted at the other surface by a birefringent crystal, e.g., barium titanate. The liquid crystal is separated from the solid crystal by an isotropic, transparent material such as SiO2. By varying the thickness of the deposited layer, we can observe the effect of retardation on the torque (which differentiates it from the close-range van der Waals torque). We find that a barium titanate slab would cause 5CB (4 -cyano -4 '-pentylbiphenyl) liquid crystal to rotate by 10∘ through its bulk when separated by 35 nm of SiO2. The optical technique for measuring this twist is also outlined.

  6. Microscopic background of the Onsager-Casimir reciprocity relations

    SciTech Connect

    Titulaer, U.M.

    1988-10-01

    It has been known for some time that small deviations from the Onsager-Casimir symmetry relations are introduced when one passes from a given description of a system to a less detailed one by adiabatic elimination of fast variables. Exact validity is preserved, however, for a slightly modified form of these relations. In this paper the question is considered whether this modified Onsager symmetry is also preserved by the transition from a microscopic to a mesoscopic description, the step that introduces manifest irreversibility into the equations of motion. This question is examined in detail for a system of a few heavy oscillators coupled to a bath, a model discussed in a recent paper by van Kampen. The modified Onsager symmetry survives the transition to an irreversible description via the dense spectrum approximation. This is shown explicitly by inspection of the results obtained by van Kampen; some arguments favoring a more general validity are also briefly discussed.

  7. F-15B in flight showing Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment attached vertically to t

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In-flight photo of the F-15B equipped with the Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment. During four research flights, laminar flow was achieved over 80 percent of the test wing at speeds approaching Mach 2. This was accomplished as the sole result of the shape of the wing, without the use of suction gloves, such as on the F-16XL. Laminar flow is a condition in which air passes over a wing in smooth layers, rather than being turbulent The greater the area of laminar flow, the lower the amount of friction drag on the wing, thus increasing an aircraft's range and fuel economy. Increasing the area of laminar flow on a wing has been the subject of research by engineers since the late 1940s, but substantial success has proven elusive. The SS-NLF experiment was intended to provide engineers with the data by which to design natural laminar flow wings.

  8. Critical Casimir interactions and colloidal self-assembly in near-critical solvents.

    PubMed

    Tasios, Nikos; Edison, John R; van Roij, René; Evans, Robert; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-28

    A binary solvent mixture close to critical demixing experiences fluctuations whose correlation length, ξ, diverges as the critical point is approached. The solvent-mediated (SM) interaction that arises between a pair of colloids immersed in such a near-critical solvent can be long-ranged and this so-called critical Casimir interaction is well-studied. How a (dense) suspension of colloids will self-assemble under these conditions is poorly understood. Using a two-dimensional lattice model for the solvent and hard disks to represent the colloids, we perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the phase behaviour of this model colloidal suspension as a function of colloid size and wettability under conditions where the solvent reservoir is supercritical. Unlike most other approaches, where the solvent is modelled as an implicit background, our model employs an explicit solvent and treats the suspension as a ternary mixture. This enables us to capture important features, including the pronounced fractionation of the solvent in the coexisting colloidal phases, of this complex system. We also present results for the partial structure factors; these shed light on the critical behaviour in the ternary mixture. The degree to which an effective two-body pair potential description can describe the phase behaviour and structure of the colloidal suspension is discussed briefly.

  9. Critical Casimir interactions around the consolute point of a binary solvent.

    PubMed

    Mohry, T F; Kondrat, S; Maciołek, A; Dietrich, S

    2014-08-14

    Spatial confinement of a near-critical medium changes its fluctuation spectrum and modifies the corresponding order parameter distribution, resulting in effective, so-called critical Casimir forces (CCFs) acting on the confining surfaces. These forces are attractive for like boundary conditions of the order parameter at the opposing surfaces of the confinement. For colloidal particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture acting as a solvent close to its critical point of demixing, one thus expects the emergence of phase segregation into equilibrium colloidal liquid and gas phases. We analyze how such phenomena occur asymmetrically in the whole thermodynamic neighborhood of the consolute point of the binary solvent. By applying field-theoretical methods within mean-field approximation and the semi-empirical de Gennes-Fisher functional, we study the CCFs acting between planar parallel walls as well as between two spherical colloids and their dependence on temperature and on the composition of the near-critical binary mixture. We find that for compositions slightly poor in the molecules preferentially adsorbed at the surfaces, the CCFs are significantly stronger than at the critical composition, thus leading to pronounced colloidal segregation. The segregation phase diagram of the colloid solution following from the calculated effective pair potential between the colloids agrees surprisingly well with experiments and simulations.

  10. Casimir potential of a compact object enclosed by a spherical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-11-15

    We study the electromagnetic Casimir interaction of a compact object contained inside a closed cavity of another compact object. We express the interaction energy in terms of the objects' scattering matrices and translation matrices that relate the coordinate systems appropriate to each object. When the enclosing object is an otherwise empty metallic spherical shell, much larger than the internal object, and the two are sufficiently separated, the Casimir force can be expressed in terms of the static electric and magnetic multipole polarizabilities of the internal object, which is analogous to the Casimir-Polder result. Although it is not a simple power law, the dependence of the force on the separation of the object from the containing sphere is a universal function of its displacement from the center of the sphere, independent of other details of the object's electromagnetic response. Furthermore, we compute the exact Casimir force between two metallic spheres contained one inside the other at arbitrary separations. Finally, we combine our results with earlier work on the Casimir force between two spheres to obtain data on the leading-order correction to the proximity force approximation for two metallic spheres both outside and within one another.

  11. Characteristic properties of the Casimir free energy for metal films deposited on metallic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Casimir free energy and pressure of thin metal films deposited on metallic plates are considered using the Lifshitz theory and the Drude and plasma model approaches to the role of conduction electrons. The bound electrons are taken into account by using the complete optical data of film and plate metals. It is shown that for films of several tens of nanometers thickness the Casimir free energy and pressure calculated using these approaches differ by hundreds and thousands percent and can be easily discriminated experimentally. According to our results, the free energy of a metal film does not vanish in the limiting case of ideal metal if the Drude model approach is used in contradiction with the fact that the fluctuating field cannot penetrate in its interior. Numerical computations of the Casimir free energy and pressure of Ag and Au films deposited on Cu and Al plates have been performed using both theoretical approaches. It is shown that the free energy of a film can be both negative and positive depending on the metals used. For a Au film on a Ag plate and vice versa the Casimir energy of a film changes its sign with increasing film thickness. Applications of the obtained results for resolving the Casimir puzzle and the problem of stability of thin films are discussed.

  12. Perfluorocarbon Tracer Experiments on a 2 km Scale in Manchester Showing Ingress of Pollutants into a Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James; Wright, Matthew; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Martin, Damien; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic perfluorocarbons (PFCs) have been used to measure the passage of air in urban and rural settings as they are chemically inert, non-toxic and have low background concentrations. The use of pre-concentrators and chemical ionisation gas chromatography enables concentrations of a few parts per quadrillion (ppq) to be measured in bag samples. Three PFC tracers were used in Manchester, UK in the summer of 2015 to map airflow in the city and ingress into buildings: perfluomethylcyclohexane (PMCH), perfluoro-2-4-dimethylcyclohexane (mPDMCH) and perfluoro-2-methyl-3-ethylpentene (PMEP). A known quantity of each PFC was released for 15 minutes from steel canisters using pre-prepared PFC mixtures. Release points were chosen to be upwind of the central sampling location (Simon Building, University of Manchester) and varied in distance up to 2.2 km. Six releases using one or three tracers in different configurations and under different conditions were undertaken in the summer. Three further experiments were conducted in the Autumn, to more closely investigate the rate of ingress and decay of tracer indoors. In each experiment, 10 litre samples were made over 30 minutes into Tedlar bags, starting at the same time the as PFC release. Samples were taken in 11 locations chosen from 15 identified areas including three in public parks, three outside within the University of Manchester area, seven inside and five outside of the Simon building and two outside a building nearby. For building measurements, receptors were placed inside the buildings on different floors; outside measurements were achieved through a sample line out of the window. Three of the sample positions inside the Simon building were paired with samplers outside to allow indoor-outdoor comparisons. PFC concentrations varied depending on location and height. The highest measured concentrations occurred when the tracer was released at sunrise; up to 330 ppq above background (11 ppq) of PMCH was measured at the 6

  13. Some developments of the Casimir effect in p-cavity of (D + 1)-dimensional space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang-Hua; Lin, Rui-Hui; Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2014-12-01

    The Casimir effect for rectangular boxes has been studied for several decades. But there are still some unclear points. Recently, there are new developments related to this topic, including the demonstration of the equivalence of the regularization methods and the clarification of the ambiguity in the regularization of the temperature-dependent free energy. Also, the interesting quantum spring was raised stemming from the topological Casimir effect of the helix boundary conditions. We review these developments together with the general derivation of the Casimir energy of the p-dimensional cavity in (D + 1)-dimensional space-time, paying special attention to the sign of the Casimir force in a cavity with unequal edges. In addition, we also review the Casimir piston, which is a configuration related to rectangular cavity.

  14. Mode Summation Approach to Casimir Effect Between Two Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2012-10-01

    In the last few years, several approaches have been developed to compute the exact Casimir interaction energy between two nonplanar objects, all lead to the same functional form, which is called the TGTG formula. In this paper, we explore the TGTG formula from the perspective of mode summation approach. Both scalar fields and electromagnetic fields are considered. In this approach, one has to first solve the equation of motion to find a wave basis for each object. The two T's in the TGTG formula are T-matrices representing the Lippmann-Schwinger T-operators, one for each of the objects. Each T-matrix can be found by matching the boundary conditions imposed on the object, and it is independent of the other object. However, it depends on whether the object is interacting with an object outside it, or an object inside it. The two G's in the TGTG formula are the translation matrices, relating the wave basis of an object to the wave basis of the other object. These translation matrices only depend on the wave basis chosen for each object, and they are independent of the boundary conditions on the objects. After discussing the general theory, we apply the prescription to derive the explicit formulas for the Casimir energies for the sphere-sphere, sphere-plane, cylinder-cylinder and cylinder-plane interactions. First the T-matrices for a plane, a sphere and a cylinder are derived for the following cases: the object is imposed with Dirichlet, Neumann or general Robin boundary conditions; the object is semitransparent; and the object is a magnetodielectric object immersed in a magnetodielectric media. Then the operator approach developed by R. C. Wittman [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag.36, 1078 (1988)] is used to derive the translation matrices. From these, the explicit TGTG formula for each of the scenarios can be written down. On the one hand, we have summarized all the TGTG formulas that have been derived so far for the sphere-sphere, cylinder-cylinder, sphere-plane and

  15. A simple optical index shows spatial and temporal heterogeneity in phytoplankton community composition during the 2008 North Atlantic Bloom Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinić, I.; Perry, M. J.; D'Asaro, E.; Briggs, N.; Poulton, N.; Sieracki, M. E.; Lee, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The ratio of two in situ optical measurements - chlorophyll fluorescence (Chl F) and optical particulate backscattering (bbp) - varied with changes in phytoplankton community composition during the North Atlantic Bloom Experiment in the Iceland Basin in 2008. Using ship-based measurements of Chl F, bbp, chlorophyll a (Chl), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigments, phytoplankton composition and carbon biomass, we found that oscillations in the ratio varied with changes in plankton community composition; hence we refer to Chl F/bbp as an "optical community index". The index varied by more than a factor of 2, with low values associated with pico- and nanophytoplankton and high values associated with diatom-dominated phytoplankton communities. Observed changes in the optical index were driven by taxa-specific chlorophyll-to-autotrophic carbon ratios and by physiological changes in Chl F associated with the silica limitation. A Lagrangian mixed-layer float and four Seagliders, operating continuously for 2 months, made similar measurements of the optical community index and followed the evolution and later demise of the diatom spring bloom. Temporal changes in optical community index and, by implication, the transition in community composition from diatom to post-diatom bloom communities were not simultaneous over the spatial domain surveyed by the ship, float and gliders. The ratio of simple optical properties measured from autonomous platforms, when carefully validated, provides a unique tool for studying phytoplankton patchiness on extended temporal scales and ecologically relevant spatial scales and should offer new insights into the processes regulating patchiness.

  16. The Majorana Demonstrator: Progress towards showing the feasibility of a 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Finnerty, P.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, Jim; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Looker, Q.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0*) of the 76Ge isotope with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate the neutrino is its own anti-particle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass-scale of the neutrino. The Demonstrator is being assembled at the 4850 foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be contained in a lowbackground environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. The goals for the Demonstrator are: demonstrating a background rate less than 3 counts tonne -1 year-1 in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) surrounding the 2039 keV 76Ge endpoint energy; establishing the technology required to build a tonne-scale germanium based double-beta decay experiment; testing the recent claim of observation of 0; and performing a direct search for lightWIMPs (3-10 GeV/c2).

  17. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-08-15

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed.

  18. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  19. L'effet Casimir : théorie et expériences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, A.; Genet, C.; Intravaia, F.; Reynaud, S.

    2004-11-01

    L'existence de fluctuations irréductibles de champ dans le vide est une prédiction importante de la théorie quantique. Ces fluctuations ont de nombreuses conséquences observables comme l'effet Casimir, qui est maintenant mesuré avec une bonne précision et un bon accord avec la théorie, pourvu que celle-ci tienne compte des différences entre les expériences rélles et la situation idéale considérée par H.G.B. Casimir. Nous présenterons quelqu'unes des expériences récentes et discuterons les principales corrections à la force de Casimir liées à la situation expérimentale.

  20. Noncontact gears. II. Casimir torque between concentric corrugated cylinders for the scalar case

    SciTech Connect

    Cavero-Pelaez, Ines; Milton, Kimball A.; Parashar, Prachi; Shajesh, K. V.

    2008-09-15

    The Casimir interaction between two concentric corrugated cylinders provides the mechanism for noncontact gears. To this end, we calculate the Casimir torque between two such cylinders, described by {delta}-potentials, which interact through a scalar field. We derive analytic expressions for the Casimir torque for the case when the corrugation amplitudes are small in comparison to the corrugation wavelengths. We derive explicit results for the Dirichlet case, and exact results for the weak coupling limit, in the leading order. The results for the corrugated cylinders approach the corresponding expressions for the case of corrugated parallel plates in the limit of large radii of cylinders (relative to the difference in their radii) while keeping the corrugation wavelength fixed.

  1. Noncontact gears. II. Casimir torque between concentric corrugated cylinders for the scalar case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavero-Peláez, Inés; Milton, Kimball A.; Parashar, Prachi; Shajesh, K. V.

    2008-09-01

    The Casimir interaction between two concentric corrugated cylinders provides the mechanism for noncontact gears. To this end, we calculate the Casimir torque between two such cylinders, described by δ-potentials, which interact through a scalar field. We derive analytic expressions for the Casimir torque for the case when the corrugation amplitudes are small in comparison to the corrugation wavelengths. We derive explicit results for the Dirichlet case, and exact results for the weak coupling limit, in the leading order. The results for the corrugated cylinders approach the corresponding expressions for the case of corrugated parallel plates in the limit of large radii of cylinders (relative to the difference in their radii) while keeping the corrugation wavelength fixed.

  2. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    On a macroscopic scale, a nonreactive liquid partially covering a homogeneous solid surface will intersect the solid at an angle called the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, the contact angle is materially dependent upon both the solid and liquid and typical values fall in the range 80-170 deg, depending on the crucible material. On a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the liquid and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously. Consider the example of the so called detached Bridgman crystal growth process. In this technique, a small gap is formed between the growing crystal and the crucible. At the crystal/melt interface, a meniscus ring is formed. Its width can be in the range of a few micrometers, approaching a microscopic scale. It then becomes questionable to describe the shape of this meniscus by the contact angle. A more advanced treatment of the interface is needed and here we propose such a refined model. The interaction of the liquid surface with the solid can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir or van der Waals force.

  3. Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Helically symmetric formulation, Casimir invariants, and equilibrium variational principles

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2012-05-15

    The noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is used to construct variational principles for continuously symmetric equilibrium configurations of magnetized plasma, including flow. In particular, helical symmetry is considered, and results on axial and translational symmetries are retrieved as special cases of the helical configurations. The symmetry condition, which allows the description in terms of a magnetic flux function, is exploited to deduce a symmetric form of the noncanonical Poisson bracket of MHD. Casimir invariants are then obtained directly from the Poisson bracket. Equilibria are obtained from an energy-Casimir principle and reduced forms of this variational principle are obtained by the elimination of algebraic constraints.

  4. Repulsive Casimir forces between solid materials with high-refractive-index intervening liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zwol, P. J. van; Palasantzas, G.

    2010-06-15

    In order to explore repulsive Casimir or van der Waals forces between solid materials with liquid as the intervening medium, we analyze dielectric data for a wide range of materials as, for example, (p)olytetrafluoroethylene, polystyrene, silica, and more than 20 liquids. Although significant variation in the dielectric data from different sources exists, we provide a scheme based on measured static dielectric constants, refractive indices, and applying Kramers-Kronig consistency to dielectric data to create accurate dielectric functions at imaginary frequencies. The latter is necessary for more accurate force calculations via the Lifshitz theory, thereby allowing reliable predictions of repulsive Casimir forces.

  5. Physical restrictions on the Casimir interaction of metal-dielectric metamaterials: An effective-medium approach

    SciTech Connect

    Silveirinha, Mario G.; Maslovski, Stanislav I.

    2010-11-15

    Using an effective-medium approach, we demonstrate that the Casimir interaction of structured metal-dielectric metamaterial slabs which effectively behave as either uniform nongyrotropic materials or bi-isotropic materials is attractive at all distances, independent of the emergence of artificial magnetism or strong magnetoelectric coupling, when the slabs stand in a vacuum. In particular, it is shown that the magnetic response of a metal-dielectric metamaterial is always diamagnetic at imaginary frequencies, and this explains in simple physical terms the impossibility of Casimir repulsion.

  6. Rectification of the lateral Casimir force in a vibrating noncontact rack and pinion.

    PubMed

    Ashourvan, Arash; Miri, Mirfaez; Golestanian, Ramin

    2007-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a cylindrical pinion that is kept at a distance from a vibrating rack is studied, and it is shown that the lateral Casimir force between the two corrugated surfaces can be rectified. The effects of friction and external load are taken into account, and it is shown that the pinion can do work against loads of up to a critical value, which is set by the amplitude of the lateral Casimir force. We present a phase diagram for the rectified motion that could help its experimental investigations, as the system exhibits a chaotic behavior in a large part of the parameter space.

  7. Noncontact racK and pinion powered by the lateral Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Ashourvan, Arash; Miri, MirFaez; Golestanian, Ramin

    2007-04-06

    The lateral Casimir force is employed to propose a design for a potentially wear-proof rack and pinion with no contact, which can be miniaturized to the nanoscale. The robustness of the design is studied by exploring the relation between the pinion velocity and the rack velocity in the different domains of the parameter space. The effects of friction and added external load are also examined. It is shown that the device can hold up extremely high velocities, unlike what the general perception of the Casimir force as a weak interaction might suggest.

  8. Standard Model Extension and Casimir effect for fermions at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2016-11-01

    Lorentz and CPT symmetries are foundations for important processes in particle physics. Recent studies in Standard Model Extension (SME) at high energy indicate that these symmetries may be violated. Modifications in the lagrangian are necessary to achieve a hermitian hamiltonian. The fermion sector of the standard model extension is used to calculate the effects of the Lorentz and CPT violation on the Casimir effect at zero and finite temperature. The Casimir effect and Stefan-Boltzmann law at finite temperature are calculated using the thermo field dynamics formalism.

  9. From optical lattice clocks to the measurement of forces in the Casimir regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Peter; Lemonde, Pierre; Bize, Sebastien; Landragin, Arnaud; Clairon, Andre; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2007-06-15

    We describe an experiment based on atoms trapped close to a macroscopic surface, to study the interactions between the atoms and the surface at very small separations (0.6-10 {mu}m). In this range the dominant potential is the QED interaction (Casimir-Polder and van der Waals) between the surface and the atom. Additionally, several theoretical models suggest the possibility of Yukawa-type potentials with sub-millimeter range, arising from new physics related to gravity. The proposed setup is very similar to neutral atom optical lattice clocks, but with the atoms trapped in lattice sites close to the reflecting mirror. A sequence of pulses of the probe laser at different frequencies is then used to create an interferometer with a coherent superposition between atomic states at different distances from the mirror (in different lattice sites). Assuming atom interferometry state-of-the-art measurement of the phase difference and a duration of the superposition of about 0.1 s, we expect to be able to measure the potential difference between separated states with an uncertainty of {approx_equal}10{sup -4} Hz. An analysis of systematic effects for different atoms and surfaces indicates no fundamentally limiting effect at the same level of uncertainty, but does influence the choice of atom and surface material. Based on those estimates, we expect that such an experiment would improve the best existing measurements of the atom-wall QED interaction by {>=} 2 orders of magnitude, while gaining up to four orders of magnitude on the best present limits on new interactions in the range between 100 nm and 100 {mu}m.

  10. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  11. Electromagnetic Casimir densities for a cylindrical shell on de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharian, A. A.; Manukyan, V. F.; Saharyan, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Complete set of cylindrical modes is constructed for the electromagnetic field inside and outside a cylindrical shell in the background of (D + 1)-dimensional dS space-time. On the shell, the field obeys the generalized perfect conductor boundary condition. For the Bunch-Davies vacuum state, we evaluate the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the electric field squared and of the energy-momentum tensor. The shell-induced contributions are explicitly extracted. In this way, for points away from the shell, the renormalization is reduced to the one for the VEVs in the boundary-free dS bulk. As a special case, the VEVs are obtained for a cylindrical shell in the (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski bulk. We show that the shell-induced contribution in the electric field squared is positive for both the interior and exterior regions. The corresponding Casimir-Polder forces are directed toward the shell. The vacuum energy-momentum tensor, in addition to the diagonal components, has a nonzero off-diagonal component corresponding to the energy flux along the direction normal to the shell. This flux is directed from the shell in both the exterior and interior regions. For points near the shell, the leading terms in the asymptotic expansions for the electric field squared and diagonal components of the energy-momentum tensor are obtained from the corresponding expressions in the Minkowski bulk replacing the distance from the shell by the proper distance in the dS bulk. The influence of the gravitational field on the local characteristics of the vacuum is essential at distances from the shell larger than the dS curvature radius. The results are extended for confining boundary conditions of flux tube models in QCD.

