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Sample records for casimir force

  1. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  2. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    PubMed Central

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  3. Archimedes force on Casimir apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shevrin, Efim

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses a problem of Casimir apparatus in dense medium, put in weak gravitational field. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle with proper account for contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general expression for the corresponding force in metric with cylindrical symmetry. By way of example, we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  4. Controlling Casimir force via coherent driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashid; Abbas, Muqaddar; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-04-01

    A four level atom-field configuration is used to investigate the coherent control of Casimir force between two identical plates made up of chiral atomic media and separated by vacuum of width d. The electromagnetic chirality-induced negative refraction is obtained via atomic coherence. The behavior of Casimir force is investigated using Casimir-Lifshitz formula. It is noticed that Casimir force can be switched from repulsive to attractive and vice versa via coherent control of the driving field. This switching feature provides new possibilities of using the repulsive Casimir force in the development of new emerging technologies, such as, micro-electro-mechanical and nano-electro-mechanical systems, i.e., MEMS and NEMS, respectively.

  5. Repulsive Casimir Force using metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh K.; Mundru, Pattabhiraju C.; Genov, Dentcho A.

    We investigate conditions for Casimir Force (CF) reversal between two parallel half-space metamaterial plates separated by air or vacuum at ambient temperatures. Practically, the Casimir effect can lead to stiction in nanoscale devices, degradation and decreased performance. While material realizations of repulsive CF has been proposed for high dielectric host materials, so far the CF reversal with air/vacuum as intermediate medium remain challenging. Here, we propose a two plate design based on artificial electromagnetic materials known as metamaterials. This configuration allows a simple analytical treatment that accurately describes the large and short distance asymptotics of CF and allows extraction of important parameters such as lower and upper cutoff gap distances that define the repulsive force window. A parametric study has been performed in terms of the plate's dielectric and magnetic plasma frequencies, plate separation distance and temperature. The parametric domain for achieving CF reversal is identified. If successfully implemented the proposed design could potentially result in frictionless bio-fluid transport devices, quantum levitation and coating for ultra-clean room environment.

  6. Resource Letter CF-1: Casimir Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.

    1999-10-01

    This resource letter provides an introductory guide to the literature on the Casimir force. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: introductory articles and books, calculations, dynamical Casimir effect, mechanical analogs, applications, and experiments. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Association of Physics Teachers.}

  7. Casimir forces of metallic microstructures into cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenanakis, George; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical estimate of the Casimir force of a metallic structure embedded into a cubic cavity is proposed. We demonstrate that by calculating the eigenmodes of the system we can determine the Casimir force, which can be either attractive or repulsive, by simply changing the geometry of the structures relative to the walls of the cavity. In this analysis, several cases of structures are taken into account, from rectangular slabs to chiral "omega" particles, and the predicted data are consistent with recent literature. We demonstrate that the sidewalls of the studied cavity contribute decisively to the repulsive Casimir force between the system and the nearby top surface of the cavity. Finally, we provide evidence that the medium embedded into the studied cavity (and especially its permittivity) can change the intensity of the Casimir force, while its repulsive nature, once established (owing to favorable geometrical features), remains quite robust.

  8. Stability of suspended graphene under Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, E. M.; Zarzuela, R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a graphene sheet suspended above a conducting surface. Treating graphene as an elastic membrane subjected to Casimir force, we study its stability against sagging towards the conductor. There exists a critical elevation at the edges below which the central part of the suspended graphene nucleates a trunk that sinks under the action of the Casimir force. The dependence of the critical elevation on temperature, dimensions, and the elastic stress applied to the graphene sheet is computed.

  9. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas; Mota, David F.

    2007-12-15

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models.

  10. Repulsive Casimir force in magnetodielectric plate configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh K.; Mundru, Pattabhiraju C.; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2014-01-01

    The Casimir force between purely dielectric materials is generally attractive and can lead to increased friction and stiction effects in nanoscale devices. While prospective quantum levitating systems have been proposed for high dielectric constant host materials, reversal of the Casimir force with air/vacuum as the intermediate medium remains challenging. Here, the problem of quantum levitation is studied for a system consisting of two parallel magnetodielectric plates. A simple analytical treatment of the problem is provided through the introduction of an upper bound of the force. An explicit sufficient condition for the manifestation of Casimir force repulsion is derived in terms of the plate's material parameters and temperature. The sufficient condition can serve as a useful tool in designing quantum levitating systems with air as the intermediate medium, which is the natural environment for practical microscopic devices.

  11. Casimir forces in systems near jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Justin; Liétor-Santos, Juan-José

    Casimir forces arise when long-ranged fluctuations are geometrically confined between two surfaces. In most cases these fluctuations are quantum or thermal in nature, such as those near a classical critical point, yet this is not a requirement. The T = 0 jamming transition in frictionless, granular systems shares many properties with classical critical points, such as a diverging correlation length, although it has recently been identified as a unique example of a random first-order transition (RFOT). Here we show the existence of Casimir forces between two pinned particles immersed in systems near the frictionless jamming transition. We observe two components to the total force: a short-ranged, depletion force and a long-ranged, repulsive Casimir force. The Casimir force dominates when the pinned particles are much larger than the ambient jammed particles. In this case, we find that particles with the largest forces have the least number of contacts, and that these particles are clustered between the pinned particles, giving rise to a repulsive force which is independent of system preparation and inter-particle potential. We acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1455086.

  12. Casimir forces in the time domain: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-07-15

    We present a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. The method involves the time evolution of electric and magnetic fields in response to a set of current sources, in a modified medium with frequency-independent conductivity. The advantage of this approach is that it allows one to exploit existing FDTD software, without modification, to compute Casimir forces. In this paper, we focus on the derivation, implementation choices, and essential properties of the time-domain algorithm, both considered analytically and illustrated in the simplest parallel-plate geometry.

  13. Casimir force in Schwarzschild metric: Progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Munawar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I report progress on both theoretical and experimental aspects. I describe two approaches to calculating putative effects of gravitational curvature on the Casimir force. The work I describe continues the quest to answer the question: do virtual field excitations follow geodesics?

  14. Critical Casimir forces for colloidal assembly.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V D; Dang, M T; Nguyen, T A; Schall, P

    2016-02-01

    Critical Casimir forces attract increasing interest due to their opportunities for reversible particle assembly in soft matter and nano science. These forces provide a thermodynamic analogue of the celebrated quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. In its thermodynamic analogue, solvent fluctuations, confined between suspended particles, give rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the particles. Due to its unique temperature dependence, this effect allows in situ control of reversible assembly. Both the force magnitude and range vary with the solvent correlation length in a universal manner, adjusting with temperature from fractions of the thermal energy, k B T, and nanometre range to several ten kT and micrometer length scale. Combined with recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of complex particles, critical Casimir forces promise the design and assembly of complex colloidal structures, for fundamental studies of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phase behaviour. This review highlights recent developments in this evolving field, with special emphasis on the dynamic interaction control to assemble colloidal structures, in and out of equilibrium. PMID:26750980

  15. Critical Casimir forces for colloidal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Dang, M. T.; Nguyen, T. A.; Schall, P.

    2016-02-01

    Critical Casimir forces attract increasing interest due to their opportunities for reversible particle assembly in soft matter and nano science. These forces provide a thermodynamic analogue of the celebrated quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. In its thermodynamic analogue, solvent fluctuations, confined between suspended particles, give rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the particles. Due to its unique temperature dependence, this effect allows in situ control of reversible assembly. Both the force magnitude and range vary with the solvent correlation length in a universal manner, adjusting with temperature from fractions of the thermal energy, k B T, and nanometre range to several ten kT and micrometer length scale. Combined with recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of complex particles, critical Casimir forces promise the design and assembly of complex colloidal structures, for fundamental studies of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phase behaviour. This review highlights recent developments in this evolving field, with special emphasis on the dynamic interaction control to assemble colloidal structures, in and out of equilibrium.

  16. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  17. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  18. Theory of Casimir Forces without the Proximity-Force Approximation.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Rubí, J Miguel

    2016-03-18

    We analyze both the attractive and repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces recently reported in experimental investigations. By using a kinetic approach, we obtain the Casimir forces from the power absorbed by the materials. We consider collective material excitations through a set of relaxation times distributed in frequency according to a log-normal function. A generalized expression for these forces for arbitrary values of temperature is obtained. We compare our results with experimental measurements and conclude that the model goes beyond the proximity-force approximation. PMID:27035293

  19. Casimir forces in the time domain: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-15

    Our previous article [Phys. Rev. A 80, 012115 (2009)] introduced a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials that was based on a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. In this article, we focus on the efficient implementation of our method for geometries of practical interest and extend our previous proof-of-concept algorithm in one dimension to problems in two and three dimensions, introducing a number of new optimizations. We consider Casimir pistonlike problems with nonmonotonic and monotonic force dependence on sidewall separation, both for previously solved geometries to validate our method and also for new geometries involving magnetic sidewalls and/or cylindrical pistons. We include realistic dielectric materials to calculate the force between suspended silicon waveguides or on a suspended membrane with periodic grooves, also demonstrating the application of perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries and/or periodic boundaries. In addition, we apply this method to a realizable three-dimensional system in which a silica sphere is stably suspended in a fluid above an indented metallic substrate. More generally, the method allows off-the-shelf FDTD software, already supporting a wide variety of materials (including dielectric, magnetic, and even anisotropic materials) and boundary conditions, to be exploited for the Casimir problem.

  20. Optical detection of the Casimir force between macroscopic objects.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Victor; Petrov, Mikhail; Bryksin, Valeriy; Petter, Juergen; Tschudi, Theo

    2006-11-01

    We report the optical detection of mechanical deformation of a macroscopic object induced by the Casimir force. An adaptive holographic interferometer based on a photorefractive BaTiO3:Co crystal was used to measure periodical nonlinear deformations of a thin pellicle caused by an oscillating Casimir force. A reasonable agreement between the experimental and calculated values of the first and second harmonics of the Casimir force oscillations has been obtained. PMID:17041670

  1. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emig, Thorsten; Bimonte, Giuseppe; Kardar, Mehran

    2015-03-01

    Thermal fluctuations of a critical system induce long-ranged Casimir forces between objects that couple to the underlying field. For two dimensional conformal field theories (CFT) we derive exact results for the Casimir interaction for a deformed strip and for two compact objects of arbitrary shape in terms of the free energy of a standard region (circular ring or flat strip) whose dimension is determined by the mutual capacitance of two conductors with the objects' shape; and a purely geometric energy that is proportional to conformal charge of the CFT, but otherwise super-universal in that it depends only on the shapes and is independent of boundary conditions and other details. The effect of inhomogenous boundary conditions is also discussed.

  2. Casimir force in the presence of a medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kheirandish, Fardin; Soltani, Morteza; Sarabadani, Jalal

    2010-05-15

    We investigate the Casimir effect in the presence of a medium by quantizing the electromagnetic field in the presence of a magnetodielectric medium using the path-integral technique. For a given medium with definite electric and magnetic susceptibilities, explicit expressions for the Casimir force are obtained. The Lifshitz formula is recovered and in the absence of a medium the results tend to the original Casimir force between two conducting parallel plates immersed in the quantum electromagnetic vacuum.

  3. Intermolecular Casimir-Polder forces in water and near surfaces.

    PubMed

    Thiyam, Priyadarshini; Persson, Clas; Sernelius, Bo E; Parsons, Drew F; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Boström, Mathias

    2014-09-01

    The Casimir-Polder force is an important long-range interaction involved in adsorption and desorption of molecules in fluids. We explore Casimir-Polder interactions between methane molecules in water, and between a molecule in water near SiO(2) and hexane surfaces. Inclusion of the finite molecular size in the expression for the Casimir-Polder energy leads to estimates of the dispersion contribution to the binding energies between molecules and between one molecule and a planar surface.

  4. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  5. Casimir-Polder Force Reversal with Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh; Genov, Dentcho

    2010-10-01

    A promising system design aiming to demonstrate Casimir-Polder force (CPF) reversal is proposed. The constraints when using naturally available materials in designing the system with air as an intermediate medium is resolved by using artificial electromagnetic materials. The parametric space in terms of the plate's magnetic and dielectric plasma frequencies, gap thickness and temperature is investigated. The parametric domain for achieving CPF reversal is obtained. Furthermore, a simple analytical expression for the CPF is derived. The analytical expression accurately describes the large and short distance asymptotics and allows extraction of important parameters such as lower and upper cutoff gap distances that define the repulsive force window. This study could possibly lead us to design of quantum levitation system, frictionless bio-fluid transport devices, etc.

  6. Nonlocal composite media in calculations of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Huang, Y.; Gao, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Casimir force between two inhomogeneous metal-dielectric composite slabs with spatial dispersion is investigated theoretically. The equivalent permittivity and permeability of the nonlocal metallic nanosphere is originally derived based on full-wave nonlocal Mie theory. We then adopt two nonlocal effective medium models to study the effective permittivity and permeability of the composite slabs and calculate the Casimir force with Casimir-Lifshitz theory. Due to the excitation of the longitudinal modes, the attractive Casimir force between nonlocal composite materials is much weaker than that of the local composites, and numerical results show that the relative errors between local and nonlocal calculations of Casimir force can be on the order of 25%. Moreover, the nonlocal effects on the Casimir force are strongly dependent on the microstructures, and they become significant near the percolation threshold of the composite media. The study may be of great interest for making a precise comparison between theoretical and experimental results on the Casimir force between inhomogeneous composite materials.

  7. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    PubMed Central

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  8. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction.

  9. Collective behaviors of the Casimir force in microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H. B.; Yelton, J.

    2013-01-23

    Our goal was to explore the strong dependence of the Casimir force on the shape of the interacting bodies. We made significant progress and measured the Casimir force on silicon surface with rectangular corrugation and showed that the results agree with theoretical calculations, provided that the optical properties of silicon are taken into account. Furthermore, we performed measurement of the Casimir force within a single chip for the first time, between a doubly clamped beam and a movable, on-chip electrode at liquid helium temperature. This experiment represents a new way of studying the Casimir effect, a significant advance from the conventional approach of placing an external surface close to a force transducer.

  10. Opposites attract: a theorem about the Casimir Force.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Oded; Klich, Israel

    2006-10-20

    We consider the Casimir interaction between (nonmagnetic) dielectric bodies or conductors. Our main result is a proof that the Casimir force between two bodies related by reflection is always attractive, independent of the exact form of the bodies or dielectric properties. Apart from being a fundamental property of fields, the theorem and its corollaries also rule out a class of suggestions to obtain repulsive forces, such as the two hemisphere repulsion suggestion and its relatives.

  11. Measurement of Casimir Force between Monolithic Silicon Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lu; Chan, Ho Bun; Zou, Jie; Marcet, Zsolt; Bao, Yiliang; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Reid, Homer; McCauley, Alexander; Johnson, Steven; Kravchenko, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    We present measurements of the Casimir force between silicon components in a near-planar geometry. We create the device from a silicon-on-insulator wafer using microfabrication. It contains a force-sensing micromechanical beam and an electrostatic comb actuator for controlling the distance. The two lithographically-defined micromechanical components are on the same silicon substrate and are automatically aligned after fabrication. Thus, we can achieve a high degree of parallelism between the two interacting surfaces. We employ a magneto-motive technique to measure the shift in the resonance frequency of the force sensing beam. Periodic Lorentz forces are exerted on the beam when an ac current is applied in a perpendicular magnetic field. As the movable electrode is pushed towards the silicon beam by the comb drives, the Casimir force increases. The force gradient is proportional to the resonance frequency shift of the beam. After the calibration using electrostatic forces and balancing the residual voltage, we measure the Casimir force gradient. Our results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical calculations, considering possible contributions of patch potentials. Apart from providing a compact platform for Casimir force measurements, this scheme also opens new opportunities for the measurement of Casimir force in complex geometries.

  12. Proof that Casimir force does not originate from vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Hrvoje

    2016-10-01

    We present a simple general proof that Casimir force cannot originate from the vacuum energy of electromagnetic (EM) field. The full QED Hamiltonian consists of 3 terms: the pure electromagnetic term Hem, the pure matter term Hmatt and the interaction term Hint. The Hem-term commutes with all matter fields because it does not have any explicit dependence on matter fields. As a consequence, Hem cannot generate any forces on matter. Since it is precisely this term that generates the vacuum energy of EM field, it follows that the vacuum energy does not generate the forces. The misleading statements in the literature that vacuum energy generates Casimir force can be boiled down to the fact that Hem attains an implicit dependence on matter fields by the use of the equations of motion and to the illegitimate treatment of the implicit dependence as if it was explicit. The true origin of the Casimir force is van der Waals force generated by Hint.

  13. CasimirSim - A Tool to Compute Casimir Polder Forces for Nontrivial 3D Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Sedmik, Rene; Tajmar, Martin

    2007-01-30

    The so-called Casimir effect is one of the most interesting macro-quantum effects. Being negligible on the macro-scale it becomes a governing factor below structure sizes of 1 {mu}m where it accounts for typically 100 kN m-2. The force does not depend on gravity, or electric charge but solely on the materials properties, and geometrical shape. This makes the effect a strong candidate for micro(nano)-mechanical devices M(N)EMS. Despite a long history of research the theory lacks a uniform description valid for arbitrary geometries which retards technical application. We present an advanced state-of-the-art numerical tool overcoming all the usual geometrical restrictions, capable of calculating arbitrary 3D geometries by utilizing the Casimir Polder approximation for the Casimir force.

  14. Isoelectronic determination of the thermal Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, G.; López, D.; Decca, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Differential force measurements between spheres coated with either nickel or gold and rotating disks with periodic distributions of nickel and gold are reported. The rotating samples are covered by a thin layer of titanium and a layer of gold. While titanium is used for fabrication purposes, the gold layer (nominal thicknesses of 21, 37, 47, and 87 nm) provides an isoelectronic environment, and is used to nullify the electrostatic contribution but allow the passage of long wavelength Casimir photons. A direct comparison between the experimental results and predictions from Drude and plasma models for the electrical permittivity is carried out. In the models, the magnetic permeability of nickel is allowed to change to investigate its effects. Possible sources of errors, both in the experimental and theoretical sides, are taken into account. It is found that a Drude response with magnetic properties of nickel taken into account is unequivocally ruled out. The full analysis of the data indicates that a dielectric plasma response with the magnetic properties of Ni included shows good agreement with the data. Neither a Drude nor a plasma dielectric response provide a satisfactory description if the magnetic properties of nickel are disregarded.

  15. Casimir switch: steering optical transparency with vacuum forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi-Fang; Li, Yong; Jing, H.

    2016-06-01

    The Casimir force, originating from vacuum zero-point energy, is one of the most intriguing purely quantum effects. It has attracted renewed interests in current field of nanomechanics, due to the rapid size decrease of on-chip devices. Here we study the optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) with a tunable Casimir force. We find that the optical output rate can be significantly altered by the vacuum force, even terminated and then restored, indicating a highly-controlled optical switch. Our result addresses the possibility of designing exotic optical nano-devices by harnessing the power of vacuum.

  16. Nonmonotonic Thermal Casimir Force from Geometry-Temperature Interplay

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Alexej; Gies, Holger

    2010-07-23

    The geometry dependence of Casimir forces is significantly more pronounced in the presence of thermal fluctuations due to a generic geometry-temperature interplay. We show that the thermal force for standard sphere-plate or cylinder-plate geometries develops a nonmonotonic behavior already in the simple case of a fluctuating Dirichlet scalar. In particular, the attractive thermal force can increase for increasing distances below a critical temperature. This anomalous behavior is triggered by a reweighting of relevant fluctuations on the scale of the thermal wavelength. The essence of the phenomenon becomes transparent within the worldline picture of the Casimir effect.

  17. Casimir switch: steering optical transparency with vacuum forces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xi-fang; Li, Yong; Jing, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Casimir force, originating from vacuum zero-point energy, is one of the most intriguing purely quantum effects. It has attracted renewed interests in current field of nanomechanics, due to the rapid size decrease of on-chip devices. Here we study the optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) with a tunable Casimir force. We find that the optical output rate can be significantly altered by the vacuum force, even terminated and then restored, indicating a highly-controlled optical switch. Our result addresses the possibility of designing exotic optical nano-devices by harnessing the power of vacuum. PMID:27256630

  18. Reversing the critical Casimir force by shape deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe; Emig, Thorsten; Kardar, Mehran

    2015-04-01

    The exact critical Casimir force between periodically deformed boundaries of a 2D semi-infinite strip is obtained for conformally invariant classical systems. Only two parameters (conformal charge, dimension of a boundary changing operator), along with the solution of an electrostatic problem, determine the Casimir force, rendering the theory practically applicable to any shape. The attraction between any two mirror symmetric objects follows directly from our general result. The possibility of purely shape induced reversal of the force, as well as occurrence of stable equilibrium is demonstrated for certain conformally invariant models, including the tricritical Ising model.

  19. Aspect-ratio dependence of thermodynamic Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucht, Alfred; Grueneberg, Daniel; Schmidt, Felix M.

    2012-02-01

    We consider the three-dimensional Ising model in a LxLxL cuboid geometry with finite aspect ratio ρ=L/L and periodic boundary conditions along all directions. For this model the finite-size scaling functions of the excess free energy and thermodynamic Casimir force are evaluated numerically by means of Monte Carlo simulations [1]. The Monte Carlo results compare well with recent field theoretical results for the Ising universality class at temperatures above and slightly below the bulk critical temperature Tc. Furthermore, the excess free energy and Casimir force scaling functions of the two-dimensional Ising model are calculated exactly for arbitrary ρ and compared to the three-dimensional case. We give a general argument that the Casimir force vanishes at the critical point for ρ=1 and becomes repulsive in periodic systems for ρ>1. [4pt] [1] Alfred Hucht, Daniel Gr"uneberg, and Felix M. Schmidt, Phys. Rev. E 83, 051101 (2011)

  20. Non-equilibrium Casimir force between vibrating plates.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed. PMID:23326401

  1. La force de Casimir et les plasmons de surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2004-11-01

    La présence de fluctuations irréductibles de champ dans le vide est une prédiction importante de la théorie quantique. Ces fluctuations ont de nombreux effets bien connus, dont l'archétype est la force de Casimir apparaîssant entre deux miroirs placés dans le vide par suite de la pression de radiation du vide. Elle a été récemment mesurée avec une précision de l'ordre du %. De nombreux travaux sont consacrés à l'évaluation théorique de cette force en visant une précision du même ordre. Ici nous étudions la force de Casimir dans la configuration de deux miroirs métalliques plans parallèles à température nulle. En supposant les miroirs décrits par un modèle plasma nous interprétons la force de Casimir comme le résultat de l'interaction entre les plasmons de surface des deux miroirs.

  2. Halving the Casimir force with conductive oxides: Experimental details

    SciTech Connect

    Man, S. de; Heeck, K.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2010-12-15

    This work is an extended version of a paper published previously [S. de Man et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 040402 (2009)], where we presented measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated sphere and a plate coated with either gold or an indium tin oxide (I TO) layer. The experiment, which was performed in air, showed that I TO conducts sufficiently to prevent charge accumulation but is still transparent enough to halve the Casimir attraction when compared to gold. Here we report all the experimental details that, owing to the limited space available, were omitted in the previous article. We discuss the performance of our setup in terms of stability of the calibration procedure and reproducibility of the Casimir force measurement. We also introduce and demonstrate a technique to obtain the spring constant of our force sensor. Furthermore, we present a thorough description of the experimental method, a comprehensive explanation of data elaboration and error analysis, and a complete characterization of the dielectric function and of the surface roughness of the samples used in the actual experiment.

  3. Convergent conductivity corrections to the Casimir force via exponential basis functions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Song; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2010-12-15

    A closed-form finite conductivity correction factor for the ideal Casimir force is proposed, based on exponential basis functions. Our method can facilitate experimental verifications of theories in the study of the Casimir force. A theoretical analysis is given to explain why our method is accurate at both large and small separation gaps. Numerical computations have been performed to confirm that our method is accurate in various experimental configurations. Our approach is widely applicable to various Casimir force interactions between metals and dielectrics. Our study can be extended to the study of the repulsive Casimir force as well.

  4. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces.

    PubMed

    Munday, J N; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction. PMID:19129843

  5. How does Casimir energy fall? III. Inertial forces on vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajesh, K. V.; Milton, Kimball A.; Parashar, Prachi; Wagner, Jeffrey A.

    2008-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Casimir energy due to parallel plates, including its divergent parts, falls like conventional mass in a weak gravitational field. The divergent parts were suitably interpreted as renormalizing the bare masses of the plates. Here, we corroborate our result regarding the inertial nature of Casimir energy by calculating the centripetal force on a Casimir apparatus rotating with constant angular speed. We show that the centripetal force is independent of the orientation of the Casimir apparatus in a frame whose origin is at the center of inertia of the apparatus.

  6. Optical Modification of Casimir Forces for Improved Function of Micro-and Nano-Scale Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been a considerable effort to study the Casimir and van der Waals forces, enabled by the improved ability to measure small forces near surfaces. Because of the continuously growing role of micro- and nanomechanical devices, the focus of this activity has shifted towards the ability to control these forces. Possible approaches to manipulating the Casimir force include development of composite materials, engineered nanostructures, mixed-phase materials, or active elements. So far, practical success has been limited. The role of geometrical factors in the Casimir force is significant. It is known, for example, that the Casimir force between two spherical shells enclosed one into the other is repulsive instead of normal attractive. Unfortunately, nanosurfaces with this topology are very difficult to make. A more direct approach to manipulating and neutralizing the Casimir force is using external mechanical or electromagnetic forces. Unfortunately, the technological overhead of such an approach is quite large. Using electromagnetic compensation instead of mechanical will considerably reduce this overhead and at the same time provide the degree of control over the Casimir force that mechanical springs cannot provide. A mechanical analog behind Casimir forces is shown.

  7. Intensifying the Casimir force between two silicon substrates within three different layers of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedzahedi, A.; Moradian, A.; Setare, M. R.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the Casimir force for a system composed of two thick slabs as substrates within three different homogeneous layers. We use the scattering approach along with the Matsubara formalism in order to calculate the Casimir force at finite temperature. First, we focus on constructing the reflection matrices and then we calculate the Casimir force for a water-lipid system. According to the conventional use of silicon as a substrate, we apply the formalism to calculate the Casimir force for layers of Au, VO2, mica, KCl and foam rubber on the thick slabs of silicon. Afterwards, introducing an increasing factor, we compare our results with Lifshitz force in the vacuum between two semispaces of silicon in order to illustrate the influence of the layers on intensifying the Casimir force. We also calculate the Casimir force between two slabs of the forementioned materials with finite thicknesses to indicate the substrate's role in increasing the obtained Casimir force. Our simple calculation is interesting since one can extend it along with the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis to systems containing inhomogeneous layers as good candidates for designing nanomechanical devices.

  8. The role of the "Casimir force analogue" at the microscopic processes of crystallization and melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvildeev, V. N.; Semenycheva, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Melting (crystallization), a phase transition from a crystalline solid to a liquid state, is a common phenomenon in nature. We suggest a new factor, "the Casimir force analogue", to describe mechanisms of melting and crystallization. The Casimir force analogue is a force occurring between the surfaces of solid and liquid phases of metals caused by different energy density of phonons of these phases. It explains abrupt changes in geometry and thermodynamic parameters at a melting point. "The Casimir force analogue" helps to estimate latent melting heat and to gain an insight into a solid-liquid transition problem.

  9. Casimir-Lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Antezza, Mauro; Stringari, Sandro; Pitaevskii, Lev P. |; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.

    2008-02-15

    We study the Casimir-Lifshitz interaction out of thermal equilibrium, when the interacting objects are at different temperatures. The analysis is focused on the surface-surface, surface-rarefied body, and surface-atom configurations. A systematic investigation of the contributions to the force coming from the propagating and evanescent components of the electromagnetic radiation is performed. The large distance behaviors of such interactions is discussed, and both analytical and numerical results are compared with the equilibrium ones. A detailed analysis of the crossing between the surface-surface and the surface-rarefied body, and finally the surface-atom force is shown, and a complete derivation and discussion of the recently predicted nonadditivity effects and asymptotic behaviors is presented.

  10. Constraints on stable equilibria with fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten

    2010-08-13

    We examine whether fluctuation-induced forces can lead to stable levitation. First, we analyze a collection of classical objects at finite temperature that contain fixed and mobile charges and show that any arrangement in space is unstable to small perturbations in position. This extends Earnshaw's theorem for electrostatics by including thermal fluctuations of internal charges. Quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are responsible for Casimir or van der Waals interactions. Neglecting permeabilities, we find that any equilibrium position of items subject to such forces is also unstable if the permittivities of all objects are higher or lower than that of the enveloping medium, the former being the generic case for ordinary materials in vacuum. PMID:20868024

  11. Constraints on Stable Equilibria with Fluctuation-Induced (Casimir) Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten

    2010-08-13

    We examine whether fluctuation-induced forces can lead to stable levitation. First, we analyze a collection of classical objects at finite temperature that contain fixed and mobile charges and show that any arrangement in space is unstable to small perturbations in position. This extends Earnshaw's theorem for electrostatics by including thermal fluctuations of internal charges. Quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are responsible for Casimir or van der Waals interactions. Neglecting permeabilities, we find that any equilibrium position of items subject to such forces is also unstable if the permittivities of all objects are higher or lower than that of the enveloping medium, the former being the generic case for ordinary materials in vacuum.

  12. Scalar Casimir-Polder forces for uniaxial corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Doebrich, Babette; DeKieviet, Maarten; Gies, Holger

    2008-12-15

    We investigate the Dirichlet-scalar equivalent of Casimir-Polder forces between an atom and a surface with arbitrary uniaxial corrugations. The complexity of the problem can be reduced to a one-dimensional Green's function equation along the corrugation which can be solved numerically. Our technique is fully nonperturbative in the height profile of the corrugation. We present explicit results for experimentally relevant sinusoidal and sawtooth corrugations. Parameterizing the deviations from the planar limit in terms of an anomalous dimension which measures the power-law deviation from the planar case, we observe up to order-one anomalous dimensions at small and intermediate scales and a universal regime at larger distances. This large-distance universality can be understood from the fact that the relevant fluctuations average over corrugation structures smaller than the atom-wall distance.

  13. Thermal fluctuations and stability of a particle levitated by a repulsive Casimir force in a liquid.

    PubMed

    Inui, Norio; Goto, Kosuke

    2013-11-01

    We study the vertical Brownian motion of a gold particle levitated by a repulsive Casimir force to a silica plate immersed in bromobenzene. The time evolution of the particle distribution starting from an equilibrium position, where the Casimir force and gravitational force are balanced, is considered by solving the Langevin equation using the Monte Carlo method. When the gold particle is very close to the silica plate, the Casimir force changes from repulsive to attractive, and the particle eventually sticks to the surface. The escape rate from a metastable position is calculated by solving the Fokker-Plank equation; it agrees with the value obtained by Kramers' escape theory. The duration of levitation increases as the particle radius increases up to around 2.3 μm. As an example, we show that a 1-μm-diameter gold particle can be levitated for a significantly long time by the repulsive Casimir force at room temperature.

  14. Quantum levitation of a thin magnetodielectric plate on a metallic plate using the repulsive Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Levitation of a thin magnetodielectric plate on a metallic plate by using the repulsive Casimir force is theoretically considered. If the permittivity of the metallic plate near zero frequency is expressed by a plasma model and the static permeability of the magnetodielectric plate is higher than its static permittivity, the Casimir force between the magnetodielectric plate and the metallic plate changes from attractive to repulsive as the separation between them increases. Furthermore, as the thickness of the magnetodielectric plate is decreased, the attractive component of the Casimir force decreases more than the repulsive one. This effect generates a larger repulsive Casimir force as compared with that between the plates having infinite thickness. Combined with the effect of decreasing the weight of the plate, this might enable a thin plate to levitate in vacuum. The height of quantum levitation is evaluated for a combination of yttrium iron garnet and gold.

  15. Casimir force for absorbing media in an open quantum system framework: Scalar model

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Fernando C.; Rubio Lopez, Adrian E.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2011-11-15

    In this article we compute the Casimir force between two finite-width mirrors at finite temperature, working in a simplified model in 1+1 dimensions. The mirrors, considered as dissipative media, are modeled by a continuous set of harmonic oscillators which in turn are coupled to an external environment at thermal equilibrium. The calculation of the Casimir force is performed in the framework of the theory of open quantum systems. It is shown that the Casimir interaction has two different contributions: the usual radiation pressure from the vacuum, which is obtained for ideal mirrors without dissipation or losses, and a Langevin force associated with the noise induced by the interaction between dielectric atoms in the slabs and the thermal bath. Both contributions to the Casimir force are needed in order to reproduce the analogous Lifshitz formula in 1+1 dimensions. We also discuss the relationship between the electromagnetic properties of the mirrors and the spectral density of the environment.

  16. Sensitivity of micromechanical actuation on amorphous to crystalline phase transformations under the influence of Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2013-10-01

    Amorphous to crystalline phase transitions in phase change materials (PCM) can have strong influence on the actuation of microelectromechanical systems under the influence of Casimir forces. Indeed, the bifurcation curves of the stationary equilibrium points and the corresponding phase portraits of the actuation dynamics between gold and AIST (Ag5In5Sb60Te30) PCM, where an increase of the Casimir force of up ˜25% has been measured upon crystallization, show strong sensitivity to changes of the Casimir force as the stiffness of the actuating component decreases and/or the effective interaction area of the Casimir force increases, which can also lead to stiction. However, introduction of intrinsic energy dissipation (associated with a finite quality factor of the actuating system) can prevent stiction by driving the system to attenuated motion towards stable equilibrium depending on the PCM state and the system quality factor.

  17. Results from electrostatic calibrations for measuring the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lombardo, F. C.; Mazzitelli, F. D.; Onofrio, R.

    2010-05-15

    We report on measurements performed on an apparatus aimed to study the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane configuration. The electrostatic calibrations evidence anomalous behaviors in the dependence of the electrostatic force and the minimizing potential upon distance. We discuss analogies and differences of these anomalies with respect to those already observed in the sphere-plane configuration. At the smallest explored distances we observe frequency shifts of non-Coulombian nature preventing the measurement of the Casimir force in the same range. We also report on measurements performed in the parallel-plane configuration, showing that the dependence on distance of the minimizing potential, if present at all, is milder than in the sphere-plane or cylinder-plane geometries. General considerations on the interplay between the distance-dependent minimizing potential and the precision of Casimir force measurements in the range relevant to detect the thermal corrections for all geometries are finally reported.

  18. Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behunin, R. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Decca, R. S.; Genet, C.; Jung, I. W.; Lambrecht, A.; Liscio, A.; López, D.; Reynaud, S.; Schnoering, G.; Voisin, G.; Zeng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy at normal pressure was performed by two different groups on the same Au-coated planar sample used to measure the Casimir interaction in a sphere-plane geometry. The obtained voltage distribution was used to calculate the separation dependence of the electrostatic pressure Pres(D ) in the configuration of the Casimir experiments. In the calculation it was assumed that the potential distribution in the sphere has the same statistical properties as the measured one, and that there are no correlation effects on the potential distributions due to the presence of the other surface. The result of this calculation, using the currently available knowledge, is that Pres(D ) does not explain the magnitude or the separation dependence of the difference Δ P (D ) between the measured Casimir pressure and the one calculated using a Drude model for the electromagnetic response of Au. We discuss in the conclusions the points which have to be checked out by future work, including the influence of pressure and a more accurate determination of the patch distribution, in order to confirm these results.

  19. Influence of materials' optical response on actuation dynamics by Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, M; Broer, W H; Van der Veeke, S; Svetovoy, V B; Palasantzas, G

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of the Casimir force on the frequency-dependent dielectric functions of interacting materials makes it possible to tailor the actuation dynamics of microactuators. The Casimir force is largest for metallic interacting systems due to the high absorption of conduction electrons in the far-infrared range. For less conductive systems, such as phase change materials or conductive silicon carbide, the reduced force offers the advantage of increased stable operation of MEMS devices against pull-in instabilities that lead to unwanted stiction. Bifurcation analysis with phase portraits has been used to compare the sensitivity of a model actuator when the optical properties are altered.

  20. Repulsive Casimir forces between solid materials with high-refractive-index intervening liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zwol, P. J. van; Palasantzas, G.

    2010-06-15

    In order to explore repulsive Casimir or van der Waals forces between solid materials with liquid as the intervening medium, we analyze dielectric data for a wide range of materials as, for example, (p)olytetrafluoroethylene, polystyrene, silica, and more than 20 liquids. Although significant variation in the dielectric data from different sources exists, we provide a scheme based on measured static dielectric constants, refractive indices, and applying Kramers-Kronig consistency to dielectric data to create accurate dielectric functions at imaginary frequencies. The latter is necessary for more accurate force calculations via the Lifshitz theory, thereby allowing reliable predictions of repulsive Casimir forces.

  1. Influence of materials' optical response on actuation dynamics by Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Broer, W. H.; Van der Veeke, S.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of the Casimir force on the frequency-dependent dielectric functions of interacting materials makes it possible to tailor the actuation dynamics of microactuators. The Casimir force is largest for metallic interacting systems due to the high absorption of conduction electrons in the far-infrared range. For less conductive systems, such as phase change materials or conductive silicon carbide, the reduced force offers the advantage of increased stable operation of MEMS devices against pull-in instabilities that lead to unwanted stiction. Bifurcation analysis with phase portraits has been used to compare the sensitivity of a model actuator when the optical properties are altered.

  2. Critical adsorption and critical Casimir forces in the canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Markus; Vasilyev, Oleg; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, S.

    2016-08-01

    Critical properties of a liquid film between two planar walls are investigated in the canonical ensemble, within which the total number of fluid particles, rather than their chemical potential, is kept constant. The effect of this constraint is analyzed within mean-field theory (MFT) based on a Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional as well as via Monte Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional Ising model with fixed total magnetization. Within MFT and for finite adsorption strengths at the walls, the thermodynamic properties of the film in the canonical ensemble can be mapped exactly onto a grand canonical ensemble in which the corresponding chemical potential plays the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. However, due to a nonintegrable divergence of the mean-field order parameter profile near a wall, the limit of infinitely strong adsorption turns out to be not well-defined within MFT, because it would necessarily violate the constraint. The critical Casimir force (CCF) acting on the two planar walls of the film is generally found to behave differently in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles. For instance, the canonical CCF in the presence of equal preferential adsorption at the two walls is found to have the opposite sign and a slower decay behavior as a function of the film thickness compared to its grand canonical counterpart. We derive the stress tensor in the canonical ensemble and find that it has the same expression as in the grand canonical case, but with the chemical potential playing the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. The different behavior of the CCF in the two ensembles is rationalized within MFT by showing that, for a prescribed value of the thermodynamic control parameter of the film, i.e., density or chemical potential, the film pressures are identical in the two ensembles, while the corresponding bulk pressures are not.

  3. Critical adsorption and critical Casimir forces in the canonical ensemble.

    PubMed

    Gross, Markus; Vasilyev, Oleg; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, S

    2016-08-01

    Critical properties of a liquid film between two planar walls are investigated in the canonical ensemble, within which the total number of fluid particles, rather than their chemical potential, is kept constant. The effect of this constraint is analyzed within mean-field theory (MFT) based on a Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional as well as via Monte Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional Ising model with fixed total magnetization. Within MFT and for finite adsorption strengths at the walls, the thermodynamic properties of the film in the canonical ensemble can be mapped exactly onto a grand canonical ensemble in which the corresponding chemical potential plays the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. However, due to a nonintegrable divergence of the mean-field order parameter profile near a wall, the limit of infinitely strong adsorption turns out to be not well-defined within MFT, because it would necessarily violate the constraint. The critical Casimir force (CCF) acting on the two planar walls of the film is generally found to behave differently in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles. For instance, the canonical CCF in the presence of equal preferential adsorption at the two walls is found to have the opposite sign and a slower decay behavior as a function of the film thickness compared to its grand canonical counterpart. We derive the stress tensor in the canonical ensemble and find that it has the same expression as in the grand canonical case, but with the chemical potential playing the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. The different behavior of the CCF in the two ensembles is rationalized within MFT by showing that, for a prescribed value of the thermodynamic control parameter of the film, i.e., density or chemical potential, the film pressures are identical in the two ensembles, while the corresponding bulk pressures are not. PMID:27627242

  4. A Light Sail Inspired Model to Harness Casimir Forces for Propellantless Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    DeBiase, R. L.