  12. Casimir energy in a small volume multiply connected static hyperbolic preinflationary universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mu''ller, Daniel; Fagundes, Helio V.; Opher, Reuven

    2001-06-15

    A few years ago, Cornish, Spergel and Starkman (CSS) suggested that a multiply connected ''small'' universe could allow for classical chaotic mixing as a preinflationary homogenization process. The smaller the volume, the more important the process. Also, a smaller universe has a greater probability of being spontaneously created. Previously DeWitt, Hart and Isham (DHI) calculated the Casimir energy for static multiply connected flat space-times. Because of the interest in small volume hyperbolic universes (e.g., CSS), we generalize the DHI calculation by making a numerical investigation of the Casimir energy for a conformally coupled, massive scalar field in a static universe, whose spatial sections are the Weeks manifold, the smallest universe of negative curvature known. In spite of being a numerical calculation, our result is in fact exact. It is shown that there is spontaneous vacuum excitation of low multipolar components.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of a rack-pinion-rack device powered by the Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Miri, MirFaez; Nekouie, Vahid; Golestanian, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Using the lateral Casimir force-a manifestation of the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between objects with corrugated surfaces-as the main force transduction mechanism, a nanomechanical device with rich dynamical behaviors is proposed. The device is made of two parallel racks that are moving in the same direction and a pinion in the middle that couples with both racks via the noncontact lateral Casimir force. The built-in frustration in the device causes it to be very sensitive and react dramatically to minute changes in the geometrical parameters and initial conditions of the system. The noncontact nature of the proposed device could help with the ubiquitous wear problem in nanoscale mechanical systems.

  14. Long-Range Interactions in Polymer Melts: The Anti-Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, S. P.; Semenov, A. N.

    2005-07-01

    It is well known that small neutral particles normally tend to aggregate due to the van der Waals forces. We discover a new universal long-range interaction between solid objects in polymer media that is directly opposite the van der Waals attraction. The new force could reverse the sign of the net interaction, possibly leading to the net repulsion. This universal repulsion comes from the subtracted soft fluctuation modes, which are not present in the real polymer system, but rather are in its ideal counterpart. The predicted effect has a deep relation to the classical Casimir interactions, providing an unusual example of fluctuation-induced repulsion instead of normal attraction. That is why it is referred to as the anti-Casimir effect. We also find that the correlation function of monomer units in a concentrated solution of infinite polymer chains follows a power-law rather than an exponential decay at large distances.

  15. Effect of temperature variations on equilibrium distances in levitating parallel dielectric plates interacting through Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteso, Victoria; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Míguez, Hernán

    2016-04-01

    We study at thermal equilibrium the effect of temperature deviations around room temperature on the equilibrium distance (deq) at which thin films made of Teflon, silica, or polystyrene immersed in glycerol levitate over a silicon substrate due to the balance of Casimir, gravity, and buoyancy forces. We find that the equilibrium nature (stable or unstable) of deq is preserved under temperature changes, and provide simple rules to predict whether the new equilibrium position will occur closer to or further from the substrate at the new temperature. These rules depend on the static permittivities of all materials comprised in the system ( ɛ0 ( m ) ) and the equilibrium nature of deq. Our designed dielectric configuration is excellent for experimental observation of thermal effects on the Casimir force indirectly detected through the tunable equilibrium distances (with slab thickness and material properties) in levitation mode.

  16. Derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2014-10-01

    We carefully reexamine the conditions of validity for the consistent derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors. We recover the usual expression for the lossy Drude model but not for the lossless plasma model. We give an interpretation of this new result in terms of the modes associated with the Foucault currents, which play a role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to common expectations.

  17. Lateral critical Casimir force in two-dimensional inhomogeneous Ising strip. Exact results.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Piotr; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2016-06-07

    We consider two-dimensional Ising strip bounded by two planar, inhomogeneous walls. The inhomogeneity of each wall is modeled by a magnetic field acting on surface spins. It is equal to +h1 except for a group of N1 neighboring surface spins where it is equal to -h1. The inhomogeneities of the upper and lower wall are shifted with respect to each other by a lateral distance L. Using exact diagonalization of the transfer matrix, we study both the lateral and normal critical Casimir forces as well as magnetization profiles for different temperature regimes: below the wetting temperature, between the wetting and the critical temperature, and above the critical temperature. The lateral critical Casimir force acts in the direction opposite to the shift L, and the excess normal force is always attractive. Upon increasing the shift L we observe, depending on the temperature regime, three different scenarios of breaking of the capillary bridge of negative magnetization connecting the inhomogeneities of the walls across the strip. As long as there exists a capillary bridge in the system, the magnitude of the excess total critical Casimir force is almost constant, with its direction depending on L. By investigating the bridge morphologies we have found a relation between the point at which the bridge breaks and the inflection point of the force. We provide a simple argument that some of the properties reported here should also hold for different models of the strip with the same type of inhomogeneity.

  18. Casimir Friction and Near-field Radiative Heat Transfer in Graphene Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, A. I.

    2017-02-01

    The dependence of the Casimir friction force between a graphene sheet and a (amorphous) SiO2 substrate on the drift velocity of the electrons in the graphene sheet is studied. It is shown that the Casimir friction is strongly enhanced for the drift velocity above the threshold velocity when the friction is determined by the resonant excitation of the surface phonon-polaritons in the SiO2 substrate and the electron-hole pairs in graphene. The theory agrees well with the experimental data for the current-voltage dependence for unsuspended graphene on the SiO2 substrate. The theories of the Casimir friction and the near-field radiative energy transfer are used to study the heat generation and dissipation in graphene due to the interaction with phonon-polaritons in the (amorphous) SiO2 substrate and acoustic phonons in graphene. For suspended graphene, the energy transfer coefficient at nanoscale gap is three orders of magnitude larger than the radiative heat transfer coefficient of the blackbody radiation limit.

  19. Critical Casimir force and its fluctuations in lattice spin models: exact and Monte Carlo results.

    PubMed

    Dantchev, Daniel; Krech, Michael

    2004-04-01

    We present general arguments and construct a stress tensor operator for finite lattice spin models. The average value of this operator gives the Casimir force of the system close to the bulk critical temperature T(c). We verify our arguments via exact results for the force in the two-dimensional Ising model, d -dimensional Gaussian, and mean spherical model with 2Casimir force F(C) in a slab geometry confining a critical substance in-between is k(b) TD(T) (A/ a(d-1) )(1/2), where A is the surface area of the plates, a is the lattice spacing, and D(T) is a slowly varying nonuniversal function of the temperature T. The numerical calculations demonstrate that at the critical temperature T(c) the force possesses a Gaussian distribution centered at the mean value of the force = k(b) T(c) (d-1)Delta/ (L/a)(d), where L is the distance between the plates and Delta is the (universal) Casimir amplitude.

  20. Out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the thermal Casimir effect in a model polarizable material.

    PubMed

    Dean, David S; Démery, Vincent; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    Relaxation of the thermal Casimir or van der Waals force (the high temperature limit of the Casimir force) for a model dielectric medium is investigated. We start with a model of interacting polarization fields with a dynamics that leads to a frequency dependent dielectric constant of the Debye form. In the static limit, the usual zero frequency Matsubara mode component of the Casimir force is recovered. We then consider the out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the van der Waals force to its equilibrium value when two initially uncorrelated dielectric bodies are brought into sudden proximity. For the interaction between dielectric slabs, it is found that the spatial dependence of the out-of-equilibrium force is the same as the equilibrium one, but it has a time dependent amplitude, or Hamaker coefficient, which increases in time to its equilibrium value. The final relaxation of the force to its equilibrium value is exponential in systems with a single or finite number of polarization field relaxation times. However, in systems, such as those described by the Havriliak-Negami dielectric constant with a broad distribution of relaxation times, we observe a much slower power law decay to the equilibrium value.

  1. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir forces between surfaces with alternating boundary conditions in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubail, J.; Santachiara, R.; Emig, T.

    2017-03-01

    Systems as diverse as binary mixtures and inclusions in biological membranes, and many more, can be described effectively by interacting spins. When the critical fluctuations in these systems are constrained by boundary conditions, critical Casimir forces (CCF) emerge. Here we analyze CCF between boundaries with alternating boundary conditions in two dimensions, employing conformal field theory (CFT). After presenting the concept of boundary changing operators, we specifically consider two different boundary configurations for a strip of critical Ising spins: (I) alternating equi-sized domains of up and down spins on both sides of the strip, with a possible lateral shift, and (II) alternating domains of up and down spins of different size on one side and homogeneously fixed spins on the other side of the strip. Asymptotic results for the CCF at small and large distances are derived. We introduce a novel modified Szegö formula for determinants of real antisymmetric block Toeplitz matrices to obtain the exact CCF and the corresponding scaling functions at all distances. We demonstrate the existence of a surface renormalization group flow between universal force amplitudes of different magnitude and sign. The Casimir force can vanish at a stable equilibrium position that can be controlled by parameters of the boundary conditions. Lateral Casimir forces assume a universal simple cosine form at large separations.

  2. Rotating Casimir systems: Magnetic-field-enhanced perpetual motion, possible realization in doped nanotubes, and laws of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that for a certain class of Casimir-type systems (“devices”) the energy of zero-point vacuum fluctuations reaches its global minimum when the device rotates about a certain axis rather than remains static. This rotational vacuum effect may lead to the emergence of permanently rotating objects provided the negative rotational energy of zero-point fluctuations cancels the positive rotational energy of the device itself. In this paper, we show that for massless electrically charged particles the rotational vacuum effect should be drastically (astronomically) enhanced in the presence of a magnetic field. As an illustration, we show that in a background of experimentally available magnetic fields the zero-point energy of massless excitations in rotating torus-shaped doped carbon nanotubes may indeed overwhelm the classical energy of rotation for certain angular frequencies so that the permanently rotating state is energetically favored. The suggested “zero-point-driven” devices—which have no internally moving parts—correspond to a perpetuum mobile of a new, fourth kind: They do not produce any work despite the fact that their equilibrium (ground) state corresponds to a permanent rotation even in the presence of an external environment. We show that our proposal is consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  3. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    processes in the soil have been modelled with simulation model SWAP. The experiment started in 2010 and is ongoing. Data, collected so far show that the plots with controlled drainage (all compared with plots equipped with conventional drainage) conserve more rain water (higher groundwater tables in early spring), lower discharges under average weather conditions and storm events, reduce N-loads and saline seepage to surface waters, enhance denitrification, show a different 'first flush' effect and show similar crop yields. The results of the experiments will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of controlled drainage on complex hydrological en geochemical processes in agricultural clay soils, the interaction between ground- en surface water and its effects on drain water quantity, quality and crop yield.

  4. The field theory of symmetrical layered electrolytic systems and the thermal Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. S.; Horgan, R. R.

    2005-06-01

    We present a general extension of a field-theoretic approach developed in earlier papers to the calculation of the free energy of symmetrically layered electrolytic systems which is based on the sine-Gordon field theory for the Coulomb gas. The method is to construct the partition function in terms of the Feynman evolution kernel in the Euclidean time variable associated with the coordinate normal to the surfaces defining the layered structure. The theory is applicable to cylindrical systems and its development is motivated by the possibility that a static van der Waals or thermal Casimir force could provide an attractive force stabilizing a dielectric tube formed from a lipid bilayer, an example of which is provided by the t-tubules occurring in certain muscle cells. In this context, we apply the theory to the calculation of the thermal Casimir effect for a dielectric tube of radius R and thickness δ formed from such a membrane in water. In a grand canonical approach we find that the leading contribution to the Casimir energy behaves like -kBTLκC/R which gives rise to an attractive force which tends to contract the tube radius. We find that κC~0.3 for the case of typical lipid membrane t-tubules. We conclude that except in the case of a very soft membrane this force is insufficient to stabilize such tubes against the bending stress which tends to increase the radius. We briefly discuss the role of the lipid membrane reservoir implicit in the approach and whether its nature in biological systems may possibly lead to a stabilizing mechanism for such lipid tubes.

  5. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  6. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  7. Thermal corrections to the Casimir energy in a general weak gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Borzoo

    2016-12-01

    We calculate finite temperature corrections to the energy of the Casimir effect of a two conducting parallel plates in a general weak gravitational field. After solving the Klein-Gordon equation inside the apparatus, mode frequencies inside the apparatus are obtained in terms of the parameters of the weak background. Using Matsubara’s approach to quantum statistical mechanics gravity-induced thermal corrections of the energy density are obtained. Well-known weak static and stationary gravitational fields are analyzed and it is found that in the low temperature limit the energy of the system increases compared to that in the zero temperature case.

  8. Stable Levitation and Alignment of Compact Objects by Casimir Spring Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Zaheer, Saad

    2010-02-19

    We investigate a stable Casimir force configuration consisting of an object contained inside a spherical or spheroidal cavity filled with a dielectric medium. The spring constant for displacements from the center of the cavity and the dependence of the energy on the relative orientations of the inner object and the cavity walls are computed. We find that the stability of the force equilibrium--unlike the direction of the torque--can be predicted based on the sign of the force between two slabs of the same material.

  9. Generalized Bogoliubov transformation for confined fields: Applications for the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.C. da; Khanna, F.C.; Matos Neto, A.; Santana, A.E.

    2002-11-01

    The Bogoliubov transformation in thermofield dynamics, an operator formalism for the finite-temperature quantum field theory, is generalized to describe a field in arbitrary confined regions of space and time. Starting with the scalar field, the approach is extended to the electromagnetic field and the energy-momentum tensor is written via the Bogoliubov transformation. In this context, the Casimir effect is calculated for zero and nonzero temperature, and therefore it can be considered as a vacuum condensation effect of the electromagnetic field. This aspect opens an interesting perspective for using this procedure as an effective scheme for calculations in the studies of confined fields, including interacting fields.

  10. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. Dowker's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-07-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  11. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. DOWKER's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so-called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  12. Casimir Funk: his discovery of the vitamins and their deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Tagarelli, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2010-01-01

    The history of the discovery of vitamins is the history of their deficiency disorders. Their discoverer was Casimir Funk, who is considered the 'father of vitamin therapy'. In his experimental research, Funk studied the interrelationships in the human body of those elements that Eijkman had demonstrated in animals, particularly in birds. In his experimental research, Funk identified the dietetic factors whose lack caused the 'deficiency disorders', as he called human beri-beri, scurvy, rickets and pellagra. In 1911, he designated these factors 'vitamins' ('vita' = life, and 'amine' = a nitrogenous substance essential for life); this name was accepted by the scientific community in 1912.

  13. Casimir effect at finite temperature for pure-photon sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics between particles is governed by Lorentz and CPT symmetry. There is a violation of Parity (P) and CP symmetry at low levels. The unified theory, that includes particle physics and quantum gravity, may be expected to be covariant with Lorentz and CPT symmetry. At high enough energies, will the unified theory display violation of any symmetry? The Standard Model Extension (SME), with Lorentz and CPT violating terms, has been suggested to include particle dynamics. The minimal SME in the pure photon sector is considered in order to calculate the Casimir effect at finite temperature.

  14. Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force for Au Using a Dynamic Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Castillo-Garza, R.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2012-07-01

    The gradient of the Casimir force between carefully cleaned Au surfaces of a sphere and a plate is measured using a dynamic atomic force microscope in the frequency modulation regime in high vacuum. The electrostatic calibration of the setup did not reveal any effect of patches or surface contaminants. The experimental data for the force gradient are found to be consistent with theory using the plasma model approach over the entire measurement range. The Drude model approach is excluded by the data at separations from 235 to 400 nm at a 67% confidence level.

  15. The Archimedes experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calloni, E.; Caprara, S.; Laurentis, M. De; Esposito, G.; Grilli, M.; Majorana, E.; Pepe, G. P.; Petrarca, S.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Ricci, F.; Rosa, L.; Rovelli, C.; Ruggi, P.; Saini, N. L.; Stornaiolo, C.; Tafuri, F.

    2016-07-01

    Archimedes is an INFN-funded pathfinder experiment aimed at verifying the feasibility of measuring the interaction of vacuum fluctuations with gravity. The final experiment will measure the force exerted by the gravitational field on a Casimir cavity whose vacuum energy is modulated with a superconductive transition, by using a balance as a small force detector. Archimedes is two-year project devoted to test the most critical experimental aspects, in particular the balance resonance frequency and quality factor, the thermal modulation efficiency and the superconductive sample realization.

  16. Theoretical modeling of the Casimir force-induced instability in freestanding nanowires with circular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhabadi, Amin; Abadian, Naeime; Rach, Randolph; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2014-09-01

    The Casimir force can induce instability and adhesion in freestanding nanostructures. Previous research efforts in this area have exclusively focused on modeling the instability in structures with planar or rectangular cross-section, while, to the best knowledge of the authors, no attention has been paid to investigate this phenomenon for nanowires with circular cross-section. In this study, effects of the Casimir force on the instability and adhesion of freestanding Cylinder-Plate and Cylinder-Cylinder geometries are investigated, which are commonly encountered in real nanodevices. To compute the Casimir force, two approaches, i.e. the proximity force approximation (PFA) for small separations and Dirichlet asymptotic approximation (scattering theory) for large separations, are considered. A continuum mechanics theory is employed, in conjunction with the Euler-beam model, to obtain constitutive equations of the systems. The governing nonlinear constitutive equations of the nanostructures are solved using two different approaches, i.e. the analytical modified Adomian decomposition (MAD) and the numerical finite difference method (FDM). The detachment length and minimum gap, both of which prevent the Casimir force-induced adhesion, are computed for both configurations.

  17. Measurements of the Critical Casimir Effect and Superfluid Density in Saturated Helium-4 Films near T(lambda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, John Bishoy Sam

    Saturated thick films of 4Helium adsorbed on a copper substrate are studied experimentally. The film thickness is measured with an ultra-sensitive capacitance bridge capable of resolving sub-Angstrom changes in film thickness. Through the use of this capacitance bridge, the critical Casimir effect in the films is studied in the vicinity of the lambda transition. Additionally, the copper substrate assembly is used to generate and detect third sound in the film. Measurements are made of the third sound speed and attenuation in thick film from 1.6 K to the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in the films. The position of the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition relative to the critical Casimir effect in the films is identifieded. It is discovered that the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition occurs at the beginning of the dip in film thickness due to the critical Casimir effect. When the temperature of the system is swept extremely slowly across the lambda transition, a step in film thickness is observed. This step is possibly a non-universal critical Casimir effect. A model of thermal second sound excitations is developed to describe this new observation.

  18. Dynamical Casimir effect in a small compact manifold for the Maxwell vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2015-05-01

    We study a novel type of contribution to the partition function of the Maxwell system defined on a small compact manifold M such as a torus. These new terms cannot be described in terms of the physical propagating photons with two transverse polarizations. Rather, these novel contributions emerge as a result of tunneling events when transitions occur between topologically different but physically identical vacuum winding states. These new terms give an extra contribution to the Casimir pressure, yet to be measured. We argue that if the same system is considered in the background of a small external time-dependent magnetic field, then there will be emission of photons from the vacuum, similar to the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) when real particles are radiated from the vacuum due to the time-dependent boundary conditions. The difference with conventional DCE is that the dynamics of the vacuum in our system is not related to the fluctuations of the conventional degrees of freedom, the virtual photons. Rather, the radiation in our case occurs as a result of tunneling events between topologically different but physically identical |k ⟩ sectors in a time-dependent background. We comment on the relation of this novel effect to the well-known, experimentally observed, and theoretically understood phenomena of the persistent currents in normal metal rings. We also comment on possible cosmological applications of this effect.

  19. Interference phenomena in the dynamical Casimir effect for a single mirror with Robin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jeferson D. Lima; Braga, Alessandra N.; Rego, Andreson L. C.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2015-07-01

    In the literature, the interference phenomenon in the particle creation via the dynamical Casimir effect is investigated for cavities with two moving mirrors. Here, considering the Robin boundary condition (BC), we investigate the interference phenomenon produced by just a single moving mirror. Specifically, we consider a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions submitted to a Robin BC with a time-dependent Robin parameter at the instantaneous position of a moving mirror, and compute the expressions for the spectral distribution and the rate of created particles. These expressions, which include interference terms, generalize those found in the literature related to the isolated effects of a Robin BC with a time-dependent Robin parameter for a fixed mirror, or a Robin BC with a time-independent Robin parameter for a moving mirror. Differently from models where the problem of interference in the dynamical Casimir effect is considered for cavities with two Dirichlet moving mirrors, in the present model the spectrum is a continuum, and the interference pattern exhibits new features, in the sense that different regions of the spectrum can be affected in different manners by constructive or destructive effects. Furthermore, we also investigate interference in the context of superconducting circuits.

  20. CALL FOR PAPERS: Topical issue on the nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2004-05-01

    The past few years have seen a growing interest in quantum mechanical systems with moving boundaries. One of its manifestations was the First International Workshop on Problems with Moving Boundaries organized by Professor J Dittrich in Prague in October 2003. Another event in this series will be the (first) International Workshop on the Dynamical Casimir Effect in Padua in June 2004, organized by Professor G Carugno (see webpage www.pd.infn.it/casimir/ for details). As Guest Editors we invite researchers working in any area related to moving boundaries to contribute to a Topical Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics on the nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries. Our intention is to cover a wide range of topics. In particular, we envisage possible contributions in the following areas: Theoretical and experimental studies on quantum fields in cavities with moving boundaries and time-dependent media. This area includes, in particular, various manifestations of the nonstationary (dynamical) Casimir effect, such as creation of quanta and modifications of Casimir force due to the motion of boundaries. Other relevant subjects are: generation and evolution of nonclassical states of fields and moving mirrors; interaction between quantized fields and atoms in cavities with moving boundaries; decoherence and entanglement due to the motion of boundaries; field quantization in nonideal cavities with moving boundaries taking into account losses and dispersion; nano-devices with moving boundaries. Quantum particles in domains confined with moving boundaries. This area includes: new exact and approximate solutions of the evolution equations (Schrödinger, Klein-Gordon, Dirac, Fokker-Planck, etc); quantum carpets and revivals; escape and tunnelling through moving barriers; evolution of quantum packets in the presence of moving boundaries; ultracold atoms (ions) in traps with moving boundaries. The topical issue is scheduled

  1. Critical and near-critical phase behavior and interplay between the thermodynamic Casimir and van der Waals forces in a confined nonpolar fluid medium with competing surface and substrate potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study, using general scaling arguments and mean-field type calculations, the behavior of the critical Casimir force and its interplay with the van der Waals force acting between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining some fluctuating fluid medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. The surfaces of the slabs are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. The slabs, on the other hand, influence the fluid by long-range competing dispersion potentials, which represent irrelevant interactions in renormalization-group sense. Under such conditions, one usually expects attractive Casimir force governed by universal scaling function, pertinent to the extraordinary surface universality class of Ising type systems, to which the dispersion potentials provide only corrections to scaling. We demonstrate, however, that below a given threshold thickness of the system Lcrit for a suitable set of slabs-fluid and fluid-fluid coupling parameters the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the slabs can result in sign change of the Casimir force acting between the surfaces confining the fluid when one changes the temperature T , the chemical potential of the fluid μ , or L . The last implies that by choosing specific materials for the slabs, coatings, and the fluid for L ≲Lcrit one can realize repulsive Casimir force with nonuniversal behavior which, upon increasing L , gradually turns into an attractive one described by a universal scaling function, depending only on the relevant scaling fields related to the temperature and the excess chemical potential, for L ≫Lcrit . We present arguments and relevant data for specific substances in support of the experimental feasibility of the predicted behavior of the force. It can

  2. Karst show caves - how DTN technology as used in space assists automatic environmental monitoring and tourist protection - experiment in Postojna Cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrovšek, F.; Grašič, B.; Božnar, M. Z.; Mlakar, P.; Udén, M.; Davies, E.

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents an experiment demonstrating a novel and successful application of delay- and disruption-tolerant networking (DTN) technology for automatic data transfer in a karst cave early warning and measuring system. The experiment took place inside the Postojna Cave in Slovenia, which is open to tourists. Several automatic meteorological measuring stations are set up inside the cave, as an adjunct to the surveillance infrastructure; the regular data transfer provided by the DTN technology allows the surveillance system to take on the role of an early warning system (EWS). One of the stations is set up alongside the railway tracks, which allows the tourist to travel inside the cave by train. The experiment was carried out by placing a DTN "data mule" (a DTN-enabled computer with WiFi connection) on the train and by upgrading the meteorological station with a DTN-enabled WiFi transmission system. When the data mule is in the wireless drive-by mode, it collects measurement data from the station over a period of several seconds as the train without stopping passes the stationary equipment, and delivers data at the final train station by the cave entrance. This paper describes an overview of the experimental equipment and organization allowing the use of a DTN system for data collection and an EWS inside karst caves where there is regular traffic of tourists and researchers.

  3. Karst show caves - how DTN technology as used in space assists automatic environmental monitoring and tourist protection - experiment in Postojna cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrovšek, F.; Grašič, B.; Božnar, M. Z.; Mlakar, P.; Udén, M.; Davies, E.

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents an experiment demonstrating a novel and successful application of Delay- and Disruption-Tolerant Networking (DTN) technology for automatic data transfer in a karst cave Early Warning and Measuring System. The experiment took place inside the Postojna Cave in Slovenia, which is open to tourists. Several automatic meteorological measuring stations are set up inside the cave, as an adjunct to the surveillance infrastructure; the regular data transfer provided by the DTN technology allows the surveillance system to take on the role of an Early Warning System (EWS). One of the stations is set up alongside the railway tracks, which allows the tourist to travel inside the cave by train. The experiment was carried out by placing a DTN "data mule" (a DTN-enabled computer with WiFi connection) on the train and by upgrading the meteorological station with a DTN-enabled WiFi transmission system. When the data mule is in the wireless drive-by mode, it collects measurement data from the station over a period of several seconds as the train passes the stationary equipment, and delivers data at the final train station by the cave entrance. This paper describes an overview of the experimental equipment and organisation allowing the use of a DTN system for data collection and an EWS inside karst caves where there is a regular traffic of tourists and researchers.

  4. Geometry-induced Casimir suspension of oblate bodies in fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Reid, M T Homer; Intravaia, Francesco; Woolf, Alexander; Dalvit, Diego A R; Capasso, Federico; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-11-01

    We predict that a low-permittivity oblate body (disk-shaped object) above a thin metal substrate (plate with a hole) immersed in a fluid of intermediate permittivity will experience a metastable equilibrium (restoring force) near the center of the hole. Stability is the result of a geometry-induced transition in the sign of the force, from repulsive to attractive, that occurs as the disk approaches the hole--in planar or nearly planar geometries, the same material combination yields a repulsive force at all separations, in accordance with the Dzyaloshinskiĭ-Lifshitz-Pitaevskiĭ condition of fluid-induced repulsion between planar bodies. We explore the stability of the system with respect to rotations and lateral translations of the disks and demonstrate interesting transitions (bifurcations) in the rotational stability of the disks as a function of their size. Finally, we consider the reciprocal situation in which the disk-plate materials are interchanged and find that in this case the system also exhibits metastability. The forces in the system are sufficiently large to be observed in experiments and should enable measurements based on the diffusion dynamics of the suspended bodies.

  5. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  6. '…it shows that there's no limits': the psychological impact of co-production for experts by experience working in youth mental health.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Claire; McKenzie, Karen

    2017-05-01

    Co-production is commonly conceptualised as a more equal sharing of power and decision-making between a dichotomy of service user and service provider, each bringing valuable and different assets to the process. Experts by experience lie in the overlap between this conceptually created duality, providing the services they now do by virtue of having once used services themselves. Previous related studies suggest that their involvement in co-production could impact positively on their social capital, self-esteem, self-efficacy and life skills. However, no studies have been explicitly psychological or phenomenological in nature, and the theoretical basis for such outcomes remains under-developed. This phenomenological study explored the psychological impact of co-production for young people who were paid experts by experience for a young person's mental health charity in a large and diverse urban area in the UK, looking at the what of psychological impact, as well as the theoretical why and how. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of five males, with a mean age of 25 years. Interpretative phenomenological analysis yielded three master themes: the co-production approach, I'm a professional and identities in transition. Participants valued a collegiate organisational approach that prioritised empowerment, agency and equality between experts by experience and 'experts by qualification', leading to a positive impact on their self-efficacy and self-esteem. Co-production impacted fundamentally on their identity structure, enabling them to explore a new identity as a 'professional'. The results are framed within identity process theory and point to the potential benefits of this model to co-production.

  7. Casimir-Polder-like force on an atom outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jialin; Yu Hongwei

    2011-10-15

    We calculate, in the framework of open quantum systems, the ground state energy-level shift for a static two-level atom outside a spherically symmetric black hole in interaction with fluctuating massless scalar fields in the Boulware and Unruh vacuums. We find that the energy-level shift is position dependent and thus gives rise to a force on the atom besides the classical gravitational force. For the case of the Boulware vacuum that represents a star which has not collapsed through its event horizon, this force is attractive near the horizon and is repulsive far away from the black hole with a behavior of r{sup -3}. For the case of the Unruh vacuum which represents a radiating black hole, we find that the contribution to the Casimir-Polder-like force due to the presence of Hawking radiation is always attractive and, remarkably, this attractive force diverges at the event horizon.

  8. Electromagnetic Casimir forces of parabolic cylinder and knife-edge geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Shpunt, Alexander; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2011-06-15

    An exact calculation of electromagnetic scattering from a perfectly conducting parabolic cylinder is employed to compute Casimir forces in several configurations. These include interactions between a parabolic cylinder and a plane, two parabolic cylinders, and a parabolic cylinder and an ordinary cylinder. To elucidate the effect of boundaries, special attention is focused on the 'knife-edge' limit in which the parabolic cylinder becomes a half-plane. Geometrical effects are illustrated by considering arbitrary rotations of a parabolic cylinder around its focal axis, and arbitrary translations perpendicular to this axis. A quite different geometrical arrangement is explored for the case of an ordinary cylinder placed in the interior of a parabolic cylinder. All of these results extend simply to nonzero temperatures.

  9. Finite temperature Casimir effect for massless Majorana fermions in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Erdas, Andrea

    2011-01-15

    The zeta function regularization technique is used to study the finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless Majorana fermion field confined between parallel plates and satisfying bag boundary conditions. A magnetic field perpendicular to the plates is included. An expression for the zeta function is obtained, which is exact to all orders in the magnetic field strength, temperature and plate distance. The zeta function is used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of the Majorana field and the pressure on the plates, in the case of weak magnetic field and strong magnetic field. In both cases, simple analytic expressions are obtained for the free energy and pressure which are very accurate and valid for all values of the temperature and plate distance.

  10. Measurement of the Casimir force between Germanium plates using a torsion balance

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego; Kim, W J; Sushkov, A O; Lamoreaux, S K

    2008-01-01

    We report the measurement of the Casimir force between Ge plates in a sphere-plane configuration using a torsion balance. We observe that the effective contact potential between the plates varies with their separation distance, resulting in a systematic force. In addition, an unexpected 1/d force is also found in our data that persists even when the electrostatic force between the plates is experimentally minimized by applying a compensating potential. After applying corrections due to these systematic forces, likely of electrostatic origin, our result can be described by the bare permittivity of Ge without conduction, the Drude and the diffusion models for electrical and optical properties of Ge, but not by the plasma model.

  11. Casimir-Polder shift and decay rate in the presence of nonreciprocal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Crosse, J. A.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the Casimir-Polder frequency shift and decay rate for an atom in front of a nonreciprocal medium by using macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The results are a generalization of the respective quantities for matter with broken time-reversal symmetry which does not fulfill the Lorentz reciprocity principle. As examples, we contrast the decay rates, the resonant and nonresonant frequency shifts of a perfectly conducting (reciprocal) mirror with those of a perfectly reflecting nonreciprocal mirror. We find different power laws for the distance dependence of all quantities in the retarded and nonretarded limits. As an example of a more realistic nonreciprocal medium, we investigate a topological insulator subject to a time-symmetry-breaking perturbation.

  12. Pronounced minimum of the thermodynamic Casimir forces of O(n) symmetric film systems: analytic theory.

    PubMed

    Dohm, Volker

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic Casimir forces of film systems in the O(n) universality classes with Dirichlet boundary conditions are studied below bulk criticality. Substantial progress is achieved in resolving the long-standing problem of describing analytically the pronounced minimum of the scaling function observed experimentally in ^{4}He films (n=2) by Garcia and Chan [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1187 (1999)] and in Monte Carlo simulations for the three-dimensional Ising model (n=1) by O. Vasilyev et al. [Europhys. Lett. 80, 60009 (2007)]. Our finite-size renormalization-group approach describes the film systems as the limit of finite-slab systems with vanishing aspect ratio. This yields excellent agreement with the depth and the position of the minimum for n=1 and semiquantitative agreement with the minimum for n=2. Our theory also predicts a pronounced minimum for the n=3 Heisenberg universality class.

  13. Fermionic condensate and Casimir densities in the presence of compact dimensions with applications to nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the fermionic condensate and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor for a massive fermionic field in the geometry of two parallel plates on the background of Minkowski spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions, in the presence of a constant gauge field. Bag boundary conditions are imposed on the plates and periodicity conditions with arbitrary phases are considered along the compact dimensions. The nontrivial topology of the background spacetime leads to an Aharonov-Bohm effect for the vacuum expectation values induced by the gauge field. The fermionic condensate and the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with period equal to the flux quantum. The boundary induced parts in the fermionic condensate and the vacuum energy density are negative, with independence of the phases in the periodicity conditions and of the value of the gauge potential. Interaction forces between the plates are thus always attractive. However, in physical situations where the quantum field is confined to the region between the plates, the pure topological part contributes as well, and then the resulting force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the specific phases encoded in the periodicity conditions along the compact dimensions, and on the gauge potential, too. Applications of the general formulas to cylindrical carbon nanotubes are considered, within the framework of a Dirac-like theory for the electronic states in graphene. In the absence of a magnetic flux, the energy density for semiconducting nanotubes is always negative. For metallic nanotubes the energy density is positive for long tubes and negative for short ones. The resulting Casimir forces acting on the edges of the nanotube are attractive for short tubes with independence of the tube chirality. The sign of the force for long nanotubes can be controlled by tuning the magnetic flux

  14. Neutron-Rich {sup 62,64,64}Fe Show Enhanced Collectivity: The Washout of N = 40 in Terms of Experiment, Valence Proton Symmetry and Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rother, W.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Hackstein, M.; Jolie, J.; Pissulla, Th.; Zel, K.-O.; Iwasaki, H.; Baugher, T.; Brown, B. A.; Gade, A.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Voss, P.; Walsh, K. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Ur, C. A.; Starosta, K.; Bazin, D.

    2011-10-28

    Probing shell structure at a large neutron excess has been of particular interest in recent times. Neutron-rich nuclei between the proton shell closures Z = 20 and Z = 28 offer an exotic testing ground for shell evolution. The development of the N = 40gap between neutron fp and lg{sub 9/2} shells gives rise to highly interesting variations of collectivity for nuclei in this region. While {sup 68}Ni shows doubly magic properties in level energies and transition strengths, this was not observed in neighbouring nuclei. Especially neutron-rich Fe isotopes proved particularly resistant to calculational approaches using the canonical valence space (fpg) resulting in important deviations of the predicted collectivity. Only an inclusion of the d{sub 5/2}-orbital could solve the problem [1]. Hitherto no transition strengths for {sup 66}Fe have been reported. We determined B(E2,2{sup +}{sub 1}{yields}0{sup +}{sub 1}) values from lifetimes measured with the recoil distance Doppler-shift method using the Cologne plunger for radioactive beams at National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. Excited states were populated by projectile Coulomb excitation for {sup 62,64,66}Fe. The data show a rise in collectivity for Fe isotopes towards N = 40. Results [2] are interpreted by means of a modified version of the Valence Proton Symmetry [3] and compared to shell model calculations using a new effective interaction recently developed for the fpgd valence space [4].

  15. Exact results for the behavior of the thermodynamic Casimir force in a model with a strong adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantchev, Daniel M.; Vassilev, Vassil M.; Djondjorov, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    When massless excitations are limited or modified by the presence of material bodies one observes a force acting between them generally called Casimir force. Such excitations are present in any fluid system close to its true bulk critical point. We derive exact analytical results for both the temperature and external ordering field behavior of the thermodynamic Casimir force within the mean-field Ginzburg-Landau Ising type model of a simple fluid or binary liquid mixture. We investigate the case when under a film geometry the boundaries of the system exhibit strong adsorption onto one of the phases (components) of the system. We present analytical and numerical results for the (temperature-field) relief map of the force in both the critical region of the film close to its finite-size or bulk critical points as well as in the capillary condensation regime below but close to the finite-size critical point.

  16. Casimir frictional drag force between a SiO2 tip and a graphene-covered SiO2 substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of the mechanical detection of the Casimir friction using noncontact force microscope is discussed. On a SiO2 tip situated above a graphene-covered SiO2 substrate will act the frictional drag force mediated by a fluctuating electromagnetic field produced by a current in the graphene sheet. This friction force will produce the bending of the cantilever, which can be measured by state-of-art noncontact force microscope. Both the thermal and quantum contributions to the Casimir frictional drag force can be studied using this experimental setup. This result paves the way for the mechanical detection of the Casimir friction and for the application of the frictional drag effect in micro- and nanoelectromechanical devices (MEMS and NEMS).

  17. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  18. Critical Casimir force scaling functions of the two-dimensional Ising model at finite aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobrecht, Hendrik; Hucht, Alfred

    2017-02-01

    We present a systematic method to calculate the universal scaling functions for the critical Casimir force and the according potential of the two-dimensional Ising model with various boundary conditions. Therefore we start with the dimer representation of the corresponding partition function Z on an L× M square lattice, wrapped around a torus with aspect ratio ρ =L/M . By assuming periodic boundary conditions and translational invariance in at least one direction, we systematically reduce the problem to a 2× 2 transfer matrix representation. For the torus we first reproduce the results by Kaufman and then give a detailed calculation of the scaling functions. Afterwards we present the calculation for the cylinder with open boundary conditions. All scaling functions are given in form of combinations of infinite products and integrals. Our results reproduce the known scaling functions in the limit of thin films ρ \\to 0 . Additionally, for the cylinder at criticality our results confirm the predictions from conformal field theory.

  19. Topological Casimir effect in a quantum LC circuit: Real-time dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2017-03-01

    We study novel contributions to the partition function of the Maxwell system defined on a small compact manifold M with nontrivial mappings π1[U (1 )]≅Z . These contributions cannot be described in terms of conventional physical propagating photons with two transverse polarizations and instead emerge as a result of tunneling transitions between topologically different but physically identical vacuum winding states. We argue that if the same system is considered in the background of a small external time-dependent electromagnetic field, then real physical photons will be emitted from the vacuum, similar to the dynamical Casimir effect where photons are radiated from the vacuum due to time-dependent boundary conditions. The fundamental technical difficulty for such an analysis is that the radiation of physical photons on mass shell is inherently a real-time Minkowskian phenomenon while the vacuum fluctuations interpolating between topological |k ⟩ sectors rest upon a Euclidean instanton formulation. We overcome this obstacle by introducing auxiliary topological fields, which allows for a simple analytical continuation between Minkowski and Euclidean descriptions, and develop a quantum mechanical technique to compute these effects. We also propose an experimental realization of such small effects using a microwave cavity with appropriate boundary conditions. Finally, we comment on the possible cosmological implications of this effect.

  20. Measurement of the Casimir-Polder force through center-of-mass oscillations of a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Harber, D.M.; Obrecht, J.M.; McGuirk, J.M.; Cornell, E.A.

    2005-09-15

    We have performed a measurement of the Casimir-Polder force using a magnetically trapped {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. By detecting perturbations of the frequency of center-of-mass oscillations of the condensate perpendicular to the surface, we are able to detect this force at a distance {approx}5 {mu}m, significantly farther than has been previously achieved, and at a precision approaching that needed to detect the modification due to thermal radiation. Additionally, this technique provides a limit for the presence of non-Newtonian gravity forces in the {approx}1 {mu}m range.

  1. Finite size corrections to scaling of the formation probabilities and the Casimir effect in the conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabpour, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We calculate formation probabilities of the ground state of the finite size quantum critical chains using conformal field theory (CFT) techniques. In particular, we calculate the formation probability of one interval in the finite open chain and also formation probability of two disjoint intervals in a finite periodic system. The presented formulas can be also interpreted as the Casimir energy of needles in particular geometries. We numerically check the validity of the exact CFT results in the case of the transverse field Ising chain.

  2. Local and nonlocal advected invariants and helicities in magnetohydrodynamics and gas dynamics: II. Noether's theorems and Casimirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Dasgupta, B.; McKenzie, J. F.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    Conservation laws in ideal gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) associated with fluid relabeling symmetries are derived using Noether's first and second theorems. Lie dragged invariants are discussed in terms of the MHD Casimirs. A nonlocal conservation law for fluid helicity applicable for a non-barotropic fluid involving Clebsch variables is derived using Noether's theorem, in conjunction with a fluid relabeling symmetry and a gauge transformation. A nonlocal cross helicity conservation law involving Clebsch potentials, and the MHD energy conservation law are derived by the same method. An Euler-Poincaré variational approach is also used to derive conservation laws associated with fluid relabeling symmetries using Noether's second theorem.

  3. Numerical calculation of the Casimir-Polder interaction between a graphene sheet with vacancies and an atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cysne, T. P.; Rappoport, T. G.; Ferreira, Aires; Lopes, J. M. Viana Parente; Peres, N. M. R.

    2016-12-01

    In this work the Casimir-Polder interaction energy between a rubidium atom and a disordered graphene sheet is investigated beyond the Dirac cone approximation by means of accurate real-space tight-binding calculations. As a model of defected graphene, we consider a tight-binding model of π electrons on a honeycomb lattice with a small concentration of vacancies. The optical response of the graphene sheet is evaluated with full spectral resolution by means of exact Chebyshev polynomial expansions of the Kubo formula in large lattices in excess of 10 million atoms. At low temperatures, the optical response of defected graphene is found to display two qualitatively distinct behaviors with a clear transition around finite (nonzero) Fermi energy. In the vicinity of the Dirac point, the imaginary part of optical conductivity is negative for low frequencies while the real part is strongly suppressed. On the other hand, for high doping, it has the same features found in the Drude model within the Dirac cone approximation, namely, a Drude peak at small frequencies and a change of sign in the imaginary part above the interband threshold. These characteristics translate into a nonmonotonic behavior of the Casimir-Polder interaction energy with very small variation with doping in the vicinity of the neutrality point while having the same form of the interaction calculated with Drude's model at high electronic density.

  4. Existence and numerical simulation of periodic traveling wave solutions to the Casimir equation for the Ito system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasbandy, S.; Van Gorder, R. A.; Hajiketabi, M.; Mesrizadeh, M.

    2015-10-01

    We consider traveling wave solutions to the Casimir equation for the Ito system (a two-field extension of the KdV equation). These traveling waves are governed by a nonlinear initial value problem with an interesting nonlinearity (which actually amplifies in magnitude as the size of the solution becomes small). The nonlinear problem is parameterized by two initial constant values, and we demonstrate that the existence of solutions is strongly tied to these parameter values. For our interests, we are concerned with positive, bounded, periodic wave solutions. We are able to classify parameter regimes which admit such solutions in full generality, thereby obtaining a nice existence result. Using the existence result, we are then able to numerically simulate the positive, bounded, periodic solutions. We elect to employ a group preserving scheme in order to numerically study these solutions, and an outline of this approach is provided. The numerical simulations serve to illustrate the properties of these solutions predicted analytically through the existence result. Physically, these results demonstrate the existence of a type of space-periodic structure in the Casimir equation for the Ito model, which propagates as a traveling wave.