    2010-01-28

    The model used to calculate Casimir forces for variously shaped conducting plates in this paper assumes the vacuum energy pervades all space and that photons randomly pop into and out of existence. While they exist, they possess energy and momentum that can be transferred by reflection as in a light sail. Quantum mechanics in the model is entirely bound up in the Casimir equation of force per unit area. This model is compared with two different experiments: that of Chen and Mohideen demonstrating lateral Casimir forces for sinusoidally corrugated spherical and flat plates and Lamoreaux demonstrating normal Casimir forces between a conducting sphere and flat plate. The calculated forces using this model were compared to the forces obtained in these experiments as well as with calculations using the proximity force approximation. In both cases the results (when compared to the actual plates measured and calculated using non-corrected equations) were less than a few parts per thousand different for the range of separation distances used. When the model was used to calculate forces on the opposite plates, different force magnitudes were obtained seemingly indicating prospects for propellentless propulsion but requiring skeptical verification.

  5. Colloidal aggregation in microgravity by critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veen, Sandra; Schall, Peter; Antoniuk, Oleg; Potenza, Marco; Alaimo, Matteo; Mazzoni, Stefano; Wegdam, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    We study aggregation and crystal growth of spherical Teflon colloids in binary liquid mixtures in microgravity by the critical Casimir effect. The critical Casimir effect induces interactions between colloids due to the confinement of bulk fluctuations (density or concentration) near the critical point of liquids. The strength and range of the interaction depends on the length scale of these fluctuations which increase as one approaches the critical point. The interaction potential can thus be tuned with temperature. We follow the growth of structures in real time with Near Field Scattering. Measurements are performed in microgravity in order to study pure diffusion limited aggregation, without disturbance by sedimentation or flow.

  6. Reduction of the Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Mohideen, U.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-08-26

    A significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35%) was observed after an indium tin oxide sample interacting with an Au sphere was subjected to the UV treatment. Measurements were performed by using an atomic force microscope in high vacuum. The experimental results are compared with theory and a hypothetical explanation for the observed phenomenon is proposed.

  7. Mechanical temporal fluctuation induced distance and force systematic errors in Casimir force experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, Steve; Wong, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    The basic theory of temporal mechanical fluctuation induced systematic errors in Casimir force experiments is developed and applications of this theory to several experiments is reviewed. This class of systematic error enters in a manner similar to the usual surface roughness correction, but unlike the treatment of surface roughness for which an exact result requires an electromagnetic mode analysis, time dependent fluctuations can be treated exactly, assuming the fluctuation times are much longer than the zero point and thermal fluctuation correlation times of the electromagnetic field between the plates. An experimental method for measuring absolute distance with high bandwidth is also described and measurement data presented.

  8. Casimir and hydrodynamic force influence on microelectromechanical system actuation in ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Mehdi; Palasantzas, George

    2014-02-01

    Casimir and hydrodynamic dissipation forces can strongly influence the actuation of microelectromechanical systems in ambient conditions. The dissipative and stiction dynamics of an actuating system is shown to depend on surface physical processes related to fluid slip and the size of the actuating components. Using phase change materials the Casimir force magnitude can be modulated via amorphous-crystalline phase transitions. The dissipative motion between amorphous coated phase change material components can be changed towards stiction upon crystallization and suitable choice of restoring spring constants. By contrast, amorphization can augment switching from stiction to dissipative dynamics.

  9. Casimir-Polder intermolecular forces in minimal length theories

    SciTech Connect

    Panella, O.

    2007-08-15

    Generalized uncertainty relations are known to provide a minimal length ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){radical}({beta}). The effect of such minimal length in the Casimir-Polder interactions between neutral atoms (molecules) is studied. The first order correction term in the minimal uncertainty parameter is derived and found to describe an attractive potential scaling as r{sup -9}, as opposed to the well-known r{sup -7} long range retarded potential.

  10. Influence of low optical frequencies on actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems via Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Mehdi; Palasantzas, George

    2015-04-01

    The role of the Casimir force on the analysis of microactuators is strongly influenced by the optical properties of interacting materials. Bifurcation and phase portrait analysis were used to compare the sensitivity of actuators when the optical properties at low optical frequencies were modeled using the Drude and Plasma models. Indeed, for metallic systems, which have strong Casimir attraction, the details of the modeling of the low optical frequency regime can be dramatic, leading to predictions of either stable motion or stiction instability. However, this difference is strongly minimized for weakly conductive systems as are the doped insulators making actuation modeling more certain to predict.

  11. Casimir scaling hypothesis on the nonperturbative force in QCD vs. dual superconducting scenario of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Y.; Koma, M.; Toki, H.

    2003-06-01

    We discuss the Casimir scaling hypothesis on the nonperturbative force in terms of the dual superconducting picture of the QCD vacuum by calculating the string tensions of flux tubes associated with static charges in various SU(3) representations in the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory.

  12. Measurement of Casimir force with magnetic materials Alexandr Banishev, Chia-Cheng Chang, Umar Mohideen Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Mohideen, Umar

    2012-02-01

    The Casimir effect is important in various fields from atomic physics to nanotechnology. According to the Lifshitz theory of the Casimir force, the interaction between two objects depends both on their dielectric permittivity and magenetic permeability. Thus the role of magnetic properties on the Casimir force is interesting particularly due to the possibility of a reduction the Casimir force. In this report we will present the results of a Casimir force measurement between a magnetic material such as nickel coated on SiO2 plate and a Au-coated sphere.

  13. Nonlocal microscopic theory of Casimir forces at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Despoja, V.; Marusic, L.

    2011-04-15

    The interaction energy between two metallic slabs in the retarded limit at finite temperature is expressed in terms of surface polariton propagators for separate slabs, avoiding the usual matching procedure, with both diamagnetic and paramagnetic excitations included correctly. This enables appropriate treatment of arbitrary electron density profiles and fully nonlocal electronic response, including both collective and single-particle excitations. The results are verified by performing the nonretarded and long-wavelength (local) limits and showing that they reduce to the previously obtained expressions. Possibilities for practical use of the theory are explored by applying it to calculation of various contributions to the Casimir energy between two silver slabs.

  14. Casimir-Lifshitz Force Out of Thermal Equilibrium and Asymptotic Nonadditivity

    SciTech Connect

    Antezza, Mauro; Stringari, Sandro; Pitaevskii, Lev P.; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the force acting between two parallel plates held at different temperatures. The force reproduces, as limiting cases, the well-known Casimir-Lifshitz surface-surface force at thermal equilibrium and the surface-atom force out of thermal equilibrium recently derived by M. Antezza et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 113202 (2005). The asymptotic behavior of the force at large distances is explicitly discussed. In particular when one of the two bodies is a rarefied gas the force is not additive, being proportional to the square root of the density. Nontrivial crossover regions at large distances are also identified.

  15. Comment on 'Casimir force acting on magnetodielectric bodies embedded in media'

    SciTech Connect

    Pitaevskii, L. P.

    2006-04-15

    It is shown that the Raabe and Welsch [Phys. Rev. A 71, 013814 (2005)] criticism of the Dzyaloshinskii-Lifshitz-Pitaevskii theory of the van der Waals-Casimir forces inside a medium is based on misunderstandings. It is explained why and at which conditions one can use the ''Minkowski-like'' stress tensor for calculations of the forces. The reason why, in my opinion, the approach of Raabe and Welsch is incorrect is discussed.

  16. The Antibubble as a Casimir force Phenomenon and its Relation to ZPF Theories of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, John

    2009-04-01

    The hypothesis that the `anti-bubble' (1) in water owes its existence to Casimir forces is proposed, based on a model of Quantum ZPF (Zero Point Fluctuation) interaction with matter. The Casimir effect can be explained by imbalanced radiation pressure from the ZPF and is linked to Gravity. This concept is extended to the phenomena of anti-bubble and ``boules'' : drops of water levitated above the surface of water. In the case of the anti-bubble the water surfaces are kept apart stably by a force of approximately 10^3 dynes /cm^2 with separations of the order of a micron (2). The hypothesized ZPF energy density is much stronger than seen in Casimir forces between metal plates and is hypothesized to be due trapped ZPF energy and linked to the unusual properties of water. Unlike Casmir repulsion derived from existing models (3) this hypothetical repulsive trapped ZPF force can arise between similar substances of suitable properties. A model of ZPF interaction with water that creates a short range repulsion between parallel water surfaces will be presented based on the principle of `Nondissipative Pondermotive Forces' of ZPF. If true, this hypothesis may allow tabletop studies of ZPF forces and perhaps Gravitation. (1) Strong, C.L., (1974) Sci. American, 230,116-120. (2) Dorbolo, S. et. al. (2003) New. Jou. Of Phys. 5, (1) 161. (3) Dzyaloshinskii, I. et al. (1961), Sov. Phys. Uspekhi, 4, (2) 153.

  17. Levitation of a metallic sphere near gas-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces by the repulsive Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2014-06-01

    By counteracting gravity, the repulsive Casimir force enables stable levitation of a perfectly conducting particle near a liquid-air interface if the particle exists inside the liquid. In the present study, we examine the levitation of a gold particle near a bromobenzene-air interface and calculate the levitation height using the scattering-matrix formulation. In addition, we consider the Casimir force acting on a gold sphere near the interface between bromobenzene and water. At asymptotically large separations, the Casimir force is attractive because of the large static dielectric permittivity of water. However, the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive as the separation decreases. We also found that the gold particle can be levitated in bromobenzene above water.

  18. Measurement of the Temperature Dependence of the Casimir-Polder Force

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.; Antezza, M.; Stringari, S.; Pitaevskii, L. P.

    2007-02-09

    We report on the first measurement of a temperature dependence of the Casimir-Polder force. This measurement was obtained by positioning a nearly pure {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate a few microns from a dielectric substrate and exciting its dipole oscillation. Changes in the collective oscillation frequency of the magnetically trapped atoms result from spatial variations in the surface-atom force. In our experiment, the dielectric substrate is heated up to 605 K, while the surrounding environment is kept near room temperature (310 K). The effect of the Casimir-Polder force is measured to be nearly 3 times larger for a 605 K substrate than for a room-temperature substrate, showing a clear temperature dependence in agreement with theory.

  19. Rabi interferometry and sensitive measurement of the Casimir-Polder force with ultracold gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chwedenczuk, Jan; Piazza, Francesco; Smerzi, Augusto; Pezze, Luca

    2010-09-15

    We show that Rabi oscillations of a degenerate fermionic or bosonic gas trapped in a double-well potential can be exploited for the interferometric measurement of external forces at micrometer length scales. The Rabi interferometer is less sensitive but easier to implement than the Mach-Zehnder, since it does not require dynamical beam-splitting or recombination processes. As an application we propose a measurement of the Casimir-Polder force acting between the atoms and a dielectric surface. We find that even if the interferometer is fed with a coherent state of relatively small number of atoms, and in the presence of realistic experimental noise, the force might be measured with a sensitivity sufficient to discriminate between thermal and zero-temperature regimes of the Casimir-Polder potential. Higher sensitivities can be reached with bosonic spin squeezed states.

  20. Analytical results on Casimir forces for conductors with edges and tips

    PubMed Central

    Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.; Kardar, Mehran

    2011-01-01

    Casimir forces between conductors at the submicron scale are paramount to the design and operation of microelectromechanical devices. However, these forces depend nontrivially on geometry, and existing analytical formulae and approximations cannot deal with realistic micromachinery components with sharp edges and tips. Here, we employ a novel approach to electromagnetic scattering, appropriate to perfect conductors with sharp edges and tips, specifically wedges and cones. The Casimir interaction of these objects with a metal plate (and among themselves) is then computed systematically by a multiple-scattering series. For the wedge, we obtain analytical expressions for the interaction with a plate, as functions of opening angle and tilt, which should provide a particularly useful tool for the design of microelectromechanical devices. Our result for the Casimir interactions between conducting cones and plates applies directly to the force on the tip of a scanning tunneling probe. We find an unexpectedly large temperature dependence of the force in the cone tip which is of immediate relevance to experiments.

  1. Influence of dielectric properties on van der Waals/Casimir forces in solid-liquid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zwol, P. J. van; Palasantzas, G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-05-15

    In this paper, we present calculations of van der Waals/Casimir forces, described by Lifshitz theory, for the solid-liquid-solid system using measured dielectric functions of all involved materials for the wavelength range from millimeters down to subnanometers. It is shown that even if the dielectric function is known over all relevant frequency ranges, the scatter in the dielectric data can lead to very large scatter in the calculated van der Waals/Casimir forces. Especially when the liquid dielectric function becomes comparable in magnitude to the dielectric function of one of the interacting solids, the associated variation in the force can be up to a factor of 2 for plate-plate separations 5-500 nm. This corresponds to an uncertainty up to 100% in the theory prediction for a specific system. As a result accuracy testing of the Lifshitz theory under these circumstances is rather questionable. Finally we discuss predictions of Lifshitz theory regarding multiple repulsive-attractive transitions with separation distance, as well as nontrivial scaling of the van der Waals/Casimir force with distance.

  2. Unified boundary conditions and Casimir forces for fields with arbitrary spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Robert; Stokes, Adam

    The electromagnetic Casimir effect is well-known and has been extensively studied for the last half-century. This attractive force between parallel plates arises from the imposition of boundary conditions upon the fluctuating spin-1 photon field, so a natural further question is wether fields of different spin can cause similar forces when confined in the same way. However, so far it has not been clear what the appropriate boundary conditions for physically-confined spinor fields may be. Here we present work that generalises the physically well-motivated electromagnetic boundary conditions to fields of arbitrary spin, thus arriving at physically reasonable boundary conditions and Casimir forces for a selection of interesting fields. For example, the so-called `bag model' boundary conditions from nuclear physics emerge from our generalised boundary condition as a special case, as do the linearised gravity boundary conditions suggested in a remarkable recent proposal concerning possible measurement of gravitonic Casimir forces. Supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  3. Another method to compute the thermodynamic Casimir force in lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenbusch, Martin

    2009-12-01

    We discuss a method that allows us to compute the thermodynamic Casimir force at a given temperature in lattice models by performing a single Monte Carlo simulation. It is analogous to the one used by de Forcrand and co-workers in the study of ‘t Hooft loops and the interface tension in SU(N) lattice gauge models in four dimensions. We test the method at the example of thin films in the XY universality class. In particular we simulate the improved two-component ϕ4 model on the simple cubic lattice. This allows us to compare with our previous study, where we have computed the Casimir force by numerically integrating energy densities over the inverse temperature.

  4. Effect of temperature variations on equilibrium distances in levitating parallel dielectric plates interacting through Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteso, Victoria; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Míguez, Hernán

    2016-04-01

    We study at thermal equilibrium the effect of temperature deviations around room temperature on the equilibrium distance (deq) at which thin films made of Teflon, silica, or polystyrene immersed in glycerol levitate over a silicon substrate due to the balance of Casimir, gravity, and buoyancy forces. We find that the equilibrium nature (stable or unstable) of deq is preserved under temperature changes, and provide simple rules to predict whether the new equilibrium position will occur closer to or further from the substrate at the new temperature. These rules depend on the static permittivities of all materials comprised in the system ( ɛ0 ( m ) ) and the equilibrium nature of deq. Our designed dielectric configuration is excellent for experimental observation of thermal effects on the Casimir force indirectly detected through the tunable equilibrium distances (with slab thickness and material properties) in levitation mode.

  5. Stable levitation and alignment of compact objects by Casimir spring forces.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Zaheer, Saad

    2010-02-19

    We investigate a stable Casimir force configuration consisting of an object contained inside a spherical or spheroidal cavity filled with a dielectric medium. The spring constant for displacements from the center of the cavity and the dependence of the energy on the relative orientations of the inner object and the cavity walls are computed. We find that the stability of the force equilibrium-unlike the direction of the torque-can be predicted based on the sign of the force between two slabs of the same material. PMID:20366865

  6. Stable Levitation and Alignment of Compact Objects by Casimir Spring Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Zaheer, Saad

    2010-02-19

    We investigate a stable Casimir force configuration consisting of an object contained inside a spherical or spheroidal cavity filled with a dielectric medium. The spring constant for displacements from the center of the cavity and the dependence of the energy on the relative orientations of the inner object and the cavity walls are computed. We find that the stability of the force equilibrium--unlike the direction of the torque--can be predicted based on the sign of the force between two slabs of the same material.

  7. Problems in the theory of the thermal Casimir force between dielectrics and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Geyer, B.

    2008-04-01

    The application of the Lifshitz theory to describe the thermal Casimir force between dielectrics and semiconductors is considered. It is shown that for all true dielectrics (i.e., for all materials having zero conductivity at zero temperature) the inclusion of a nonzero conductivity arising at nonzero temperature into the model of dielectric response leads to the violation of the Nernst heat theorem. This result refers equally to simple insulators, intrinsic semiconductors, Mott-Hubbard dielectrics and doped semiconductors with doping concentration below a critical value. We demonstrate that in the insulator-metal transition the Casimir free energy changes abruptly irrespective of whether the conductivity changes continuously or discontinuously. The application of the Lifshitz formula to polar dielectrics results in a large thermal correction that is linear in temperature. A rule is formulated on how to apply the Lifshitz theory to real materials in agreement with thermodynamics and experiment.

  8. Thermal noise limitations to force measurements with torsion pendulums: Applications to the measurement of the Casimir force and its thermal correction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.; Buttler, W.T.

    2005-03-01

    A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular we elaborate on the prospects for measuring the thermal correction.

  9. Casimir force in Randall-Sundrum models with q+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Mariana; Turan, Ismail; Saad, Nasser

    2008-09-01

    We evaluate the Casimir force between two parallel plates in Randall-Sundrum (RS) scenarios extended by q compact dimensions. After giving exact expressions for one extra compact dimension (6D RS model), we generalize to an arbitrary number of compact dimensions. We present the complete calculation for both the two-brane scenario (RSI model) and the one-brane scenario (RSII model) using the method of summing over the modes. We investigate the effects of extra dimensions on the magnitude and sign of the force, and comment on limits for the size and number of the extra dimensions.

  10. Modeling the influence of the Casimir force on the pull-in instability of nanowire-fabricated nanotweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhabadi, Amin; Mokhtari, Javad; Rach, Randolph; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2015-09-01

    The Casimir force can strongly interfere with the pull-in performance of ultra-small structures. The strength of the Casimir force is significantly affected by the geometries of interacting bodies. Previous investigators have exclusively studied the effect of the Casimir force on the electromechanical instability of nanostructures with planar geometries. However no work has yet considered this effect on the pull-in instability of systems with cylindrical geometries such as nanotweezers fabricated from nanotube/nanowires. In our present work, the influence of the Casimir attraction on the electrostatic response and pull-in instability of nanotweezers fabricated from cylindrical conductive nanowires/nanotubes is theoretically investigated. An asymptotic solution, based on scattering theory, is applied to consider the effect of vacuum fluctuations in the theoretical model. The Euler-Bernoulli beam model is employed, in conjunction with the size-dependent modified couple stress continuum theory, to derive the governing equation of the nanotweezers. The governing nonlinear equations are solved by two different approaches, i.e., the modified Adomian-Padé method (MAD-Padé) and a numerical solution. Various aspects of the problem, i.e., the variation of pull-in parameters, effect of geometry, coupling between the Casimir force and size dependency effects and comparison with the van der Waals force regime are discussed.

  11. Measurement of the Casimir force between Germanium plates using a torsion balance

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego; Kim, W J; Sushkov, A O; Lamoreaux, S K

    2008-01-01

    We report the measurement of the Casimir force between Ge plates in a sphere-plane configuration using a torsion balance. We observe that the effective contact potential between the plates varies with their separation distance, resulting in a systematic force. In addition, an unexpected 1/d force is also found in our data that persists even when the electrostatic force between the plates is experimentally minimized by applying a compensating potential. After applying corrections due to these systematic forces, likely of electrostatic origin, our result can be described by the bare permittivity of Ge without conduction, the Drude and the diffusion models for electrical and optical properties of Ge, but not by the plasma model.

  12. Dependence of the Direction of the Casimir Force on the Shape of the Boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Schaden, Martin

    2009-02-13

    The Casimir force due to a massless scalar field satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions may draw a piston into the neck or toward the bulb of a flasklike container. In the worldline formalism this is due to competing contributions to the interaction energy from two types of Brownian bridges. Geometrical subtractions define a finite interaction energy. The procedure does not require regularization and appears well suited for numerical studies. The worldline analysis is robust with respect to variations in the shape of both piston and flask.

  13. Calculation of nonzero-temperature Casimir forces in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kai; Reid, M. T. Homer; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob K.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-04-15

    We show how to compute Casimir forces at nonzero temperatures with time-domain electromagnetic simulations, for example, using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Compared to our previous zero-temperature time-domain method, only a small modification is required, but we explain that some care is required to properly capture the zero-frequency contribution. We validate the method against analytical and numerical frequency-domain calculations, and show a surprising high-temperature disappearance of a nonmonotonic behavior previously demonstrated in a pistonlike geometry.

  14. Van der Waals, Casimir, and Lifshitz forces in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    2015-09-01

    E M Lifshitz's theory of fluctuation molecular forces (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz., Vol. 29, p. 94, 1955 [Sov. Phys. JETP, Vol. 2, 73, 1956]) and related problems are introduced from a historical perspective. Applications of the theory to soft matter physics are discussed, together with some new predictions (for example, the stability of smectic or cholesteric liquid crystal films).

  15. Virtual photons in imaginary time: Computing exact Casimir forces via standard numerical electromagnetism techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2007-09-15

    We describe a numerical method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries, for arbitrary dielectric and metallic materials, with arbitrary accuracy (given sufficient computational resources). Our approach, based on well-established integration of the mean stress tensor evaluated via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, is designed to directly exploit fast methods developed for classical computational electromagnetism, since it only involves repeated evaluation of the Green's function for imaginary frequencies (equivalently, real frequencies in imaginary time). We develop the approach by systematically examining various formulations of Casimir forces from the previous decades and evaluating them according to their suitability for numerical computation. We illustrate our approach with a simple finite-difference frequency-domain implementation, test it for known geometries such as a cylinder and a plate, and apply it to new geometries. In particular, we show that a pistonlike geometry of two squares sliding between metal walls, in both two and three dimensions with both perfect and realistic metallic materials, exhibits a surprising nonmonotonic ''lateral'' force from the walls.

  16. Casimir force between two Aharonov-Bohm solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Duru, I.H. )

    1993-05-01

    The vacuum structure for the massive charged scalar field in the region of two parallel, infinitely long and thin solenoids confining the fluxes n[sub 1] and n[sub 2] is studied. By using the Green function method, it is found that the vacuum expectation value of the system's energy has a finite mutual interaction term depending on the distance a between the solenoids, which implies an attractive force per unit length given by F[sub n1n2] = [minus]([h bar]c/[pi][sup 2])(n[sub 1]n[sub 2])[sup 2]/a[sup 3]. 11 refs.

  17. First analytic correction to the proximity force approximation in the Casimir effect between two parallel cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2011-09-01

    We consider the small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energy and the Casimir interaction force between two parallel cylinders. The leading order terms and the next-to-leading order terms are computed analytically. Four combinations of boundary conditions are considered, which are Dirichlet-Dirichlet, Neumann-Neumann, Dirichlet-Neumann, and Neumann-Dirichlet. For the case where one cylinder is inside another cylinder, the computations are shown in detail. In this case, we restrict our attention to the situation where the cylinders are strictly eccentric and the distance between the cylinders d is much smaller than the distance between the centers of the cylinders. The computations for the case where the two cylinders are exterior to each other can be done in the same way and we only present the results, which turn up to be similar to the results for the case where one cylinder is inside another except for some changes of signs. In all the scenarios we consider, the leading order terms are of order d-7/2 and they agree completely with the proximity force approximations. The results for the next-to-leading order terms are new. In the limiting case where the radius of the larger cylinder approaches infinity, the well-known results for the cylinder-plate configuration with Dirichlet-Dirichlet or Neumann-Neumann boundary conditions are recovered.

  18. On the use of the proximity force approximation for deriving limits to short-range gravitational-like interactions from sphere-plane Casimir force experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Onofrio, Roberto

    2009-09-15

    We discuss the role of the proximity force approximation in deriving limits to the existence of Yukawian forces--predicted in the submillimeter range by many unification models--from Casimir force experiments using the sphere-plane geometry. Two forms of this approximation are discussed, the first used in most analyses of the residuals from the Casimir force experiments performed so far, and the second recently discussed in this context in R. Decca et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 124021 (2009)]. We show that the former form of the proximity force approximation overestimates the expected Yukawa force and that the relative deviation from the exact Yukawa force is of the same order of magnitude, in the realistic experimental settings, as the relative deviation expected between the exact Casimir force and the Casimir force evaluated in the proximity force approximation. This implies both a systematic shift making the actual limits to the Yukawa force weaker than claimed so far, and a degree of uncertainty in the {alpha}-{lambda} plane related to the handling of the various approximations used in the theory for both the Casimir and the Yukawa forces. We further argue that the recently discussed form for the proximity force approximation is equivalent, for a geometry made of a generic object interacting with an infinite planar slab, to the usual exact integration of any additive two-body interaction, without any need to invoke approximation schemes. If the planar slab is of finite size, an additional source of systematic error arises due to the breaking of the planar translational invariance of the system, and we finally discuss to what extent this may affect limits obtained on power-law and Yukawa forces.

  19. Influence of ultrathin water layer on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palasantzas, G.; Zwol, P. J. van; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we investigate the influence of ultrathin water layer ({approx}1-1.5 nm) on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces. Adsorbed water is inevitably present on gold surfaces at ambient conditions as jump-up-to contact during adhesion experiments demonstrate. Calculations based on the Lifshitz theory give very good agreement with the experiment in the absence of any water layer for surface separations d > or approx. 10 nm. However, a layer of thickness h < or approx. 1.5 nm is allowed by the error margin in force measurements. At shorter separations, d < or approx. 10 nm, the water layer can have a strong influence as calculations show for flat surfaces. Nonetheless, in reality the influence of surface roughness must also be considered, and it can overshadow any water layer influence at separations comparable to the total sphere-plate rms roughness w{sub shp}+w.

  20. Electromagnetic energy, absorption, and Casimir forces: Uniform dielectric media in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, F. S. S.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Milonni, P. W.

    2010-03-15

    The derivation of Casimir forces between dielectrics can be simplified by ignoring absorption, calculating energy changes due to displacements of the dielectrics, and only then admitting absorption by allowing permittivities to be complex. As a first step toward a better understanding of this situation we consider in this article the model of a dielectric as a collection of oscillators, each of which is coupled to a reservoir giving rise to damping and Langevin forces on the oscillators and a noise polarization acting as a source of a fluctuating electromagnetic field in the dielectric. The model leads naturally to expressions for the quantized electric and magnetic fields that are consistent with those obtained in approaches that diagonalize the coupled system of oscillators for the dielectric medium, the reservoir, and the electromagnetic field. It also results in a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the noise polarization and the imaginary part of the permittivity; comparison with the Rytov fluctuation-dissipation relation employed in the well-known Lifshitz theory for the van der Waals (or Casimir) force shows that the Lifshitz theory is actually a classical stochastic electrodynamical theory. The approximate classical expression for the energy density in a band of frequencies at which absorption in a dielectric is negligible is shown to be exact as a spectral thermal equilibrium expectation value in quantum electrodynamic theory. Our main result is the derivation of an expression for the QED energy density of a uniform dispersive, absorbing media in thermal equilibrium. The spectral density of the energy is found to have the same form with or without absorption. We also show how the fluctuation-dissipation theorem ensures a detailed balance of energy exchange between the (absorbing) medium, the reservoir, and the electromagnetic field in thermal equilibrium.

  1. Casimir force between a half-space and a plate of finite thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Johan S.; Brevik, Iver

    2016-05-01

    Zero-frequency Casimir theory is analyzed from different viewpoints, with the aim of obtaining further insight into the delicate Drude-plasma issue that turns up when one considers thermal corrections to the Casimir force. The problem is essentially that the plasma model, physically inferior in comparison to the Drude model since it leaves out dissipation in the material, apparently gives the best results when comparing with recent experiments. Our geometric setup is quite conventional, namely, a dielectric plate separated from a dielectric half-space by a vacuum gap, both media being made of the same material. Our investigation is divided into the following categories: (1) Making use of the statistical-mechanical method developed by J. S. Høye and I. Brevik [Physica A (Amsterdam, Neth.) 259, 165 (1998), 10.1016/S0378-4371(98)00249-0], implying that the quantized electromagnetic field is replaced by interaction between dipole moments oscillating in harmonic potentials, we first verify that the Casimir force is in agreement with the Drude prediction. No use of Fresnel's reflection coefficients is made at this stage. (2) Then turning to the field-theoretic description implying use of the reflection coefficients, we derive results in agreement with the forgoing when first setting the frequency equal to zero, before letting the permittivity become large. With the plasma relation the reflection coefficient for TE zero-frequency modes depends on the component of the wave vector parallel to the surfaces and lies between 0 and 1. This contradicts basic electrostatic theory. (3) Turning to high-permeability magnetic materials, the TE zero-frequency mode describes the static magnetic field in the same way the TM zero-frequency modes describe the static electric fields in electrostatics. With the plasma model magnetic fields, except for a small part, cannot pass through metals; that is, metals effectively become superconductors. However, recent experimental results clearly

  2. Electromagnetic Casimir forces of parabolic cylinder and knife-edge geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Shpunt, Alexander; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2011-06-15

    An exact calculation of electromagnetic scattering from a perfectly conducting parabolic cylinder is employed to compute Casimir forces in several configurations. These include interactions between a parabolic cylinder and a plane, two parabolic cylinders, and a parabolic cylinder and an ordinary cylinder. To elucidate the effect of boundaries, special attention is focused on the 'knife-edge' limit in which the parabolic cylinder becomes a half-plane. Geometrical effects are illustrated by considering arbitrary rotations of a parabolic cylinder around its focal axis, and arbitrary translations perpendicular to this axis. A quite different geometrical arrangement is explored for the case of an ordinary cylinder placed in the interior of a parabolic cylinder. All of these results extend simply to nonzero temperatures.

  3. From Casimir-Polder Force to Dicke Physics: Interaction between Atoms and a Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Buhmann, Stefan

    We apply the theory of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics in dispersing and absorbing media to study the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a topological insulator. The electromagnetic response of a topological insulator surface leads to a mixing of electric and magnetic fields, breaking the time-reversal symmetry. The coupling of these fields to an atom causes shifts of the atom's eigenenergies and modified decay rates near the surface of the topological insulator. Energy shifts and modified decay rates cannot only be triggered by the presence of a material, but can be caused by other atoms in close proximity as well. The collective dynamics of atoms (Dicke Physics) leads to a superradiant burst. Combining macroscopic QED and Dicke physics opens the door to the investigation of cooperative atom-surface interactions.

  4. Significance of the Casimir force and surface roughness for actuation dynamics of MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Wijnand; Palasantzas, George; Knoester, Jasper; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.

    2013-03-01

    Using the measured optical response and surface roughness topography as inputs, we perform realistic calculations of the combined effect of Casimir and electrostatic forces on the actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In contrast with the expectations, roughness can influence MEMS dynamics, even at distances between bodies significantly larger than the root-mean-square roughness. This effect is associated with statistically rare high asperities that can be locally close to the point of contact. It is found that even though surface roughness appears to have a detrimental effect on the availability of stable equilibria, it ensures that those equilibria can be reached more easily than in the case of flat surfaces. Hence our findings play a principal role for the stability of microdevices such as vibration sensors, switches, and other related MEM architectures operating at distances below 100 nm.

  5. Constraints on non-Newtonian gravity from measuring the Casimir force in a configuration with nanoscale rectangular corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-04-01

    We report constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from measurements of the gradient of the Casimir force in the configuration of an Au-coated sphere above a Si plate covered with corrugations of trapezoidal shape. For this purpose, the exact expression for the gradient of Yukawa force in the experimental configuration is derived and compared with that obtained using the proximity force approximation. The reported constraints are of almost the same strength as those found previously from several different experiments on the Casimir force and extend over a wide interaction range from 30 to 1260 nm. It is discussed how to make them stronger by replacing the material of the plate.

  6. Measurement of the Casimir force between a spherical gold tip and Si(111)-(7 × 7) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki; Higashino, Kazuhiko; Sueoka, Kazuhisa

    2016-08-01

    We have performed the measurement of Casimir force between a spherical Au tip and an atomically flat Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface at tip–sample distances ranging from 15 to 50 nm in an ultrahigh vacuum of 1.5 × 10‑8 Pa by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat Si(111) surfaces provided by the ultrahigh-vacuum condition and a degassed Au tip reduce the contact potential difference that must be compensated. These experimental conditions led to the elucidation of the distance dependence of the Casimir force down to the distance of 15 nm. The observed distance dependence still follows a theory provided by Chen et al. [Phys. Rev. A 74, 022103 (2006)] within these distances.

  7. Computation and Visualization of Casimir Forces in Arbitrary Geometries: Nonmonotonic Lateral-Wall Forces and the Failure of Proximity-Force Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Iannuzzi, Davide; Capasso, Federico

    2007-08-24

    We present a method of computing Casimir forces for arbitrary geometries, with any desired accuracy, that can directly exploit the efficiency of standard numerical-electromagnetism techniques. Using the simplest possible finite-difference implementation of this approach, we obtain both agreement with past results for cylinder-plate geometries, and also present results for new geometries. In particular, we examine a pistonlike problem involving two dielectric and metallic squares sliding between two metallic walls, in two and three dimensions, respectively, and demonstrate nonadditive and nonmonotonic changes in the force due to these lateral walls.

  8. Three-body radiative heat transfer and Casimir-Lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium for arbitrary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Riccardo; Antezza, Mauro

    2014-05-01

    We study the Casimir-Lifshitz force and the radiative heat transfer in a system consisting of three bodies held at three independent temperatures and immersed in a thermal environment, the whole system being in a stationary configuration out of thermal equilibrium. The theory we develop is valid for arbitrary bodies, i.e., for any set of temperatures, dielectric, and geometrical properties, and describes each body by means of its scattering operators. For the three-body system we provide a closed-form unified expression of the radiative heat transfer and of the Casimir-Lifshitz force (both in and out of thermal equilibrium). This expression is thus first applied to the case of three planar parallel slabs. In this context we discuss the nonadditivity of the force at thermal equilibrium, as well as the equilibrium temperature of the intermediate slab as a function of its position between two external slabs having different temperatures. Finally, we consider the force acting on an atom inside a planar cavity. We show that, differently from the equilibrium configuration, the absence of thermal equilibrium admits one or more positions of minima for the atomic potential. While the corresponding atomic potential depths are very small for typical ground-state atoms, they may become particularly relevant for Rydberg atoms, becoming a promising tool to produce an atomic trap.

  9. Nanolevitation Phenomena in Real Plane-Parallel Systems Due to the Balance between Casimir and Gravity Forces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on the theoretical analysis of equilibrium distances in real plane-parallel systems under the influence of Casimir and gravity forces at thermal equilibrium. Due to the balance between these forces, thin films of Teflon, silica, or polystyrene in a single-layer configuration and immersed in glycerol stand over a silicon substrate at certain stable or unstable positions depending on the material and the slab thickness. Hybrid systems containing silica and polystyrene, materials which display Casimir forces and equilibrium distances of opposite nature when considered individually, are analyzed in either bilayer arrangements or as composite systems made of a homogeneous matrix with small inclusions inside. For each configuration, equilibrium distances and their stability can be adjusted by fine-tuning of the volume occupied by each material. We find the specific conditions under which nanolevitation of realistic films should be observed. Our results indicate that thin films of real materials in plane-parallel configurations can be used to control suspension or stiction phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:26405466

  10. Material dependence of Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate: First analytic correction beyond proximity force approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2013-08-01

    We derive analytically the asymptotic behavior of the Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate when the distance between them, d, is much smaller than the radius of the sphere, R. The leading-order and next-to-leading-order terms are derived from the exact formula for the Casimir interaction energy. They are found to depend nontrivially on the dielectric functions of the objects. As expected, the leading-order term coincides with that derived using the proximity force approximation. Numerical results are presented when the dielectric functions are given by the plasma model or the Drude model, with the plasma frequency (for plasma and Drude models) and relaxation frequency (for Drude model) given by the conventional values used for gold metal. It is found that if plasma model is used instead of the Drude model, the error in the sum of the first two leading terms is at most 2%, while the error in θ1, the ratio of the next-to-leading-order term divided by d/R to the leading-order term, can go up to 4.5%.

  11. Vacuum Fluctuation Force on a Rigid Casimir Cavity in de Sitter and Schwarzschild-De Sitter Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the net force on a rigid Casimir cavity generated by vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field in three cases: de Sitter space-time, de Sitter space-time with weak gravitational field and Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time. In de Sitter space-time the resulting net force follows the square inverse law but unfortunately it is too weak to be measurable due to the large universe radius. By introducing a weak gravitational field into the de Sitter space-time, we find that the net force can now be split into two parts, one is the gravitational force due to the induced effective mass between the two plates and the other one is generated by the metric structure of de Sitter space-time. In order to investigate the vacuum fluctuation force on the rigid cavity under strong gravitational field, we perform a similar analysis in Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time and results are obtained in three different limits. The most interesting one is when the cavity gets closer to the horizon of a blackhole, square inverse law is recovered and the repulsive force due to negative energy/mass of the cavity now has an observable strength. More importantly the force changes from being repulsive to attractive when the cavity crosses the event horizon, so that the energy/mass of the cavity switches the sign, which suggests the unusual time direction inside the event horizon.

  12. Strengthening constraints on Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from measuring the Casimir force between a cylinder and a plate

    SciTech Connect

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Romero, C.

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the possibility of obtaining stronger constraints on non-Newtonian gravity from measuring the gradient of the Casimir force between a cylinder and a plate. The exact analytical expression for the Yukawa-type force in a cylinder-plate configuration is obtained, as well as its asymptotic expansions. The gravitational force is compared with the Casimir force acting between a cylinder and a plate. Numerical computations for the prospective constraints on non-Newtonian gravity are performed for a recently proposed experiment using a microfabricated cylinder attached to a micromachined oscillator. Specifically, it is shown that this experiment is expected to obtain up to 70 times stronger constraints on the Yukawa-type force, compared with the best present day limits, over a wide interaction range from 12.5 to 630 nm.

  13. From optical lattice clocks to the measurement of forces in the Casimir regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Peter; Lemonde, Pierre; Bize, Sebastien; Landragin, Arnaud; Clairon, Andre; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2007-06-15

    We describe an experiment based on atoms trapped close to a macroscopic surface, to study the interactions between the atoms and the surface at very small separations (0.6-10 {mu}m). In this range the dominant potential is the QED interaction (Casimir-Polder and van der Waals) between the surface and the atom. Additionally, several theoretical models suggest the possibility of Yukawa-type potentials with sub-millimeter range, arising from new physics related to gravity. The proposed setup is very similar to neutral atom optical lattice clocks, but with the atoms trapped in lattice sites close to the reflecting mirror. A sequence of pulses of the probe laser at different frequencies is then used to create an interferometer with a coherent superposition between atomic states at different distances from the mirror (in different lattice sites). Assuming atom interferometry state-of-the-art measurement of the phase difference and a duration of the superposition of about 0.1 s, we expect to be able to measure the potential difference between separated states with an uncertainty of {approx_equal}10{sup -4} Hz. An analysis of systematic effects for different atoms and surfaces indicates no fundamentally limiting effect at the same level of uncertainty, but does influence the choice of atom and surface material. Based on those estimates, we expect that such an experiment would improve the best existing measurements of the atom-wall QED interaction by {>=} 2 orders of magnitude, while gaining up to four orders of magnitude on the best present limits on new interactions in the range between 100 nm and 100 {mu}m.

  14. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  15. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  16. Reply to comment on ""Anomalies in electrostatic calibrations for the measurement of the Casimir force in a sphere-plane geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A; Kim, W J; Borwn-hayes, M; Brownell, J H; Onofrio, R

    2008-01-01

    In a recent Comment, Decca et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 026101 (2009)] discussed the origin of the anomalies recently reported by us in Phys. Rev. A 78, 036102(R) (2008). Here we restate our view corroborated by their considerations that quantitative geometrical and electrostatic characterizations of the conducting surfaces (a topic not discussed explicitly in the literature until very recently) are critical for the assessment of precision and accuracy of the demonstration of the Casimir force and for deriving meaningful limits on the existence of Yukawian components possibly superimposed to the Newtonian gravitational interaction.