  5. Nanolevitation Phenomena in Real Plane-Parallel Systems Due to the Balance between Casimir and Gravity Forces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on the theoretical analysis of equilibrium distances in real plane-parallel systems under the influence of Casimir and gravity forces at thermal equilibrium. Due to the balance between these forces, thin films of Teflon, silica, or polystyrene in a single-layer configuration and immersed in glycerol stand over a silicon substrate at certain stable or unstable positions depending on the material and the slab thickness. Hybrid systems containing silica and polystyrene, materials which display Casimir forces and equilibrium distances of opposite nature when considered individually, are analyzed in either bilayer arrangements or as composite systems made of a homogeneous matrix with small inclusions inside. For each configuration, equilibrium distances and their stability can be adjusted by fine-tuning of the volume occupied by each material. We find the specific conditions under which nanolevitation of realistic films should be observed. Our results indicate that thin films of real materials in plane-parallel configurations can be used to control suspension or stiction phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:26405466

  6. Casimir amplitudes and capillary condensation of near-critical fluids between parallel plates: renormalized local functional theory.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2012-03-21

    We investigate the critical behavior of a near-critical fluid confined between two parallel plates in contact with a reservoir by calculating the order parameter profile and the Casimir amplitudes (for the force density and for the grand potential). Our results are applicable to one-component fluids and binary mixtures. We assume that the walls absorb one of the fluid components selectively for binary mixtures. We propose a renormalized local functional theory accounting for the fluctuation effects. Analysis is performed in the plane of the temperature T and the order parameter in the reservoir ψ(∞). Our theory is universal if the physical quantities are scaled appropriately. If the component favored by the walls is slightly poor in the reservoir, there appears a line of first-order phase transition of capillary condensation outside the bulk coexistence curve. The excess adsorption changes discontinuously between condensed and noncondensed states at the transition. With increasing T, the transition line ends at a capillary critical point T=T(c) (ca) slightly lower than the bulk critical temperature T(c) for the upper critical solution temperature. The Casimir amplitudes are larger than their critical point values by 10-100 times at off-critical compositions near the capillary condensation line.

  7. Hey Teacher, Your Personality's Showing!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A study of 30 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers and 300 of their students showed that a teacher's age, sex, and years of experience did not relate to students' mathematics achievement, but that more effective teachers showed greater "freedom from defensive behavior" than did less effective teachers. (DT)

  8. [Experience of medical backup of military parade on Red Square. Authors showed data about medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade on Red Square dedicating to anniversary of victory in the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Malykh, A B; Iakovlev, S V; Valevskiĭ, V V

    2014-03-01

    Authors showed data about medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade on Red Square dedicating to anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War. Experience of running such events allowed to work out an algorithm for medical service: preparatory stage, training stage, running of parade, stage of move out to permanent base. During the parade on Red Square for medical care asked 18 people (participants of parade and civilians). Authors came to conclusion that as a result of medical backup of military personnel taking part in the parade no infectious and group diseases were registered.

  9. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  10. Alpenglow: A signature for chameleons in axionlike particle search experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, M.; Lindner, A.; Ringwald, A.; Schrempp, L.; Weniger, C.

    2008-01-01

    We point out that chameleon field theories might reveal themselves as an afterglow effect in axionlike particle search experiments due to chameleon-photon conversion in a magnetic field. We estimate the parameter space which is accessible by currently available technology and find that afterglow experiments could constrain this parameter space in a way complementary to gravitational and Casimir force experiments. In addition, one could reach photon-chameleon couplings which are beyond the sensitivity of common laser polarization experiments. We also sketch the idea of a Fabry-Perot cavity with chameleons which could increase the experimental sensitivity significantly.

  11. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  12. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  13. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  14. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  15. Chemistry Game Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Susan; Muzyka, Jennifer

    2002-04-01

    We present a technological improvement to the use of game shows to help students review for tests. Our approach uses HTML files interpreted with a browser on a computer attached to an LCD projector. The HTML files can be easily modified for use of the game in a variety of courses.

  16. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  17. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  18. On the dynamic instability of nanowire-fabricated electromechanical actuators in the Casimir regime: Coupled effects of surface energy and size dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, Maryam; Mardaneh, Mohamadreza; Koochi, Ali; Rezaei, Morteza; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-02-01

    Herein, the dynamic pull-in instability of cantilever nanoactuator fabricated from conductive cylindrical nanowire with circular cross-section is studied under the presence of Casimir force. The Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity in combination with the couple stress theory is employed to incorporate the coupled effects of surface energy and size phenomenon. Using Green-Lagrange strain, the higher order surface stress components are incorporated in the governing equation. The Dirichlet mode is considered and an asymptotic solution, based on the path integral approach, is applied to consider the effect of the Casimir attraction. Furthermore, the influence of structural damping is considered in the model. The nonlinear governing equation is solved using analytical reduced order method (ROM). The effects of various parameters on the dynamic pull-in parameters, phase planes and stability threshold of the actuator are demonstrated.

  19. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre.

  20. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  1. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  2. Record Low Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Si Nanowire: Breaking the Casimir Limit by Severe Suppression of Propagons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Hu, Ming

    2016-10-12

    Thermoelectrics offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Nanoengineering existing low-dimensional thermoelectric materials pertaining to realizing fundamentally low thermal conductivity has emerged as an efficient route to achieve high energy conversion performance for advanced thermoelectrics. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium and Green-Kubo equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we report that the thermal conductivity of Si nanowires (NWs) in polycrystalline form can reach a record low value substantially below the Casimir limit, a theory of diffusive boundary limit that regards the direction-averaged mean free path is limited by the characteristic size of the nanostructures. The astonishingly low thermal conductivity of polycrystalline Si NW is 269 and 77 times lower with respect to that of bulk Si and pristine Si NW, respectively, and is even only about one-third of the value of the purely amorphous Si NW at room temperature. By examining the mode level phonon behaviors including phonon group velocities, lifetime, and so forth, we identify the mechanism of breaking the Casimir limit as the strong localization of the middle and high frequency phonon modes, which leads to a prominent decrease of effective mean free path of the heat carriers including both propagons and diffusons. The contribution of the propagons to the overall thermal transport is further quantitatively characterized and is found to be dramatically suppressed in polycrystalline Si NW form as compared with bulk Si, perfect Si NW, and pure amorphous Si NW. Consequently, the diffusons, which transport the heat through overlap with other vibrations, carry the majority of the heat in polycrystalline Si NWs. We also proposed approach of introducing "disorder" in the polycrystalline Si NWs that could eradicate the contribution of propagons to achieve an even lower thermal conductivity than that ever thought possible

  3. Vacuum Fluctuation Force on a Rigid Casimir Cavity in de Sitter and Schwarzschild-De Sitter Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the net force on a rigid Casimir cavity generated by vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field in three cases: de Sitter space-time, de Sitter space-time with weak gravitational field and Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time. In de Sitter space-time the resulting net force follows the square inverse law but unfortunately it is too weak to be measurable due to the large universe radius. By introducing a weak gravitational field into the de Sitter space-time, we find that the net force can now be split into two parts, one is the gravitational force due to the induced effective mass between the two plates and the other one is generated by the metric structure of de Sitter space-time. In order to investigate the vacuum fluctuation force on the rigid cavity under strong gravitational field, we perform a similar analysis in Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time and results are obtained in three different limits. The most interesting one is when the cavity gets closer to the horizon of a blackhole, square inverse law is recovered and the repulsive force due to negative energy/mass of the cavity now has an observable strength. More importantly the force changes from being repulsive to attractive when the cavity crosses the event horizon, so that the energy/mass of the cavity switches the sign, which suggests the unusual time direction inside the event horizon.

  4. Effective Landau-Zener transitions in the circuit dynamical Casimir effect with time-varying modulation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Militello, B.; Napoli, A.; Messina, A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the dissipative single-qubit circuit QED architecture in which the atomic transition frequency undergoes a weak external time modulation. For sinusoidal modulation with linearly varying frequency we derive effective Hamiltonians that resemble the Landau-Zener problem of finite duration associated with a two- or multilevel systems. The corresponding off-diagonal coupling coefficients originate either from the rotating or the counter-rotating terms in the Rabi Hamiltonian, depending on the values of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that in the dissipationless case one can accomplish almost complete transitions between the eigenstates of the bare Rabi Hamiltonian even for relatively short durations of the frequency sweep. To assess the experimental feasibility of our scheme we solved numerically the phenomenological and the microscopic quantum master equations in the Markovian regime at zero temperature. Both models exhibit qualitatively similar behavior and indicate that photon generation from vacuum via effective Landau-Zener transitions could be implemented with the current technology on the time scales of a few microseconds. Moreover, unlike the harmonic dynamical Casimir effect implementations, our proposal does not require precise knowledge of the resonant modulation frequency to accomplish meaningful photon generation.

  5. Influence de la dépendance en température des propriétés optiques des matériaux sur la force de Casimir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulain, K.; Henkel, C.; Greffet, J.-J.

    2006-10-01

    Nous évaluons la force de Casimir entre deux surfaces planes métalliques constituées d'argent. Nous prenons, pour effectuer cette évaluation, des propriétés optiques de l'argent à différentes températures [1]. Nous montrons que cette dépendance en température modifie la force de Casimir (de 0.2%) y compris à des distances inférieures à la longueur d'onde thermique.

  6. Reply to comment on ""Anomalies in electrostatic calibrations for the measurement of the Casimir force in a sphere-plane geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A; Kim, W J; Borwn-hayes, M; Brownell, J H; Onofrio, R

    2008-01-01

    In a recent Comment, Decca et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 026101 (2009)] discussed the origin of the anomalies recently reported by us in Phys. Rev. A 78, 036102(R) (2008). Here we restate our view corroborated by their considerations that quantitative geometrical and electrostatic characterizations of the conducting surfaces (a topic not discussed explicitly in the literature until very recently) are critical for the assessment of precision and accuracy of the demonstration of the Casimir force and for deriving meaningful limits on the existence of Yukawian components possibly superimposed to the Newtonian gravitational interaction.

  7. Fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane and classical Casimir-Polder force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-05-01

    We start with the well-known expression for the vacuum polarization and suitably modify it for 2+1-dimensional spin-orbit coupled (SOC) fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane described by the low-energy Liu-Yao-Feng-Ezawa (LYFE) model Hamiltonian involving the Dirac matrices in the chiral representation obeying the Clifford algebra. The silicene and germanene fit this description suitably. They have the Dirac cones similar to those of graphene and SOC is much stronger. The system could be normal or ferromagnetic in nature. The silicene turns into the latter type if there is exchange field arising due to the proximity coupling to a ferromagnet (FM) such as depositing Fe atoms to the silicene surface. For the silicene, we find that the many-body effects considerably change the bare Coulomb potential by way of the dependence of the Coulomb propagator on the real-spin, iso-spin and the potential due to an electric field applied perpendicular to the silicene plane. The computation aspect of the Casimir-Polder force (CPF) needs to be investigated in this paper. An important quantity in this process is the dielectric response function (DRF) of the material. The plasmon branch was obtained by finding the zeros of DRF in the long-wavelength limit. This leads to the plasmon frequencies. We find that the collective charge excitations at zero doping, i.e., intrinsic plasmons, in this system, are absent in the Dirac limit. The valley-spin-split intrinsic plasmons, however, come into being in the case of the massive Dirac particles with characteristic frequency close to 10 THz. Our scheme to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction (CPI) of a micro-particle with a sheet involves replacing the dielectric constant of the sample in the CPI expression obtained on the basis of the Lifshitz theory by the static DRF obtained using the expressions for the polarization function we started with. Though the approach replaces a macroscopic constant by a microscopic

  8. Stress tensor for a scalar field in a spatially varying background potential: Divergences, "renormalization", anomalies, and Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Fulling, Stephen A.; Parashar, Prachi; Kalauni, Pushpa; Murphy, Taylor

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand quantum fluctuation energy densities and stress within a spatially varying dielectric medium, we examine the vacuum expectation value for the stress tensor of a scalar field with arbitrary conformal parameter, in the background of a given potential that depends on only one spatial coordinate. We regulate the expressions by incorporating a temporal-spatial cutoff in the (imaginary) time and transverse-spatial directions. The divergences are captured by the zeroth- and second-order WKB approximations. Then the stress tensor is "renormalized" by omitting the terms that depend on the cutoff. The ambiguities that inevitably arise in this procedure are both duly noted and restricted by imposing certain physical conditions; one result is that the renormalized stress tensor exhibits the expected trace anomaly. The renormalized stress tensor exhibits no pressure anomaly, in that the principle of virtual work is satisfied for motions in a transverse direction. We then consider a potential that defines a wall, a one-dimensional potential that vanishes for z <0 and rises like zα, α >0 , for z >0 . Previously, the stress tensor had been computed outside of the wall, whereas now we compute all components of the stress tensor in the interior of the wall. The full finite stress tensor is computed numerically for the two cases where explicit solutions to the differential equation are available, α =1 and 2. The energy density exhibits an inverse linear divergence as the boundary is approached from the inside for a linear potential, and a logarithmic divergence for a quadratic potential. Finally, the interaction between two such walls is computed, and it is shown that the attractive Casimir pressure between the two walls also satisfies the principle of virtual work (i.e., the pressure equals the negative derivative of the energy with respect to the distance between the walls).

  9. Casimir energy-momentum tensor for a quantized bulk scalar field in the geometry of two curved branes on Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejhan, Hamed; Rahbardehghan, Surena

    2016-09-01

    In a previous work [S. Rahbardehghan and H. Pejhan, Phys. Lett. B 750, 627 (2015)], we considered a simple brane-world model: a single four-dimensional brane embedded in a five-dimensional de Sitter (dS) space-time. Then, by including a conformally coupled scalar field in the bulk, we studied the induced Casimir energy-momentum tensor. Technically, the Krein-Gupta-Bleuler quantization scheme as a covariant and renormalizable quantum field theory in dS space was used to perform the calculations. In the present paper, we generalize this study to a less idealized, but physically motivated, scenario; namely, we consider Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time which behaves asymptotically as a dS space-time. More precisely, we evaluate a Casimir energy-momentum tensor for a system with two D -dimensional curved branes on background of D +1 -dimensional FRW space-time with negative spatial curvature and a conformally coupled bulk scalar field that satisfied the Dirichlet boundary condition on the branes.

  10. Casimir force for a scalar field in a single brane world

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, R.; Morales-Tecotl, H. A.; Pedraza, O.

    2010-02-10

    Vacuum force is an interesting low energy test for brane worlds due to its dependence on field's modes and its role in submillimeter gravity experiments. In this contribution we obtain the scalar field vacuum force between two parallel plates lying in the brane of a Randall-Sundrum scenario extended by p compact dimensions (RSII-{sub p}). We obtain the force using the Green's function technique and we compare our results with the ones obtained by using the zeta function regularization method. As a result we obtain agreement in the expression for the force independently of the method used, thus we solve a previous discrepancy between the two approaches.

  11. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail showing lower chord pin-connected to vertical member, showing floor beam riveted to extension of vertical member below pin-connection, and showing brackets supporting cantilevered sidewalk. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  12. Analytical comparison of the first- and second-order resonances for implementation of the dynamical Casimir effect in nonstationary circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, E. L. S.; Dodonov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate analytically and numerically the nonstationary circuit QED setup in which N independent qubits interact with a single mode of the Electromagnetic field confined in a resonator. We consider the harmonic time modulation of some parameter (atomic transition frequency or the atom-field coupling strength) and derive the unitary dynamics up to the second order in the modulation depth for N = 1 and N\\gg 1. It is shown that all the resonant phenomena that occur for modulation frequencies ∼ 2{ω }0 (where {ω }0 is the cavity frequency) also occur for the halved frequencies. However, in the latter case the associated transition rates are significantly smaller and the modulation of the coupling strength is less effective. The transition rates are evaluated explicitly and the prospects of employing the second-order resonances in the phenomena related to the dynamical Casimir effect are examined.

  13. Planning a Successful Tech Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tech shows are a great way to introduce prospective students, parents, and local business and industry to a technology and engineering or career and technical education program. In addition to showcasing instructional programs, a tech show allows students to demonstrate their professionalism and skills, practice public presentations, and interact…

  14. Bulk Casimir densities and vacuum interaction forces in higher dimensional brane models

    SciTech Connect

    Saharian, Aram A.

    2006-03-15

    Vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor and the vacuum interaction forces are evaluated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter satisfying Robin boundary conditions on two codimension one parallel branes embedded in (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime AdS{sub D{sub 1}}{sub +1}x{sigma} with a warped internal space {sigma}. The vacuum energy-momentum tensor is presented as a sum of boundary-free, single brane-induced, and interference parts. The latter is finite everywhere including the points on the branes and is exponentially small for large interbrane distances. Unlike to the purely anti-de Sitter (AdS) bulk, the part induced by a single brane, in addition to the distance from the brane, depends also on the position of the brane in the bulk. The asymptotic behavior of this part is investigated for the points near the brane and for the position of the brane close to the AdS horizon and AdS boundary. The contribution of Kaluza-Klein modes along {sigma} is discussed in various limiting cases. The vacuum forces acting on the branes are presented as a sum of the self-action and interaction terms. The first one contains well-known surface divergences and needs a further renormalization. The interaction forces between the branes are finite for all nonzero interbrane distances and are investigated as functions of the brane positions and the length scale of the internal space. We show that there is a region in the space of parameters in which these forces are repulsive for small distances and attractive for large distances. As an example, the case {sigma}=S{sup D{sub 2}} is considered. An application to the higher dimensional generalization of the Randall-Sundrum brane model with arbitrary mass terms on the branes is discussed. Taking the limit with infinite curvature radius for the AdS bulk, from the general formulas we derive the results for two parallel Robin plates on background of R{sup (D{sub 1},1)}x{sigma} spacetime.

  15. Satellite Animation Shows California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows a series of moisture-laden storms affecting California from Jan. 6 through Jan. 9, 2017. TRT: 00:36 Credit: NASA...

  16. Satellite Movie Shows Erika Dissipate

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Aug. 27 to 29 shows Tropical Storm Erika move through the Eastern Caribbean Sea and dissipate near eastern Cuba. ...

  17. National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Jimenez Sheri Raborn, CPA; Tom Baker

    2008-03-31

    National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration created a 400KW Photovoltaic self-generation plant at the National Orange Show Events Center (NOS). The NOS owns a 120-acre state fairground where it operates an events center and produces an annual citrus fair known as the Orange Show. The NOS governing board wanted to employ cost-saving programs for annual energy expenses. It is hoped the Photovoltaic program will result in overall savings for the NOS, help reduce the State's energy demands as relating to electrical power consumption, improve quality of life within the affected grid area as well as increase the energy efficiency of buildings at our venue. In addition, the potential to reduce operational expenses would have a tremendous effect on the ability of the NOS to service its community.

  18. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth.

    PubMed

    Makidono, Akari; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Mori, Miki; Yagata, Hiroshi; Onoda, Yui; Kikuchi, Mari; Nozaki, Taiki; Saida, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Seigo; Suzuki, Koyu

    2013-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare fibroepithelial lesion and particularly uncommon in adolescent girls. It is thought to arise from the periductal rather than intralobular stroma. Usually, it is seen as a well-defined mass. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth is extremely rare. Here we report a girl who has a phyllodes tumor with intraductal growth.

  19. Magic Carpet Shows Its Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The upper left image in this display is from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, showing the 'Magic Carpet' region near the rover at Gusev Crater, Mars, on Sol 7, the seventh martian day of its journey (Jan. 10, 2004). The lower image, also from the panoramic camera, is a monochrome (single filter) image of a rock in the 'Magic Carpet' area. Note that colored portions of the rock correlate with extracted spectra shown in the plot to the side. Four different types of materials are shown: the rock itself, the soil in front of the rock, some brighter soil on top of the rock, and some dust that has collected in small recesses on the rock face ('spots'). Each color on the spectra matches a line on the graph, showing how the panoramic camera's different colored filters are used to broadly assess the varying mineral compositions of martian rocks and soils.

  20. "Medicine show." Alice in Doctorland.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    This is an excerpt from the script of a 1939 play provided to the Institute of Social Medicine and Community Health by the Library of Congress Federal Theater Project Collection at George Mason University Library, Fairfax, Virginia, pages 2-1-8 thru 2-1-14. The Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was part of the New Deal program for the arts 1935-1939. Funded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) its goal was to employ theater professionals from the relief rolls. A number of FTP plays deal with aspects of medicine and public health. Pageants, puppet shows and documentary plays celebrated progress in medical science while examining social controversies in medical services and the public health movement. "Medicine Show" sharply contrasts technological wonders with social backwardness. The play was rehearsed by the FTP but never opened because funding ended. A revised version ran on Broadway in 1940. The preceding comments are adapted from an excellent, well-illustrated review of five of these plays by Barabara Melosh: "The New Deal's Federal Theatre Project," Medical Heritage, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Jan/Feb 1986), pp. 36-47.

  1. "Show me" bioethics and politics.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Myra J

    2007-10-01

    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy positions; and to serve as a neutral convener and provider of a public forum for discussion. In this article, the Center's work on early stem cell research is a case study through which to argue that not only the Center, but also the field of bioethics has a critical role in the politics of public health policy.

  2. Phoenix Scoop Inverted Showing Rasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows the silver colored rasp protruding from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm scoop. The scoop is inverted and the rasp is pointing up.

    Shown with its forks pointing toward the ground is the thermal and electrical conductivity probe, at the lower right. The Robotic Arm Camera is pointed toward the ground.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  4. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ν 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength λ) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to λ2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ν 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ν 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further

  5. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  6. Critical casimir forces and colloidal phase transitions in a near-critical solvent: a simple model reveals a rich phase diagram.

    PubMed

    Edison, John R; Tasios, Nikos; Belli, Simone; Evans, Robert; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2015-01-23

    From experimental studies, it is well known that colloidal particles suspended in a near-critical binary solvent exhibit interesting aggregation phenomena, often associated with colloidal phase transitions and assumed to be driven by long-ranged solvent-mediated (SM) interactions (critical Casimir forces), set by the (diverging) correlation length of the solvent. We present the first simulation and theoretical study of an explicit model of a ternary mixture that mimics this situation. Both the effective SM pair interactions and the full ternary phase diagram are determined for Brownian disks suspended in an explicit two-dimensional supercritical binary liquid mixture. Gas-liquid and fluid-solid transitions are observed in a region that extends well away from criticality of the solvent reservoir. We discuss to what extent an effective pair-potential description can account for the phase behavior we observe. Our study provides a fresh perspective on how proximity to the critical point of the solvent reservoir might influence colloidal self-assembly.

  7. Educational Outreach: The Space Science Road Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.

    2002-01-01

    The poster presented will give an overview of a study towards a "Space Road Show". The topic of this show is space science. The target group is adolescents, aged 12 to 15, at Dutch high schools. The show and its accompanying experiments would be supported with suitable educational material. Science teachers at schools can decide for themselves if they want to use this material in advance, afterwards or not at all. The aims of this outreach effort are: to motivate students for space science and engineering, to help them understand the importance of (space) research, to give them a positive feeling about the possibilities offered by space and in the process give them useful knowledge on space basics. The show revolves around three main themes: applications, science and society. First the students will get some historical background on the importance of space/astronomy to civilization. Secondly they will learn more about novel uses of space. On the one hand they will learn of "Views on Earth" involving technologies like Remote Sensing (or Spying), Communication, Broadcasting, GPS and Telemedicine. On the other hand they will experience "Views on Space" illustrated by past, present and future space research missions, like the space exploration missions (Cassini/Huygens, Mars Express and Rosetta) and the astronomy missions (Soho and XMM). Meanwhile, the students will learn more about the technology of launchers and satellites needed to accomplish these space missions. Throughout the show and especially towards the end attention will be paid to the third theme "Why go to space"? Other reasons for people to get into space will be explored. An important question in this is the commercial (manned) exploration of space. Thus, the questions of benefit of space to society are integrated in the entire show. It raises some fundamental questions about the effects of space travel on our environment, poverty and other moral issues. The show attempts to connect scientific with

  8. Restrictions on the parameters of the spin-1 antigraviton and the dilaton resulting from the Casimir effect and from the Eoetvoes and Cavendish experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mostepanenko, V.M.; Sokolov, I.Y. )

    1989-06-01

    On the basis of an analysis of experimental data, restrictions are obtained on the parameters of hypothetical long-range Yukawa-type interactions which arise from the exchange of vector and pseudo-Goldstone particles. The masses of the spin-1 antigraviton and the dilaton are estimated to be greater than 6{times}10{sup {minus}5} and 4{times}10{sup {minus}5} eV, respectively.

  9. GOES-West Shows U.S. West's Record Rainfall

    NASA Video Gallery

    A new time-lapse animation of data from NOAA's GOES-West satellite provides a good picture of why the U.S. West Coast continues to experience record rainfall. The new animation shows the movement o...

  10. Dolphin shows and interaction programs: benefits for conservation education?

    PubMed

    Miller, L J; Zeigler-Hill, V; Mellen, J; Koeppel, J; Greer, T; Kuczaj, S

    2013-01-01

    Dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs are two types of education programs within zoological institutions used to educate visitors about dolphins and the marine environment. The current study examined the short- and long-term effects of these programs on visitors' conservation-related knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Participants of both dolphin shows and interaction programs demonstrated a significant short-term increase in knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions. Three months following the experience, participants of both dolphin shows and interaction programs retained the knowledge learned during their experience and reported engaging in more conservation-related behaviors. Additionally, the number of dolphin shows attended in the past was a significant predictor of recent conservation-related behavior suggesting that repetition of these types of experiences may be important in inspiring people to conservation action. These results suggest that both dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs can be an important part of a conservation education program for visitors of zoological facilities.

  11. Children Show Selective Trust in Technological Informants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danovitch, Judith H.; Alzahabi, Reem

    2013-01-01

    Although children are often exposed to technological devices early in life, little is known about how they evaluate these novel sources of information. In two experiments, children aged 3, 4, and 5 years old ("n" = 92) were presented with accurate and inaccurate computer informants, and they subsequently relied on information provided by…

  12. The Demise of the Magic Lantern Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Edward W.

    2006-01-01

    Extracting and applying lessons from history is rarely easy and sometimes risky but there are moments when historical records are so compelling that they rise above mere proof to the level of interocular impact. In this article, the author shares his similar experience while visiting his colleague, Professor Bruce Clark, at the University of…

  13. TRIO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

    1984-09-01

    The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

  14. The Physics of Equestrian Show Jumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinner, Art

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the kinematics and dynamics of equestrian show jumping. For some time I have attended a series of show jumping events at Spruce Meadows, an international equestrian center near Calgary, Alberta, often referred to as the "Wimbledon of equestrian jumping." I have always had a desire to write an article such as this…

  15. Serving Up Activities for TV Cooking Shows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katchen, Johanna E.

    This paper documents a presentation given on the use of English-language television cooking shows in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) classrooms in Taiwan. Such shows can be ideal for classroom use, since they have a predictable structure consisting of short segments, are of interest to most students,…

  16. 47 CFR 90.505 - Showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Developmental Operation § 90.505 Showing required. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each application for developmental operation shall be accompanied by a showing that: (1) The applicant has an organized plan of development leading to a specific objective;...

  17. The Language of Show Biz: A Dictionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sergel, Sherman Louis, Ed.

    This dictionary of the language of show biz provides the layman with definitions and essays on terms and expressions often used in show business. The overall pattern of selection was intended to be more rather than less inclusive, though radio, television, and film terms were deliberately omitted. Lengthy explanations are sometimes used to express…

  18. Casimir effect for Dirac lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordag, M.; Pirozhenko, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    We consider polarizable sheets, which recently received some attention, especially in the context of the dispersion interaction of thin sheets like graphene. These sheets are modeled by a collection of delta function potentials and resemble zero-range potentials, which are known in quantum mechanics. We develop a theoretical description and apply the so-called TGTG formula to calculate the interaction of two such lattices. Thereby, we make use of the formulation of the scattering of waves off such sheets provided earlier. We consider all limiting cases, providing a link to earlier results. Also, we discuss the relation to the pairwise summation method.

  19. Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163824.html Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma Over one-third of patients appeared disease- ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental gene therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma beat back more than a ...

  20. Poverty Harder on Women's Hearts, Research Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163168.html Poverty Harder on Women's Hearts, Research Shows Poor females ... reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease around the world," Peters said. The study findings were published online ...

  1. Do dogs (Canis familiaris) show contagious yawning?

    PubMed

    Harr, Aimee L; Gilbert, Valerie R; Phillips, Kimberley A

    2009-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation into whether domesticated dogs display contagious yawning. Fifteen dogs were shown video clips of (1) humans and (2) dogs displaying yawns and open-mouth expressions (not yawns) to investigate whether dogs showed contagious yawning to either of these social stimuli. Only one dog performed significantly more yawns during or shortly after viewing yawning videos than to the open-mouth videos, and most of these yawns occurred to the human videos. No dogs showed significantly more yawning to the open-mouth videos (human or dog). The percentage of dogs showing contagious yawning was less than chimpanzees and humans showing this behavior, and considerably less than a recently published report investigating this behavior in dogs (Joly-Mascheroni et al. in Biol Lett 4:446-448, 2008).

  2. Spacecraft Image Mashup Shows Galactic Collision

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new composite image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Spitzer Space Telescope shows two colliding galaxies more than a 100 million years after they first ...

  3. Study Shows How Zika Attacks Infant Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162514.html Study Shows How Zika Attacks Infant Brain Virus can copy itself thousands ... New research paints a chilling portrait of how Zika ravages the infant brain. Scientists from the U.S. ...

  4. Fecal Transplant Shows Early Promise Against Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163263.html Fecal Transplant Shows Early Promise Against Autism Small study found giving healthy gut bacteria to ... study suggests a novel treatment for kids with autism: Give these young patients a fresh supply of ...

  5. TRMM Satellite Shows Heavy Rainfall in Cristina

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM satellite rainfall data was overlaid on an enhanced visible/infrared image from NOAA's GOES-East satellite showing cloud and rainfall extent. Green areas indicate rainfall at over 20 mm...

  6. GOES Satellite Data Shows Tornado Development

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite data shows the development and movement of the weather system that spawned tornadoes affecting the southern and eastern U.S. states on April 27-29, 2014...

  7. An Easy Way to Show Memory Color Effects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes and evaluates a simple stimulus display that allows one to measure memory color effects (the effect of object knowledge and memory on color perception). The proposed approach is fast and easy and does not require running an extensive experiment. It shows that memory color effects are robust to minor variations due to a lack of color calibration. PMID:27698988

  8. AIDS control: TN may show the way.

    PubMed

    1999-04-19

    The successful experiences of Tamil Nadu (TN) in the control and prevention of HIV/AIDS provides vital clues for the second phase of the Rs. 1,150-crore World Bank-funded national AIDS control program which will begin in July. The National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) is looking at TN for concrete answers in several areas before it composes its guidelines for the second phase. Key areas of focus in the second phase will be high-risk groups, control of STDs, people living with AIDS, communication structures and blood safety. NACO and the funding agency has been impressed by TN¿s method of mobilizing NGOs in the massive anti-HIV/AIDS campaign and its handling of the cost of the care. In addition to the Tamil Nadu State AIDS Control Society (TNSACS), the AIDS Prevention and Control Project of the Voluntary Health Services (supported by USAID) also contributed to the impressive performance of this State.

  9. Liquid Crystal Research Shows Deformation By Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These images, from David Weitz's liquid crystal research, show ordered uniform sized droplets (upper left) before they are dried from their solution. After the droplets are dried (upper right), they are viewed with crossed polarizers that show the deformation caused by drying, a process that orients the bipolar structure of the liquid crystal within the droplets. When an electric field is applied to the dried droplets (lower left), and then increased (lower right), the liquid crystal within the droplets switches its alignment, thereby reducing the amount of light that can be scattered by the droplets when a beam is shone through them.

  10. Show Them You Really Want the Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Showing that one really "wants" the job entails more than just really wanting the job. An interview is part Broadway casting call, part intellectual dating game, part personality test, and part, well, job interview. When there are 300 applicants for a position, many of them will "fit" the required (and even the preferred) skills listed in the job…

  11. EFFECT OF REPETITIVE FILM SHOWINGS ON LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCTAVISH, C.L.; AND OTHERS

    A DETERMINATION OF THE INCREMENT IN LEARNING ATTRIBUTABLE SOLELY TO ONE, TWO, AND THREE REPETITIONS OF A FILM OVER AND ABOVE A SINGLE SHOWING WAS INVESTIGATED. THE SUBJECTS WERE 319 COLLEGE FRESHMEN WHO WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS AND WHO WERE SHOWN FOUR GENERAL SCIENCE FILMS. EACH GROUP SAW ONE OF THE FILMS ONCE, A SECOND FILM TWICE, A THIRD…

  12. Showing Enantiomorphous Crystals of Tartaric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade-Gamboa, Julio

    2007-01-01

    Most of the articles and textbooks that show drawings of enantiomorphous crystals use an inadequate view to appreciate the fact that they are non-superimposable mirror images of one another. If a graphical presentation of crystal chirality is not evident, the main attribute of crystal enantiomorphism can not be recognized by students. The classic…

  13. Laser entertainment and light shows in education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaratnam, Andrew T.; Symons, Charles

    2002-05-01

    Laser shows and beam effects have been a source of entertainment since its first public performance May 9, 1969, at Mills College in Oakland, California. Since 1997, the Photonics Center, NgeeAnn Polytechnic, Singapore, has been using laser shows as a teaching tool. Students are able to exhibit their creative skills and learn at the same time how lasers are used in the entertainment industry. Students will acquire a number of skills including handling three- phase power supply, operation of cooling system, and laser alignment. Students also acquire an appreciation of the arts, learning about shapes and contours as they develop graphics for the shows. After holography, laser show animation provides a combination of the arts and technology. This paper aims to briefly describe how a krypton-argon laser, galvanometer scanners, a polychromatic acousto-optic modulator and related electronics are put together to develop a laser projector. The paper also describes how students are trained to make their own laser animation and beam effects with music, and at the same time have an appreciation of the operation of a Class IV laser and the handling of optical components.

  14. 47 CFR 90.505 - Showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Developmental Operation § 90.505 Showing required. (a) Except as provided in...) The actual transmission by radio is essential to proceed beyond the present stage of the program;...

  15. 47 CFR 90.505 - Showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Developmental Operation § 90.505 Showing required. (a) Except as provided in...) The actual transmission by radio is essential to proceed beyond the present stage of the program;...

  16. Tilapia show immunization response against Ich

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compares the immune response of Nile tilapia and red tilapia against parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) using a cohabitation challenge model. Both Nile and red tilapia showed strong immune response post immunization with live Ich theronts by IP injection or immersion. Blood serum...

  17. A Talk Show from the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Arlene F.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a two-day activity in which elementary students examine voting rights, the right to assemble, and women's suffrage. Explains the game, "Assemble, Reassemble," and a student-produced talk show with five students playing the roles of leaders of the women's suffrage movement. Profiles Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Susan…

  18. State Data Show Gains in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2007-01-01

    Schools taking part in the federal Reading First program are showing significant progress in boosting students' reading fluency and comprehension, according to state-reported data compiled and released by the U.S. Department of Education last week. In releasing for the first time detailed, multiyear data on how Reading First schools are performing…

  19. Human platelet sulfotransferase shows seasonal rhythms.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, D; Palego, L; Mazzanti, C; Silvestri, S; Cassano, G B

    1995-04-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the possible presence of seasonal changes in platelet phenolsulfotransferase (ST) in a group of 20 healthy, drug-free subjects of both sexes between 24 and 37 years of age. Blood samples were taken four times a year in the period immediately following the equinoxes and the solstices. The results showed that both Sts underwent seasonal changes: the lowest values were found in autumn and in winter, and the highest in the summer. A positive correlation between the two STs and the length of the photoperiod was observed in winter whereas in the spring we detected a negative correlation between the TL ST and the photoperiod length. Future studies should clarify whether platelet ST of patients with mood disorders shows a similar seasonality.

  20. Male genital leiomyomas showing androgen receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Vieites, Begoña; Evgenyeva, Elena; Vázquez-Veiga, Hugo; Forteza, Jeronimo

    2007-12-01

    Genital leiomyoma in men include those superficial leiomyomas arising in the scrotum and the areola. They are unusual neoplasms: few cases have been reported in the literature and they usually escape clinical diagnosis. Three cases of male genital leiomyomas are reported: two in the scrotum and one in the areola. They were all conservatively excised and the behaviour was completely benign in all cases. Histopathological examination showed the typical findings of superficial leiomyomas, with some minor differences between cases arising in the scrotum and those from the areola. Immunohistochemical findings not only confirmed the smooth muscle nature of all cases but also showed unequivocal immunostaining for androgen receptors in the leiomyomas from the scrotum. Immunostaining for androgen receptors in scrotal leiomyomas is, as far as we are aware, a previously unknown characteristic of male genital leiomyomas. This finding supports the role of steroid hormones in the growth of genital leiomyomas, similar to leiomyomas found in other locations.

  1. Kepler Systems That Show Multiple Transiting Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Holman, M. J.; Lissauer, J. J.; Ragozzine, D.; Welsh, W. F.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    Exoplanetary systems that have multiple transiting planets provide unique and important insight into the formation, evolution, and dynamics of exoplanetary systems. Kepler has announced the discovery of a confirmed planetary system with multiple transiting planets (Kepler 9, Holman et al. 2010) as well as several candidate planetary systems that show multiple transiting objects (Steffen et al. 2010). Kepler 9 shows deviations from a constant period due to the ongoing dynamical interactions between the confirmed planets. From these transit timing variations (TTV) one can measure the planetary masses from the photometric data alone. The presence of several systems with multiple transiting candidates from the first quarter of data indicate that Kepler should continue to find systems with multiple transiting planets. Such systems will provide important, general information about the histories of planetary systems.

  2. Showing Emulsion Properties with Common Dairy Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Diaz, Carlos; Gonzalez-Romero, Elisa

    1996-09-01

    Foods are mixtures of different chemical compounds, and the quality we sense (taste, texture, color, etc.) are all manifestations of its chemical properties. Some of them can be visualized with the aid of simple, safe and inexpensive experiments using dairy products that can be found in any kitchen and using almost exclusively kitchen utensils. In this paper we propose some of them related with food emulsions. Food emulsions cover an extremely wide area of daily-life applications such as milk, sauces, dressings and beverages. Experimentation with some culinary recipes to prepare them and the analyisis of the observed results is close to ideal subject for the introduction of chemical principles, allowing to discuss about the nature and composition of foods, the effects of additives, etc. At the same time it allows to get insights into the scientific reasons that underlie on the recipes (something that it is not usually found in most cookbooks). For example, when making an emulsion like mayonnaise, why the egg yolks and water are the first materials in the bowl , and the oil is added to them rather than in the other way around? How you can "rescue" separate emulsions (mayonnaise)? Which parameters affect emulsion stability? Since safety, in its broad sense, is the first requisite for any food, concerns about food exist throughout the world and the more we are aware of our everyday life, the more likely we will be to deal productively with the consequences. On the other hand, understanding what foods are and how cooking works destroys no delightful mystery of the art of cuisine, instead the mystery expands.

  3. Latest European coelacanth shows Gondwanan affinities.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Lionel; Forey, Peter L; Buffetaut, Eric; Tong, Haiyan

    2005-06-22

    The last European fossil occurrence of a coelacanth is from the Mid-Cretaceous of the English Chalk (Turonian, 90 million years ago). Here, we report the discovery of a coelacanth from Late Cretaceous non-marine rocks in southern France. It consists of a left angular bone showing structures that imply close phylogenetic affinities with some extinct Mawsoniidae. The closest relatives are otherwise known from Cretaceous continental deposits of southern continents and suggest that the dispersal of freshwater organisms from Africa to Europe occurred in the Late Cretaceous.

  4. DAST in Flight Showing Diverging Wingtip Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Two BQM-34 Firebee II drones were modified with supercritical airfoils, called the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW), for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, which ran from 1977 to 1983. In this view of DAST-1 (Serial # 72-1557), taken on June 12, 1980, severe wingtip flutter is visible. Moments later, the right wing failed catastrophically and the vehicle crashed near Cuddeback Dry Lake. Before the drone was lost, it had made two captive and two free flights. Its first free flight, on October 2, 1979, was cut short by an uplink receiver failure. The drone was caught in midair by an HH-3 helicopter. The second free flight, on March 12, 1980, was successful, ending in a midair recovery. The third free flight, made on June 12, was to expand the flutter envelope. All of these missions launched from the NASA B-52. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than

  5. Show Me the Invisible: Visualizing Hidden Content

    PubMed Central

    Geymayer, Thomas; Steinberger, Markus; Lex, Alexander; Streit, Marc; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Content on computer screens is often inaccessible to users because it is hidden, e.g., occluded by other windows, outside the viewport, or overlooked. In search tasks, the efficient retrieval of sought content is important. Current software, however, only provides limited support to visualize hidden occurrences and rarely supports search synchronization crossing application boundaries. To remedy this situation, we introduce two novel visualization methods to guide users to hidden content. Our first method generates awareness for occluded or out-of-viewport content using see-through visualization. For content that is either outside the screen’s viewport or for data sources not opened at all, our second method shows off-screen indicators and an on-demand smart preview. To reduce the chances of overlooking content, we use visual links, i.e., visible edges, to connect the visible content or the visible representations of the hidden content. We show the validity of our methods in a user study, which demonstrates that our technique enables a faster localization of hidden content compared to traditional search functionality and thereby assists users in information retrieval tasks. PMID:25325078

  6. ShowFlow: A practical interface for groundwater modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tauxe, J.D.

    1990-12-01

    ShowFlow was created to provide a user-friendly, intuitive environment for researchers and students who use computer modeling software. What traditionally has been a workplace available only to those familiar with command-line based computer systems is now within reach of almost anyone interested in the subject of modeling. In the case of this edition of ShowFlow, the user can easily experiment with simulations using the steady state gaussian plume groundwater pollutant transport model SSGPLUME, though ShowFlow can be rewritten to provide a similar interface for any computer model. Included in this thesis is all the source code for both the ShowFlow application for Microsoft{reg sign} Windows{trademark} and the SSGPLUME model, a User's Guide, and a Developer's Guide for converting ShowFlow to run other model programs. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Surveys show support for green 'activities'.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Two independently conducted surveys on sustainability - one into the 'views and values' of NHS 'leaders', and the other questioning the public about the importance of the 'green agenda' in the NHS, and their opinions on how the service might most effectively reduce its carbon footprint, form the basis of Sustainability in the NHS: Health Check 2012, a new NHS Sustainable Development Unit (NHS SDU) publication. As HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports, the new document also presents updated data on the 'size' of the carbon footprint of the NHS in England, showing that, although good work by a number of Trusts in the past two years has seen healthcare-generated carbon emissions start to 'level off', the biggest contributors have been the current health service spending review, and the increased national availability of renewable energy.