  17. Fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane and classical Casimir-Polder force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-05-01

    We start with the well-known expression for the vacuum polarization and suitably modify it for 2+1-dimensional spin-orbit coupled (SOC) fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane described by the low-energy Liu-Yao-Feng-Ezawa (LYFE) model Hamiltonian involving the Dirac matrices in the chiral representation obeying the Clifford algebra. The silicene and germanene fit this description suitably. They have the Dirac cones similar to those of graphene and SOC is much stronger. The system could be normal or ferromagnetic in nature. The silicene turns into the latter type if there is exchange field arising due to the proximity coupling to a ferromagnet (FM) such as depositing Fe atoms to the silicene surface. For the silicene, we find that the many-body effects considerably change the bare Coulomb potential by way of the dependence of the Coulomb propagator on the real-spin, iso-spin and the potential due to an electric field applied perpendicular to the silicene plane. The computation aspect of the Casimir-Polder force (CPF) needs to be investigated in this paper. An important quantity in this process is the dielectric response function (DRF) of the material. The plasmon branch was obtained by finding the zeros of DRF in the long-wavelength limit. This leads to the plasmon frequencies. We find that the collective charge excitations at zero doping, i.e., intrinsic plasmons, in this system, are absent in the Dirac limit. The valley-spin-split intrinsic plasmons, however, come into being in the case of the massive Dirac particles with characteristic frequency close to 10 THz. Our scheme to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction (CPI) of a micro-particle with a sheet involves replacing the dielectric constant of the sample in the CPI expression obtained on the basis of the Lifshitz theory by the static DRF obtained using the expressions for the polarization function we started with. Though the approach replaces a macroscopic constant by a microscopic

  18. Casimir stress in an inhomogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, T.G. Xiong, C.; Leonhardt, U.

    2010-03-15

    The Casimir effect in an inhomogeneous dielectric is investigated using Lifshitz's theory of electromagnetic vacuum energy. A permittivity function that depends continuously on one Cartesian coordinate is chosen, bounded on each side by homogeneous dielectrics. The result for the Casimir stress is infinite everywhere inside the inhomogeneous region, a divergence that does not occur for piece-wise homogeneous dielectrics with planar boundaries. A Casimir force per unit volume can be extracted from the infinite stress but it diverges on the boundaries between the inhomogeneous medium and the homogeneous dielectrics. An alternative regularization of the vacuum stress is considered that removes the contribution of the inhomogeneity over small distances, where macroscopic electromagnetism is invalid. The alternative regularization yields a finite Casimir stress inside the inhomogeneous region, but the stress and force per unit volume diverge on the boundaries with the homogeneous dielectrics. The case of inhomogeneous dielectrics with planar boundaries thus falls outside the current understanding of the Casimir effect.

  19. Bulk Casimir densities and vacuum interaction forces in higher dimensional brane models

    SciTech Connect

    Saharian, Aram A.

    2006-03-15

    Vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor and the vacuum interaction forces are evaluated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter satisfying Robin boundary conditions on two codimension one parallel branes embedded in (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime AdS{sub D{sub 1}}{sub +1}x{sigma} with a warped internal space {sigma}. The vacuum energy-momentum tensor is presented as a sum of boundary-free, single brane-induced, and interference parts. The latter is finite everywhere including the points on the branes and is exponentially small for large interbrane distances. Unlike to the purely anti-de Sitter (AdS) bulk, the part induced by a single brane, in addition to the distance from the brane, depends also on the position of the brane in the bulk. The asymptotic behavior of this part is investigated for the points near the brane and for the position of the brane close to the AdS horizon and AdS boundary. The contribution of Kaluza-Klein modes along {sigma} is discussed in various limiting cases. The vacuum forces acting on the branes are presented as a sum of the self-action and interaction terms. The first one contains well-known surface divergences and needs a further renormalization. The interaction forces between the branes are finite for all nonzero interbrane distances and are investigated as functions of the brane positions and the length scale of the internal space. We show that there is a region in the space of parameters in which these forces are repulsive for small distances and attractive for large distances. As an example, the case {sigma}=S{sup D{sub 2}} is considered. An application to the higher dimensional generalization of the Randall-Sundrum brane model with arbitrary mass terms on the branes is discussed. Taking the limit with infinite curvature radius for the AdS bulk, from the general formulas we derive the results for two parallel Robin plates on background of R{sup (D{sub 1},1)}x{sigma} spacetime.

  20. Pseudo-Casimir forces in nematics with disorders in the bulk.

    PubMed

    Karimi Pour Haddadan, Fahimeh

    2016-10-12

    A nematic liquid-crystalline slab is considered in which some rod-like particles are randomly distributed. The particles are locally elongated either homeotropic or planar with respect to the confining substrates of the cell. We consider thermal fluctuations of a nematic director which is aligned perpendicular to the confining substrates due to strong homeotropic anchoring at the substrates. The resulting fluctuation-induced force across the cell is analyzed for an annealed disorder in the anchoring of the nematic director at the dispersed mesoscopic particles. Within the saddle-point approximation to free energy of the system, the effect of the disorder is renormalization of the strength of the mean anchoring which is assumed to be homeotropic. By increasing the variance of the disorder, the modes become less massive and deviations from the mean behavior become larger, so that the disorder-free universal long-range attraction, due to the soft modes, is approached. PMID:27537426

  1. Pseudo-Casimir forces in nematics with disorders in the bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi Pour Haddadan, Fahimeh

    2016-10-01

    A nematic liquid-crystalline slab is considered in which some rod-like particles are randomly distributed. The particles are locally elongated either homeotropic or planar with respect to the confining substrates of the cell. We consider thermal fluctuations of a nematic director which is aligned perpendicular to the confining substrates due to strong homeotropic anchoring at the substrates. The resulting fluctuation-induced force across the cell is analyzed for an annealed disorder in the anchoring of the nematic director at the dispersed mesoscopic particles. Within the saddle-point approximation to free energy of the system, the effect of the disorder is renormalization of the strength of the mean anchoring which is assumed to be homeotropic. By increasing the variance of the disorder, the modes become less massive and deviations from the mean behavior become larger, so that the disorder-free universal long-range attraction, due to the soft modes, is approached.

  2. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  3. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, C; Soto, R

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  4. Nonequilibrium Tuning of the Thermal Casimir Effect.

    PubMed

    Dean, David S; Lu, Bing-Sui; Maggs, A C; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-17

    In net-neutral systems correlations between charge fluctuations generate strong attractive thermal Casimir forces and engineering these forces to optimize nanodevice performance is an important challenge. We show how the normal and lateral thermal Casimir forces between two plates containing Brownian charges can be modulated by decorrelating the system through the application of an electric field, which generates a nonequilibrium steady state with a constant current in one or both plates, reducing the ensuing fluctuation-generated normal force while at the same time generating a lateral drag force. This hypothesis is confirmed by detailed numerical simulations as well as an analytical approach based on stochastic density functional theory. PMID:27367374

  5. Nonequilibrium Tuning of the Thermal Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David S.; Lu, Bing-Sui; Maggs, A. C.; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    In net-neutral systems correlations between charge fluctuations generate strong attractive thermal Casimir forces and engineering these forces to optimize nanodevice performance is an important challenge. We show how the normal and lateral thermal Casimir forces between two plates containing Brownian charges can be modulated by decorrelating the system through the application of an electric field, which generates a nonequilibrium steady state with a constant current in one or both plates, reducing the ensuing fluctuation-generated normal force while at the same time generating a lateral drag force. This hypothesis is confirmed by detailed numerical simulations as well as an analytical approach based on stochastic density functional theory.

  6. Effect of the Casimir-Polder force on the collective oscillations of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Antezza, Mauro; Stringari, Sandro; Pitaevskii, Lev P.

    2004-11-01

    We calculate the effect of the interaction between an optically active material and a Bose-Einstein condensate on the collective oscillations of the condensate. We provide explicit expressions for the frequency shift of the center-of-mass oscillation in terms of the potential generated by the substrate and of the density profile of the gas. The form of the potential is discussed in detail and various regimes (van der Waals-London, Casimir-Polder, and thermal regimes) are identified as a function of the distance of atoms from the surface. Numerical results for the frequency shifts are given for the case of a sapphire dielectric substrate interacting with a harmonically trapped condensate of {sup 87}Rb atoms. We find that at distances of 4-8 {mu}m, where thermal effects become visible, the relative frequency shifts produced by the substrate are of the order 10{sup -4} and hence accessible experimentally. The effects of nonlinearities due to the finite amplitude of the oscillation are explicitly discussed. Predictions are also given for the radial breathing mode.

  7. Casimir interactions for anisotropic magnetodielectric metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rosa, Felipe S; Dalvit, Diego A; Milonni, Peter W

    2008-01-01

    We extend our previous work on the generalization of the Casimir-Lifshitz theory to treat anisotropic magnetodielectric media, focusing on the forces between metals and magnetodielectric metamaterials and on the possibility of inferring magnetic effects by measurements of these forces.

  8. Stress tensor for a scalar field in a spatially varying background potential: Divergences, "renormalization", anomalies, and Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Fulling, Stephen A.; Parashar, Prachi; Kalauni, Pushpa; Murphy, Taylor

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand quantum fluctuation energy densities and stress within a spatially varying dielectric medium, we examine the vacuum expectation value for the stress tensor of a scalar field with arbitrary conformal parameter, in the background of a given potential that depends on only one spatial coordinate. We regulate the expressions by incorporating a temporal-spatial cutoff in the (imaginary) time and transverse-spatial directions. The divergences are captured by the zeroth- and second-order WKB approximations. Then the stress tensor is "renormalized" by omitting the terms that depend on the cutoff. The ambiguities that inevitably arise in this procedure are both duly noted and restricted by imposing certain physical conditions; one result is that the renormalized stress tensor exhibits the expected trace anomaly. The renormalized stress tensor exhibits no pressure anomaly, in that the principle of virtual work is satisfied for motions in a transverse direction. We then consider a potential that defines a wall, a one-dimensional potential that vanishes for z <0 and rises like zα, α >0 , for z >0 . Previously, the stress tensor had been computed outside of the wall, whereas now we compute all components of the stress tensor in the interior of the wall. The full finite stress tensor is computed numerically for the two cases where explicit solutions to the differential equation are available, α =1 and 2. The energy density exhibits an inverse linear divergence as the boundary is approached from the inside for a linear potential, and a logarithmic divergence for a quadratic potential. Finally, the interaction between two such walls is computed, and it is shown that the attractive Casimir pressure between the two walls also satisfies the principle of virtual work (i.e., the pressure equals the negative derivative of the energy with respect to the distance between the walls).

  9. Graphene Casimir Interactions and Some Possible Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Anh D.

    Scientific development requires profound understandings of micromechanical and nanomechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) due to their applications not only in the technological world, but also for scientific understanding. At the micro- or nano-scale, when two objects are brought close together, the existence of stiction or adhesion is inevitable and plays an important role in the behavior operation of these systems. Such effects are due to surface dispersion forces, such as the van der Waals or Casimir interactions. The scientific understanding of these forces is particularly important for low-dimensional materials. In addition, the discovery of materials, such as graphitic systems has provided opportunities for new classes of devices and challenging fundamental problems. Therefore, investigations of the van der Waals or Caismir forces in graphene-based systems, in particular, and the solution generating non-touching systems are needed. In this study, the Casimir force involving 2D graphene is investigated under various conditions. The Casimir interaction is usually studied in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. According to this theory, it is essential to know the frequency-dependent reflection coefficients of materials. Here, it is found that the graphene reflection coefficients strongly depend on the optical conductivity of graphene, which is described by the Kubo formalism. When objects are placed in vacuum, the Casimir force is attractive and leads to adhesion on the surface. We find that the Casimir repulsion can be obtained by replacing vacuum with a suitable liquid. Our studies show that bromobenzene is the liquid providing this effect. We also find that this long-range force is temperature dependent and graphene/bromobenzene/metal substrate configuration can be used to demonstrate merely thermal Casimir interaction at room temperature and micrometer distances. These findings would provide good guidance and predictions for practical studies.

  10. A theory of the Casimir effect for compact regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, L. A.; Wreszinski, W. F.

    2002-09-01

    We develop a mathematically precise framework for the Casimir effect. Our working hypothesis, verified in the case of parallel plates, is that only the regularization-independent Ramanujan sum of a given asymptotic series contributes to the Casimir pressure. As an illustration, we treat two cases: parallel plates, identifying a previous cutoff-free version (by Scharf and Wreszinski) as a special case, and the sphere. We finally discuss the open problem of the Casimir force for the cube. We propose an Ansatz for the exterior force and argue why it may provide the exact solution, as well as an explanation of the repulsive sign of the force.

  11. Critical and near-critical phase behavior and interplay between the thermodynamic Casimir and van der Waals forces in a confined nonpolar fluid medium with competing surface and substrate potentials.

    PubMed

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study, using general scaling arguments and mean-field type calculations, the behavior of the critical Casimir force and its interplay with the van der Waals force acting between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining some fluctuating fluid medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. The surfaces of the slabs are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. The slabs, on the other hand, influence the fluid by long-range competing dispersion potentials, which represent irrelevant interactions in renormalization-group sense. Under such conditions, one usually expects attractive Casimir force governed by universal scaling function, pertinent to the extraordinary surface universality class of Ising type systems, to which the dispersion potentials provide only corrections to scaling. We demonstrate, however, that below a given threshold thickness of the system L(crit) for a suitable set of slabs-fluid and fluid-fluid coupling parameters the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the slabs can result in sign change of the Casimir force acting between the surfaces confining the fluid when one changes the temperature T, the chemical potential of the fluid μ, or L. The last implies that by choosing specific materials for the slabs, coatings, and the fluid for L≲L(crit) one can realize repulsive Casimir force with nonuniversal behavior which, upon increasing L, gradually turns into an attractive one described by a universal scaling function, depending only on the relevant scaling fields related to the temperature and the excess chemical potential, for L≫L(crit). We present arguments and relevant data for specific substances in support of the experimental feasibility of the predicted behavior of the force. It can

  12. Critical and near-critical phase behavior and interplay between the thermodynamic Casimir and van der Waals forces in a confined nonpolar fluid medium with competing surface and substrate potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study, using general scaling arguments and mean-field type calculations, the behavior of the critical Casimir force and its interplay with the van der Waals force acting between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining some fluctuating fluid medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. The surfaces of the slabs are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. The slabs, on the other hand, influence the fluid by long-range competing dispersion potentials, which represent irrelevant interactions in renormalization-group sense. Under such conditions, one usually expects attractive Casimir force governed by universal scaling function, pertinent to the extraordinary surface universality class of Ising type systems, to which the dispersion potentials provide only corrections to scaling. We demonstrate, however, that below a given threshold thickness of the system Lcrit for a suitable set of slabs-fluid and fluid-fluid coupling parameters the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the slabs can result in sign change of the Casimir force acting between the surfaces confining the fluid when one changes the temperature T , the chemical potential of the fluid μ , or L . The last implies that by choosing specific materials for the slabs, coatings, and the fluid for L ≲Lcrit one can realize repulsive Casimir force with nonuniversal behavior which, upon increasing L , gradually turns into an attractive one described by a universal scaling function, depending only on the relevant scaling fields related to the temperature and the excess chemical potential, for L ≫Lcrit . We present arguments and relevant data for specific substances in support of the experimental feasibility of the predicted behavior of the force. It can

  13. Casimir effect for regions with broken symmetry of boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zayaev, Yu.B.; Kazakov, A.Ya.; Mostepanenko, V.M.; Trunov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed for computing corrections to the Casimir force caused by a broken symmetry of the boundaries. The values of these corrections are obtained for a parallelepiped in the case of scalar and electromagnetic fields.

  14. Casimir effect for two lossy dispersive dielectric slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matloob, R.; Keshavarz, A.; Sedighi, D.

    1999-11-01

    The electromagnetic field is quantized using the Green's-function method for the geometry of a Fabry-Perot cavity, made up of two identical lossy dispersive slabs of finite thickness. The dielectric functions of the slabs are assumed to be an arbitrary complex function of frequency obeying causality requirements. The attractive Casimir force between the two slabs is calculated by the help of the latter field operators, via evaluating the difference between the vacuum pressures on both sides of each slab. Special attention is paid to the limiting case of the Casimir effect for two conducting plates. The Lorentz model of the dielectric function is used to demonstrate the variation of the force in terms of plasma frequency. The Casimir force expression is also related to the imaginary part of the response function. The latter expression is used to introduce the repulsive Casimir force between two conducting plates located inside a Fabry-Perot cavity.

  15. Quantum field theory of the Casimir effect for real media

    SciTech Connect

    Mostepanenko, V.M.; Trunov, N.N.

    1985-11-01

    The quantum field theory is developed for the corrections to the Casimir force arising when the field penetrates the material of the plates. A new type of divergence arising from the corresponding modification of the boundary conditions is analyzed. General expressions are obtained for the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in the space between nonideal plates, and the actual corrections to the Casimir force are calculated in first-order perturbation theory in the penetration depth.

  16. Casimir friction: relative motion more generally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Johan S.; Brevik, Iver

    2015-06-01

    This paper extends our recent study on Casimir friction forces for dielectric plates moving parallel to each other (Høye and Brevik 2014 Eur. Phys. J. D 68 61), to a case where the plates are no longer restricted to rectilinear motion. Part of the mathematical formalism thereby becomes more cumbersome, but reduces in the end to the form that we expected to be the natural one in advance. As an example, we calculate the Casimir torque on a planar disc rotating with constant angular velocity around its vertical symmetry axis next to another plate.

  17. An ``Anatomic approach" to study the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Haakh, Harald; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The Casimir effect, in its simplest definition, is a quantum mechanical force between two objects placed in vacuum. In recent years the Casimir force has been the object of an exponentially growing attention both from theorists and experimentalists. A new generation of experiments paved the way for new challenges and spotted some shadows in the comparison to theory. Here we are going to isolate different contributions to the Casimir interaction and perform a detailed study to shine new light on this phenomenon. As an example, the contributions of Foucault (eddy current) modes will be discussed in different configurations. This ``anatomic approach'' allows to clearly put into evidence special features and to explain unusual behaviors. This brings new physical understanding on the undergoing physical mechanisms and suggests new ways to engineer the Casimir effect.

  18. Weak Gravitational Wave and Casimir Energy of a Scalar Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, F.; Pirmoradian, R.; Parsabod, I.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we calculate the effect of a weak gravitational field on the Casimir force between two ideal plates subjected to a massless minimally coupled field. It is the aim of this work to study the Casimir energy under a weak perturbation of gravity. Moreover, the fluctuations of the stress-energy tensor for a scalar field in de Sitter space-time are computed as well.

  19. Casimir energy in Kerr space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, F.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the vacuum energy of a scalar massless field confined in a Casimir cavity moving in a circular equatorial orbit in the exact Kerr space-time geometry. We find that both the orbital motion of the cavity and the underlying space-time geometry conspire in lowering the absolute value of the (renormalized) Casimir energy ⟨ɛvac⟩ren , as measured by a comoving observer, with respect to whom the cavity is at rest. This, in turn, causes a weakening in the attractive force between the Casimir plates. In particular, we show that the vacuum energy density ⟨ɛvac⟩ren→0 when the orbital path of the Casimir cavity comes close to the corotating or counter-rotating circular null orbits (possibly geodesic) allowed by the Kerr geometry. Such an effect could be of some astrophysical interest on relevant orbits, such as the Kerr innermost stable circular orbits, being potentially related to particle confinement (as in some interquark models). The present work generalizes previous results obtained by several authors in the weak field approximation.

  20. The Casimir effect as a scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirzba, A.

    2008-04-01

    We show that Casimir-force calculations for a finite number of non-overlapping obstacles can be mapped onto quantum-mechanical billiard-type problems which are characterized by the scattering of a fictitious point particle off the very same obstacles. With the help of a modified Krein trace formula the genuine/finite part of the Casimir energy is determined as the energy-weighted integral over the log-determinant of the multi-scattering matrix of the analog billiard problem. The formalism is self-regulating and inherently shows that the Casimir energy is governed by the infrared end of the multi-scattering phase shifts or the spectrum of the fluctuating field. The calculation is exact and in principle applicable for any separation(s) between the obstacles. In practice, it is more suited for large- to medium-range separations. We report especially about the Casimir energy of a fluctuating massless scalar field between two spheres or a sphere and a plate under Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. But the formalism can easily be extended to any number of spheres and/or planes in three or arbitrary dimensions, with a variety of boundary conditions or non-overlapping potentials/non-ideal reflectors.

  1. Casimir entropy for magnetodielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Korikov, C. C.

    2015-06-01

    We find the analytic expressions for the Casimir free energy, entropy and pressure at low temperature in the configuration of two parallel plates made of magnetodielectic material. The cases of constant and frequency-dependent dielectic permittivity and magnetic permeability of the plates are considered. Special attention is paid to the account of dc conductivity. It is shown that in the case of finite static dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability the Nernst heat theorem for the Casimir entropy is satisfied. If the dc conductivity is taken into account, the Casimir entropy goes to a positive nonzero limit depending on the parameters of a system when the temperature vanishes, i.e. the Nernst theorem is violated. The experimental situation is also discussed.

  2. Onsager-Casimir relations revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hubmer, G.F.; Titulaer, U.M.

    1987-10-01

    The authors study the fate of the Onsager-Casimir reciprocity relations for a continuous system when some of its variables are eliminated adiabatically. Just as for discrete systems, deviations appear in correction terms to the reduced evolution equation that are of higher order in the time scale ratio. The deviations are not removed by including correction terms to the coarse-grained thermodynamic potential. However, via a reformulation of the theory, in which the central role of the thermodynamic potential is taken over by an associated Lagrangian-type expression, they arrive at a modified form of the Onsager-Casimir relations that survives the adiabatic elimination procedure. There is a simple relation between the time evolution of the redefined thermodynamic forces and that of the basic thermodynamic variables; this relation also survives the adiabatic elimination. The formalism is illustrated by explicit calculations for the Klein-Kramers equation, which describes the phase space distribution of Brownian particles, and for the corrected Smoluchowski equation derived from it by adiabatic elimination of the velocity variable. The symmetry relation for the latter leads to a simple proof that the reality of the eigenvalues of the simple Smoluchowski equation is not destroyed by the addition of higher order corrections, at least not within the framework of a formal perturbation expansion in the time scale ratio.

  3. Negative Casimir entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Milton, Kimball

    In the last decade, various results on the entropy related to the Casimir interactions between two bodies have been obtained and the striking feature that negative values of Casimir entropy frequently appear. The origin of this effect lies in many factors, such as the dissipation of the materials, the geometry of the configuration and so on. We recently investigated the entropies of one body systems. Although the self-free energy of one body systems are always divergent, the self-entropy could be finite in many cases. These phenomenon may throw more light on thermal dynamical behavior of quantum field systems.

  4. Optical and Casimir effects in topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Justin H.

    Two major electromagnetic phenomena, magneto-optical effects and the Casimir effect, have seen much theoretical and experimental use for many years. On the other hand, recently there has been an explosion of theoretical and experimental work on so-called topological materials, and a natural question to ask is how such electromagnetic phenomena change with these novel materials. Specifically, we will consider are topological insulators and Weyl semimetals. When Dirac electrons on the surface of a topological insulator are gapped or Weyl fermions in the bulk of a Weyl semimetal appear due to time-reversal symmetry breaking, there is a resulting quantum anomalous Hall effect (2D in one case and bulk 3D in the other, respectively). For topological insulators, we investigate the role of localized in-gap states which can leave their own fingerprints on the magneto-optics and can therefore be probed. We have shown that these states resonantly contribute to the Hall conductivity and are magneto-optically active. For Weyl semimetals we investigate the Casimir force and show that with thickness, chemical potential, and magnetic field, a repulsive and tunable Casimir force can be obtained. Additionally, various values of the parameters can give various combinations of traps and antitraps. We additionally probe the topological transition called a Lifshitz transition in the band structure of a material and show that in a Casimir experiment, one can observe a non-analytic "kink'' in the Casimir force across such a transition. The material we propose is a spin-orbit coupled semiconductor with large g-factor that can be magnetically tuned through such a transition. Additionally, we propose an experiment with a two-dimensional metal where weak localization is tuned with an applied field in order to definitively test the effect of diffusive electrons on the Casimir force---an issue that is surprisingly unresolved to this day. Lastly, we show how the time-continuous coherent state

  5. Casimir interactions between scatterers in metallic carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhabinskaya, Dina; Mele, E. J.

    2009-10-15

    We study interactions between localized scatterers on metallic carbon nanotubes by a mapping onto a one-dimensional Casimir problem. Backscattering of electrons between localized scattering potentials mediates long-range forces between them. We model spatially localized scatterers by local and nonlocal potentials and treat simultaneously the effects of intravalley and intervalley backscattering. We find that the long-range forces between scatterers exhibit the universal power-law decay of the Casimir force in one dimension, with prefactors that control the sign and strength of the interaction. These prefactors are nonuniversal and depend on the symmetry and degree of localization of the scattering potentials. We find that local potentials inevitably lead to a coupled valley scattering problem, though by contrast nonlocal potentials lead to two decoupled single-valley problems in a physically realized regime. The Casimir effect due to two-valley scattering potentials is characterized by the appearance of spatially periodic modulations of the force.

  6. Casimir repulsion between metallic objects in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Reid, M T Homer; Johnson, Steven G

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis. PMID:20868142

  7. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis.

  8. Casimir interaction at liquid nitrogen temperature: Comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Garza, R.; Xu, J.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2013-08-01

    We have measured the normalized gradient of the Casimir force between Au-coated surfaces of the sphere and the plate and equivalent Casimir pressure between two parallel Au plates at T=77K. These measurements have been performed by means of dynamic force microscope adapted for operating at low temperatures in the frequency shift technique. It was shown that the measurement results at T=77K are in a very good agreement with those at T=300K and with computations at T=77K using both theoretical approaches to the thermal Casimir force proposed in the literature. No thermal effect in the Casimir pressure was observed in the limit of experimental errors with the increase of temperature from T=77 to 300K. Taking this into account, we have discussed the possible role of patch potentials in the comparison between measured and calculated Casimir pressures.

  9. Attractive and repulsive Casimir vacuum energy with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Muñoz-Castañeda, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    The infrared behaviour of quantum field theories confined in bounded domains is strongly dependent on the shape and structure of space boundaries. The most significant physical effect arises in the behaviour of the vacuum energy. The Casimir energy can be attractive or repulsive depending on the nature of the boundary. We calculate the vacuum energy for a massless scalar field confined between two homogeneous parallel plates with the most general type of boundary conditions depending on four parameters. The analysis provides a powerful method to identify which boundary conditions generate attractive or repulsive Casimir forces between the plates. In the interface between both regimes we find a very interesting family of boundary conditions which do not induce any type of Casimir force. We also show that the attractive regime holds far beyond identical boundary conditions for the two plates required by the Kenneth-Klich theorem and that the strongest attractive Casimir force appears for periodic boundary conditions whereas the strongest repulsive Casimir force corresponds to anti-periodic boundary conditions. Most of the analysed boundary conditions are new and some of them can be physically implemented with metamaterials.

  10. Casimir effect, quantum fluctuations and related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hushwater, Velvel Shaia

    Casimir forces are the very long-range (retarded) forces between electrically neutral systems. Such forces may be thought of as arising from the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Contrary to popular opinion such forces need not be attractive. After giving a foundation of the method of the change in the 'zero-point energy' we show how other methods to compute Casimir forces follow from it. We consider the repulsion between electric and magnetic dipoles induced by vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field. The calculation are made by the use of the Heisenberg picture operators and by the stochastic electrodynamics approach. We present a purely geometrical proof of the image method, and use it to discuss the Casimir interaction between an atom and a plate. We study the Casimir repulsion between a perfectly conducting and an infinitely permeable plate with the radiation pressure approach. This example illustrates how a repulsive force arises as a consequence of the redistribution of vacuum-field modes corresponding to specific boundary conditions. We show that result is independent of a cutoff function. Discussing the connection with perturbation theory, we prove the negativity of the leading order shift in the ground state. The Casimir effect supports the reality of the 'zero- point energy.' To clarify this we present a novel approach to quantum theory, based on the principle of the quantization of the ensemble-averaged action variable. This quantization leads to the probabilistic description of coordinates and momentum as random variables, which satisfy the uncertainty relation. Using such variables we show that the 'quantum momentum function' must satisfy the Riccati differential equation, which can be converted to the Schrodinger equation for the Ψ function. We derive also the form of basic operators and the rule for probabilities in quantum mechanics. We show that the approach leads to a simple interpretation of gauge invariance, and discuss

  11. The Casimir Effect at Finite Temperature in a Six-Dimensional Vortex Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongbo

    2016-03-01

    The Casimir effect for parallel plates satisfying the Dirichlet boundary condition in the context of effective QED coming from a six-dimensional Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution of the Abelian Higgs model with fermions coupled to gravity is studied at finite temperature. We find that the sign of the Casimir energy remains negative under the thermal influence. It is also shown that the Casimir force between plates will be weaker in the higher-temperature surroundings while keeps attractive. This Casimir effect involving the thermal influence is still inconsistent with the known experiments. We find that the thermal correction can not compensate or even reduce the modification from this kind of vortex model to make the Casimir force to be in less conflict with the measurements.

  12. Enhancing Casimir repulsion via topological insulator multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ran; Chen, Liang; Nie, Wenjie; Bi, Meihua; Yang, Yaping; Zhu, Shiyao

    2016-08-01

    We propose to observe the enhanced Casimir repulsion between two parallel multilayer walls made of alternating layers of a topological insulator (TI) and a normal insulator. Based on the transfer matrix method, the Fresnel coefficients matrix is generalized to apply to the TI multilayer structure. The Casimir repulsion under the influence of the magnetization orientation in the magnetic coatings on TI layer surfaces, the layer thicknesses, and the topological magnetoelectric polarizability, is investigated. We show that, for the multilayer structures with parallel magnetization on the TI layer surfaces, it is possible to enhance the repulsion by increasing the TI layer number, which is due to the accumulation of the contribution to the repulsion from the polarization rotation effect occurring on each TI layer surface. Generally, in the distance region where there is Casimir attraction between semi-infinite TIs, the force may turn into repulsion in TI multilayer structure, and in the region of repulsion for semi-infinite TI, the repulsive force can be enhanced in magnitude, the enhancement tends to a maximum while the structure contains sufficiently many layers.

  13. Casimir effect with uniformly moving mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M.; Dittes, F.; Robaschik, D.

    1986-06-01

    We study a simple example of quantum electrodynamics with nonstationary boundary conditions in (3+1) dimensions: the problem of two parallel mirrors moving relative to each other with constant speed v. The Green functions are constructed using the reflection principle. The behavior of physical quantities like the Casimir force and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are discussed. If the motion of an arbitrary point between the mirrors is described by a straight world line, then in the local rest frame at the point in question the energy-momentum tensor has the same structure as in the standard Casimir problem with stationary mirrors. In particular, all physical quantities are smooth functions of v, so that the limit v..-->..0 leads to the expected results.

  14. Achieving a Strongly Temperature-Dependent Casimir Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Woolf, David; Capasso, Federico; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-06

    We propose a method of achieving large temperature T sensitivity in the Casimir force that involves measuring the stable separation between dielectric objects immersed in a fluid. We study the Casimir force between slabs and spheres using realistic material models, and find large >2 nm/K variations in their stable separations (hundreds of nanometers) near room temperature. In addition, we analyze the effects of Brownian motion on suspended objects, and show that the average separation is also sensitive to changes in T. Finally, this approach also leads to rich qualitative phenomena, such as irreversible transitions, from suspension to stiction, as T is varied.

  15. On the possibility of Casimir repulsion using metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rosa, Felipe S

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that the Casimir force between two half-spaces is dictated by their electromagnetic properties. In particular, when one of the half-spaces is mainly metallic or dielectric and the other is mainly magnetic, it is possible to show that the force is repulsive. This has attracted lots of interest towards the study of metamaterials (MMs) in the context of Casimir effect, as their magnetic activity might help bring the idea of Casimir repulsion from the theoretical realm to experimental verification. In this paper we investigate the possibility of repulsion when the MM magnetic permeability is given not by a Drude-Lorentz behavior, but by a model put forward by Pendry et al. [16]. After introducing the model and deriving the necessary formulas, we show that it is impossible to achieve repulsion with such a model and present a qualitative discussion of why this is so.

  16. Casimir effect and radiative heat transfer between Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Lopez, Pablo; Grushin, Adolfo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego

    2015-03-01

    Chern Insulators are a class of two-dimensional topological materials. Their electronic properties are different from conventional materials, and lead to interesting new physics as quantum Hall effect in absence of an external magnetic field. Here we will review some of their special properties and, in particular, we will discuss the radiative heat transfer and the Casimir effect between two planar Chern Insulators sheets. Finally, we will see how to control the intensity and sign of this Casimir force and the requirements to observe a repulsive Casimir force in the lab with those materials. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement No. 302005.

  17. Interplay between geometry and temperature for inclined Casimir plates

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Alexej; Gies, Holger

    2009-09-15

    We provide further evidence for the nontrivial interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect. We investigate the temperature dependence of the Casimir force between an inclined semi-infinite plate above an infinite plate in D dimensions using the worldline formalism. Whereas the high-temperature behavior is always found to be linear in T in accordance with dimensional-reduction arguments, different power-law behaviors at small temperatures emerge. Unlike the case of infinite parallel plates, which shows the well-known T{sup D} behavior of the force, we find a T{sup D-1} behavior for inclined plates, and a {approx}T{sup D-0.3} behavior for the edge effect in the limit where the plates become parallel. The strongest temperature dependence {approx}T{sup D-2} occurs for the Casimir torque of inclined plates. Numerical as well as analytical worldline results are presented.

  18. Casimir dynamics: Interactions of surfaces with codimension >1 due to quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Scardicchio, A.

    2005-09-15

    We study the Casimir force between defects (branes) of codimension larger than 1 due to quantum fluctuations of a scalar field {phi} living in the bulk. We show that the Casimir force is attractive and that it diverges as the distance between the branes approaches a critical value L{sub c}. Below this critical distance L{sub c} the vacuum state {phi}=0 of the theory is unstable, due to the birth of a tachyon, and the field condenses.

  19. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir interactions in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, G.; Emig, T.; Kardar, M.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal fluctuations of a critical system induce long-ranged Casimir forces between objects that couple to the underlying field. For two-dimensional (2D) conformal field theories (CFT) we derive an exact result for the Casimir interaction between two objects of arbitrary shape, in terms of 1) the free energy of a circular ring whose radii are determined by the mutual capacitance of two conductors with the objects' shape; and 2) a purely geometric energy that is proportional to the conformal charge of the CFT, but otherwise super-universal in that it depends only on the shapes and is independent of boundary conditions and other details.

  20. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work.

  1. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work.

  2. Critical Casimir interactions between Janus particles.

    PubMed

    Labbé-Laurent, M; Dietrich, S

    2016-08-21

    Recently there has been strong experimental and theoretical interest in studying the self-assembly and the phase behavior of patchy and Janus particles, which form colloidal suspensions. Although in this quest a variety of effective interactions have been proposed and used in order to achieve a directed assembly, the critical Casimir effect stands out as being particularly suitable in this respect because it provides both attractive and repulsive interactions as well as the potential of a sensitive temperature control of their strength. Specifically, we have calculated the critical Casimir force between a single Janus particle and a laterally homogeneous substrate as well as a substrate with a chemical step. We have used the Derjaguin approximation and compared it with results from full mean field theory. A modification of the Derjaguin approximation turns out to be generally reliable. Based on this approach we have derived the effective force and the effective potential between two Janus cylinders as well as between two Janus spheres. PMID:27444691

  3. Casimir energy in a spherical surface within surface impedance approach: The Drude model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Luigi; Trozzo, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    The Casimir Energy of a spherical cavity whose surface is characterized by means of its surface impedance is calculated. The material properties of the boundary are described by means of the Drude model, so that a generalization of a previous result, based on plasma model, is obtained. The limits of the proposed approach are analyzed and a possible solution is suggested. The possibility of modulating the sign of the Casimir force from positive (repulsion) to negative (attraction) is studied.

  4. Casimir interaction between a sphere and a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2013-02-01

    We study the Casimir interaction between a sphere and a cylinder both subjected to Dirichlet, Neumann, or perfectly conducting boundary conditions. Generalizing the operator approach developed by Wittman [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 36, 1078 (1988)IETPAK0018-926X], we compute the scalar and vector translation matrices between a sphere and a cylinder, and thus write down explicitly the exact TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy. In the scalar case, the formula shows manifestly that the Casimir interaction force is attractive at all separations. The large separation leading term of the Casimir interaction energy is computed directly from the exact formula. It is of order ˜ℏcR1/[L2ln⁡(L/R2)], ˜ℏcR13R22/L6, and ˜ℏcR13/[L4ln⁡(L/R2)], respectively, for Dirichlet, Neumann, and perfectly conducting boundary conditions, where R1 and R2 are, respectively, the radii of the sphere and the cylinder, and L is the distance between their centers.

  5. Casimir energies of cylinders: Universal function

    SciTech Connect

    Abalo, E. K.; Milton, K. A.; Kaplan, L.

    2010-12-15

    New exact results are given for the interior Casimir energies of infinitely long waveguides of triangular cross section (equilateral, hemiequilateral, and isosceles right triangles). Results for cylinders of rectangular cross section are rederived. In particular, results are obtained for interior modes belonging to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions (TM and TE modes). These results are expressed in rapidly convergent series using the Chowla-Selberg formula, and in fact may be given in closed form, except for general rectangles. The energies are finite because only the first three heat-kernel coefficients can be nonzero for the case of polygonal boundaries. What appears to be a universal behavior of the Casimir energy as a function of the shape of the regular or quasiregular cross-sectional figure is presented. Furthermore, numerical calculations for arbitrary right triangular cross sections suggest that the universal behavior may be extended to waveguides of general polygonal cross sections. The new exact and numerical results are compared with the proximity force approximation (PFA).

  6. Perturbative Casimir Energies of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, G.

    The Casimir energies of single bodies (as opposed to the interaction between mutually disjoint bodies) have accumulated deceptive folklore which this talk will try to exorcise, by mean of calculations for atomic solids that, though optically dilute, are realistically dispersive. This is easy, because quantum electrodynamics then yields identically the same energy as one gets from the properly retarded interatomic potentials. The problem of regularizing (nominal) divergences turns out to be quite distinct from the appropriate process of renormalization: simply discarding all nominally divergent contributions would prevent one from understanding the physics. Contrary to legend, the pertinent Casimir energies for dielectric spheres are attractive.

  7. Casimir potential of a compact object enclosed by a spherical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-11-15

    We study the electromagnetic Casimir interaction of a compact object contained inside a closed cavity of another compact object. We express the interaction energy in terms of the objects' scattering matrices and translation matrices that relate the coordinate systems appropriate to each object. When the enclosing object is an otherwise empty metallic spherical shell, much larger than the internal object, and the two are sufficiently separated, the Casimir force can be expressed in terms of the static electric and magnetic multipole polarizabilities of the internal object, which is analogous to the Casimir-Polder result. Although it is not a simple power law, the dependence of the force on the separation of the object from the containing sphere is a universal function of its displacement from the center of the sphere, independent of other details of the object's electromagnetic response. Furthermore, we compute the exact Casimir force between two metallic spheres contained one inside the other at arbitrary separations. Finally, we combine our results with earlier work on the Casimir force between two spheres to obtain data on the leading-order correction to the proximity force approximation for two metallic spheres both outside and within one another.

  8. Casimir effect: An avatar of the quantum vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajesh, Kuloth V.

    In this dissertation we study the Casimir effect, which is demonstrated to be a manifestation of the quantum vacuum. The boundary conditions are imposed by constructing delta-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. The coupling to the delta-function potential reduces to the Dirichlet boundary condition in the strong coupling limit. In the case of electrodynamics the strong coupling limit corresponds to metallic plates, and the weak coupling limit corresponds to tenuous dielectrics. In chapter 1 we derive the expression for the vacuum energy in the presence of a background for the case of scalar fields. The vacuum energy, or the Casimir energy, is expressed in terms of the trace of the logarithm of Green's functions. Thus the problem is reduced to solving a second order differential equation for the Green's function in the presence of a background potential. The Casimir energy is compared to the alternate expression derived from the energy-momentum tensor associated with the field in the presence of a background. The Casimir force is interpreted as the force between two objects arising due to the change in energy when the distance between their center of masses is varied. The Casimir force is also identified in terms of the divergence of the energy-momentum tensor. In Chapter 2 we study the differential equations satisfied by Green's function and present solutions to the Green's functions which will be used in this thesis. Using the expressions derived in chapters 1 and 2 we derive the Casimir energy associated with a single plate, and two parallel plates, in chapter 3. The infinite energy associated with the vacuum in the absence of a potential, or the plates, which is a divergent quantity, is isolated. The Casimir energy associated with a single plate is shown to be divergent. The Casimir energy for two parallel plates is written as a sum of three terms. Two of these terms correspond to the energy associated with the two single plates

  9. Casimir effect: An avatar of the quantum vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajesh, Kuloth V.

    In this dissertation we study the Casimir effect, which is demonstrated to be a manifestation of the quantum vacuum. The boundary conditions are imposed by constructing delta-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. The coupling to the delta-function potential reduces to the Dirichlet boundary condition in the strong coupling limit. In the case of electrodynamics the strong coupling limit corresponds to metallic plates, and the weak coupling limit corresponds to tenuous dielectrics. In chapter 1 we derive the expression for the vacuum energy in the presence of a background for the case of scalar fields. The vacuum energy, or the Casimir energy, is expressed in terms of the trace of the logarithm of Green's functions. Thus the problem is reduced to solving a second order differential equation for the Green's function in the presence of a background potential. The Casimir energy is compared to the alternate expression derived from the energy-momentum tensor associated with the field in the presence of a background. The Casimir force is interpreted as the force between two objects arising due to the change in energy when the distance between their center of masses is varied. The Casimir force is also identified in terms of the divergence of the energy-momentum tensor. In Chapter 2 we study the differential equations satisfied by Green's function and present solutions to the Green's functions which will be used in this thesis. Using the expressions derived in chapters 1 and 2 we derive the Casimir energy associated with a single plate, and two parallel plates, in chapter 3. The infinite energy associated with the vacuum in the absence of a potential, or the plates, which is a divergent quantity, is isolated. The Casimir energy associated with a single plate is shown to be divergent. The Casimir energy for two parallel plates is written as a sum of three terms. Two of these terms correspond to the energy associated with the two single plates

  10. Critical Casimir effect for colloids close to chemically patterned substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Troendle, M.; Kondrat, S.; Harnau, L.; Dietrich, S.; Gambassi, A.