  8. Star Shows It Has The Right Stuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an observation by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make the best case yet that a star can be engulfed by its companion star and survive. This discovery will help astronomers better understand how closely coupled stars, and perhaps even stars and planets, evolve when one of the stars expands enormously in its red giant phase. The binary star system known as V471 Tauri comprises a white dwarf star (the primary) in a close orbit -- one thirtieth of the distance between Mercury and the Sun -- with a normal Sun-like star (the secondary). Chandra's data showed that the hot upper atmosphere of the secondary star has a deficit of carbon atoms relative to nitrogen atoms. "This deficit of carbon atoms is the first clear observational evidence that the normal star was engulfed by its companion in the past," according to Jeremy Drake of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, MA, who coauthored an article on V471 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters with Marek Sarna of the N. Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland. The white dwarf star was once a star several times as massive as the Sun. Nuclear fusion reactions in the core of such a star convert carbon into nitrogen over a period of about a billion years. When the fuel in the core of the star is exhausted, the core collapses, triggering more energetic nuclear reactions that cause the star to expand and transform into a red giant before eventually collapsing to become a white dwarf. The carbon-poor material in the core of the red giant is mixed with outer part of the star, so its atmosphere shows a deficit of carbon, as compared with Sun-like stars. The X-ray spectra of a red giant star (top panel) and a Sun-like star (bottom panel) show the large difference in the peaks due to carbon atoms in the two stars. Theoretical calculations indicate that a red giant in a binary system can completely envelop its companion star and dramatically affect its evolution. During this common envelope

  9. Microbiological and environmental issues in show caves.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2012-07-01

    Cultural tourism expanded in the last half of the twentieth century, and the interest of visitors has come to include caves containing archaeological remains. Some show caves attracted mass tourism, and economical interests prevailed over conservation, which led to a deterioration of the subterranean environment and the rock art. The presence and the role of microorganisms in caves is a topic that is often ignored in cave management. Knowledge of the colonisation patterns, the dispersion mechanisms, and the effect on human health and, when present, over rock art paintings of these microorganisms is of the utmost importance. In this review the most recent advances in the study of microorganisms in caves are presented, together with the environmental implications of the findings.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells show radioresistance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvpreet; Kloss, Frank R; Brunauer, Regina; Schimke, Magdalena; Jamnig, Angelika; Greiderer-Kleinlercher, Brigitte; Klima, Günter; Rentenberger, Julia; Auberger, Thomas; Hächl, Oliver; Rasse, Michael; Gassner, Robert; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2012-04-01

    Irradiation impacts on the viability and differentiation capacity of tissue-borne mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which play a pivotal role in bone regeneration. As a consequence of radiotherapy, bones may develop osteoradionecrosis. When irradiating human bone-derived MSC in vitro with increasing doses, the cells' self-renewal capabilities were greatly reduced. Mitotically stalled cells were still capable of differentiating into osteoblasts and pre-adipocytes. As a large animal model comparable to the clinical situation, pig mandibles were subjected to fractionized radiation of 2 χ 9 Gy within 1 week. This treatment mimics that of a standardized clinical treatment regimen of head and neck cancer patients irradiated 30 χ 2 Gy. In the pig model, fractures which had been irradiated, showed delayed osseous healing. When isolating MSC at different time points post-irradiation, no significant changes regarding proliferation capacity and osteogenic differentiation potential became apparent. Therefore, pig mandibles were irradiated with a single dose of either 9 or 18 Gy in vivo, and MSC were isolated immediately afterwards. No significant differences between the untreated and 9 Gy irradiated bone with respect to proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were unveiled. Yet, cells isolated from 18 Gy irradiated specimens exhibited a reduced osteogenic differentiation capacity, and during the first 2 weeks proliferation rates were greatly diminished. Thereafter, cells recovered and showed normal proliferation behaviour. These findings imply that MSC can effectively cope with irradiation up to high doses in vivo. This finding should thus be implemented in future therapeutic concepts to protect regenerating tissue from radiation consequences.

  11. VLA Shows "Boiling" in Atmosphere of Betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    A team of astronomers says that observations with the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope show that a neighboring bloated star has giant convective plumes propelling gas from its surface (photosphere) up into the star's atmosphere. This new information contradicts long-held ideas that such stellar atmospheres are more uniform, and may resolve questions about how the star's atmosphere attains its enormous size as well as how dust and gas is driven away from the star. Jeremy Lim of the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics in Taiwan; Chris Carilli, Anthony Beasley, and Ralph Marson of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM; and Stephen White of the University of Maryland studied the red-supergiant star Betelgeuse, about 430 light-years away in the constellation Orion. They reported their findings in the April 9 issue of the scientific journal Nature. "These radio-telescope images confirm that Betelgeuse -- already more than 600 times larger than our Sun -- has a dense atmosphere that extends to many times larger still than the star itself," said Lim. "The highest-resolution image shows the star's atmosphere to have a remarkably complex structure." "To our surprise," added White, "the images also show that most of the gas in the atmosphere is only about as hot as that on the surface. Previously, all of it was thought to be very much hotter." The astronomers used the VLA to make images of Betelgeuse at a variety of radio frequencies. The series of radio observations measured the temperature of the star's atmosphere at different heights. Previous observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at ultraviolet wavelengths showed that the star's atmosphere contains very hot gas at about twice the surface temperature. The VLA images showed that there also is lower-temperature gas throughout the atmosphere. This gas is near the surface temperature at low heights and decreases in temperature

  12. The earliest published electrocardiogram showing ventricular preexcitation.

    PubMed

    Von Knorre, Georg H

    2005-03-01

    When in 1930, Wolff, Parkinson, and White published what is today known as the WPW, or preexcitation syndrome, they, and subsequently others, found few comparable cases in the preceding literature. Among these the report of Cohn and Fraser, published in 1913, was the earliest. However, another even earlier documentation in a 1909 article by Hoffmann escaped notice till now. The ECG of a patient with paroxysmal tachycardia reveals a short PR interval and a delta-wave-induced widening of the QRS complex, even though the reproduced tachycardia was not preexcitation related. The interpretation of this poorly reproduced ECG can be confirmed by another and more detailed description of the patient in an electrocardiography textbook published in 1914 by the same author. Thus, the earliest publication of an ECG showing ventricular preexcitation now can be dated back to 1909. Moreover, the Hoffmann monograph contains two additional examples of the WPW syndrome not noticed until now. All three cases published by Hoffmann had their first ECG recordings in 1912 or earlier.

  13. NASA GIBS Use in Live Planetarium Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmart, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History's Hayden Planetarium was rebuilt in year 2000 as an immersive theater for scientific data visualization to show the universe in context to our planet. Specific astrophysical movie productions provide the main daily programming, but interactive control software, developed at AMNH allows immersive presentation within a data aggregation of astronomical catalogs called the Digital Universe 3D Atlas. Since 2006, WMS globe browsing capabilities have been built into a software development collaboration with Sweden's Linkoping University (LiU). The resulting Uniview software, now a product of the company SCISS, is operated by about fifty planetariums around that world with ability to network amongst the sites for global presentations. Public presentation of NASA GIBS has allowed authoritative narratives to be presented within the range of data available in context to other sources such as Science on a Sphere, NASA Earth Observatory and Google Earth KML resources. Specifically, the NOAA supported World Views Network conducted a series of presentations across the US that focused on local ecological issues that could then be expanded in the course of presentation to national and global scales of examination. NASA support of for GIBS resources in an easy access multi scale streaming format like WMS has tremendously enabled particularly facile presentations of global monitoring like never before. Global networking of theaters for distributed presentations broadens out the potential for impact of this medium. Archiving and refinement of these presentations has already begun to inform new types of documentary productions that examine pertinent, global interdependency topics.

  14. Tetrahydrobiopterin shows chaperone activity for tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Thöny, Beat; Calvo, Ana C; Scherer, Tanja; Svebak, Randi M; Haavik, Jan; Blau, Nenad; Martinez, Aurora

    2008-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. Primary inherited defects in TH have been associated with l-DOPA responsive and non-responsive dystonia and infantile parkinsonism. In this study, we show that both the cofactor (6R)-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the feedback inhibitor and catecholamine product dopamine increase the kinetic stability of human TH isoform 1 in vitro. Activity measurements and synthesis of the enzyme by in vitro transcription-translation revealed a complex regulation by the cofactor including both enzyme inactivation and conformational stabilization. Oral BH(4) supplementation to mice increased TH activity and protein levels in brain extracts, while the Th-mRNA level was not affected. All together our results indicate that the molecular mechanisms for the stabilization are a primary folding-aid effect of BH(4) and a secondary effect by increased synthesis and binding of catecholamine ligands. Our results also establish that orally administered BH(4) crosses the blood-brain barrier and therapeutic regimes based on BH(4) supplementation should thus consider the effect on TH. Furthermore, BH(4) supplementation arises as a putative therapeutic agent in the treatment of brain disorders associated with TH misfolding, such as for the human TH isoform 1 mutation L205P.

  15. Temperature Data Shows Warming in 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    TThe figure above depicts how much air temperatures near the Earth's surface changed relative to the global mean temperature from 1951 to 1980. NASA researchers used maps of urban areas derived from city lights data to account for the 'heat island' effect of cities. The red and orange colors show that temperatures are warmer in most regions of the world when compared to the 1951 to 1980 'normal' temperatures. Warming around the world has been widespread, but it is not present everywhere. The largest warming is in Northern Canada, Alaska and Siberia, as indicated by the deeper red colors. The lower 48 United States have become warmer recently, but only enough to make the temperatures comparable to what they were in the 1930s. The scale on the bottom of these temperature anomaly images represent degrees in Celsius. The negative numbers represent cooling and the positive numbers depict warming. Overall, the air temperature near the Earth's surface has warmed by 1oF (0.6oC) globally, on average, over the last century. For more information and additional images, read Satellites Shed Light on a Warmer World. Image courtesy Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS).

  16. First K2 mutiplanatary system showing TTVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Susana C. C.

    2015-08-01

    In traditional transit timing variations (TTVs) analysis of multi-planetary systems, the individual TTVs are first derived from transit fitting and later modeled using n-body dynamic simulations to constrain planetary masses.I will show that fitting simultaneously the transit light curves with the system dynamics (photo-dynamical model) increases the precision of the TTV measurements and helps constrain the system architecture. I will exemplify the advantages of applying this photo-dynamical model to a multi-planetary system found in K2 data very close to 3:2 mean motion resonance. In this case the period of the larger TTV variations (libration period) is much longer (~1.5 years) than the duration of the K2 observations (~80 days). However, our method allows to detect the short period TTVs produced by the orbital conjunctions between the planets that in turn permits to uniquely characterize the system. Therefore, our method can be used to constrain the masses of near-resonant systems even when the full libration curve is not observed and hence will help understanding evolution of these interesting systems.

  17. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B.; Christensen, Torben R.; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Nielsen, Rasmus; Munch, Kasper; Brand, Tina; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Zuber, Maria T.; Bunce, Michael; Rønn, Regin; Gilichinsky, David; Froese, Duane; Willerslev, Eske

    2007-01-01

    Recent claims of cultivable ancient bacteria within sealed environments highlight our limited understanding of the mechanisms behind long-term cell survival. It remains unclear how dormancy, a favored explanation for extended cellular persistence, can cope with spontaneous genomic decay over geological timescales. There has been no direct evidence in ancient microbes for the most likely mechanism, active DNA repair, or for the metabolic activity necessary to sustain it. In this paper, we couple PCR and enzymatic treatment of DNA with direct respiration measurements to investigate long-term survival of bacteria sealed in frozen conditions for up to one million years. Our results show evidence of bacterial survival in samples up to half a million years in age, making this the oldest independently authenticated DNA to date obtained from viable cells. Additionally, we find strong evidence that this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability. PMID:17728401

  18. AD-1 multiple exposure showing wing sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This photograph is a multiple exposure showing the AD-1 aircraft with its wing swept at different angles between zero and 60 degrees. The Ames-Dryden-1 (AD-1) aircraft was designed to investigate the concept of an oblique (pivoting) wing. The wing could be rotated on its center pivot, so that it could be set at its most efficient angle for the speed at which the aircraft was flying. NASA Ames Research Center Aeronautical Engineer Robert T. Jones conceived the idea of an oblique wing. His wind tunnel studies at Ames (Moffett Field, CA) indicated that an oblique wing design on a supersonic transport might achieve twice the fuel economy of an aircraft with conventional wings. The oblique wing on the AD-1 pivoted about the fuselage, remaining perpendicular to it during slow flight and rotating to angles of up to 60 degrees as aircraft speed increased. Analytical and wind tunnel studiesthat Jones conducted at Ames indicated that a transport-sized oblique-wing aircraft flying at speeds of up to Mach 1.4 (1.4 times the speed of sound) would have substantially better aerodynamic performance than aircraft with conventional wings. The AD-1 structure allowed the project to complete all of its technical objectives. The type of low-speed, low-cost vehicle - as expected - exhibited aeroelastic and pitch-roll-coupling effects that contributed to poor handling at sweep angles above 45 degrees. The fiberglass structure limited the wing stiffness that would have improved the handling qualities. Thus, after completion of the AD-1 project, there was still a need for a transonic oblique-wing research aircraft to assess the effects of compressibility, evaluate a more representative structure, and analyze flight performance at transonic speeds (those on either side of the speed of sound). The aircraft was delivered to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, in March 1979 and its first flight was on December 21, 1979. Piloting the aircraft on that flight, as well as on its last

  19. Mercury's Core Molten, Radar Study Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    100 times, and showed that Mercury's spin axis is almost, but not exactly, perpendicular to the plane of its rotation around the Sun," Margot said. Margot worked with Stanton Peale of the University of California, Santa Barbara, Raymond Jurgens and Martin Slade of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Igor Holin of the Space Research Institute in Moscow. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. The Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, which is operated by Cornell University under a cooperative agreement with the NSF. Part of this work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, operated by Caltech under contract with NASA.

  20. Human lice show photopositive behaviour to white light.

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2011-10-01

    We studied the behavioural response of body lice and head lice to white light. We also evaluated the influence of starvation and the presence of other individuals on this response. Experiments were performed in a rectangular arena, half of which was illuminated and the other half kept in the dark. Two experiments were performed: in the first, a single louse was released into the arena for 60 min and the percentage of time spent in the illuminated half was recorded; in the second experiment, a group of lice was released and the number of insects in the illuminated half was recorded. The results showed that the average number of lice and time spent in the illuminated side of the arena was statistically higher than for the controls. Starvation did not influence the reaction of lice, but the number of insects in the illuminated area did increase with the size of the group. This study shows that human lice are photopositive towards white light and that this behaviour is not affected by the nutritional state of the insects. Moreover, it is enhanced by the presence of other lice.

  1. Showing You're Working: A Project Using Former Pupils' Experiences to Engage Current Mathematics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musto, Garrod

    2008-01-01

    To help students view mathematics in a more favourable light, a number of former pupils were contacted and asked to give details of how they use mathematics in their daily lives. This information was gathered through an online questionnaire or visits to the school to talk to pupils--a booklet of responses was also given to students. Attitudinally…

  2. From the States: Show Me--Missouri's Experience with the Collegiate Learning Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewell, Peter T.

    2005-01-01

    Last fall, the National Center for Public Policy in Higher Education published the results of a five-state demonstration project aimed at developing common state-level benchmarks for student learning for its fifty-state report card, "Measuring Up." One of the instruments used in this Pew-funded project was the Collegiate Learning…

  3. The PROMETHEUS bundled payment experiment: slow start shows problems in implementing new payment models.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Peter S; Ridgely, M Susan; Rosenthal, Meredith B

    2011-11-01

    Fee-for-service payment is blamed for many of the problems observed in the US health care system. One of the leading alternative payment models proposed in the Affordable Care Act of 2010 is bundled payment, which provides payment for all of the care a patient needs over the course of a defined clinical episode, instead of paying for each discrete service. We evaluated the initial "road test" of PROMETHEUS Payment, one of several bundled payment pilot projects. The project has faced substantial implementation challenges, and none of the three pilot sites had executed contracts or made bundled payments as of May 2011. The pilots have taken longer to set up than expected, primarily because of the complexity of the payment model and the fact that it builds on the existing fee-for-service payment system and other complexities of health care. Participants continue to see promise and value in the bundled payment model, but the pilot results suggest that the desired benefits of this and other payment reforms may take time and considerable effort to materialize.

  4. A Simple Experiment to Show Photodynamic Inactivation of Bacteria on Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caminos, Daniel A.; Durantini, Edgardo N.

    2007-01-01

    New suitable approaches were investigated to visualize the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacteria immobilized on agar surfaces. The PDI capacities of a cationic photosensitizer (5,10,15,20-tetra(4-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumphenyl)porphyrin) and an anionic photosensitizer (5,10,15,20-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin) were analyzed on a typical…

  5. Directing Diplomacy: Creating the Best Experience for Everyone in the Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the subtle psychological strategies good directors know how to employ with actors. Contends that if a director demonstrates a diplomatic attitude toward every student involved in a production, a perfect working atmosphere is created. Explores diplomacy basics; first impressions; rehearsal problems; personality issues; and talking points.…

  6. Chemistry for Kids: A Unique Demonstration Show for the Elementary School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, Edward L.; Bilsing, Larry M.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses development and presentation of a chemical demonstration show for grades 1-6 students. Includes major concepts presented and experiments used in the hour-long show. Concepts/experiments focus on the show's theme: the nature of chemical change. Safety factors involved when conducting demonstrations with children are addressed. (JN)

  7. Showing and Telling Farming: Agricultural Shows and Re-Imaging British Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Lewis

    2004-01-01

    Some actors in the ''mainstream'' agricultural sector are beginning to engage in strategies of influencing public perceptions of farming, responding to public anxieties over industrialised agriculture and to a supposed separation of non-farming publics from food production. This paper focuses on agricultural shows as sites and events central to…

  8. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  9. Tomato Fruits Show Wide Phenomic Diversity but Fruit Developmental Genes Show Low Genomic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vijee; Gupta, Soni; Thomas, Sherinmol; Mickey, Hanjabam; Charakana, Chaitanya; Chauhan, Vineeta Singh; Sharma, Kapil; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyagi, Kamal; Sarma, Supriya; Gupta, Suresh Kumar; Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Nongmaithem, Sapana; Kumari, Alka; Gupta, Prateek; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Domestication of tomato has resulted in large diversity in fruit phenotypes. An intensive phenotyping of 127 tomato accessions from 20 countries revealed extensive morphological diversity in fruit traits. The diversity in fruit traits clustered the accessions into nine classes and identified certain promising lines having desirable traits pertaining to total soluble salts (TSS), carotenoids, ripening index, weight and shape. Factor analysis of the morphometric data from Tomato Analyzer showed that the fruit shape is a complex trait shared by several factors. The 100% variance between round and flat fruit shapes was explained by one discriminant function having a canonical correlation of 0.874 by stepwise discriminant analysis. A set of 10 genes (ACS2, COP1, CYC-B, RIN, MSH2, NAC-NOR, PHOT1, PHYA, PHYB and PSY1) involved in various plant developmental processes were screened for SNP polymorphism by EcoTILLING. The genetic diversity in these genes revealed a total of 36 non-synonymous and 18 synonymous changes leading to the identification of 28 haplotypes. The average frequency of polymorphism across the genes was 0.038/Kb. Significant negative Tajima'D statistic in two of the genes, ACS2 and PHOT1 indicated the presence of rare alleles in low frequency. Our study indicates that while there is low polymorphic diversity in the genes regulating plant development, the population shows wider phenotype diversity. Nonetheless, morphological and genetic diversity of the present collection can be further exploited as potential resources in future.

  10. Tomato Fruits Show Wide Phenomic Diversity but Fruit Developmental Genes Show Low Genomic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vijee; Gupta, Soni; Thomas, Sherinmol; Mickey, Hanjabam; Charakana, Chaitanya; Chauhan, Vineeta Singh; Sharma, Kapil; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyagi, Kamal; Sarma, Supriya; Gupta, Suresh Kumar; Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Nongmaithem, Sapana; Kumari, Alka; Gupta, Prateek; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Domestication of tomato has resulted in large diversity in fruit phenotypes. An intensive phenotyping of 127 tomato accessions from 20 countries revealed extensive morphological diversity in fruit traits. The diversity in fruit traits clustered the accessions into nine classes and identified certain promising lines having desirable traits pertaining to total soluble salts (TSS), carotenoids, ripening index, weight and shape. Factor analysis of the morphometric data from Tomato Analyzer showed that the fruit shape is a complex trait shared by several factors. The 100% variance between round and flat fruit shapes was explained by one discriminant function having a canonical correlation of 0.874 by stepwise discriminant analysis. A set of 10 genes (ACS2, COP1, CYC-B, RIN, MSH2, NAC-NOR, PHOT1, PHYA, PHYB and PSY1) involved in various plant developmental processes were screened for SNP polymorphism by EcoTILLING. The genetic diversity in these genes revealed a total of 36 non-synonymous and 18 synonymous changes leading to the identification of 28 haplotypes. The average frequency of polymorphism across the genes was 0.038/Kb. Significant negative Tajima’D statistic in two of the genes, ACS2 and PHOT1 indicated the presence of rare alleles in low frequency. Our study indicates that while there is low polymorphic diversity in the genes regulating plant development, the population shows wider phenotype diversity. Nonetheless, morphological and genetic diversity of the present collection can be further exploited as potential resources in future. PMID:27077652

  11. An Undergraduate Endeavor: Assembling a Live Planetarium Show About Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Allison M.

    2016-10-01

    Viewing the mysterious red planet Mars goes back thousands of years with just the human eye but in more recent years the growth of telescopes, satellites and lander missions unveil unrivaled detail of the Martian surface that tells a story worth listening to. This planetarium show will go through the observations starting with the ancients to current understandings of the Martian surface, atmosphere and inner-workings through past and current Mars missions. Visual animations of its planetary motions, display of high resolution images from the Hi-RISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) and CTX (Context Camera) data imagery aboard the MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) as well as other datasets will be used to display the terrain detail and imagery of the planet Mars with a digital projection system. Local planetary scientists and Mars specialists from the Lunar and Planetary Lab at the University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ) will be interviewed and used in the show to highlight current technology and understandings of the red planet. This is an undergraduate project that is looking for collaborations and insight in order gain structure in script writing that will teach about this planetary body to all ages in the format of a live planetarium show.

  12. Thalamocortical Inputs Show Post-Critical Period Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Chung, Seungsoo; Chen, Der-Yow; Wang, Shumin; Dodd, Stephen; Walters, Judith; Isaac, John; Koretsky, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Experience-dependent plasticity in the adult brain has clinical potential for functional rehabilitation following central and peripheral nerve injuries. Here, plasticity induced by unilateral infraorbital (IO) nerve resection in four week-old rats was mapped using MRI and synaptic mechanisms were elucidated by slice electrophysiology. Functional MRI demonstrates a cortical potentiation compared to thalamus two weeks after IO nerve resection. Tracing thalamocortical (TC) projections with manganese-enhanced MRI revealed circuit changes in the spared layer 4 (L4) barrel cortex. Brain slice electrophysiology revealed TC input strengthening onto L4 stellate cells due to an increase in postsynaptic strength and the number of functional synapses. This work shows that the TC input is a site for robust plasticity after the end of the previously defined critical period for this input. Thus, TC inputs may represent a major site for adult plasticity in contrast to the consensus that adult plasticity mainly occurs at cortico-cortical connections. PMID:22632730

  13. CO2 study shows effects on scrub oak environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    CO2 study site manager and plant physiologist Graham Hymus (left) examines scrub oak foliage while project engineer David Johnson (right) looks on. The life sciences study is showing that rising levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, caused by the burning of fossil fuels, could spur plant growth globally. The site of KSC's study is a natural scrub oak area near the Vehicle Assembly Building. Twelve-foot areas of scrub oak have been enclosed in 16 open-top test chambers into which CO2 has been blown. Five scientists from NASA and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md., work at the site to monitor experiments and keep the site running. Scientists hope to continue the study another five to 10 years. More information on this study can be found in Release No. 57- 00.

  14. Learning from a dive show in an aquarium setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Lori M.

    A study was conducted at an aquarium next to a theme park to understand information recalled from two versions of shows viewed at the largest display. The goal of this research was to determine if learning was enhanced by having a diver in water as the treatment group. This project focused on the knowledge recalled about shark and ray feeding adaptations, the information recalled about the mentioned conservation message about sustainable seafood and the potential of the two shows to make memorable experiences. During the project, 30 adult participants from each group were given a survey with five open-ended questions. Results suggest that the diver might distract from biological content information, or that the diver is such a novel element that it interferes with recall. While guests seemed to recall information about rays and sharks, the amount of information was not substantial. It appears that the diver does not affect content messaging but does impact whether guests attend to Seafood Watch messaging. The diver may have been so novel that the treatment group could not attend to the conservation message that was delivered, regardless of topic, or the control group recalled the message because the guests were not distracted by the diver or feeding. The absence of a diver seems to allow the guests to better attend to what is happening outside of the tank. While adding a diver increases photo opportunities and may bring guests to a show, the results seem to indicate that it does not significantly increase recall. The results of this study show that guests in a theme park setting can recall information from an educational program. Guests may not enter this hybrid aquarium with the intention of learning, but recall, one of the components in learning, does occur.

  15. Monkeys show recognition without priming in a classification task

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    Humans show visual perceptual priming by identifying degraded images faster and more accurately if they have seen the original images, while simultaneously failing to recognize the same images. Such priming is commonly thought, with little evidence, to be widely distributed phylogenetically. Following Brodbeck (1997), we trained rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) to categorize photographs according to content (e.g., birds, fish, flowers, people). In probe trials, we tested whether monkeys were faster or more accurate at categorizing degraded versions of previously seen images (primed) than degraded versions of novel images (unprimed). Monkeys categorized reliably, but showed no benefit from having previously seen the images. This finding was robust across manipulations of image quality (color, grayscale, line drawings), type of image degradation (occlusion, blurring), levels of processing, and number of repetitions of the prime. By contrast, in probe matching-to-sample trials, monkeys recognized the primes, demonstrating that they remembered the primes and could discriminate them from other images in the same category under the conditions used to test for priming. Two experiments that replicated Brodbeck’s (1997) procedures also produced no evidence of priming. This inability to find priming in monkeys under perceptual conditions sufficient for recognition presents a puzzle. PMID:22975587

  16. Mixtures of thermostable enzymes show high performance in biomass saccharification.

    PubMed

    Kallioinen, Anne; Puranen, Terhi; Siika-aho, Matti

    2014-07-01

    Optimal enzyme mixtures of six Trichoderma reesei enzymes and five thermostable enzyme components were developed for the hydrolysis of hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw, alkaline oxidised sugar cane bagasse and steam-exploded bagasse by statistically designed experiments. Preliminary studies to narrow down the optimization parameters showed that a cellobiohydrolase/endoglucanase (CBH/EG) ratio of 4:1 or higher of thermostable enzymes gave the maximal CBH-EG synergy in the hydrolysis of hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw. The composition of optimal enzyme mixtures depended clearly on the substrate and on the enzyme system studied. The optimal enzyme mixture of thermostable enzymes was dominated by Cel7A and required a relatively high amount of xylanase, whereas with T. reesei enzymes, the high proportion of Cel7B appeared to provide the required xylanase activity. The main effect of the pretreatment method was that the required proportion of xylanase was higher and the proportion of Cel7A lower in the optimized mixture for hydrolysis of alkaline oxidised bagasse than steam-exploded bagasse. In prolonged hydrolyses, less Cel7A was generally required in the optimal mixture. Five-component mixtures of thermostable enzymes showed comparable hydrolysis yields to those of commercial enzyme mixtures.

  17. Human-directed social behaviour in dogs shows significant heritability.

    PubMed

    Persson, M E; Roth, L S V; Johnsson, M; Wright, D; Jensen, P

    2015-04-01

    Through domestication and co-evolution with humans, dogs have developed abilities to attract human attention, e.g. in a manner of seeking assistance when faced with a problem solving task. The aims of this study were to investigate within breed variation in human-directed contact seeking in dogs and to estimate its genetic basis. To do this, 498 research beagles, bred and kept under standardized conditions, were tested in an unsolvable problem task. Contact seeking behaviours recorded included both eye contact and physical interactions. Behavioural data was summarized through a principal component analysis, resulting in four components: test interactions, social interactions, eye contact and physical contact. Females scored significantly higher on social interactions and physical contact and age had an effect on eye contact scores. Narrow sense heritabilities (h(2) ) of the two largest components were estimated at 0.32 and 0.23 but were not significant for the last two components. These results show that within the studied dog population, behavioural variation in human-directed social behaviours was sex dependent and that the utilization of eye contact seeking increased with age and experience. Hence, heritability estimates indicate a significant genetic contribution to the variation found in human-directed social interactions, suggesting that social skills in dogs have a genetic basis, but can also be shaped and enhanced through individual experiences. This research gives the opportunity to further investigate the genetics behind dogs' social skills, which could also play a significant part into research on human social disorders such as autism.

  18. Children Show Heightened Memory for Threatening Social Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltazar, Nicole C.; Shutts, Kristin; Kinzler, Katherine D.

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether a negativity bias in social perception extends to preschool-aged children's memory for the details of others' social actions and experiences. After learning about individuals who committed nice or mean social actions, children in Experiment 1 were more accurate at remembering who was mean compared with who…

  19. Psychology Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Ken; Tew, Mark D.; Williams, John E.

    2001-01-01

    A goal of the PsychExperiments project was to reduce the financial burden on psychology departments for hardware/software used in their laboratories. In its third year, the PsychExperiments site now hosts 39 experiments. Over 200 classrooms worldwide have signed up as official site users and there have been nearly 10,000 data sessions conducted.…

  20. Variation in the peacock's train shows a genetic component.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Marion; Cotgreave, Peter; Pike, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    Female peafowl (Pavo cristatus) show a strong mating preference for males with elaborate trains. This, however, poses something of a paradox because intense directional selection should erode genetic variation in the males' trains, so that females will no longer benefit by discriminating among males on the basis of these traits. This situation is known as the 'lek paradox', and leads to the theoretical expectation of low heritability in the peacock's train. We used two independent breeding experiments, involving a total of 42 sires and 86 of their male offspring, to estimate the narrow sense heritabilities of male ornaments and other morphometric traits. Contrary to expectation, we found significant levels of heritability in a trait known to be used by females during mate choice (train length), while no significant heritabilities were evident for other, non-fitness related morphological traits (tarsus length, body weight or spur length). This study adds to the building body of evidence that high levels of additive genetic variance can exist in secondary sexual traits under directional selection, but further emphasizes the main problem of what maintains this variation.

  1. Extracts of marine algae show inhibitory activity against osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells that play a crucial role in bone resorption. The imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation results in osteoporosis. Therefore, substances that can suppress osteoclast formation are potential candidate materials for drug development or functional foods. There have been reports that extracts or purified compounds from marine micro- and macroalgae can suppress osteoclast differentiation. Symbioimine, isolated from the cultured dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., had suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation in osteoclast-like cells. Norzoanthamine, isolated from the colonial zoanthid Zoanthas sp., has been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice. With regard to marine extracts, the fucoxanthin-rich component from brown algae has been shown to have suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation. An extract of Sargassum fusiforme has recently been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity. This extract suppressed both osteoclast differentiation and accelerated osteoblast formation in separate in vitro experiments. It also showed antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice by regulating the balance between bone resorption and bone formation. These marine algae and their extracts may be sources of marine medicinal foods for the prevention of osteoporosis.

  2. Limb proportions show developmental plasticity in response to embryo movement

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, A. S.; Charlton, B. G.; Hutchinson, J. R.; Gustafsson, T.; McGonnell, I. M.; Timmons, J. A.; Pitsillides, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Animals have evolved limb proportions adapted to different environments, but it is not yet clear to what extent these proportions are directly influenced by the environment during prenatal development. The developing skeleton experiences mechanical loading resulting from embryo movement. We tested the hypothesis that environmentally-induced changes in prenatal movement influence embryonic limb growth to alter proportions. We show that incubation temperature influences motility and limb bone growth in West African Dwarf crocodiles, producing altered limb proportions which may, influence post-hatching performance. Pharmacological immobilisation of embryonic chickens revealed that altered motility, independent of temperature, may underpin this growth regulation. Use of the chick also allowed us to merge histological, immunochemical and cell proliferation labelling studies to evaluate changes in growth plate organisation, and unbiased array profiling to identify specific cellular and transcriptional targets of embryo movement. This disclosed that movement alters limb proportions and regulates chondrocyte proliferation in only specific growth plates. This selective targeting is related to intrinsic mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway activity in individual growth plates. Our findings provide new insights into how environmental factors can be integrated to influence cellular activity in growing bones and ultimately gross limb morphology, to generate phenotypic variation during prenatal development. PMID:28165010

  3. Limb proportions show developmental plasticity in response to embryo movement.

    PubMed

    Pollard, A S; Charlton, B G; Hutchinson, J R; Gustafsson, T; McGonnell, I M; Timmons, J A; Pitsillides, A A

    2017-02-06

    Animals have evolved limb proportions adapted to different environments, but it is not yet clear to what extent these proportions are directly influenced by the environment during prenatal development. The developing skeleton experiences mechanical loading resulting from embryo movement. We tested the hypothesis that environmentally-induced changes in prenatal movement influence embryonic limb growth to alter proportions. We show that incubation temperature influences motility and limb bone growth in West African Dwarf crocodiles, producing altered limb proportions which may, influence post-hatching performance. Pharmacological immobilisation of embryonic chickens revealed that altered motility, independent of temperature, may underpin this growth regulation. Use of the chick also allowed us to merge histological, immunochemical and cell proliferation labelling studies to evaluate changes in growth plate organisation, and unbiased array profiling to identify specific cellular and transcriptional targets of embryo movement. This disclosed that movement alters limb proportions and regulates chondrocyte proliferation in only specific growth plates. This selective targeting is related to intrinsic mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway activity in individual growth plates. Our findings provide new insights into how environmental factors can be integrated to influence cellular activity in growing bones and ultimately gross limb morphology, to generate phenotypic variation during prenatal development.

  4. On the Poggendorff Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Ricardo Lopes; Silva, P. A. S.; Borges, Paulo de Faria

    2015-01-01

    Poggendorff showed experimentally, in the middle of the 19th century, that the weight of an Atwood machine is reduced when it is brought to motion. His experiment has been revisited from time to time, making use of instrumentation that reflects the technological development of the moment. In this paper, the evolution of the experiment is briefly…

  5. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  6. Electron diffraction from polycrystalline materials showing stress induced preferred orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    1999-07-01

    The Gibbs free energy as generalized by J. F. Nye [Physical Properties of Crystals (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1957), p. 179] is minimized in thermodynamic systems held at constant temperature and constant stress. This function is orientation dependent in all crystal systems in stress fields which are not purely hydrostatic. There are situations in which preferred orientation arises as a result of the synthesis of materials under impressed stress conditions such as thin film growth under ion bombardment and the pressing of powders into solids. Here, we derive the orientational constraints for cubic crystals which result from growth under a general biaxial stress field. The sign of the expression δ=s11-s12-1/2s44 determines the behavior of a cubic crystal. Electron diffraction patterns of face-centered-cubic specimens with both positive and negative values of δ are calculated using a program in MATLAB and displayed in a form suitable for direct comparison with experiment. The use of a biaxial stress with unequal principal components for producing highly oriented polycrystalline material is discussed. In the case of δ positive, as occurs in silicon, the preferred orientation is simply an alignment of the <100> directions along the principal stresses. For δ negative, as occurs in titanium nitride, the preferred orientation depends on the ratio of the principal stresses and low index directions are aligned with the principal stresses only when the principal stresses are either equal or one of them is zero. In the general case, arc-like diffraction patterns are produced. The results of a calculation of a diffraction pattern from a cross-sectional TiN film are compared with diffraction patterns reported by L. Hultman et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 78, 5395 (1995)] and show good agreement.

  7. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Introduced are two experiments: radon detection method shows real data using vacuum cleaner, soft toilet paper, and Geiger-Muller tube; critical potentials measurement describes the operation of Teltron tube with VELA. (YP)

  8. Simulated Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snadden, R. B.; Runquist, O.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which a programmable calculator is employed as a data generating system for simulated laboratory experiments. The example used as an illustration is a simulated conductimetric titration of an aqueous solution of HC1 with an aqueous solution of NaOH. (Author/EB)

  9. Khalid Alshibli shows a child MGM apparatus at outreach event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Khalid Alshibli of Louisiana State University, project scientist for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM-III) experiment, uses a jar of sand and a training model of the MGM apparatus to explain the experiment to two young Virginia students. The activity was part of the Space Research and You education event held by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research on June 25, 2002, in Arlington, VA, to highlight the research that will be conducted on STS-107.

  10. site plan, floor plan, southeast and east elevations, detail showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    site plan, floor plan, southeast and east elevations, detail showing original front entrance, interior detail showing fireplace in elevation - Neiman House, 1930 Providence Road, Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, NC

  11. Mixture Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2007-12-01

    A mixture experiment involves combining two or more components in various proportions or amounts and then measuring one or more responses for the resulting end products. Other factors that affect the response(s), such as process variables and/or the total amount of the mixture, may also be studied in the experiment. A mixture experiment design specifies the combinations of mixture components and other experimental factors (if any) to be studied and the response variable(s) to be measured. Mixture experiment data analyses are then used to achieve the desired goals, which may include (i) understanding the effects of components and other factors on the response(s), (ii) identifying components and other factors with significant and nonsignificant effects on the response(s), (iii) developing models for predicting the response(s) as functions of the mixture components and any other factors, and (iv) developing end-products with desired values and uncertainties of the response(s). Given a mixture experiment problem, a practitioner must consider the possible approaches for designing the experiment and analyzing the data, and then select the approach best suited to the problem. Eight possible approaches include 1) component proportions, 2) mathematically independent variables, 3) slack variable, 4) mixture amount, 5) component amounts, 6) mixture process variable, 7) mixture of mixtures, and 8) multi-factor mixture. The article provides an overview of the mixture experiment designs, models, and data analyses for these approaches.

  12. Hydronuclear experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, R.N.; Westervelt, D.R.

    1987-02-01

    Hydronuclear experiments, a method for assessing some aspects of nuclear weapon safety, were conducted at Los Alamos during the 1958 to 1961 moratorium on nuclear testing. The experiments resulted in subcritical multiplying assemblies or a very slight degree of supercriticality and, in some cases, involved a slight, but insignificant, fission energy release. These experiments helped to identify so-called one-point safety problems associated with some of the nuclear weapons systems of that time. The need for remedial action was demonstrated, although some of the necessary design changes could not be made until after the resumption of weapons testing at the end of 1961.

  13. 42 CFR 456.655 - Validation of showings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Validation of showings. 456.655 Section 456.655... Showing of an Effective Institutional Utilization Control Program § 456.655 Validation of showings. (a) The Administrator will periodically validate showings submitted under § 456.654. Validation...

  14. 42 CFR 456.655 - Validation of showings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Validation of showings. 456.655 Section 456.655... Showing of an Effective Institutional Utilization Control Program § 456.655 Validation of showings. (a) The Administrator will periodically validate showings submitted under § 456.654. Validation...

  15. Interpretive Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHaan, Frank, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interpretative experiment involving the application of symmetry and temperature-dependent proton and fluorine nmr spectroscopy to the solution of structural and kinetic problems in coordination chemistry. (MLH)

  16. Wanted: Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Floyd D.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a project to produce a series of laboratory manuals and instructional materials in which nuclear experiments are presented for the undergraduate advanced laboratory. The manuals are being compiled in the areas of physics, chemistry, geology and environmental sciences. (BR)

  17. Experiment Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschoren, Joaquin; Blockeel, Hendrik

    Next to running machine learning algorithms based on inductive queries, much can be learned by immediately querying the combined results of many prior studies. Indeed, all around the globe, thousands of machine learning experiments are being executed on a daily basis, generating a constant stream of empirical information on machine learning techniques. While the information contained in these experiments might have many uses beyond their original intent, results are typically described very concisely in papers and discarded afterwards. If we properly store and organize these results in central databases, they can be immediately reused for further analysis, thus boosting future research. In this chapter, we propose the use of experiment databases: databases designed to collect all the necessary details of these experiments, and to intelligently organize them in online repositories to enable fast and thorough analysis of a myriad of collected results. They constitute an additional, queriable source of empirical meta-data based on principled descriptions of algorithm executions, without reimplementing the algorithms in an inductive database. As such, they engender a very dynamic, collaborative approach to experimentation, in which experiments can be freely shared, linked together, and immediately reused by researchers all over the world. They can be set up for personal use, to share results within a lab or to create open, community-wide repositories. Here, we provide a high-level overview of their design, and use an existing experiment database to answer various interesting research questions about machine learning algorithms and to verify a number of recent studies.

  18. Experiments in Ice Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, P. F.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments in ice physics that demonstrate the behavior and properties of ice. Show that ice behaves as an ionic conductor in which charge is transferred by the movement of protons, its electrical conductivity is highly temperature-dependent, and its dielectric properties show dramatic variation in the kilohertz range. (Author/GA)

  19. TRMM Satellite Shows Bertha's Heavy Rain Pushed From Wind Shear

    NASA Video Gallery

    TRMM Satellite Shows Bertha's Heavy Rain Pushed From Wind Shear This 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Bertha on Aug. 1 was created from TRMM satellite data. It shows (from the south) intense thunderstor...

  20. 78. VIEW OF UNCOMPLETED RESERVOIR, SHOWING FOREBAY AND FLUME; ALSO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. VIEW OF UNCOMPLETED RESERVOIR, SHOWING FOREBAY AND FLUME; ALSO SHOWING POOL ARRANGEMENT FOR TEMPORARILY UTILIZING WATER WITHOUT FILLING THE RESERVOIR, Print No. 232, April 1904 - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  1. 1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING COVERED BARGE (VESSEL 37) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING COVERED BARGE (VESSEL 37) IN CENTER OF PICTURE WITH FOUR HATCHES SHOWING IN SUPERSTRUCTURE Charles Wisniewski, photographer, January 1985 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 37, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  2. 22. DETAIL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING FISH LADDER AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING FISH LADDER AT NORTH END OF DAM/SPILLWAY; VIEW SHOWS SECTION OF FISH LADDER NEAR WHERE IT ENTERS THE COLUMBIA RIVER. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  3. 16. SECOND FLOOR, EAST ROOM, SHOWING DOORWAYS TO BOXED WINDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. SECOND FLOOR, EAST ROOM, SHOWING DOORWAYS TO BOXED WINDER STAIRWAYS-- UP AND DOWN-- AND WALL CABINET WITH DOORS OPEN TO SHOW STAIRWAY - High Farm, House, Creek Road, 1 mile West of Easton Road, Pipersville, Bucks County, PA

  4. 94. View looking south showing foundation equipment at work on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. View looking south showing foundation equipment at work on two of the piers. The view also shows the two completed cylinders in the midstream cluster of four. - Carquinez Bridge, Spanning Carquinez Strait at Interstate 80, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  5. The Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariana Nicoara, Floare

    2016-04-01

    My name is Nicoara Floarea and I am teacher at Secondary School Calatele and I teach students from preparatory class and the second grade . They are six-eight years old. In my activity, for introducing scientific concepts to my students, I use various and active methods or traditional methods including experiments. The experiment stimulates students' curiosity, their creativity, the understanding and knowledge taught accessibility. I propose you two such experiments: The life cycle of the plants (long-term experiment, with rigorous observation time):We use beans, wheat or other; They are grown in pots and on the cotton soaked with water,keeping under students' observation protecting them ( just soak them regularly) and we waiting the plants rise. For discussions and comments of plant embryo development we use the plants which rose on the cotton soaked with water plants at the end of the first week. Last school year we had in the pot climbing beans which in May made pods. They were not too great but our experiment was a success. The students could deduce that there will develop those big beans which after drying will be planted again. The influence of light on plants (average duration experiment with the necessary observation time): We use two pots in which plants are of the same type (two geraniums), one of them is situated so as to get direct sunlight and other plant we put in a closed box. Although we wet both plants after a week we see that the plant that benefited from sunlight has turned strain in direct sunlight, developing normally in return the plant out of the box I have yellowed leaves, photosynthesis does not She has occurred . Students will understand the vital role of the Sun in plants' life, both in the classroom and in nature. The experiment is a method of teaching students extremely pleasant, with a remarkable percentage of acquiring more knowledge.