    2010-08-21

    Colloids immersed in a critical or near-critical binary liquid mixture and close to a chemically patterned substrate are subject to normal and lateral critical Casimir forces of dominating strength. For a single colloid, we calculate these attractive or repulsive forces and the corresponding critical Casimir potentials within mean-field theory. Within this approach we also discuss the quality of the Derjaguin approximation and apply it to Monte Carlo simulation data available for the system under study. We find that the range of validity of the Derjaguin approximation is rather large and that it fails only for surface structures which are very small compared to the geometric mean of the size of the colloid and its distance from the substrate. For certain chemical structures of the substrate, the critical Casimir force acting on the colloid can change sign as a function of the distance between the particle and the substrate; this provides a mechanism for stable levitation at a certain distance which can be strongly tuned by temperature, i.e., with a sensitivity of more than 200 nm/K.

  11. The Casimir effect for fields with arbitrary spin

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, Adam; Bennett, Robert

    2015-09-15

    The Casimir force arises when a quantum field is confined between objects that apply boundary conditions to it. In a recent paper we used the two-spinor calculus to derive boundary conditions applicable to fields with arbitrary spin in the presence of perfectly reflecting surfaces. Here we use these general boundary conditions to investigate the Casimir force between two parallel perfectly reflecting plates for fields up to spin-2. We use the two-spinor calculus formalism to present a unified calculation of well-known results for spin-1/2 (Dirac) and spin-1 (Maxwell) fields. We then use our unified framework to derive new results for the spin-3/2 and spin-2 fields, which turn out to be the same as those for spin-1/2 and spin-1. This is part of a broader conclusion that there are only two different Casimir forces for perfectly reflecting plates—one associated with fermions and the other with bosons.

  12. Casimir effect for parallel metallic plates in cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.; Grigoryan, A. Kh

    2012-09-01

    We evaluate the renormalized vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of electric and magnetic field squared and the energy-momentum tensor for the electromagnetic field in the geometry of two parallel conducting plates on the background of cosmic string spacetime. On the basis of these results, the Casimir-Polder force acting on a polarizable particle and the Casimir forces acting on the plates are investigated. The VEVs are decomposed into the pure string and plate-induced parts. The VEV of the electric field squared is negative for points with the radial distance to the string smaller than the distance to the plates, and positive for the opposite situation. On the other hand, the VEV for the magnetic field squared is negative everywhere. The boundary-induced part in the VEV of the energy-momentum tensor is different from zero in the region between the plates only. Moreover, this part only depends on the distance from the string. The boundary-induced part in the vacuum energy density is positive for points with a distance to the string smaller than the distance to the plates and negative in the opposite situation. The Casimir stresses on the plates depend non-monotonically on the distance from the string. We show that the Casimir forces acting on the plates are always attractive. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  13. Casimir effect in the nonequilibrium steady state of a quantum spin chain

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, D. L.; Racz, Z.

    2010-05-15

    We present a fully microscopics-based calculation of the Casimir effect in a nonequilibrium system, namely, an energy-flux-driven quantum XX chain. The force between the walls (transverse-field impurities) is calculated in a nonequilibrium steady state which is prepared by letting the system evolve from an initial state with the two halves of the chain prepared at equilibrium at different temperatures. The steady state emerging in the large-time limit is homogeneous but carries an energy flux. The Casimir force in this nonequilibrium state is calculated analytically in the limit when the transverse fields are small. We find that the the Casimir force range is reduced compared to the equilibrium case, and suggest that the reason for this is the reduction of fluctuations in the flux-carrying steady state.

  14. Numerical and semiclassical analysis of some generalized Casimir pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Schaden, M.

    2009-05-15

    The Casimir force due to a scalar field in a cylinder of radius r with a spherical cap of radius R>r is computed numerically in the world-line approach. A geometrical subtraction scheme gives the finite interaction energy that determines the Casimir force. The spectral function of convex domains is obtained from a probability measure on convex surfaces that is induced by the Wiener measure on Brownian bridges the convex surfaces are the hulls of. Due to reflection positivity, the vacuum force on the piston by a scalar field satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions is attractive in these geometries, but the strength and short-distance behavior of the force depend strongly on the shape of the piston casing. For a cylindrical casing with a hemispherical head, the force on the piston does not depend on the dimension of the casing at small piston elevation a<force is due to short, closed, and nonperiodic trajectories that reflect just once off the piston near its periphery. A semiclassical estimate reproduces the numerical results for the small-distance behavior of the force within statistical errors, whereas the proximity force approximation is off by one order of magnitude when R{approx}r.

  15. Casimir interaction between spheres in ( D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-05-01

    We consider the Casimir interaction between two spheres in ( D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime due to the vacuum fluctuations of scalar fields. We consider combinations of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The TGTG formula of the Casimir interaction energy is derived. The computations of the T matrices of the two spheres are straightforward. To compute the two G matrices, known as translation matrices, which relate the hyper-spherical waves in two spherical coordinate frames differ by a translation, we generalize the operator approach employed in [39]. The result is expressed in terms of an integral over Gegenbauer polynomials. In contrast to the D=3 case, we do not re-express the integral in terms of 3 j-symbols and hyper-spherical waves, which in principle, can be done but does not simplify the formula. Using our expression for the Casimir interaction energy, we derive the large separation and small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energy. In the large separation regime, we find that the Casimir interaction energy is of order L -2 D+3, L -2 D+1 and L -2 D-1 respectively for Dirichlet-Dirichlet, Dirichlet-Neumann and Neumann-Neumann boundary conditions, where L is the center-to-center distance of the two spheres. In the small separation regime, we confirm that the leading term of the Casimir interaction agrees with the proximity force approximation, which is of order , where d is the distance between the two spheres. Another main result of this work is the analytic computations of the next-to-leading order term in the small separation asymptotic expansion. This term is computed using careful order analysis as well as perturbation method. In the case the radius of one of the sphere goes to infinity, we find that the results agree with the one we derive for sphere-plate configuration. When D=3, we also recover previously known results. We find that when D is large, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading

  16. Casimir interactions of an object inside a spherical metal shell

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the electromagnetic Casimir interactions of an object contained within an otherwise empty, perfectly conducting spherical shell. For a small object we present analytical calculations of the force, which is directed away from the center of the cavity, and the torque, which tends to align the object opposite to the preferred alignment outside the cavity. For a perfectly conducting sphere as the interior object, we compute the corrections to the proximity force approximation (PFA) numerically. In both cases the results for the interior configuration match smoothly onto those for the corresponding exterior configuration.

  17. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work. PMID:27627286

  18. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead of general relativity.

  19. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-30

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead of general relativity.

  20. Repulsive Casimir interaction: Boyer oscillators at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabadani, Jalal; Ojaghi Dogahe, Badrosadat; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect of temperature on the repulsive Casimir interaction between an ideally permeable and an ideally polarizable plate in vacuo. At small separations or for low temperatures the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field give the main contribution to the interaction, while at large separations or for high temperatures the interaction is dominated by the classical thermal fluctuations of the field. At intermediate separations or finite temperatures both the quantum and thermal fluctuations contribute. For a system composed of one infinitely permeable plate between two ideal conductors at a finite temperature, we identify a stable mechanical equilibrium state, if the infinitely permeable plate is located in the middle of the cavity. For small displacements the restoring force of this Boyer oscillator is linear in the deviation from the equilibrium position, with a spring constant that depends inversely on the separation between the two conducting plates and linearly on temperature. Furthermore, an array of such oscillators presents an ideal Einsteinian crystal that displays a fluctuation force between its outer boundaries stemming from the displacement fluctuations of the Boyer oscillators.

  1. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  2. L'effet Casimir : théorie et expériences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, A.; Genet, C.; Intravaia, F.; Reynaud, S.

    2004-11-01

    L'existence de fluctuations irréductibles de champ dans le vide est une prédiction importante de la théorie quantique. Ces fluctuations ont de nombreuses conséquences observables comme l'effet Casimir, qui est maintenant mesuré avec une bonne précision et un bon accord avec la théorie, pourvu que celle-ci tienne compte des différences entre les expériences rélles et la situation idéale considérée par H.G.B. Casimir. Nous présenterons quelqu'unes des expériences récentes et discuterons les principales corrections à la force de Casimir liées à la situation expérimentale.

  3. Casimir Interaction from Magnetically Coupled Eddy Currents

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, Francesco; Henkel, Carsten

    2009-09-25

    We study the quantum and thermal fluctuations of eddy (Foucault) currents in thick metallic plates. A Casimir interaction between two plates arises from the coupling via quasistatic magnetic fields. As a function of distance, the relevant eddy current modes cross over from a quantum to a thermal regime. These modes alone reproduce previously discussed thermal anomalies of the electromagnetic Casimir interaction between good conductors. In particular, they provide a physical picture for the Casimir entropy whose nonzero value at zero temperature arises from a correlated, glassy state.

  4. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  5. Direct Measurement of Intermediate-Range Casimir-Polder Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Marzok, C.; Zimmermann, C.; Slama, S.

    2010-02-26

    We present the first direct measurements of Casimir-Polder forces between solid surfaces and atomic gases in the transition regime between the electrostatic short-distance and the retarded long-distance limit. The experimental method is based on ultracold ground-state Rb atoms that are reflected from evanescent wave barriers at the surface of a dielectric glass prism. Our novel approach does not require assumptions about the potential shape. The experimental data are compared to the theoretical predictions valid in the different regimes. They agree best with a full QED calculation.

  6. PREFACE: International Workshop '60 Years of the Casimir Effect'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Carugno, Giovanni; Dodonov, Victor; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-07-01

    In 1948 Hendrick Casimir published a short article predicting that (neutral) ideal metallic plates attract each other. This attraction is widely ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field (even though away from the limit of ideal metals it depends demonstrably on the physics of the charge carriers vanishing when they cease to carry). Casimir's remarkable discovery, nowadays called the Casimir effect, has charmed several generations of physicists. In the last decade alone, more than a thousand publications have addressed its many consequences, generalizations, and possible applications in different areas from particle physics to cosmology. Interest in the field is still growing driven by impressive progress in experimental skills and its importance for the recently opened-up area of micro- and nano-electromechanical systems: according to the Thompson ISI Web of Science database, in 2005 the number of papers related to the Casimir effect or to Casimir forces jumped to over 125, compared to approximately 60 in 2000 and 30 in 1995. The increase continues, with more than 170 papers in 2008. The International Workshop '60 Years of the Casimir Effect' took place on 23-27June 2008, in Brasilia (Brazil) organized by the International Center for Condensed Matter Physics (ICCMP). The purpose was to celebrate this anniversary of Casimir's pioneering paper by inviting the leading specialists in the area, both theorists and experimentalists, together with young researchers and post-graduate students interested in hearing about the most recent achievements in the field. The Workshop was attended by 65 participants from 14 countries, who presented 41 talks and 12 posters. These Proceedings contain extended versions of almost all the talks and some posters, plus several papers by authors who had planned to attend but for various reasons could not. The contributions are divided (with some inevitable arbitrariness) into four groups. The largest one

  7. Out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the thermal Casimir effect in a model polarizable material.

    PubMed

    Dean, David S; Démery, Vincent; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    Relaxation of the thermal Casimir or van der Waals force (the high temperature limit of the Casimir force) for a model dielectric medium is investigated. We start with a model of interacting polarization fields with a dynamics that leads to a frequency dependent dielectric constant of the Debye form. In the static limit, the usual zero frequency Matsubara mode component of the Casimir force is recovered. We then consider the out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the van der Waals force to its equilibrium value when two initially uncorrelated dielectric bodies are brought into sudden proximity. For the interaction between dielectric slabs, it is found that the spatial dependence of the out-of-equilibrium force is the same as the equilibrium one, but it has a time dependent amplitude, or Hamaker coefficient, which increases in time to its equilibrium value. The final relaxation of the force to its equilibrium value is exponential in systems with a single or finite number of polarization field relaxation times. However, in systems, such as those described by the Havriliak-Negami dielectric constant with a broad distribution of relaxation times, we observe a much slower power law decay to the equilibrium value.

  8. Sphere-plate Casimir interaction in (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we derive the formula for the Casimir interaction energy between a sphere and a plate in (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. It is assumed that the scalar field satisfies the Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the sphere and the plate. As in the D = 3 case, the formula is of TGTG type. One of our main contributions is deriving the translation matrices which express the change of bases between plane waves and spherical waves for general D. Using orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials, it turns out that the final TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy can be simplified to one that is similar to the D = 3 case. To illustrate the application of the formula, both large separation and small separation asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir interaction energy are computed. The large separation leading term is proportional to L-D+1 if the sphere is imposed with Dirichlet boundary condition, and to L-D-1 if the sphere is imposed with Neumann boundary condition, where L is distance from the center of the sphere to the plane. For the small separation asymptotic behavior, it is shown that the leading term is equal to the one obtained using proximity force approximation. The next-to-leading order term is also computed using perturbation method. It is shown that when the space dimension D is larger than 5, the next-to-leading order has sign opposite to the leading order term. Moreover, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading order term is linear in D, indicating a larger correction at higher dimensions.

  9. Sphere-plate Casimir interaction in (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we derive the formula for the Casimir interaction energy between a sphere and a plate in (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. It is assumed that the scalar field satisfies the Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the sphere and the plate. As in the D = 3 case, the formula is of TGTG type. One of our main contributions is deriving the translation matrices which express the change of bases between plane waves and spherical waves for general D. Using orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials, it turns out that the final TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy can be simplified to one that is similar to the D = 3 case. To illustrate the application of the formula, both large separation and small separation asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir interaction energy are computed. The large separation leading term is proportional to L{sup −D+1} if the sphere is imposed with Dirichlet boundary condition, and to L{sup −D−1} if the sphere is imposed with Neumann boundary condition, where L is distance from the center of the sphere to the plane. For the small separation asymptotic behavior, it is shown that the leading term is equal to the one obtained using proximity force approximation. The next-to-leading order term is also computed using perturbation method. It is shown that when the space dimension D is larger than 5, the next-to-leading order has sign opposite to the leading order term. Moreover, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading order term is linear in D, indicating a larger correction at higher dimensions.

  10. Casimir interaction in smectic-A liquid crystals caused by coupled fluctuations of positional and orientational order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markun, B.; Žumer, S.

    2006-03-01

    A theoretical study of the Casimir interaction in smectic-A systems, considering fluctuations of both types of smectic ordering—positional and orientational—including the coupling between them, is presented. Two model systems with plan-parallel geometry are studied: homeotropic cell and free-standing film. At large thicknesses of the system the behavior of the Casimir force is found to be primarily determined by positional fluctuations, whereas at small thicknesses also the orientational degrees of freedom greatly contribute to the interaction. The influence of different coupling strengths between orientational and positional order is presented. The dependence of the Casimir force on the director anchoring and surface-tension parameters is studied. The possibilities of experimental detection of the interaction are discussed.

  11. Weak localization as a definitive test of diffusive models in the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allocca, Andrew; Wilson, Justin; Galitski, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Results from many measurements of the Casimir effect suggest that the metallic plates in these experiments should be modeled with the plasma model of free electrons as opposed to the naive diffusive Drude model, while other experiments seem to indicate the exact opposite, with results more in line with a diffusive model. We study the Casimir effect at low temperatures between a thick disordered plate and purely two-dimensional disordered system where the Drude conductivity decreases logarithmically at low temperatures due to weak localization. This effect can be tuned with either temperature or applied magnetic field leading to a measurable change in the Casimir force. On the other hand, a ballistic model cannot experience such an effect and is only weakly dependent on temperature and magnetic field. As a result, we propose that an experiment would unambiguously differentiate between diffusive and ballistic models by measuring the effect at low temperatures with an applied magnetic field. Additionally, we calculate the impact that fluctuations in the disorder distribution have on the Casimir effect. Assuming the validity of a diffusive model, we find that the Drude model is a good approximation of a more exact treatment of disorder. This work was supported by the DOE-BES (Grant No. DESC0001911) (A.A. and V.G.), the JQI-PFC (J.W.), and the Simons Foundation.

  12. Casimir-Polder effect with thermally excited surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laliotis, A.; Ducloy, M.

    2015-05-01

    We take a closer look at the fundamental Casimir-Polder (CP) interaction between quantum particles and dispersive dielectric surfaces with surface polariton or plasmon resonances. Linear response theory shows that in the near-field, van der Waals regime the free-energy shift of a particle contains a thermal component that depends exclusively on the excitation of the evanescent surface polariton (plasmon or phonon) modes. Our work makes evident the link between particle surface interaction and near-field thermal emission and demonstrates how this can be used to engineer Casimir-Polder forces. We also examine how the exotic effects of surface waves are washed out as the distance from the surface increases. In the case of molecules or excited-state atoms, far-field approximations result in a classical dipole-dipole interaction which depends on the surface reflectivity and the mean number of photons at the frequency of the atomic or molecular transition. Finally we present numerical results for the CP interaction between Cs atoms and various dielectric surfaces with a single polariton resonance and discuss the implications of temperature and retardation effects for specific spectroscopic experiments.

  13. Advance and prospects in constraining the Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-03-01

    We report stronger constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from measurements of the lateral Casimir force between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces of a sphere and a plate. In the interaction range from 1.6 to 14 nm the strengthening of previously known high confidence constraints up to a factor of 2.4x10{sup 7} is achieved using these measurements. It is shown that the replacement of a plane plate with a corrugated one in the measurements of the normal Casimir force by means of an atomic force microscope would result in the strengthening of respective high confidence constraints on the Yukawa-type interaction by a factor of 1.1x10{sup 12}. The use of a corrugated plate instead of a plane plate in the experiment by means of a micromachined oscillator also leads to strengthening of the obtained constraints. We further obtain constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type interaction from the data of experiments measuring the gradient of the Casimir pressure between two parallel plates and the gradient of the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a plate. The obtained results are compared with the previously known constraints. The possibilities of how to further strengthen the constraints on non-Newtonian gravity are discussed.

  14. Casimir effect due to a single boundary as a manifestation of the Weyl problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.; Langsjoen, Luke S.; Zaidi, Hussain

    2010-09-01

    The Casimir self-energy of a boundary is ultraviolet-divergent. In many cases, the divergences can be eliminated by methods such as zeta-function regularization or through physical arguments (ultraviolet transparency of the boundary would provide a cutoff). Using the example of a massless scalar field theory with a single Dirichlet boundary, we explore the relationship between such approaches, with the goal of better understanding of the origin of the divergences. We are guided by the insight due to Dowker and Kennedy (1978 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 11 895) and Deutsch and Candelas (1979 Phys. Rev. D 20 3063) that the divergences represent measurable effects that can be interpreted with the aid of the theory of the asymptotic distribution of eigenvalues of the Laplacian discussed by Weyl. In many cases, the Casimir self-energy is the sum of cutoff-dependent (Weyl) terms having a geometrical origin, and an 'intrinsic' term that is independent of the cutoff. The Weyl terms make a measurable contribution to the physical situation even when regularization methods succeed in isolating the intrinsic part. Regularization methods fail when the Weyl terms and intrinsic parts of the Casimir effect cannot be clearly separated. Specifically, we demonstrate that the Casimir self-energy of a smooth boundary in two dimensions is a sum of two Weyl terms (exhibiting quadratic and logarithmic cutoff dependence), a geometrical term that is independent of cutoff and a non-geometrical intrinsic term. As by-products, we resolve the puzzle of the divergent Casimir force on a ring and correct the sign of the coefficient of linear tension of the Dirichlet line predicted in earlier treatments.

  15. Critical Casimir effect in the Ising strips with standard normal and ordinary boundary conditions and the grain boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borjan, Z.

    2016-09-01

    We consider critical Casimir force in the Ising strips with boundary conditions defined by standard normal and ordinary surface universality classes containing also the internal grain boundary. Using exact variational approach of Mikheev and Fisher we have elaborated on behaviors of Casimir amplitudes Δ++(g) , ΔOO(g) and Δ+O(g) , corresponding to normal-normal, ordinary-ordinary and mixed normal-ordinary boundary conditions, respectively, with g as a strength of the grain boundary. Closed analytic results describe Casimir amplitudes Δ++(g) and ΔOO(g) as continuous functions of the grain boundary's strength g, changing the character of the Casimir force from repulsive to attractive and vice versa for certain domains of g. Present results reveal a new type of symmetry between Casimir amplitudes Δ++(g) and ΔOO(g) . Unexpectedly simple constant result for the Casimir amplitude Δ+O(g) = π/12 we have comprehensively interpreted in terms of equilibrium states of the present Ising strip as a complex interacting system comprising two sub-systems. Short-distance expansions of energy density profiles in the vicinity of the grain boundary reveal new distant-wall correction amplitudes that we examined in detail. Analogy of present considerations with earlier more usual short-distance expansions near one of the (N), (O) and (SB) boundaries, as well as close to surfaces with variable boundary conditions refers to the set of scaling dimensions appearing in the present calculations but also to the discovery of the de Gennes-Fisher distant wall correction amplitudes.

  16. Casimir microsphere diclusters and three-body effects in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, Jaime; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-04-15

    Our previous paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 060401 (2010)] predicted that Casimir forces induced by the material-dispersion properties of certain dielectrics can give rise to stable configurations of objects. This phenomenon was illustrated via a dicluster configuration of nontouching objects consisting of two spheres immersed in a fluid and suspended against gravity above a plate. Here, we examine these predictions from the perspective of a practical experiment and consider the influence of nonadditive, three-body, and nonzero-temperature effects on the stability of the two spheres. We conclude that the presence of Brownian motion reduces the set of experimentally realizable silicon-teflon spherical diclusters to those consisting of layered microspheres, such as the hollow core (spherical shells) considered here.

  17. Nonlinear Actuation Dynamics of Driven Casimir Oscillators with Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Wijnand; Waalkens, Holger; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Knoester, Jasper; Palasantzas, George

    2015-11-01

    At separations below 100 nm, Casimir-Lifshitz forces strongly influence the actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in dry vacuum conditions. For a micron-size plate oscillating near a surface, which mimics a frequently used setup in experiments with MEMS, we show that the roughness of the surfaces significantly influences the qualitative dynamics of the oscillator. Via a combination of analytical and numerical methods, it is shown that surface roughness leads to a clear increase of initial conditions associated with chaotic motion, that eventually lead to stiction between the surfaces. Since stiction leads to a malfunction of MEMS oscillators, our results are of central interest for the design of microdevices. Moreover, stiction is of significance for fundamentally motivated experiments performed with MEMS.

  18. The Casimir Effect in Light-Front Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    We show that the standard result for the Casimir force between conducting plates at rest in an inertial frame can be computed in light-front quantization. This is not the same as light-front analyses where the plates are at "rest" in an infinite momentum frame. In that case, Lenz and Steinbacher have shown that the result does not agree with the standard result for plates at rest. The two important ingredients in the present analysis are a careful treatment of the boundary conditions, inspired by the work of Almeida et al. on oblique light-front coordinates, and computation of the ordinary energy density, rather than the light-front energy density.

  19. Casimir energy for a double spherical shell: A global mode sum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltão, M. S. R.

    2008-09-01

    In this work we study the configuration of two perfectly conducting spherical shells. This is a problem of basic importance to make possible development of experimental apparatuses that they make possible to measure the spherical Casimir effect, an open subject. We apply the mode sum method via cutoff exponential function regularization with two independent parameters: one to regularize the infinite order sum of the Bessel functions; other, to regularize the integral that becomes related, due to the argument theorem, with the infinite zero sum of the Bessel functions. We obtain a general expression of the Casimir energy as a quadrature sum. We investigate two immediate limit cases as a consistency test of the expression obtained: that of a spherical shell and that of two parallel plates. In the approximation of a thin spherical shell we obtain an expression that allows to relate our result with that of the proximity-force approximation, supplying a correction to this result.

  20. Magnetic anisotropy due to the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Metalidis, G.; Bruno, P.

    2010-02-15

    We consider the Casimir interaction between a ferromagnetic and a nonmagnetic mirror and show how the Casimir effect gives rise to a magnetic anisotropy in the ferromagnetic layer. The anisotropy is out of plane if the nonmagnetic plate is optically isotropic. If the nonmagnetic plate shows a uniaxial optical anisotropy (with optical axis in the plate plane), we find an in-plane magnetic anisotropy. In both cases, the energetically most favorable magnetization orientation is given by the competition between polar, longitudinal, and transverse contributions to the magneto-optical Kerr effect and will therefore depend on the interplate distance. Numerical results will be presented for a magnetic plate made out of Fe and nonmagnetic plates of Au (optically isotropic), quartz, calcite, and barium titanate (all uniaxially birefringent).

  1. The character of the supersymmetric Casimir energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Dario; Sparks, James

    2016-08-01

    We study the supersymmetric Casimir energy E susy of {N}=1 field theories with an R-symmetry, defined on rigid supersymmetric backgrounds S 1 ×M 3, using a Hamiltonian formalism. These backgrounds admit an ambi-Hermitian geometry, and we show that the net contributions to E susy arise from certain twisted holomorphic modes on ℝ × M 3, with respect to both complex structures. The supersymmetric Casimir energy may then be identified as a limit of an index-character that counts these modes. In particular this explains a recent observation relating E susy on S 1 × S 3 to the anomaly polynomial. As further applications we compute E susy for certain secondary Hopf surfaces, and discuss how the index-character may also be used to compute generalized supersymmetric indices.

  2. Casimir effect of massive vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2010-11-15

    We study the Casimir effect due to a massive vector field in a system of two parallel plates made of real materials, in an arbitrary magnetodielectric background. The plane waves satisfying the Proca equations are classified into transverse modes and longitudinal modes which have different dispersion relations. Transverse modes are further divided into type I and type II corresponding to TE and TM modes in the massless case. For general magnetodielectric media, we argue that the correct boundary conditions are the continuities of H{sub ||}, {phi}, A, and {partial_derivative}{sub x}A{sub x}, where x is the direction normal to the plates. Although there are type I transverse modes that satisfy all the boundary conditions, it is impossible to find type II transverse modes or longitudinal modes that satisfy all the boundary conditions. To circumvent this problem, type II transverse modes and longitudinal modes have to be considered together. We call the contribution to the Casimir energy from type I transverse modes TE contribution, and the contribution from the superposition of type II transverse modes and longitudinal modes TM contribution. Their massless limits give, respectively, the TE and TM contributions to the Casimir energy of a massless vector field. The limit where the plates become perfectly conducting is discussed in detail. For the special case where the background has a unity refractive index, it is shown that the TM contribution to the Casimir energy can be written as a sum of contributions from two different types of modes, corresponding to type II discrete modes and type III continuum modes discussed by Barton and Dombey [G. Barton and N. Dombey, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 162, 231 (1985).]. For general background, this splitting does not work. The limit where both plates become infinitely permeable and the limit where one plate becomes perfectly conducting and one plate becomes infinitely permeable are also investigated.

  3. Casimir effect in spacetimes with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessa, C. H. G.; Bezerra, V. B.; Silva, J. C. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we study the influence of the gravitational field induced by the presence of a cosmological constant Λ on the Casimir energy density. We consider two metrics with the presence of the Λ-term, namely de Sitter and Schwarzschild-de Sitter (SdS). In the former case, we consider a conformal de Sitter spacetime and in the last one, a weak gravitational SdS spacetime.

  4. Dynamical Casimir effect in a Josephson metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Paraoanu, G. S.; Hassel, Juha; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2013-01-01

    The zero-point energy stored in the modes of an electromagnetic cavity has experimentally detectable effects, giving rise to an attractive interaction between the opposite walls, the static Casimir effect. A dynamical version of this effect was predicted to occur when the vacuum energy is changed either by moving the walls of the cavity or by changing the index of refraction, resulting in the conversion of vacuum fluctuations into real photons. Here, we demonstrate the dynamical Casimir effect using a Josephson metamaterial embedded in a microwave cavity at 5.4 GHz. We modulate the effective length of the cavity by flux-biasing the metamaterial based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), which results in variation of a few percentage points in the speed of light. We extract the full 4 × 4 covariance matrix of the emitted microwave radiation, demonstrating that photons at frequencies symmetrical with respect to half of the modulation frequency are generated in pairs. At large detunings of the cavity from half of the modulation frequency, we find power spectra that clearly show the theoretically predicted hallmark of the Casimir effect: a bimodal, “sparrow-tail” structure. The observed substantial photon flux cannot be assigned to parametric amplification of thermal fluctuations; its creation is a direct consequence of the noncommutativity structure of quantum field theory.

  5. Weyl problem and Casimir effects in spherical shell geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Zaidi, Hussain; Langsjoen, Luke; Straley, Joseph P.

    2013-04-01

    We compute the generic mode sum that quantifies the effect on the spectrum of a harmonic field when a spherical shell is inserted into vacuum. This encompasses a variety of problems including the Weyl spectral problem and the Casimir effect of quantum electrodynamics. This allows us to resolve several long-standing controversies regarding the question of universality of the Casimir self-energy; the resolution comes naturally through the connection to the Weyl problem. Specifically we demonstrate that in the case of a scalar field obeying Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the shell surface the Casimir self-energy is cutoff dependent while in the case of the electromagnetic field perturbed by a conductive shell the Casimir self-energy is universal. We additionally show that an analog nonrelativistic Casimir effect due to zero-point magnons takes place when a nonmagnetic spherical shell is inserted inside a bulk ferromagnet.

  6. Does the transverse electric zero mode contribute to the Casimir effect for a metal?

    PubMed

    Høye, J S; Brevik, I; Aarseth, J B; Milton, K A

    2003-05-01

    The finite-temperature Casimir free energy, entropy, and internal energy are considered anew for a conventional parallel-plate configuration, in the light of current discussions in the literature. In the case of an "ideal" metal, characterized by a refractive index equal to infinity for all frequencies, we recover, via a somewhat unconventional method, conventional results for the temperature dependence, meaning that the zero-frequency transverse electric mode contributes the same as the transverse magnetic mode. For a real metal, however, approximately obeying the Drude dispersive model at low frequencies, we find that the zero-frequency transverse electric mode does not contribute at all. This would appear to lead to an observable temperature dependence and a violation of the third law of thermodynamics. It had been suggested that the source of the difficulty was the behavior of the reflection coefficient for perpendicular polarization but we show that this is not the case. By introducing a simplified model for the Casimir interaction, consisting of two harmonic oscillators interacting via a third one, we illustrate the behavior of the transverse electric field. Numerical results are presented based on the refractive index for gold. A linear temperature correction to the Casimir force between parallel plates is indeed found which should be observable in room-temperature experiments, but this does not entail any thermodynamic inconsistency. PMID:12786229

  7. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  8. Casimir entropy for ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korikov, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe recent results concerning the compatibility of the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces with thermodynamics. It is shown that for ferromagnetic metals described by the plasma model and for ferromagnetic dielectrics with omitted dc conductivity the Lifshitz theory satisfies the Nernst heat theorem. At the same time, for magnetic metals described by the Drude model and for ferromagnetic dielectrics with account of dc conductivity the Nernst heat theorem is violated.

  9. Casimir energies of self-similar plate configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajesh, K. V.; Brevik, Iver; Cavero-Peláez, Inés; Parashar, Prachi

    2016-09-01

    We construct various self-similar configurations using parallel δ -function plates and show that it is possible to evaluate the Casimir interaction energy of these configurations using the idea of self-similarity alone. We restrict our analysis to interactions mediated by a scalar field, but the extension to the electromagnetic field is immediate. Our work unveils an easy and powerful method that can be easily employed to calculate the Casimir energies of a class of self-similar configurations. As a highlight, in an example, we determine the Casimir interaction energy of a stack of parallel plates constructed by positioning δ -function plates at the points constituting the Cantor set, a prototype of a fractal. This, to our knowledge, is the first time that the Casimir energy of a fractal configuration has been reported. Remarkably, the Casimir energy of some of the configurations we consider turn out to be positive, and a few even have zero Casimir energy. For the case of positive Casimir energy that is monotonically decreasing as the stacking parameter increases, the interpretation is that the pressure of vacuum tends to inflate the infinite stack of plates. We further support our results, derived using the idea of self-similarity alone, by rederiving them using the Green's function formalism. These expositions gives us insight into the connections between the regularization methods used in quantum field theories and regularized sums of divergent series in number theory.

  10. The complete set of Casimirs in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazura, Yohei; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2012-08-01

    A procedure for determining all the Casimir constants of motion in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) [E. Hameiri, Phys. Plasmas 11, 3423 (2004)] is extended to Hall-MHD. We obtain and solve differential equations for the variational derivatives of all the Casimirs, which must be satisfied for any dynamically accessible motion in Hall-MHD. In an extension of the more commonly considered Hall-MHD model, we also include the electron fluid entropy. The most interesting case for plasma confinement, which is usually true for axisymmetric configurations but desirable in general, is when both the magnetic field and the ion velocity field form the two separate families of nested toroidal surfaces. The Casimirs are then three functionals for each surface, involving the fluxes of certain vector fields and the number of particles contained in each. We also determine a family of independent Casimirs in a general configuration.

  11. The complete set of Casimirs in Hall-MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazura, Yohei; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2012-03-01

    A procedure to determine all Casimir constants of motion in MHDfootnotetextE. Hameiri, Phy. Plasmas, 11, 3423 (2004). is extended to Hall-MHD. We obtain differential equations for the variational derivatives of all Casimirs which must be satisfied for any dynamically accessible motion of Hall-MHD. In an extension of the more commonly considered model, we also include the electron fluid entropy. The most interesting case, usually true for axisymmetric configurations, is when both the electron and ion entropy functions form families of nested toroidal surfaces. The Casimirs are then three functions of each of the entropies, involving fluxes of certain vector fields and the number of particles contained in each torus. If any of the species loses its nested tori, the number of the associated Casimirs is much larger (but physically less relevant).

  12. Observability of the bulk Casimir effect: Can the dynamical Casimir effect be relevant to sonoluminescence?

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, K.A.; Jack Ng, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The experimental observation of intense light emission by acoustically driven, periodically collapsing bubbles of air in water (sonoluminescence) has yet to receive an adequate explanation. One of the most intriguing ideas is that the conversion of acoustic energy into photons occurs quantum mechanically, through a dynamical version of the Casimir effect. We have argued elsewhere that in the adiabatic approximation, which should be reliable here, Casimir or zero-point energies cannot possibly be large enough to be relevant. (About 10 MeV of energy is released per collapse.) However, there are sufficient subtleties involved that others have come to opposite conclusions. In particular, it has been suggested that bulk energy, that is, simply the naive sum of (1) /(2) {h_bar}{omega}, which is proportional to the volume, could be relevant. We show that this cannot be the case, based on general principles as well as specific calculations. In the process we further illuminate some of the divergence difficulties that plague Casimir calculations, with an example relevant to the bag model of hadrons. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Trace formulas for nonequilibrium Casimir interactions, heat radiation, and heat transfer for arbitrary objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Matthias; Bimonte, Giuseppe; Emig, Thorsten; Kardar, Mehran

    2012-09-01

    We present a detailed derivation of heat radiation, heat transfer, and (Casimir) interactions for N arbitrary objects in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics in thermal nonequilibrium. The results can be expressed as basis-independent trace formulas in terms of the scattering operators of the individual objects. We prove that heat radiation of a single object is positive, and that heat transfer (for two arbitrary passive objects) is from the hotter to a colder body. The heat transferred is also symmetric, exactly reversed if the two temperatures are exchanged. Introducing partial wave expansions, we transform the results for radiation, transfer, and forces into traces of matrices that can be evaluated in any basis, analogous to the equilibrium Casimir force. The method is illustrated by (re)deriving the heat radiation of a plate, a sphere, and a cylinder. We analyze the radiation of a sphere for different materials, emphasizing that a simplification often employed for metallic nanospheres is typically invalid. We derive asymptotic formulas for heat transfer and nonequilibrium interactions for the cases of a sphere in front a plate and for two spheres, extending previous results. As an example, we show that a hot nanosphere can levitate above a plate with the repulsive nonequilibrium force overcoming gravity, an effect that is not due to radiation pressure.

  14. Disentangling geometric and dissipative origins of negative Casimir entropies.

    PubMed

    Umrath, Stefan; Hartmann, Michael; Ingold, Gert-Ludwig; Neto, Paulo A Maia

    2015-10-01

    Dissipative electromagnetic response and scattering geometry are potential sources for the appearance of a negative Casimir entropy. We show that the dissipative contribution familiar from the plane-plane geometry appears also in the plane-sphere and the sphere-sphere geometries and adds to the negative Casimir entropy known to exist in these geometries even for perfectly reflecting objects. Taking the sphere-sphere geometry as an example, we carry out a scattering-channel analysis, which allows us to distinguish between the contributions of different polarizations. We demonstrate that dissipation and geometry share a common feature making possible negative values of the Casimir entropy. In both cases there exists a scattering channel whose contribution to the Casimir free energy vanishes in the high-temperature limit. While the mode-mixing channel is associated with the geometric origin, the transverse electric channel is associated with the dissipative origin of the negative Casimir entropy. By going beyond the Rayleigh limit, we find even for large distances that negative Casimir entropies can occur also for Drude-type metals provided the dissipation strength is sufficiently small.

  15. Casimir Effect for the Piecewise Uniform String

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver

    The Casimir energy for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string is calculated. In its simplest version the string consists of two parts I and II having in general different tension and mass density, but is always obeying the condition that the velocity of sound is equal to the velocity of light. The model, first introduced by Brevik and Nielsen in 1990, possesses attractive formal properties implying that it becomes easily regularizable by several methods, the most powerful one being the contour integration method.We also consider the case where the string is divided into 2N pieces, of alternating type-I and type-II material. The free energy at finite temperature, as well as the Hagedorn temperature, are found. Finally, we make some remarks on the relationship between this kind of theory and the theory of quantum star graphs, recently considered by Fulling et al..

  16. Radiative dark-bright instability and the critical Casimir effect in DQW exciton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakioğlu, T.; Özgün, Ege

    2011-07-01

    It is already well known that radiative interband interaction in the excitonic normal liquid in semiconducting double quantum wells is responsible for a negligible splitting between the energies of the dark and bright excitons enabling us to consider a four fold spin degeneracy. This has also lead many workers to naively consider the same degeneracy in studying the condensate. On the other hand, the non-perturbative aspects of this interaction in the condensed phase, e.g. its consequences on the order parameter and the dark-bright mixture in the ground state have not been explored. In this work, we demonstrate that the ground state concentrations of the dark and the bright exciton condensates are dramatically different beyond a sharp interband coupling threshold where the contribution of the bright component in the ground state vanishes. This shows that the effect of the radiative interband interaction on the condensate is nonperturbative. We also observe in the free energy a discontinuous derivative with respect to the layer separation at the entrance to the condensed phase, indicating a strong critical Casimir force. An estimate of its strength shows that it is measurable. Measuring the Casimir force is challenging, but at the same time it has a conclusive power about the presence of the long sought for condensed phase.

  17. Fermionic condensate and Casimir densities in the presence of compact dimensions with applications to nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the fermionic condensate and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor for a massive fermionic field in the geometry of two parallel plates on the background of Minkowski spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions, in the presence of a constant gauge field. Bag boundary conditions are imposed on the plates and periodicity conditions with arbitrary phases are considered along the compact dimensions. The nontrivial topology of the background spacetime leads to an Aharonov-Bohm effect for the vacuum expectation values induced by the gauge field. The fermionic condensate and the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with period equal to the flux quantum. The boundary induced parts in the fermionic condensate and the vacuum energy density are negative, with independence of the phases in the periodicity conditions and of the value of the gauge potential. Interaction forces between the plates are thus always attractive. However, in physical situations where the quantum field is confined to the region between the plates, the pure topological part contributes as well, and then the resulting force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the specific phases encoded in the periodicity conditions along the compact dimensions, and on the gauge potential, too. Applications of the general formulas to cylindrical carbon nanotubes are considered, within the framework of a Dirac-like theory for the electronic states in graphene. In the absence of a magnetic flux, the energy density for semiconducting nanotubes is always negative. For metallic nanotubes the energy density is positive for long tubes and negative for short ones. The resulting Casimir forces acting on the edges of the nanotube are attractive for short tubes with independence of the tube chirality. The sign of the force for long nanotubes can be controlled by tuning the magnetic flux

  18. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  19. Remarks on a gravitational analogue of the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Mota, H. F.; Muniz, C. R.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the Casimir effect, by calculating the Casimir energy and its corrections for nonzero temperatures, of a massless scalar field in the spacetime with topology S3 × R1 (Einstein universe) containing an idealized cosmic string. The obtained results confirm the role played by the identifications imposed on the quantum field by boundary conditions arising from the topology of the gravitational field under consideration and illustrate a realization of a gravitational analogue of the Casimir effect. In this backgorund, we show that the vacuum energy can be written as a term which corresponds to the vacuum energy of the massless scalar field in the Einstein universe added by another term that formally corresponds to the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in the Einstein universe, multiplied by a parameter associated with the presence of the cosmic string, namely, λ = (1/α) ‑ 1, where α is a constant related to the cosmic string tension, Gμ.

  20. Remarks on a gravitational analogue of the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Mota, H. F.; Muniz, C. R.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the Casimir effect, by calculating the Casimir energy and its corrections for nonzero temperatures, of a massless scalar field in the spacetime with topology S3 × R1 (Einstein universe) containing an idealized cosmic string. The obtained results confirm the role played by the identifications imposed on the quantum field by boundary conditions arising from the topology of the gravitational field under consideration and illustrate a realization of a gravitational analogue of the Casimir effect. In this backgorund, we show that the vacuum energy can be written as a term which corresponds to the vacuum energy of the massless scalar field in the Einstein universe added by another term that formally corresponds to the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in the Einstein universe, multiplied by a parameter associated with the presence of the cosmic string, namely, λ = (1/α) - 1, where α is a constant related to the cosmic string tension, Gμ.

  1. Casimir invariants for systems undergoing collective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C. Allen; Byrd, Mark S.; Wu Lianao

    2011-06-15

    Dicke states are an important class of states which exhibit collective behavior in many-body systems. They are interesting because (1) the decay rates of these states can be quite different from a set of independently evolving particles and (2) a particular class of these states are decoherence-free or noiseless with respect to a set of errors. These noiseless states, or more generally subsystems, avoid certain types of errors in quantum-information-processing devices. Here we provide a method for determining a set of transformations of these states which leave the states in their subsystems but still enable them to evolve in particular ways. For subsystems of particles undergoing collective motions, these transformations can be calculated by using essentially the same construction which is used to determine the famous Casimir invariants for quantum systems. Such invariants can be used to determine a complete set of commuting observables for a class of Dicke states as well as to identify possible logical operations for decoherence-free-noiseless subsystems. Our method is quite general and provides results for cases where the constituent particles have more than two internal states.

  2. Singular perturbations with boundary conditions and the Casimir effect in the half space

    SciTech Connect

    Albeverio, S.; Cognola, G.; Zerbini, S.; Spreafico, M.

    2010-06-15

    We study the self-adjoint extensions of a class of nonmaximal multiplication operators with boundary conditions. We show that these extensions correspond to singular rank 1 perturbations (in the sense of Albeverio and Kurasov [Singular Perturbations of Differential Operaters (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000)]) of the Laplace operator, namely, the formal Laplacian with a singular delta potential, on the half space. This construction is the appropriate setting to describe the Casimir effect related to a massless scalar field in the flat space-time with an infinite conducting plate and in the presence of a pointlike ''impurity.'' We use the relative zeta determinant (as defined in the works of Mueller [''Relative zeta functions, relative determinants and scattering theory,'' Commun. Math. Phys. 192, 309 (1998)] and Spreafico and Zerbini [''Finite temperature quantum field theory on noncompact domains and application to delta interactions,'' Rep. Math. Phys. 63, 163 (2009)]) in order to regularize the partition function of this model. We study the analytic extension of the associated relative zeta function, and we present explicit results for the partition function and for the Casimir force.

  3. Casimir interaction between a dielectric nanosphere and a metallic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Canaguier-Durand, Antoine; Gerardin, Antoine; Guerout, Romain; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge; Maia Neto, Paulo A.; Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.; Voronin, Alexei Yu.

    2011-03-15

    We study the Casimir interaction between a dielectric nanosphere and a metallic plane, using the multiple scattering theory. Exact results are obtained with the dielectric described by a Sellmeier model and the metal by a Drude model. Asymptotic forms are discussed for small spheres and large or small distances. The well-known Casimir-Polder formula is recovered at the limit of vanishingly small spheres, while an expression that behaves better at small distances is found for any finite value of the radius. The exact results are of particular interest for the study of quantum states of nanospheres in the vicinity of surfaces.

  4. Worldline numerics for energy-momentum tensors in Casimir geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Marco; Huet, Idrish; Gies, Holger

    2016-04-01

    We develop the worldline formalism for computations of composite operators such as the fluctuation induced energy-momentum tensor. As an example, we use a fluctuating real scalar field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions. The resulting worldline representation can be evaluated by worldline Monte-Carlo methods in continuous spacetime. We benchmark this worldline numerical algorithm with the aid of analytically accessible single-plate and parallel-plate Casimir configurations, providing a detailed analysis of statistical and systematic errors. The method generalizes straightforwardly to arbitrary Casimir geometries and general background potentials.

  5. Topological thermal Casimir effect for spinor and electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, H. F.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2015-12-01

    We obtain the thermal corrections to the Casimir energy for the neutrino and electromagnetic fields in Einstein and closed Friedmann universes containing a static, infinitely straight and thin cosmic string. The Casimir free energy is also obtained as well as their low and high temperature limits. It is shown that the vacuum energies associated with these fields, in the background considered, are given simply by the vacuum energies in the absence of the cosmic string multiplied by a factor that codifies the presence of this topological defect.

  6. Thermodynamic Casimir effect for films in the three-dimensional Ising universality class: Symmetry-breaking boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenbusch, Martin

    2010-09-01

    We study the thermodynamic Casimir force for films in the three-dimensional Ising universality class with symmetry-breaking boundary conditions. To this end we simulate the improved Blume-Capel model on the simple cubic lattice. We study the two cases ++ , where all spins at the boundary are fixed to +1 and +- , where the spins at one boundary are fixed to +1 while those at the other boundary are fixed to -1 . An important issue in analyzing Monte Carlo and experimental data are corrections to scaling. Since we simulate an improved model, leading corrections to scaling, which are proportional to L0-ω , where L0 is the thickness of the film and ω≈0.8 , can be ignored. This allows us to focus on corrections to scaling that are caused by the boundary conditions. The analysis of our data shows that these corrections can be accounted for by an effective thickness L0,eff=L0+Ls . Studying the correlation length of the films, the energy per area, the magnetization profile, and the thermodynamic Casimir force at the bulk critical point we find Ls=1.9(1) for our model and the boundary conditions discussed here. Using this result for Ls we find a nice collapse of the finite-size scaling curves obtained for the thicknesses L0=8.5 , 16.5, and 32.5 for the full range of temperatures that we consider. We compare our results for the finite-size scaling functions θ++ and θ+- of the thermodynamic Casimir force with those obtained in a previous Monte Carlo study, by the de Gennes-Fisher local-functional method, field theoretic methods, and an experiment with a classical binary liquid mixture.

  7. Canonical realization of Bondi-Metzner-Sachs symmetry: Quadratic Casimir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We study the canonical realization of Bondi-Metzner-Sacks symmetry for a massive scalar field introduced by Longhi and Materassi [J. Math. Phys. 40, 480 (1999)]. We construct an invariant scalar product for the generalized momenta. As a consequence we introduce a quadratic Casimir with the supertranslations.

  8. Singular Casimir Elements of the Euler Equation and Equilibrium Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Zensho; Morrison, Philip J.; Dobarro, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The problem of the nonequivalence of the sets of equilibrium points and energy-Casimir extremal points, which occurs in the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of equations describing ideal fluid and plasma dynamics, is addressed in the context of the Euler equation for an incompressible inviscid fluid. The problem is traced to a Casimir deficit, where Casimir elements constitute the center of the Poisson algebra underlying the Hamiltonian formulation, and this leads to a study of singularities of the Poisson operator defining the Poisson bracket. The kernel of the Poisson operator, for this typical example of an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system for media in terms of Eulerian variables, is analyzed. For two-dimensional flows, a rigorously solvable system is formulated. The nonlinearity of the Euler equation makes the Poisson operator inhomogeneous on phase space (the function space of the state variable), and it is seen that this creates a singularity where the nullity of the Poisson operator (the "dimension" of the center) changes. The problem is an infinite-dimension generalization of the theory of singular differential equations. Singular Casimir elements stemming from this singularity are unearthed using a generalization of the functional derivative that occurs in the Poisson bracket.

  9. Singular Casimir Elements of the Euler Equation and Equilibrium Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Zensho; Morrison, Philip J.; Dobarro, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    The problem of the nonequivalence of the sets of equilibrium points and energy-Casimir extremal points, which occurs in the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of equations describing ideal fluid and plasma dynamics, is addressed in the context of the Euler equation for an incompressible inviscid fluid. The problem is traced to a Casimir deficit, where Casimir elements constitute the center of the Poisson algebra underlying the Hamiltonian formulation, and this leads to a study of singularities of the Poisson operator defining the Poisson bracket. The kernel of the Poisson operator, for this typical example of an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system for media in terms of Eulerian variables, is analyzed. For two-dimensional flows, a rigorously solvable system is formulated. The nonlinearity of the Euler equation makes the Poisson operator inhomogeneous on phase space (the function space of the state variable), and it is seen that this creates a singularity where the nullity of the Poisson operator (the "dimension" of the center) changes. The problem is an infinite-dimension generalization of the theory of singular differential equations. Singular Casimir elements stemming from this singularity are unearthed using a generalization of the functional derivative that occurs in the Poisson bracket.

  10. Dynamical Casimir effect and minimal temperature in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenti, Giuliano; Strini, Giuliano

    2015-02-01

    We study the fundamental limitations of cooling to absolute zero for a qubit, interacting with a single mode of the electromagnetic field. Our results show that the dynamical Casimir effect, which is unavoidable in any finite-time thermodynamic cycle, forbids the attainability of the absolute zero of temperature, even in the limit of an infinite number of cycles.

  11. CALL FOR PAPERS: Topical issue on the nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2004-05-01

    The past few years have seen a growing interest in quantum mechanical systems with moving boundaries. One of its manifestations was the First International Workshop on Problems with Moving Boundaries organized by Professor J Dittrich in Prague in October 2003. Another event in this series will be the (first) International Workshop on the Dynamical Casimir Effect in Padua in June 2004, organized by Professor G Carugno (see webpage www.pd.infn.it/casimir/ for details). As Guest Editors we invite researchers working in any area related to moving boundaries to contribute to a Topical Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics on the nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries. Our intention is to cover a wide range of topics. In particular, we envisage possible contributions in the following areas: Theoretical and experimental studies on quantum fields in cavities with moving boundaries and time-dependent media. This area includes, in particular, various manifestations of the nonstationary (dynamical) Casimir effect, such as creation of quanta and modifications of Casimir force due to the motion of boundaries. Other relevant subjects are: generation and evolution of nonclassical states of fields and moving mirrors; interaction between quantized fields and atoms in cavities with moving boundaries; decoherence and entanglement due to the motion of boundaries; field quantization in nonideal cavities with moving boundaries taking into account losses and dispersion; nano-devices with moving boundaries. Quantum particles in domains confined with moving boundaries. This area includes: new exact and approximate solutions of the evolution equations (Schrödinger, Klein-Gordon, Dirac, Fokker-Planck, etc); quantum carpets and revivals; escape and tunnelling through moving barriers; evolution of quantum packets in the presence of moving boundaries; ultracold atoms (ions) in traps with moving boundaries. The topical issue is scheduled

  12. Dynamics of the Vacuum and Casimir Analogs to the Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold; Vera, Jerry; Bailey, Paul; March, Paul; Lawrence, Tim; Sylvester, Andre; Brady, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss the current viewpoint of the vacuum state and explore the idea of a "natural" vacuum as opposed to immutable, non-degradable vacuum. This concept will be explored for all primary quantum numbers to show consistency with observation at the level of Bohr theory. A comparison with the Casimir force per unit area will be made, and an explicit function for the spatial variation of the vacuum density around the atomic nucleus will be derived. This explicit function will be numerically modeled using the industry multi-physics tool, COMSOL(trademark), and the eigenfrequencies for the n = 1 to n = 7 states will be found and compared to expectation.

  13. Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and an infinite boundary in a thermal bath

    SciTech Connect

    She Wuying; Yu Hongwei; Zhu Zhiying

    2010-01-15

    We study the energy level shift of a static two-level atom interacting with a massless scalar field in a thermal bath with the presence of a plane boundary, which gives rise to the Casimir-Polder force. We separately calculate contributions of both thermal fluctuations and radiation reaction using the formalism suggested by J. Dalibard, J. Dupont-Roc, and C. Cohen-Tannoudji [J. Phys. (France) 43, 1617 (1982); 45, 673 (1984)] and analyze in detail the behaviors of the total energy level shifts in three distinct distance regimes in both the low- and high-temperature limits. A comparison of our results with those of a uniformly accelerated atom reveals that uniformly accelerated atoms, in general, do not behave the same as static ones in a thermal bath at the Unruh temperature in terms of the atomic energy level shifts.

  14. Dynamics of the two-dimensional ideal incompressible fluid and Casimirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikov, V. P.

    2016-07-01

    Problems are considered in which the role of Casimirs in forming dynamics of the two-dimensional ideal incompressible fluid is basically studied; in particular, the conditions are formulated which arise in the stability problem of two-dimensional flows in the presence of Casimirs. Some general approaches to the construction of difference schemes for solving equations of two-dimensional fluid which possess the given Casimirs are considered.

  15. On the dynamic instability of nanowire-fabricated electromechanical actuators in the Casimir regime: Coupled effects of surface energy and size dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, Maryam; Mardaneh, Mohamadreza; Koochi, Ali; Rezaei, Morteza; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-02-01

    Herein, the dynamic pull-in instability of cantilever nanoactuator fabricated from conductive cylindrical nanowire with circular cross-section is studied under the presence of Casimir force. The Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity in combination with the couple stress theory is employed to incorporate the coupled effects of surface energy and size phenomenon. Using Green-Lagrange strain, the higher order surface stress components are incorporated in the governing equation. The Dirichlet mode is considered and an asymptotic solution, based on the path integral approach, is applied to consider the effect of the Casimir attraction. Furthermore, the influence of structural damping is considered in the model. The nonlinear governing equation is solved using analytical reduced order method (ROM). The effects of various parameters on the dynamic pull-in parameters, phase planes and stability threshold of the actuator are demonstrated.

  16. Casimir energy of a semi-circular infinite cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. V.; Lambiase, G.; Scarpetta, G.

    2001-05-01

    The Casimir energy of a semi-circular cylindrical shell is calculated by making use of the zeta function technique. This shell is obtained by crossing an infinite circular cylindrical shell by a plane passing through the symmetry axes of the cylinder and by considering only half of this configuration. All the surfaces, including the cutting plane, are assumed to be perfectly conducting. The zeta functions for scalar massless fields obeying the Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions on the semi-circular cylinder are constructed exactly. The sum of these zeta functions gives the zeta function for the electromagnetic field in question. The relevant plane problem is considered also. In all the cases the final expressions for the corresponding Casimir energies contain the pole contributions which are the consequence of the edges or corners in the boundaries. This implies that further renormalization is needed in order for the finite physical values for vacuum energy to be obtained for given boundary conditions.

  17. Chern-Simons potential in models of Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pis'mak, Yury M.; Pis'mak, Daria Yu.

    2014-07-23

    In the model constructed in the framework of the proposed by Symanzik approach for description of interaction of a macroscopic material body with quantum fields the interaction of thin material film with photon field is presented by the Chern-Simons potential. All the effects of this interaction with can by described in the framework of one model. In this way, the Casimir energy for two parallel infinite planes and sphere, the Casimir-Polder potential, and characteristics of other physical phenomena have been calculated for non-ideal conducting material of film. The specific of regularization and renormalization procedures used by calculations and the physical meaning of obtained results are discussed. In the limit of infinite coupling constant one obtains the known results of models with boundary conditions. By finite value of coupling constants the model predicts unusual effects which could be important for micro-mechanics, nano-photonics, constructing of new materials.

  18. Casimir-Polder effect for a stack of conductive planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusnutdinov, Nail; Kashapov, Rashid; Woods, Lilia M.

    2016-07-01

    The Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a multilayered system composed of infinitely thin planes is considered using the ζ -function regularization approach with zero-point energies summation. As a prototype material, each plane is represented by a graphene sheet, an atomically thin layer of carbon atoms organized in a hexagonal lattice, whose optical response is described by a constant conductivity or Drude-Lorentz model conductivity. Asymptotic expressions for various separations are derived and compared to numerical calculations. We distinguish between large atom-plane distance limit, where retardation effects are prominent, and small atom-plane distance limit, where the typical van der Waals coefficient is found to be dependent on the number of graphenes and characteristic separations. The calculated energies for different atoms and graphene conductivity models brings forward the basic science of the Casimir-Polder effect and suggests ways to manipulate this interaction experimentally.

  19. Casimir effect for a scalar field via Krein quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Pejhan, H.; Tanhayi, M.R.; Takook, M.V.

    2014-02-15

    In this work, we present a rather simple method to study the Casimir effect on a spherical shell for a massless scalar field with Dirichlet boundary condition by applying the indefinite metric field (Krein) quantization technique. In this technique, the field operators are constructed from both negative and positive norm states. Having understood that negative norm states are un-physical, they are only used as a mathematical tool for renormalizing the theory and then one can get rid of them by imposing some proper physical conditions. -- Highlights: • A modification of QFT is considered to address the vacuum energy divergence problem. • Casimir energy of a spherical shell is calculated, through this approach. • In this technique, it is shown, the theory is automatically regularized.

  20. Casimir effect for a semitransparent wedge and an annular piston

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Kirsten, Klaus

    2009-12-15

    We consider the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field in a geometry of an infinite wedge closed by a Dirichlet circular cylinder, where the wedge is formed by {delta}-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. A finite expression for the Casimir energy corresponding to the arc and the presence of both semitransparent potentials is obtained, from which the torque on the sidewalls can be derived. The most interesting part of the calculation is the nontrivial nature of the angular mode functions. Numerical results are obtained which are closely analogous to those recently found for a magnetodielectric wedge, with the same speed of light on both sides of the wedge boundaries. Alternative methods are developed for annular regions with radial semitransparent potentials, based on reduced Green's functions for the angular dependence, which allows calculations using the multiple-scattering formalism. Numerical results corresponding to the torque on the radial plates are likewise computed, which generalize those for the wedge geometry. Generally useful formulas for calculating Casimir energies in separable geometries are derived.

  1. Casimir effect for a semitransparent wedge and an annular piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Kirsten, Klaus

    2009-12-01

    We consider the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field in a geometry of an infinite wedge closed by a Dirichlet circular cylinder, where the wedge is formed by δ-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. A finite expression for the Casimir energy corresponding to the arc and the presence of both semitransparent potentials is obtained, from which the torque on the sidewalls can be derived. The most interesting part of the calculation is the nontrivial nature of the angular mode functions. Numerical results are obtained which are closely analogous to those recently found for a magnetodielectric wedge, with the same speed of light on both sides of the wedge boundaries. Alternative methods are developed for annular regions with radial semitransparent potentials, based on reduced Green’s functions for the angular dependence, which allows calculations using the multiple-scattering formalism. Numerical results corresponding to the torque on the radial plates are likewise computed, which generalize those for the wedge geometry. Generally useful formulas for calculating Casimir energies in separable geometries are derived.

  2. Application of the proximity force approximation to gravitational and Yukawa-type forces

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2009-06-15

    We apply the proximity force approximation, which is widely used for the calculation of the Casimir force between bodies with nonplanar boundary surfaces, to gravitational and Yukawa-type interactions. It is shown that for the gravitational force in a sphere-plate configuration the general formulation of the proximity force approximation is well applicable. For a Yukawa-type interaction we demonstrate the validity of both the general formulation of the proximity force approximation and a simple mapping between the sphere-plate and plate-plate configurations. The claims to the contrary in some recent literature are thus incorrect. Our results justify the constraints on the parameters of non-Newtonian gravity previously obtained from the indirect dynamic measurements of the Casimir pressure.

  3. Casimir bag energy in the stochastic approximation to the pure QCD vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, C. D.; Oxman, L. E.

    2007-01-15

    We study the Casimir contribution to the bag energy coming from gluon field fluctuations, within the context of the stochastic vacuum model of pure QCD. After formulating the problem in terms of the generating functional of field strength cumulants, we argue that the resulting predictions about the Casimir energy are compatible with the phenomenologically required bag energy term.

  4. EDITORIAL: The nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2005-03-01

    This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics contains 16 contributions devoted to quantum systems with moving boundaries. In a broad sense, the papers continue the studies opened exactly 100 years ago by Einstein in his seminal work on the electrodynamics of moving bodies and the quantum nature of light. Another jubilee which we wish to celebrate by launching this issue is the 80th anniversary of the publication of two papers, where the first solutions of the classical Maxwell equations in a one-dimensional cavity with moving boundaries were obtained, by T H Havelock (1924 Some dynamical illustrations of the pressure of radiation and of adiabatic invariance Phil. Mag. 47 754-71) and by E L Nicolai (1925 On a dynamical illustration of the pressure of radiation Phil. Mag. 49 171-7). As was shown by Einstein, studying the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field inevitably leads one to its quantum (corpuscular) nature. Many papers in this issue deal with problems where moving boundaries produce parametric excitation of vacuum fluctuations of the field, which could result in several different observable effects, like the modification of the famous Casimir force, or the creation of real quanta from the vacuum. It is worth emphasizing that these phenomena, frequently referred to as nonstationary (or dynamical) Casimir effects, are no longer the province only of pure theorists: some experimental groups have already started long-term work aimed at observing such effects in the laboratory. Of course, many difficult problems remain to be resolved before this dream becomes reality. Several papers here show both important progress in this direction, and possible difficulties still to be tackled. Problems that have been considered include, in particular, decoherence, entanglement, and the roles of geometry and polarization. Other papers deal with fundamental problems like the Unruh effect, the interaction of accelerated relativistic atoms with

  5. The design of long range quantum electrodynamical forces and torques between macroscopic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Lisanti, Mariangela; Munday, Jeremy N.; Capasso, Federico

    2005-09-01

    The interaction between electrically neutral surfaces at sub-micron separation is dominated by the force arising from quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, known as the Casimir force. This effect has been witnessing a renewed interest because of its potential impact in micro- and nanotechnology. Most recent literature has focused on the study of the attraction between bulk-like metallic surfaces in vacuum. Because electromagnetic fluctuations depend on the dielectric function of the surfaces, the use of different materials might reveal new aspects of the Casimir force and suggest novel solutions for the design of micro- and nanofabricated devices. Following this approach, we have measured the Casimir force using Hydrogen Switchable Mirrors—a metallic mirror that switches from highly reflective to transparent when exposed to hydrogen. The comparison of the results obtained in air and in hydrogen sheds light on the relative contribution of visible and infrared wavelengths to the Casimir interaction. We have also studied the dependence of the Casimir force on the metallic film thickness and have shown the effect of the skin-depth. The final section of the paper discusses the torque induced by quantum fluctuations on two birefringent plates and describes an experiment that should allow us to observe this phenomenon.

  6. Fluctuation-induced forces in a fluid membrane under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Roya

    2012-02-01

    We develop an exact method to calculate thermal Casimir forces between inclusions of arbitrary shapes and separation, embedded in a fluid membrane whose fluctuations are governed by the combined action of surface tension, bending modulus, and Gaussian rigidity. Each object's shape and mechanical properties enter only through a characteristic matrix, a static analog of the scattering matrix. We calculate the Casimir interaction between two elastic disks embedded in a membrane. In particular, we find that at short separations the interaction is strong and independent of surface tension.

  7. Positive Casimir and Central Characters of Split Real Quantum Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ivan C. H.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the generalized Casimir operators and their actions on the positive representations {mathcal{P}_λ} of the modular double of split real quantum groups {mathcal{U}_{qtilde{q}}(mathfrak{g}_mathbb{R})}. We introduce the notion of virtual highest and lowest weights, and show that the central characters admit positive values for all parameters {λ}. We show that their image defines a semi-algebraic region bounded by real points of the discriminant variety independent of q, and we discuss explicit examples in the lower rank cases.

  8. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy.

  9. Dynamical Casimir effect in microwave cavities containing nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    I consider a possibility of parametric amplification of the microwave vacuum field in a reentrant cavity enclosing a nonlinear crystal whose refractive index is modulated by periodic high-intensity short laser pulses. The main result is that the total number of created ‘Casimir quanta’ depends neither on the laser beam shape, nor on the duration or power of individual pulses, but it depends on the total energy of all the pulses, provided the duration of each pulse is much shorter than the period of field oscillations in the selected resonant mode. The scheme can be feasible if reliable materials with high nonlinear coefficients can be found.

  10. Solutions to a Novel Casimir Equation for the Ito System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, A. Van Gorder

    2011-11-01

    We discuss two classes of solutions to a novel Casimir equation associated with the Ito system, a coupled nonlinear wave equation. Both travelling wave solutions and separable self-similar solutions are discussed. In a number of cases, explicit exact solutions are found. Such results, particularly the exact solutions, are useful in that they provide us a baseline of comparison to any numerical simulations. Besides, such solutions provide us a glimpse of the behavior of the Ito system, and hence the behavior of a type of nonlinear wave equation, for certain parameter regimes.

  11. Low Temperature Atomic Force Microscopy: the Electrostatic Casimir Force Across the Superconducting Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunckle, Christopher Gregory

    Time Reversal can be used to time reverse and propagate the measured scattered wave- forms to a point in both time and space, ideally to a delta function delta( r⃗ )delta(t). This is commonly referred to as time reversal focusing and has led to time reversal being applied in a wide variety of fields such as medicine, communications, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), and seismology. In practice, time reversal is not optimal for generating a delta function focus if certain conditions are not upheld. For time reversal to work perfectly, the following four conditions must be present: (1) one must record for an infinitely long period of time; (2) Green's functions must be assumed to contain infinite bandwidth; (3) attenuation must be absent within the medium; and (4) one must have full coverage of the wavefield. Due to the need for these conditions, much research is being carried out in order to enhance the time reversal process in practice. We introduce deconvolution, a simple and robust approach, in order to calculate an optimal signal for back propagation designed to give an improved focus. We demonstrate experimentally that deconvolution is able to dramatically improve the temporal focus com- pared to time reversal. Through a joint project with Los Alamos National Laboratory, we compared time reversal to deconvolution. The results showed that deconvolution was able to dramatically improve the temporal focus for a source and a receiver which were both located on the surface of our object. We then continued our experimental studies of deconvolution by doing a joint project with researcher Dr. Ernst Niederleithinger from the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). For this experiment, we placed multiple sources within a concrete block and recorded the source wavefields on the surface with a single re- ceiver. This experiment was designed to further test the robust nature of deconvolution and compare its temporal focusing capability to that of time reversal. All of these experimental studies show that deconvolution was able to improve the temporal focus compared to time reversal. We continued our comparison study between time reversal and deconvolution and demon- strated theoretically, experimentally, and numerically that deconvolution also improves spa- tial focusing. We give a proof explaining why one would expect improved spatial focusing when there is improved temporal focusing for both a acoustic and elastic media. We then demonstrate in our experiments the improved spatial focus achieved using deconvolution by scanning around the source location with a laser vibrometer at the time of focus for an acoustic case. Finally, we use deconvolution to locate synthetic microseismic events to prove numerically that improved temporal focusing leads to improved spatial focusing for both acoustic and elastic media.

  12. Effect of intermolecular force on the static/dynamic behaviour of M/NEM devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namjung; Aluru, N R

    2014-12-01

    Advances made in the fabrication of micro/nano-electromechanical (M/NEM) devices over the last ten years necessitate the understanding of the attractive force that arises from quantum fluctuations (generally referred to as Casimir effects) [Casimir H B G 1948 Proc. K. Ned. Akad. Wet. 51 793]. The fundamental mechanisms underlying quantum fluctuations have been actively investigated through various theoretical and experimental approaches. However, the effect of the force on M/NEM devices has not been fully understood yet, especially in the transition region involving gaps ranging from 10 nm to 1 μm, due to the complexity of the force. Here, we numerically calculate the Casimir effects in M/NEM devices by using the Lifshitz formula, the general expression for the Casimir effects [Lifshitz E 1956 Sov. Phys. JETP 2 73]. Since the Casimir effects are highly dependent on the permittivity of the materials, the Kramer-Kronig relation [Landau L D, Lifshitz E M and Pitaevskii L P 1984 Electrodynamics of Continuous Media (New York: Pergamon Press)] and the optical data for metals and dielectrics are used in order to obtain the permittivity. Several simplified models for the permittivity of the materials, such as the Drude and Lorentz models [Jackson J D 1975 Classical Electrodynamics (New York: Wiley)], are also used to extrapolate the optical data. Important characteristic values of M/NEM devices, such as the pull-in voltage, pull-in gap, detachment length, etc, are calculated for devices operating in the transition region. Our results show that accurate predictions for the pull-in behaviour are possible when the Lifshitz formula is used instead of the idealized expressions for Casimir effects. We expand this study into the dynamics of M/NEM devices, so that the time and frequency response of M/NEM devices with Casimir effects can be explored.

  13. Symmetry reduction for central force problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, Robert I.; Modin, Klas; Verdier, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    We given an elementary illustration of symmetry reduction for central force problems, drawing phase portraits of the reduced dynamics as the intersection of Casimir and energy level sets in three dimensions. These systems form a classic example of symplectic reduction which can usefully be compared to the more commonly seen case of the free rigid body. Dedicated to the memory of Jerry Marsden, 1942–2010.

  14. Casimir Effect Near the Future Singularity in Kaluza Klein Viscous Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadekar, G. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the analytical properties of the scalar expansion θ in the cosmic fluid close to the future singularity, when the fluid possesses a constant bulk viscosity ζ in the framework of Kaluza-Klein theory of gravitation. In addition, we assume the viscous cosmology theories in the sense that the Casimir contributions to the energy density and pressure are both proportional to 1/ a 4, where a being scale factor. We also worked out the series expansion for the scalar expansion θ under the condition that the Casimir influence is small. However, near to the big rip singularity the Casimir term has to fade away and we obtain the same singularity behavior for the scalar expansion θ, energy density ρ, the scale factor a as in the Casimir-free viscous case.

  15. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2015-05-15

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over {sup 4}He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  16. Worldline approach for numerical computation of electromagnetic Casimir energies: Scalar field coupled to magnetodielectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackrory, Jonathan B.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Steck, Daniel A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a worldline method for the calculation of Casimir energies for scalar fields coupled to magnetodielectric media. The scalar model we consider may be applied in arbitrary geometries, and it corresponds exactly to one polarization of the electromagnetic field in planar layered media. Starting from the field theory for electromagnetism, we work with the two decoupled polarizations in planar media and develop worldline path integrals, which represent the two polarizations separately, for computing both Casimir and Casimir-Polder potentials. We then show analytically that the path integrals for the transverse-electric polarization coupled to a dielectric medium converge to the proper solutions in certain special cases, including the Casimir-Polder potential of an atom near a planar interface, and the Casimir energy due to two planar interfaces. We also evaluate the path integrals numerically via Monte Carlo path-averaging for these cases, studying the convergence and performance of the resulting computational techniques. While these scalar methods are only exact in particular geometries, they may serve as an approximation for Casimir energies for the vector electromagnetic field in other geometries.

  17. Nernst heat theorem for the thermal Casimir interaction between two graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Romero, C.

    2016-10-01

    We find analytic asymptotic expressions at low temperature for the Casimir free energy, entropy, and pressure of two parallel graphene sheets in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. The reflection coefficients of electromagnetic waves on graphene are described on the basis of first principles of quantum electrodynamics at nonzero temperature using the polarization tensor in (2+1)-dimensional space-time. The leading contributions to the Casimir entropy and to the thermal corrections to the Casimir energy and pressure are given by the thermal correction to the polarization tensor at nonzero Matsubara frequencies. It is shown that the Casimir entropy for two graphene sheets goes to zero when the temperature vanishes, i.e., the third law of thermodynamics (the Nernst heat theorem) is satisfied. At low temperature, the magnitude of the thermal correction to the Casimir pressure between two graphene sheets is shown to vary inversely proportional to the separation. The Nernst heat theorem for graphene is discussed in the context of problems occurring in Casimir physics for both metallic and dielectric plates.

  18. Rotation of a liquid crystal by the Casimir torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-03-01

    We present a calculation of the Casimir torque acting on a liquid crystal near a birefringent crystal. In this system, a liquid crystal bulk is uniformly aligned at one surface and is twisted at the other surface by a birefringent crystal, e.g., barium titanate. The liquid crystal is separated from the solid crystal by an isotropic, transparent material such as SiO2. By varying the thickness of the deposited layer, we can observe the effect of retardation on the torque (which differentiates it from the close-range van der Waals torque). We find that a barium titanate slab would cause 5CB (4 -cyano -4 '-pentylbiphenyl) liquid crystal to rotate by 10∘ through its bulk when separated by 35 nm of SiO2. The optical technique for measuring this twist is also outlined.

  19. Microscopic background of the Onsager-Casimir reciprocity relations

    SciTech Connect

    Titulaer, U.M.

    1988-10-01

    It has been known for some time that small deviations from the Onsager-Casimir symmetry relations are introduced when one passes from a given description of a system to a less detailed one by adiabatic elimination of fast variables. Exact validity is preserved, however, for a slightly modified form of these relations. In this paper the question is considered whether this modified Onsager symmetry is also preserved by the transition from a microscopic to a mesoscopic description, the step that introduces manifest irreversibility into the equations of motion. This question is examined in detail for a system of a few heavy oscillators coupled to a bath, a model discussed in a recent paper by van Kampen. The modified Onsager symmetry survives the transition to an irreversible description via the dense spectrum approximation. This is shown explicitly by inspection of the results obtained by van Kampen; some arguments favoring a more general validity are also briefly discussed.

  20. Classification and Casimir Invariants of Lie--Poisson Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Morrison, P. J.

    1997-11-01

    Several types of fluid and plasma systems admit a Hamiltonian formulation using Lie-Poisson brackets, including Euler's equation for fluids, reduced MHD for plasmas, and others. Lie-Poisson brackets, which are examples of noncanonical Poisson brackets, consist of an inner product, < , >, and the bracket, [ , ], of a Lie algebra which we call the inner bracket. The Lie-Poisson bracket is then lF,Gr = l<Ψ, l[F_Ψ , G_Ψr]r>. Here Ψ is a vector of field variables, and subscripts denote functional differentiation. The algebras corresponding to the inner brackets are algebras by extension: they are defined for multiple field variables from the bracket for a single variable. We derive a classification scheme for all such brackets using cohomology theory for Lie algebras. We then derive the Casimir invariants for the classes of Lie-Poisson brackets where the inner bracket is of canonical type.

  1. An improved proximity force approximation for electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2012-08-15

    A quite straightforward approximation for the electrostatic interaction between two perfectly conducting surfaces suggests itself when the distance between them is much smaller than the characteristic lengths associated with their shapes. Indeed, in the so called 'proximity force approximation' the electrostatic force is evaluated by first dividing each surface into a set of small flat patches, and then adding up the forces due two opposite pairs, the contributions of which are approximated as due to pairs of parallel planes. This approximation has been widely and successfully applied in different contexts, ranging from nuclear physics to Casimir effect calculations. We present here an improvement on this approximation, based on a derivative expansion for the electrostatic energy contained between the surfaces. The results obtained could be useful for discussing the geometric dependence of the electrostatic force, and also as a convenient benchmark for numerical analyses of the tip-sample electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proximity force approximation (PFA) has been widely used in different areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PFA can be improved using a derivative expansion in the shape of the surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the improved PFA to compute electrostatic forces between conductors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results can be used as an analytic benchmark for numerical calculations in AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight is provided for people who use the PFA to compute nuclear and Casimir forces.

  2. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen A.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-09-15

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  3. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen Å.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.130405 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  4. Characteristic properties of the Casimir free energy for metal films deposited on metallic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Casimir free energy and pressure of thin metal films deposited on metallic plates are considered using the Lifshitz theory and the Drude and plasma model approaches to the role of conduction electrons. The bound electrons are taken into account by using the complete optical data of film and plate metals. It is shown that for films of several tens of nanometers thickness the Casimir free energy and pressure calculated using these approaches differ by hundreds and thousands percent and can be easily discriminated experimentally. According to our results, the free energy of a metal film does not vanish in the limiting case of ideal metal if the Drude model approach is used in contradiction with the fact that the fluctuating field cannot penetrate in its interior. Numerical computations of the Casimir free energy and pressure of Ag and Au films deposited on Cu and Al plates have been performed using both theoretical approaches. It is shown that the free energy of a film can be both negative and positive depending on the metals used. For a Au film on a Ag plate and vice versa the Casimir energy of a film changes its sign with increasing film thickness. Applications of the obtained results for resolving the Casimir puzzle and the problem of stability of thin films are discussed.

  5. Fluctuation-Induced Forces Between Inclusions in a Fluid Membrane Under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiang-Ku; Zandi, Roya; Mohideen, Umar; Pryadko, Leonid P.

    2011-11-01

    We develop an exact method to calculate thermal Casimir forces between inclusions of arbitrary shapes and separation, embedded in a fluid membrane whose fluctuations are governed by the combined action of surface tension, bending modulus, and Gaussian rigidity. Each object’s shape and mechanical properties enter only through a characteristic matrix, a static analog of the scattering matrix. We calculate the Casimir interaction between two elastic disks embedded in a membrane. In particular, we find that at short separations the interaction is strong and independent of surface tension.

  6. Fluctuation-induced forces between inclusions in a fluid membrane under tension.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiang-Ku; Zandi, Roya; Mohideen, Umar; Pryadko, Leonid P

    2011-11-25

    We develop an exact method to calculate thermal Casimir forces between inclusions of arbitrary shapes and separation, embedded in a fluid membrane whose fluctuations are governed by the combined action of surface tension, bending modulus, and Gaussian rigidity. Each object's shape and mechanical properties enter only through a characteristic matrix, a static analog of the scattering matrix. We calculate the Casimir interaction between two elastic disks embedded in a membrane. In particular, we find that at short separations the interaction is strong and independent of surface tension.

  7. Mode Summation Approach to Casimir Effect Between Two Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2012-10-01

    In the last few years, several approaches have been developed to compute the exact Casimir interaction energy between two nonplanar objects, all lead to the same functional form, which is called the TGTG formula. In this paper, we explore the TGTG formula from the perspective of mode summation approach. Both scalar fields and electromagnetic fields are considered. In this approach, one has to first solve the equation of motion to find a wave basis for each object. The two T's in the TGTG formula are T-matrices representing the Lippmann-Schwinger T-operators, one for each of the objects. Each T-matrix can be found by matching the boundary conditions imposed on the object, and it is independent of the other object. However, it depends on whether the object is interacting with an object outside it, or an object inside it. The two G's in the TGTG formula are the translation matrices, relating the wave basis of an object to the wave basis of the other object. These translation matrices only depend on the wave basis chosen for each object, and they are independent of the boundary conditions on the objects. After discussing the general theory, we apply the prescription to derive the explicit formulas for the Casimir energies for the sphere-sphere, sphere-plane, cylinder-cylinder and cylinder-plane interactions. First the T-matrices for a plane, a sphere and a cylinder are derived for the following cases: the object is imposed with Dirichlet, Neumann or general Robin boundary conditions; the object is semitransparent; and the object is a magnetodielectric object immersed in a magnetodielectric media. Then the operator approach developed by R. C. Wittman [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag.36, 1078 (1988)] is used to derive the translation matrices. From these, the explicit TGTG formula for each of the scenarios can be written down. On the one hand, we have summarized all the TGTG formulas that have been derived so far for the sphere-sphere, cylinder-cylinder, sphere-plane and

  8. CASIMIR Effect in a Supersymmetry-Breaking Brane-World as Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P

    2004-09-29

    A new model for the origin of dark energy is proposed based on the Casimir effect in a supersymmetry-breaking brane-world. Supersymmetry is assumed to be preserved in the bulk while broken on a 3-brane. Due to the boundary conditions imposed on the compactified extra dimensions, there is an effective Casimir energy induced on the brane. The net Casimir energy contributed from the graviton and the gravitino modes as a result of supersymmetry-breaking on the brane is identified as the observed dark energy, which in our construction is a cosmological constant. We show that the smallness of the cosmological constant, which results from the huge contrast in the extra-dimensional volumes between that associated with the 3-brane and that of the bulk, is attainable under very relaxed condition.

  9. Apparent Endless Extraction of Energy from the Vacuum by Cyclic Manipulation of Casimir Cavity Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1983, Ambjorn and Wolfram produced plots of the energy density of the quantum mechanical electromagnetic fluctuations in a volume of vacuum bounded by perfectly conducting walls in the shape of a rectangular cavity of dimensions a(1), a(2), and a(3), as a function of the ratios a(2)/a(1) and a(3)/a(1). Portions of these plots are double-valued, in that they allow rectangular cavities with the same, value of a(2)/a(1), but different values of a(3)/a(1), to have the saint total energy. Using these double-valued regions of the plots, I show that it is possible to define a "Casimir Vacuum Energy Extraction Cycle" which apparently would allow for the endless extraction of energy from the vacuum in the Casimir cavity by cyclic manipulation of the Casimir cavity dimensions.

  10. Effective field theory of thermal Casimir interactions between anisotropic particles.

    PubMed

    Haussman, Robert C; Deserno, Markus

    2014-06-01

    We employ an effective field theory (EFT) approach to study thermal Casimir interactions between objects bound to a fluctuating fluid surface or interface dominated by surface tension, with a focus on the effects of particle anisotropy. The EFT prescription disentangles the constraints imposed by the particles' boundaries from the calculation of the interaction free energy by constructing an equivalent point particle description. The finite-size information is captured in a derivative expansion that encodes the particles' response to external fields. The coefficients of the expansion terms correspond to generalized tensorial polarizabilities and are found by matching the results of a linear response boundary value problem computed in both the full and effective theories. We demonstrate the versatility of the EFT approach by constructing the general effective Hamiltonian for a collection of particles of arbitrary shapes. Taking advantage of the conformal symmetry of the Hamiltonian, we discuss a straightforward conformal mapping procedure to systematically determine the polarizabilities and derive a complete description for elliptical particles. We compute the pairwise interaction energies to several orders for nonidentical ellipses as well as their leading-order triplet interactions and discuss the resulting preferred pair and multibody configurations. Furthermore, we elaborate on the complications that arise with pinned particle boundary conditions and show that the powerlike corrections expected from dimensional analysis are exponentially suppressed by the leading-order interaction energies. PMID:25019720

  11. Observation of the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Modern quantum theory predicts that the vacuum of space is not empty, but instead teeming with virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. While initially a curiosity, it was quickly realized that these vacuum fluctuations had measurable consequences, for instance producing the Lamb shift of atomic spectra and modifying the magnetic moment for the electron. This type of renormalization due to vacuum fluctuations is now central to our understanding of nature. 40 years ago, Moore suggested that a mirror undergoing relativistic motion could convert virtual photons into directly observable real photons. This effect was later named the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE). Using a superconducting circuit, we have observed the DCE for the first time. The circuit consists of a coplanar transmission line with an electrical length that can be changed at a substantial fraction of the speed of light. The length is changed by modulating the inductance of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) at high frequencies (> 10 GHz). In addition to observing the creation of real photons, we observe two-mode squeezing of the emitted radiation, which is a signature of the quantum character of the generation process.

  12. Casimir scaling in a dual superconducting scenario of confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Koma, Y.; Ilgenfritz, E. -M.; Toki, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2001-07-01

    The string tensions of flux tubes associated with static charges in various SU(3) representations are studied within the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory. The ratios of the string tensions between higher and fundamental representations, d{sub D}{equivalent_to}{sigma}{sub D}/{sigma}{sub F}, are found to depend only on the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter, {kappa}=m{sub {chi}}/m{sub B}, the mass ratio between monopoles m{sub {chi}} and dual gauge bosons m{sub B}. In the case of the Bogomol{close_quote}nyi limit ({kappa}=1), analytical values of d{sub D} are easily obtained by adopting the manifestly Weyl invariant formulation of the DGL theory, which are provided simply by the number of color-electric Dirac strings inside the flux tube. A numerical investigation of the ratio for various GL-parameter cases is also performed, which suggests that the Casimir scaling is obtained in the type-II parameter range within the interval {kappa}=5{similar_to}9 for various ratios d{sub D}.

  13. Casimir scaling in a dual superconducting scenario of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Y.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Toki, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2001-07-01

    The string tensions of flux tubes associated with static charges in various SU(3) representations are studied within the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory. The ratios of the string tensions between higher and fundamental representations, dD≡σD/σF, are found to depend only on the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter, κ=mχ/mB, the mass ratio between monopoles mχ and dual gauge bosons mB. In the case of the Bogomol'nyi limit (κ=1), analytical values of dD are easily obtained by adopting the manifestly Weyl invariant formulation of the DGL theory, which are provided simply by the number of color-electric Dirac strings inside the flux tube. A numerical investigation of the ratio for various GL-parameter cases is also performed, which suggests that the Casimir scaling is obtained in the type-II parameter range within the interval κ=5~9 for various ratios dD.

  14. A measurable force driven by an excitonic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hakioğlu, T.; Özgün, Ege; Günay, Mehmet

    2014-04-21

    Free energy signatures related to the measurement of an emergent force (≈10{sup −9}N) due to the exciton condensate (EC) in Double Quantum Wells are predicted and experiments are proposed to measure the effects. The EC-force is attractive and reminiscent of the Casimir force between two perfect metallic plates, but also distinctively different from it by its driving mechanism and dependence on the parameters of the condensate. The proposed experiments are based on a recent experimental work on a driven micromechanical oscillator. Conclusive observations of EC in recent experiments also provide a strong promise for the observation of the EC-force.

  15. Force detection with an optically levitated microsphere in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, G.; Atherton, D.; Stutz, J.; Cunningham, M.; Karr, D.; Geraci, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    A microsphere levitated using purely optical forces in vacuum has a high quality factor and can be used as a micro-mechanical sensor for the precise measurements of small forces such as non-Newtonian gravity in the nanoscale regime and Casimir forces. In this talk, I will discuss the progress on our experiment towards the cooling of the center-of-mass motion of a dielectric microsphere trapped in an optical cavity. I will also discuss the calibration of the force sensitivity using known modulated electric fields. NSF grant PHY-1205994.

  16. CASIMIR: a high resolution far-IR/submm spectrometer for airborne astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, Michael L.; Emprechtinger, Martin; Karpov, Alexandre; Lin, Robert; Lin, Sean; Maiwald, Frank; Mehdi, Imran; Miller, David; Radford, Simon J. E.; Rice, Frank; Ward, John; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2010-07-01

    CASIMIR, the Caltech Airborne Submillimeter Interstellar Medium Investigations Receiver, is a far-infrared and submillimeter heterodyne spectrometer, being developed for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA. CASIMIR will use newly developed superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixers. Combined with the 2.5 m mirror of SOFIA, these detectors will allow observations with high sensitivity to be made in the frequency range from 500 GHz up to 1.4 THz. Initially, at least 5 frequency bands in this range are planned, each with a 4-8 GHz IF passband. Up to 4 frequency bands will be available on each flight and bands may be swapped readily between flights. The local oscillators for all bands are synthesized and tuner-less, using solid state multipliers. CASIMIR also uses a novel, commercial, field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based, fast Fourier transform spectrometer, with extremely high resolution, 22000 (268 kHz at 6 GHz), yielding a system resolution > 106. CASIMIR is extremely well suited to observe the warm, ~ 100K, interstellar medium, particularly hydrides and water lines, in both galactic and extragalactic sources. We present an overview of the instrument, its capabilities and systems. We also describe recent progress in development of the local oscillators and present our first astronomical observations obtained with the new type of spectrometer.

  17. Reply to "Comment on `Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the "Comment on `Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors.' " We believe the comment misrepresents our papers, and fails to provide a plausible resolution to the conflict between theory and experiment.

  18. Sensitive Measurement of Forces at the Micron Scale Using Bloch Oscillations of Ultracold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Carusotto, I.; Pitaevskii, L.; Stringari, S.; Modugno, G.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-08-26

    We show that Bloch oscillations of ultracold fermionic atoms in the periodic potential of an optical lattice can be used for a sensitive measurement of forces at the micrometer length scale, e.g., in the vicinity of a dielectric surface. In particular, the proposed approach allows us to perform a local and direct measurement of the Casimir-Polder force which is, for realistic experimental parameters, as large as 10{sup -4} gravity.

  19. Sensitive measurement of forces at the micron scale using Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Carusotto, I; Pitaevskii, L; Stringari, S; Modugno, G; Inguscio, M

    2005-08-26

    We show that Bloch oscillations of ultracold fermionic atoms in the periodic potential of an optical lattice can be used for a sensitive measurement of forces at the micrometer length scale, e.g., in the vicinity of a dielectric surface. In particular, the proposed approach allows us to perform a local and direct measurement of the Casimir-Polder force which is, for realistic experimental parameters, as large as 10(-4) gravity.

  20. Dispersion forces between ultracold atoms and a carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, P; Gierling, M; Visanescu, G; Kern, D P; Judd, T E; Günther, A; Fortágh, J

    2012-08-01

    Dispersion forces are long-range interactions between polarizable objects that arise from fluctuations in the electromagnetic field between them. Dispersion forces have been observed between microscopic objects such as atoms and molecules (the van der Waals interaction), between macroscopic objects (the Casimir interaction) and between an atom and a macroscopic object (the Casimir-Polder interaction). Dispersion forces are known to increase the attractive forces between the components in nanomechanical devices, to influence adsorption rates onto nanostructures, and to influence the interactions between biomolecules in biological systems. In recent years, there has been growing interest in studying dispersion forces in nanoscale systems and in exploring the interactions between carbon nanotubes and cold atoms. However, there are considerable difficulties in developing dispersion force theories for general, finite geometries such as nanostructures. Thus, there is a need for new experimental methods that are able to go beyond measurements of planar surfaces and nanoscale gratings and make measurements on isolated nanostructures. Here, we measure the dispersion force between a rubidium atom and a multiwalled carbon nanotube by inserting the nanotube into a cloud of ultracold rubidium atoms and monitoring the loss of atoms from the cloud as a function of time. We perform these experiments with both thermal clouds of ultracold atoms and with Bose-Einstein condensates. The results obtained with this approach will aid the development of theories describing quantum fields near nanostructures, and hybrid cold-atom/solid-state devices may also prove useful for applications in quantum sensing and quantum information.

  1. Radiative corrections to the Casimir Pressure under the influence of temperature and external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Robaschik, D.; Scharonhorst, K.; Wieczorek, E.

    1987-03-01

    Generalizing the quantum field theory (QFT) with boundary conditions in covariant gauge to the case of finite temperature, we develop the quantum electrodynamics (QED) with boundary conditions in the Matsubara approach as well as in the thermofield formulation. We rederive the known results of the free-field theory for the pressure and the free energy of the Casimir problem. For infinitely thin plates we calculate the radiative corrections in second-order perturbation theory at finite temperature. Thereby it turns out that the calculation in of the vacuum energy at the vanishing temperature via the Z functional is much simplier than the calculation via the energy momentum tensor. This observation allows determination of the influence of static electromagnetic fields on the Casimir problem. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc.

  2. Comment on "Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    Recently Guérout et al. [Phys. Rev. E 93, 022108 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.022108] advocated that the lossless plasma model has to be redefined as the limit of the Drude model when the relaxation parameter goes to zero. It was claimed that the previously used plasma model cannot correctly describe the Casimir pressure between two plates made of both nonmagnetic and magnetic metals and has to be replaced with the redefined one. We show that the suggested redefinition does not satisfy necessary physical requirements imposed on the dielectric permittivity. We also present a plausible explanation for the fact that the lossless plasma model describes the Casimir pressure correctly even though it does not match the optical and electrical properties of metals.

  3. Comment on "Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors".

    PubMed

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2016-08-01

    Recently Guérout et al. [Phys. Rev. E 93, 022108 (2016)1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.93.022108] advocated that the lossless plasma model has to be redefined as the limit of the Drude model when the relaxation parameter goes to zero. It was claimed that the previously used plasma model cannot correctly describe the Casimir pressure between two plates made of both nonmagnetic and magnetic metals and has to be replaced with the redefined one. We show that the suggested redefinition does not satisfy necessary physical requirements imposed on the dielectric permittivity. We also present a plausible explanation for the fact that the lossless plasma model describes the Casimir pressure correctly even though it does not match the optical and electrical properties of metals.

  4. A dispersion relation for the density of states with application to the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeev, S.G.

    2011-06-15

    Research Highlights: > The density of states is determined by the log determinant of the scattering matrix. > But this 'Krein Forluma' is divergent. > We remove the divergence by using a dispersion relation. > A formula for the Casimir energy in terms of the optical scattering matrix follows. > No rotational symmetries are assumed, nor is perturbation theory used. - Abstract: The trace of a function of a Schroedinger operator minus the same for the Laplacian can be expressed in terms of the determinant of its scattering matrix. The naive formula for this determinant is divergent. Using a dispersion relation, we find another expression for it which is convergent, but needs one piece of information beyond the scattering matrix: the spatial integral of the potential. Except for this 'anomaly', we can express the Casimir energy of a compact body in terms of its optical scattering matrix, without assuming any rotational symmetry for its shape.

  5. Comment on "Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors".

    PubMed

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2016-08-01

    Recently Guérout et al. [Phys. Rev. E 93, 022108 (2016)1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.93.022108] advocated that the lossless plasma model has to be redefined as the limit of the Drude model when the relaxation parameter goes to zero. It was claimed that the previously used plasma model cannot correctly describe the Casimir pressure between two plates made of both nonmagnetic and magnetic metals and has to be replaced with the redefined one. We show that the suggested redefinition does not satisfy necessary physical requirements imposed on the dielectric permittivity. We also present a plausible explanation for the fact that the lossless plasma model describes the Casimir pressure correctly even though it does not match the optical and electrical properties of metals. PMID:27627423

  6. New aspects of the Casimir energy theory for a piecewise uniform string

    SciTech Connect

    Brevik, I.; Elizalde, E. )

    1994-05-15

    The Casimir energy for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string is calculated. The string consists of two parts (I and II) each having in general different tension and mass density but adjusted in such a way that the velocity of sound always equals the velocity of light. This model was introduced by Brevik and Nielsen, and the present paper contains new developments of the theory, in particular, a very simple regularization of the energy density. Using the technique introduced by van Kampen, Nijboer, and Schram, the Casimir energy is written as a contour integral, from which the energy can be readily calculated, for arbitrary length [ital s]=[ital L][sub II]/[ital L][sub I] and tension [ital x]=[ital T][sub I]/[ital T][sub II] ratios. Also, the finite temperature version of the theory is constructed.

  7. Das Vakuum kommt zu Kräften: Der Casimir-Effekt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, Astrid

    2005-03-01

    Die Casimir-Kraft zwischen zwei Spiegeln im Vakuum wird durch Vakuumfluktuationen verursacht. Dieser bedeutende Effekt ermöglicht es, in präzisen Laborversuchen unser Verständnis vom Quantenvakuum zu vertiefen. Eine Vielzahl neuer Experimente setzt dazu moderne Techniken wie die atomare Kraftmikroskopie oder mikroelektromechanische Systeme ein. Auch die theoretischen Modelle werden verbessert, um diese Experimente realistischer nachzubilden. Bislang stimmen die experimentellen Daten gut mit den theoretischen Vorhersagen überein. Da der Casimir-Effekt auf kurzen Distanzen dominieren kann, wird er für die zukünftige Nanotechnik wichtig sein. Der Grundlagenforschung bietet er eine gute Möglichkeit, neue Theorien zur Vereinigung aller Kräfte zu überprüfen.

  8. Derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2014-10-01

    We carefully reexamine the conditions of validity for the consistent derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors. We recover the usual expression for the lossy Drude model but not for the lossless plasma model. We give an interpretation of this new result in terms of the modes associated with the Foucault currents, which play a role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to common expectations.

  9. Disorder in Quantum Vacuum: Casimir-Induced Localization of Matter Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G. A.; Messina, R.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.; Maia Neto, P. A.

    2010-11-19

    Disordered geometrical boundaries such as rough surfaces induce important modifications to the mode spectrum of the electromagnetic quantum vacuum. In analogy to Anderson localization of waves induced by a random potential, here we show that the Casimir-Polder interaction between a cold atomic sample and a rough surface also produces localization phenomena. These effects, that represent a macroscopic manifestation of disorder in quantum vacuum, should be observable with Bose-Einstein condensates expanding in proximity of rough surfaces.

  10. Disorder in quantum vacuum: Casimir-induced localization of matter waves.

    PubMed

    Moreno, G A; Messina, R; Dalvit, D A R; Lambrecht, A; Maia Neto, P A; Reynaud, S

    2010-11-19

    Disordered geometrical boundaries such as rough surfaces induce important modifications to the mode spectrum of the electromagnetic quantum vacuum. In analogy to Anderson localization of waves induced by a random potential, here we show that the Casimir-Polder interaction between a cold atomic sample and a rough surface also produces localization phenomena. These effects, that represent a macroscopic manifestation of disorder in quantum vacuum, should be observable with Bose-Einstein condensates expanding in proximity of rough surfaces.

  11. Degeneration of Trigonometric Dynamical Difference Equations for Quantum Loop Algebras to Trigonometric Casimir Equations for Yangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagović, Martina

    2015-03-01

    We show that, under Drinfeld's degeneration (Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians. American Mathematical Society, Providence, pp 798-820, 1987) of quantum loop algebras to Yangians, the trigonometric dynamical difference equations [Etingof and Varchenko (Adv Math 167:74-127, 2002)] for the quantum affine algebra degenerate to the trigonometric Casimir differential equations [Toledano Laredo (J Algebra 329:286-327, 2011)] for Yangians.

  12. Functional determinants and Casimir energy in higher dimensional spherically symmetric background potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucci, Guglielmo; Kirsten, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we analyze the spectral zeta function associated with a Laplace operator acting on scalar functions on an N-dimensional Euclidean space in the presence of a spherically symmetric background potential. The obtained analytic continuation of the spectral zeta function is then used to derive very simple results for the functional determinant of the operator and the Casimir energy of the scalar field.

  13. Invariance of bipartite separability and PPT-probabilities over Casimir invariants of reduced states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    Milz and Strunz (J Phys A 48:035306, 2015) recently studied the probabilities that two-qubit and qubit-qutrit states, randomly generated with respect to Hilbert-Schmidt (Euclidean/flat) measure, are separable. They concluded that in both cases, the separability probabilities (apparently exactly 8/33 in the two-qubit scenario) hold constant over the Bloch radii ( r) of the single-qubit subsystems, jumping to 1 at the pure state boundaries (r=1). Here, firstly, we present evidence that in the qubit-qutrit case, the separability probability is uniformly distributed, as well, over the generalized Bloch radius ( R) of the qutrit subsystem. While the qubit (standard) Bloch vector is positioned in three-dimensional space, the qutrit generalized Bloch vector lives in eight-dimensional space. The radii variables r and R themselves are the lengths/norms (being square roots of quadratic Casimir invariants) of these ("coherence") vectors. Additionally, we find that not only are the qubit-qutrit separability probabilities invariant over the quadratic Casimir invariant of the qutrit subsystem, but apparently also over the cubic one—and similarly the case, more generally, with the use of random induced measure. We also investigate two-qutrit (3 × 3) and qubit- qudit (2 × 4) systems—with seemingly analogous positive partial transpose-probability invariances holding over what has been termed by Altafini the partial Casimir invariants of these systems.

  14. All-optical dynamical Casimir effect in a three-dimensional terahertz photonic band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenmüller, David

    2016-06-01

    We identify an architecture for the observation of all-optical dynamical Casimir effect in realistic experimental conditions. We suggest that by integrating quantum wells in a three-dimensional (3D) photonic band-gap material made out of large-scale (˜200 -μ m ) germanium logs, it is possible to achieve ultrastrong light-matter coupling at terahertz frequencies for the cyclotron transition of a two-dimensional electron gas interacting with long-lived optical modes, in which vacuum Rabi splitting is comparable to the Landau level spacing. When a short, intense electromagnetic transient of duration ˜250 fs and carrying a peak magnetic field ˜5 T is applied to the structure, the cyclotron transition can be suddenly tuned on resonance with a desired photon mode, switching on the light-matter interaction and leading to a Casimir radiation emitted parallel to the quantum well plane. The radiation spectrum consists of sharp peaks with frequencies coinciding with engineered optical modes within the 3D photonic band gap, and its characteristics are extremely robust to the nonradiative damping which can be large in our system. Furthermore, the absence of continuum with associated low-energy excitations for both electromagnetic and electronic quantum states can prevent the rapid absorption of the photon flux which is likely to occur in other proposals for all-optical dynamical Casimir effect.

  15. Casimir scaling and string breaking in G{sub 2} gluodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wellegehausen, Bjoern H.; Wipf, Andreas; Wozar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We study the potential energy between static charges in G{sub 2} gluodynamics in three and four dimensions. Our work is based on an efficient local hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm and a multilevel Luescher-Weisz algorithm with exponential error reduction to accurately measure expectation values of Wilson and Polyakov loops. Both in three and four dimensions we show that at intermediate scales the string tensions for charges in various G{sub 2} representations scale with the second order Casimir. In three dimensions Casimir scaling is confirmed within 4% for charges in representations of dimensions 7, 14, 27, 64, 77, 77{sup '}, 182, and 189 and in four dimensions within 5% for charges in representations of dimensions 7, 14, 27, and 64. In three dimensions we detect string breaking for charges in the two fundamental representations. The scale for string breaking agrees very well with the mass of the created pair of glue lumps. Close to the string breaking distance Casimir scaling between adjoint and defining representation is violated by 2.5%. The analytical prediction for the continuum string tension is confirmed for the defining representation in three dimensions.

  16. Optical-approximation analysis of sidewall-spacing effects on the force between two squares with parallel sidewalls

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Johnson, Steven G.; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2007-12-15

    Using the ray-optics approximation, we analyze the Casimir force in a two-dimensional domain formed by two metallic blocks adjacent to parallel metallic sidewalls, which are separated from the blocks by a finite distance h. For h>0, the ray-optics approach is not exact because diffraction effects are neglected. Nevertheless, we show that ray optics is able to qualitatively reproduce a surprising effect recently identified in an exact numerical calculation: the force between the blocks varies nonmonotonically with h. In this sense, the ray-optics approach captures an essential part of the physics of multibody interactions in this system, unlike simpler pairwise-interaction approximations such as proximity force approximations (PFA). Furthermore, by comparison to the exact numerical results, we are able to quantify the impact of diffraction on Casimir forces in this geometry.

  17. Physical origin of nonequilibrium fluctuation-induced forces in fluids.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, T R; Ortiz de Zárate, J M; Sengers, J V

    2016-01-01

    Long-range thermal fluctuations appear in fluids in nonequilibrium states leading to fluctuation-induced Casimir-like forces. Two distinct mechanisms have been identified for the origin of the long-range nonequilibrium fluctuations in fluids subjected to a temperature or concentration gradient. One is a coupling between the heat or mass-diffusion mode with a viscous mode in fluids subjected to a temperature or concentration gradient. Another one is the spatial inhomogeneity of thermal noise in the presence of a gradient. We show that in fluids fluctuation-induced forces arising from mode coupling are several orders of magnitude larger than those from inhomogeneous noise.

  18. Giant vacuum forces via transmission lines

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Quantum electromagnetic fluctuations induce forces between neutral particles, known as the van der Waals and Casimir interactions. These fundamental forces, mediated by virtual photons from the vacuum, play an important role in basic physics and chemistry and in emerging technologies involving, e.g., microelectromechanical systems or quantum information processing. Here we show that these interactions can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude upon changing the character of the mediating vacuum modes. By considering two polarizable particles in the vicinity of any standard electric transmission line, along which photons can propagate in one dimension, we find a much stronger and longer-range interaction than in free space. This enhancement may have profound implications on many-particle and bulk systems and impact the quantum technologies mentioned above. The predicted giant vacuum force is estimated to be measurable in a coplanar waveguide line. PMID:25002503

  19. Attonewton force detection using microspheres in a dual-beam optical trap in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Atherton, David P.; Stutz, Jordan H.; Cunningham, Mark; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the implementation of laser-cooled silica microspheres as force sensors in a dual-beam optical dipole trap in high vacuum. Using this system we have demonstrated trap lifetimes exceeding several days, attonewton force detection capability, and wide tunability in trapping and cooling parameters. Measurements have been performed with charged and neutral beads to calibrate the sensitivity of the detector. This work establishes the suitability of dual-beam optical dipole traps for precision force measurement in high vacuum with long averaging times, and enables future applications including the study of gravitational inverse square law violations at short range, Casimir forces, acceleration sensing, and quantum optomechanics.

  20. Geometry-Induced Casimir Suspension of Oblate Bodies in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Intravaia, Francesco; Woolf, Alexander; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Capasso, Federico; Johnson, Steven G.

    2013-11-01

    We predict that a low-permittivity oblate body (disk-shaped object) above a thin metal substrate (plate with a hole) immersed in a fluid of intermediate permittivity will experience a metastable equilibrium (restoring force) near the center of the hole. Stability is the result of a geometry-induced transition in the sign of the force, from repulsive to attractive, that occurs as the disk approaches the hole—in planar or nearly planar geometries, the same material combination yields a repulsive force at all separations, in accordance with the Dzyaloshinskiĭ-Lifshitz-Pitaevskiĭ condition of fluid-induced repulsion between planar bodies. We explore the stability of the system with respect to rotations and lateral translations of the disks and demonstrate interesting transitions (bifurcations) in the rotational stability of the disks as a function of their size. Finally, we consider the reciprocal situation in which the disk-plate materials are interchanged and find that in this case the system also exhibits metastability. The forces in the system are sufficiently large to be observed in experiments and should enable measurements based on the diffusion dynamics of the suspended bodies.

  1. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  2. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  3. Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors.

    PubMed

    Guérout, R; Lambrecht, A; Milton, K A; Reynaud, S

    2016-02-01

    We examine the conditions of validity for the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic plane mirrors. As in the previously studied case of nonmagnetic materials [Guérout et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 042125 (2014)], we recover the usual expression for the lossy model of optical response, but not for the lossless plasma model. We also show that the modes associated with the Foucault currents play a crucial role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to expectations.

  4. Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the conditions of validity for the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic plane mirrors. As in the previously studied case of nonmagnetic materials [Guérout et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 042125 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.042125], we recover the usual expression for the lossy model of optical response, but not for the lossless plasma model. We also show that the modes associated with the Foucault currents play a crucial role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to expectations.

  5. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. DOWKER's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so-called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  6. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. Dowker's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-07-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  7. Nonadditivity of van der Waals forces on liquid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataram, Prashanth S.; Whitton, Jeremy D.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach for modeling nanoscale wetting and dewetting of textured solid surfaces that exploits recently developed, sophisticated techniques for computing exact long-range dispersive van der Waals (vdW) or (more generally) Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries. We apply these techniques to solve the variational formulation of the Young-Laplace equation and predict the equilibrium shapes of liquid-vacuum interfaces near solid gratings. We show that commonly employed methods of computing vdW interactions based on additive Hamaker or Derjaguin approximations, which neglect important electromagnetic boundary effects, can result in large discrepancies in the shapes and behaviors of liquid surfaces compared to exact methods.

  8. Sensing dispersive and dissipative forces by an optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchoi, Oren; Buks, Eyal

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally study an optomechanical cavity that is formed between a mechanical resonator, which serves as a movable mirror, and a stationary on-fiber dielectric mirror. A significant change in the behavior of the system is observed when the distance between the fiber's tip and the mechanical resonator is made smaller than about 1 μ \\text{m} . The combined influence of Casimir force, Coulomb interaction due to trapped charges, and optomechanical coupling is theoretically analyzed. The comparison between experimental results and theory yields a partial agreement.

  9. Reply to "Comment on 'Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors' ".

    PubMed

    Guérout, R; Lambrecht, A; Milton, K A; Reynaud, S

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the "Comment on 'Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors.' " We believe the comment misrepresents our papers, and fails to provide a plausible resolution to the conflict between theory and experiment.

  10. Reply to "Comment on 'Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors' ".

    PubMed

    Guérout, R; Lambrecht, A; Milton, K A; Reynaud, S

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the "Comment on 'Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors.' " We believe the comment misrepresents our papers, and fails to provide a plausible resolution to the conflict between theory and experiment. PMID:27627424

  11. Optical gecko toe: Optically controlled attractive near-field forces between plasmonic metamaterials and dielectric or metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2012-05-01

    On the mesoscopic scale, electromagnetic forces are of fundamental importance to an enormously diverse range of systems, from optical tweezers to the adhesion of gecko toes. Here we show that a strong light-driven force may be generated when a plasmonic metamaterial is illuminated in close proximity to a dielectric or metal surface. This near-field force can exceed radiation pressure and Casimir forces to provide an optically controlled adhesion mechanism mimicking the gecko toe: At illumination intensities of just a few tens of nW/μm2 it is sufficient to overcome the Earth's gravitational pull.

  12. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions.

    PubMed

    Berman, P R; Ford, G W; Milonni, P W

    2014-10-28

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r(-4), a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called "remarkable formula" for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. O'Connell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  13. Electromagnetic semitransparent δ-function plate: Casimir interaction energy between parallel infinitesimally thin plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Prachi; Milton, Kimball A.; Shajesh, K. V.; Schaden, M.

    2012-10-01

    We derive boundary conditions for electromagnetic fields on a δ-function plate. The optical properties of such a plate are shown to necessarily be anisotropic in that they only depend on the transverse properties of the plate. We unambiguously obtain the boundary conditions for a perfectly conducting δ-function plate in the limit of infinite dielectric response. We show that a material does not “optically vanish” in the thin-plate limit. The thin-plate limit of a plasma slab of thickness d with plasma frequency ωp2=ζp/d reduces to a δ-function plate for frequencies (ω=iζ) satisfying ζd≪ζpd≪1. We show that the Casimir interaction energy between two parallel perfectly conducting δ-function plates is the same as that for parallel perfectly conducting slabs. Similarly, we show that the interaction energy between an atom and a perfect electrically conducting δ-function plate is the usual Casimir-Polder energy, which is verified by considering the thin-plate limit of dielectric slabs. The “thick” and “thin” boundary conditions considered by Bordag are found to be identical in the sense that they lead to the same electromagnetic fields.

  14. Impact of Casimir-Polder interaction on Poisson-spot diffraction at a dielectric sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerich, Joshua L.; Bennett, Robert; Reisinger, Thomas; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Fiedler, Johannes; Hahn, Horst; Gleiter, Herbert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-08-01

    Diffraction of matter waves is an important demonstration of the fact that objects in nature possess a mixture of particlelike and wavelike properties. Unlike in the case of light diffraction, matter waves are subject to a vacuum-mediated interaction with diffraction obstacles. Here we present a detailed account of this effect through the calculation of the attractive Casimir-Polder potential between a dielectric sphere and an atomic beam. Furthermore, we use our calculated potential to make predictions about the diffraction patterns to be observed in an ongoing experiment where a beam of indium atoms is diffracted around a silicon-dioxide sphere. The result is an amplification of the on-axis bright feature, which is the matter-wave analog of the well-known "Poisson spot" from optics. Our treatment confirms that the diffraction patterns resulting from our complete account of the sphere Casimir-Polder potential are indistinguishable from those found via a large-sphere nonretarded approximation in the discussed experiments, establishing the latter as an adequate model.

  15. Interference phenomena in the dynamical Casimir effect for a single mirror with Robin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jeferson D. Lima; Braga, Alessandra N.; Rego, Andreson L. C.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2015-07-01

    In the literature, the interference phenomenon in the particle creation via the dynamical Casimir effect is investigated for cavities with two moving mirrors. Here, considering the Robin boundary condition (BC), we investigate the interference phenomenon produced by just a single moving mirror. Specifically, we consider a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions submitted to a Robin BC with a time-dependent Robin parameter at the instantaneous position of a moving mirror, and compute the expressions for the spectral distribution and the rate of created particles. These expressions, which include interference terms, generalize those found in the literature related to the isolated effects of a Robin BC with a time-dependent Robin parameter for a fixed mirror, or a Robin BC with a time-independent Robin parameter for a moving mirror. Differently from models where the problem of interference in the dynamical Casimir effect is considered for cavities with two Dirichlet moving mirrors, in the present model the spectrum is a continuum, and the interference pattern exhibits new features, in the sense that different regions of the spectrum can be affected in different manners by constructive or destructive effects. Furthermore, we also investigate interference in the context of superconducting circuits.

  16. Discontinuous bundling transition in semiflexible polymer networks induced by Casimir interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin; Müller, Kei W.; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Levine, Alex J.

    2016-09-01

    Fluctuation-induced interactions are an important organizing principle in a variety of soft matter systems. We investigate the role of fluctuation-based or thermal Casimir interactions between cross linkers in a semiflexible network. One finds that, by integrating out the polymer degrees of freedom, there is an attractive logarithmic potential between nearest-neighbor cross linkers in a bundle, with a significantly weaker next-nearest-neighbor interaction. Here we show that a one-dimensional gas of these strongly interacting linkers in equilibrium with a source of unbound ones admits a discontinuous phase transition between a sparsely and a densely bound bundle. This discontinuous transition induced by the long-ranged nature of the Casimir interaction allows for a similarly abrupt structural transition in semiflexible filament networks between a low cross linker density isotropic phase and a higher cross link density bundle network. We support these calculations with the results of finite element Brownian dynamics simulations of semiflexible filaments and transient cross linkers.

  17. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, P. R.; Ford, G. W.; Milonni, P. W.

    2014-10-01

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r-4, a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called "remarkable formula" for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. O'Connell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  18. Pseudo-Casimir stresses and elasticity of a confined elastomer film.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-05-11

    Investigations of the elastic behavior of bulk elastomers have traditionally proceeded on the basis of classical rubber elasticity, which regards chains as thermally fluctuating but disregards the thermal fluctuations of the cross-links. Herein, we consider an incompressible and flat elastomer film of an axisymmetric shape confined between two large hard co-planar substrates, with the axis of the film perpendicular to the substrates. We address the impact that thermal fluctuations of the cross-links have on the free energy of elastic deformation of the system, subject to the requirement that the fluctuating elastomer cannot detach from the substrates. We examine the behavior of the deformation free energy for one case where a rigid pinning boundary condition is applied to a class of elastic fluctuations at the confining surfaces, and another case where the same elastic fluctuations are subjected to soft "gluing" potentials. We find that there can be significant departures (both quantitative and qualitative) from the prediction of classical rubber elasticity theory when elastic fluctuations are included. Finally, we compare the character of the attractive part of the elastic fluctuation-induced, or pseudo-Casimir, stress with the standard thermal Casimir stress in confined but non-elastomeric systems, finding the same power law decay behavior when a rigid pinning boundary condition is applied; for the case of the gluing potential, we find that the leading order correction to the attractive part of the fluctuation stress decays inversely with the inter-substrate separation. PMID:27079513

  19. Pull-in instability of paddle-type and double-sided NEMS sensors under the accelerating force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, M.; Khorsandi, J.; Mokhtari, J.; Kanani, A.; Abadian, N.; Abadyan, M.

    2016-02-01

    Paddle-type and double-sided nanostructures are potential for use as accelerometers in flying vehicles and aerospace applications. Herein the pull-in instability of the cantilever paddle-type and double-sided sensors in the Casimir regime are investigated under the acceleration. The D'Alembert principle is employed to transform the accelerating system into an equivalent static system by incorporating the accelerating force. Based on the couple stress theory (CST), the size-dependent constitutive equations of the sensors are derived. The governing nonlinear equations are solved by two approaches, i.e. modified variational iteration method and finite difference method. The influences of the Casimir force, geometrical parameters, acceleration and the size phenomenon on the instability performance have been demonstrated. The obtained results are beneficial to design and fabricate paddle-type and double-sided accelerometers.

  20. Vacuum polarization and Casimir energy of a Dirac field induced by a scalar potential in one spatial dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gousheh, S. S.; Mousavi, S. S.; Shahkarami, L.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the vacuum polarization and Casimir energy of a Dirac field coupled to a scalar potential in one spatial dimension. Both of these effects have a common cause, which is the distortion of the spectrum of the Dirac field due to its coupling with the background field. Choosing the potential to be a symmetrical square well renders the problem exactly solvable, and we can obtain the whole spectrum of the system analytically. We show that the total number of states and the total density remain unchanged as compared with the free case, as one expects. Furthermore, since there is a reflection symmetry between positive- and negative-energy eigenstates of the fermion, the total density and the total number of negative and positive states remain unchanged, separately. This, along with the fact that there is no zero mode, mandate that the vacuum polarization in this model is zero for any choice of the parameters of the potential. It is important to note that although the vacuum polarization is zero due to the symmetries of the model, the Casimir energy of the system is not zero in general. In the graph of the Casimir energy as a function of the depth of the well, there is a maximum approximately when the bound energy levels change direction and move back towards their continuum of origin. The Casimir energy for a fixed value of the depth is an almost linear increasing function of the width. Moreover, the Casimir energy density (the energy density of all the negative-energy states) and the energy density of all the positive-energy states are exactly the mirror images of each other. Finally, we compute the total energy of a valence fermion present in the lowest positive-energy fermionic bound state. We find that taking into account the Casimir energy does not result in the appearance of any local minima in the graphs of the total energy as a function of the parameters of the model, and this is in sharp contrast to the cases where there are levels crossing the line

  1. New Asymptotic Behavior of the Surface-Atom Force out of Thermal Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Antezza, Mauro; Pitaevskii, Lev P.; Stringari, Sandro

    2005-09-09

    The Casimir-Polder-Lifshitz force felt by an atom near the surface of a substrate is calculated out of thermal equilibrium in terms of the dielectric function of the material and of the atomic polarizability. The new force decays like 1/z{sup 3} at large distances (i.e., slower than at equilibrium), exhibits a sizable temperature dependence, and is attractive or repulsive depending on whether the temperature of the substrate is higher or smaller than the one of the environment. Our predictions can be relevant for experiments with ultracold atomic gases. Both dielectric and metal substrates are considered.

  2. Possibilities of Verifying Dynamical Casimir Effect with Nonlinear Materials in Microwave Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    I evaluate the number of ``Casimir quanta'' that could be created in high-quality electromagnetic cavities containing materials with big third-order nonlinear optical coefficients, due to the parametric amplification of the microwave vacuum field, if the effective refractive index of the material is modulated by periodic high-intensity short laser pulses. The main result is that the expected total number of created microwave photons depends neither on the laser beam shape, nor on the duration or power of individual pulses, but it is determined by the total energy of all pulses, provided the duration of each pulse is much shorter than the period of field oscillations in the selected resonant mode. The experiment can be feasible in small cavities with high resonance frequencies. Possible spurious effects will be discussed, too.

  3. Efficient near-field energy transfer and relieved Casimir stiction between sub-wavelength gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianglei; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Zhuomin

    2015-03-01

    The promising applications of near-field heat transfer in thermophotovoltaic devices, thermal imaging, thermal rectifiers, and local thermal management have motivated the search for nanostructures capable of supporting higher efficiency or greater heat flux than simple planar substances. In this work, efficient and delocalized radiative heat transfer between two aligned 1D sub-wavelength gratings is demonstrated based on the scattering theory using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). It is shown that the heat flux can be greatly enhanced and the accurate prediction may differ significantly from that of the geometry-based Derjaguin's proximity approximation (PA). The underlying mechanism is attributed to the excitation of hyperbolic modes that increase the energy transmission by supporting propagation of waves with large parallel wavevectors and. Besides efficient energy transport, the performance is robust, insensitive to the relative lateral shift. In addition, the Casimir stiction considering both quantum and thermal fluctuations is found to be relieved compared with bulks.

  4. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, P. R.; Ford, G. W.; Milonni, P. W.

    2014-10-28

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r{sup −4}, a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called “remarkable formula” for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. O’Connell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  5. When is the mode-summation method of calculating van der Waals force valid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, Arvind

    2015-03-01

    Most calculations of van der Waals forces and Casimir forces can be categorized as variations of two ``proto methods'': (1) Lifshitz theory, and (2) mode summation method. In the Lifshitz theory, by which I include the subsequent generalization by Dzyaloshinskii, Lifshitz, and Pitaevskii [Adv. Phys. 10, 165 (1961); See also Zheng and Narayanaswamy, Phys. Rev. A 83, 042504 (2011)] the dispersion force is expressed in terms of the (dyadic) Green's function of the vector Helmholtz equation. In the mode summation method [see Casimir, Proc. Kon. Ned. Akad. Wetensch. 51, 793 (1948); Van Kampen, Nijboer, and Schram, Phys. Lett. A 26, 307 (1968)], the free energy of a configuration of objects is expressed in terms of the sum of the free energies of each of the possible electromagnetic modes. The derivative of this free energy with respect to variation of relative positions between the objects yields the force between two objects. However, we raised questions about the validity of the mode summation method when calculating van der Waals forces in dissipative media [see Narayanaswamy and Zheng, Phys. Rev. A 88, 012502 (2013) and Ninham, Parsegian, and Weiss, J. Stat. Phys. 2, 323 (1970)]. In this talk, I want to start a discussion about the validity of the mode summation method.

  6. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Their description as an inherently quantum mechanical phenomenon was developed for single atoms and homogeneous macroscopic bodies by London, Casimir, and Lifshitz. For intermediate-sized objects like organic molecules an atomistic description is required, but explicit first principles calculations are very difficult since correlations between many interacting electrons have to be considered. Hence, semi-empirical correction schemes are often used that simplify the vdW interaction to a sum over atom-pair potentials. A similar gap exists between successful measurements of vdW and Casimir forces for single atoms on the one hand and macroscopic bodies on the other, as comparable experiments for molecules are absent. I will present experiments in which long-range vdW potentials between a series of related molecules and a metal surface have been determined experimentally. The experiments rely on the extremely sensitive force detection of an atomic force microscope in combination with its molecular manipulation capabilities. The results allow us to confirm the asymptotic force law and to quantify the non-additive part of the vdW interaction which is particularly challenging for theory. In the present case, cooperative effects account for 10% of the total interaction. This effect is of general validity in molecules and thus relevant at the intersection of chemistry, physics, biology, and materials science.

  7. Casimir theory of the relativistic composite string revisited, and a formally related problem in scalar QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver

    2012-09-01

    The main part of this paper is to present an updated review of the Casimir energy at zero and finite temperature for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string. We make use of three different regularizations: the cutoff method, the complex contour integration method and the zeta-function method. The string model is relativistic, in the sense that the velocity of sound is for each string piece set equal to the velocity of light. In this sense the theory is analogous to the electromagnetic theory in a dielectric medium in which the product of permittivity and permeability is equal to unity (an isorefractive medium). We demonstrate how the formalism works for a two-piece string, and for a 2N-piece string, and show how in the latter case a compact recursion relation serves to facilitate the formalism considerably. The Casimir energy turns out to be negative, and the more so the larger the number of pieces in the string. The two-piece string is quantized in D-dimensional spacetime, in the limit when the ratio between the two tensions is very small. We calculate the free energy and other thermodynamic quantities, demonstrate scaling properties, and comment finally on the meaning of the Hagedorn critical temperature for the two-piece string. Thereafter, as a novel development we present a scalar field theory for a real field in three-dimensional space in a potential rising linearly with a longitudinal coordinate z in the interval 0 < z < 1, and which is thereafter held constant on a horizontal plateau. The potential is taken as a rough model of the two-piece string potential under simplifying conditions, when the length ratio between the pieces is replaced formally with the mentioned length parameter z. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  8. Quantum Gravitational Force Between Polarizable Objects.

    PubMed

    Ford, L H; Hertzberg, Mark P; Karouby, J

    2016-04-15

    Since general relativity is a consistent low energy effective field theory, it is possible to compute quantum corrections to classical forces. Here we compute a quantum correction to the gravitational potential between a pair of polarizable objects. We study two distant bodies and compute a quantum force from their induced quadrupole moments due to two-graviton exchange. The effect is in close analogy to the Casimir-Polder and London-van der Waals forces between a pair of atoms from their induced dipole moments due to two photon exchange. The new effect is computed from the shift in vacuum energy of metric fluctuations due to the polarizability of the objects. We compute the potential energy at arbitrary distances compared to the wavelengths in the system, including the far and near regimes. In the far distance, or retarded, regime, the potential energy takes on a particularly simple form: V(r)=-3987ℏcG^{2}α_{1S}α_{2S}/(4πr^{11}), where α_{1S}, α_{2S} are the static gravitational quadrupole polarizabilities of each object. We provide estimates of this effect. PMID:27127955

  9. Quantum Gravitational Force Between Polarizable Objects.

    PubMed

    Ford, L H; Hertzberg, Mark P; Karouby, J

    2016-04-15

    Since general relativity is a consistent low energy effective field theory, it is possible to compute quantum corrections to classical forces. Here we compute a quantum correction to the gravitational potential between a pair of polarizable objects. We study two distant bodies and compute a quantum force from their induced quadrupole moments due to two-graviton exchange. The effect is in close analogy to the Casimir-Polder and London-van der Waals forces between a pair of atoms from their induced dipole moments due to two photon exchange. The new effect is computed from the shift in vacuum energy of metric fluctuations due to the polarizability of the objects. We compute the potential energy at arbitrary distances compared to the wavelengths in the system, including the far and near regimes. In the far distance, or retarded, regime, the potential energy takes on a particularly simple form: V(r)=-3987ℏcG^{2}α_{1S}α_{2S}/(4πr^{11}), where α_{1S}, α_{2S} are the static gravitational quadrupole polarizabilities of each object. We provide estimates of this effect.

  10. Constraining axion coupling constants from measuring the Casimir interaction between polarized test bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Romero, C.

    2016-08-01

    We propose an experiment for measuring the effective Casimir pressure between two parallel silicon carbide (SiC) plates with aligned nuclear spins. The prospective constraints on an axion-neutron coupling constant for both hadronic and grand unified theory (GUT) axions are calculated using the process of one-axion exchange. For this purpose, a general expression for the additional pressure arising between two polarized plates due to the exchange of one axion between their constituent fermions is derived. We demonstrate that only the polarization component perpendicular to the plates contributes to the pressure. The obtained pressure can be both repulsive and attractive depending on whether the polarizations of both plates are unidirectional or directed in opposite directions. It is shown that although the constraints on an axion-electron coupling obtained in the case of magnetized plates are not competitive, the constraints on an axion-neutron coupling found for plates with polarized nuclear spins are of the same order of magnitude as those obtained previously for the GUT axions alone using the process of two-axion exchange. The proposed experiment allows us also to strengthen the presently known constraints on the axion-neutron coupling constants of GUT axions by using both processes of one- and two-axion exchange.

  11. Radial phononic thermal conductance in thin membranes in the Casimir limit: Design guidelines for devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puurtinen, T. A.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In a previous publication [I. J. Maasilta, AIP Advances 1, 041704 (2011)], we discussed the formalism and some computational results for phononic thermal conduction in the suspended membrane geometry for radial heat flow from a central source, which is a common geometry for some low-temperature detectors, for example. We studied the case where only diffusive surface scattering is present, the so called Casimir limit, which can be experimentally relevant at temperatures below ˜ 10 K in typical materials, and even higher for ultrathin samples. Here, we extend our studies to much thinner membranes, obtaining numerical results for geometries which are more typical in experiments. In addition, we interpret the results in terms of the small signal and differential thermal conductance, so that guidelines for designing devices, such as low-temperature bolometric detectors, are more easily obtained. Scaling with membrane dimensions is shown to differ significantly from the bulk scattering, and, in particular, thinning the membrane is shown to lead to a much stronger reduction in thermal conductance than what one would envision from the simplest bulk formulas.

  12. Casimir scaling and hadronic flux tube in the dual Ginzburg-Landau theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koma, Yoshiaki

    2001-10-01

    The string tensions of flux tubes associated with static charges in various SU(3) representations are studied within the dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory. The ratios of the string tensions between higher and fundamental representations, dD ≡ σ_D/σ_F, are found to depend only on the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter, κ = m_\\chi/m_B, the mass ratio between monopoles m_\\chi and dual gauge bosons m_B. In the case of the Bogomol'nyi limit (κ=1), analytical values of dD are easily obtained by adopting the manifestly Weyl invariant formulation of the DGL theory, which are provided simply by the number of color-electric Dirac strings inside the flux tube. A numerical investigation of the ratio for various GL-parameter cases is also performed, which suggests that the Casimir scaling is obtained in the type-II parameter range within the interval κ=5 ~ 9 for various ratios d_D. [Y. Koma et al., Phys. Rev. D 64 (2001) 011501 (R)

  13. Critical Casimir interactions and colloidal self-assembly in near-critical solvents.

    PubMed

    Tasios, Nikos; Edison, John R; van Roij, René; Evans, Robert; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-28

    A binary solvent mixture close to critical demixing experiences fluctuations whose correlation length, ξ, diverges as the critical point is approached. The solvent-mediated (SM) interaction that arises between a pair of colloids immersed in such a near-critical solvent can be long-ranged and this so-called critical Casimir interaction is well-studied. How a (dense) suspension of colloids will self-assemble under these conditions is poorly understood. Using a two-dimensional lattice model for the solvent and hard disks to represent the colloids, we perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the phase behaviour of this model colloidal suspension as a function of colloid size and wettability under conditions where the solvent reservoir is supercritical. Unlike most other approaches, where the solvent is modelled as an implicit background, our model employs an explicit solvent and treats the suspension as a ternary mixture. This enables us to capture important features, including the pronounced fractionation of the solvent in the coexisting colloidal phases, of this complex system. We also present results for the partial structure factors; these shed light on the critical behaviour in the ternary mixture. The degree to which an effective two-body pair potential description can describe the phase behaviour and structure of the colloidal suspension is discussed briefly. PMID:27586941

  14. Impact of the Casimir-Polder potential and Johnson noise on Bose-Einstein condensate stability near surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-ju; Teper, Igor; Chin, Cheng; Vuletić, Vladan

    2004-02-01

    We investigate the stability of magnetically trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and thermal clouds near the transition temperature at small distances 0.5 microm< or =d< or =10 microm from a microfabricated silicon chip. For a 2 microm thick copper film, the trap lifetime is limited by Johnson noise induced currents and falls below 1 s at a distance of 4 microm. A dielectric surface does not adversely affect the sample until the attractive Casimir-Polder potential significantly reduces the trap depth.

  15. Local and nonlocal advected invariants and helicities in magnetohydrodynamics and gas dynamics: II. Noether's theorems and Casimirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Dasgupta, B.; McKenzie, J. F.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    Conservation laws in ideal gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) associated with fluid relabeling symmetries are derived using Noether's first and second theorems. Lie dragged invariants are discussed in terms of the MHD Casimirs. A nonlocal conservation law for fluid helicity applicable for a non-barotropic fluid involving Clebsch variables is derived using Noether's theorem, in conjunction with a fluid relabeling symmetry and a gauge transformation. A nonlocal cross helicity conservation law involving Clebsch potentials, and the MHD energy conservation law are derived by the same method. An Euler-Poincaré variational approach is also used to derive conservation laws associated with fluid relabeling symmetries using Noether's second theorem.

  16. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  17. Retardation (Casimir) energy shifts for Rydberg helium-like low-Z ions: An exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babb, James F.; Habs, Dietrich; Spruch, Larry; Wolf, Andreas

    1992-09-01

    The development of storage rings and electromagnetic traps for heavy charged particles is opening up new regimes of atomic physics, including, in particular, spectroscopic studies of Rydberg helium-like ions — with nuclear charge Z, one electron in the 1 s state, and one electron in a near-hydrogenic state of high n and l < n, with n and l the principal and orbital quantum numbers, respectively. We consider the possibility of detecting energy shifts due to retardation, Δ E ret ( n, l), Casimir-like effects. These are quantum electrodynamic (QED) retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. (As opposed to basically kinematic and dynamic QED effects for small quantum numbers n and l, the appropriate expansion parameter for n and l large for retardation QED corrections is not Z( e 2/ħ c) but [( Z - 1)/ n 2 Z 2](ħ c/e 2).) We wish to provide some orientation to those planning experiments in the area, with regard to the choices of n, l, and Z most likely to be able to generate a high-precision confirmation of a retarded interaction. To do so, we provide extensive tables of estimates, for 1 s, nl states, of Δ E ret( n, l), of radiative widths, and of E, the spin-independent (“electric” fine structure) energy in the absence of retardation shifts, for (nuclear spin zero) ions with Z=2, 6, 8, 16 and 20. These ions might be experimentally accessible in storage rings, and the Z's are low enough that virtual pair production effects may not yet be significant. There is also a brief survey of possible experimental techniques.

  18. The Casimir Effect from the Point of View of Algebraic Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio; Nosari, Gabriele; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    We consider a region of Minkowski spacetime bounded either by one or by two parallel, infinitely extended plates orthogonal to a spatial direction and a real Klein-Gordon field satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions. We quantize these two systems within the algebraic approach to quantum field theory using the so-called functional formalism. As a first step we construct a suitable unital ∗-algebra of observables whose generating functionals are characterized by a labelling space which is at the same time optimal and separating and fulfils the F-locality property. Subsequently we give a definition for these systems of Hadamard states and we investigate explicit examples. In the case of a single plate, it turns out that one can build algebraic states via a pull-back of those on the whole Minkowski spacetime, moreover inheriting from them the Hadamard property. When we consider instead two plates, algebraic states can be put in correspondence with those on flat spacetime via the so-called method of images, which we translate to the algebraic setting. For a massless scalar field we show that this procedure works perfectly for a large class of quasi-free states including the Poincaré vacuum and KMS states. Eventually Wick polynomials are introduced. Contrary to the Minkowski case, the extended algebras, built in globally hyperbolic subregions can be collected in a global counterpart only after a suitable deformation which is expressed locally in terms of a *-isomorphism. As a last step, we construct explicitly the two-point function and the regularized energy density, showing, moreover, that the outcome is consistent with the standard results of the Casimir effect.

  19. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  20. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces

    PubMed Central

    Munday, J. N.; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies1–3. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces4. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz5–7, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies8–11. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction12, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction13–15. PMID:19129843

  1. Nonequilibrium forces between neutral atoms mediated by a quantum field

    SciTech Connect

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2010-08-15

    We study forces between two neutral atoms, modeled as three-dimensional harmonic oscillators, arising from mutual influences mediated by an electromagnetic field but not from their direct interactions. We allow as dynamical variables the center-of-mass motion of the atom, its internal degrees of freedom, and the quantum field treated relativistically. We adopt the method of nonequilibrium quantum field theory which can provide a first-principles, systematic, and unified description including the intrinsic and induced dipole fluctuations. The inclusion of self-consistent back-actions makes possible a fully dynamical description of these forces valid for general atom motion. In thermal equilibrium we recover the known forces--London, van der Waals, and Casimir-Polder--between neutral atoms in the long-time limit. We also reproduce a recently reported force between atoms when the system is out of thermal equilibrium at late times. More noteworthy is the discovery of the existence of a type of (or identification of the source of some known) interatomic force which we call the ''entanglement force,'' originating from the quantum correlations of the internal degrees of freedom of entangled atoms.

  2. Vertical electrostatic force in MEMS cantilever IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezadad, Imen; Boroumand Azad, Javaneh; Smith, Evan M.; Alhasan, Ammar; Peale, Robert E.

    2014-06-01

    A MEMS cantilever IR detector that repetitively lifts from the surface under the influence of a saw-tooth electrostatic force, where the contact duty cycle is a measure of the absorbed IR radiation, is analyzed. The design is comprised of three parallel conducting plates. Fixed buried and surface plates are held at opposite potential. A moveable cantilever is biased the same as the surface plate. Calculations based on energy methods with position-dependent capacity and electrostatic induction coefficients demonstrate the upward sign of the force on the cantilever and determine the force magnitude. 2D finite element method calculations of the local fields confirm the sign of the force and determine its distribution across the cantilever. The upward force is maximized when the surface plate is slightly larger than the other two. The electrostatic repulsion is compared with Casimir sticking force to determine the maximum useful contact area. MEMS devices were fabricated and the vertical displacement of the cantilever was observed in a number of experiments. The approach may be applied also to MEMS actuators and micromirrors.

  3. A Scheme for Solving the Plane-Plane Challenge in Force Measurements at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siria, Alessandro; Huant, Serge; Auvert, Geoffroy; Comin, Fabio; Chevrier, Joel

    2010-08-01

    Non-contact interaction between two parallel flat surfaces is a central paradigm in sciences. This situation is the starting point for a wealth of different models: the capacitor description in electrostatics, hydrodynamic flow, thermal exchange, the Casimir force, direct contact study, third body confinement such as liquids or films of soft condensed matter. The control of parallelism is so demanding that no versatile single force machine in this geometry has been proposed so far. Using a combination of nanopositioning based on inertial motors, of microcrystal shaping with a focused-ion beam (FIB) and of accurate in situ and real-time control of surface parallelism with X-ray diffraction, we propose here a “gedanken” surface-force machine that should enable one to measure interactions between movable surfaces separated by gaps in the micrometer and nanometer ranges.

  4. A scheme for solving the plane-plane challenge in force measurements at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Huant, Serge; Auvert, Geoffroy; Comin, Fabio; Chevrier, Joel

    2010-05-19

    Non-contact interaction between two parallel flat surfaces is a central paradigm in sciences. This situation is the starting point for a wealth of different models: the capacitor description in electrostatics, hydrodynamic flow, thermal exchange, the Casimir force, direct contact study, third body confinement such as liquids or films of soft condensed matter. The control of parallelism is so demanding that no versatile single force machine in this geometry has been proposed so far. Using a combination of nanopositioning based on inertial motors, of microcrystal shaping with a focused-ion beam (FIB) and of accurate in situ and real-time control of surface parallelism with X-ray diffraction, we propose here a "gedanken" surface-force machine that should enable one to measure interactions between movable surfaces separated by gaps in the micrometer and nanometer ranges.

  5. Snap-through buckling of initially curved microbeam subject to an electrostatic force

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.; Meguid, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the snap-through buckling of an initially curved microbeam subject to an electrostatic force, accounting for fringing field effect, is investigated. The general governing equations of the curved microbeam are developed using Euler–Bernoulli beam theory and used to develop a new criterion for the snap-through buckling of that beam. The size effect of the microbeam is accounted for using the modified couple stress theory, and intermolecular effects, such as van der Waals and Casimir forces, are also included in our snap-through formulations. The snap-through governing equations are solved using Galerkin decomposition of the deflection. The results of our work enable us to carefully characterize the snap-through behaviour of the initially curved microbeam. They further reveal the significant effect of the beam size, and to a much lesser extent, the effect of fringing field and intermolecular forces, upon the snap-through criterion for the curved beam. PMID:27547104

  6. One Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald R.

    2002-04-01

    There is only one entity that can extend force and couple through space; and it should be apparent that Electromagnetism is that entity. In the cases of the nuclear strong force and the nuclear weak force, this is the same fundamental Electromagnetism manifesting itself in two different ways in the nucleus. It remains the same basic Electromagnetism. On the other hand, General Relativity fails to produce force at a distance, fails the Cavendish experiment, and does not allow an apple to fall to the ground. The result shows there is only Electromagnetism that functions through physical nature providing gravity, actions in the nucleus, as well as all other physical actions universally, including Gravity and Gravitation. There are many direct proofs of this, the same proofs as in NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. In contrast, General Relativity plainly relies on fallacy abstract and incoherent proofs; proofs which have now been mostly disproved. In the past it was deemed necessary by some to have an "ether" to propagate Electromagnetic waves. The fallacy concept of time space needs "space distortions" in order to cause gravity. However, Electromagnetic gravity does not have this problem. Clearly there is only ONE FORCE that causes Gravity, Electromagnetism, the Nuclear Strong Force, and the Nuclear Weak Force, and that ONE FORCE is Electromagnetism.

  7. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  8. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  9. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  10. Anisotropic contribution to the van der Waals and the Casimir-Polder energies for CO2 and CH4 molecules near surfaces and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyam, Priyadarshini; Parashar, Prachi; Shajesh, K. V.; Persson, Clas; Schaden, Martin; Brevik, Iver; Parsons, Drew F.; Milton, Kimball A.; Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Boström, Mathias

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand why carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) molecules interact differently with surfaces, we investigate the Casimir-Polder energy of a linearly polarizable CO2 molecule and an isotropically polarizable CH4 molecule in front of an atomically thin gold film and an amorphous silica slab. We quantitatively analyze how the anisotropy in the polarizability of the molecule influences the van der Waals contribution to the binding energy of the molecule.

  11. Improved finite-difference computation of the van der Waals force: One-dimensional case

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2009-10-15

    We present an improved demonstration of the calculation of Casimir forces in one-dimensional systems based on the recently proposed numerical imaginary frequency Green's function computation approach. The dispersion force on two thick lossy dielectric slabs separated by an empty gap and placed within a perfectly conducting cavity is obtained from the Green's function of the modified Helmholtz equation by means of an ordinary finite-difference method. In order to demonstrate the possibility to develop algorithms to explore complex geometries in two and three dimensions to higher order in the mesh spacing, we generalize existing classical electromagnetism algebraic methods to generate the difference equations for dielectric boundaries not coinciding with any grid points. Diagnostic tests are presented to monitor the accuracy of our implementation of the method and follow-up applications in higher dimensions are introduced.

  12. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  13. Strategic forces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Air Force now plans to retain the Minuteman II and III missile force through fiscal year 2008. Introduced about 25 years ago, these missiles have served as a nuclear deterrence for longer than initially envisioned. Over the extended lives of the systems, questions have arisen over their continued reliability and operational effectiveness, particularly the Minuteman II system. Limited flight testing, due to a shortage of test missiles, and reduced reliability caused by age-related deterioration of guidance computers and propulsion motors are two factors undermining confidence in the Minuteman II. GAO believes that the Minuteman II could be retired before 1998 as presently contemplated under an assumption of a Strategic Arms Reduction Talks agreement. An alternative would be to reinstate the Air Force's plans to replace deteriorated missile components and acquire the assets needed to resume flight testing at rates necessary to restore and sustain confidence in the system's performance through fiscal year 2008. However, on the basis of current test schedules, GAO is concerned that components to test the missile's warheads will be depleted by about 1999.

  14. The thermal near-field: Coherence, spectroscopy, heat-transfer, and optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew C.; O'Callahan, Brian T.; Yang, Honghua U.; Raschke, Markus B.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most universal physical processes shared by all matter at finite temperature is the emission of thermal radiation. The experimental characterization and theoretical description of far-field black-body radiation was a cornerstone in the development of modern physics with the groundbreaking contributions from Gustav Kirchhoff and Max Planck. With its origin in thermally driven fluctuations of the charge carriers, thermal radiation reflects the resonant and non-resonant dielectric properties of media, which is the basis for far-field thermal emission spectroscopy. However, associated with the underlying fluctuating optical source polarization are fundamentally distinct spectral, spatial, resonant, and coherence properties of the evanescent thermal near-field. These properties have been recently predicted theoretically and characterized experimentally for systems with thermally excited molecular, surface plasmon polariton (SPP), and surface phonon polariton (SPhP) resonances. We review, starting with the early historical developments, the emergence of theoretical models, and the description of the thermal near-field based on the fluctuation-dissipation theory and in terms of the electromagnetic local density of states (EM-LDOS). We discuss the optical and spectroscopic characterization of distance dependence, magnitude, spectral distribution, and coherence of evanescent thermal fields. Scattering scanning near-field microscopy proved instrumental as an enabling technique for the investigations of several of these fundamental thermal near-field properties. We then discuss the role of thermal fields in nano-scale heat transfer and optical forces, and the correlation to the van der Waals, Casimir, and Casimir-Polder forces. We conclude with an outlook on the possibility of intrinsic and extrinsic resonant manipulation of optical forces, control of nano-scale radiative heat transfer with optical antennas and metamaterials, and the use of thermal infrared near

  15. Rotating Casimir systems: Magnetic-field-enhanced perpetual motion, possible realization in doped nanotubes, and laws of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that for a certain class of Casimir-type systems (“devices”) the energy of zero-point vacuum fluctuations reaches its global minimum when the device rotates about a certain axis rather than remains static. This rotational vacuum effect may lead to the emergence of permanently rotating objects provided the negative rotational energy of zero-point fluctuations cancels the positive rotational energy of the device itself. In this paper, we show that for massless electrically charged particles the rotational vacuum effect should be drastically (astronomically) enhanced in the presence of a magnetic field. As an illustration, we show that in a background of experimentally available magnetic fields the zero-point energy of massless excitations in rotating torus-shaped doped carbon nanotubes may indeed overwhelm the classical energy of rotation for certain angular frequencies so that the permanently rotating state is energetically favored. The suggested “zero-point-driven” devices—which have no internally moving parts—correspond to a perpetuum mobile of a new, fourth kind: They do not produce any work despite the fact that their equilibrium (ground) state corresponds to a permanent rotation even in the presence of an external environment. We show that our proposal is consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  16. Theory of light scattering at nanoparticles and optical forces between small particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Juan Jose

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with ``optical tweezers'' as well as to induce significant ``optical binding'' forces between particles. Here we review some basic concepts related to the optical forces on small (subwavelength) particles, focusing on the interplay between scattering asymmetry and momentum transfer. These forces are, in general, non-conservative (curl forces) which lead to a number of intriguing predictions regarding the dynamics of nanoparticles. Optical forces between small particles are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. As we will see, artificially created random fluctuating light fields can be used to induce and control dispersion forces between small colloidal particles. Interestingly, for relatively high refractive index semiconductor nanoparticles, the interactions can be tuned from attractive to strongly repulsive when the frequency of the external fluctuating field is tuned near the first magnetic Mie-resonance. Interactions induced by randomly fluctuating light fields open a path towards the control of translational invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  17. Wightman function and scalar Casimir densities for a wedge with two cylindrical boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Saharian, A.A. Tarloyan, A.S.

    2008-07-15

    Wightman function, the vacuum expectation values of the field square and the energy-momentum tensor are investigated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter inside a wedge with two coaxial cylindrical boundaries. It is assumed that the field obeys Dirichlet boundary condition on bounding surfaces. The application of a variant of the generalized Abel-Plana formula enables to extract from the expectation values the contribution corresponding to the geometry of a wedge with a single shell and to present the interference part in terms of exponentially convergent integrals. The local properties of the vacuum are investigated in various asymptotic regions of the parameters. The vacuum forces acting on the boundaries are presented as the sum of self-action and interaction terms. It is shown that the interaction forces between the separate parts of the boundary are always attractive. The generalization to the case of a scalar field with Neumann boundary condition is discussed.

  18. Casimir interaction of rodlike particles in a two-dimensional critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenriegler, E.; Burkhardt, T. W.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the fluctuation-induced interaction of two thin, rodlike particles, or "needles," immersed in a two-dimensional critical fluid of Ising symmetry right at the critical point. Conformally mapping the plane containing the needles onto a simpler geometry in which the stress tensor is known, we analyze the force and torque between needles of arbitrary length, separation, and orientation. For infinite and semi-infinite needles we utilize the mapping of the plane bounded by the needles onto the half plane, and for two needles of finite length we use the mapping onto an annulus. For semi-infinite and infinite needles the force is expressed in terms of elementary functions, and we also obtain analytical results for the force and torque between needles of finite length with separation much greater than their length. Evaluating formulas in our approach numerically for several needle geometries and surface universality classes, we study the full crossover from small to large values of the separation to length ratio. In these two limits the numerical results agree with results for infinitely long needles and with predictions of the small-particle operator expansion, respectively.

  19. A note on the history of experimental and theoretical research into molecular attractive forces between solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilova, N. P.

    2015-09-01

    From the Editorial Board. In a brief followup to the talk by E I Kats on "Van der Waals, Casimir, and Lifshitz forces in soft matter" (see pp. 892 - 896 of this issue) at the E M Lifshitz centennial session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, an interesting and instructive story was told by Nina Petrovna Danilova (Department of Low Temperature Physics and Superconductivity, Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University) of how E M Lifshitz was enlisted to explain I I Abrikosova's and B V Derjaguin's experimental results. The Editorial Board of Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (UFN) [Physics-Uspekhi] journal found the story appropriate to be published in the "Letters to the Editor" section of UFN in a jubilee selection of works marking the centennial of E M Lifshitz' birth.

  20. Dynamical Casimir effect for TE and TM modes in a resonant cavity bisected by a plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, W.; Matsuki, S.; Kido, Y.; Nishimura, T.

    2009-10-15

    Parametric photon creation via the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) is evaluated numerically, in a three-dimensional rectangular resonant cavity bisected by a semiconductor diaphragm (SD), which is irradiated by a pulsed laser with frequency of GHz order. The aim of this paper is to determine some of the optimum conditions required to detect DCE photons relevant to an experimental detection system. We expand upon the thin plasma sheet model [M. Crocce et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 033811 (2004)] to estimate the number of photons for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes at any given SD position. Numerical calculations are performed considering up to 51 intermode couplings by varying the SD location, driving period and laser power without any perturbations. It is found that the number of photons created for TE modes strongly depends on SD position, where the strongest enhancement occurs at the midpoint (not near the cavity wall); while TM modes have weak dependence on SD position. Another important finding is the fact that significant photon production for TM{sub 111} modes still takes place at the midpoint even for a low-laser power of 0.01 {mu}J/pulse, although the number of TE{sub 111} photons decreases almost proportionately with laser power. We also find a relatively wide tuning range for both TE and TM modes that is correlated with the frequency variation in the instantaneous mode functions caused by the interaction between the cavity photons and conduction electrons in the SD excited by a pulsed laser.

  1. Stueckelberg massive electromagnetism in curved spacetime: Hadamard renormalization of the stress-energy tensor and the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokogne, Andrei; Folacci, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    We discuss Stueckelberg massive electromagnetism on an arbitrary four-dimensional curved spacetime and, in particular, (i) the gauge invariance of the classical theory and its covariant quantization; (ii) the wave equations for the massive spin-1 field Aμ , for the auxiliary Stueckelberg scalar field Φ and for the ghost fields C and C*; (iii) Ward identities; (iv) the Hadamard representation of the various Feynman propagators and the covariant Taylor series expansions of the corresponding coefficients. This permits us to construct, for a Hadamard quantum state, the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor associated with the Stueckelberg theory. We provide two alternative but equivalent expressions for this result. The first one is obtained by removing the contribution of the "Stueckelberg ghost" Φ and only involves state-dependent and geometrical quantities associated with the massive vector field Aμ. The other one involves contributions coming from both the massive vector field and the auxiliary Stueckelberg scalar field, and it has been constructed in such a way that, in the zero-mass limit, the massive vector field contribution reduces smoothly to the result obtained from Maxwell's theory. As an application of our results, we consider the Casimir effect outside a perfectly conducting medium with a plane boundary. We discuss the results obtained using Stueckelberg but also de Broglie-Proca electromagnetism, and we consider the zero-mass limit of the vacuum energy in both theories. We finally compare the de Broglie-Proca and Stueckelberg formalisms and highlight the advantages of the Stueckelberg point of view, even if, in our opinion, the de Broglie-Proca and Stueckelberg approaches of massive electromagnetism are two faces of the same field theory.

  2. First analytic correction beyond the proximity force approximation in the Casimir effect for the electromagnetic field in sphere-plane geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordag, M.; Nikolaev, V.

    2010-03-01

    We consider the vacuum energy for a configuration of a sphere in front of a plane, both obeying the conductor boundary condition, at small separation. For the separation becoming small we derive the first next-to-leading order of the asymptotic expansion in the separation-to-radius ratio ɛ. This correction is of order ɛ. Opposite to the scalar cases it contains also contributions proportional to logarithms in first and second order, ɛln⁡ɛ and ɛ(ln⁡ɛ)2. We compare this result with the available findings of numerical and experimental approaches.

  3. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ν 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength λ) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to λ2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ν 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ν 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further

  4. Self-bridging of vertical silicon nanowires and a universal capacitive force model for spontaneous attraction in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhelin; Wang, Deli; Xiang, Jie

    2014-11-25

    Spontaneous attractions between free-standing nanostructures have often caused adhesion or stiction that affects a wide range of nanoscale devices, particularly nano/microelectromechanical systems. Previous understandings of the attraction mechanisms have included capillary force, van der Waals/Casimir forces, and surface polar charges. However, none of these mechanisms universally applies to simple semiconductor structures such as silicon nanowire arrays that often exhibit bunching or adhesions. Here we propose a simple capacitive force model to quantitatively study the universal spontaneous attraction that often causes stiction among semiconductor or metallic nanostructures such as vertical nanowire arrays with inevitably nonuniform size variations due to fabrication. When nanostructures are uniform in size, they share the same substrate potential. The presence of slight size differences will break the symmetry in the capacitive network formed between the nanowires, substrate, and their environment, giving rise to electrostatic attraction forces due to the relative potential difference between neighboring wires. Our model is experimentally verified using arrays of vertical silicon nanowire pairs with varied spacing, diameter, and size differences. Threshold nanowire spacing, diameter, or size difference between the nearest neighbors has been identified beyond which the nanowires start to exhibit spontaneous attraction that leads to bridging when electrostatic forces overcome elastic restoration forces. This work illustrates a universal understanding of spontaneous attraction that will impact the design, fabrication, and reliable operation of nanoscale devices and systems.

  5. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  6. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  7. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  8. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  9. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness. PMID:25514470

  10. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  11. Microprocessor controlled force actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, D. C.; Inman, D. J.; Horner, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical design of a prototype force actuator for vibration control of large space structures (LSS) is described. The force actuator is an electromagnetic system that produces a force by reacting against a proof-mass. The actuator has two colocated sensors, a digital microcontroller, and a power amplifier. The total weight of actuator is .998 kg. The actuator has a steady state force output of approximately 2.75 N from approximately 2 Hz to well beyond 1000 Hz.

  12. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  13. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  14. Turkish Students' Force Meanings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menekse, Muhsin; Clark, Douglas B.; Ozdemir, Gokhan; D'angelo, Cynthia; Scheligh, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    What are Turkish pre, elementary, middle, and high school students' force ideas? And, how do Turkish students' non-normative force ideas differ or be similar to the well-known force misconceptions reported in the literature? Students have false and persistent beliefs about the physical world and they struggle with challenging misconceptions based…

  15. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  16. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  17. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such

  18. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  19. Entropic force between biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Song, Fan

    2016-08-01

    Undulation force, an entropic force, stems from thermally excited fluctuations, and plays a key role in the essential interactions between neighboring surfaces of objects. Although the characteristics of the undulation force have been widely studied theoretically and experimentally, the distance dependence of the force, which constitutes its most fundamental characteristic, remains poorly understood. In this paper, first, we obtain a novel expression for the undulation force by employing elasticity and statistical mechanics and prove it to be in good agreement with existing experimental results. Second, we clearly demonstrate that the two representative forms of the undulation force proposed by Helfrich and Freund were respectively the upper and lower bounds of the present expression when the separation between membranes is sufficiently small, which was intrinsically different from the existing results where Helfrich's and Freund's forms of the undulation force were only suitable for the intermediate and small separations. The investigations show that only in a sufficiently small separation does Helfrich's result stand for the undulation force with a large wave number and Freund's result express the force with a small wave number. Finally, a critical acting distance of the undulation force, beyond which the entropic force will rapidly decay approaching zero, is presented.

  20. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  1. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  2. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  3. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  4. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tower

    2010-05-15

    Motivated by Verlinde's theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb's law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb's law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  5. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tower

    2010-05-01

    Motivated by Verlinde’s theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb’s law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb’s law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  6. Quantum Fictitious Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Białynicki-Birula, I.; Cirone, M. A.; Dahl, J. P.; Seligman, T. H.; Straub, F.; Schleich, W. P.

    2003-09-01

    We present Heisenberg's equation of motion for the radial variable of a free non-relativistic particle in D dimensions. The resulting radial force consists of three contributions: (i) the quantum fictitious force which is either attractive or repulsive depending on the number of dimensions, (ii) a singular quantum force located at the origin, and (iii) the centrifugal force associated with non-vanishing angular momentum. Moreover, we use Heisenberg's uncertainty relation to introduce a lower bound for the kinetic energy of an ensemble of neutral particles. This bound is quadratic in the number of atoms and can be traced back to the repulsive quantum fictitious potential. All three forces arise for a free particle: “Force without force”.

  7. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  8. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-11-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force.1-8 Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without unleashing the usual mathematical apparatus, which we believe is more of a hindrance than a help.

  9. Electrodynamic force law controversy.

    PubMed

    Graneau, P; Graneau, N

    2001-05-01

    Cavalleri et al. [Phys. Rev. E 52, 2505 (1998); Eur. J. Phys. 17, 205 (1996)] have attempted to resolve the electrodynamic force law controversy. This attempt to prove the validity of either the Ampère or Lorentz force law by theory and experiment has revealed only that the two are equivalent when predicting the force on part of a circuit due to the current in the complete circuit. However, in our analysis of internal stresses, only Ampère's force law agrees with experiment. PMID:11415053

  10. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  11. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  12. Polarizable force fields.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Salonen, Emppu

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the most common methods for including an explicit description of electronic polarization in molecular mechanics force fields: the induced point dipole, shell, and fluctuating charge models. The importance of including polarization effects in biomolecular simulations is discussed, and some of the most important achievements in the development of polarizable biomolecular force fields to date are highlighted.

  13. Forces in yeast flocculation.

    PubMed

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2015-02-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion ("flocculation") is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  14. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  15. Force Concept Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestenes, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reports the rationale, design, validation, and uses of the "Force Concept Inventory," an instrument to assess the students' beliefs on force. Includes results and implications of two studies that compared the inventory with the "Mechanics Baseline." Includes a copy of the instrument. (MDH)

  16. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang,Shuaiqi; Zhang,Yunyan; Zhang,Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  17. Lorentz force velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Thess, A; Votyakov, E V; Kolesnikov, Y

    2006-04-28

    We describe a noncontact technique for velocity measurement in electrically conducting fluids. The technique, which we term Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV), is based on exposing the fluid to a magnetic field and measuring the drag force acting upon the magnetic field lines. Two series of measurements are reported, one in which the force is determined through the angular velocity of a rotary magnet system and one in which the force on a fixed magnet system is measured directly. Both experiments confirm that the measured signal is a linear function of the flow velocity. We then derive the scaling law that relates the force on a localized distribution of magnetized material to the velocity of an electrically conducting fluid. This law shows that LFV, if properly designed, has a wide range of potential applications in metallurgy, semiconductor crystal growth, and glass manufacturing. PMID:16712237

  18. Conservative entropic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2011-10-01

    Entropic forces have recently attracted considerable attention as ways to reformulate, retrodict, and perhaps even "explain" classical Newtonian gravity from a rather specific thermodynamic perspective. In this article I point out that if one wishes to reformulate classical Newtonian gravity in terms of an entropic force, then the fact that Newtonian gravity is described by a conservative force places significant constraints on the form of the entropy and temperature functions. (These constraints also apply to entropic reinterpretations of electromagnetism, and indeed to any conservative force derivable from a potential.) The constraints I will establish are sufficient to present real and significant problems for any reasonable variant of Verlinde's entropic gravity proposal, though for technical reasons the constraints established herein do not directly impact on either Jacobson'sor Padmanabhan's versions of entropic gravity. In an attempt to resolve these issues, I will extend the usual notion of entropic force to multiple heat baths with multiple "temperatures" and multiple "entropies".

  19. Traceable periodic force calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Ch; Kieckenap, G.; Glöckner, B.; Buß, A.; Kumme, R.

    2012-06-01

    A procedure for dynamic force calibration using sinusoidal excitations of force transducers is described. The method is based on a sinusoidal excitation of force transducers equipped with an additional top mass excited with an electrodynamic shaker system. The acting dynamic force can in this way be determined according to Newton's law as mass times acceleration, whereby the acceleration is measured on the surface of the top mass with the aid of laser interferometers. The dynamic sensitivity, which is the ratio of the electrical output signal of the force transducer and the acting dynamic force, is the main point of interest of such a dynamic calibration. In addition to the sensitivity, the parameter stiffness and damping of the transducer can also be determined. The first part of the paper outlines a mathematical model to describe the dynamic behaviour of a transducer. This is followed by a presentation of the traceability of the measured quantities involved and their uncertainties. The paper finishes with an example calibration of a 25 kN strain gauge force transducer.

  20. Turbomachinery rotor forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Norbert

    1988-01-01

    The fluid-induced forces, both steady and unsteady, acting upon an impeller of a centrifugal pump, and impeller blade-diffuser vane interaction in centrifugal pumps with vaned radial diffusers were evaluated experimentally and theoretically. Knowledge of the steady and unsteady forces, and the associated rotordynamic coefficients are required to effectively model the rotor dynamics of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). These forces and rotordynamic coefficients were investigated using different impellers in combination with volutes and vaned diffusers, and axial inducers. These rotor forces are global. Local forces and pressures are also important in impeller-diffuser interaction, for they may cause cavitation damage and even vane failures. Thus, in a separate investigation, impeller wake, and impeller blade and diffuser vane pressure measurements were made. The nature of the rotordynamic forces is discussed, the experimental facility is described, and the measurements of unsteady forces and pressure are reported together with a brief and incomplete attempt to calculate these flows.

  1. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  2. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  3. Dilatonic Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.

    2011-08-01

    We show in detail that the entropic force of the static spherically symmetric spacetimes with unusual asymptotics can be calculated through the Verlinde's arguments. We introduce three different holographic screen candidates, which are first employed thoroughly by Myung and Kim [Phys. Rev. D 81, 105012 (2010)] for Schwarzschild black hole solutions, in order to identify the entropic force arising between a charged dilaton black hole and a test particle. The significance of the dilaton parameter on the entropic force is highlighted, and shown graphically.

  4. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  5. Forces in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity to give students experience with the variables and forces impacting a moving body on an inclined plane by observing a ball as it rolls down an inclined PVC pipe of fixed length. Includes a student worksheet. (MKR)

  6. Metamaterials enhancing optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginis, Vincent; Tassin, Philippe; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Veretennicoff, Irina

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between light and matter involves not only an energy transfer, but also the transfer of linear momentum. In everyday life applications this linear momentum of light is too small to play any significant role. However, in nanoscale dimensions, the associated optical forces start to play an increasingly important role. These forces are, e.g., large enough for exiting experiments in the fields of cavity-optomechanics, laser cooling and optical trapping of small particles. Recently, it has been suggested that optical gradient forces can also be employed for all-optical actuation in micro- and nanophotonic systems. The typical setup consists of two slab waveguides positioned in each others vicinity such that they are coupled through the interaction of the evanescent tails. Although the gradient forces between these waveguides can be enhanced considerably using electromagnetic resonators or slow-light techniques, the resulting displacements remain relatively small. In this contribution, we present an alternative approach to enhance optical gradient forces between waveguides using a combination of transformation optics and metamaterials. Our design starts from the observation that gradient forces exponentially decay with the separation distance between the waveguides. Therefore, we employ transformation optics to annihilate the apparent distance for light between the waveguides. Analytical calculations confirm that the resulting forces indeed increase when such an annihilating cladding is inserted. Subsequently, we discuss the metamaterial implementation of this annihilating medium. Such lensing media automatically translate into anisotropic metamaterials with negative components in the permittivity and permeability tensors. Our full-wave numerical simulations show that the overall amplification is highly limited by the loss-tangent of the metamaterial cladding. However, as this cladding only needs to operate in the near-field for a specific polarization

  7. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  8. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  9. Optical ``Bernoulli'' forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassagh, Ramis; Johnson, Steven

    2015-03-01

    By Bernoulli's law, an increase in the relative speed of a fluid around a body is accompanies by a decrease in the pressure. Therefore, a rotating body in a fluid stream experiences a force perpendicular to the motion of the fluid because of the unequal relative speed of the fluid across its surface. It is well known that light has a constant speed irrespective of the relative motion. Does a rotating body immersed in a stream of photons experience a Bernoulli-like force? We show that, indeed, a rotating dielectric cylinder experiences such a lateral force from an electromagnetic wave. In fact, the sign of the lateral force is the same as that of the fluid-mechanical analogue as long as the electric susceptibility is positive (ɛ >ɛ0), but for negative-susceptibility materials (e.g. metals) we show that the lateral force is in the opposite direction. Because these results are derived from a classical electromagnetic scattering problem, Mie-resonance enhancements that occur in other scattering phenomena also enhance the lateral force. [This talk is based on Phys. Rev. A 88, 023829 (2013).] Supported in part by the U.S. Army Research Office under contract W911NF-13-D-0001.

  10. The Missing Climate Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Lacis, A.; Ruedy, R.

    1997-02-01

    Observed climate change is consistent with radiative forcings on several time scales for which the dominant forcings are known, ranging from the few years after a large volcanic eruption to glacial-to-interglacial changes. In the period with most detailed data, 1979 to the present, climate observations contain clear signatures of both natural and anthropogenic forcings. But in the full period since the industrial revolution began, global warming is only about half of that expected due to the principal forcing, increasing greenhouse gases. The direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols contributes only little towards resolving this discrepancy. Unforced climate variability is an unlikely explanation. We argue on the basis of several lines of indirect evidence that aerosol effects on clouds have caused a large negative forcing, at least -1 Wm-2, which has substantially offset greenhouse warming. The tasks of observing this forcing and determining the microphysical mechanisms at its basis are exceptionally difficult, but they are essential for the prognosis of future climate change.

  11. Van der Waals Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2006-03-01

    This should prove to be the definitive work explaining van der Waals forces, how to calculate them and take account of their impact under any circumstances and conditions. These weak intermolecular forces are of truly pervasive impact, and biologists, chemists, physicists and engineers will profit greatly from the thorough grounding in these fundamental forces that this book offers. Parsegian has organized his book at three successive levels of mathematical sophistication, to satisfy the needs and interests of readers at all levels of preparation. The Prelude and Level 1 are intended to give everyone an overview in words and pictures of the modern theory of van der Waals forces. Level 2 gives the formulae and a wide range of algorithms to let readers compute the van der Waals forces under virtually any physical or physiological conditions. Level 3 offers a rigorous basic formulation of the theory. Author is among the most highly respected biophysicists Van der Waals forces are significant for a wide range of questions and problems in the life sciences, chemistry, physics, and engineering, ranging up to the macro level No other book that develops the subject vigorously, and this book also makes the subject intuitively accessible to students who had not previously been mathematically sophisticated enough to calculate them

  12. Lenz's Law: Feel the Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawicki, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple, inexpensive system that allows students to have hands-on contact with simple experiments involving forces generated by induced currents. Discusses the use of a dynamic force sensor in making quantitative measurements of the forces generated. (JRH)

  13. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  14. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  15. Rectified Forces in Rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Timothy Todd

    The forces exerted on a three-level atom by a bichromatic standing-wave field are investigated. A theoretical analysis shows that the standing-wave dipole force can be rectified, i.e., maintain its sign over many optical wavelengths. Three systems in particular are studied: the lambda, the vee, and the cascade. Experimental results for the rubidium 5S --> 5P --> 5D cascade system are used to confirm the theory. The nearly coincident transition wavelengths for this system (780.0 nm and 776.0 nm) provide potential wells repeating at the beat wavelength (71 μm) which can accumulate laser cooled atoms. This force may have future applications in forming deep neutral atom traps as well as in the creation of new elements for atom optics. Two-color, two-photon spectroscopy of the 5D_{5/2}<=vel using the same cascade system (5S --> 5P --> 5D) was also performed.

  16. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  17. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  18. [Forced spirometry procedure].

    PubMed

    Cortés Aguilera, Antonio Javier

    2008-11-01

    Forced spirometry consists in a complementary test which is carried out in a health office in a workplace in order to determine the lung capacity of workers exposed to determined professional risks or those susceptible to determined working conditions which could lead to the development of respiratory problems. This test has been developed based on health vigilance laws under Article 22 of the Law for Prevention of Risks in the Workplace and requires that the technician, a nurse in a workplace, who performs it have some knowledge and skills regarding its use, following the norms for forced spirometry set by the Spanish Association for Pneumatology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR). PMID:19203116

  19. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  20. Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Thess, André; Moreau, René; Tan, Yanqing; Dai, Shangjun; Tao, Zhen; Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    A new contactless technique is presented for the detection of micron-sized insulating particles in the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. A transverse magnetic field brakes this flow and tends to become entrained in the flow direction by a Lorentz force, whose reaction force on the magnetic-field-generating system can be measured. The presence of insulating particles suspended in the fluid produce changes in this Lorentz force, generating pulses in it; these pulses enable the particles to be counted and sized. A two-dimensional numerical model that employs a moving mesh method demonstrates the measurement principle when such a particle is present. Two prototypes and a three-dimensional numerical model are used to demonstrate the feasibility of a Lorentz force particle analyzer (LFPA). The findings of this study conclude that such an LFPA, which offers contactless and on-line quantitative measurements, can be applied to an extensive range of applications. These applications include measurements of the cleanliness of high-temperature and aggressive molten metal, such as aluminum and steel alloys, and the clean manufacturing of semiconductors.

  1. The Force of Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    2005-01-01

    "The Force of Ideas" describes a little-known aspect of both educational history and Viennese psychoanalysis during the interwar years: the movement for psychoanalytic pedagogy. The author traces her father's own story, beginning with his application to the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society for training as a psychoanalytic pedagogue, as a way to…

  2. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  3. Measuring Your Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, David E.

    2005-01-01

    This article talks about the force behind education leaders. With all the challenges facing public education today, it is difficult to remain focused and to remember why one chartered this particular leadership course. Perhaps someone respected encouraged one to take this path long ago. Perhaps this kind of service to the nation and its future…

  4. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  5. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  6. Perpendicular-Force Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattei, John P.; Buck, Peter A.; Williams, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    Latching mechanism simultaneously applies force in two perpendicular directions to install or remove electronic-equipment modules. Used to simplify installation and removal of modular equipment where movement restricted by protective clothing as in hazardous environments or where installation and removal to be performed by robots or remote manipulators. Concept adaptable to hydraulic, pneumatic, and mechanical systems.

  7. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  8. Chiral drag force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Krishna; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2015-10-01

    We provide a holographic evaluation of novel contributions to the drag force acting on a heavy quark moving through strongly interacting plasma. The new contributions are chiral in the sense that they act in opposite directions in plasmas containing an excess of left- or right-handed quarks. The new contributions are proportional to the coefficient of the axial anomaly, and in this sense also are chiral. These new contributions to the drag force act either parallel to or antiparallel to an external magnetic field or to the vorticity of the fluid plasma. In all these respects, these contributions to the drag force felt by a heavy quark are analogous to the chiral magnetic effect (CME) on light quarks. However, the new contribution to the drag force is independent of the electric charge of the heavy quark and is the same for heavy quarks and antiquarks, meaning that these novel effects do not in fact contribute to the CME current. We show that although the chiral drag force can be non-vanishing for heavy quarks that are at rest in the local fluid rest frame, it does vanish for heavy quarks that are at rest in a suitably chosen frame. In this frame, the heavy quark at rest sees counterpropagating momentum and charge currents, both proportional to the axial anomaly coefficient, but feels no drag force. This provides strong concrete evidence for the absence of dissipation in chiral transport, something that has been predicted previously via consideration of symmetries. Along the way to our principal results, we provide a general calculation of the corrections to the drag force due to the presence of gradients in the flowing fluid in the presence of a nonzero chemical potential. We close with a consequence of our result that is at least in principle observable in heavy ion collisions, namely an anticorrelation between the direction of the CME current for light quarks in a given event and the direction of the kick given to the momentum of all the heavy quarks and

  9. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  10. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-05-28

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  11. Force Feedback Joystick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  12. Suicide and Forced Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of “predicaments”, in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Methods: Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Results: Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. Conclusion: These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder. PMID:23983577

  13. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  14. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  15. Air Force seal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1994-07-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

  16. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  17. ``Force,'' ontology, and language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, David T.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a linguistic framework through which one can interpret systematically students’ understanding of and reasoning about force and motion. Some researchers have suggested that students have robust misconceptions or alternative frameworks grounded in everyday experience. Others have pointed out the inconsistency of students’ responses and presented a phenomenological explanation for what is observed, namely, knowledge in pieces. We wish to present a view that builds on and unifies aspects of this prior research. Our argument is that many students’ difficulties with force and motion are primarily due to a combination of linguistic and ontological difficulties. It is possible that students are primarily engaged in trying to define and categorize the meaning of the term “force” as spoken about by physicists. We found that this process of negotiation of meaning is remarkably similar to that engaged in by physicists in history. In this paper we will describe a study of the historical record that reveals an analogous process of meaning negotiation, spanning multiple centuries. Using methods from cognitive linguistics and systemic functional grammar, we will present an analysis of the force and motion literature, focusing on prior studies with interview data. We will then discuss the implications of our findings for physics instruction.

  18. Force Fluctuations and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Robert

    1998-03-01

    Granular materials exhibit a rich array of dynamic and static phenomena which are only partly understood. Here, I focus on fluctuations in kinetic properties and in forces for slowly sheared granular materials. We have carried out a series of experiments in both 2D and in 3D. For 2D, we use a novel apparatus which allows us to quantify the forces, positions and orientations associated with individual grains. For slow to moderate shear rates, we find rate independence except for small random deviations which are associated with very long time changes in the system. The system evolves to a nearly steady average flow profile in which the velocity falls off approximately exponentially with distance from the shearing surface. The particle rotation shows systematic oscillations near the shearing surface. Velocity profiles show a complicated non-gaussian structure. Force measurements in both the 2D and 3D system are approximately exponentially distributed, but there are also some systematic deviations. Companion calculations by S. Schoellmann, S. Luding and H. Herrmann capture a number of these features. The experimental work has been carried out partially at Duke and partially at the E.S.P.C.I. Paris in collaboration with D. Howell, B. Miller, S. Tennakoon, and C. Veje.

  19. The task force process

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, J.S.

    1995-01-31

    This paper focuses on the unique aspects of the Fernald Citizens Task Force process that have contributed to a largely successful public participation effort at Fernald. The Fernald Citizens Task Force passed quickly by many procedural issues. Instead, the Task Force concentrated on (a) educating itself about the site, its problems, and possible solutions, and (b) choosing a directed way to approach its mandate: To make recommendations on several {open_quotes}big picture{close_quotes} issues, including future use of the site, cleanup levels, waste disposition, and cleanup priorities. This paper presents the approach used at Fernald for establishing and running a focused site-specific advisory board, the key issues that have been faced, and how these issues were resolved. The success of Fernald in establishing a strong and functioning site-specific advisory board serves as a useful model for other DOE facilities, although the Fernald model is just one of many approaches that can be taken. However, the approach presented here has worked extremely well for Fernald.

  20. Modified entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun

    2010-04-15

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration g{sub D}. It is found the Debye acceleration is g{sub D}=10{sup -15} N kg{sup -1}. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -4} N kg{sup -1} which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -10} N kg{sup -1} felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  1. Finger force perception during ipsilateral and contralateral force matching tasks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo-Hyung; Leonard, Charles T.; Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare matching performance between ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks and to examine the effect of handedness on finger force perception. Eleven subjects were instructed to produce reference forces by an instructed finger (index – I or little – L finger) and to reproduce the same amount force by the same or a different finger within the hand (i.e., ipsilateral matching task), or by a finger of the other hand (i.e., contralateral matching task). The results of the ipsilateral and contralateral tasks in the present study commonly showed that 1) the reference and matching forces were matched closely when the two forces were produced by the same or homologous finger(s) such as I/I task; 2) the weaker little finger underestimated the magnitude of reference force of the index finger (I/L task), even with the higher level of effort (relative force), but the two forces were matched when considering total finger forces; 3) the stronger index finger closely matched the reference force of the little finger with the lower level of relative force (i.e., L/I task); 4) when considering the constant errors, I/L tasks showed an underestimation and L/I tasks showed an overestimation compared to I/I tasks. There was no handedness effect during ipsilateral tasks. During the contralateral task, the dominant hand overestimated the force of the non-dominant hand, while the non-dominant hand attempted to match the absolute force of the dominant hand. The overall results support the notion that the absolute, rather than relative, finger force is perceived and reproduced during ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks, indicating the uniqueness of finger force perception. PMID:18488212

  2. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  3. Causal Entropic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in fields ranging from cosmology to computer science have hinted at a possible deep connection between intelligence and entropy maximization, but no formal physical relationship between them has yet been established. Here, we explicitly propose a first step toward such a relationship in the form of a causal generalization of entropic forces that we find can cause two defining behaviors of the human “cognitive niche”—tool use and social cooperation—to spontaneously emerge in simple physical systems. Our results suggest a potentially general thermodynamic model of adaptive behavior as a nonequilibrium process in open systems.

  4. Turbulent forced diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaci, V.S.; Li, C.Y.

    1995-07-01

    It is the purpose of this study to introduce a turbulent microscale appropriate for forced diffusion flames and to propose models for fuel consumption and skin friction in terms of this scale. The study consists of four sections. Following the introduction, Section 2 recapitulates the laminar theories of reacting boundary layers in terms of dimensional arguments and proposes models for fuel consumption and skin friction. Section 3 extends these arguments by introducing a microscale appropriate for turbulent flames and, in terms of this scale, develops models for fuel consumption and skin friction, correlates the experimental data on skin friction, and Section 4 concludes the study.

  5. Radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanswamy, V.; Shine, Keith; Leovy, Conway; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Rodhe, Henning; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Ding, M.; Lelieveld, Joseph; Edmonds, Jae A.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    An update of the scientific discussions presented in Chapter 2 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report is presented. The update discusses the atmospheric radiative and chemical species of significance for climate change. There are two major objectives of the present update. The first is an extension of the discussion on the Global Warming Potentials (GWP's), including a reevaluation in view of the updates in the lifetimes of the radiatively active species. The second important objective is to underscore major developments in the radiative forcing of climate due to the observed stratospheric ozone losses occurring between 1979 and 1990.

  6. Forces stabilizing proteins.

    PubMed

    Nick Pace, C; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. (1) Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a -CH2- group on folding contributes 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (2) The burial of non-polar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. (3) Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1±0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (5) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (6) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. (7) Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability.

  7. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  8. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  9. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  10. Environmental Crack Driving Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of environment on the crack driving force is considered, first by assuming quasistatic extension of a stationary crack and second, by use of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth rate models developed previously by this author and developed further here. A quasistatic thermodynamic energy balance approach, of the Griffith-Irwin type, is used to develop stationary crack threshold expressions, tilde{J}_c , which represent the conjoint mechanical and electrochemical conditions, below which stationary cracks are stable. Expressions for the electrochemical crack driving force (CDF) were derived using an analysis that is analogous to that used by Irwin to derive his "strain energy release rate," G, which Rice showed as being equivalent to his mechanical CDF, J. The derivations show that electrochemical CDFs both for active path dissolution (APD) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanisms of SCC are simply proportional to Tafel's electrochemical anodic and cathodic overpotentials, η a and η c, respectively. Phenomenological SCC models based on the kinetics of APD and HE crack growth are used to derive expressions for the kinetic threshold, J scc, below which crack growth cannot be sustained. These models show how independent mechanical and environmental CDFs may act together to drive SCC crack advance. Development of a user-friendly computational tool for calculating Tafel's overpotentials is advocated.

  11. Force normalization in paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Serra-Añó, P; García-Massó, X; Pellicer, M; González, L-M; López-Pascual, J; Giner-Pascual, M; Toca-Herrera, J L

    2012-06-01

    The principal aim of our study was the determination of the effectiveness of a standardized ratio, allometric scaling model and a gamma function model in normalizing the isometric torque data of spinal cord patients and healthy subjects. For this purpose we studied a sample of 21 healthy males and 23 spinal cord injury males. The experiment consisted of the measurement of the force of the upper limb movement executed by all the subjects. We also determined anthropometric variables with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The experimental data were analyzed with 3 force normalization methods. Our results indicate that the most important confounding variable was the fat free mass of the dominant upper limb (r>0.36, p<0.05). With the standardization by body mass and allometric scaling model, the normalized torque was influenced by body size variables. However, the normalized torque by the gamma function model was independent of body size measures. Paraplegics were weaker (p<0.05) in extension movements when the data were normalized by the gamma function model. In summary, this study shows that the gamma function model with fat free mass of the dominant upper limb was more effective than the standardized ratio in removing the influence of body size variables. PMID:22377940

  12. Forced emigration, favourable outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    2001-10-01

    The discipline of public health and preventive medicine in Australia and New Zealand had its genesis in the advocacy of 18th and 19th century military pioneers. Military (Royal Navy and British Army) surgeons were posted to Australia as part of their non-discretionary duty. Civilian doctors emigrated variously for adventure, escapism and gold fever. One group, a particularly influential group disproportionate to their numbers, came in one sense as forced emigrants because of chronic respiratory disease in general, and tuberculosis in particular. Tuberculosis was an occupational hazard of 19th century medical and surgical practice throughout western Europe. This paper analyses six examples of such emigration which had, perhaps unforeseen at the time, significant results in the advancement of public health. Such emigration was in one sense voluntary, but in another was forced upon the victims in their quest for personal survival. In Australia, such medical individuals became leading advocates and successful catalysts for change in such diverse fields as social welfare, public health, the preventive aspects of medical practice, child health, nutrition and medical education. A number of such public health pioneers today have no physical memorials; but their influence is to be seen in the ethos of medical practice in Australia and New Zealand today. Their memory is further perpetuated in the names of Australian native wildflowers and trees that symbolise not only a healthy environment but the long-term investment, accrued with interest, of the institution of public health measures for which their advocacy achieved much success.

  13. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas A. (Inventor); Snow, Edward R. (Inventor); Townsend, William T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  14. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAffee, Douglas A.; Snow, Edward R.; Townsend, William T.

    1993-03-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  15. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  16. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Billy C; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-10-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  17. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Billy C.; Lum, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  18. Parallel computation with the force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology, called the force, supports the construction of programs to be executed in parallel by a force of processes. The number of processes in the force is unspecified, but potentially very large. The force idea is embodied in a set of macros which produce multiproceossor FORTRAN code and has been studied on two shared memory multiprocessors of fairly different character. The method has simplified the writing of highly parallel programs within a limited class of parallel algorithms and is being extended to cover a broader class. The individual parallel constructs which comprise the force methodology are discussed. Of central concern are their semantics, implementation on different architectures and performance implications.

  19. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  20. Forced to be right.

    PubMed

    Trout, J D

    2014-05-01

    In "Forced to be Free", Neil Levy surveys the raft of documented decision-making biases that humans are heir to, and advances several bold proposals designed to enhance the patient's judgment. Gratefully, Levy is moved by the psychological research on judgment and decision-making that documents people's inaccuracy when identifying courses of action will best promote their subjective well-being. But Levy is quick to favour the patient's present preferences, to ensure they get "final say" about their treatment. I urge the opposite inclination, raising doubts about whether the patient's "present preferences" are the best expression of their "final say". When there is adequate evidence that people, by their own lights, overemphasize their present preferences about the future, we should carefully depreciate those preferences, in effect biasing them to make the right decision by their own lights.

  1. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25029818

  2. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  3. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  4. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  5. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  6. Force protection: today's reality.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Ron

    2004-11-11

    Most US infrastructure and major chemical manufacturing facilities as well as their supporting utility systems are inherently vulnerable to a terrorist attack. Force protection is a military and civilian term used to protect personnel and critical facilities and assets against would-be aggressors or terrorists. The war on terrorism is a 200-300-year war. Terrorist attacks on US soil could become as common-place as in the State of Israel. It is very easy to penetrate infrastructure or plants as evidenced by vulnerability assessments performed for states, cities, plants, and military facilities by Versar and others around the country. Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive weapons can be readily used to attack facilities in the US. This paper will explain some of those vulnerabilities, outline the current DoD standard as it relates to vulnerability assessments, and explain how this may be used in commercial applications to deter potential aggressors.

  7. Comparison between static maximal force and handbrake pulling force.

    PubMed

    Chateauroux, E; Wang, X

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of maximum pulling force is important not only for specifying force limit of industrial workers but also for designing controls requiring high force. This paper presents a comparison between maximal static handbrake pulling force (FST) and force exerted during normal handbrake pulling task (FDY). These forces were measured for different handle locations and subject characteristics. Participants were asked to pull a handbrake on an adjustable car mock-up as they would do when parking their own car, then to exert a force as high as possible on the pulled handbrake. Hand pulling forces were measured using a six-axes force sensor. 5 fixed handbrake positions were tested as well as a neutral handbrake position defined by the subject. FST and FDY were significantly correlated. Both were found to be dependent on handbrake position, age and gender. As expected, women and older subjects exerted lower forces. FST was significantly higher than FDY. The ratio FmR (FDY divided by FST) was also analyzed. Women showed higher FmR than men meaning that the task required a higher amount of muscle capability for women. FmR was also influenced by handbrake location. These data will be useful for handbrake design.

  8. Normal Force and Drag Force in Magnetorheological Finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2010-01-13

    The material removal in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is known to be controlled by shear stress, tau, which equals drag force, Fd, divided by spot area, As. However, it is unclear how the normal force, Fn, affects the material removal in MRF and how the measured ratio of drag force to normal force Fd/Fn, equivalent to coefficient of friction, is related to material removal. This work studies, for the first time for MRF, the normal force and the measured ratio Fd/Fn as a function of material mechanical properties. Experimental data were obtained by taking spots on a variety of materials including optical glasses and hard ceramics with a spot-taking machine (STM). Drag force and normal force were measured with a dual load cell. Drag force decreases linearly with increasing material hardness. In contrast, normal force increases with hardness for glasses, saturating at high hardness values for ceramics. Volumetric removal rate decreases with normal force across all materials. The measured ratio Fd/Fn shows a strong negative linear correlation with material hardness. Hard materials exhibit a low “coefficient of friction”. The volumetric removal rate increases with the measured ratio Fd/Fn which is also correlated with shear stress, indicating that the measured ratio Fd/Fn is a useful measure of material removal in MRF.

  9. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  10. Microphotonic Forces from Superfluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuslan, D. L.; Harris, G. I.; Baker, C.; Sachkou, Y.; He, X.; Sheridan, E.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly 1 order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces we demonstrate here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, while the ability to apply forces remotely, combined with the persistence of flow in superfluids, offers the prospect for new applications.

  11. Force feedback in limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Wee, Jinyong; Rahman, Tariq; Seliktar, Rahamim; Akins, Robert; Levine, David; Richardson, Dean; Dodge, George R; Thabet, Ahmed M; Holmes, Lauren; Mackenzie, William G

    2010-01-01

    A new variable-rate distraction system using a motorized distractor driven by feedback from the distraction force was designed. The distractor was mounted on a unilateral fixator and attached to the tibiae of 6 sheep that underwent distraction osteogenesis. The sheep were divided equally into 3 groups. In group 1, the forces were recorded but were not used to drive the lengthening rate. In group 2, force feedback was used and the desired distraction force level was set to 300 N and the initial rate was 1 mm/day. Group 3 also underwent force feedback with the desired force limit at 300 N, but the rate change was initiated earlier, at 200 N. The distraction force was recorded at 15 second intervals throughout the distraction phase and stored onboard the distractor.

  12. Force oscillations simulating breathing maneuvers do not prevent force adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Chris; Jiao, Yuekan; Seow, Chun Y; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2012-07-01

    Airway inflammation in patients with asthma exposes the airway smooth muscle (ASM) to a variety of spasmogens. These spasmogens increase ASM tone, which can lead to force adaptation. Length oscillations of ASM, which occur in vivo due to breathing maneuvers, can attenuate force adaptation. However, in the presence of tone, the force oscillations required to achieve these length oscillations may be unphysiologic (i.e., magnitude greater than the ones achieved due to the swings in transpulmonary pressure required for breathing). In the present study, we applied force oscillations simulating the tension oscillations experienced by the wall of a fourth-generation airway during tidal breathing with or without deep inspirations (DI) to ASM. The goal was to investigate whether force adaptation occurs in conditions mimicking breathing maneuvers. Tone was induced by carbachol (average, 20 nM), and the force-generating capacity of the ASM was assessed at 5-minute intervals before and after carbachol administration using electrical field stimulations (EFS). The results show that force oscillations applied before the introduction of tone had a small effect on the force produced by EFS (declined to 96.8% [P > 0.05] and 92.3% [P < 0.05] with and without DI, respectively). The tone induced by carbachol transiently decreased after a DI and declined significantly (P < 0.05) due to tidal breathing oscillations (25%). These force oscillations did not prevent force adaptation (gain of force of 11.2 ± 2.2 versus 13.5 ± 2.7 and 11.2 ± 3.0% in static versus dynamic conditions with or without DI, respectively). The lack of effect of simulated breathing maneuvers on force adaptation suggests that this gain in ASM force may occur in vivo and could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:22323367

  13. Casimir effect around a cone

    SciTech Connect

    Dowker, J.S.

    1987-11-15

    The vacuum average of the energy density of a free, massless scalar field around a conical flux-tube singularity in d+1 space-time dimensions is calculated. A complex contour method is employed and the results involve higher-order Bernoulli polynomials. The formulas might have applications to cosmic strings.

  14. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars.

  15. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars. PMID:21952980

  16. Mapping interaction forces with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Radmacher, M; Cleveland, J P; Fritz, M; Hansma, H G; Hansma, P K

    1994-01-01

    Force curves were recorded as the sample was raster-scanned under the tip. This opens new opportunities for imaging with the atomic force microscope: several characteristics of the samples can be measured simultaneously, for example, topography, adhesion forces, elasticity, van der Waals, and electrostatic interactions. The new opportunities are illustrated by images of several characteristics of thin metal films, aggregates of lysozyme, and single molecules of DNA. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8075349

  17. An Integrated Higgs Force Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    An Integrated Higgs force theory (IHFT) was based on 2 key requirement amplifications: a matter particle/Higgs force was one and inseparable; a matter particle/Higgs force bidirectionally condensed/evaporated from/to super force. These were basis of 5 theories: particle creation, baryogenesis, superpartner/quark decays, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and stellar black holes. Our universe's 129 matter/force particles contained 64 supersymmetric Higgs particles; 9 transient matter particles/Higgs forces decayed to 8 permanent matter particles/Higgs forces; mass was given to a matter particle by its Higgs force and gravitons; and sum of 8 Higgs force energies of 8 permanent matter particles was dark energy. An IHFT's essence is the intimate physical relationships between 8 theories. These theories are independent because physicists in one theory worked independently of physicists in the other seven. An IHFT's premise is without sacrificing their integrities, 8 independent existing theories are replaced by 8 interrelated amplified theories. Requirement amplifications provide interfaces between the 8 theories. Intimate relationships between 8 theories including the above 5 and string, Higgs forces, and Super Universe are described. The sorting category selected was F. PARTICLES AND FIELDS (e.g., F1 Higgs Physics, F10 Alternative Beyond the Standard Model Physics, F11 Dark Sector Theories and Searches, and F12 Particle Cosmology).

  18. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed. PMID:27250433

  19. Performance of different force fields in force probe simulations.

    PubMed

    Schlesier, Thomas; Diezemann, Gregor

    2013-02-14

    We present detailed force probe molecular dynamic simulations of mechanically interlocked dimeric calix[4]arene-catenanes, comparing the results obtained using three different commonly used force fields (GROMOS G53a5, OPLS-AA, and AMBER GAFF). The model system is well characterized as a two-state system consisting of a closed compact and an elongated structure. Both states are stabilized by a different hydrogen-bond network, and complete separation of the dimer is prevented by the mechanical lock of the entangled aliphatic loops. The system shows fully reversible rebinding meaning that after bond rupture the system rejoins when the external force is relaxed. We present a detailed study of quantities determined in simulations using a force ramp, like the rupture force and rejoin force distributions. Additionally, we analyze the dynamics of the hydrogen-bond network. We find that the results obtained from using the different force fields qualitatively agree in the sense that always the fully reversible behavior is found. The details, like the mean rupture forces, however, do depend on the particular force field. Some of the differences observed can be traced back to differences in the strength of the hydrogen-bond networks.

  20. Elementary Implantable Force Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wachs, Rebecca A.; Ellstein, David; Drazan, John; Healey, Colleen P.; Uhl, Richard L.; Connor, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing implantable sensors which are robust enough to maintain long term functionality inside the body remains a significant challenge. The ideal implantable sensing system is one which is simple and robust; free from batteries, telemetry, and complex electronics. We have developed an elementary implantable sensor for orthopaedic smart implants. The sensor requires no telemetry and no batteries to communicate wirelessly. It has no on-board signal conditioning electronics. The sensor itself has no electrical connections and thus does not require a hermetic package. The sensor is an elementary L-C resonator which can function as a simple force transducer by using a solid dielectric material of known stiffness between two parallel Archimedean coils. The operating characteristics of the sensors are predicted using a simplified, lumped circuit model. We have demonstrated sensor functionality both in air and in saline. Our preliminary data indicate that the sensor can be reasonably well modeled as a lumped circuit to predict its response to loading. PMID:24883335

  1. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  2. Maximum bow force revisited.

    PubMed

    Mores, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Schelleng [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53, 26-41 (1973)], Askenfelt [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 503-516 (1989)], Schumacher [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1985-1998 (1994)], and Schoonderwaldt, Guettler, and Askenfelt [Acta Acust. Acust. 94, 604-622 (2008)] formulated-in different ways-how the maximum bow force relates to bow velocity, bow-bridge distance, string impedance, and friction coefficients. Issues of uncertainty are how to account for friction or for the rotational admittance of the strings. Related measurements at the respective transitions between regimes of Helmholtz motion and non-Helmholtz motion employ a variety of bowing machines and stringed instruments. The related findings include all necessary parameters except the friction coefficients, leaving the underlying models unconfirmed. Here, a bowing pendulum has been constructed which allows precise measurement of relevant bowing parameters, including the friction coefficients. Two cellos are measured across all strings for three different bow-bridge distances. The empirical data suggest that-taking the diverse elements of existing models as options-Schelleng's model combined with Schumacher's velocity term yields the best fit. Furthermore, the pendulum employs a bow driving mechanism with adaptive impedance which discloses that mentioned regimes are stable and transitions between them sometimes require a hysteresis on related parameters. PMID:27586745

  3. Forced air heater

    SciTech Connect

    Livezey, D.J.

    1980-09-23

    An air heating chamber is supported to project into a stove through an opening provided in the rear wall of the stove by a mounting plate mounted to the exterior of the stove rear wall. The mounting plate which forms the exterior end wall of the heating chamber, includes laterally spaced heating chamber inlet and outlet openings. A blower is detachably mounted to the exterior of the mounting plate in registration with the heating chamber inlet opening to deliver cool forced air into the heating chamber. After circulating therethrough, the air exits the heating chamber through the outlet opening and flows into a hot air manifold, which is also detachably mounted to the exterior of the mounting plate. The manifold includes an upwardly extending inlet chamber with a hot air inlet at its lower end aligned with the heating chamber outlet opening. A horizontal outlet chamber is attached to the top end of the inlet chamber to extend laterally along the back of the stove. Hot air outlets are provided at each end of the manifold outlet chamber to discharge the heated air horizontally over the top and towards the front of the stove.

  4. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  5. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  6. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  7. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  8. Coriolis Force on Your Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Robert

    2003-12-01

    The Coriolis force is a sideward force that acts on a rotating object as it moves toward or away from the center of rotation. It is important to long-range artillery and the formation of tornados, but we seldom experience this force on a human scale, unless we play on a merry-go-round or similar apparatus. This note describes a simple activity that lets us see the effect of the Coriolis force on our outstretched arms as they fall down to our sides while we rotate.

  9. Force As A Momentum Current

    SciTech Connect

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-07-28

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  10. Force As A Momentum Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múnera, Héctor A.

    2010-07-01

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  11. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area. Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams, and over recent years a rich variety of…

  12. Magnetic force and optical force sensing with ultrathin silicon resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takahito; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2003-12-01

    In this article, we demonstrated magnetic and optical force measurements using an ultrathin silicon cantilever down to 20 nm or 50 nm in thickness. The cantilever was heated in an ultrahigh vacuum for enhancing the Q factor and a magnetic particle was mounted at the end of the cantilever using a manipulator. The vibration was measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer and its signal was fed to an opposed metal electrode for electrostatic self-oscillation. An application of a magnetic field with a coil exerted a force to the magnetic material, which results in the change of the resonant frequency. However, the change in the mechanical properties of the cantilever, due to mechanical instability and temperature variation, drifts the resonance peak. Force balancing between the magnetic force and an electrostatic force in the opposite phase can minimize the vibration amplitude. From the electrostatic force at the minimum point, the exerted force can be estimated. A magnetic moment of 4×10-20 J/T was measured by this method. The same technique was also applied to measure the optical force of ˜10-17 N, impinging on the cantilever by a laser diode.

  13. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  14. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Radiative forcing and climate response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.

    1997-03-01

    We examine the sensitivity of a climate model to a wide range of radiative forcings, including changes of solar irradiance, atmospheric CO2, O3, CFCs, clouds, aerosols, surface albedo, and a "ghost" forcing introduced at arbitrary heights, latitudes, longitudes, seasons, and times of day. We show that, in general, the climate response, specifically the global mean temperature change, is sensitive to the altitude, latitude, and nature of the forcing; that is, the response to a given forcing can vary by 50% or more depending upon characteristics of the forcing other than its magnitude measured in watts per square meter. The consistency of the response among different forcings is higher, within 20% or better, for most of the globally distributed forcings suspected of influencing global mean temperature in the past century, but exceptions occur for certain changes of ozone or absorbing aerosols, for which the climate response is less well behaved. In all cases the physical basis for the variations of the response can be understood. The principal mechanisms involve alterations of lapse rate and decrease (increase) of large-scale cloud cover in layers that are preferentially heated (cooled). Although the magnitude of these effects must be model-dependent, the existence and sense of the mechanisms appear to be reasonable. Overall, we reaffirm the value of the radiative forcing concept for predicting climate response and for comparative studies of different forcings; indeed, the present results can help improve the accuracy of such analyses and define error estimates. Our results also emphasize the need for measurements having the specificity and precision needed to define poorly known forcings such as absorbing aerosols and ozone change. Available data on aerosol single scatter albedo imply that anthropogenic aerosols cause less cooling than has commonly been assumed. However, negative forcing due to the net ozone change since 1979 appears to have counterbalanced 30

  16. Exotic nuclei and nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    I overview new aspects of the structure of exotic nuclei as compared to stable nuclei, focusing on several characteristic effects of nuclear forces. The shell structure of nuclei has been proposed by Mayer and Jensen, and has been considered to be kept valid basically for all nuclei, with well-known magic numbers, 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …. Nuclear forces were shown, very recently, to change this paradigm. It will be presented that the evolution of shell structure occurs in various ways as more neutrons and/or protons are added, and I will present basic points of this shell evolution in terms of the monopole interaction of nuclear forces. I will discuss three types of nuclear forces. The first one is the tensor force. The tensor force is one of the most fundamental nuclear forces, but its first-order effect on the shell structure has been clarified only recently in studies on exotic nuclei. The tensor force can change the spin-orbit splitting depending on the occupation of specific orbits. This results in changes of the shell structure in many nuclei, and consequently some of Mayer-Jensen's magic numbers are lost and new ones emerge, in certain nuclei. This mechanism can be understood in an intuitive way, meaning that the effect is general and robust. The second type of nuclear forces is central force. I will show a general but unknown property of the central force in the shell-model Hamiltonian that can describe nuclear properties in a good agreement with experiment. I will then demonstrate how it can be incorporated into a simple model of the central force, and will discuss how this force works in the shell evolution. Actually, by combining this central force with the tensor force, one can understand and foresee how the same proton-neutron interaction drives the shell evolution, for examples such as Sn/Sb isotopes, N = 20 nuclei and Ni/Cu isotopes. The distribution of single-particle strength is discussed also in comparison to (e,e‧p) experiment on 48Ca. The shell

  17. How Does Force Affect Motion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Whether playing soccer at recess, walking to lunch, or sitting at their desk, children encounter forces every moment of their lives. The connection between force and motion is absolutely amazing to children, so anyone working with them better be prepared for the battery of tough questions they ask: "What made the ball move that way? Why does a…

  18. Low-closing-force seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergquist, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Compress soft, inert metal gasket between cone and corresponding socket to attach tubes to vessels containing gas samples. Technique effects seals with minimum of applied force and does not contaminate contents. Seal is formed when port connector is pushed firmly into its socket. Gold washer is deformed and forced to flow into imperfections in surfaces.

  19. Minorities in the Armed Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Anthony

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of the Congressional Black Caucus and the specially formed task force; reports that high ranking officers have pledged to attack racial discrimination; and describes an association of minority officers whose purpose is to enhance the image of the armed forces within the minority community. (Author/JM)

  20. Force optimized recoil control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. E.; Radkiewicz, R. J.; Gartner, R. F.

    1982-05-01

    Reduction of the recoil force of high rate of fire automatic guns was proven effective. This system will allow consideration of more powerful guns for use in both helicopter and armored personnel carrier applications. By substituting the large shock loads of firing guns with a nearly constant force, both vibration and fatigue problems that prevent mounting of powerful automatic guns is eliminated.