  6. Casimir Forces Between Thermally Activated Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    M6xico, Circuito de la Investigaci6n Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria , M6xico, DF, 04510, M6xico. ABSTRACT We present a theoretical study of the...function of the slabs is needed. For a nanocomposite slab made of a host material with a dielectric function cj,(o) and inclusions with dielectric...8-2a wheref is the volume fraction of the inclusions and ox is the effective polarizability given by the Maxwell Garnett theory. This expression for

  7. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-27

    levitation , as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.090403 PACS numbers: 03.70.+k, 03.65.w...displacements away from the symmetry axis, so that the system does not support stable levitation , consistent with the theorem of Ref. [1]. We...interaction is unambiguously repulsive.) Repulsive forces also arise for fluid-separated geometries [7] or magnetic [8,9] or magnetoelectric materials

  8. Casimir Energy in Non-Covariant Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giampiero; Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu.; Kirsten, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    The zero-point energy of a conducting spherical shell is studied by imposing the axial gauge via path-integral methods, with boundary conditions on the electromagnetic potential and ghost fields. The coupled modes are then found to be the temporal and longitudinal modes for the Maxwell field. The resulting system can be decoupled by studying a fourth-order differential equation with boundary conditions on longitudinal modes and their second derivatives. Complete agreement is found with a previous path-integral analysis in the Lorenz gauge, and with Boyer's value. This investigation leads to a better understanding of how gauge independence is achieved in quantum field theory on backgrounds with boundary.

  9. 21 CFR 1314.150 - Order To show cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Order To show cause. 1314.150 Section 1314.150 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RETAIL SALE OF SCHEDULED LISTED CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Order to Show Cause § 1314.150 Order To show cause. (a) If, upon information gathered...

  10. 20. MEMBER 'A' SHOWS TENON AS USED IN POST 'A' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. MEMBER 'A' SHOWS TENON AS USED IN POST 'A' (TN-159A-19), MEMBER 'B' IS BEAM 'B' IN TN-159A-19 AND SHOWS METHOD OF JOINING THESE MEMBERS. MEMBER 'C' SHOWS MORTISE IN BEAM 'B'. - Caleb Crosby Threshing Barn, Noeton (moved to Norris Dam State Park, Lake City), Morristown, Hamblen County, TN

  11. Do Infants Show Social Preferences for People Differing in Race?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzler, Katherine D.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2011-01-01

    Do infants develop meaningful social preferences among novel individuals based on their social group membership? If so, do these social preferences depend on familiarity on any dimension, or on a more specific focus on particular kinds of categorical information? The present experiments use methods that have previously demonstrated infants' social…

  12. Sex-Specific Labour Market Indicators: What They Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Sara; Johnson, Lawrence Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Data indicate that women's experience in the labor market is substantially different from men's. Women work in different sectors for fewer hours; women have lower rates of education and literacy; and women are more likely to be unemployed, underemployed, or outside the labor force. (JOW)

  13. Homeschoolers on to College: What Research Shows Us

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    Experience and anecdotes have led many people to believe that homeschool parents were either move-to-the-country anarchist goat-herders, or right-wing Bible-thumpers, and their children were either mathematically-limited, due to Mama's fear of math, or child prodigies in rocket-science who were unthinkably socially hindered. Although one can find…

  14. Experiment 2042

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Zora V.; Dennis, Bert R.; Dreesen, Donald S.; Fehler, Michael C.; House, Leigh S.; Walter, Fritz; Zyvoloski, George A.

    1984-09-10

    Experiment 2042, an injection test in EE-3, was conducted from May 15, 1984 through May 19, 1984. During this four day test ~2 million gallons of water were injected with a maximum injection rate of ~10BPM at 6000 psi. It was planned as a pumping test of the lower zone of well EE-3 (the open hole region from 11,400 ft to 11,648 ft) to test the reservoir characteristics and fracture-seismic system first created during Experiment 2025. However early in the experiment it became apparent that there was some sort connection between the lower zone and the upper "low pressure" zone in EE-3 (from the casing shoe at 10374 ft to about 10900 ft). Available information ruled out a packer failure or other direct connection between these zones so the experiment was continued as planned. Although not a major goal of the experiment, it was hoped that fractures would propagate from EE-3 to EE-2, so hydraulic communication could be established between the two wells, however this did not occur.

  15. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  16. THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    KRAJEWSKI,R.F.; ANDREWS,J.W.; WEI,G.

    1999-09-01

    A laboratory experiment has been conducted which tests for the effects of distribution system purging on system Delivery Effectiveness (DE) as defined in ASHRAE 152P. The experiment is described in its configuration, instrumentation, and data acquisition system. Data gathered in the experiment is given and discussed. The results show that purging of the distribution system alone does not offer any improvement of the system DE. Additional supporting tests were conducted regarding experimental simulations of buffer zones and bare pipe and are also discussed.

  17. 56. View looking east. Detail showing an end of three ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. View looking east. Detail showing an end of three crib side walls, being flown by the derrick. The upper part of the fourth member, marked with an identifying tag, shows evidence of burning. Notice how well the lower members fit together. This view shows that individual timber members were worked, in part, after assembly. - Wabash & Erie Canal, Lock No. 2, 8 miles east of Fort Wayne, adjacent to U.S. Route 24, New Haven, Allen County, IN

  18. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. 26. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHWEST INSIDE TRANSFORMER ROOM, SHOWING OIL FILLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHWEST INSIDE TRANSFORMER ROOM, SHOWING OIL- FILLED TRANSFORMER POTS - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  20. 4. View facing southwest showing the Silvertop Diner, Providence Fruit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View facing southwest showing the Silvertop Diner, Providence Fruit & Produce Building, and Merchants' Cold Storage Warehouse. - Provisions Warehouse Historic District, Kinsley & Harris Avenues, Providence, Providence County, RI

  1. 29. Detail view north showing amperage and voltage meters, operator's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Detail view north showing amperage and voltage meters, operator's room, west operator's house. - Yellow Mill Bridge, Spanning Yellow Mill Channel at Stratford Avenue, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  2. 11. Exterior detail view of northeast corner, showing stucco finish ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Exterior detail view of northeast corner, showing stucco finish and woodwork details - American Railway Express Company Freight Building, 1060 Northeast Division Street, Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  3. EAST AND NORTH SIDES OF BLOWER HOUSE SHOWING POWER WHEELS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST AND NORTH SIDES OF BLOWER HOUSE SHOWING POWER WHEELS AND RACEWAY, LOOKING SOUTH. - Tannehill Furnace, 12632 Confederate Parkway, Tannehill Historical State Park, Bucksville, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  4. 17. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SORTING AND SHIPPING SHED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SORTING AND SHIPPING SHED WITH SAWMILL BEHIND - Ichabod T. Williams & Sons Sawmill & Veneer Plant, Roosevelt Avenue at Carteret Avenue, Carteret, Middlesex County, NJ

  5. 25. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST INSIDE TRANSFORMER ROOM, SHOWING TRANSFORMERS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST INSIDE TRANSFORMER ROOM, SHOWING TRANSFORMERS AND KNIFE SWITCHES - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  6. Contextual view showing northeastern eucalyptus windbreak and portion of citrus ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view showing northeastern eucalyptus windbreak and portion of citrus orchard. Camera facing 118" east-southeast. - Goerlitz House, 9893 Highland Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 14. View showing detail of truss (unidentified). Drawing courtesy Engineering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View showing detail of truss (unidentified). Drawing courtesy Engineering Department, City of Cleveland. - Superior Avenue Viaduct, Cleveland East & West side, Cuyahoga Valley Vicinity, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  8. 4. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF MAIN AND EAST ELEVATIONS, SHOWING VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF MAIN AND EAST ELEVATIONS, SHOWING VIEW TOWARD CARPENTER'S HALL - Carpenters' Company, Front Store, 322 Chestnut Street & Carpenters' Court, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 54. VIEW SHOWING THE PLACEMENT OF SPIDER WEB BRACING, SHOOFLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. VIEW SHOWING THE PLACEMENT OF SPIDER WEB BRACING, SHOOFLY BRIDGE, January 1935 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  10. 246. View showing the curvilinear alignment of the parkway on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    246. View showing the curvilinear alignment of the parkway on a ridge. Looking northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  11. 5. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING BRIDGE COUNTERWEIGHT New York, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING BRIDGE COUNTERWEIGHT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Niantic Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  12. 2. GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTH SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTH SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST SIDES AND CLERESTORY ARRANGEMENT - Sulphur Springs Methodist Campground, Sulphur Springs Road (Sulphur Springs), Sulphur Springs, Washington County, TN

  13. New rain shed (Building No. 241) interior showing posts, braces, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    New rain shed (Building No. 241) interior showing posts, braces, and roof structure. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  14. 13. VIEW INTO BLOCK AREA SHOWING KEY MECHANISM, NOTE FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW INTO BLOCK AREA SHOWING KEY MECHANISM, NOTE FLOOR SEPARATION AT THRESHOLD AND KEY-WINDING MECHANISM - Montgomery County Jail, Washington & Spring Streets, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, IN

  15. 1. Aerial view, looking northeast up Newark Bay, showing entire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Aerial view, looking northeast up Newark Bay, showing entire island Charles Wisniewski, photographer, January 1985 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  16. PERSPECTIVE VIEW SHOWING SOUTH SIDE OF BUILDING, LOOKING WESTNORTHWEST DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW SHOWING SOUTH SIDE OF BUILDING, LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST DOWN HARRISON AVENUE - Pearce Manufacturing Company, Factory A, Harrison Avenue West at Wilkens, Latrobe, Westmoreland County, PA

  17. INTERIOR VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO LABORATORY, SHOWING HANDHAMMERED ALUMINUM DOORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO LABORATORY, SHOWING HAND-HAMMERED ALUMINUM DOORS AND MARBLE. NOTE ALUMINUM LIGHT FIXTURE - Alcoa Research Laboratory, Freeport Road, New Kensington, Westmoreland County, PA

  18. Interior view, detail of the staircase to show the burnished ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, detail of the staircase to show the burnished aluminum and brass balustrade - Departmental Auditorium, Constitution Avenue between Twelfth and Fourteenth Streets, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 7. Photocopy of photograph (from Broome County Historical Society) showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph (from Broome County Historical Society) showing SWIMMERS, PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN FACING NORTHEAST - Charles F. Johnson Pool, Charles F. Johnson Park, Johnson City, Broome County, NY

  20. 5. GENERAL VIEW, SECOND FLOOR, SHOWING TYPICAL WINDOW TRIM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL VIEW, SECOND FLOOR, SHOWING TYPICAL WINDOW TRIM AND THE PRESSED METAL CEILING, VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST. - 443 Seventh Street, Northwest (Commercial Building), Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 23. VIEW SHOWING SALT RIVER PROJECT CREWS SLIPFORMING LATERAL DURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW SHOWING SALT RIVER PROJECT CREWS SLIPFORMING LATERAL DURING REHABILITATION AND BETTERMENT PROGRAM Photographer: unknown. April 1968 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 1. Southeast elevation of Oil House showing loading platform. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Southeast elevation of Oil House showing loading platform. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Oil House, 650 feet Southeast of Cliff & Mechanic Streets, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  3. 24. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING BLOWER BUILDING. INEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING BLOWER BUILDING. INEEL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-60-4407. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Detail view of upper southwest corner, showing representative view of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of upper southwest corner, showing representative view of cornice and window ornamentation - Hungarian Sick Benefit Societies Building, 1406-1418 State Street, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  5. 13. FOURTH FLOOR ROASTING ROOM, SHOWING CLERESTORY. VIEW TO SOUTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. FOURTH FLOOR ROASTING ROOM, SHOWING CLERESTORY. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, McFadden Coffee & Spice Company, Factory & Warehouse, 145 First Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  6. 12. TRANSMISSION GEARING SHOWING RELATION TO SEGMENT GEAR ON WATERWHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. TRANSMISSION GEARING SHOWING RELATION TO SEGMENT GEAR ON WATERWHEEL william E. Barrett, photographer, 1973 (copy negative) - Thomas Shepherd's Grist Mill, High Street Vicinity, Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, WV

  7. 2. VIEW SOUTH SHOWING NORTHEAST ELEVATION; BRICK CORBELLING, BUTTRESSES AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH SHOWING NORTHEAST ELEVATION; BRICK CORBELLING, BUTTRESSES AND ART DECO STAINED GLASS - Poletown Historic District, St. Michael's Greek Catholic Church, 2390 East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI

  8. 6. SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AT CALVERT STREET, SHOWING LEON HERMANT ALLEGORICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AT CALVERT STREET, SHOWING LEON HERMANT ALLEGORICAL RELIEF OF TRANSPORTATION BY AUTOMOBILE - Calvert Street Bridge, Spanning Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 25. DETAIL SHOWING BRAKING MECHANISM FOR TRAIN, NOTE HOT RAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL SHOWING BRAKING MECHANISM FOR TRAIN, NOTE HOT RAIL ON LEFT - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  10. 3. Photocopy of 1932 photograph showing another general view of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of 1932 photograph showing another general view of the mansion, looking northwest. Original photograph at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. - Strawberry Mansion, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. 13. Detail showing canopy at southeast corner; note single column ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail showing canopy at southeast corner; note single column supporting structure - Fort Hood, World War II Temporary Buildings, Cold Storage Building, Seventeenth Street, Killeen, Bell County, TX

  12. Video game players show more precise multisensory temporal processing abilities.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Sarah E; Woldorff, Marty G; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2010-05-01

    Recent research has demonstrated enhanced visual attention and visual perception in individuals with extensive experience playing action video games. These benefits manifest in several realms, but much remains unknown about the ways in which video game experience alters perception and cognition. In the present study, we examined whether video game players' benefits generalize beyond vision to multisensory processing by presenting auditory and visual stimuli within a short temporal window to video game players and non-video game players. Participants performed two discrimination tasks, both of which revealed benefits for video game players: In a simultaneity judgment task, video game players were better able to distinguish whether simple visual and auditory stimuli occurred at the same moment or slightly offset in time, and in a temporal-order judgment task, they revealed an enhanced ability to determine the temporal sequence of multisensory stimuli. These results suggest that people with extensive experience playing video games display benefits that extend beyond the visual modality to also impact multisensory processing.

  13. HEGRA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The La Palma cosmic-ray observatory HEGRA (High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy) is an air shower experiment, located at the OBSERVATORIO DEL ROQUE DE LOS MUCHACHOS (2200 m above sea level, 28.75°N, 17.89°W) on the Canary island of La Palma, and is operated by institutes from Germany, Spain and Yerevan....

  14. Time dependent patient no-show predictive modelling development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Li; Hanauer, David A

    2016-05-09

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop evident-based predictive no-show models considering patients' each past appointment status, a time-dependent component, as an independent predictor to improve predictability. Design/methodology/approach - A ten-year retrospective data set was extracted from a pediatric clinic. It consisted of 7,291 distinct patients who had at least two visits along with their appointment characteristics, patient demographics, and insurance information. Logistic regression was adopted to develop no-show models using two-thirds of the data for training and the remaining data for validation. The no-show threshold was then determined based on minimizing the misclassification of show/no-show assignments. There were a total of 26 predictive model developed based on the number of available past appointments. Simulation was employed to test the effective of each model on costs of patient wait time, physician idle time, and overtime. Findings - The results demonstrated the misclassification rate and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic gradually improved as more appointment history was included until around the 20th predictive model. The overbooking method with no-show predictive models suggested incorporating up to the 16th model and outperformed other overbooking methods by as much as 9.4 per cent in the cost per patient while allowing two additional patients in a clinic day. Research limitations/implications - The challenge now is to actually implement the no-show predictive model systematically to further demonstrate its robustness and simplicity in various scheduling systems. Originality/value - This paper provides examples of how to build the no-show predictive models with time-dependent components to improve the overbooking policy. Accurately identifying scheduled patients' show/no-show status allows clinics to proactively schedule patients to reduce the negative impact of patient no-shows.

  15. 13. VIEW SHOWING MOST OF THE PERIMETER FROM SPILLWAY BOX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW SHOWING MOST OF THE PERIMETER FROM SPILLWAY BOX TO END OF EAST DAM. FOREGROUND VIEW SHOWS TRIPLE WALL CONSTRUCTION OF TONGUE AND GROOVE PLANKING USED IN CRIBBING - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  16. 2. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING WOODEN CRIBBING WITH LOWERED LAKE LEVEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL VIEW SHOWING WOODEN CRIBBING WITH LOWERED LAKE LEVEL, EAST DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST (View is middle of the perimeter showing in MT-88-A-1 above.) - Three Bears Lake & Dams, East Dam, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  17. 47 CFR 101.411 - Supplementary showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Supplementary showing required. 101.411 Section 101.411 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Developmental Authorizations § 101.411 Supplementary showing required....

  18. Cross Section; Half Longitudinal Section Showing Middle Wall Reinforced with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cross Section; Half Longitudinal Section Showing Middle Wall Reinforced with Arch; Part Long Section Showing Inside of External Side Wall; East Entrance; Part Side South External; Part Reflected Plan of Soffite of Floor; Part Reflected Plan of Soffite of Roof - Blenheim Covered Bridge, Spanning Schoharie River, North Blenheim, Schoharie County, NY

  19. Showing and Telling: The Difference That Makes a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, David

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to clarify an essential difference between the ways in which pictures and words convey meaning. Examines one attempt to differentiate and characterize various types of picture books and concludes by showing how Anthony Browne exploits the distinction between showing and telling to create the atmosphere of uncertainty and mystery in his…

  20. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  1. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  2. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  3. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  4. 47 CFR 73.33 - Antenna systems; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems; showing required. 73.33... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.33 Antenna systems; showing required. (a) An application for authority to install a broadcast antenna shall specify a definite site and include...

  5. 31. Photographic copy of drawing showing profile of bridge after ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photographic copy of drawing showing profile of bridge after the 1888-1889 and 1899-1900 reconstructions; also shows profile of bridge before 1888 (Martin Sigvart Grytbak, Wabasha St. Bridge, Formerly St. Paul Bridge, 1919); profile of Wabasha street bridge - Wabasha Street Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at Wabasha Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  6. 15. BALD MOUNTAIN MILL, INTERIOR SHOWING PRECIPITATION AREA FROM NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. BALD MOUNTAIN MILL, INTERIOR SHOWING PRECIPITATION AREA FROM NORTH, c. 1934. SHOWS PRECIPITATION TANK No. 1 (NOTE LOCKS), ZINC FEEDER WITH MIXING CONE, VACUUM RECEIVER AND PIPING. CREDIT WR. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  7. 77 FR 1513 - Air Show and Air Races; Public Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Air Show and Air Races; Public Hearing TIME AND DATE: 9 a.m., Tuesday, January 10, 2012... hearing is to examine current regulations and oversight practices for air shows and air races,...

  8. TV shows on Light Pollution Education for the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, Valentin

    2015-03-01

    TV shows have the biggest impact for the public, so we can use them to inform and educate the public about light pollution and the importance of the dark sky for humanity and for the contemporary society. Some examples used in the TV show Us and the Sky at Columna TV, Romania, are presented.

  9. Survey Shows Blacks Not Concerned Enough about Kidney Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Health officials may have an uphill battle in educating Blacks about a disease that's being called a "silent killer," a recent survey shows. Kidney disease is an illness that's become more prevalent, especially in the nation's Black population, but a survey conducted in Jackson, Atlanta, Baltimore and Cleveland shows only 15 percent of those…

  10. Computer Slide Shows: A Trap for Bad Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemm, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Slide shows presented with software such as PowerPoint or WordPerfect Presentations can trap instructors into bad teaching practices. Research on memory suggests that slide-show instruction can actually be less effective than traditional lecturing when the teacher uses a blackboard or overhead projector. The author proposes a model of classroom…

  11. The Easy Way to Create Computer Slide Shows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1995-01-01

    Discusses techniques for creating computer slide shows. Topics include memory; format; color use; HyperCard and CD-ROM; font styles and sizes; graphs and graphics; the slide show option; special effects; and tips for effective presentation. (Author/AEF)

  12. 43 CFR 3430.2-1 - Initial showing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-1 Initial showing. All preference right coal lease applications shall have contained or shall have... analysis, sulfur content and BTU content of the coal, and all supporting geological and geophysical data... to be mined by surface mining methods, isopachous maps of the overburden. These maps shall show...

  13. The Presentation of Science in Everyday Life: The Science Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watermeyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper constitutes a case-study of the "science show" model of public engagement employed by a company of science communicators focused on the popularization of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subject disciplines with learner constituencies. It examines the potential of the science show to foster the interest…

  14. 47 CFR 73.24 - Broadcast facilities; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Broadcast facilities; showing required. 73.24... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.24 Broadcast facilities; showing required. An authorization for a new AM broadcast station or increase in facilities of an existing station will be...

  15. 47 CFR 101.411 - Supplementary showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplementary showing required. 101.411 Section 101.411 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Developmental Authorizations § 101.411 Supplementary showing required....

  16. 47 CFR 101.411 - Supplementary showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Supplementary showing required. 101.411 Section 101.411 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Developmental Authorizations § 101.411 Supplementary showing required....

  17. "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart": Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trier, James

    2008-01-01

    Comedy Central's popular program "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" is the best critical media literacy program on television, and it can be used in valuable ways in the classroom as part of a media literacy pedagogy. This Media Literacy column provides an overview of the show and its accompanying website and considers ways it might be used in the…

  18. The Daily Show with Jon Stewart: Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trier, James

    2008-01-01

    "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" is one of the best critical literacy programs on television, and in this Media Literacy column the author suggests ways that teachers can use video clips from the show in their classrooms. (For Part 1, see EJ784683.)

  19. View of Lake Sabrina Dam showing wooden planks along the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam showing wooden planks along the upstream face and concrete base added in 1916/1917 and showing the iron grating covering upstream side of outlet structure is visible at lower photo center, view northeast - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  20. 28. VIEW SOUTHWEST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING BASCULE LEAF IN RAISED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW SOUTHWEST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING BASCULE LEAF IN RAISED POSITION WITH THE EXTREME UPPER PORTION OF THE BASCULE RACK GEAR SHOWING IN THE LOWER RIGHT PORTION OF THE PHOTOGRAPH - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT