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Sample records for casimir force

  1. Casimir force between hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ge; Xu, Jingping; Zhu, Chengjie; He, Pengfei; Yang, Yaping; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2017-02-01

    The Casimir force between two hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) constructed by alternative metal-dielectric layers is investigated. Due to the existence of the hyperbolic dispersion, the electromagnetic response of HMMs becomes extremely dramatic, which is embodied by the nearly total reflection in such frequency region. As a result, the Casimir force between HMMs is much greater than that between ordinary dielectrics. In addition, it is shown that the Casimir force is proportional to the bandwidth of this hyperbolic dispersion, which is dependent on the filling factor as well as the characteristic frequencies of ingredient materials. Therefore, the relations between the force and these parameters are discussed. We show that the Casimir force can be controlled by tuning the bandwidth possessing hyperbolic dispersion of the structures. This work provides promising applications of HMMs on microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems.

  2. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    PubMed Central

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  3. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  4. Archimedes force on Casimir apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shevrin, Efim

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses a problem of Casimir apparatus in dense medium, put in weak gravitational field. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle with proper account for contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general expression for the corresponding force in metric with cylindrical symmetry. By way of example, we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  5. Archimedes force on Casimir apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V.; Shevrin, E.

    2016-11-01

    The talk addresses a problem of Casimir apparatus in weak gravitational field, surrounded by a dense medium. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle, taking into account proper contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general ex pression for the corresponding force in terms of the effective action. By way of example we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  6. Halving the Casimir force with Conductive Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Man, S.; Heeck, K.; Wijngaarden, R. J.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2009-07-01

    The possibility to modify the strength of the Casimir effect by tailoring the dielectric functions of the interacting surfaces is regarded as a unique opportunity in the development of micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. In air, however, one expects that, unless noble metals are used, the electrostatic force arising from trapped charges overcomes the Casimir attraction, leaving no room for exploitation of Casimir force engineering at ambient conditions. Here we show that, in the presence of a conductive oxide, the Casimir force can be the dominant interaction even in air, and that the use of conductive oxides allows one to reduce the Casimir force up to a factor of 2 when compared to noble metals.

  7. Resource Letter CF-1: Casimir Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.

    1999-10-01

    This resource letter provides an introductory guide to the literature on the Casimir force. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: introductory articles and books, calculations, dynamical Casimir effect, mechanical analogs, applications, and experiments. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Association of Physics Teachers.}

  8. Diamagnetic effect on the Casimir force

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Norio

    2011-03-15

    The Casimir force between a diamagnetic plate and a magnetodielectric plate at finite temperature is considered. Under the condition that the permittivity of the magnetodielectric plate is sufficiently small, we show that the diamagnetic property dominantly determines the asymptotic behavior of the repulsive Casimir force for large separations. On the basis of this simple property, we present numerical results showing that if an effective permeability of a superconductor is much less than one, its diamagnetic response can be indirectly detected by measuring the Casimir force.

  9. Casimir forces of metallic microstructures into cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenanakis, George; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical estimate of the Casimir force of a metallic structure embedded into a cubic cavity is proposed. We demonstrate that by calculating the eigenmodes of the system we can determine the Casimir force, which can be either attractive or repulsive, by simply changing the geometry of the structures relative to the walls of the cavity. In this analysis, several cases of structures are taken into account, from rectangular slabs to chiral "omega" particles, and the predicted data are consistent with recent literature. We demonstrate that the sidewalls of the studied cavity contribute decisively to the repulsive Casimir force between the system and the nearby top surface of the cavity. Finally, we provide evidence that the medium embedded into the studied cavity (and especially its permittivity) can change the intensity of the Casimir force, while its repulsive nature, once established (owing to favorable geometrical features), remains quite robust.

  10. Stability of suspended graphene under Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, E. M.; Zarzuela, R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a graphene sheet suspended above a conducting surface. Treating graphene as an elastic membrane subjected to Casimir force, we study its stability against sagging towards the conductor. There exists a critical elevation at the edges below which the central part of the suspended graphene nucleates a trunk that sinks under the action of the Casimir force. The dependence of the critical elevation on temperature, dimensions, and the elastic stress applied to the graphene sheet is computed.

  11. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas; Mota, David F.

    2007-12-15

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models.

  12. Casimir forces in the time domain: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-07-15

    We present a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. The method involves the time evolution of electric and magnetic fields in response to a set of current sources, in a modified medium with frequency-independent conductivity. The advantage of this approach is that it allows one to exploit existing FDTD software, without modification, to compute Casimir forces. In this paper, we focus on the derivation, implementation choices, and essential properties of the time-domain algorithm, both considered analytically and illustrated in the simplest parallel-plate geometry.

  13. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, C.; Helden, L.; Gambassi, A.; Dietrich, S.; Bechinger, C.

    2008-01-01

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  14. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, C; Helden, L; Gambassi, A; Dietrich, S; Bechinger, C

    2008-01-10

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  15. Critical Casimir forces along the isofields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubaszewska, M.; Maciołek, A.; Drzewiński, A.

    2013-11-01

    Using quasiexact numerical density-matrix renormalization-group techniques we calculate the critical Casimir force for a two-dimensional (2D) Ising strip with equal strong surface fields, along the thermodynamic paths corresponding to the fixed nonzero bulk field h≠0. Using the Derjaguin approximation we also determine the critical Casimir force and its potential for two disks. We find that varying the temperature along the isofields lying between the bulk coexistence and the capillary condensation critical point leads to a dramatic increase of the critical Casimir interactions with a qualitatively different functional dependence on the temperature than along h=0. These findings might be of relevance for biomembranes, whose heterogeneity is recently interpreted as being connected with a critical behavior belonging to the 2D Ising universality class.

  16. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  17. Scattering theory approach to electrodynamic Casimir forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2009-10-15

    We give a comprehensive presentation of methods for calculating the Casimir force to arbitrary accuracy, for any number of objects, arbitrary shapes, susceptibility functions, and separations. The technique is applicable to objects immersed in media other than vacuum, nonzero temperatures, and spatial arrangements in which one object is enclosed in another. Our method combines each object's classical electromagnetic scattering amplitude with universal translation matrices, which convert between the bases used to calculate scattering for each object, but are otherwise independent of the details of the individual objects. The method is illustrated by rederiving the Lifshitz formula for infinite half-spaces, by demonstrating the Casimir-Polder to van der Waals crossover, and by computing the Casimir interaction energy of two infinite, parallel, perfect metal cylinders either inside or outside one another. Furthermore, it is used to obtain new results, namely, the Casimir energies of a sphere or a cylinder opposite a plate, all with finite permittivity and permeability, to leading order at large separation.

  18. Casimir forces in the time domain: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-15

    Our previous article [Phys. Rev. A 80, 012115 (2009)] introduced a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials that was based on a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. In this article, we focus on the efficient implementation of our method for geometries of practical interest and extend our previous proof-of-concept algorithm in one dimension to problems in two and three dimensions, introducing a number of new optimizations. We consider Casimir pistonlike problems with nonmonotonic and monotonic force dependence on sidewall separation, both for previously solved geometries to validate our method and also for new geometries involving magnetic sidewalls and/or cylindrical pistons. We include realistic dielectric materials to calculate the force between suspended silicon waveguides or on a suspended membrane with periodic grooves, also demonstrating the application of perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries and/or periodic boundaries. In addition, we apply this method to a realizable three-dimensional system in which a silica sphere is stably suspended in a fluid above an indented metallic substrate. More generally, the method allows off-the-shelf FDTD software, already supporting a wide variety of materials (including dielectric, magnetic, and even anisotropic materials) and boundary conditions, to be exploited for the Casimir problem.

  19. Measurement of non-monotonic Casimir forces between silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, L.; Wang, M.; Ng, C. Y.; Nikolic, M.; Chan, C. T.; Rodriguez, A. W.; Chan, H. B.

    2017-01-01

    Casimir forces are of fundamental interest because they originate from quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Apart from controlling this force via the optical properties of materials, a number of novel geometries have been proposed to generate repulsive and/or non-monotonic Casimir forces between bodies separated by vacuum gaps. Experimental realization of these geometries, however, is hindered by the difficulties in alignment when the bodies are brought into close proximity. Here, using an on-chip platform with integrated force sensors and actuators, we circumvent the alignment problem and measure the Casimir force between two surfaces with nanoscale protrusions. We demonstrate that the force depends non-monotonically on the displacement. At some displacements, the Casimir force leads to an effective stiffening of the nanomechanical spring. Our findings pave the way for exploiting the Casimir force in nanomechanical systems using structures of complex and non-conventional shapes.

  20. Controlling the Casimir force via the electromagnetic properties of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yaping; Chen Hong; Zeng Ran; Zhu Shiyao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2010-02-15

    The control of the Casimir force between two parallel plates can be achieved through adjusting the frequency-dependent electromagnetic properties of materials of the two plates. We show that, for different plate separations, the main contribution to the Casimir force comes from different frequency regions: For smaller (larger) separation, it comes from the higher (lower) frequency region. When the separation of the plates increases, the Casimir force can vary from attractive to repulsive and/or vice versa, by selecting the two plates with suitable electromagnetic properties. We discuss how a restoring Casimir force, which varies from repulsive to attractive by increasing the separation, can be realized and that the stable equilibrium is formed at zero Casimir force.

  1. Tunable polarity of the Casimir force based on saturated ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Ran; Yang Yaping

    2011-01-15

    We study the polarity of the Casimir force between two different parallel slabs separated by vacuum when the saturated ferrite materials under the influence of an external magnetic field are taken into consideration. Between the ordinary dielectric slab and the ferrite slab, repulsive Casimir force may be observed by adjusting the applied magnetic field. For the ferrite material, we consider the frequency dependence of the permeability modified by the external magnetic field to analyze the formation of the repulsive Casimir force. The restoring force, which means the transition of the force polarity from repulsion to attraction with the increasing slab separation, can also be obtained between two different ferrite slabs.

  2. Casimir force at a knife's edge

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Shpunt, Alexander; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-03-15

    The Casimir force has been computed exactly for only a few simple geometries, such as infinite plates, cylinders, and spheres. We show that a parabolic cylinder, for which analytic solutions to the Helmholtz equation are available, is another case where such a calculation is possible. We compute the interaction energy of a parabolic cylinder and an infinite plate (both perfect mirrors), as a function of their separation and inclination, H and {theta}, and the cylinder's parabolic radius R. As H/R{yields}0, the proximity force approximation becomes exact. The opposite limit of R/H{yields}0 corresponds to a semi-infinite plate, where the effects of edge and inclination can be probed.

  3. Temperature dependence of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver; Høye, Johan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Casimir force—at first, a rather unexpected consequence of quantum electrodynamics—was discovered by Hendrik Casimir in Eindhoven in 1948. It predicts that two uncharged metal plates experience an attractive force because of the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The idea was tested experimentally in the 1950s and 1960s, but the results were not so accurate that one could make a definite conclusion regarding the existence of the effect. Evgeny Lifshitz expanded the theory in 1955 so as to deal with general dielectric media. Much experimental work was later done to test the theory’s predictions, especially with regards to the temperature dependence of the effect. The existence of the effect itself was verified beyond doubt by Sabisky and Anderson in 1973. Another quarter century had to pass before Lamoreaux and collaborators were able to confirm—or at least make plausible—the temperature dependence predicted by Lifshitz formula in combination with reasonable input data for the material’s dispersive properties. The situation is not yet clear-cut, however, there are recent experiments indicating results in disagreement with those of Lamoreaux. In this paper, a brief review is given of the status of this research field.

  4. Thickness dependence of the Casimir force between a magnetodielectric plate and a diamagnetic plate

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Norio

    2011-11-15

    This paper examines the repulsive Casimir force between a magnetodielectric plate, with static permeability greater than static permittivity, and a diamagnetic plate. As the thickness of the magnetodielectric plate is decreased, the attractive component of the Casimir force decreases more than the repulsive one. This effect makes the net Casimir force repulsive, and a larger repulsive Casimir force is generated compared to the Casimir force between the plates with infinite thickness.

  5. Modal approach to Casimir forces in periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravaia, F.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Dalvit, D. A. R.

    2010-12-15

    We present a modal approach to calculate finite-temperature Casimir interactions between two periodically modulated surfaces. The scattering formula is used and the reflection matrices of the patterned surfaces are calculated by decomposing the electromagnetic field into the natural modes of the structures. The Casimir force gradient from a deeply etched silicon grating is evaluated using the modal approach and compared to experiment for validation. The Casimir force involving a two-dimensional periodic structure is computed and deviations from the proximity force approximation are examined.

  6. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    PubMed Central

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  7. Effect of hydrogen-switchable mirrors on the Casimir force

    PubMed Central

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Lisanti, Mariangela; Capasso, Federico

    2004-01-01

    We present systematic measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated plate and a sphere coated with a hydrogen-switchable mirror. Hydrogen-switchable mirrors are shiny metals that can become transparent upon hydrogenation. Despite such a dramatic change of the optical properties of the sphere, we did not observe any significant decrease of the Casimir force after filling the experimental apparatus with hydrogen. This counterintuitive result can be explained by the Lifshitz theory that describes the Casimir attraction between metallic and dielectric materials. PMID:15024111

  8. Collective behaviors of the Casimir force in microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H. B.; Yelton, J.

    2013-01-23

    Our goal was to explore the strong dependence of the Casimir force on the shape of the interacting bodies. We made significant progress and measured the Casimir force on silicon surface with rectangular corrugation and showed that the results agree with theoretical calculations, provided that the optical properties of silicon are taken into account. Furthermore, we performed measurement of the Casimir force within a single chip for the first time, between a doubly clamped beam and a movable, on-chip electrode at liquid helium temperature. This experiment represents a new way of studying the Casimir effect, a significant advance from the conventional approach of placing an external surface close to a force transducer.

  9. CasimirSim - A Tool to Compute Casimir Polder Forces for Nontrivial 3D Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Sedmik, Rene; Tajmar, Martin

    2007-01-30

    The so-called Casimir effect is one of the most interesting macro-quantum effects. Being negligible on the macro-scale it becomes a governing factor below structure sizes of 1 {mu}m where it accounts for typically 100 kN m-2. The force does not depend on gravity, or electric charge but solely on the materials properties, and geometrical shape. This makes the effect a strong candidate for micro(nano)-mechanical devices M(N)EMS. Despite a long history of research the theory lacks a uniform description valid for arbitrary geometries which retards technical application. We present an advanced state-of-the-art numerical tool overcoming all the usual geometrical restrictions, capable of calculating arbitrary 3D geometries by utilizing the Casimir Polder approximation for the Casimir force.

  10. A design manual for micromachines using Casimir forces: Preliminary considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclay, G. Jordan

    2000-01-01

    General properties of the Casimir force are reviewed, with particular attention to the effects of geometry. Using the conservation of energy, the forces in several simple idealized structures are derived, including the lateral forces on partially overlapping parallel plates, the force in a Casimir ``comb'' drive with several interleaved surfaces, and the average force when a plate is inserted into a rectangular cavity. The properties of rectangular cavities with a moveable piston are discussed, and illustrated with numerical computations. An oscillating structure is proposed. .

  11. Transient Casimir Forces from Quenches in Thermal and Active Matter.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Christian M; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-01-06

    We compute fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces for classical systems after a temperature quench. Using a generic coarse-grained model for fluctuations of a conserved density, we find that transient forces arise even if the initial and final states are force free. In setups reminiscent of Casimir (planar walls) and van der Waals (small inclusions) interactions, we find comparable exact universal expressions for the force. Dynamical details only scale the time axis of transient force curves. We propose that such quenches can be achieved, for instance, in experiments on active matter, employing tunable activity or interaction protocols.

  12. Transient Casimir Forces from Quenches in Thermal and Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Christian M.; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We compute fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces for classical systems after a temperature quench. Using a generic coarse-grained model for fluctuations of a conserved density, we find that transient forces arise even if the initial and final states are force free. In setups reminiscent of Casimir (planar walls) and van der Waals (small inclusions) interactions, we find comparable exact universal expressions for the force. Dynamical details only scale the time axis of transient force curves. We propose that such quenches can be achieved, for instance, in experiments on active matter, employing tunable activity or interaction protocols.

  13. Dynamics of thermal Casimir-Polder forces on polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Simen Aadnoey; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Scheel, Stefan

    2009-05-15

    We study the influence of thermal Casimir-Polder forces on the near-surface trapping of cold polar molecules, with emphasis on LiH and YbF near a Au surface at room temperature. We show that even for a molecule initially prepared in its electronic and rovibrational ground state, the Casimir-Polder force oscillates with the molecule-wall separation. The nonresonant force and the evanescent part of the resonant force almost exactly cancel at high temperature which results in a saturation of the (attractive) force in this limit. This implies that the Casimir-Polder force on a fully thermalized molecule can differ dramatically from that obtained using a naive perturbative expansion of the Lifshitz formula based on the molecular ground-state polarizability. A dynamical calculation reveals how the spatial oscillations die out on a typical time scale of several seconds as thermalization of the molecule with its environment sets in.

  14. The Casimir force between real materials: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2009-10-15

    The physical origin of the Casimir force is connected with the existence of zero-point and thermal fluctuations. The Casimir effect is very general and finds applications in various fields of physics. This review is limited to the rapid progress at the intersection of experiment and theory that has been achieved in the last few years. It includes a critical assessment of the proposed approaches to the resolution of the puzzles arising in the applications of the Lifshitz theory of the van der Waals and Casimir forces to real materials. All the primary experiments on the measurement of the Casimir force between macroscopic bodies and the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a wall that have been performed in the last decade are reviewed, including the theory needed for their interpretation. The methodology for the comparison between experiment and theory in the force-distance measurements is presented. The experimental and theoretical results described here provide a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of dispersion forces in real materials and offer guidance for the application of the Lifshitz theory to the interpretation of the measurement results.

  15. Casimir switch: steering optical transparency with vacuum forces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xi-fang; Li, Yong; Jing, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Casimir force, originating from vacuum zero-point energy, is one of the most intriguing purely quantum effects. It has attracted renewed interests in current field of nanomechanics, due to the rapid size decrease of on-chip devices. Here we study the optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) with a tunable Casimir force. We find that the optical output rate can be significantly altered by the vacuum force, even terminated and then restored, indicating a highly-controlled optical switch. Our result addresses the possibility of designing exotic optical nano-devices by harnessing the power of vacuum. PMID:27256630

  16. Casimir forces in multilayer magnetodielectrics with both gain and loss

    SciTech Connect

    Amooghorban, Ehsan; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kheirandish, Fardin

    2011-07-15

    A path-integral approach to the quantization of the electromagnetic field in a linearly amplifying magnetodielectric medium is presented. Two continua of inverted harmonic oscillators are used to describe the polarizability and magnetizability of the amplifying medium. The causal susceptibilities of the amplifying medium, with negative imaginary parts in finite frequency intervals, are identified and their relationships to microscopic coupling functions are determined. By carefully relating the two-point functions of the field theory to the optical Green functions, we calculate the Casimir energy and Casimir forces for a multilayer magnetodielectric medium with both gain and loss. We point out the essential differences with a purely passive layered medium. For a single layer, we find different bounds on the Casimir force for fully amplifying and for lossy media. The force is attractive in both cases, even if the medium exhibits negative refraction. From our Lagrangian we also derive by canonical quantization the postulates of the phenomenological theory of amplifying magnetodielectrics.

  17. Critical Casimir forces in colloidal suspensions on chemically patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Florian; Zvyagolskaya, Olga; Hertlein, Christopher; Helden, Laurent; Bechinger, Clemens

    2008-11-14

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine in the presence of a chemically patterned substrate. Close to the critical point of the mixture, the particles are subjected to critical Casimir interactions with force components normal and parallel to the surface. Because the strength and sign of these interactions can be tuned by variations in the surface properties and the mixtures temperature, critical Casimir forces allow the formation of highly ordered monolayers but also extend the use of colloids as model systems.

  18. Critical Casimir Forces in Colloidal Suspensions on Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyka, Florian; Zvyagolskaya, Olga; Hertlein, Christopher; Helden, Laurent; Bechinger, Clemens

    2008-11-01

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine in the presence of a chemically patterned substrate. Close to the critical point of the mixture, the particles are subjected to critical Casimir interactions with force components normal and parallel to the surface. Because the strength and sign of these interactions can be tuned by variations in the surface properties and the mixtures temperature, critical Casimir forces allow the formation of highly ordered monolayers but also extend the use of colloids as model systems.

  19. Casimir force phase transitions in the graphene family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2017-03-01

    The Casimir force is a universal interaction induced by electromagnetic quantum fluctuations between any types of objects. The expansion of the graphene family by adding silicene, germanene and stanene (2D allotropes of Si, Ge, and Sn), lends itself as a platform to probe Dirac-like physics in honeycomb staggered systems in such a ubiquitous interaction. We discover Casimir force phase transitions between these staggered 2D materials induced by the complex interplay between Dirac physics, spin-orbit coupling and externally applied fields. In particular, we find that the interaction energy experiences different power law distance decays, magnitudes and dependences on characteristic physical constants. Furthermore, due to the topological properties of these materials, repulsive and quantized Casimir interactions become possible.

  20. Casimir force phase transitions in the graphene family.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Dalvit, Diego A R; Woods, Lilia M

    2017-03-15

    The Casimir force is a universal interaction induced by electromagnetic quantum fluctuations between any types of objects. The expansion of the graphene family by adding silicene, germanene and stanene (2D allotropes of Si, Ge, and Sn), lends itself as a platform to probe Dirac-like physics in honeycomb staggered systems in such a ubiquitous interaction. We discover Casimir force phase transitions between these staggered 2D materials induced by the complex interplay between Dirac physics, spin-orbit coupling and externally applied fields. In particular, we find that the interaction energy experiences different power law distance decays, magnitudes and dependences on characteristic physical constants. Furthermore, due to the topological properties of these materials, repulsive and quantized Casimir interactions become possible.

  1. Casimir force between a microfabricated elliptic cylinder and a plate

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the Casimir force between a microfabricated elliptic cylinder (cylindrical lens) and a plate made of real materials. After a brief discussion of the fabrication procedure, which typically results in elliptic rather than circular cylinders, the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir force and for its gradient are derived. In the specific case of equal semiaxes, the resulting formulas coincide with those derived previously for circular cylinders. The nanofabrication procedure may also result in asymmetric cylindrical lenses obtained from parts of two different cylinders, or rotated through some angle about the axis of the cylinder. In these cases, the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir force between a lens and a plate and for its gradient are also derived, and the influence of lens asymmetry is determined. Additionally, we obtain an expression for the shift of the natural frequency of a micromachined oscillator with an attached elliptic cylindrical lens interacting with a plate via the Casimir force in a nonlinear regime.

  2. Three-dimensional Casimir force between absorbing multilayer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, Christian; Knöll, Ludwig; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar

    2003-09-01

    Recently the influence of dielectric and geometrical properties on the Casimir force between dispersing and absorbing multilayered plates in the zero-temperature limit has been studied within a one-dimensional (1D) quantization scheme for the electromagnetic field in the presence of causal media [R. Esquivel-Sirvent, C. Villarreal, and G.H. Cocoletzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 052108 (2001)]. In the present paper a rigorous 3D analysis is given, which shows that for complex heterostructures the 1D theory only roughly reflects the dependence of the Casimir force on the plate separation in general. Further, an extension of the very recently derived formula for the Casimir force at zero temperature [M.S. Tomaš, Phys. Rev. A 66, 052103 (2002)] to finite temperatures is given, and analytical expressions for specific distance laws in the zero-temperature limit are derived. In particular, it is shown that the Casimir force between two single-slab plates behaves asymptotically like d-6 instead of d-4 (d, plate separation).

  3. Numerical calculation of the Casimir forces between a gold sphere and a nanocomposite sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio; Miura, Kouji; Akamatsu, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2010-11-01

    The repulsive Casimir force is expected as a force which enables to levitate small objects such as machine parts used in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), and superlubricity in MEMS may be realized by this levitation. We study the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a nanocomposite sheet containing many nickel nanoparticles. In particular, we focus on the dependence of the Casimir force on the separation between the gold sphere and the surface of the nanocomposite sheet. The Casimir force changes from the attractive force to the repulsive force as the separation increases. The strength of the repulsive force is, however, too small to levitate MEMS parts.

  4. Nonequilibrium Casimir Force with a Nonzero Chemical Potential for Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaifeng; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new class of nonequilibrium Casimir forces, where the deviation from equilibrium is achieved through the use of a nonzero chemical potential of photons. Such a force can be observed when two semiconductors are brought in close proximity to each other, and when at least one of the semiconductors is subject to an external voltage. By exact numerical calculations of a sphere-plate configuration, we show that in the total force the non-equilibrium component can dominate over its equilibrium counterpart with a relatively modest external voltage, even when the sphere-plate separation is in the nanoscale. As a result, repulsion can be achieved at the nanoscale even with a relatively modest applied voltage. The results here point to a pathway that can significantly advance the quest for observing and harnessing nonequilibrium Casimir forces in solid-state systems.

  5. La force de Casimir et les plasmons de surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2004-11-01

    La présence de fluctuations irréductibles de champ dans le vide est une prédiction importante de la théorie quantique. Ces fluctuations ont de nombreux effets bien connus, dont l'archétype est la force de Casimir apparaîssant entre deux miroirs placés dans le vide par suite de la pression de radiation du vide. Elle a été récemment mesurée avec une précision de l'ordre du %. De nombreux travaux sont consacrés à l'évaluation théorique de cette force en visant une précision du même ordre. Ici nous étudions la force de Casimir dans la configuration de deux miroirs métalliques plans parallèles à température nulle. En supposant les miroirs décrits par un modèle plasma nous interprétons la force de Casimir comme le résultat de l'interaction entre les plasmons de surface des deux miroirs.

  6. Finite-temperature Casimir force between perfectly metallic corrugated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sarabadani, Jalal; Miri, MirFaez

    2011-09-15

    We study the Casimir force between two corrugated plates due to thermal fluctuations of a scalar field. For arbitrary corrugations and temperature T, we provide an analytical expression for the Casimir force, which is exact to second order in the corrugation amplitude. We study the specific case of two sinusoidally corrugated plates with corrugation wavelength {lambda}, lateral displacement b, and mean separation H. We find that the lateral Casimir force is F{sub l}(T,H)sin(2{pi}b/{lambda}). In other words, at all temperatures, the lateral force is a sinusoidal function of the lateral shift. In the limit {lambda}>>H, F{sub l}(T{yields}{infinity},H){proportional_to}k{sub B}TH{sup -4}{lambda}{sup -1}. In the opposite limit {lambda}<

  7. Critical Casimir forces between homogeneous and chemically striped surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2013-11-01

    Recent experiments have measured the critical Casimir force acting on a colloid immersed in a binary liquid mixture near its continuous demixing phase transition and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. Motivated by these experiments, we study the critical behavior of a system, which belongs to the Ising universality class, for the film geometry with one planar wall chemically striped, such that there is a laterally alternating adsorption preference for the two species of the binary liquid mixture, which is implemented by surface fields. For the opposite wall we employ alternatively a homogeneous adsorption preference or homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions, which within a lattice model are realized by open boundary conditions. By means of mean-field theory, Monte Carlo simulations, and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the critical Casimir force acting on the two parallel walls and its corresponding universal scaling function. We show that in the limit of stripe widths small compared with the film thickness, on the striped surface the system effectively realizes Dirichlet boundary conditions, which generically do not hold for actual fluids. Moreover, the critical Casimir force is found to be attractive or repulsive, depending on the width of the stripes of the chemically patterned surface and on the boundary condition applied to the opposing surface.

  8. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  9. Possibility of measuring thermal effects in the Casimir force

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-09-15

    We analyze the possibility of measuring small thermal effects in the Casimir force between metal test bodies in configurations of a sphere above a plate and two parallel plates. For the sphere-plate geometry used in many experiments, we investigate the applicability of the proximity force approximation (PFA) to calculation of thermal effects in the Casimir force and its gradient. It is shown that for real metals the two formulations of the PFA used in the literature lead to relative differences in the results obtained being less than a small parameter equal to the ratio of separation distance to sphere radius. For ideal metals, PFA results for the thermal correction are obtained and compared with available exact results. It is emphasized that in the experimental region in the zeroth order of the small parameter already mentioned, the thermal Casimir force and its gradient calculated using the PFA (and thermal corrections in their own right) coincide with the respective exact results. For real metals, available exact results are outside the application region of the PFA. However, the exact results are shown to converge with the PFA results when the small parameter goes down to experimental values. We arrive at the conclusion that the large thermal effects predicted by the Drude-model approach, if they exist, could be measured in both static and dynamic experiments in sphere-plate and plate-plate configurations. As for the small thermal effects predicted by the plasma-model approach, the static experiment in the configuration of two parallel plates is found to be the best for their observation.

  10. Virtual photons in imaginary time: Computing Casimir forces in new geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-03-01

    One of the most dramatic manifestations of the quantum nature of light in the past half-century has been the Casimir force: a force between neutral objects at close separations caused by quantum vacuum fluctuations in the electromagnetic fields. In classical photonics, wavelength-scale structures can be designed to dramatically alter the behavior of light, so it is natural to consider whether analogous geometry-based effects occur for Casimir forces. However, this problem turns out to be surprisingly difficult for all but the simplest planar geometries. (The deceptively simple case of an infinite plate and infinite cylinder, for perfect metals, was first solved in 2006.) Many formulations of the Casimir force, indeed, correspond to impossibly hard numerical problems. We will describe how the availability of large-scale computing resources in NSF's Teragrid, combined with reformulations of the Casimir-force problem oriented towards numerical computation, are enabling the exploration of Casimir forces in new regimes of geometry and materials.

  11. Casimir force between δ -δ' mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Alessandra N.; Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac δ -δ' point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified δ -δ' point interaction that enables full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified δ -δ' model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  12. Casimir force for a scalar field in warped brane worlds

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, Roman; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Pedraza, Omar

    2008-03-15

    In looking for imprints of extra dimensions in braneworld models one usually builds these so that they are compatible with known low energy physics and thus focuses on high energy effects. Nevertheless, just as submillimeter Newton's law tests probe the mode structure of gravity other low energy tests might apply to matter. As a model example, in this work we determine the 4D Casimir force corresponding to a scalar field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on two parallel planes lying within the single brane of a Randall-Sundrum scenario extended by one compact extra dimension. Using the Green's function method such a force picks the contribution of each field mode as if it acted individually but with a weight given by the square of the mode wave functions on the brane. In the low energy regime one regains the standard 4D Casimir force that is associated to a zero mode in the massless case or to a quasilocalized or resonant mode in the massive one while the effect of the extra dimensions gets encoded as an additional term.

  13. Optical Modification of Casimir Forces for Improved Function of Micro-and Nano-Scale Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been a considerable effort to study the Casimir and van der Waals forces, enabled by the improved ability to measure small forces near surfaces. Because of the continuously growing role of micro- and nanomechanical devices, the focus of this activity has shifted towards the ability to control these forces. Possible approaches to manipulating the Casimir force include development of composite materials, engineered nanostructures, mixed-phase materials, or active elements. So far, practical success has been limited. The role of geometrical factors in the Casimir force is significant. It is known, for example, that the Casimir force between two spherical shells enclosed one into the other is repulsive instead of normal attractive. Unfortunately, nanosurfaces with this topology are very difficult to make. A more direct approach to manipulating and neutralizing the Casimir force is using external mechanical or electromagnetic forces. Unfortunately, the technological overhead of such an approach is quite large. Using electromagnetic compensation instead of mechanical will considerably reduce this overhead and at the same time provide the degree of control over the Casimir force that mechanical springs cannot provide. A mechanical analog behind Casimir forces is shown.

  14. Crossover from attractive to repulsive Casimir forces and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Felix M; Diehl, H W

    2008-09-05

    Systems described by an O(n) symmetrical varphi;{4} Hamiltonian are considered in a d-dimensional film geometry at their bulk critical points. The critical Casimir forces between the film's boundary planes B_{j}, j=1,2, are investigated as functions of film thickness L for generic symmetry-preserving boundary conditions partial differential_{n}phi=c[over composite function]_{j}phi. The L-dependent part of the reduced excess free energy per cross-sectional area takes the scaling form f_{res} approximately D(c_{1}L;{Phi/nu},c_{2}L;{Phi/nu})/L;{d-1} when d<4, where c_{i} are scaling fields associated with the variables c[over composite function]_{i} and Phi is a surface crossover exponent. Explicit two-loop renormalization group results for the function D(c_{1},c_{2}) at d=4- dimensions are presented. These show that (i) the Casimir force can have either sign, depending on c_{1} and c_{2}, and (ii) for appropriate choices of the enhancements c[over composite function]_{j}, crossovers from attraction to repulsion and vice versa occur as L increases.

  15. The role of the "Casimir force analogue" at the microscopic processes of crystallization and melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvildeev, V. N.; Semenycheva, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Melting (crystallization), a phase transition from a crystalline solid to a liquid state, is a common phenomenon in nature. We suggest a new factor, "the Casimir force analogue", to describe mechanisms of melting and crystallization. The Casimir force analogue is a force occurring between the surfaces of solid and liquid phases of metals caused by different energy density of phonons of these phases. It explains abrupt changes in geometry and thermodynamic parameters at a melting point. "The Casimir force analogue" helps to estimate latent melting heat and to gain an insight into a solid-liquid transition problem.

  16. Constraints on Stable Equilibria with Fluctuation-Induced (Casimir) Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten

    2010-08-13

    We examine whether fluctuation-induced forces can lead to stable levitation. First, we analyze a collection of classical objects at finite temperature that contain fixed and mobile charges and show that any arrangement in space is unstable to small perturbations in position. This extends Earnshaw's theorem for electrostatics by including thermal fluctuations of internal charges. Quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are responsible for Casimir or van der Waals interactions. Neglecting permeabilities, we find that any equilibrium position of items subject to such forces is also unstable if the permittivities of all objects are higher or lower than that of the enveloping medium, the former being the generic case for ordinary materials in vacuum.

  17. Measurement of the Casimir force between dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Decca, R S; López, D; Fischbach, E; Krause, D E

    2003-08-01

    The first precise measurement of the Casimir force between dissimilar metals is reported. The attractive force, between a Cu layer evaporated on a microelectromechanical torsional oscillator and an Au layer deposited on an Al2O3 sphere, was measured dynamically with a noise level of 6 fN/sqrt[Hz]. Measurements were performed for separations in the 0.2-2 micro m range. The results agree to better than 1% in the 0.2-0.5 micro m range with a theoretical model that takes into account the finite conductivity and roughness of the two metals. The observed discrepancies, which are much larger than the experimental precision, can be attributed to a lack of a complete characterization of the optical properties of the specific samples used in the experiment.

  18. Investigating the Role of Ferromagnetic Materials on the Casimir Force & Investigation of the Van Der Waals/Casimir Force with Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Mohideen, Umar

    2015-04-14

    Duration of award was from 4/15/10-4/14/15. In this grant period our contributions to the field of VdW/Casimir forces are 24 refereed publications in journals such as Physical Review Letters (4) [1-4], Physical Review B (10) [5-14], Physical Review D (2) [15,16], Applied Physics Letters (1) [17], Review of Scientific Instruments (1) [18] and the International Journal of Modern Physics A (5) [19-23] and B(1) (invited review article [24]). We presented 2 plenary conference talks, 3 lectures at the Pan American School on Frontiers in Casimir Physics, 2 conferences, 1 colloquium and 11 APS talks. If publications are restricted to only those with direct connection to the aims proposed in the prior grant period, then it will be a total of 12: Physical Review Letters (3) [2-4], Physical Review B (6) [6-8,12,13,25], Review of Scientific Instruments (1) [18], International Journal of Modern Physics A (1) [19] and B(1) [169]. A brief aggregated description of the directly connected accomplishments is below. The following topics are detailed: dispersion force measurements with graphene, dispersion force from ferromagnetic metals, conclusion on role of electrostatic patches, UV radiation induced modification of the Casimir force, low temperature measurement of the Casimir force, and Casimir force from thin fluctuating membranes.

  19. Impact of surface imperfections on the Casimir force for lenses of centimeter-size curvature radii

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-02-15

    The impact of imperfections, which are always present on surfaces of lenses with centimeter-size curvature radii, on the Casimir force in the lens-plate geometry is investigated. It is shown that the commonly used formulation of the proximity force approximation is inapplicable for spherical lenses with surface imperfections, such as bubbles and pits. More general expressions for the Casimir force are derived that take surface imperfections into account. Using these expressions, we show that surface imperfections can both increase and decrease the magnitude of the Casimir force up to a few tens percent when compared with the case of a perfectly spherical lens. We demonstrate that the Casimir force between a perfectly spherical lens and a plate described by the Drude model can be made approximately equal to the force between a sphere with some surface imperfection and a plate described by the plasma model, and vice versa. In the case of a metallic sphere and a semiconductor plate, approximately the same Casimir forces are obtained for four different descriptions of charge carriers in the semiconductor if appropriate surface imperfections on the lens surface are present. The conclusion is made that there is a fundamental problem in the interpretation of measurement data for the Casimir force using spherical lenses of centimeter-size radii.

  20. Critical Casimir forces from the equation of state of quantum critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rançon, Adam; Henry, Louis-Paul; Rose, Félix; Cardozo, David Lopes; Dupuis, Nicolas; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2016-10-01

    The mapping between a classical length and inverse temperature as imaginary time provides a direct equivalence between the Casimir force of a classical system in D dimensions and internal energy of a quantum system in d =D -1 dimensions. The scaling functions of the critical Casimir force of the classical system with periodic boundaries thus emerge from the analysis of the symmetry related quantum critical point. We show that both nonperturbative renormalization group and quantum Monte Carlo analysis of quantum critical points provide quantitative estimates for the critical Casimir force in the corresponding classical model, giving access to widely different aspect ratios for the geometry of confined systems. In light of these results, we propose protocols for the realization of critical Casimir forces for periodic boundaries through state-of-the-art cold-atom and solid-state experiments.

  1. Line contribution to the critical Casimir force between a homogeneous and a chemically stepped surface.

    PubMed

    Toldin, Francesco Parisen; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2015-06-03

    Recent experimental realizations of the critical Casimir effect have been implemented by monitoring colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture near demixing and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. In particular, critical Casimir forces have been measured for surfaces consisting of stripes with periodically alternating adsorption preferences, forming chemical steps between them. Motivated by these experiments, we analyze the contribution of such chemical steps to the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and within the Ising universality class. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, mean-field theory and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the universal scaling function associated with the contribution to the critical Casimir force due to individual, isolated chemical steps facing a surface with homogeneous adsorption preference or with Dirichlet boundary condition. In line with previous findings, these results allow one to compute the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and in the presence of arbitrarily shaped, but wide stripes. In this latter limit the force decomposes into a sum of the contributions due to the two homogeneous parts of the surface and due to the chemical steps between the stripes. We assess this decomposition by comparing the resulting sum with actual simulation data for the critical Casimir force in the presence of a chemically striped substrate.

  2. Casimir force in brane worlds: Coinciding results from Green's and zeta function approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, Roman; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Pedraza, Omar

    2010-06-15

    Casimir force encodes the structure of the field modes as vacuum fluctuations and so it is sensitive to the extra dimensions of brane worlds. Now, in flat spacetimes of arbitrary dimension the two standard approaches to the Casimir force, Green's function, and zeta function yield the same result, but for brane world models this was only assumed. In this work we show that both approaches yield the same Casimir force in the case of universal extra dimensions and Randall-Sundrum scenarios with one and two branes added by p compact dimensions. Essentially, the details of the mode eigenfunctions that enter the Casimir force in the Green's function approach get removed due to their orthogonality relations with a measure involving the right hypervolume of the plates, and this leaves just the contribution coming from the zeta function approach. The present analysis corrects previous results showing a difference between the two approaches for the single brane Randall-Sundrum; this was due to an erroneous hypervolume of the plates introduced by the authors when using the Green's function. For all the models we discuss here, the resulting Casimir force can be neatly expressed in terms of two four-dimensional Casimir force contributions: one for the massless mode and the other for a tower of massive modes associated with the extra dimensions.

  3. Results from electrostatic calibrations for measuring the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lombardo, F. C.; Mazzitelli, F. D.; Onofrio, R.

    2010-05-15

    We report on measurements performed on an apparatus aimed to study the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane configuration. The electrostatic calibrations evidence anomalous behaviors in the dependence of the electrostatic force and the minimizing potential upon distance. We discuss analogies and differences of these anomalies with respect to those already observed in the sphere-plane configuration. At the smallest explored distances we observe frequency shifts of non-Coulombian nature preventing the measurement of the Casimir force in the same range. We also report on measurements performed in the parallel-plane configuration, showing that the dependence on distance of the minimizing potential, if present at all, is milder than in the sphere-plane or cylinder-plane geometries. General considerations on the interplay between the distance-dependent minimizing potential and the precision of Casimir force measurements in the range relevant to detect the thermal corrections for all geometries are finally reported.

  4. Critical Casimir force in the presence of random local adsorption preference.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    We study the critical Casimir force for a film geometry in the Ising universality class. We employ a homogeneous adsorption preference on one of the confining surfaces, while the opposing surface exhibits quenched random disorder, leading to a random local adsorption preference. Disorder is characterized by a parameter p, which measures, on average, the portion of the surface that prefers one component, so that p=0,1 correspond to homogeneous adsorption preference. By means of Monte Carlo simulations of an improved Hamiltonian and finite-size scaling analysis, we determine the critical Casimir force. We show that by tuning the disorder parameter p, the system exhibits a crossover between an attractive and a repulsive force. At p=1/2, disorder allows to effectively realize Dirichlet boundary conditions, which are generically not accessible in classical fluids. Our results are relevant for the experimental realizations of the critical Casimir force in binary liquid mixtures.

  5. Repulsive Casimir forces between solid materials with high-refractive-index intervening liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zwol, P. J. van; Palasantzas, G.

    2010-06-15

    In order to explore repulsive Casimir or van der Waals forces between solid materials with liquid as the intervening medium, we analyze dielectric data for a wide range of materials as, for example, (p)olytetrafluoroethylene, polystyrene, silica, and more than 20 liquids. Although significant variation in the dielectric data from different sources exists, we provide a scheme based on measured static dielectric constants, refractive indices, and applying Kramers-Kronig consistency to dielectric data to create accurate dielectric functions at imaginary frequencies. The latter is necessary for more accurate force calculations via the Lifshitz theory, thereby allowing reliable predictions of repulsive Casimir forces.

  6. A Light Sail Inspired Model to Harness Casimir Forces for Propellantless Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    DeBiase, R. L.

    2010-01-28

    The model used to calculate Casimir forces for variously shaped conducting plates in this paper assumes the vacuum energy pervades all space and that photons randomly pop into and out of existence. While they exist, they possess energy and momentum that can be transferred by reflection as in a light sail. Quantum mechanics in the model is entirely bound up in the Casimir equation of force per unit area. This model is compared with two different experiments: that of Chen and Mohideen demonstrating lateral Casimir forces for sinusoidally corrugated spherical and flat plates and Lamoreaux demonstrating normal Casimir forces between a conducting sphere and flat plate. The calculated forces using this model were compared to the forces obtained in these experiments as well as with calculations using the proximity force approximation. In both cases the results (when compared to the actual plates measured and calculated using non-corrected equations) were less than a few parts per thousand different for the range of separation distances used. When the model was used to calculate forces on the opposite plates, different force magnitudes were obtained seemingly indicating prospects for propellentless propulsion but requiring skeptical verification.

  7. Critical adsorption and critical Casimir forces in the canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Markus; Vasilyev, Oleg; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, S.

    2016-08-01

    Critical properties of a liquid film between two planar walls are investigated in the canonical ensemble, within which the total number of fluid particles, rather than their chemical potential, is kept constant. The effect of this constraint is analyzed within mean-field theory (MFT) based on a Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional as well as via Monte Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional Ising model with fixed total magnetization. Within MFT and for finite adsorption strengths at the walls, the thermodynamic properties of the film in the canonical ensemble can be mapped exactly onto a grand canonical ensemble in which the corresponding chemical potential plays the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. However, due to a nonintegrable divergence of the mean-field order parameter profile near a wall, the limit of infinitely strong adsorption turns out to be not well-defined within MFT, because it would necessarily violate the constraint. The critical Casimir force (CCF) acting on the two planar walls of the film is generally found to behave differently in the canonical and grand canonical ensembles. For instance, the canonical CCF in the presence of equal preferential adsorption at the two walls is found to have the opposite sign and a slower decay behavior as a function of the film thickness compared to its grand canonical counterpart. We derive the stress tensor in the canonical ensemble and find that it has the same expression as in the grand canonical case, but with the chemical potential playing the role of the Lagrange multiplier associated with the constraint. The different behavior of the CCF in the two ensembles is rationalized within MFT by showing that, for a prescribed value of the thermodynamic control parameter of the film, i.e., density or chemical potential, the film pressures are identical in the two ensembles, while the corresponding bulk pressures are not.

  8. Rectification of the lateral Casimir force in a vibrating noncontact rack and pinion.

    PubMed

    Ashourvan, Arash; Miri, Mirfaez; Golestanian, Ramin

    2007-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a cylindrical pinion that is kept at a distance from a vibrating rack is studied, and it is shown that the lateral Casimir force between the two corrugated surfaces can be rectified. The effects of friction and external load are taken into account, and it is shown that the pinion can do work against loads of up to a critical value, which is set by the amplitude of the lateral Casimir force. We present a phase diagram for the rectified motion that could help its experimental investigations, as the system exhibits a chaotic behavior in a large part of the parameter space.

  9. Noncontact racK and pinion powered by the lateral Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Ashourvan, Arash; Miri, MirFaez; Golestanian, Ramin

    2007-04-06

    The lateral Casimir force is employed to propose a design for a potentially wear-proof rack and pinion with no contact, which can be miniaturized to the nanoscale. The robustness of the design is studied by exploring the relation between the pinion velocity and the rack velocity in the different domains of the parameter space. The effects of friction and added external load are also examined. It is shown that the device can hold up extremely high velocities, unlike what the general perception of the Casimir force as a weak interaction might suggest.

  10. Edge effects in electrostatic calibrations for the measurement of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qun; Onofrio, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    We have performed numerical simulations to evaluate the effect on the capacitance of finite size boundaries realistically present in the parallel plane, sphere-plane, and cylinder-plane geometries. The potential impact of edge effects in assessing the accuracy of the parameters obtained in the electrostatic calibrations of Casimir force experiments is then discussed.

  11. Nonlocal microscopic theory of Casimir forces at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Despoja, V.; Marusic, L.

    2011-04-15

    The interaction energy between two metallic slabs in the retarded limit at finite temperature is expressed in terms of surface polariton propagators for separate slabs, avoiding the usual matching procedure, with both diamagnetic and paramagnetic excitations included correctly. This enables appropriate treatment of arbitrary electron density profiles and fully nonlocal electronic response, including both collective and single-particle excitations. The results are verified by performing the nonretarded and long-wavelength (local) limits and showing that they reduce to the previously obtained expressions. Possibilities for practical use of the theory are explored by applying it to calculation of various contributions to the Casimir energy between two silver slabs.

  12. Measurement of the Temperature Dependence of the Casimir-Polder Force

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.; Antezza, M.; Stringari, S.; Pitaevskii, L. P.

    2007-02-09

    We report on the first measurement of a temperature dependence of the Casimir-Polder force. This measurement was obtained by positioning a nearly pure {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate a few microns from a dielectric substrate and exciting its dipole oscillation. Changes in the collective oscillation frequency of the magnetically trapped atoms result from spatial variations in the surface-atom force. In our experiment, the dielectric substrate is heated up to 605 K, while the surrounding environment is kept near room temperature (310 K). The effect of the Casimir-Polder force is measured to be nearly 3 times larger for a 605 K substrate than for a room-temperature substrate, showing a clear temperature dependence in agreement with theory.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of a rack-pinion-rack device powered by the Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Miri, MirFaez; Nekouie, Vahid; Golestanian, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Using the lateral Casimir force-a manifestation of the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between objects with corrugated surfaces-as the main force transduction mechanism, a nanomechanical device with rich dynamical behaviors is proposed. The device is made of two parallel racks that are moving in the same direction and a pinion in the middle that couples with both racks via the noncontact lateral Casimir force. The built-in frustration in the device causes it to be very sensitive and react dramatically to minute changes in the geometrical parameters and initial conditions of the system. The noncontact nature of the proposed device could help with the ubiquitous wear problem in nanoscale mechanical systems.

  14. Lateral critical Casimir force in two-dimensional inhomogeneous Ising strip. Exact results.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Piotr; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2016-06-07

    We consider two-dimensional Ising strip bounded by two planar, inhomogeneous walls. The inhomogeneity of each wall is modeled by a magnetic field acting on surface spins. It is equal to +h1 except for a group of N1 neighboring surface spins where it is equal to -h1. The inhomogeneities of the upper and lower wall are shifted with respect to each other by a lateral distance L. Using exact diagonalization of the transfer matrix, we study both the lateral and normal critical Casimir forces as well as magnetization profiles for different temperature regimes: below the wetting temperature, between the wetting and the critical temperature, and above the critical temperature. The lateral critical Casimir force acts in the direction opposite to the shift L, and the excess normal force is always attractive. Upon increasing the shift L we observe, depending on the temperature regime, three different scenarios of breaking of the capillary bridge of negative magnetization connecting the inhomogeneities of the walls across the strip. As long as there exists a capillary bridge in the system, the magnitude of the excess total critical Casimir force is almost constant, with its direction depending on L. By investigating the bridge morphologies we have found a relation between the point at which the bridge breaks and the inflection point of the force. We provide a simple argument that some of the properties reported here should also hold for different models of the strip with the same type of inhomogeneity.

  15. Critical Casimir force and its fluctuations in lattice spin models: exact and Monte Carlo results.

    PubMed

    Dantchev, Daniel; Krech, Michael

    2004-04-01

    We present general arguments and construct a stress tensor operator for finite lattice spin models. The average value of this operator gives the Casimir force of the system close to the bulk critical temperature T(c). We verify our arguments via exact results for the force in the two-dimensional Ising model, d -dimensional Gaussian, and mean spherical model with 2Casimir force F(C) in a slab geometry confining a critical substance in-between is k(b) TD(T) (A/ a(d-1) )(1/2), where A is the surface area of the plates, a is the lattice spacing, and D(T) is a slowly varying nonuniversal function of the temperature T. The numerical calculations demonstrate that at the critical temperature T(c) the force possesses a Gaussian distribution centered at the mean value of the force = k(b) T(c) (d-1)Delta/ (L/a)(d), where L is the distance between the plates and Delta is the (universal) Casimir amplitude.

  16. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir forces between surfaces with alternating boundary conditions in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubail, J.; Santachiara, R.; Emig, T.

    2017-03-01

    Systems as diverse as binary mixtures and inclusions in biological membranes, and many more, can be described effectively by interacting spins. When the critical fluctuations in these systems are constrained by boundary conditions, critical Casimir forces (CCF) emerge. Here we analyze CCF between boundaries with alternating boundary conditions in two dimensions, employing conformal field theory (CFT). After presenting the concept of boundary changing operators, we specifically consider two different boundary configurations for a strip of critical Ising spins: (I) alternating equi-sized domains of up and down spins on both sides of the strip, with a possible lateral shift, and (II) alternating domains of up and down spins of different size on one side and homogeneously fixed spins on the other side of the strip. Asymptotic results for the CCF at small and large distances are derived. We introduce a novel modified Szegö formula for determinants of real antisymmetric block Toeplitz matrices to obtain the exact CCF and the corresponding scaling functions at all distances. We demonstrate the existence of a surface renormalization group flow between universal force amplitudes of different magnitude and sign. The Casimir force can vanish at a stable equilibrium position that can be controlled by parameters of the boundary conditions. Lateral Casimir forces assume a universal simple cosine form at large separations.

  17. Effect of temperature variations on equilibrium distances in levitating parallel dielectric plates interacting through Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteso, Victoria; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Míguez, Hernán

    2016-04-01

    We study at thermal equilibrium the effect of temperature deviations around room temperature on the equilibrium distance (deq) at which thin films made of Teflon, silica, or polystyrene immersed in glycerol levitate over a silicon substrate due to the balance of Casimir, gravity, and buoyancy forces. We find that the equilibrium nature (stable or unstable) of deq is preserved under temperature changes, and provide simple rules to predict whether the new equilibrium position will occur closer to or further from the substrate at the new temperature. These rules depend on the static permittivities of all materials comprised in the system ( ɛ0 ( m ) ) and the equilibrium nature of deq. Our designed dielectric configuration is excellent for experimental observation of thermal effects on the Casimir force indirectly detected through the tunable equilibrium distances (with slab thickness and material properties) in levitation mode.

  18. Critical Casimir forces between defects in the 2D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, P.; Maciołek, A.; Dietrich, S.

    2016-12-01

    An exact statistical mechanical derivation is given of the critical Casimir interactions between two defects in a planar lattice-gas Ising model. Each defect is a finite group of nearest-neighbor spins with modified coupling constants. Such a system can be regarded as a model of a binary liquid mixture with the molecules confined to a membrane and the defects mimicking protein inclusions embedded into the membrane. As suggested by recent experiments, certain cellular membranes appear to be tuned to the proximity of a critical demixing point belonging to the two-dimensional Ising universality class. Therefore one can expect the emergence of critical Casimir forces between membrane inclusions. These forces are governed by universal scaling functions, which we derive for simple defects. We prove that the scaling law appearing at criticality is the same for all types of defects considered here.

  19. Stable Levitation and Alignment of Compact Objects by Casimir Spring Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Zaheer, Saad

    2010-02-19

    We investigate a stable Casimir force configuration consisting of an object contained inside a spherical or spheroidal cavity filled with a dielectric medium. The spring constant for displacements from the center of the cavity and the dependence of the energy on the relative orientations of the inner object and the cavity walls are computed. We find that the stability of the force equilibrium--unlike the direction of the torque--can be predicted based on the sign of the force between two slabs of the same material.

  20. Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force for Au Using a Dynamic Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Castillo-Garza, R.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2012-07-01

    The gradient of the Casimir force between carefully cleaned Au surfaces of a sphere and a plate is measured using a dynamic atomic force microscope in the frequency modulation regime in high vacuum. The electrostatic calibration of the setup did not reveal any effect of patches or surface contaminants. The experimental data for the force gradient are found to be consistent with theory using the plasma model approach over the entire measurement range. The Drude model approach is excluded by the data at separations from 235 to 400 nm at a 67% confidence level.

  1. Thermal noise limitations to force measurements with torsion pendulums: Applications to the measurement of the Casimir force and its thermal correction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.; Buttler, W.T.

    2005-03-01

    A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular we elaborate on the prospects for measuring the thermal correction.

  2. Noncontact gears. I. Next-to-leading order contribution to the lateral Casimir force between corrugated parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Cavero-Pelaez, Ines; Milton, Kimball A.; Parashar, Prachi; Shajesh, K. V.

    2008-09-15

    We calculate the lateral Casimir force between corrugated parallel plates, described by {delta}-function potentials, interacting through a scalar field, using the multiple scattering formalism. The contributions to the Casimir energy due to uncorrugated parallel plates is treated as a background from the outset. We derive the leading- and next-to-leading-order contribution to the lateral Casimir force for the case when the corrugation amplitudes are small in comparison to corrugation wavelengths. We present explicit results in terms of finite integrals for the case of the Dirichlet limit, and exact results for the weak-coupling limit, for the leading- and next-to-leading-orders. The correction due to the next-to-leading contribution is significant. In the weak coupling limit we calculate the lateral Casimir force exactly in terms of a single integral which we evaluate numerically. Exact results for the case of the weak limit allows us to estimate the error in the perturbative results. We show that the error in the lateral Casimir force, in the weak coupling limit, when the next-to-leading order contribution is included is remarkably low when the corrugation amplitudes are small in comparison to corrugation wavelengths. We expect similar conclusions to hold for the Dirichlet case. The analogous calculation for the electromagnetic case should reduce the theoretical error sufficiently for comparison with the experiments.

  3. Casimir-Polder-like force on an atom outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jialin; Yu Hongwei

    2011-10-15

    We calculate, in the framework of open quantum systems, the ground state energy-level shift for a static two-level atom outside a spherically symmetric black hole in interaction with fluctuating massless scalar fields in the Boulware and Unruh vacuums. We find that the energy-level shift is position dependent and thus gives rise to a force on the atom besides the classical gravitational force. For the case of the Boulware vacuum that represents a star which has not collapsed through its event horizon, this force is attractive near the horizon and is repulsive far away from the black hole with a behavior of r{sup -3}. For the case of the Unruh vacuum which represents a radiating black hole, we find that the contribution to the Casimir-Polder-like force due to the presence of Hawking radiation is always attractive and, remarkably, this attractive force diverges at the event horizon.

  4. Measurement of the Casimir force between Germanium plates using a torsion balance

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego; Kim, W J; Sushkov, A O; Lamoreaux, S K

    2008-01-01

    We report the measurement of the Casimir force between Ge plates in a sphere-plane configuration using a torsion balance. We observe that the effective contact potential between the plates varies with their separation distance, resulting in a systematic force. In addition, an unexpected 1/d force is also found in our data that persists even when the electrostatic force between the plates is experimentally minimized by applying a compensating potential. After applying corrections due to these systematic forces, likely of electrostatic origin, our result can be described by the bare permittivity of Ge without conduction, the Drude and the diffusion models for electrical and optical properties of Ge, but not by the plasma model.

  5. Strong Thermal and Electrostatic Manipulation of the Casimir Force in Graphene Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Chahine; Guizal, Brahim; Antezza, Mauro

    2017-03-01

    We show that graphene-dielectric multilayers give rise to an unusual tunability of the Casimir-Lifshitz forces and allow to easily realize completely different regimes within the same structure. Concerning thermal effects, graphene-dielectric multilayers take advantage of the anomalous features predicted for isolated suspended graphene sheets, even though they are considerably affected by the presence of the dielectric substrate. They can also achieve the anomalous nonmonotonic thermal metallic behavior by increasing the graphene sheets density and their Fermi level. In addition to a strong thermal modulation occurring at short separations, in a region where the force is orders of magnitude larger than the one occurring at large distances, the force can be also adjusted by varying the number of graphene layers as well as their Fermi levels, allowing for relevant force amplifications which can be tuned, very rapidly and in situ, by simply applying an electric potential. Our predictions can be relevant for both Casimir experiments and micro- or nanoelectromechanical systems and in new devices for technological applications.

  6. Calculation of nonzero-temperature Casimir forces in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kai; Reid, M. T. Homer; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob K.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-04-15

    We show how to compute Casimir forces at nonzero temperatures with time-domain electromagnetic simulations, for example, using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Compared to our previous zero-temperature time-domain method, only a small modification is required, but we explain that some care is required to properly capture the zero-frequency contribution. We validate the method against analytical and numerical frequency-domain calculations, and show a surprising high-temperature disappearance of a nonmonotonic behavior previously demonstrated in a pistonlike geometry.

  7. Van der Waals, Casimir, and Lifshitz forces in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    2015-09-01

    E M Lifshitz's theory of fluctuation molecular forces (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz., Vol. 29, p. 94, 1955 [Sov. Phys. JETP, Vol. 2, 73, 1956]) and related problems are introduced from a historical perspective. Applications of the theory to soft matter physics are discussed, together with some new predictions (for example, the stability of smectic or cholesteric liquid crystal films).

  8. Virtual photons in imaginary time: Computing exact Casimir forces via standard numerical electromagnetism techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2007-09-15

    We describe a numerical method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries, for arbitrary dielectric and metallic materials, with arbitrary accuracy (given sufficient computational resources). Our approach, based on well-established integration of the mean stress tensor evaluated via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, is designed to directly exploit fast methods developed for classical computational electromagnetism, since it only involves repeated evaluation of the Green's function for imaginary frequencies (equivalently, real frequencies in imaginary time). We develop the approach by systematically examining various formulations of Casimir forces from the previous decades and evaluating them according to their suitability for numerical computation. We illustrate our approach with a simple finite-difference frequency-domain implementation, test it for known geometries such as a cylinder and a plate, and apply it to new geometries. In particular, we show that a pistonlike geometry of two squares sliding between metal walls, in both two and three dimensions with both perfect and realistic metallic materials, exhibits a surprising nonmonotonic ''lateral'' force from the walls.

  9. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  10. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-27

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  11. Theoretical modeling of the Casimir force-induced instability in freestanding nanowires with circular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhabadi, Amin; Abadian, Naeime; Rach, Randolph; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2014-09-01

    The Casimir force can induce instability and adhesion in freestanding nanostructures. Previous research efforts in this area have exclusively focused on modeling the instability in structures with planar or rectangular cross-section, while, to the best knowledge of the authors, no attention has been paid to investigate this phenomenon for nanowires with circular cross-section. In this study, effects of the Casimir force on the instability and adhesion of freestanding Cylinder-Plate and Cylinder-Cylinder geometries are investigated, which are commonly encountered in real nanodevices. To compute the Casimir force, two approaches, i.e. the proximity force approximation (PFA) for small separations and Dirichlet asymptotic approximation (scattering theory) for large separations, are considered. A continuum mechanics theory is employed, in conjunction with the Euler-beam model, to obtain constitutive equations of the systems. The governing nonlinear constitutive equations of the nanostructures are solved using two different approaches, i.e. the analytical modified Adomian decomposition (MAD) and the numerical finite difference method (FDM). The detachment length and minimum gap, both of which prevent the Casimir force-induced adhesion, are computed for both configurations.

  12. On the use of the proximity force approximation for deriving limits to short-range gravitational-like interactions from sphere-plane Casimir force experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Onofrio, Roberto

    2009-09-15

    We discuss the role of the proximity force approximation in deriving limits to the existence of Yukawian forces--predicted in the submillimeter range by many unification models--from Casimir force experiments using the sphere-plane geometry. Two forms of this approximation are discussed, the first used in most analyses of the residuals from the Casimir force experiments performed so far, and the second recently discussed in this context in R. Decca et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 124021 (2009)]. We show that the former form of the proximity force approximation overestimates the expected Yukawa force and that the relative deviation from the exact Yukawa force is of the same order of magnitude, in the realistic experimental settings, as the relative deviation expected between the exact Casimir force and the Casimir force evaluated in the proximity force approximation. This implies both a systematic shift making the actual limits to the Yukawa force weaker than claimed so far, and a degree of uncertainty in the {alpha}-{lambda} plane related to the handling of the various approximations used in the theory for both the Casimir and the Yukawa forces. We further argue that the recently discussed form for the proximity force approximation is equivalent, for a geometry made of a generic object interacting with an infinite planar slab, to the usual exact integration of any additive two-body interaction, without any need to invoke approximation schemes. If the planar slab is of finite size, an additional source of systematic error arises due to the breaking of the planar translational invariance of the system, and we finally discuss to what extent this may affect limits obtained on power-law and Yukawa forces.

  13. Electromagnetic energy, absorption, and Casimir forces: Uniform dielectric media in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, F. S. S.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Milonni, P. W.

    2010-03-01

    The derivation of Casimir forces between dielectrics can be simplified by ignoring absorption, calculating energy changes due to displacements of the dielectrics, and only then admitting absorption by allowing permittivities to be complex. As a first step toward a better understanding of this situation we consider in this article the model of a dielectric as a collection of oscillators, each of which is coupled to a reservoir giving rise to damping and Langevin forces on the oscillators and a noise polarization acting as a source of a fluctuating electromagnetic field in the dielectric. The model leads naturally to expressions for the quantized electric and magnetic fields that are consistent with those obtained in approaches that diagonalize the coupled system of oscillators for the dielectric medium, the reservoir, and the electromagnetic field. It also results in a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the noise polarization and the imaginary part of the permittivity; comparison with the Rytov fluctuation-dissipation relation employed in the well-known Lifshitz theory for the van der Waals (or Casimir) force shows that the Lifshitz theory is actually a classical stochastic electrodynamical theory. The approximate classical expression for the energy density in a band of frequencies at which absorption in a dielectric is negligible is shown to be exact as a spectral thermal equilibrium expectation value in quantum electrodynamic theory. Our main result is the derivation of an expression for the QED energy density of a uniform dispersive, absorbing media in thermal equilibrium. The spectral density of the energy is found to have the same form with or without absorption. We also show how the fluctuation-dissipation theorem ensures a detailed balance of energy exchange between the (absorbing) medium, the reservoir, and the electromagnetic field in thermal equilibrium.

  14. Casimir force between a half-space and a plate of finite thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Johan S.; Brevik, Iver

    2016-05-01

    Zero-frequency Casimir theory is analyzed from different viewpoints, with the aim of obtaining further insight into the delicate Drude-plasma issue that turns up when one considers thermal corrections to the Casimir force. The problem is essentially that the plasma model, physically inferior in comparison to the Drude model since it leaves out dissipation in the material, apparently gives the best results when comparing with recent experiments. Our geometric setup is quite conventional, namely, a dielectric plate separated from a dielectric half-space by a vacuum gap, both media being made of the same material. Our investigation is divided into the following categories: (1) Making use of the statistical-mechanical method developed by J. S. Høye and I. Brevik [Physica A (Amsterdam, Neth.) 259, 165 (1998), 10.1016/S0378-4371(98)00249-0], implying that the quantized electromagnetic field is replaced by interaction between dipole moments oscillating in harmonic potentials, we first verify that the Casimir force is in agreement with the Drude prediction. No use of Fresnel's reflection coefficients is made at this stage. (2) Then turning to the field-theoretic description implying use of the reflection coefficients, we derive results in agreement with the forgoing when first setting the frequency equal to zero, before letting the permittivity become large. With the plasma relation the reflection coefficient for TE zero-frequency modes depends on the component of the wave vector parallel to the surfaces and lies between 0 and 1. This contradicts basic electrostatic theory. (3) Turning to high-permeability magnetic materials, the TE zero-frequency mode describes the static magnetic field in the same way the TM zero-frequency modes describe the static electric fields in electrostatics. With the plasma model magnetic fields, except for a small part, cannot pass through metals; that is, metals effectively become superconductors. However, recent experimental results clearly

  15. Constraints on non-Newtonian gravity from measuring the Casimir force in a configuration with nanoscale rectangular corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-04-01

    We report constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from measurements of the gradient of the Casimir force in the configuration of an Au-coated sphere above a Si plate covered with corrugations of trapezoidal shape. For this purpose, the exact expression for the gradient of Yukawa force in the experimental configuration is derived and compared with that obtained using the proximity force approximation. The reported constraints are of almost the same strength as those found previously from several different experiments on the Casimir force and extend over a wide interaction range from 30 to 1260 nm. It is discussed how to make them stronger by replacing the material of the plate.

  16. Exact results for the behavior of the thermodynamic Casimir force in a model with a strong adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantchev, Daniel M.; Vassilev, Vassil M.; Djondjorov, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    When massless excitations are limited or modified by the presence of material bodies one observes a force acting between them generally called Casimir force. Such excitations are present in any fluid system close to its true bulk critical point. We derive exact analytical results for both the temperature and external ordering field behavior of the thermodynamic Casimir force within the mean-field Ginzburg-Landau Ising type model of a simple fluid or binary liquid mixture. We investigate the case when under a film geometry the boundaries of the system exhibit strong adsorption onto one of the phases (components) of the system. We present analytical and numerical results for the (temperature-field) relief map of the force in both the critical region of the film close to its finite-size or bulk critical points as well as in the capillary condensation regime below but close to the finite-size critical point.

  17. Electromagnetic Casimir forces of parabolic cylinder and knife-edge geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Shpunt, Alexander; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2011-06-15

    An exact calculation of electromagnetic scattering from a perfectly conducting parabolic cylinder is employed to compute Casimir forces in several configurations. These include interactions between a parabolic cylinder and a plane, two parabolic cylinders, and a parabolic cylinder and an ordinary cylinder. To elucidate the effect of boundaries, special attention is focused on the 'knife-edge' limit in which the parabolic cylinder becomes a half-plane. Geometrical effects are illustrated by considering arbitrary rotations of a parabolic cylinder around its focal axis, and arbitrary translations perpendicular to this axis. A quite different geometrical arrangement is explored for the case of an ordinary cylinder placed in the interior of a parabolic cylinder. All of these results extend simply to nonzero temperatures.

  18. Pronounced minimum of the thermodynamic Casimir forces of O(n) symmetric film systems: analytic theory.

    PubMed

    Dohm, Volker

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic Casimir forces of film systems in the O(n) universality classes with Dirichlet boundary conditions are studied below bulk criticality. Substantial progress is achieved in resolving the long-standing problem of describing analytically the pronounced minimum of the scaling function observed experimentally in ^{4}He films (n=2) by Garcia and Chan [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1187 (1999)] and in Monte Carlo simulations for the three-dimensional Ising model (n=1) by O. Vasilyev et al. [Europhys. Lett. 80, 60009 (2007)]. Our finite-size renormalization-group approach describes the film systems as the limit of finite-slab systems with vanishing aspect ratio. This yields excellent agreement with the depth and the position of the minimum for n=1 and semiquantitative agreement with the minimum for n=2. Our theory also predicts a pronounced minimum for the n=3 Heisenberg universality class.

  19. Measurement of the Casimir-Polder force through center-of-mass oscillations of a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Harber, D.M.; Obrecht, J.M.; McGuirk, J.M.; Cornell, E.A.

    2005-09-15

    We have performed a measurement of the Casimir-Polder force using a magnetically trapped {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. By detecting perturbations of the frequency of center-of-mass oscillations of the condensate perpendicular to the surface, we are able to detect this force at a distance {approx}5 {mu}m, significantly farther than has been previously achieved, and at a precision approaching that needed to detect the modification due to thermal radiation. Additionally, this technique provides a limit for the presence of non-Newtonian gravity forces in the {approx}1 {mu}m range.

  20. Critical Casimir force scaling functions of the two-dimensional Ising model at finite aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobrecht, Hendrik; Hucht, Alfred

    2017-02-01

    We present a systematic method to calculate the universal scaling functions for the critical Casimir force and the according potential of the two-dimensional Ising model with various boundary conditions. Therefore we start with the dimer representation of the corresponding partition function Z on an L× M square lattice, wrapped around a torus with aspect ratio ρ =L/M . By assuming periodic boundary conditions and translational invariance in at least one direction, we systematically reduce the problem to a 2× 2 transfer matrix representation. For the torus we first reproduce the results by Kaufman and then give a detailed calculation of the scaling functions. Afterwards we present the calculation for the cylinder with open boundary conditions. All scaling functions are given in form of combinations of infinite products and integrals. Our results reproduce the known scaling functions in the limit of thin films ρ \\to 0 . Additionally, for the cylinder at criticality our results confirm the predictions from conformal field theory.

  1. Casimir frictional drag force between a SiO2 tip and a graphene-covered SiO2 substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of the mechanical detection of the Casimir friction using noncontact force microscope is discussed. On a SiO2 tip situated above a graphene-covered SiO2 substrate will act the frictional drag force mediated by a fluctuating electromagnetic field produced by a current in the graphene sheet. This friction force will produce the bending of the cantilever, which can be measured by state-of-art noncontact force microscope. Both the thermal and quantum contributions to the Casimir frictional drag force can be studied using this experimental setup. This result paves the way for the mechanical detection of the Casimir friction and for the application of the frictional drag effect in micro- and nanoelectromechanical devices (MEMS and NEMS).

  2. Nanolevitation Phenomena in Real Plane-Parallel Systems Due to the Balance between Casimir and Gravity Forces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on the theoretical analysis of equilibrium distances in real plane-parallel systems under the influence of Casimir and gravity forces at thermal equilibrium. Due to the balance between these forces, thin films of Teflon, silica, or polystyrene in a single-layer configuration and immersed in glycerol stand over a silicon substrate at certain stable or unstable positions depending on the material and the slab thickness. Hybrid systems containing silica and polystyrene, materials which display Casimir forces and equilibrium distances of opposite nature when considered individually, are analyzed in either bilayer arrangements or as composite systems made of a homogeneous matrix with small inclusions inside. For each configuration, equilibrium distances and their stability can be adjusted by fine-tuning of the volume occupied by each material. We find the specific conditions under which nanolevitation of realistic films should be observed. Our results indicate that thin films of real materials in plane-parallel configurations can be used to control suspension or stiction phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:26405466

  3. Vacuum Fluctuation Force on a Rigid Casimir Cavity in de Sitter and Schwarzschild-De Sitter Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the net force on a rigid Casimir cavity generated by vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field in three cases: de Sitter space-time, de Sitter space-time with weak gravitational field and Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time. In de Sitter space-time the resulting net force follows the square inverse law but unfortunately it is too weak to be measurable due to the large universe radius. By introducing a weak gravitational field into the de Sitter space-time, we find that the net force can now be split into two parts, one is the gravitational force due to the induced effective mass between the two plates and the other one is generated by the metric structure of de Sitter space-time. In order to investigate the vacuum fluctuation force on the rigid cavity under strong gravitational field, we perform a similar analysis in Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time and results are obtained in three different limits. The most interesting one is when the cavity gets closer to the horizon of a blackhole, square inverse law is recovered and the repulsive force due to negative energy/mass of the cavity now has an observable strength. More importantly the force changes from being repulsive to attractive when the cavity crosses the event horizon, so that the energy/mass of the cavity switches the sign, which suggests the unusual time direction inside the event horizon.

  4. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razmi, H.; Abdollahi, M.

    2008-11-01

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock!

  5. From optical lattice clocks to the measurement of forces in the Casimir regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Peter; Lemonde, Pierre; Bize, Sebastien; Landragin, Arnaud; Clairon, Andre; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2007-06-15

    We describe an experiment based on atoms trapped close to a macroscopic surface, to study the interactions between the atoms and the surface at very small separations (0.6-10 {mu}m). In this range the dominant potential is the QED interaction (Casimir-Polder and van der Waals) between the surface and the atom. Additionally, several theoretical models suggest the possibility of Yukawa-type potentials with sub-millimeter range, arising from new physics related to gravity. The proposed setup is very similar to neutral atom optical lattice clocks, but with the atoms trapped in lattice sites close to the reflecting mirror. A sequence of pulses of the probe laser at different frequencies is then used to create an interferometer with a coherent superposition between atomic states at different distances from the mirror (in different lattice sites). Assuming atom interferometry state-of-the-art measurement of the phase difference and a duration of the superposition of about 0.1 s, we expect to be able to measure the potential difference between separated states with an uncertainty of {approx_equal}10{sup -4} Hz. An analysis of systematic effects for different atoms and surfaces indicates no fundamentally limiting effect at the same level of uncertainty, but does influence the choice of atom and surface material. Based on those estimates, we expect that such an experiment would improve the best existing measurements of the atom-wall QED interaction by {>=} 2 orders of magnitude, while gaining up to four orders of magnitude on the best present limits on new interactions in the range between 100 nm and 100 {mu}m.

  6. Fundamental optics: On-chip Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.

    2017-02-01

    Measurement of the forces that arise from quantum vacuum fluctuations between closely spaced surfaces typically requires large apparatus, making applications difficult. Now, an experiment on a silicon chip to measure the Casimir force has been realized.

  7. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  8. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  9. Casimir force for a scalar field in a single brane world

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, R.; Morales-Tecotl, H. A.; Pedraza, O.

    2010-02-10

    Vacuum force is an interesting low energy test for brane worlds due to its dependence on field's modes and its role in submillimeter gravity experiments. In this contribution we obtain the scalar field vacuum force between two parallel plates lying in the brane of a Randall-Sundrum scenario extended by p compact dimensions (RSII-{sub p}). We obtain the force using the Green's function technique and we compare our results with the ones obtained by using the zeta function regularization method. As a result we obtain agreement in the expression for the force independently of the method used, thus we solve a previous discrepancy between the two approaches.

  10. Casimir stress in an inhomogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, T.G. Xiong, C.; Leonhardt, U.

    2010-03-15

    The Casimir effect in an inhomogeneous dielectric is investigated using Lifshitz's theory of electromagnetic vacuum energy. A permittivity function that depends continuously on one Cartesian coordinate is chosen, bounded on each side by homogeneous dielectrics. The result for the Casimir stress is infinite everywhere inside the inhomogeneous region, a divergence that does not occur for piece-wise homogeneous dielectrics with planar boundaries. A Casimir force per unit volume can be extracted from the infinite stress but it diverges on the boundaries between the inhomogeneous medium and the homogeneous dielectrics. An alternative regularization of the vacuum stress is considered that removes the contribution of the inhomogeneity over small distances, where macroscopic electromagnetism is invalid. The alternative regularization yields a finite Casimir stress inside the inhomogeneous region, but the stress and force per unit volume diverge on the boundaries with the homogeneous dielectrics. The case of inhomogeneous dielectrics with planar boundaries thus falls outside the current understanding of the Casimir effect.

  11. Theoretical ingredients of a Casimir analog computer

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    We derive a correspondence between the contour integration of the Casimir stress tensor in the complex-frequency plane and the electromagnetic response of a physical dissipative medium in a finite real-frequency bandwidth. The consequences of this correspondence are at least threefold: First, the correspondence makes it easier to understand Casimir systems from the perspective of conventional classical electromagnetism, based on real-frequency responses, in contrast to the standard imaginary-frequency point of view based on Wick rotations. Second, it forms the starting point of finite-difference time-domain numerical techniques for calculation of Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries. Finally, this correspondence is also key to a technique for computing quantum Casimir forces at micrometer scales using antenna measurements at tabletop (e.g., centimeter) scales, forming a type of analog computer for the Casimir force. Superficially, relationships between the Casimir force and the classical electromagnetic Green’s function are well known, so one might expect that any experimental measurement of the Green’s function would suffice to calculate the Casimir force. However, we show that the standard forms of this relationship lead to infeasible experiments involving infinite bandwidth or exponentially growing fields, and a fundamentally different formulation is therefore required. PMID:20460309

  12. Reply to comment on ""Anomalies in electrostatic calibrations for the measurement of the Casimir force in a sphere-plane geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A; Kim, W J; Borwn-hayes, M; Brownell, J H; Onofrio, R

    2008-01-01

    In a recent Comment, Decca et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 026101 (2009)] discussed the origin of the anomalies recently reported by us in Phys. Rev. A 78, 036102(R) (2008). Here we restate our view corroborated by their considerations that quantitative geometrical and electrostatic characterizations of the conducting surfaces (a topic not discussed explicitly in the literature until very recently) are critical for the assessment of precision and accuracy of the demonstration of the Casimir force and for deriving meaningful limits on the existence of Yukawian components possibly superimposed to the Newtonian gravitational interaction.

  13. Fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane and classical Casimir-Polder force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-05-01

    We start with the well-known expression for the vacuum polarization and suitably modify it for 2+1-dimensional spin-orbit coupled (SOC) fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane described by the low-energy Liu-Yao-Feng-Ezawa (LYFE) model Hamiltonian involving the Dirac matrices in the chiral representation obeying the Clifford algebra. The silicene and germanene fit this description suitably. They have the Dirac cones similar to those of graphene and SOC is much stronger. The system could be normal or ferromagnetic in nature. The silicene turns into the latter type if there is exchange field arising due to the proximity coupling to a ferromagnet (FM) such as depositing Fe atoms to the silicene surface. For the silicene, we find that the many-body effects considerably change the bare Coulomb potential by way of the dependence of the Coulomb propagator on the real-spin, iso-spin and the potential due to an electric field applied perpendicular to the silicene plane. The computation aspect of the Casimir-Polder force (CPF) needs to be investigated in this paper. An important quantity in this process is the dielectric response function (DRF) of the material. The plasmon branch was obtained by finding the zeros of DRF in the long-wavelength limit. This leads to the plasmon frequencies. We find that the collective charge excitations at zero doping, i.e., intrinsic plasmons, in this system, are absent in the Dirac limit. The valley-spin-split intrinsic plasmons, however, come into being in the case of the massive Dirac particles with characteristic frequency close to 10 THz. Our scheme to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction (CPI) of a micro-particle with a sheet involves replacing the dielectric constant of the sample in the CPI expression obtained on the basis of the Lifshitz theory by the static DRF obtained using the expressions for the polarization function we started with. Though the approach replaces a macroscopic constant by a microscopic

  14. Influence de la dépendance en température des propriétés optiques des matériaux sur la force de Casimir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulain, K.; Henkel, C.; Greffet, J.-J.

    2006-10-01

    Nous évaluons la force de Casimir entre deux surfaces planes métalliques constituées d'argent. Nous prenons, pour effectuer cette évaluation, des propriétés optiques de l'argent à différentes températures [1]. Nous montrons que cette dépendance en température modifie la force de Casimir (de 0.2%) y compris à des distances inférieures à la longueur d'onde thermique.

  15. Bulk Casimir densities and vacuum interaction forces in higher dimensional brane models

    SciTech Connect

    Saharian, Aram A.

    2006-03-15

    Vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor and the vacuum interaction forces are evaluated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter satisfying Robin boundary conditions on two codimension one parallel branes embedded in (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime AdS{sub D{sub 1}}{sub +1}x{sigma} with a warped internal space {sigma}. The vacuum energy-momentum tensor is presented as a sum of boundary-free, single brane-induced, and interference parts. The latter is finite everywhere including the points on the branes and is exponentially small for large interbrane distances. Unlike to the purely anti-de Sitter (AdS) bulk, the part induced by a single brane, in addition to the distance from the brane, depends also on the position of the brane in the bulk. The asymptotic behavior of this part is investigated for the points near the brane and for the position of the brane close to the AdS horizon and AdS boundary. The contribution of Kaluza-Klein modes along {sigma} is discussed in various limiting cases. The vacuum forces acting on the branes are presented as a sum of the self-action and interaction terms. The first one contains well-known surface divergences and needs a further renormalization. The interaction forces between the branes are finite for all nonzero interbrane distances and are investigated as functions of the brane positions and the length scale of the internal space. We show that there is a region in the space of parameters in which these forces are repulsive for small distances and attractive for large distances. As an example, the case {sigma}=S{sup D{sub 2}} is considered. An application to the higher dimensional generalization of the Randall-Sundrum brane model with arbitrary mass terms on the branes is discussed. Taking the limit with infinite curvature radius for the AdS bulk, from the general formulas we derive the results for two parallel Robin plates on background of R{sup (D{sub 1},1)}x{sigma} spacetime.

  16. Fermionic Casimir effect with helix boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang-hua; Li, Xin-zhou; Feng, Chao-Jun

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the fermionic Casimir effect under a new type of space-time topology using the concept of quotient topology. The relation between the new topology and that in Feng and Li (Phys. Lett. B 691:167, 2010), Zhai et al. (Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:669, 2011) is something like that between a Möbius strip and a cylindric. We obtain the exact results of the Casimir energy and force for the massless and massive Dirac fields in the ( D+1)-dimensional space-time. For both massless and massive cases, there is a Z 2 symmetry for the Casimir energy. To see the effect of the mass, we compare the result with that of the massless one and we found that the Casimir force approaches the result of the force in the massless case when the mass tends to zero and vanishes when the mass tends to infinity.

  17. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, C; Soto, R

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  18. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  19. Three-dimensional Casimir piston for massive scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S.C. Teo, L.P.

    2009-08-15

    We consider Casimir force acting on a three-dimensional rectangular piston due to a massive scalar field subject to periodic, Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Exponential cut-off method is used to derive the Casimir energy. It is shown that the divergent terms do not contribute to the Casimir force acting on the piston, thus render a finite well-defined Casimir force acting on the piston. Explicit expressions for the total Casimir force acting on the piston is derived, which show that the Casimir force is always attractive for all the different boundary conditions considered. As a function of a - the distance from the piston to the opposite wall, it is found that the magnitude of the Casimir force behaves like 1/a{sup 4} when a{yields}0{sup +} and decays exponentially when a{yields}{infinity}. Moreover, the magnitude of the Casimir force is always a decreasing function of a. On the other hand, passing from massless to massive, we find that the effect of the mass is insignificant when a is small, but the magnitude of the force is decreased for large a in the massive case.

  20. Nonequilibrium Tuning of the Thermal Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David S.; Lu, Bing-Sui; Maggs, A. C.; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    In net-neutral systems correlations between charge fluctuations generate strong attractive thermal Casimir forces and engineering these forces to optimize nanodevice performance is an important challenge. We show how the normal and lateral thermal Casimir forces between two plates containing Brownian charges can be modulated by decorrelating the system through the application of an electric field, which generates a nonequilibrium steady state with a constant current in one or both plates, reducing the ensuing fluctuation-generated normal force while at the same time generating a lateral drag force. This hypothesis is confirmed by detailed numerical simulations as well as an analytical approach based on stochastic density functional theory.

  1. Thermal Casimir interaction between two magnetodielectric plates

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the thermal Casimir interaction between two magnetodielectric plates made of real materials. On the basis of the Lifshitz theory, it is shown that for diamagnets and for paramagnets in the broad sense (with exception of ferromagnets) the magnetic properties do not influence the magnitude of the Casimir force. For ferromagnets, taking into account the realistic dependence of magnetic permeability on frequency, we conclude that the impact of magnetic properties on the Casimir interaction arises entirely from the contribution of the zero-frequency term in the Lifshitz formula. The computations of the Casimir free energy and pressure are performed for the configurations of two plates made of ferromagnetic metals (Co and Fe), for one plate made of ferromagnetic metal and the other of nonmagnetic metal (Au), for two ferromagnetic dielectric plates (on the basis of polystyrene), and for a ferromagnetic dielectric plate near a nonmagnetic metal plate. The dielectric permittivity of metals is described using both the Drude and the plasma model approaches. It is shown that the Casimir repulsion through the vacuum gap can be realized in the configuration of a ferromagnetic dielectric plate near a nonmagnetic metal plate described by the plasma model. In all cases considered, the respective analytical results in the asymptotic limit of large separations between the plates are obtained. The impact of the magnetic phase transition through the Curie temperature on the Casimir interaction is considered. In conclusion, we propose several experiments allowing to determine whether the magnetic properties really influence the Casimir interaction and to independently verify the Drude and plasma model approaches to the thermal Casimir force.

  2. Gravitational Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quach, James Q.

    2015-02-01

    We derive the gravitonic Casimir effect with nonidealized boundary conditions. This allows the quantification of the gravitonic contribution to the Casimir effect from real bodies. We quantify the meagerness of the gravitonic Casimir effect in ordinary matter. We also quantify the enhanced effect produced by the speculated Heisenberg-Couloumb (HC) effect in superconductors, thereby providing a test for the validity of the HC theory, and, consequently, the existence of gravitons.

  3. Casimir effect on graphene resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigated the influence of the Casimir effect on mechanical properties of a graphene resonator, where a graphene sheet is located in parallel with a perfectly conducting plate. The Casimir force arising from this effect strongly attracts a graphene sheet to a perfectly conducting plate and increases the tension of a graphene sheet as the separation distance between them decreases. The maximum vertical displacement of a graphene sheet to the substrate increases obeying a power law of a separation distance with an exponent of 4/3 as the separation distance decreases. For small separation distances, the Casimir force is excessively strong for the graphene sheet to maintain a free-standing shape, consequently resulting in the adhesion of the sheet to the substrate below a critical separation distance. The resonant frequency increases over a wide range as the separation distance decreases for large separation distances. However, it then rapidly decreases for small separations and converges to zero at a critical separation. These various behaviors enable the control of a graphene resonator.

  4. Stress tensor for a scalar field in a spatially varying background potential: Divergences, "renormalization", anomalies, and Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Fulling, Stephen A.; Parashar, Prachi; Kalauni, Pushpa; Murphy, Taylor

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand quantum fluctuation energy densities and stress within a spatially varying dielectric medium, we examine the vacuum expectation value for the stress tensor of a scalar field with arbitrary conformal parameter, in the background of a given potential that depends on only one spatial coordinate. We regulate the expressions by incorporating a temporal-spatial cutoff in the (imaginary) time and transverse-spatial directions. The divergences are captured by the zeroth- and second-order WKB approximations. Then the stress tensor is "renormalized" by omitting the terms that depend on the cutoff. The ambiguities that inevitably arise in this procedure are both duly noted and restricted by imposing certain physical conditions; one result is that the renormalized stress tensor exhibits the expected trace anomaly. The renormalized stress tensor exhibits no pressure anomaly, in that the principle of virtual work is satisfied for motions in a transverse direction. We then consider a potential that defines a wall, a one-dimensional potential that vanishes for z <0 and rises like zα, α >0 , for z >0 . Previously, the stress tensor had been computed outside of the wall, whereas now we compute all components of the stress tensor in the interior of the wall. The full finite stress tensor is computed numerically for the two cases where explicit solutions to the differential equation are available, α =1 and 2. The energy density exhibits an inverse linear divergence as the boundary is approached from the inside for a linear potential, and a logarithmic divergence for a quadratic potential. Finally, the interaction between two such walls is computed, and it is shown that the attractive Casimir pressure between the two walls also satisfies the principle of virtual work (i.e., the pressure equals the negative derivative of the energy with respect to the distance between the walls).

  5. Critical casimir forces and colloidal phase transitions in a near-critical solvent: a simple model reveals a rich phase diagram.

    PubMed

    Edison, John R; Tasios, Nikos; Belli, Simone; Evans, Robert; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2015-01-23

    From experimental studies, it is well known that colloidal particles suspended in a near-critical binary solvent exhibit interesting aggregation phenomena, often associated with colloidal phase transitions and assumed to be driven by long-ranged solvent-mediated (SM) interactions (critical Casimir forces), set by the (diverging) correlation length of the solvent. We present the first simulation and theoretical study of an explicit model of a ternary mixture that mimics this situation. Both the effective SM pair interactions and the full ternary phase diagram are determined for Brownian disks suspended in an explicit two-dimensional supercritical binary liquid mixture. Gas-liquid and fluid-solid transitions are observed in a region that extends well away from criticality of the solvent reservoir. We discuss to what extent an effective pair-potential description can account for the phase behavior we observe. Our study provides a fresh perspective on how proximity to the critical point of the solvent reservoir might influence colloidal self-assembly.

  6. Role of surface plasmons in the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.; Lambrecht, A.

    2007-09-15

    In this paper we study the role of surface plasmon modes in the Casimir effect. The Casimir energy can be written as a sum over the modes of a real cavity and one may identify two sorts of modes, two evanescent surface plasmon modes and propagative modes. As one of the surface plasmon modes becomes propagative for some choice of parameters we adopt an adiabatic mode definition where we follow this mode into the propagative sector and count it together with the surface plasmon contribution, calling this contribution 'plasmonic'. We evaluate analytically the contribution of the plasmonic modes to the Casimir energy. Surprisingly we find that this becomes repulsive for intermediate and large mirror separations. The contribution of surface plasmons to the Casimir energy plays a fundamental role not only at short but also at large distances. This suggests possibilities to tailor the Casimir force via a manipulation of the surface plasmons properties.

  7. Casimir effect for regions with broken symmetry of boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zayaev, Yu.B.; Kazakov, A.Ya.; Mostepanenko, V.M.; Trunov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed for computing corrections to the Casimir force caused by a broken symmetry of the boundaries. The values of these corrections are obtained for a parallelepiped in the case of scalar and electromagnetic fields.

  8. Quantum field theory of the Casimir effect for real media

    SciTech Connect

    Mostepanenko, V.M.; Trunov, N.N.

    1985-11-01

    The quantum field theory is developed for the corrections to the Casimir force arising when the field penetrates the material of the plates. A new type of divergence arising from the corresponding modification of the boundary conditions is analyzed. General expressions are obtained for the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in the space between nonideal plates, and the actual corrections to the Casimir force are calculated in first-order perturbation theory in the penetration depth.

  9. Critical and near-critical phase behavior and interplay between the thermodynamic Casimir and van der Waals forces in a confined nonpolar fluid medium with competing surface and substrate potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study, using general scaling arguments and mean-field type calculations, the behavior of the critical Casimir force and its interplay with the van der Waals force acting between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining some fluctuating fluid medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. The surfaces of the slabs are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. The slabs, on the other hand, influence the fluid by long-range competing dispersion potentials, which represent irrelevant interactions in renormalization-group sense. Under such conditions, one usually expects attractive Casimir force governed by universal scaling function, pertinent to the extraordinary surface universality class of Ising type systems, to which the dispersion potentials provide only corrections to scaling. We demonstrate, however, that below a given threshold thickness of the system Lcrit for a suitable set of slabs-fluid and fluid-fluid coupling parameters the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the slabs can result in sign change of the Casimir force acting between the surfaces confining the fluid when one changes the temperature T , the chemical potential of the fluid μ , or L . The last implies that by choosing specific materials for the slabs, coatings, and the fluid for L ≲Lcrit one can realize repulsive Casimir force with nonuniversal behavior which, upon increasing L , gradually turns into an attractive one described by a universal scaling function, depending only on the relevant scaling fields related to the temperature and the excess chemical potential, for L ≫Lcrit . We present arguments and relevant data for specific substances in support of the experimental feasibility of the predicted behavior of the force. It can

  10. An ``Anatomic approach" to study the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Haakh, Harald; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The Casimir effect, in its simplest definition, is a quantum mechanical force between two objects placed in vacuum. In recent years the Casimir force has been the object of an exponentially growing attention both from theorists and experimentalists. A new generation of experiments paved the way for new challenges and spotted some shadows in the comparison to theory. Here we are going to isolate different contributions to the Casimir interaction and perform a detailed study to shine new light on this phenomenon. As an example, the contributions of Foucault (eddy current) modes will be discussed in different configurations. This ``anatomic approach'' allows to clearly put into evidence special features and to explain unusual behaviors. This brings new physical understanding on the undergoing physical mechanisms and suggests new ways to engineer the Casimir effect.

  11. Quantum spring from the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2010-07-01

    The Casimir effect arises not only in the presence of material boundaries but also in space with nontrivial topology. In this Letter, we choose a topology of the flat (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime, which causes the helix boundary condition for a Hermitian massless scalar field. Especially, Casimir effect for a massless scalar field on the helix boundary condition is investigated in two and three dimensions by using the zeta function techniques. The Casimir force parallel to the axis of the helix behaves very much like the force on a spring that obeys the Hooke's law when the ratio r of the pitch to the circumference of the helix is small, but in this case, the force comes from a quantum effect, so we would like to call it quantum spring. When r is large, this force behaves like the Newton's law of universal gravitation in the leading order. On the other hand, the force perpendicular to the axis decreases monotonously with the increasing of the ratio r. Both forces are attractive and their behaviors are the same in two and three dimensions.

  12. Electromagnetic Casimir piston in higher-dimensional spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2011-05-15

    We consider the Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field in a higher-dimensional spacetime of the form MxN, where M is the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime and N is an n-dimensional compact manifold. The Casimir force acting on a planar piston that can move freely inside a closed cylinder is investigated. Different combinations of perfectly conducting boundary conditions and infinitely permeable boundary conditions are imposed on the cylinder and the piston. It is verified that if the piston and the cylinder have the same boundary conditions, the piston is always going to be pulled towards the closer end of the cylinder. However, if the piston and the cylinder have different boundary conditions, the piston is always going to be pushed to the middle of the cylinder. By taking the limit where one end of the cylinder tends to infinity, one obtains the Casimir force acting between two parallel plates inside an infinitely long cylinder. The asymptotic behavior of this Casimir force in the high temperature regime and the low temperature regime are investigated for the case where the cross section of the cylinder in M is large. It is found that if the separation between the plates is much smaller than the size of N, the leading term of the Casimir force is the same as the Casimir force on a pair of large parallel plates in the (4+n)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. However, if the size of N is much smaller than the separation between the plates, the leading term of the Casimir force is 1+h/2 times the Casimir force on a pair of large parallel plates in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime, where h is the first Betti number of N. In the limit the manifold N vanishes, one does not obtain the Casimir force in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime if h is nonzero. Therefore the data obtained from Casimir experiments suggest that the first Betti number of the extra dimensions should be zero.

  13. Casimir energy in Kerr space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, F.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the vacuum energy of a scalar massless field confined in a Casimir cavity moving in a circular equatorial orbit in the exact Kerr space-time geometry. We find that both the orbital motion of the cavity and the underlying space-time geometry conspire in lowering the absolute value of the (renormalized) Casimir energy ⟨ɛvac⟩ren , as measured by a comoving observer, with respect to whom the cavity is at rest. This, in turn, causes a weakening in the attractive force between the Casimir plates. In particular, we show that the vacuum energy density ⟨ɛvac⟩ren→0 when the orbital path of the Casimir cavity comes close to the corotating or counter-rotating circular null orbits (possibly geodesic) allowed by the Kerr geometry. Such an effect could be of some astrophysical interest on relevant orbits, such as the Kerr innermost stable circular orbits, being potentially related to particle confinement (as in some interquark models). The present work generalizes previous results obtained by several authors in the weak field approximation.

  14. Onsager-Casimir relations revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hubmer, G.F.; Titulaer, U.M.

    1987-10-01

    The authors study the fate of the Onsager-Casimir reciprocity relations for a continuous system when some of its variables are eliminated adiabatically. Just as for discrete systems, deviations appear in correction terms to the reduced evolution equation that are of higher order in the time scale ratio. The deviations are not removed by including correction terms to the coarse-grained thermodynamic potential. However, via a reformulation of the theory, in which the central role of the thermodynamic potential is taken over by an associated Lagrangian-type expression, they arrive at a modified form of the Onsager-Casimir relations that survives the adiabatic elimination procedure. There is a simple relation between the time evolution of the redefined thermodynamic forces and that of the basic thermodynamic variables; this relation also survives the adiabatic elimination. The formalism is illustrated by explicit calculations for the Klein-Kramers equation, which describes the phase space distribution of Brownian particles, and for the corrected Smoluchowski equation derived from it by adiabatic elimination of the velocity variable. The symmetry relation for the latter leads to a simple proof that the reality of the eigenvalues of the simple Smoluchowski equation is not destroyed by the addition of higher order corrections, at least not within the framework of a formal perturbation expansion in the time scale ratio.

  15. Casimir interactions between graphene sheets and metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Drosdoff, D.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2011-12-15

    The Casimir force between graphene sheets and metamaterials is studied. Theoretical results based on the Lifshitz theory for layered, planar, two-dimensional systems in media are presented. We consider graphene-graphene, graphene-metamaterial, and metal-graphene-metamaterial configurations. We find that quantum effects of the temperature-dependent force are not apparent until the submicron range. In contrast to results with bulk dielectric and bulk metallic materials, no Casimir repulsion is found when graphene is placed on top of a magnetically active metamaterial substrate, regardless of the strength of the low-frequency magnetic response. In the case of the metal-graphene-metamaterial setting, repulsion between the metamaterial and the metal-graphene system is possible only when the dielectric response from the metal contributes significantly.

  16. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis.

  17. Casimir effect, quantum fluctuations and related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hushwater, Velvel Shaia

    Casimir forces are the very long-range (retarded) forces between electrically neutral systems. Such forces may be thought of as arising from the quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Contrary to popular opinion such forces need not be attractive. After giving a foundation of the method of the change in the 'zero-point energy' we show how other methods to compute Casimir forces follow from it. We consider the repulsion between electric and magnetic dipoles induced by vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field. The calculation are made by the use of the Heisenberg picture operators and by the stochastic electrodynamics approach. We present a purely geometrical proof of the image method, and use it to discuss the Casimir interaction between an atom and a plate. We study the Casimir repulsion between a perfectly conducting and an infinitely permeable plate with the radiation pressure approach. This example illustrates how a repulsive force arises as a consequence of the redistribution of vacuum-field modes corresponding to specific boundary conditions. We show that result is independent of a cutoff function. Discussing the connection with perturbation theory, we prove the negativity of the leading order shift in the ground state. The Casimir effect supports the reality of the 'zero- point energy.' To clarify this we present a novel approach to quantum theory, based on the principle of the quantization of the ensemble-averaged action variable. This quantization leads to the probabilistic description of coordinates and momentum as random variables, which satisfy the uncertainty relation. Using such variables we show that the 'quantum momentum function' must satisfy the Riccati differential equation, which can be converted to the Schrodinger equation for the Ψ function. We derive also the form of basic operators and the rule for probabilities in quantum mechanics. We show that the approach leads to a simple interpretation of gauge invariance, and discuss

  18. Hide It to See It Better: A Robust Setup to Probe the Thermal Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    We describe a Casimir setup consisting of two aligned sinusoidally corrugated Ni surfaces, one of which is "hidden" by a thin opaque layer of gold with a flat exposed surface. The gold layer acts as a low-pass filter that allows for a clean observation of the controversial thermal Casimir force between the corrugations, with currently available Casimir apparatuses. The proposed scheme of measurement, based on the phase-dependent modulation of the Casimir force, requires no electrostatic calibrations of the apparatus, and is unaffected by uncertainties in the knowledge of the optical properties of the surfaces. This scheme should allow for an unambiguous discrimination between alternative theoretical prescriptions that have been proposed in the literature for the thermal Casimir effect.

  19. Materials perspective on Casimir and van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, L. M.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Tkatchenko, A.; Rodriguez-Lopez, P.; Rodriguez, A. W.; Podgornik, R.

    2016-10-01

    Interactions induced by electromagnetic fluctuations, such as van der Waals and Casimir forces, are of universal nature present at any length scale between any types of systems. Such interactions are important not only for the fundamental science of materials behavior, but also for the design and improvement of micro- and nanostructured devices. In the past decade, many new materials have become available, which has stimulated the need for understanding their dispersive interactions. The field of van der Waals and Casimir forces has experienced an impetus in terms of developing novel theoretical and computational methods to provide new insights into related phenomena. The understanding of such forces has far reaching consequences as it bridges concepts in materials, atomic and molecular physics, condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, chemistry, and biology. This review summarizes major breakthroughs and emphasizes the common origin of van der Waals and Casimir interactions. Progress related to novel ab initio modeling approaches and their application in various systems, interactions in materials with Dirac-like spectra, force manipulations through nontrivial boundary conditions, and applications of van der Waals forces in organic and biological matter are examined. The outlook of the review is to give the scientific community a materials perspective of van der Waals and Casimir phenomena and stimulate the development of experimental techniques and applications.

  20. Gravitational Casimir-Polder effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    The interaction due to quantum gravitational vacuum fluctuations between a gravitationally polarizable object modelled as a two-level system and a gravitational boundary is investigated. This quantum gravitational interaction is found to be position-dependent, which induces a force in close analogy to the Casimir-Polder force in the electromagnetic case. For a Dirichlet boundary, the quantum gravitational potential for the polarizable object in its ground-state is shown to behave like z-5 in the near zone, and z-6 in the far zone, where z is the distance to the boundary. For a concrete example, where a Bose-Einstein condensate is taken as a gravitationally polarizable object, the relative correction to the radius of the BEC caused by fluctuating quantum gravitational waves in vacuum is found to be of order 10-21. Although the correction is far too small to observe in comparison with its electromagnetic counterpart, it is nevertheless of the order of the gravitational strain caused by a recently detected black hole merger on the arms of the LIGO.

  1. Casimir dynamics: Interactions of surfaces with codimension >1 due to quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Scardicchio, A.

    2005-09-15

    We study the Casimir force between defects (branes) of codimension larger than 1 due to quantum fluctuations of a scalar field {phi} living in the bulk. We show that the Casimir force is attractive and that it diverges as the distance between the branes approaches a critical value L{sub c}. Below this critical distance L{sub c} the vacuum state {phi}=0 of the theory is unstable, due to the birth of a tachyon, and the field condenses.

  2. Quantum Field Energy Sensor based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thorsten

    The Casimir effect converts vacuum fluctuations into a measurable force. Some new energy technologies aim to utilize these vacuum fluctuations in commonly used forms of energy like electricity or mechanical motion. In order to study these energy technologies it is helpful to have sensors for the energy density of vacuum fluctuations. In today's scientific instrumentation and scanning microscope technologies there are several common methods to measure sub-nano Newton forces. While the commercial atomic force microscopes (AFM) mostly work with silicon cantilevers, there are a large number of reports on the use of quartz tuning forks to get high-resolution force measurements or to create new force sensors. Both methods have certain advantages and disadvantages over the other. In this report the two methods are described and compared towards their usability for Casimir force measurements. Furthermore a design for a quantum field energy sensor based on the Casimir force measurement will be described. In addition some general considerations on extracting energy from vacuum fluctuations will be given.

  3. Casimir effect for parallel plates involving massless Majorana fermions at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Hongbo

    2010-08-15

    We study the Casimir effect for parallel plates with massless Majorana fermions obeying the bag boundary conditions at finite temperature. The thermal influence will modify the effect. It is found that the sign of the Casimir energy remains negative if the product of the plate distance and the temperature is larger than a special value, otherwise the energy will change to positive. The Casimir energy rises with the stronger thermal influence. We show that the attractive Casimir force between two parallel plates becomes greater with increasing temperature. In the case of the piston system involving the same Majorana fermions with the same boundary conditions, the attractive force on the piston will be weaker in higher-temperature surroundings.

  4. Single-interface Casimir torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Tiago A.; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2016-10-01

    A different type of Casimir-type interaction is theoretically predicted: a single-interface torque at a junction of an anisotropic material and a vacuum or another material system. The torque acts to reorient the polarizable microscopic units of the involved materials near the interface, and thus to change the internal structure of the materials. The single-interface torque depends on the zero-point energy of the interface localized and extended modes. Our theory demonstrates that the single-interface torque is essential to understand the Casimir physics of material systems with anisotropic elements and may influence the orientation of the director of nematic liquid crystals.

  5. Some developments of the Casimir effect in p-cavity of (D + 1)-dimensional space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang-Hua; Lin, Rui-Hui; Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2014-12-01

    The Casimir effect for rectangular boxes has been studied for several decades. But there are still some unclear points. Recently, there are new developments related to this topic, including the demonstration of the equivalence of the regularization methods and the clarification of the ambiguity in the regularization of the temperature-dependent free energy. Also, the interesting quantum spring was raised stemming from the topological Casimir effect of the helix boundary conditions. We review these developments together with the general derivation of the Casimir energy of the p-dimensional cavity in (D + 1)-dimensional space-time, paying special attention to the sign of the Casimir force in a cavity with unequal edges. In addition, we also review the Casimir piston, which is a configuration related to rectangular cavity.

  6. Nonmonotonic Casimir interaction: The role of amplifying dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Morteza; Sarabadani, Jalal; Zakeri, S. Peyman

    2017-02-01

    The normal and the lateral Casimir interactions between corrugated ideal metallic plates in the presence of an amplifying or an absorptive dielectric slab is studied by the path-integral quantization technique. The effect of the amplifying slab, which is located between corrugated conductors, is to increase the normal and lateral Casimir interactions, while the presence of the absorptive slab diminishes the interactions. These effects are more pronounced if the thickness of the slab increases and, also, if the slab comes closer to one of the bounding conductors. When both bounding ideal conductors are flat, the normal Casimir force is nonmonotonic in the presence of the amplifying slab and the system has a stable mechanical equilibrium state, while the force is attractive and is weakened by intervening the absorptive dielectric slab in the cavity. Upon replacing one of the flat conductors with a flat ideal permeable plate the force becomes nonmonotonic and the system has an unstable mechanical equilibrium state in the presence of either an amplifying or an absorptive slab. When the left-side plate is a conductor and the right one is permeable, the force is nonmonotonic in the presence of a double-layer dissipative-amplifying dielectric slab with a stable mechanical equilibrium state, while it is purely repulsive in the presence of a double-layer amplifying-dissipative dielectric slab.

  7. Casimir potential of a compact object enclosed by a spherical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-11-15

    We study the electromagnetic Casimir interaction of a compact object contained inside a closed cavity of another compact object. We express the interaction energy in terms of the objects' scattering matrices and translation matrices that relate the coordinate systems appropriate to each object. When the enclosing object is an otherwise empty metallic spherical shell, much larger than the internal object, and the two are sufficiently separated, the Casimir force can be expressed in terms of the static electric and magnetic multipole polarizabilities of the internal object, which is analogous to the Casimir-Polder result. Although it is not a simple power law, the dependence of the force on the separation of the object from the containing sphere is a universal function of its displacement from the center of the sphere, independent of other details of the object's electromagnetic response. Furthermore, we compute the exact Casimir force between two metallic spheres contained one inside the other at arbitrary separations. Finally, we combine our results with earlier work on the Casimir force between two spheres to obtain data on the leading-order correction to the proximity force approximation for two metallic spheres both outside and within one another.

  8. Thermal Fluctuations in Casimir Pistons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, M.; Villarreal, C.

    2012-07-01

    We present analytical and simple expressions to determine the free energy, internal energy, entropy, as well as the pressure acting at the interface of a perfectly conducting rectangular Casimir piston. We show that infrared divergencies linear in temperature become cancelled within the piston configuration, and show a continuous behavior consistent with intuitive expectations.

  9. The Casimir effect for fields with arbitrary spin

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, Adam; Bennett, Robert

    2015-09-15

    The Casimir force arises when a quantum field is confined between objects that apply boundary conditions to it. In a recent paper we used the two-spinor calculus to derive boundary conditions applicable to fields with arbitrary spin in the presence of perfectly reflecting surfaces. Here we use these general boundary conditions to investigate the Casimir force between two parallel perfectly reflecting plates for fields up to spin-2. We use the two-spinor calculus formalism to present a unified calculation of well-known results for spin-1/2 (Dirac) and spin-1 (Maxwell) fields. We then use our unified framework to derive new results for the spin-3/2 and spin-2 fields, which turn out to be the same as those for spin-1/2 and spin-1. This is part of a broader conclusion that there are only two different Casimir forces for perfectly reflecting plates—one associated with fermions and the other with bosons.

  10. Critical Casimir effect for colloids close to chemically patterned substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Troendle, M.; Kondrat, S.; Harnau, L.; Dietrich, S.; Gambassi, A.

    2010-08-21

    Colloids immersed in a critical or near-critical binary liquid mixture and close to a chemically patterned substrate are subject to normal and lateral critical Casimir forces of dominating strength. For a single colloid, we calculate these attractive or repulsive forces and the corresponding critical Casimir potentials within mean-field theory. Within this approach we also discuss the quality of the Derjaguin approximation and apply it to Monte Carlo simulation data available for the system under study. We find that the range of validity of the Derjaguin approximation is rather large and that it fails only for surface structures which are very small compared to the geometric mean of the size of the colloid and its distance from the substrate. For certain chemical structures of the substrate, the critical Casimir force acting on the colloid can change sign as a function of the distance between the particle and the substrate; this provides a mechanism for stable levitation at a certain distance which can be strongly tuned by temperature, i.e., with a sensitivity of more than 200 nm/K.

  11. Thermodynamic Casimir effect in films: the exchange cluster algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hasenbusch, Martin

    2015-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic Casimir force for films with various types of boundary conditions and the bulk universality class of the three-dimensional Ising model. To this end, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of the improved Blume-Capel model on the simple cubic lattice. In particular, we employ the exchange or geometric cluster cluster algorithm [Heringa and Blöte, Phys. Rev. E 57, 4976 (1998)]. In a previous work, we demonstrated that this algorithm allows us to compute the thermodynamic Casimir force for the plate-sphere geometry efficiently. It turns out that also for the film geometry a substantial reduction of the statistical error can achieved. Concerning physics, we focus on (O,O) boundary conditions, where O denotes the ordinary surface transition. These are implemented by free boundary conditions on both sides of the film. Films with such boundary conditions undergo a phase transition in the universality class of the two-dimensional Ising model. We determine the inverse transition temperature for a large range of thicknesses L(0) of the film and study the scaling of this temperature with L(0). In the neighborhood of the transition, the thermodynamic Casimir force is affected by finite size effects, where finite size refers to a finite transversal extension L of the film. We demonstrate that these finite size effects can be computed by using the universal finite size scaling function of the free energy of the two-dimensional Ising model.

  12. Casimir interaction between spheres in ( D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-05-01

    We consider the Casimir interaction between two spheres in ( D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime due to the vacuum fluctuations of scalar fields. We consider combinations of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The TGTG formula of the Casimir interaction energy is derived. The computations of the T matrices of the two spheres are straightforward. To compute the two G matrices, known as translation matrices, which relate the hyper-spherical waves in two spherical coordinate frames differ by a translation, we generalize the operator approach employed in [39]. The result is expressed in terms of an integral over Gegenbauer polynomials. In contrast to the D=3 case, we do not re-express the integral in terms of 3 j-symbols and hyper-spherical waves, which in principle, can be done but does not simplify the formula. Using our expression for the Casimir interaction energy, we derive the large separation and small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energy. In the large separation regime, we find that the Casimir interaction energy is of order L -2 D+3, L -2 D+1 and L -2 D-1 respectively for Dirichlet-Dirichlet, Dirichlet-Neumann and Neumann-Neumann boundary conditions, where L is the center-to-center distance of the two spheres. In the small separation regime, we confirm that the leading term of the Casimir interaction agrees with the proximity force approximation, which is of order , where d is the distance between the two spheres. Another main result of this work is the analytic computations of the next-to-leading order term in the small separation asymptotic expansion. This term is computed using careful order analysis as well as perturbation method. In the case the radius of one of the sphere goes to infinity, we find that the results agree with the one we derive for sphere-plate configuration. When D=3, we also recover previously known results. We find that when D is large, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading

  13. Casimir interactions of an object inside a spherical metal shell

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the electromagnetic Casimir interactions of an object contained within an otherwise empty, perfectly conducting spherical shell. For a small object we present analytical calculations of the force, which is directed away from the center of the cavity, and the torque, which tends to align the object opposite to the preferred alignment outside the cavity. For a perfectly conducting sphere as the interior object, we compute the corrections to the proximity force approximation (PFA) numerically. In both cases the results for the interior configuration match smoothly onto those for the corresponding exterior configuration.

  14. Critical Casimir effect in classical binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambassi, A.; Maciołek, A.; Hertlein, C.; Nellen, U.; Helden, L.; Bechinger, C.; Dietrich, S.

    2009-12-01

    If a fluctuating medium is confined, the ensuing perturbation of its fluctuation spectrum generates Casimir-like effective forces acting on its confining surfaces. Near a continuous phase transition of such a medium the corresponding order parameter fluctuations occur on all length scales and therefore close to the critical point this effect acquires a universal character, i.e., to a large extent it is independent of the microscopic details of the actual system. Accordingly it can be calculated theoretically by studying suitable representative model systems. We report on the direct measurement of critical Casimir forces by total internal reflection microscopy with femtonewton resolution. The corresponding potentials are determined for individual colloidal particles floating above a substrate under the action of the critical thermal noise in the solvent medium, constituted by a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its lower consolute point. Depending on the relative adsorption preferences of the colloid and substrate surfaces with respect to the two components of the binary liquid mixture, we observe that, upon approaching the critical point of the solvent, attractive or repulsive forces emerge and supersede those prevailing away from it. Based on the knowledge of the critical Casimir forces acting in film geometries within the Ising universality class and with equal or opposing boundary conditions, we provide the corresponding theoretical predictions for the sphere—planar wall geometry of the experiment. The experimental data for the effective potential can be interpreted consistently in terms of these predictions and a remarkable quantitative agreement is observed.

  15. Critical Casimir effect in classical binary liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gambassi, A; Maciołek, A; Hertlein, C; Nellen, U; Helden, L; Bechinger, C; Dietrich, S

    2009-12-01

    If a fluctuating medium is confined, the ensuing perturbation of its fluctuation spectrum generates Casimir-like effective forces acting on its confining surfaces. Near a continuous phase transition of such a medium the corresponding order parameter fluctuations occur on all length scales and therefore close to the critical point this effect acquires a universal character, i.e., to a large extent it is independent of the microscopic details of the actual system. Accordingly it can be calculated theoretically by studying suitable representative model systems. We report on the direct measurement of critical Casimir forces by total internal reflection microscopy with femtonewton resolution. The corresponding potentials are determined for individual colloidal particles floating above a substrate under the action of the critical thermal noise in the solvent medium, constituted by a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its lower consolute point. Depending on the relative adsorption preferences of the colloid and substrate surfaces with respect to the two components of the binary liquid mixture, we observe that, upon approaching the critical point of the solvent, attractive or repulsive forces emerge and supersede those prevailing away from it. Based on the knowledge of the critical Casimir forces acting in film geometries within the Ising universality class and with equal or opposing boundary conditions, we provide the corresponding theoretical predictions for the sphere-planar wall geometry of the experiment. The experimental data for the effective potential can be interpreted consistently in terms of these predictions and a remarkable quantitative agreement is observed.

  16. The holographic supersymmetric Casimir energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti Genolini, Pietro; Cassani, Davide; Martelli, Dario; Sparks, James

    2017-01-01

    We consider a general class of asymptotically locally AdS5 solutions of minimal gauged supergravity, which are dual to superconformal field theories on curved backgrounds S1×M3 preserving two supercharges. We demonstrate that standard holographic renormalization corresponds to a scheme that breaks supersymmetry. We propose new boundary terms that restore supersymmetry, and show that for smooth solutions with topology S1×R4 the improved on-shell action reproduces both the supersymmetric Casimir energy and the field theory supersymmetric relation between charges.

  17. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-30

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead of general relativity.

  18. Casimir interaction of arbitrarily shaped conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straley, Joseph P.; Kolomeisky, Eugene B.

    2017-04-01

    We review a systematic practical implementation of the multiple scattering formalism due to Balian and Duplantier (1977 Ann. Phys. 104 300, 1978 Ann. Phys. 112 165) for the calculation of the Casimir interaction between arbitrarily shaped smooth conductors. The leading two-point scattering term of the expansion has a simple compact form, amenable to exact or accurate numerical evaluation. It is a general expression which improves upon the proximity force and pairwise summation approximations. We show that for many geometries it captures the bulk of the interaction effect. The inclusion of terms beyond the two-point approximation provides an accuracy check and explains screening. As an illustration of the power and versatility of the method we re-evaluate sphere–sphere and sphere–plane interactions and compared the results with previous findings that employed different methods. We also compute for the first time interaction of a hyperboloid (mimicking an atomic force microscope tip) and a plane. We also analyze the anomalous situations involving long cylindrical conductors where the two-point scattering approximation fails qualitatively. In such cases analytic summation of the entire scattering series is carried out and a topological argument is put forward as an explanation of the result. We give the extension of this theory to the case of finite temperatures where the two-point scattering approximation result has a simple compact form, also amenable to exact or accurate numerical evaluation.

  19. Casimir Forces Between Thermally Activated Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    M6xico, Circuito de la Investigaci6n Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria , M6xico, DF, 04510, M6xico. ABSTRACT We present a theoretical study of the...function of the slabs is needed. For a nanocomposite slab made of a host material with a dielectric function cj,(o) and inclusions with dielectric...8-2a wheref is the volume fraction of the inclusions and ox is the effective polarizability given by the Maxwell Garnett theory. This expression for

  20. Possibility of measuring the thermal Casimir interaction between a plate and a cylinder attached to a micromachined oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-11-15

    We investigate the possibility of measuring the thermal Casimir force and its gradient in the configuration of a plate and a microfabricated cylinder attached to a micromachined oscillator. The Lifshitz-type formulas in this configuration are derived using the proximity force approximation. The accuracy of the obtained expressions is determined from a comparison with exact results available in ideal metal case. Computations of the thermal correction to both the Casimir force and its gradient are performed in the framework of different theoretical approaches proposed in the literature. The correction to the Casimir force and its gradient due to lack of parallelism of the plate and cylinder is determined using the nonmultiplicative approach. The error introduced in the theory due to the finite length of the cylinder is estimated. We propose that both static and dynamic experiments measuring the thermal Casimir interaction between a cylinder and a plate using a micromachined oscillator can shed additional light on the thermal Casimir force problem. Specifically, it is shown that the static experiment is better adapted for the measurement of thermal effects.

  1. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  2. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-08-15

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed.

  3. L'effet Casimir : théorie et expériences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, A.; Genet, C.; Intravaia, F.; Reynaud, S.

    2004-11-01

    L'existence de fluctuations irréductibles de champ dans le vide est une prédiction importante de la théorie quantique. Ces fluctuations ont de nombreuses conséquences observables comme l'effet Casimir, qui est maintenant mesuré avec une bonne précision et un bon accord avec la théorie, pourvu que celle-ci tienne compte des différences entre les expériences rélles et la situation idéale considérée par H.G.B. Casimir. Nous présenterons quelqu'unes des expériences récentes et discuterons les principales corrections à la force de Casimir liées à la situation expérimentale.

  4. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  5. Direct Measurement of Intermediate-Range Casimir-Polder Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Marzok, C.; Zimmermann, C.; Slama, S.

    2010-02-26

    We present the first direct measurements of Casimir-Polder forces between solid surfaces and atomic gases in the transition regime between the electrostatic short-distance and the retarded long-distance limit. The experimental method is based on ultracold ground-state Rb atoms that are reflected from evanescent wave barriers at the surface of a dielectric glass prism. Our novel approach does not require assumptions about the potential shape. The experimental data are compared to the theoretical predictions valid in the different regimes. They agree best with a full QED calculation.

  6. Geometrical investigations of the Casimir effect: Thickness and corrugation dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Prachi

    2011-12-01

    In the quantum theory the vacuum is not empty space. It is considered as a state of infinite energy arising due to zero point fluctuations of the vacuum. Calculation of any physically relevant process requires subtracting this infinite energy using a procedure called normalization. As such the vacuum energy is treated as an infinite constant. However, it has been established beyond doubt that mere subtraction of this infinite constant does not remove the effect of vacuum fluctuations and it cannot be treated just as a mathematical artifact. The presence of boundaries, which restricts the vacuum field, causes vacuum polarization. Any non-trivial space-time topology can cause similar effects. This is manifested as the Casimir effect, whereby the boundaries experience a force due to a change in the energy of the vacuum. To calculate the vacuum energy we treat the boundaries or other restrictive conditions as classical backgrounds, which impose boundary conditions on the solution of the vacuum field equations. Alternatively, we can incorporate the classical background in the Lagrangian of the system as classical potentials, which automatically include the boundary conditions in the field equations. Any change in the boundary conditions changes the vacuum energy and consequently the Casimir force is experienced by the boundaries. In this dissertation we study the geometric aspect of the Casimir effect. We consider both the scalar field and the physically relevant electromagnetic field. After a brief survey of the field in Chapter 1, we derive the energy expression using the Schwinger's quantum action principle in Chapter 2. We present the multiple scattering formalism for calculating the vacuum energy, which allows us to calculate the interaction energy between disjoint bodies and subtract out the divergent terms from the beginning. We then solve the Green's dyadic equation for the electromagnetic field interacting with the planar background surfaces, where we can

  7. The Casimir Energy for the Riemann Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palesheva, E. V.; Pecheritsyn, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The Casimir energy of a massive scalar field on a Riemann cap with the Dirichlet boundary conditions is calculated. The problem is considered in the quasi-stationary approximation. Formulas are derived which are suitable for numerical calculations.

  8. Thermofield dynamics and Casimir effect for fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, H. . E-mail: hebe@fis.ufba.br; Silva, J.C. da . E-mail: jcsilva@cefetba.br; Khanna, F.C. . E-mail: khanna@phys.ualberta.ca; Malbouisson, J.M.C. . E-mail: jmalbou@phys.ualberta.ca; Revzen, M. . E-mail: revzen@physics.technion.ac.il; Santana, A.E. . E-mail: asantana@fis.unb.br

    2005-05-01

    A generalization of the Bogoliubov transformation is developed to describe a space compactified fermionic field. The method is the fermionic counterpart of the formalism introduced earlier for bosons [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 052101], and is based on the thermofield dynamics approach. We analyze the energy-momentum tensor for the Casimir effect of a free massless fermion field in a d-dimensional box at finite temperature. As a particular case the Casimir energy and pressure for the field confined in a three-dimensional parallelepiped box are calculated. It is found that the attractive or repulsive nature of the Casimir pressure on opposite faces changes depending on the relative magnitude of the edges. We also determine the temperature at which the Casimir pressure in a cubic box changes sign and estimate its value when the edge of the cube is of the order of the confining lengths for baryons.

  9. Casimir Energy Associated With Fractional Derivative Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S. C.

    2007-04-28

    Casimir energy associated with fractional derivative scalar massless field at zero and positive temperature can be obtained using the regularization based on generalized Riemann zeta function of Epstein-Hurwitz type.

  10. PREFACE: International Workshop '60 Years of the Casimir Effect'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Carugno, Giovanni; Dodonov, Victor; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-07-01

    In 1948 Hendrick Casimir published a short article predicting that (neutral) ideal metallic plates attract each other. This attraction is widely ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field (even though away from the limit of ideal metals it depends demonstrably on the physics of the charge carriers vanishing when they cease to carry). Casimir's remarkable discovery, nowadays called the Casimir effect, has charmed several generations of physicists. In the last decade alone, more than a thousand publications have addressed its many consequences, generalizations, and possible applications in different areas from particle physics to cosmology. Interest in the field is still growing driven by impressive progress in experimental skills and its importance for the recently opened-up area of micro- and nano-electromechanical systems: according to the Thompson ISI Web of Science database, in 2005 the number of papers related to the Casimir effect or to Casimir forces jumped to over 125, compared to approximately 60 in 2000 and 30 in 1995. The increase continues, with more than 170 papers in 2008. The International Workshop '60 Years of the Casimir Effect' took place on 23-27June 2008, in Brasilia (Brazil) organized by the International Center for Condensed Matter Physics (ICCMP). The purpose was to celebrate this anniversary of Casimir's pioneering paper by inviting the leading specialists in the area, both theorists and experimentalists, together with young researchers and post-graduate students interested in hearing about the most recent achievements in the field. The Workshop was attended by 65 participants from 14 countries, who presented 41 talks and 12 posters. These Proceedings contain extended versions of almost all the talks and some posters, plus several papers by authors who had planned to attend but for various reasons could not. The contributions are divided (with some inevitable arbitrariness) into four groups. The largest one

  11. Sphere-plate Casimir interaction in (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we derive the formula for the Casimir interaction energy between a sphere and a plate in (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. It is assumed that the scalar field satisfies the Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the sphere and the plate. As in the D = 3 case, the formula is of TGTG type. One of our main contributions is deriving the translation matrices which express the change of bases between plane waves and spherical waves for general D. Using orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials, it turns out that the final TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy can be simplified to one that is similar to the D = 3 case. To illustrate the application of the formula, both large separation and small separation asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir interaction energy are computed. The large separation leading term is proportional to L{sup −D+1} if the sphere is imposed with Dirichlet boundary condition, and to L{sup −D−1} if the sphere is imposed with Neumann boundary condition, where L is distance from the center of the sphere to the plane. For the small separation asymptotic behavior, it is shown that the leading term is equal to the one obtained using proximity force approximation. The next-to-leading order term is also computed using perturbation method. It is shown that when the space dimension D is larger than 5, the next-to-leading order has sign opposite to the leading order term. Moreover, the ratio of the next-to-leading order term to the leading order term is linear in D, indicating a larger correction at higher dimensions.

  12. Out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the thermal Casimir effect in a model polarizable material.

    PubMed

    Dean, David S; Démery, Vincent; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    Relaxation of the thermal Casimir or van der Waals force (the high temperature limit of the Casimir force) for a model dielectric medium is investigated. We start with a model of interacting polarization fields with a dynamics that leads to a frequency dependent dielectric constant of the Debye form. In the static limit, the usual zero frequency Matsubara mode component of the Casimir force is recovered. We then consider the out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the van der Waals force to its equilibrium value when two initially uncorrelated dielectric bodies are brought into sudden proximity. For the interaction between dielectric slabs, it is found that the spatial dependence of the out-of-equilibrium force is the same as the equilibrium one, but it has a time dependent amplitude, or Hamaker coefficient, which increases in time to its equilibrium value. The final relaxation of the force to its equilibrium value is exponential in systems with a single or finite number of polarization field relaxation times. However, in systems, such as those described by the Havriliak-Negami dielectric constant with a broad distribution of relaxation times, we observe a much slower power law decay to the equilibrium value.

  13. Long-Range Interactions in Polymer Melts: The Anti-Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, S. P.; Semenov, A. N.

    2005-07-01

    It is well known that small neutral particles normally tend to aggregate due to the van der Waals forces. We discover a new universal long-range interaction between solid objects in polymer media that is directly opposite the van der Waals attraction. The new force could reverse the sign of the net interaction, possibly leading to the net repulsion. This universal repulsion comes from the subtracted soft fluctuation modes, which are not present in the real polymer system, but rather are in its ideal counterpart. The predicted effect has a deep relation to the classical Casimir interactions, providing an unusual example of fluctuation-induced repulsion instead of normal attraction. That is why it is referred to as the anti-Casimir effect. We also find that the correlation function of monomer units in a concentrated solution of infinite polymer chains follows a power-law rather than an exponential decay at large distances.

  14. Advance and prospects in constraining the Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-03-01

    We report stronger constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type corrections to Newtonian gravity from measurements of the lateral Casimir force between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces of a sphere and a plate. In the interaction range from 1.6 to 14 nm the strengthening of previously known high confidence constraints up to a factor of 2.4x10{sup 7} is achieved using these measurements. It is shown that the replacement of a plane plate with a corrugated one in the measurements of the normal Casimir force by means of an atomic force microscope would result in the strengthening of respective high confidence constraints on the Yukawa-type interaction by a factor of 1.1x10{sup 12}. The use of a corrugated plate instead of a plane plate in the experiment by means of a micromachined oscillator also leads to strengthening of the obtained constraints. We further obtain constraints on the parameters of Yukawa-type interaction from the data of experiments measuring the gradient of the Casimir pressure between two parallel plates and the gradient of the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a plate. The obtained results are compared with the previously known constraints. The possibilities of how to further strengthen the constraints on non-Newtonian gravity are discussed.

  15. Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Varun

    2014-08-01

    I utilize effective field theory(EFT) techniques to calculate the Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear in the presence of a polarizable but neutral object and present results for the energy and torque as a function of angle for a gear with multiple cogs, as well as for the case of a concentric cylindrical gear.

  16. Quantum coherence in the dynamical Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samos-Sáenz de Buruaga, D. N.; Sabín, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We propose to use quantum coherence as the ultimate proof of the quantum nature of the radiation that appears by means of the dynamical Casimir effect in experiments with superconducting microwave waveguides. We show that, unlike previously considered measurements such as entanglement and discord, quantum coherence does not require a threshold value of the external pump amplitude and is highly robust to thermal noise.

  17. Thermal Casimir effect in closed Friedmann universe revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Romero, C.

    2011-05-01

    We reconsider Casimir free energy and internal energy at nonzero temperature in the static Einstein and closed Friedmann universe. It is shown that the Casimir free energy is given by the difference between the free energy of a topologically nontrivial manifold and a tangential Minkowski space-time. We derive exact expressions for the Casimir free energy, internal energy and pressure in Einstein and Friedmann universes in terms of single sums. The Casimir entropy is shown to satisfy the Nernst heat theorem. Exact expressions for corresponding total quantities in the Einstein universe are obtained from the Casimir ones by adding a contribution of the black-body radiation. The asymptotic expressions for the Casimir free energy and internal energy at both high and low temperature are shown to be in direct analogy with those for two ideal-metal plates and an ideal-metal spherical shell. Specifically, at high temperature the classical limit holds.

  18. Gravitational Casimir effect, the Lifshitz theory, and the existence of gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    It has been predicted that, if gravitational wave reflectors exist, two such parallel plane gravitational mirrors separated by an empty gap will interact not only via the well-known Casimir effect of quantum electrodynamics but also because of an analogous gravitational Casimir force. It has been further claimed that this phenomenon would demonstrate the existence of gravitons. In this note, we discuss epistemological pitfalls of such a conclusion connected to the logical structure of the Lifshitz theory and we show such an experiment cannot prove gravity quantization. We also expose interpretative challenges of any future data due to extreme uncertainties on the spectrum of the predicted stochastic astrophysical and cosmological gravitational wave background.

  19. Magnetic anisotropy due to the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Metalidis, G.; Bruno, P.

    2010-02-15

    We consider the Casimir interaction between a ferromagnetic and a nonmagnetic mirror and show how the Casimir effect gives rise to a magnetic anisotropy in the ferromagnetic layer. The anisotropy is out of plane if the nonmagnetic plate is optically isotropic. If the nonmagnetic plate shows a uniaxial optical anisotropy (with optical axis in the plate plane), we find an in-plane magnetic anisotropy. In both cases, the energetically most favorable magnetization orientation is given by the competition between polar, longitudinal, and transverse contributions to the magneto-optical Kerr effect and will therefore depend on the interplate distance. Numerical results will be presented for a magnetic plate made out of Fe and nonmagnetic plates of Au (optically isotropic), quartz, calcite, and barium titanate (all uniaxially birefringent).

  20. Effective Casimir conditions and group coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Tsobanjan, Artur

    2014-06-01

    Properties of group coherent states can be derived ‘effectively’ without knowing full wave functions. The procedure is detailed in this paper as an example of general methods for effective constraints. The role of constraints in the present context is played by a Casimir condition that puts states within an irreducible representation of a Lie group (or, equivalently, on a quantization of a co-adjoint orbit of the dual Lie algebra). Simplifications implied by a Casimir condition, compared with general first-class constraints, allows one to show that the correct number of degrees of freedom is obtained after imposing the condition. When combined with conditions to saturate uncertainty relations, moments of group coherent states can be derived. A detailed example in quantum cosmology (cosmic forgetfulness) illustrates the usefulness of the methods.

  1. An experimental apparatus for Casimir torque measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    We have developed an experiment to measure the Casimir torque. In our experiment, a solid birefringent crystal causes a nematic liquid crystal director to rotate such that the extraordinary axes are aligned. A transparent and isotropic dielectric spacer layer is used to separate the two birefringent materials and an all-optical technique is used for detection. In this talk, we report on the progress of this experiment. Department of Physics, Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics.

  2. Nonequilibrium Casimir-Polder plasmonic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Messina, Riccardo; Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto; Intravaia, Francesco

    2016-04-18

    Here we investigate how the combination of nonequilibrium effects and material properties impacts on the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a surface. By addressing systems with temperature inhomogeneities and laser interactions, we show that nonmonotonous energetic landscapes can be produced where barriers and minima appear. Lastly, our treatment provides a self-consistent quantum theoretical framework for investigating the properties of a class of nonequilibrium atom-surface interactions.

  3. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    On a macroscopic scale, a nonreactive liquid partially covering a homogeneous solid surface will intersect the solid at an angle called the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, the contact angle is materially dependent upon both the solid and liquid and typical values fall in the range 80-170 deg, depending on the crucible material. On a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the liquid and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously. Consider the example of the so called detached Bridgman crystal growth process. In this technique, a small gap is formed between the growing crystal and the crucible. At the crystal/melt interface, a meniscus ring is formed. Its width can be in the range of a few micrometers, approaching a microscopic scale. It then becomes questionable to describe the shape of this meniscus by the contact angle. A more advanced treatment of the interface is needed and here we propose such a refined model. The interaction of the liquid surface with the solid can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir or van der Waals force.

  4. Does the transverse electric zero mode contribute to the Casimir effect for a metal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, J. S.; Brevik, I.; Aarseth, J. B.; Milton, K. A.

    2003-05-01

    The finite-temperature Casimir free energy, entropy, and internal energy are considered anew for a conventional parallel-plate configuration, in the light of current discussions in the literature. In the case of an “ideal” metal, characterized by a refractive index equal to infinity for all frequencies, we recover, via a somewhat unconventional method, conventional results for the temperature dependence, meaning that the zero-frequency transverse electric mode contributes the same as the transverse magnetic mode. For a real metal, however, approximately obeying the Drude dispersive model at low frequencies, we find that the zero-frequency transverse electric mode does not contribute at all. This would appear to lead to an observable temperature dependence and a violation of the third law of thermodynamics. It had been suggested that the source of the difficulty was the behavior of the reflection coefficient for perpendicular polarization but we show that this is not the case. By introducing a simplified model for the Casimir interaction, consisting of two harmonic oscillators interacting via a third one, we illustrate the behavior of the transverse electric field. Numerical results are presented based on the refractive index for gold. A linear temperature correction to the Casimir force between parallel plates is indeed found which should be observable in room-temperature experiments, but this does not entail any thermodynamic inconsistency.

  5. Casimir Friction and Near-field Radiative Heat Transfer in Graphene Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, A. I.

    2017-02-01

    The dependence of the Casimir friction force between a graphene sheet and a (amorphous) SiO2 substrate on the drift velocity of the electrons in the graphene sheet is studied. It is shown that the Casimir friction is strongly enhanced for the drift velocity above the threshold velocity when the friction is determined by the resonant excitation of the surface phonon-polaritons in the SiO2 substrate and the electron-hole pairs in graphene. The theory agrees well with the experimental data for the current-voltage dependence for unsuspended graphene on the SiO2 substrate. The theories of the Casimir friction and the near-field radiative energy transfer are used to study the heat generation and dissipation in graphene due to the interaction with phonon-polaritons in the (amorphous) SiO2 substrate and acoustic phonons in graphene. For suspended graphene, the energy transfer coefficient at nanoscale gap is three orders of magnitude larger than the radiative heat transfer coefficient of the blackbody radiation limit.

  6. The field theory of symmetrical layered electrolytic systems and the thermal Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. S.; Horgan, R. R.

    2005-06-01

    We present a general extension of a field-theoretic approach developed in earlier papers to the calculation of the free energy of symmetrically layered electrolytic systems which is based on the sine-Gordon field theory for the Coulomb gas. The method is to construct the partition function in terms of the Feynman evolution kernel in the Euclidean time variable associated with the coordinate normal to the surfaces defining the layered structure. The theory is applicable to cylindrical systems and its development is motivated by the possibility that a static van der Waals or thermal Casimir force could provide an attractive force stabilizing a dielectric tube formed from a lipid bilayer, an example of which is provided by the t-tubules occurring in certain muscle cells. In this context, we apply the theory to the calculation of the thermal Casimir effect for a dielectric tube of radius R and thickness δ formed from such a membrane in water. In a grand canonical approach we find that the leading contribution to the Casimir energy behaves like -kBTLκC/R which gives rise to an attractive force which tends to contract the tube radius. We find that κC~0.3 for the case of typical lipid membrane t-tubules. We conclude that except in the case of a very soft membrane this force is insufficient to stabilize such tubes against the bending stress which tends to increase the radius. We briefly discuss the role of the lipid membrane reservoir implicit in the approach and whether its nature in biological systems may possibly lead to a stabilizing mechanism for such lipid tubes.

  7. Ultrastrong optomechanics incorporating the dynamical Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, P. D.; Suh, J.; Blencowe, M. P.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit comprising a dc superconducting quantum interference device with a mechanically compliant arm embedded in a coplanar microwave cavity that realizes an optomechanical system with a degenerate or nondegenerate parametric interaction generated via the dynamical Casimir effect. For experimentally feasible parameters, this setup is capable of reaching the single-photon ultrastrong-coupling regime while simultaneously possessing a parametric coupling strength approaching the renormalized cavity frequency. This opens up the possibility of observing the interplay between these two fundamental nonlinearities at the single-photon level.

  8. Sign and other aspects of semiclassical Casimir energies

    SciTech Connect

    Schaden, Martin

    2006-04-15

    The Casimir energy of a massless scalar field is semiclassically given by contributions due to classical periodic rays. The required subtractions in the spectral density are determined explicitly. The semiclassical Casimir energies so defined coincide with those of zeta function regularization in the cases studied. Poles in the analytic continuation of zeta function regularization are related to nonuniversal subtractions in the spectral density. The sign of the Casimir energy of a scalar field on a smooth manifold is estimated by the sign of the contribution due to the shortest periodic rays only. Demanding continuity of the Casimir energy under small deformations of the manifold, the method is extended to integrable systems. The Casimir energy of a massless scalar field on a manifold with boundaries includes contributions due to periodic rays that lie entirely within the boundaries. These contributions in general depend on the boundary conditions. Although the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field may be sensitive to the physical dimensions of manifolds with boundary. In favorable cases its sign can, contrary to conventional wisdom, be inferred without calculation of the Casimir energy.

  9. Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a cavity wall under the influence of real conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Babb, J.F.; Klimchitskaya, G.L.; Mostepanenko, V.M.

    2004-10-01

    The Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a metal wall is investigated under the influence of real conditions including the dynamic polarizability of the atom, finite conductivity of the wall metal, and nonzero temperature of the system. Both analytical and numerical results for the free energy and force are obtained over a wide range of atom-wall distances. Numerical computations are performed for an Au wall and metastable He*, Na, and Cs atoms. For the He* atom we demonstrate, as an illustration, that at short separations of about the Au plasma wavelength at room temperature the free energy deviates up to 35% and the force up to 57% from the classical Casimir-Polder result. Accordingly, such large deviations should be taken into account in precision experiments on atom-wall interactions. The combined account of different corrections to the Casimir-Polder interaction leads to the conclusion that at short separations the corrections due to the dynamic polarizability of an atom play a more important role than--and suppress--the corrections due to the nonideality of the metal wall. By comparison of the exact atomic polarizabilities with those in the framework of the single oscillator model, it is shown that the obtained asymptotic expressions enable calculation of the free energy and force for the atom-wall interaction under real conditions with a precision of 1%.

  10. Casimir-Polder shifts on quantum levitation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crépin, P.-P.; Dufour, G.; Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2017-03-01

    An ultracold atom above a horizontal mirror experiences quantum reflection from the attractive Casimir-Polder interaction, which holds it against gravity and leads to quantum levitation states. We analyze this system by using a Liouville transformation of the Schrödinger equation and a Langer coordinate adapted to problems with a classical turning point. Reflection on the Casimir-Polder attractive well is replaced by reflection on a repulsive wall, and the problem is then viewed as an ultracold atom trapped inside a cavity with gravity and Casimir-Polder potentials acting, respectively, as top and bottom mirrors. We calculate numerically Casimir-Polder shifts of the energies of the cavity resonances and propose an approximate treatment which is precise enough to discuss spectroscopy experiments aimed at tests of the weak-equivalence principle on antihydrogen. We also discuss the lifetimes by calculating complex energies associated with cavity resonances.

  11. Observability of the bulk Casimir effect: Can the dynamical Casimir effect be relevant to sonoluminescence?

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, K.A.; Jack Ng, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The experimental observation of intense light emission by acoustically driven, periodically collapsing bubbles of air in water (sonoluminescence) has yet to receive an adequate explanation. One of the most intriguing ideas is that the conversion of acoustic energy into photons occurs quantum mechanically, through a dynamical version of the Casimir effect. We have argued elsewhere that in the adiabatic approximation, which should be reliable here, Casimir or zero-point energies cannot possibly be large enough to be relevant. (About 10 MeV of energy is released per collapse.) However, there are sufficient subtleties involved that others have come to opposite conclusions. In particular, it has been suggested that bulk energy, that is, simply the naive sum of (1) /(2) {h_bar}{omega}, which is proportional to the volume, could be relevant. We show that this cannot be the case, based on general principles as well as specific calculations. In the process we further illuminate some of the divergence difficulties that plague Casimir calculations, with an example relevant to the bag model of hadrons. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Fermionic condensate and Casimir densities in the presence of compact dimensions with applications to nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the fermionic condensate and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor for a massive fermionic field in the geometry of two parallel plates on the background of Minkowski spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions, in the presence of a constant gauge field. Bag boundary conditions are imposed on the plates and periodicity conditions with arbitrary phases are considered along the compact dimensions. The nontrivial topology of the background spacetime leads to an Aharonov-Bohm effect for the vacuum expectation values induced by the gauge field. The fermionic condensate and the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with period equal to the flux quantum. The boundary induced parts in the fermionic condensate and the vacuum energy density are negative, with independence of the phases in the periodicity conditions and of the value of the gauge potential. Interaction forces between the plates are thus always attractive. However, in physical situations where the quantum field is confined to the region between the plates, the pure topological part contributes as well, and then the resulting force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the specific phases encoded in the periodicity conditions along the compact dimensions, and on the gauge potential, too. Applications of the general formulas to cylindrical carbon nanotubes are considered, within the framework of a Dirac-like theory for the electronic states in graphene. In the absence of a magnetic flux, the energy density for semiconducting nanotubes is always negative. For metallic nanotubes the energy density is positive for long tubes and negative for short ones. The resulting Casimir forces acting on the edges of the nanotube are attractive for short tubes with independence of the tube chirality. The sign of the force for long nanotubes can be controlled by tuning the magnetic flux

  13. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  14. Casimir effect in the Kerr spacetime with quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Cunha, M. S.; Freitas, L. F. F.; Muniz, C. R.; Tahim, M. O.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the Casimir energy of a massless scalar field in a cavity formed by nearby parallel plates orbiting a rotating spherical body surrounded by quintessence, investigating the influence of the gravitational field on that energy, at zero temperature. This influence includes the effects due to the spacetime dragging caused by the source rotation as well as those ones due to the quintessence. We show that the energy depends on all the involved parameters, as source mass, angular momentum and quintessence state parameter, for any radial coordinate and polar angle. We show that at the north pole the Casimir energy is not influenced by the quintessential matter. At the equatorial plane, when the quintessence is canceled, the result obtained in the literature is recovered. Finally, constraints in the quintessence parameters are obtained from the uncertainty in the current measurements of Casimir effect.

  15. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  16. Comment on 'Casimir energies: Temperature dependence, dispersion, and anomalies'

    SciTech Connect

    Ravndal, Finn

    2009-05-15

    It is pointed out that the Casimir energy in a medium can be obtained most directly from the zero-point energy of the electromagnetic field because of its reduced propagation velocity. This brings to the fore again the old problem related to how the principle of relativity is combined with the Maxwell field equations in a continuous medium.

  17. Dynamical Casimir effect and minimal temperature in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenti, Giuliano; Strini, Giuliano

    2015-02-01

    We study the fundamental limitations of cooling to absolute zero for a qubit, interacting with a single mode of the electromagnetic field. Our results show that the dynamical Casimir effect, which is unavoidable in any finite-time thermodynamic cycle, forbids the attainability of the absolute zero of temperature, even in the limit of an infinite number of cycles.

  18. CALL FOR PAPERS: Topical issue on the nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel; Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2004-05-01

    The past few years have seen a growing interest in quantum mechanical systems with moving boundaries. One of its manifestations was the First International Workshop on Problems with Moving Boundaries organized by Professor J Dittrich in Prague in October 2003. Another event in this series will be the (first) International Workshop on the Dynamical Casimir Effect in Padua in June 2004, organized by Professor G Carugno (see webpage www.pd.infn.it/casimir/ for details). As Guest Editors we invite researchers working in any area related to moving boundaries to contribute to a Topical Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics on the nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries. Our intention is to cover a wide range of topics. In particular, we envisage possible contributions in the following areas: Theoretical and experimental studies on quantum fields in cavities with moving boundaries and time-dependent media. This area includes, in particular, various manifestations of the nonstationary (dynamical) Casimir effect, such as creation of quanta and modifications of Casimir force due to the motion of boundaries. Other relevant subjects are: generation and evolution of nonclassical states of fields and moving mirrors; interaction between quantized fields and atoms in cavities with moving boundaries; decoherence and entanglement due to the motion of boundaries; field quantization in nonideal cavities with moving boundaries taking into account losses and dispersion; nano-devices with moving boundaries. Quantum particles in domains confined with moving boundaries. This area includes: new exact and approximate solutions of the evolution equations (Schrödinger, Klein-Gordon, Dirac, Fokker-Planck, etc); quantum carpets and revivals; escape and tunnelling through moving barriers; evolution of quantum packets in the presence of moving boundaries; ultracold atoms (ions) in traps with moving boundaries. The topical issue is scheduled

  19. Dynamics of the Vacuum and Casimir Analogs to the Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold; Vera, Jerry; Bailey, Paul; March, Paul; Lawrence, Tim; Sylvester, Andre; Brady, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss the current viewpoint of the vacuum state and explore the idea of a "natural" vacuum as opposed to immutable, non-degradable vacuum. This concept will be explored for all primary quantum numbers to show consistency with observation at the level of Bohr theory. A comparison with the Casimir force per unit area will be made, and an explicit function for the spatial variation of the vacuum density around the atomic nucleus will be derived. This explicit function will be numerically modeled using the industry multi-physics tool, COMSOL(trademark), and the eigenfrequencies for the n = 1 to n = 7 states will be found and compared to expectation.

  20. Semiclassical estimates of electromagnetic Casimir self-energies of spherical and cylindrical metallic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Schaden, Martin

    2010-08-15

    The leading semiclassical estimates of the electromagnetic Casimir stresses on a spherical and a cylindrical metallic shell are within 1% of the field theoretical values. The electromagnetic Casimir energy for both geometries is given by two decoupled massless scalars that satisfy conformally covariant boundary conditions. Surface contributions vanish for smooth metallic boundaries, and the finite electromagnetic Casimir energy in leading semiclassical approximation is due to quadratic fluctuations about periodic rays in the interior of the cavity only. Semiclassically, the nonvanishing Casimir energy of a metallic cylindrical shell is almost entirely due to Fresnel diffraction.

  1. On the dynamic instability of nanowire-fabricated electromechanical actuators in the Casimir regime: Coupled effects of surface energy and size dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, Maryam; Mardaneh, Mohamadreza; Koochi, Ali; Rezaei, Morteza; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-02-01

    Herein, the dynamic pull-in instability of cantilever nanoactuator fabricated from conductive cylindrical nanowire with circular cross-section is studied under the presence of Casimir force. The Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity in combination with the couple stress theory is employed to incorporate the coupled effects of surface energy and size phenomenon. Using Green-Lagrange strain, the higher order surface stress components are incorporated in the governing equation. The Dirichlet mode is considered and an asymptotic solution, based on the path integral approach, is applied to consider the effect of the Casimir attraction. Furthermore, the influence of structural damping is considered in the model. The nonlinear governing equation is solved using analytical reduced order method (ROM). The effects of various parameters on the dynamic pull-in parameters, phase planes and stability threshold of the actuator are demonstrated.

  2. Short-range Fundamental forces

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, I; Baessler, Stefan; Buechner, M; Fedorov, General Victor; Hoedl, S.; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Pignol, G; Reynaud, S.; Sobolev, Yu.

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: (1) spin-independent forces; and (2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Different experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experiments. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  3. Casimir effect for a scalar field via Krein quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Pejhan, H.; Tanhayi, M.R.; Takook, M.V.

    2014-02-15

    In this work, we present a rather simple method to study the Casimir effect on a spherical shell for a massless scalar field with Dirichlet boundary condition by applying the indefinite metric field (Krein) quantization technique. In this technique, the field operators are constructed from both negative and positive norm states. Having understood that negative norm states are un-physical, they are only used as a mathematical tool for renormalizing the theory and then one can get rid of them by imposing some proper physical conditions. -- Highlights: • A modification of QFT is considered to address the vacuum energy divergence problem. • Casimir energy of a spherical shell is calculated, through this approach. • In this technique, it is shown, the theory is automatically regularized.

  4. Casimir, gravitational, and neutron tests of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2015-03-01

    We investigate laboratory tests of dark energy theories which modify gravity in a way generalizing the inverse power law chameleon models. We make use of the tomographic description of such theories which captures f (R ) models in the large curvature limit, the dilaton and the symmetron. We consider their effects in various experiments where the presence of a new scalar interaction may be uncovered. More precisely, we focus on the Casimir, Eötvös-Washington and neutron experiments. We show that dilatons, symmetrons and generalized chameleon models are efficiently testable in the laboratory. For generalized chameleons, we revise their status in the light of forthcoming Casimir experiments like CANNEX in Amsterdam and show that they are within reach of detection.

  5. Chern-Simons potential in models of Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pis'mak, Yury M.; Pis'mak, Daria Yu.

    2014-07-23

    In the model constructed in the framework of the proposed by Symanzik approach for description of interaction of a macroscopic material body with quantum fields the interaction of thin material film with photon field is presented by the Chern-Simons potential. All the effects of this interaction with can by described in the framework of one model. In this way, the Casimir energy for two parallel infinite planes and sphere, the Casimir-Polder potential, and characteristics of other physical phenomena have been calculated for non-ideal conducting material of film. The specific of regularization and renormalization procedures used by calculations and the physical meaning of obtained results are discussed. In the limit of infinite coupling constant one obtains the known results of models with boundary conditions. By finite value of coupling constants the model predicts unusual effects which could be important for micro-mechanics, nano-photonics, constructing of new materials.

  6. On the static Casimir effect with parity-breaking mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosco, C. D.; Remaggi, M. L.

    2017-03-01

    We study the Casimir interaction energy due to the vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic (EM) field in the presence of two mirrors, described by 2+1-dimensional, generally nonlocal actions, which may contain both parity-conserving and parity-breaking terms. We compare the results with the ones corresponding to Chern-Simons boundary conditions and evaluate the interaction energy for several particular situations.

  7. Giant vacuum forces via transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2015-03-01

    Quantum electromagnetic fluctuations induce forces between neutral particles, namely, the van der Waals (vdW) and Casimir interactions. Here we show that these fundamental interactions can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude upon changing the character of the mediating vacuum photon-modes. We consider two dipoles in the vicinity of any standard electric transmission line and find analytically that the interaction scales non-trivially with the inter-dipolar distance, resulting in a strong and long-range interaction. This may have profound implications on the non-additivity of vdW and Casimir interactions in many-particle systems, and opens the door for Casimir Physics in 1d. We discuss the possibilities of measuring this effect, e.g. in a coplanar waveguide line. In January 2015, my affiliation is supposed to change to ``Department of Physics, Harvard University.''

  8. Casimir bag energy in the stochastic approximation to the pure QCD vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, C. D.; Oxman, L. E.

    2007-01-15

    We study the Casimir contribution to the bag energy coming from gluon field fluctuations, within the context of the stochastic vacuum model of pure QCD. After formulating the problem in terms of the generating functional of field strength cumulants, we argue that the resulting predictions about the Casimir energy are compatible with the phenomenologically required bag energy term.

  9. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2015-05-01

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over 4He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  10. Eigenvalues of Casimir invariants for U{sub q}[osp(m vertical bar n)

    SciTech Connect

    Dancer, K.A.; Gould, M.D.; Links, J.

    2005-12-15

    For each quantum superalgebra U{sub q}[osp(m vertical bar n)] with m>2, an infinite family of Casimir invariants is constructed. This is achieved by using an explicit form for the Lax operator. The eigenvalue of each Casimir invariant on an arbitrary irreducible highest weight module is also calculated.

  11. Van der Waals forces in pNRQED

    SciTech Connect

    Shtabovenko, Vladyslav

    2016-01-22

    We report on the calculation of electromagnetic van der Waals forces [1] between two hydrogen atoms using non-relativistic effective field theories (EFTs) of QED for large and small momentum transfers with respect to the intrinsic energy scale of the hydrogen atom. Our results reproduce the well known London and Casimir-Polder forces.

  12. The Casimir Effect in Biology: The Role of Molecular Quantum Electrodynamics in Linear Aggregations of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradonjić, K.; Swain, J. D.; Widom, A.; Srivastava, Y. N.

    2009-04-01

    Despite the fact that red blood cells carry negative charges, under certain conditions they form cylindrical stacks, or "rouleaux". It is shown here that a form of the Casimir effect, generalizing the more well-known van der Waals forces, can provide the necessary attractive force to balance the electrostatic repulsion. Erythrocytes in plasma are modelled as negatively charged dielectric disks in an ionic solution, allowing predictions to be made about the conditions under which rouleaux will form. The results show qualitative agreement with observations which suggest that the basic idea is worth further pursuit. In addition to revealing a mechanism which may be widespread in biology at the cellular level, it also suggest new experiments and further applications to other biological systems, colloid chemistry and nanotechnology.

  13. Casimir amplitudes and capillary condensation of near-critical fluids between parallel plates: renormalized local functional theory.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2012-03-21

    We investigate the critical behavior of a near-critical fluid confined between two parallel plates in contact with a reservoir by calculating the order parameter profile and the Casimir amplitudes (for the force density and for the grand potential). Our results are applicable to one-component fluids and binary mixtures. We assume that the walls absorb one of the fluid components selectively for binary mixtures. We propose a renormalized local functional theory accounting for the fluctuation effects. Analysis is performed in the plane of the temperature T and the order parameter in the reservoir ψ(∞). Our theory is universal if the physical quantities are scaled appropriately. If the component favored by the walls is slightly poor in the reservoir, there appears a line of first-order phase transition of capillary condensation outside the bulk coexistence curve. The excess adsorption changes discontinuously between condensed and noncondensed states at the transition. With increasing T, the transition line ends at a capillary critical point T=T(c) (ca) slightly lower than the bulk critical temperature T(c) for the upper critical solution temperature. The Casimir amplitudes are larger than their critical point values by 10-100 times at off-critical compositions near the capillary condensation line.

  14. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-27

    levitation , as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.090403 PACS numbers: 03.70.+k, 03.65.w...displacements away from the symmetry axis, so that the system does not support stable levitation , consistent with the theorem of Ref. [1]. We...interaction is unambiguously repulsive.) Repulsive forces also arise for fluid-separated geometries [7] or magnetic [8,9] or magnetoelectric materials

  15. Structural Anisotropy and Orientation-Induced Casimir Repulsion in Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    Physics , Lecture Notes in Physics , edited by D. A. R. Dalvit, P. W. Milonni, D. C. Roberts, and F. S. S. Rosa (Springer, New York) (in press). [53] A... PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 052503 (2011) Structural anisotropy and orientation-induced Casimir repulsion in fluids Alexander P. McCauley,1 F. S. S. Rosa...2,3 Alejandro W. Rodriguez,4,5 John D. Joannopoulos,1 D. A. R. Dalvit,3 and Steven G. Johnson4 1Department of Physics , Massachusetts Institute of

  16. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy.

  17. Application of the proximity force approximation to gravitational and Yukawa-type forces

    SciTech Connect

    Decca, R. S.; Fischbach, E.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Krause, D. E.; Lopez, D.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2009-06-15

    We apply the proximity force approximation, which is widely used for the calculation of the Casimir force between bodies with nonplanar boundary surfaces, to gravitational and Yukawa-type interactions. It is shown that for the gravitational force in a sphere-plate configuration the general formulation of the proximity force approximation is well applicable. For a Yukawa-type interaction we demonstrate the validity of both the general formulation of the proximity force approximation and a simple mapping between the sphere-plate and plate-plate configurations. The claims to the contrary in some recent literature are thus incorrect. Our results justify the constraints on the parameters of non-Newtonian gravity previously obtained from the indirect dynamic measurements of the Casimir pressure.

  18. Critical Casimir interactions around the consolute point of a binary solvent.

    PubMed

    Mohry, T F; Kondrat, S; Maciołek, A; Dietrich, S

    2014-08-14

    Spatial confinement of a near-critical medium changes its fluctuation spectrum and modifies the corresponding order parameter distribution, resulting in effective, so-called critical Casimir forces (CCFs) acting on the confining surfaces. These forces are attractive for like boundary conditions of the order parameter at the opposing surfaces of the confinement. For colloidal particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture acting as a solvent close to its critical point of demixing, one thus expects the emergence of phase segregation into equilibrium colloidal liquid and gas phases. We analyze how such phenomena occur asymmetrically in the whole thermodynamic neighborhood of the consolute point of the binary solvent. By applying field-theoretical methods within mean-field approximation and the semi-empirical de Gennes-Fisher functional, we study the CCFs acting between planar parallel walls as well as between two spherical colloids and their dependence on temperature and on the composition of the near-critical binary mixture. We find that for compositions slightly poor in the molecules preferentially adsorbed at the surfaces, the CCFs are significantly stronger than at the critical composition, thus leading to pronounced colloidal segregation. The segregation phase diagram of the colloid solution following from the calculated effective pair potential between the colloids agrees surprisingly well with experiments and simulations.

  19. Observation of the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C M; Johansson, G; Pourkabirian, A; Simoen, M; Johansson, J R; Duty, T; Nori, F; Delsing, P

    2011-11-16

    One of the most surprising predictions of modern quantum theory is that the vacuum of space is not empty. In fact, quantum theory predicts that it teems with virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. Although initially a curiosity, it was quickly realized that these vacuum fluctuations had measurable consequences--for instance, producing the Lamb shift of atomic spectra and modifying the magnetic moment of the electron. This type of renormalization due to vacuum fluctuations is now central to our understanding of nature. However, these effects provide indirect evidence for the existence of vacuum fluctuations. From early on, it was discussed whether it might be possible to more directly observe the virtual particles that compose the quantum vacuum. Forty years ago, it was suggested that a mirror undergoing relativistic motion could convert virtual photons into directly observable real photons. The phenomenon, later termed the dynamical Casimir effect, has not been demonstrated previously. Here we observe the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit consisting of a coplanar transmission line with a tunable electrical length. The rate of change of the electrical length can be made very fast (a substantial fraction of the speed of light) by modulating the inductance of a superconducting quantum interference device at high frequencies (>10 gigahertz). In addition to observing the creation of real photons, we detect two-mode squeezing in the emitted radiation, which is a signature of the quantum character of the generation process.

  20. Impact of magnetic properties on the Casimir torque between anisotropic metamaterial plates

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Gang; Liu Zhongzhu; Luo Jun

    2009-12-15

    The quantized surface mode technique is used to calculate the Casimir torque between two parallel anisotropic metamaterial plates with in-plane optical axes, and our main concern is focused on the impact of the magnetic properties of the plates on the Casimir torque. Our result shows that at small separation, the Casimir torque between the two plates with frequency dependent permeabilities is larger than that between two nonmagnetic plates, while at large separation it is smaller. This can be explained as a result of the impact of both magnetic properties and material dispersion of the plates. The impact of the Drude background in connected metallic metamaterial is also discussed. These phenomena provide us with new understanding about the Casimir effect and show great potential in application.

  1. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2015-05-15

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over {sup 4}He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  2. Worldline approach for numerical computation of electromagnetic Casimir energies: Scalar field coupled to magnetodielectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackrory, Jonathan B.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Steck, Daniel A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a worldline method for the calculation of Casimir energies for scalar fields coupled to magnetodielectric media. The scalar model we consider may be applied in arbitrary geometries, and it corresponds exactly to one polarization of the electromagnetic field in planar layered media. Starting from the field theory for electromagnetism, we work with the two decoupled polarizations in planar media and develop worldline path integrals, which represent the two polarizations separately, for computing both Casimir and Casimir-Polder potentials. We then show analytically that the path integrals for the transverse-electric polarization coupled to a dielectric medium converge to the proper solutions in certain special cases, including the Casimir-Polder potential of an atom near a planar interface, and the Casimir energy due to two planar interfaces. We also evaluate the path integrals numerically via Monte Carlo path-averaging for these cases, studying the convergence and performance of the resulting computational techniques. While these scalar methods are only exact in particular geometries, they may serve as an approximation for Casimir energies for the vector electromagnetic field in other geometries.

  3. Nernst heat theorem for the thermal Casimir interaction between two graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Romero, C.

    2016-10-01

    We find analytic asymptotic expressions at low temperature for the Casimir free energy, entropy, and pressure of two parallel graphene sheets in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. The reflection coefficients of electromagnetic waves on graphene are described on the basis of first principles of quantum electrodynamics at nonzero temperature using the polarization tensor in (2+1)-dimensional space-time. The leading contributions to the Casimir entropy and to the thermal corrections to the Casimir energy and pressure are given by the thermal correction to the polarization tensor at nonzero Matsubara frequencies. It is shown that the Casimir entropy for two graphene sheets goes to zero when the temperature vanishes, i.e., the third law of thermodynamics (the Nernst heat theorem) is satisfied. At low temperature, the magnitude of the thermal correction to the Casimir pressure between two graphene sheets is shown to vary inversely proportional to the separation. The Nernst heat theorem for graphene is discussed in the context of problems occurring in Casimir physics for both metallic and dielectric plates.

  4. Effect of intermolecular force on the static/dynamic behaviour of M/NEM devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namjung; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    Advances made in the fabrication of micro/nano-electromechanical (M/NEM) devices over the last ten years necessitate the understanding of the attractive force that arises from quantum fluctuations (generally referred to as Casimir effects) [Casimir H B G 1948 Proc. K. Ned. Akad. Wet. 51 793]. The fundamental mechanisms underlying quantum fluctuations have been actively investigated through various theoretical and experimental approaches. However, the effect of the force on M/NEM devices has not been fully understood yet, especially in the transition region involving gaps ranging from 10 nm to 1 μm, due to the complexity of the force. Here, we numerically calculate the Casimir effects in M/NEM devices by using the Lifshitz formula, the general expression for the Casimir effects [Lifshitz E 1956 Sov. Phys. JETP 2 73]. Since the Casimir effects are highly dependent on the permittivity of the materials, the Kramer-Kronig relation [Landau L D, Lifshitz E M and Pitaevskii L P 1984 Electrodynamics of Continuous Media (New York: Pergamon Press)] and the optical data for metals and dielectrics are used in order to obtain the permittivity. Several simplified models for the permittivity of the materials, such as the Drude and Lorentz models [Jackson J D 1975 Classical Electrodynamics (New York: Wiley)], are also used to extrapolate the optical data. Important characteristic values of M/NEM devices, such as the pull-in voltage, pull-in gap, detachment length, etc, are calculated for devices operating in the transition region. Our results show that accurate predictions for the pull-in behaviour are possible when the Lifshitz formula is used instead of the idealized expressions for Casimir effects. We expand this study into the dynamics of M/NEM devices, so that the time and frequency response of M/NEM devices with Casimir effects can be explored.

  5. Casimir effect: running Newton constant or cosmological term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonyi, Janos; Regos, Eniko

    2006-01-01

    We argue that the instability of Euclidean Einstein gravity is an indication that the vacuum is non-perturbative and contains a condensate of the metric tensor in a manner reminiscent of Yang Mills theories. As a simple step toward the characterization of such a vacuum the value of the 1-loop effective action is computed for Euclidean de Sitter spaces as a function of the curvature when the unstable conformal modes are held fixed. Two phases are found, one where the curvature is large and gravitons should be confined and another one which appears to be weakly coupled and tends to be flat. The induced cosmological constant is positive or negative in the strongly or weakly curved phase, respectively. The relevance of the Casimir effect in understanding the UV sensitivity of gravity is pointed out.

  6. Rotation of a liquid crystal by the Casimir torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-03-01

    We present a calculation of the Casimir torque acting on a liquid crystal near a birefringent crystal. In this system, a liquid crystal bulk is uniformly aligned at one surface and is twisted at the other surface by a birefringent crystal, e.g., barium titanate. The liquid crystal is separated from the solid crystal by an isotropic, transparent material such as SiO2. By varying the thickness of the deposited layer, we can observe the effect of retardation on the torque (which differentiates it from the close-range van der Waals torque). We find that a barium titanate slab would cause 5CB (4 -cyano -4 '-pentylbiphenyl) liquid crystal to rotate by 10∘ through its bulk when separated by 35 nm of SiO2. The optical technique for measuring this twist is also outlined.

  7. Microscopic background of the Onsager-Casimir reciprocity relations

    SciTech Connect

    Titulaer, U.M.

    1988-10-01

    It has been known for some time that small deviations from the Onsager-Casimir symmetry relations are introduced when one passes from a given description of a system to a less detailed one by adiabatic elimination of fast variables. Exact validity is preserved, however, for a slightly modified form of these relations. In this paper the question is considered whether this modified Onsager symmetry is also preserved by the transition from a microscopic to a mesoscopic description, the step that introduces manifest irreversibility into the equations of motion. This question is examined in detail for a system of a few heavy oscillators coupled to a bath, a model discussed in a recent paper by van Kampen. The modified Onsager symmetry survives the transition to an irreversible description via the dense spectrum approximation. This is shown explicitly by inspection of the results obtained by van Kampen; some arguments favoring a more general validity are also briefly discussed.

  8. Symmetry reduction for central force problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, Robert I.; Modin, Klas; Verdier, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    We given an elementary illustration of symmetry reduction for central force problems, drawing phase portraits of the reduced dynamics as the intersection of Casimir and energy level sets in three dimensions. These systems form a classic example of symplectic reduction which can usefully be compared to the more commonly seen case of the free rigid body. Dedicated to the memory of Jerry Marsden, 1942-2010.

  9. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen Å.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.130405 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  10. Characteristic properties of the Casimir free energy for metal films deposited on metallic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Casimir free energy and pressure of thin metal films deposited on metallic plates are considered using the Lifshitz theory and the Drude and plasma model approaches to the role of conduction electrons. The bound electrons are taken into account by using the complete optical data of film and plate metals. It is shown that for films of several tens of nanometers thickness the Casimir free energy and pressure calculated using these approaches differ by hundreds and thousands percent and can be easily discriminated experimentally. According to our results, the free energy of a metal film does not vanish in the limiting case of ideal metal if the Drude model approach is used in contradiction with the fact that the fluctuating field cannot penetrate in its interior. Numerical computations of the Casimir free energy and pressure of Ag and Au films deposited on Cu and Al plates have been performed using both theoretical approaches. It is shown that the free energy of a film can be both negative and positive depending on the metals used. For a Au film on a Ag plate and vice versa the Casimir energy of a film changes its sign with increasing film thickness. Applications of the obtained results for resolving the Casimir puzzle and the problem of stability of thin films are discussed.

  11. Mode Summation Approach to Casimir Effect Between Two Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2012-10-01

    In the last few years, several approaches have been developed to compute the exact Casimir interaction energy between two nonplanar objects, all lead to the same functional form, which is called the TGTG formula. In this paper, we explore the TGTG formula from the perspective of mode summation approach. Both scalar fields and electromagnetic fields are considered. In this approach, one has to first solve the equation of motion to find a wave basis for each object. The two T's in the TGTG formula are T-matrices representing the Lippmann-Schwinger T-operators, one for each of the objects. Each T-matrix can be found by matching the boundary conditions imposed on the object, and it is independent of the other object. However, it depends on whether the object is interacting with an object outside it, or an object inside it. The two G's in the TGTG formula are the translation matrices, relating the wave basis of an object to the wave basis of the other object. These translation matrices only depend on the wave basis chosen for each object, and they are independent of the boundary conditions on the objects. After discussing the general theory, we apply the prescription to derive the explicit formulas for the Casimir energies for the sphere-sphere, sphere-plane, cylinder-cylinder and cylinder-plane interactions. First the T-matrices for a plane, a sphere and a cylinder are derived for the following cases: the object is imposed with Dirichlet, Neumann or general Robin boundary conditions; the object is semitransparent; and the object is a magnetodielectric object immersed in a magnetodielectric media. Then the operator approach developed by R. C. Wittman [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag.36, 1078 (1988)] is used to derive the translation matrices. From these, the explicit TGTG formula for each of the scenarios can be written down. On the one hand, we have summarized all the TGTG formulas that have been derived so far for the sphere-sphere, cylinder-cylinder, sphere-plane and

  12. Apparent Endless Extraction of Energy from the Vacuum by Cyclic Manipulation of Casimir Cavity Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1983, Ambjorn and Wolfram produced plots of the energy density of the quantum mechanical electromagnetic fluctuations in a volume of vacuum bounded by perfectly conducting walls in the shape of a rectangular cavity of dimensions a(1), a(2), and a(3), as a function of the ratios a(2)/a(1) and a(3)/a(1). Portions of these plots are double-valued, in that they allow rectangular cavities with the same, value of a(2)/a(1), but different values of a(3)/a(1), to have the saint total energy. Using these double-valued regions of the plots, I show that it is possible to define a "Casimir Vacuum Energy Extraction Cycle" which apparently would allow for the endless extraction of energy from the vacuum in the Casimir cavity by cyclic manipulation of the Casimir cavity dimensions.

  13. Noncontact gears. II. Casimir torque between concentric corrugated cylinders for the scalar case

    SciTech Connect

    Cavero-Pelaez, Ines; Milton, Kimball A.; Parashar, Prachi; Shajesh, K. V.

    2008-09-15

    The Casimir interaction between two concentric corrugated cylinders provides the mechanism for noncontact gears. To this end, we calculate the Casimir torque between two such cylinders, described by {delta}-potentials, which interact through a scalar field. We derive analytic expressions for the Casimir torque for the case when the corrugation amplitudes are small in comparison to the corrugation wavelengths. We derive explicit results for the Dirichlet case, and exact results for the weak coupling limit, in the leading order. The results for the corrugated cylinders approach the corresponding expressions for the case of corrugated parallel plates in the limit of large radii of cylinders (relative to the difference in their radii) while keeping the corrugation wavelength fixed.

  14. Noncontact gears. II. Casimir torque between concentric corrugated cylinders for the scalar case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavero-Peláez, Inés; Milton, Kimball A.; Parashar, Prachi; Shajesh, K. V.

    2008-09-01

    The Casimir interaction between two concentric corrugated cylinders provides the mechanism for noncontact gears. To this end, we calculate the Casimir torque between two such cylinders, described by δ-potentials, which interact through a scalar field. We derive analytic expressions for the Casimir torque for the case when the corrugation amplitudes are small in comparison to the corrugation wavelengths. We derive explicit results for the Dirichlet case, and exact results for the weak coupling limit, in the leading order. The results for the corrugated cylinders approach the corresponding expressions for the case of corrugated parallel plates in the limit of large radii of cylinders (relative to the difference in their radii) while keeping the corrugation wavelength fixed.

  15. Topological Casimir effect in compactified cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the Wightman function, the vacuum expectation values of the field squared and the energy-momentum tensor for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling in the generalized cosmic string geometry with a compact dimension along its axis. The boundary condition along the compactified dimension is taken in general form with an arbitrary phase. The vacuum expectation values are decomposed into two parts. The first one corresponds to the uncompactified cosmic string geometry and the second one is the correction induced by the compactification. The asymptotic behavior of the vacuum expectation values of the field squared, energy density and stresses is investigated near the string and at large distances. We show that the nontrivial topology due to the cosmic string enhances the vacuum polarization effects induced by the compactness of spatial dimension for both the field squared and the vacuum energy density. A simple formula is given for the part of the integrated topological Casimir energy induced by the planar angle deficit. The results are generalized for a charged scalar field in the presence of a constant gauge field. In this case, the vacuum expectation values are periodic functions of the component of the vector potential along the compact dimension.

  16. Test of Zero-point Energy Emission from Gases Flowing Through Casimir Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga; Moddel, Garret

    A recently issued patent [1] describes a method by which vacuum energy is extracted from gas flowing through a Casimir cavity. According to stochastic electrodynamics, the electronic orbitals in atoms are supported by the ambient zero-point (ZP) field. When the gas atoms are pumped into a Casimir cavity, where long-wavelength ZP field modes are excluded, the electrons spin down into lower energy orbitals and release energy in the process. This energy is collected in a local absorber. When the electrons exit the Casimir cavity they are re-energized to their original orbitals by the ambient ZP fields. The process is repeated to produce continuous power. In this way, the device functions like a heat pump for ZP energy, extracting it globally from the electromagnetic quantum vacuum and collecting it in a local absorber. This energy can be used for heating, or converted to electric power. We carried out a series of experiments to test whether energy is, in fact, radiated from Casimir cavities when the appropriate gas flows through them. The Casimir cavity devices we tested were nanopore polycarbonate membranes with submicron pores having a density of 3x108pores/cm2. Gas was pumped through the membranes in a stainless steel vacuum system, and emitted energy was measured using a broadband pyroelectric detector and lock-in amplifier. Emission in the infrared was clearly observed. We analyzed the emission from different gases and cavities to determine its origin. None of the conventional thermodynamic models we applied to our data fully explain it, leaving open the possibility that it is due to Casimir-cavity-induced emission from ZP fields.

  17. Electromagnetic Casimir densities for a cylindrical shell on de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharian, A. A.; Manukyan, V. F.; Saharyan, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Complete set of cylindrical modes is constructed for the electromagnetic field inside and outside a cylindrical shell in the background of (D + 1)-dimensional dS space-time. On the shell, the field obeys the generalized perfect conductor boundary condition. For the Bunch-Davies vacuum state, we evaluate the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the electric field squared and of the energy-momentum tensor. The shell-induced contributions are explicitly extracted. In this way, for points away from the shell, the renormalization is reduced to the one for the VEVs in the boundary-free dS bulk. As a special case, the VEVs are obtained for a cylindrical shell in the (D + 1)-dimensional Minkowski bulk. We show that the shell-induced contribution in the electric field squared is positive for both the interior and exterior regions. The corresponding Casimir-Polder forces are directed toward the shell. The vacuum energy-momentum tensor, in addition to the diagonal components, has a nonzero off-diagonal component corresponding to the energy flux along the direction normal to the shell. This flux is directed from the shell in both the exterior and interior regions. For points near the shell, the leading terms in the asymptotic expansions for the electric field squared and diagonal components of the energy-momentum tensor are obtained from the corresponding expressions in the Minkowski bulk replacing the distance from the shell by the proper distance in the dS bulk. The influence of the gravitational field on the local characteristics of the vacuum is essential at distances from the shell larger than the dS curvature radius. The results are extended for confining boundary conditions of flux tube models in QCD.

  18. Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Helically symmetric formulation, Casimir invariants, and equilibrium variational principles

    SciTech Connect

    Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2012-05-15

    The noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is used to construct variational principles for continuously symmetric equilibrium configurations of magnetized plasma, including flow. In particular, helical symmetry is considered, and results on axial and translational symmetries are retrieved as special cases of the helical configurations. The symmetry condition, which allows the description in terms of a magnetic flux function, is exploited to deduce a symmetric form of the noncanonical Poisson bracket of MHD. Casimir invariants are then obtained directly from the Poisson bracket. Equilibria are obtained from an energy-Casimir principle and reduced forms of this variational principle are obtained by the elimination of algebraic constraints.

  19. Physical restrictions on the Casimir interaction of metal-dielectric metamaterials: An effective-medium approach

    SciTech Connect

    Silveirinha, Mario G.; Maslovski, Stanislav I.

    2010-11-15

    Using an effective-medium approach, we demonstrate that the Casimir interaction of structured metal-dielectric metamaterial slabs which effectively behave as either uniform nongyrotropic materials or bi-isotropic materials is attractive at all distances, independent of the emergence of artificial magnetism or strong magnetoelectric coupling, when the slabs stand in a vacuum. In particular, it is shown that the magnetic response of a metal-dielectric metamaterial is always diamagnetic at imaginary frequencies, and this explains in simple physical terms the impossibility of Casimir repulsion.

  20. Casimir effect on the lattice: U(1) gauge theory in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.; Goy, V. A.; Molochkov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a general numerical method to study the Casimir effect in lattice gauge theories. We illustrate the method by calculating the energy density of zero-point fluctuations around two parallel wires of finite static permittivity in Abelian gauge theory in two spatial dimensions. We discuss various subtle issues related to the lattice formulation of the problem and show how they can successfully be resolved. Finally, we calculate the Casimir potential between the wires of a fixed permittivity, extrapolate our results to the limit of ideally conducting wires and demonstrate excellent agreement with a known theoretical result.

  1. Standard Model Extension and Casimir effect for fermions at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2016-11-01

    Lorentz and CPT symmetries are foundations for important processes in particle physics. Recent studies in Standard Model Extension (SME) at high energy indicate that these symmetries may be violated. Modifications in the lagrangian are necessary to achieve a hermitian hamiltonian. The fermion sector of the standard model extension is used to calculate the effects of the Lorentz and CPT violation on the Casimir effect at zero and finite temperature. The Casimir effect and Stefan-Boltzmann law at finite temperature are calculated using the thermo field dynamics formalism.

  2. An improved proximity force approximation for electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2012-08-15

    A quite straightforward approximation for the electrostatic interaction between two perfectly conducting surfaces suggests itself when the distance between them is much smaller than the characteristic lengths associated with their shapes. Indeed, in the so called 'proximity force approximation' the electrostatic force is evaluated by first dividing each surface into a set of small flat patches, and then adding up the forces due two opposite pairs, the contributions of which are approximated as due to pairs of parallel planes. This approximation has been widely and successfully applied in different contexts, ranging from nuclear physics to Casimir effect calculations. We present here an improvement on this approximation, based on a derivative expansion for the electrostatic energy contained between the surfaces. The results obtained could be useful for discussing the geometric dependence of the electrostatic force, and also as a convenient benchmark for numerical analyses of the tip-sample electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proximity force approximation (PFA) has been widely used in different areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PFA can be improved using a derivative expansion in the shape of the surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the improved PFA to compute electrostatic forces between conductors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results can be used as an analytic benchmark for numerical calculations in AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight is provided for people who use the PFA to compute nuclear and Casimir forces.

  3. Reply to "Comment on `Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the "Comment on `Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors.' " We believe the comment misrepresents our papers, and fails to provide a plausible resolution to the conflict between theory and experiment.

  4. A measurable force driven by an excitonic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hakioğlu, T.; Özgün, Ege; Günay, Mehmet

    2014-04-21

    Free energy signatures related to the measurement of an emergent force (≈10{sup −9}N) due to the exciton condensate (EC) in Double Quantum Wells are predicted and experiments are proposed to measure the effects. The EC-force is attractive and reminiscent of the Casimir force between two perfect metallic plates, but also distinctively different from it by its driving mechanism and dependence on the parameters of the condensate. The proposed experiments are based on a recent experimental work on a driven micromechanical oscillator. Conclusive observations of EC in recent experiments also provide a strong promise for the observation of the EC-force.

  5. Particles with nonlinear electric response: Suppressing van der Waals forces by an external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Heino; Dean, David S.; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We study the classical thermal component of Casimir, or van der Waals, forces between point particles with highly anharmonic dipole Hamiltonians when they are subjected to an external electric field. Using a model for which the individual dipole moments saturate in a strong field (a model that mimics the charges in a neutral, perfectly conducting sphere), we find that the resulting Casimir force depends strongly on the strength of the field, as demonstrated by analytical results. For a certain angle between the external field and center-to-center axis, the fluctuation force can be tuned and suppressed to arbitrarily small values. We compare the forces between these particles with those between particles with harmonic Hamiltonians and also provide a simple formula for asymptotically large external fields, which we expect to be generally valid for the case of saturating dipole moments.

  6. Casimir energy in a small volume multiply connected static hyperbolic preinflationary universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mu''ller, Daniel; Fagundes, Helio V.; Opher, Reuven

    2001-06-15

    A few years ago, Cornish, Spergel and Starkman (CSS) suggested that a multiply connected ''small'' universe could allow for classical chaotic mixing as a preinflationary homogenization process. The smaller the volume, the more important the process. Also, a smaller universe has a greater probability of being spontaneously created. Previously DeWitt, Hart and Isham (DHI) calculated the Casimir energy for static multiply connected flat space-times. Because of the interest in small volume hyperbolic universes (e.g., CSS), we generalize the DHI calculation by making a numerical investigation of the Casimir energy for a conformally coupled, massive scalar field in a static universe, whose spatial sections are the Weeks manifold, the smallest universe of negative curvature known. In spite of being a numerical calculation, our result is in fact exact. It is shown that there is spontaneous vacuum excitation of low multipolar components.

  7. Derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2014-10-01

    We carefully reexamine the conditions of validity for the consistent derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors. We recover the usual expression for the lossy Drude model but not for the lossless plasma model. We give an interpretation of this new result in terms of the modes associated with the Foucault currents, which play a role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to common expectations.

  8. Degeneration of Trigonometric Dynamical Difference Equations for Quantum Loop Algebras to Trigonometric Casimir Equations for Yangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagović, Martina

    2015-03-01

    We show that, under Drinfeld's degeneration (Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians. American Mathematical Society, Providence, pp 798-820, 1987) of quantum loop algebras to Yangians, the trigonometric dynamical difference equations [Etingof and Varchenko (Adv Math 167:74-127, 2002)] for the quantum affine algebra degenerate to the trigonometric Casimir differential equations [Toledano Laredo (J Algebra 329:286-327, 2011)] for Yangians.

  9. Casimir energies and special dimensions in a toy model for branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Isaac

    1988-12-01

    We consider a generalization to branes of the old action for the strings without reparamentrization invariance. These actions admit natural supplementary mass-shell conditions. By regularizing the Casimir energies we calculate the special dimensions at which these toy branes show vector massless states in its spectrum. They all turn out to be non-integers. On sabbatical leave from Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado Postal 66961, Caracas 1061A, Venezuela.

  10. Casimir scaling and string breaking in G{sub 2} gluodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wellegehausen, Bjoern H.; Wipf, Andreas; Wozar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We study the potential energy between static charges in G{sub 2} gluodynamics in three and four dimensions. Our work is based on an efficient local hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm and a multilevel Luescher-Weisz algorithm with exponential error reduction to accurately measure expectation values of Wilson and Polyakov loops. Both in three and four dimensions we show that at intermediate scales the string tensions for charges in various G{sub 2} representations scale with the second order Casimir. In three dimensions Casimir scaling is confirmed within 4% for charges in representations of dimensions 7, 14, 27, 64, 77, 77{sup '}, 182, and 189 and in four dimensions within 5% for charges in representations of dimensions 7, 14, 27, and 64. In three dimensions we detect string breaking for charges in the two fundamental representations. The scale for string breaking agrees very well with the mass of the created pair of glue lumps. Close to the string breaking distance Casimir scaling between adjoint and defining representation is violated by 2.5%. The analytical prediction for the continuum string tension is confirmed for the defining representation in three dimensions.

  11. Geometry-induced Casimir suspension of oblate bodies in fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Reid, M T Homer; Intravaia, Francesco; Woolf, Alexander; Dalvit, Diego A R; Capasso, Federico; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-11-01

    We predict that a low-permittivity oblate body (disk-shaped object) above a thin metal substrate (plate with a hole) immersed in a fluid of intermediate permittivity will experience a metastable equilibrium (restoring force) near the center of the hole. Stability is the result of a geometry-induced transition in the sign of the force, from repulsive to attractive, that occurs as the disk approaches the hole--in planar or nearly planar geometries, the same material combination yields a repulsive force at all separations, in accordance with the Dzyaloshinskiĭ-Lifshitz-Pitaevskiĭ condition of fluid-induced repulsion between planar bodies. We explore the stability of the system with respect to rotations and lateral translations of the disks and demonstrate interesting transitions (bifurcations) in the rotational stability of the disks as a function of their size. Finally, we consider the reciprocal situation in which the disk-plate materials are interchanged and find that in this case the system also exhibits metastability. The forces in the system are sufficiently large to be observed in experiments and should enable measurements based on the diffusion dynamics of the suspended bodies.

  12. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  13. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  14. Thermal corrections to the Casimir energy in a general weak gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Borzoo

    2016-12-01

    We calculate finite temperature corrections to the energy of the Casimir effect of a two conducting parallel plates in a general weak gravitational field. After solving the Klein-Gordon equation inside the apparatus, mode frequencies inside the apparatus are obtained in terms of the parameters of the weak background. Using Matsubara’s approach to quantum statistical mechanics gravity-induced thermal corrections of the energy density are obtained. Well-known weak static and stationary gravitational fields are analyzed and it is found that in the low temperature limit the energy of the system increases compared to that in the zero temperature case.

  15. Generalized Bogoliubov transformation for confined fields: Applications for the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.C. da; Khanna, F.C.; Matos Neto, A.; Santana, A.E.

    2002-11-01

    The Bogoliubov transformation in thermofield dynamics, an operator formalism for the finite-temperature quantum field theory, is generalized to describe a field in arbitrary confined regions of space and time. Starting with the scalar field, the approach is extended to the electromagnetic field and the energy-momentum tensor is written via the Bogoliubov transformation. In this context, the Casimir effect is calculated for zero and nonzero temperature, and therefore it can be considered as a vacuum condensation effect of the electromagnetic field. This aspect opens an interesting perspective for using this procedure as an effective scheme for calculations in the studies of confined fields, including interacting fields.

  16. The Casimir energy in a dispersive and absorptive medium in the Fano diagonalization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the Casimir energy of the electromagnetic field in the one-dimensional space between two metallic plates filled with a dispersive and absorptive dielectric in the framework of a microscopic approach in which the medium is modeled by a set of oscillators with continuously distributed frequencies. We analyze the treatment of singular expressions used in other papers and show that with appropriate regularization and omission of certain infinite terms, the results coincide with those obtained in an approach without such singularities. We study the asymptotic behavior at large distances and conclude that it always corresponds to attraction, but the influence of the dielectric can lead to repulsion at finite distances.

  17. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. Dowker's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-07-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  18. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. DOWKER's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so-called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  19. Casimir Funk: his discovery of the vitamins and their deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Tagarelli, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2010-01-01

    The history of the discovery of vitamins is the history of their deficiency disorders. Their discoverer was Casimir Funk, who is considered the 'father of vitamin therapy'. In his experimental research, Funk studied the interrelationships in the human body of those elements that Eijkman had demonstrated in animals, particularly in birds. In his experimental research, Funk identified the dietetic factors whose lack caused the 'deficiency disorders', as he called human beri-beri, scurvy, rickets and pellagra. In 1911, he designated these factors 'vitamins' ('vita' = life, and 'amine' = a nitrogenous substance essential for life); this name was accepted by the scientific community in 1912.

  20. Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the conditions of validity for the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic plane mirrors. As in the previously studied case of nonmagnetic materials [Guérout et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 042125 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.042125], we recover the usual expression for the lossy model of optical response, but not for the lossless plasma model. We also show that the modes associated with the Foucault currents play a crucial role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to expectations.

  1. Casimir effect at finite temperature for pure-photon sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics between particles is governed by Lorentz and CPT symmetry. There is a violation of Parity (P) and CP symmetry at low levels. The unified theory, that includes particle physics and quantum gravity, may be expected to be covariant with Lorentz and CPT symmetry. At high enough energies, will the unified theory display violation of any symmetry? The Standard Model Extension (SME), with Lorentz and CPT violating terms, has been suggested to include particle dynamics. The minimal SME in the pure photon sector is considered in order to calculate the Casimir effect at finite temperature.

  2. Giant vacuum forces via transmission lines

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Quantum electromagnetic fluctuations induce forces between neutral particles, known as the van der Waals and Casimir interactions. These fundamental forces, mediated by virtual photons from the vacuum, play an important role in basic physics and chemistry and in emerging technologies involving, e.g., microelectromechanical systems or quantum information processing. Here we show that these interactions can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude upon changing the character of the mediating vacuum modes. By considering two polarizable particles in the vicinity of any standard electric transmission line, along which photons can propagate in one dimension, we find a much stronger and longer-range interaction than in free space. This enhancement may have profound implications on many-particle and bulk systems and impact the quantum technologies mentioned above. The predicted giant vacuum force is estimated to be measurable in a coplanar waveguide line. PMID:25002503

  3. Anisotropic particles near surfaces: Propulsion force and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Boris; Krüger, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically study the phenomenon of propulsion through Casimir forces in thermal nonequilibrium. Using fluctuational electrodynamics, we derive a formula for the propulsion force for an arbitrary small object in two scenarios: (i) for the object being isolated, and (ii) for the object being close to a planar surface. In the latter case, the propulsion force (i.e., the force parallel to the surface) increases with decreasing distance, i.e., it couples to the near field. We numerically calculate the lateral force acting on a hot spheroid near a surface and show that it can be as large as the gravitational force, thus being potentially measurable in fly-by experiments. We close by linking our results to well-known relations of linear-response theory in fluctuational electrodynamics: Looking at the friction of the anisotropic object for constant velocity, we identify a correction term that is additional to the typically used approach.

  4. Measurements of the Critical Casimir Effect and Superfluid Density in Saturated Helium-4 Films near T(lambda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, John Bishoy Sam

    Saturated thick films of 4Helium adsorbed on a copper substrate are studied experimentally. The film thickness is measured with an ultra-sensitive capacitance bridge capable of resolving sub-Angstrom changes in film thickness. Through the use of this capacitance bridge, the critical Casimir effect in the films is studied in the vicinity of the lambda transition. Additionally, the copper substrate assembly is used to generate and detect third sound in the film. Measurements are made of the third sound speed and attenuation in thick film from 1.6 K to the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in the films. The position of the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition relative to the critical Casimir effect in the films is identifieded. It is discovered that the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition occurs at the beginning of the dip in film thickness due to the critical Casimir effect. When the temperature of the system is swept extremely slowly across the lambda transition, a step in film thickness is observed. This step is possibly a non-universal critical Casimir effect. A model of thermal second sound excitations is developed to describe this new observation.

  5. Dynamical Casimir effect in a small compact manifold for the Maxwell vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2015-05-01

    We study a novel type of contribution to the partition function of the Maxwell system defined on a small compact manifold M such as a torus. These new terms cannot be described in terms of the physical propagating photons with two transverse polarizations. Rather, these novel contributions emerge as a result of tunneling events when transitions occur between topologically different but physically identical vacuum winding states. These new terms give an extra contribution to the Casimir pressure, yet to be measured. We argue that if the same system is considered in the background of a small external time-dependent magnetic field, then there will be emission of photons from the vacuum, similar to the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) when real particles are radiated from the vacuum due to the time-dependent boundary conditions. The difference with conventional DCE is that the dynamics of the vacuum in our system is not related to the fluctuations of the conventional degrees of freedom, the virtual photons. Rather, the radiation in our case occurs as a result of tunneling events between topologically different but physically identical |k ⟩ sectors in a time-dependent background. We comment on the relation of this novel effect to the well-known, experimentally observed, and theoretically understood phenomena of the persistent currents in normal metal rings. We also comment on possible cosmological applications of this effect.

  6. Discontinuous bundling transition in semiflexible polymer networks induced by Casimir interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin; Müller, Kei W.; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Levine, Alex J.

    2016-09-01

    Fluctuation-induced interactions are an important organizing principle in a variety of soft matter systems. We investigate the role of fluctuation-based or thermal Casimir interactions between cross linkers in a semiflexible network. One finds that, by integrating out the polymer degrees of freedom, there is an attractive logarithmic potential between nearest-neighbor cross linkers in a bundle, with a significantly weaker next-nearest-neighbor interaction. Here we show that a one-dimensional gas of these strongly interacting linkers in equilibrium with a source of unbound ones admits a discontinuous phase transition between a sparsely and a densely bound bundle. This discontinuous transition induced by the long-ranged nature of the Casimir interaction allows for a similarly abrupt structural transition in semiflexible filament networks between a low cross linker density isotropic phase and a higher cross link density bundle network. We support these calculations with the results of finite element Brownian dynamics simulations of semiflexible filaments and transient cross linkers.

  7. Interference phenomena in the dynamical Casimir effect for a single mirror with Robin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jeferson D. Lima; Braga, Alessandra N.; Rego, Andreson L. C.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2015-07-01

    In the literature, the interference phenomenon in the particle creation via the dynamical Casimir effect is investigated for cavities with two moving mirrors. Here, considering the Robin boundary condition (BC), we investigate the interference phenomenon produced by just a single moving mirror. Specifically, we consider a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions submitted to a Robin BC with a time-dependent Robin parameter at the instantaneous position of a moving mirror, and compute the expressions for the spectral distribution and the rate of created particles. These expressions, which include interference terms, generalize those found in the literature related to the isolated effects of a Robin BC with a time-dependent Robin parameter for a fixed mirror, or a Robin BC with a time-independent Robin parameter for a moving mirror. Differently from models where the problem of interference in the dynamical Casimir effect is considered for cavities with two Dirichlet moving mirrors, in the present model the spectrum is a continuum, and the interference pattern exhibits new features, in the sense that different regions of the spectrum can be affected in different manners by constructive or destructive effects. Furthermore, we also investigate interference in the context of superconducting circuits.

  8. Casimir-Polder potential in a dielectric medium out of thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Justo J.; Salam, A.

    2010-12-15

    The Casimir-Polder potential between a pair of atoms or molecules, either one of which may be excited, in a dielectric medium out of thermal equilibrium is obtained using a field operator that accounts for the attenuation or amplification of the radiation. Two contributions to the intermolecular potential are identified. One term is that induced by the excitations and relaxations that the interacting molecules experience due to the thermal bath, obtained using the resonance energy transfer rate and the Wigner-Weisskopf model. The second contribution arises as a consequence of the polarization induced in the interacting molecules by vacuum and thermal radiation. A number of disagreements between the present theory and several previously reported formulations examining this intermolecular potential are revealed.

  9. Finite temperature Casimir effect for massless Majorana fermions in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Erdas, Andrea

    2011-01-15

    The zeta function regularization technique is used to study the finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless Majorana fermion field confined between parallel plates and satisfying bag boundary conditions. A magnetic field perpendicular to the plates is included. An expression for the zeta function is obtained, which is exact to all orders in the magnetic field strength, temperature and plate distance. The zeta function is used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of the Majorana field and the pressure on the plates, in the case of weak magnetic field and strong magnetic field. In both cases, simple analytic expressions are obtained for the free energy and pressure which are very accurate and valid for all values of the temperature and plate distance.

  10. Casimir-Polder shift and decay rate in the presence of nonreciprocal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Crosse, J. A.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the Casimir-Polder frequency shift and decay rate for an atom in front of a nonreciprocal medium by using macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The results are a generalization of the respective quantities for matter with broken time-reversal symmetry which does not fulfill the Lorentz reciprocity principle. As examples, we contrast the decay rates, the resonant and nonresonant frequency shifts of a perfectly conducting (reciprocal) mirror with those of a perfectly reflecting nonreciprocal mirror. We find different power laws for the distance dependence of all quantities in the retarded and nonretarded limits. As an example of a more realistic nonreciprocal medium, we investigate a topological insulator subject to a time-symmetry-breaking perturbation.

  11. Optical gecko toe: Optically controlled attractive near-field forces between plasmonic metamaterials and dielectric or metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2012-05-01

    On the mesoscopic scale, electromagnetic forces are of fundamental importance to an enormously diverse range of systems, from optical tweezers to the adhesion of gecko toes. Here we show that a strong light-driven force may be generated when a plasmonic metamaterial is illuminated in close proximity to a dielectric or metal surface. This near-field force can exceed radiation pressure and Casimir forces to provide an optically controlled adhesion mechanism mimicking the gecko toe: At illumination intensities of just a few tens of nW/μm2 it is sufficient to overcome the Earth's gravitational pull.

  12. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, P. R.; Ford, G. W.; Milonni, P. W.

    2014-10-28

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r{sup −4}, a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called “remarkable formula” for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. O’Connell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  13. Pull-in instability of paddle-type and double-sided NEMS sensors under the accelerating force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, M.; Khorsandi, J.; Mokhtari, J.; Kanani, A.; Abadian, N.; Abadyan, M.

    2016-02-01

    Paddle-type and double-sided nanostructures are potential for use as accelerometers in flying vehicles and aerospace applications. Herein the pull-in instability of the cantilever paddle-type and double-sided sensors in the Casimir regime are investigated under the acceleration. The D'Alembert principle is employed to transform the accelerating system into an equivalent static system by incorporating the accelerating force. Based on the couple stress theory (CST), the size-dependent constitutive equations of the sensors are derived. The governing nonlinear equations are solved by two approaches, i.e. modified variational iteration method and finite difference method. The influences of the Casimir force, geometrical parameters, acceleration and the size phenomenon on the instability performance have been demonstrated. The obtained results are beneficial to design and fabricate paddle-type and double-sided accelerometers.

  14. Nonlinear oscillation of nanoelectro-mechanical resonators using energy balance method: considering the size effect and the van der Waals force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalambaz, Mohammad; Ghalambaz, Mehdi; Edalatifar, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The energy balance method is utilized to analyze the oscillation of a nonlinear nanoelectro-mechanical system resonator. The resonator comprises an electrode, which is embedded between two substrates. Two types of clamped-clamped and cantilever nano-resonators are studied. The effects of the van der Waals attractions, Casimir force, the small size, the fringing field, the mid-plane stretching, and the axial load are taken into account. The governing partial differential equation of the resonator is reduced using the Galerkin method. The energy method is applied to obtain an analytical solution without considering any linearization or small parameter. The results of the present study are compared with the results available in the literature. In addition, the results of the present analytical solution are compared with the Runge-Kutta numerical results. An excellent agreement between the present analytical solution, numerical solution, and the results available in the literature was found. The influences of the van der Waals force, Casimir force, size effect, and fringing field effect on the oscillation frequency of resonators are studied. The results indicate that the presence of the intermolecular forces (van der Waals), Casimir force, and fringing field effect decreases the oscillation frequency of the resonator. In contrast, the presence of the size effect increases the oscillation frequency of the resonator.

  15. Fluctuation-induced forces in nematics with a foreign anisotropy in the bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi Pour Haddadan, Fahimeh

    2017-02-01

    Within a linear coupling between orientational order of nematic liquid crystal and anisotropic mesoscopic particles immeresed in the nematic, the pseudo-Casimir effect is investigated. A quenched disorder in the alignment of the particles, which is on average in the direction of the nematic director, induces an inter-substrate force as this composite is confined by two flat parallel surfaces a distance d apart. The disorder-induced force decays as -d -1 in the weak coupling regime. The force magnitude increases with the variance of the disorder and decreases on increasing the correlation length of the disorder. If the disorder is considered to be annealed, the disorder effects are not decoupled from the thermal effects and thus the form of the nematic fluctuation-induced force does not alter. The force is affected by the disorder only through a re-normalization of the mean particles’ pinning strength. The trend for this modified thermal-induced force with respect to the variance and the correlation length of the disorder remains as in the quenched case, where the pseudo-Casimir force was decomposed into two distinct thermal- and disorder-induced components.

  16. Towards weighing the condensation energy to ascertain the Archimedes force of vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calloni, Enrico; De Laurentis, Martina; De Rosa, Rosario; Garufi, Fabio; Rosa, Luigi; Di Fiore, Luciano; Esposito, Giampiero; Rovelli, Carlo; Ruggi, Paolo; Tafuri, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    The force exerted by the gravitational field on a Casimir cavity in terms of Archimedes force of vacuum is discussed, the force that can be tested against observation is identified, and it is shown that the present technology makes it possible to perform the first experimental tests. The use of suitable high-Tc superconductors as modulators of Archimedes force is motivated. The possibility is analyzed of using gravitational wave interferometers as detectors of the force, transported through an optical spring from the Archimedes vacuum force apparatus to the gravitational interferometer test masses to maintain the two systems well separated. The use of balances to actuate and detect the force is also analyzed, the different solutions are compared, and the most important experimental issues are discussed.

  17. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  18. Critical Casimir interactions and colloidal self-assembly in near-critical solvents.

    PubMed

    Tasios, Nikos; Edison, John R; van Roij, René; Evans, Robert; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-28

    A binary solvent mixture close to critical demixing experiences fluctuations whose correlation length, ξ, diverges as the critical point is approached. The solvent-mediated (SM) interaction that arises between a pair of colloids immersed in such a near-critical solvent can be long-ranged and this so-called critical Casimir interaction is well-studied. How a (dense) suspension of colloids will self-assemble under these conditions is poorly understood. Using a two-dimensional lattice model for the solvent and hard disks to represent the colloids, we perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the phase behaviour of this model colloidal suspension as a function of colloid size and wettability under conditions where the solvent reservoir is supercritical. Unlike most other approaches, where the solvent is modelled as an implicit background, our model employs an explicit solvent and treats the suspension as a ternary mixture. This enables us to capture important features, including the pronounced fractionation of the solvent in the coexisting colloidal phases, of this complex system. We also present results for the partial structure factors; these shed light on the critical behaviour in the ternary mixture. The degree to which an effective two-body pair potential description can describe the phase behaviour and structure of the colloidal suspension is discussed briefly.

  19. Topological Casimir effect in a quantum LC circuit: Real-time dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2017-03-01

    We study novel contributions to the partition function of the Maxwell system defined on a small compact manifold M with nontrivial mappings π1[U (1 )]≅Z . These contributions cannot be described in terms of conventional physical propagating photons with two transverse polarizations and instead emerge as a result of tunneling transitions between topologically different but physically identical vacuum winding states. We argue that if the same system is considered in the background of a small external time-dependent electromagnetic field, then real physical photons will be emitted from the vacuum, similar to the dynamical Casimir effect where photons are radiated from the vacuum due to time-dependent boundary conditions. The fundamental technical difficulty for such an analysis is that the radiation of physical photons on mass shell is inherently a real-time Minkowskian phenomenon while the vacuum fluctuations interpolating between topological |k ⟩ sectors rest upon a Euclidean instanton formulation. We overcome this obstacle by introducing auxiliary topological fields, which allows for a simple analytical continuation between Minkowski and Euclidean descriptions, and develop a quantum mechanical technique to compute these effects. We also propose an experimental realization of such small effects using a microwave cavity with appropriate boundary conditions. Finally, we comment on the possible cosmological implications of this effect.

  20. Finite size corrections to scaling of the formation probabilities and the Casimir effect in the conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabpour, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We calculate formation probabilities of the ground state of the finite size quantum critical chains using conformal field theory (CFT) techniques. In particular, we calculate the formation probability of one interval in the finite open chain and also formation probability of two disjoint intervals in a finite periodic system. The presented formulas can be also interpreted as the Casimir energy of needles in particular geometries. We numerically check the validity of the exact CFT results in the case of the transverse field Ising chain.

  1. Local and nonlocal advected invariants and helicities in magnetohydrodynamics and gas dynamics: II. Noether's theorems and Casimirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Dasgupta, B.; McKenzie, J. F.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    Conservation laws in ideal gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) associated with fluid relabeling symmetries are derived using Noether's first and second theorems. Lie dragged invariants are discussed in terms of the MHD Casimirs. A nonlocal conservation law for fluid helicity applicable for a non-barotropic fluid involving Clebsch variables is derived using Noether's theorem, in conjunction with a fluid relabeling symmetry and a gauge transformation. A nonlocal cross helicity conservation law involving Clebsch potentials, and the MHD energy conservation law are derived by the same method. An Euler-Poincaré variational approach is also used to derive conservation laws associated with fluid relabeling symmetries using Noether's second theorem.

  2. Relating work, change in internal energy, and heat radiated for dispersion force situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Daniel C.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes how Casimir-like forces can be calculated for quasistatic situations of macroscopic bodies composed of different materials. The framework of stochastic electrodynamics (SED) is used for much of this discussion in an attempt to provide a very clear physical picture when considering quantities like forces, work done, changes in internal energy, and heat flow. By relating these quantities, one can readily understand why the different methods of calculating dispersion forces agree, such as when obtaining forces via changes in electromagnetic zero-point energy versus computing the average of the Maxwell stress tensor. In addition, a number of physical subtleties involving dispersion forces are discussed, that were certainly not recognized in early work on blackbody radiation, and that still may not be fully appreciated. .

  3. Numerical calculation of the Casimir-Polder interaction between a graphene sheet with vacancies and an atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cysne, T. P.; Rappoport, T. G.; Ferreira, Aires; Lopes, J. M. Viana Parente; Peres, N. M. R.

    2016-12-01

    In this work the Casimir-Polder interaction energy between a rubidium atom and a disordered graphene sheet is investigated beyond the Dirac cone approximation by means of accurate real-space tight-binding calculations. As a model of defected graphene, we consider a tight-binding model of π electrons on a honeycomb lattice with a small concentration of vacancies. The optical response of the graphene sheet is evaluated with full spectral resolution by means of exact Chebyshev polynomial expansions of the Kubo formula in large lattices in excess of 10 million atoms. At low temperatures, the optical response of defected graphene is found to display two qualitatively distinct behaviors with a clear transition around finite (nonzero) Fermi energy. In the vicinity of the Dirac point, the imaginary part of optical conductivity is negative for low frequencies while the real part is strongly suppressed. On the other hand, for high doping, it has the same features found in the Drude model within the Dirac cone approximation, namely, a Drude peak at small frequencies and a change of sign in the imaginary part above the interband threshold. These characteristics translate into a nonmonotonic behavior of the Casimir-Polder interaction energy with very small variation with doping in the vicinity of the neutrality point while having the same form of the interaction calculated with Drude's model at high electronic density.

  4. Existence and numerical simulation of periodic traveling wave solutions to the Casimir equation for the Ito system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasbandy, S.; Van Gorder, R. A.; Hajiketabi, M.; Mesrizadeh, M.

    2015-10-01

    We consider traveling wave solutions to the Casimir equation for the Ito system (a two-field extension of the KdV equation). These traveling waves are governed by a nonlinear initial value problem with an interesting nonlinearity (which actually amplifies in magnitude as the size of the solution becomes small). The nonlinear problem is parameterized by two initial constant values, and we demonstrate that the existence of solutions is strongly tied to these parameter values. For our interests, we are concerned with positive, bounded, periodic wave solutions. We are able to classify parameter regimes which admit such solutions in full generality, thereby obtaining a nice existence result. Using the existence result, we are then able to numerically simulate the positive, bounded, periodic solutions. We elect to employ a group preserving scheme in order to numerically study these solutions, and an outline of this approach is provided. The numerical simulations serve to illustrate the properties of these solutions predicted analytically through the existence result. Physically, these results demonstrate the existence of a type of space-periodic structure in the Casimir equation for the Ito model, which propagates as a traveling wave.

  5. In situ ion gun cleaning of surface adsorbates and its effect on electrostatic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Robert; Xu, Jun; Mohideen, Umar

    2016-01-01

    To obtain precise measurements of the Casimir force, it is crucial to take into account the electrostatic interactions that exist between the two boundaries. Two otherwise grounded conductors will continue to have residual electrostatic effects from patch potentials existing on the surfaces. In this paper, we look at the effect of in situ cleaning of adsorbate patches, and the resultant effect on the net electrostatic potential difference between two surfaces. We find a significant reduction in the residual potential due to in situ Ar+ cleaning for the samples used.

  6. Quantum Gravitational Force Between Polarizable Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark; Ford, Larry; Karouby, Johanna

    2016-03-01

    Since general relativity is a consistent low energy effective field theory, it is possible to compute quantum corrections to classical forces. Here we compute a quantum correction to the gravitational potential between a pair of polarizable objects. We study two distant bodies and compute a quantum force from their induced quadrupole moments due to two graviton exchange. The effect is in close analogy to the Casimir-Polder and London-van der Waals forces between a pair of atoms from their induced dipole moments due to two photon exchange. The new effect is computed from the shift in vacuum energy of metric fluctuations due to the polarizability of the objects. We compute the potential energy at arbitrary distances compared to the wavelengths in the system, including the far and near regimes. In the far distance, or retarded, regime, the potential energy takes on a particularly simple form: V (r) = - 3987 ℏ cG2α1 Sα2 S / (4 πr11) , where α1 S ,α2 S are the static gravitational quadrupole polarizabilities of each object. We provide estimates of this effect.

  7. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces

    PubMed Central

    Munday, J. N.; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies1–3. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces4. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz5–7, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies8–11. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction12, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction13–15. PMID:19129843

  8. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields.

    PubMed

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-06-22

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  9. A scheme for solving the plane-plane challenge in force measurements at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Huant, Serge; Auvert, Geoffroy; Comin, Fabio; Chevrier, Joel

    2010-05-19

    Non-contact interaction between two parallel flat surfaces is a central paradigm in sciences. This situation is the starting point for a wealth of different models: the capacitor description in electrostatics, hydrodynamic flow, thermal exchange, the Casimir force, direct contact study, third body confinement such as liquids or films of soft condensed matter. The control of parallelism is so demanding that no versatile single force machine in this geometry has been proposed so far. Using a combination of nanopositioning based on inertial motors, of microcrystal shaping with a focused-ion beam (FIB) and of accurate in situ and real-time control of surface parallelism with X-ray diffraction, we propose here a "gedanken" surface-force machine that should enable one to measure interactions between movable surfaces separated by gaps in the micrometer and nanometer ranges.

  10. Snap-through buckling of initially curved microbeam subject to an electrostatic force

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.; Meguid, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the snap-through buckling of an initially curved microbeam subject to an electrostatic force, accounting for fringing field effect, is investigated. The general governing equations of the curved microbeam are developed using Euler–Bernoulli beam theory and used to develop a new criterion for the snap-through buckling of that beam. The size effect of the microbeam is accounted for using the modified couple stress theory, and intermolecular effects, such as van der Waals and Casimir forces, are also included in our snap-through formulations. The snap-through governing equations are solved using Galerkin decomposition of the deflection. The results of our work enable us to carefully characterize the snap-through behaviour of the initially curved microbeam. They further reveal the significant effect of the beam size, and to a much lesser extent, the effect of fringing field and intermolecular forces, upon the snap-through criterion for the curved beam. PMID:27547104

  11. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  12. Record Low Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Si Nanowire: Breaking the Casimir Limit by Severe Suppression of Propagons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Hu, Ming

    2016-10-12

    Thermoelectrics offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Nanoengineering existing low-dimensional thermoelectric materials pertaining to realizing fundamentally low thermal conductivity has emerged as an efficient route to achieve high energy conversion performance for advanced thermoelectrics. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium and Green-Kubo equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we report that the thermal conductivity of Si nanowires (NWs) in polycrystalline form can reach a record low value substantially below the Casimir limit, a theory of diffusive boundary limit that regards the direction-averaged mean free path is limited by the characteristic size of the nanostructures. The astonishingly low thermal conductivity of polycrystalline Si NW is 269 and 77 times lower with respect to that of bulk Si and pristine Si NW, respectively, and is even only about one-third of the value of the purely amorphous Si NW at room temperature. By examining the mode level phonon behaviors including phonon group velocities, lifetime, and so forth, we identify the mechanism of breaking the Casimir limit as the strong localization of the middle and high frequency phonon modes, which leads to a prominent decrease of effective mean free path of the heat carriers including both propagons and diffusons. The contribution of the propagons to the overall thermal transport is further quantitatively characterized and is found to be dramatically suppressed in polycrystalline Si NW form as compared with bulk Si, perfect Si NW, and pure amorphous Si NW. Consequently, the diffusons, which transport the heat through overlap with other vibrations, carry the majority of the heat in polycrystalline Si NWs. We also proposed approach of introducing "disorder" in the polycrystalline Si NWs that could eradicate the contribution of propagons to achieve an even lower thermal conductivity than that ever thought possible

  13. Force cycles and force chains.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Walker, David M; Lin, Qun

    2010-01-01

    We examine the coevolution of N cycles and force chains as part of a broader study which is designed to quantitatively characterize the role of the laterally supporting contact network to the evolution of force chains. Here, we elucidate the rheological function of these coexisting structures, especially in the lead up to failure. In analogy to force chains, we introduce the concept of force cycles: N cycles whose contacts each bear above average force. We examine their evolution around force chains in a discrete element simulation of a dense granular material under quasistatic biaxial loading. Three-force cycles are shown to be stabilizing structures that inhibit relative particle rotations and provide strong lateral support to force chains. These exhibit distinct behavior from other cycles. Their population decreases rapidly during the initial stages of the strain-hardening regime-a trend that is suddenly interrupted and reversed upon commencement of force chain buckling prior to peak shear stress. Results suggest that the three-force cycles are called upon for reinforcements to ward off failure via shear banding. Ultimately though, the resistance to buckling proves futile; buckling wins under the combined effects of dilatation and increasing compressive load. The sudden increase in three-force cycles may thus be viewed as an indicator of imminent failure via shear bands.

  14. Rotating Casimir systems: Magnetic-field-enhanced perpetual motion, possible realization in doped nanotubes, and laws of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that for a certain class of Casimir-type systems (“devices”) the energy of zero-point vacuum fluctuations reaches its global minimum when the device rotates about a certain axis rather than remains static. This rotational vacuum effect may lead to the emergence of permanently rotating objects provided the negative rotational energy of zero-point fluctuations cancels the positive rotational energy of the device itself. In this paper, we show that for massless electrically charged particles the rotational vacuum effect should be drastically (astronomically) enhanced in the presence of a magnetic field. As an illustration, we show that in a background of experimentally available magnetic fields the zero-point energy of massless excitations in rotating torus-shaped doped carbon nanotubes may indeed overwhelm the classical energy of rotation for certain angular frequencies so that the permanently rotating state is energetically favored. The suggested “zero-point-driven” devices—which have no internally moving parts—correspond to a perpetuum mobile of a new, fourth kind: They do not produce any work despite the fact that their equilibrium (ground) state corresponds to a permanent rotation even in the presence of an external environment. We show that our proposal is consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  15. Effective Landau-Zener transitions in the circuit dynamical Casimir effect with time-varying modulation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Militello, B.; Napoli, A.; Messina, A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the dissipative single-qubit circuit QED architecture in which the atomic transition frequency undergoes a weak external time modulation. For sinusoidal modulation with linearly varying frequency we derive effective Hamiltonians that resemble the Landau-Zener problem of finite duration associated with a two- or multilevel systems. The corresponding off-diagonal coupling coefficients originate either from the rotating or the counter-rotating terms in the Rabi Hamiltonian, depending on the values of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that in the dissipationless case one can accomplish almost complete transitions between the eigenstates of the bare Rabi Hamiltonian even for relatively short durations of the frequency sweep. To assess the experimental feasibility of our scheme we solved numerically the phenomenological and the microscopic quantum master equations in the Markovian regime at zero temperature. Both models exhibit qualitatively similar behavior and indicate that photon generation from vacuum via effective Landau-Zener transitions could be implemented with the current technology on the time scales of a few microseconds. Moreover, unlike the harmonic dynamical Casimir effect implementations, our proposal does not require precise knowledge of the resonant modulation frequency to accomplish meaningful photon generation.

  16. Improved finite-difference computation of the van der Waals force: One-dimensional case

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2009-10-15

    We present an improved demonstration of the calculation of Casimir forces in one-dimensional systems based on the recently proposed numerical imaginary frequency Green's function computation approach. The dispersion force on two thick lossy dielectric slabs separated by an empty gap and placed within a perfectly conducting cavity is obtained from the Green's function of the modified Helmholtz equation by means of an ordinary finite-difference method. In order to demonstrate the possibility to develop algorithms to explore complex geometries in two and three dimensions to higher order in the mesh spacing, we generalize existing classical electromagnetism algebraic methods to generate the difference equations for dielectric boundaries not coinciding with any grid points. Diagnostic tests are presented to monitor the accuracy of our implementation of the method and follow-up applications in higher dimensions are introduced.

  17. Wightman function and scalar Casimir densities for a wedge with two cylindrical boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Saharian, A.A. Tarloyan, A.S.

    2008-07-15

    Wightman function, the vacuum expectation values of the field square and the energy-momentum tensor are investigated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter inside a wedge with two coaxial cylindrical boundaries. It is assumed that the field obeys Dirichlet boundary condition on bounding surfaces. The application of a variant of the generalized Abel-Plana formula enables to extract from the expectation values the contribution corresponding to the geometry of a wedge with a single shell and to present the interference part in terms of exponentially convergent integrals. The local properties of the vacuum are investigated in various asymptotic regions of the parameters. The vacuum forces acting on the boundaries are presented as the sum of self-action and interaction terms. It is shown that the interaction forces between the separate parts of the boundary are always attractive. The generalization to the case of a scalar field with Neumann boundary condition is discussed.

  18. Casimir interaction of rodlike particles in a two-dimensional critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenriegler, E.; Burkhardt, T. W.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the fluctuation-induced interaction of two thin, rodlike particles, or "needles," immersed in a two-dimensional critical fluid of Ising symmetry right at the critical point. Conformally mapping the plane containing the needles onto a simpler geometry in which the stress tensor is known, we analyze the force and torque between needles of arbitrary length, separation, and orientation. For infinite and semi-infinite needles we utilize the mapping of the plane bounded by the needles onto the half plane, and for two needles of finite length we use the mapping onto an annulus. For semi-infinite and infinite needles the force is expressed in terms of elementary functions, and we also obtain analytical results for the force and torque between needles of finite length with separation much greater than their length. Evaluating formulas in our approach numerically for several needle geometries and surface universality classes, we study the full crossover from small to large values of the separation to length ratio. In these two limits the numerical results agree with results for infinitely long needles and with predictions of the small-particle operator expansion, respectively.

  19. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  20. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  1. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  2. The thermal near-field: Coherence, spectroscopy, heat-transfer, and optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew C.; O'Callahan, Brian T.; Yang, Honghua U.; Raschke, Markus B.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most universal physical processes shared by all matter at finite temperature is the emission of thermal radiation. The experimental characterization and theoretical description of far-field black-body radiation was a cornerstone in the development of modern physics with the groundbreaking contributions from Gustav Kirchhoff and Max Planck. With its origin in thermally driven fluctuations of the charge carriers, thermal radiation reflects the resonant and non-resonant dielectric properties of media, which is the basis for far-field thermal emission spectroscopy. However, associated with the underlying fluctuating optical source polarization are fundamentally distinct spectral, spatial, resonant, and coherence properties of the evanescent thermal near-field. These properties have been recently predicted theoretically and characterized experimentally for systems with thermally excited molecular, surface plasmon polariton (SPP), and surface phonon polariton (SPhP) resonances. We review, starting with the early historical developments, the emergence of theoretical models, and the description of the thermal near-field based on the fluctuation-dissipation theory and in terms of the electromagnetic local density of states (EM-LDOS). We discuss the optical and spectroscopic characterization of distance dependence, magnitude, spectral distribution, and coherence of evanescent thermal fields. Scattering scanning near-field microscopy proved instrumental as an enabling technique for the investigations of several of these fundamental thermal near-field properties. We then discuss the role of thermal fields in nano-scale heat transfer and optical forces, and the correlation to the van der Waals, Casimir, and Casimir-Polder forces. We conclude with an outlook on the possibility of intrinsic and extrinsic resonant manipulation of optical forces, control of nano-scale radiative heat transfer with optical antennas and metamaterials, and the use of thermal infrared near

  3. Casimir energy-momentum tensor for a quantized bulk scalar field in the geometry of two curved branes on Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejhan, Hamed; Rahbardehghan, Surena

    2016-09-01

    In a previous work [S. Rahbardehghan and H. Pejhan, Phys. Lett. B 750, 627 (2015)], we considered a simple brane-world model: a single four-dimensional brane embedded in a five-dimensional de Sitter (dS) space-time. Then, by including a conformally coupled scalar field in the bulk, we studied the induced Casimir energy-momentum tensor. Technically, the Krein-Gupta-Bleuler quantization scheme as a covariant and renormalizable quantum field theory in dS space was used to perform the calculations. In the present paper, we generalize this study to a less idealized, but physically motivated, scenario; namely, we consider Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time which behaves asymptotically as a dS space-time. More precisely, we evaluate a Casimir energy-momentum tensor for a system with two D -dimensional curved branes on background of D +1 -dimensional FRW space-time with negative spatial curvature and a conformally coupled bulk scalar field that satisfied the Dirichlet boundary condition on the branes.

  4. Forced Snaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponedel, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    We study spatial localization in the real subcritical Ginzburg-Landau equation ut =m0 u +m1 cos2/π l x u +uxx +d | u | 2 u -| u | 4 u with spatially periodic forcing. When d > 0 and m1 = 0 this equation exhibits bistability between the trivial state u = 0 and a homogeneous nontrivial state u =u0 with stationary localized structures which accumulate at the Maxwell point m0 = - 3d2 / 16 . When spatial forcing is included its wavelength is imprinted on u0 creating conditions favorable to front pinning and hence spatial localization. We use numerical continuation to show that under appropriate conditions such forcing generates a sequence of localized states organized within a snakes-and-ladders structure centered on the Maxwell point, and refer to this phenomenon as forced snaking. We determine the stability properties of these states and show that longer lengthscale forcing leads to stationary trains consisting of a finite number of strongly localized, weakly interacting pulses exhibiting foliated snaking.

  5. Intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, A D

    1975-11-06

    The nature of molecular interactions is examined. Intermolecular forces are divided into long-range and short-range components; the former operate at distances where the effects of electron exchange are negligible and decrease as an inverse power of the separation. The long-range interactions may be subdividied into electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions, where the electrostatic component is the interaction of the permanent charge distributions and the others originate in the fluctuations in the distributions. Typical magnitudes of the various contributions are given. The forces between macroscopic bodies are briefly considered, as are the effects of a medium. Some of the manifestations of molecular interactions are discussed.

  6. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ν 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength λ) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to λ2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ν 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ν 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further

  7. Force decomposition in robot force control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Steve H.; Wen, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The unit inconsistency in force decomposition has motivated an investigation into the force control problem in multiple-arm manipulation. Based on physical considerations, it is argued that the force that should be controlled is the internal force at the specified frame in the payload. This force contains contributions due to both applied forces from the arms and the inertial force from the payload and the arms. A least-squares scheme free of unit inconsistency for finding this internal force is presented. The force control issue is analyzed, and an integral force feedback controller is proposed.

  8. Strategic forces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Air Force now plans to retain the Minuteman II and III missile force through fiscal year 2008. Introduced about 25 years ago, these missiles have served as a nuclear deterrence for longer than initially envisioned. Over the extended lives of the systems, questions have arisen over their continued reliability and operational effectiveness, particularly the Minuteman II system. Limited flight testing, due to a shortage of test missiles, and reduced reliability caused by age-related deterioration of guidance computers and propulsion motors are two factors undermining confidence in the Minuteman II. GAO believes that the Minuteman II could be retired before 1998 as presently contemplated under an assumption of a Strategic Arms Reduction Talks agreement. An alternative would be to reinstate the Air Force's plans to replace deteriorated missile components and acquire the assets needed to resume flight testing at rates necessary to restore and sustain confidence in the system's performance through fiscal year 2008. However, on the basis of current test schedules, GAO is concerned that components to test the missile's warheads will be depleted by about 1999.

  9. Analytical comparison of the first- and second-order resonances for implementation of the dynamical Casimir effect in nonstationary circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, E. L. S.; Dodonov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate analytically and numerically the nonstationary circuit QED setup in which N independent qubits interact with a single mode of the Electromagnetic field confined in a resonator. We consider the harmonic time modulation of some parameter (atomic transition frequency or the atom-field coupling strength) and derive the unitary dynamics up to the second order in the modulation depth for N = 1 and N\\gg 1. It is shown that all the resonant phenomena that occur for modulation frequencies ∼ 2{ω }0 (where {ω }0 is the cavity frequency) also occur for the halved frequencies. However, in the latter case the associated transition rates are significantly smaller and the modulation of the coupling strength is less effective. The transition rates are evaluated explicitly and the prospects of employing the second-order resonances in the phenomena related to the dynamical Casimir effect are examined.

  10. Self-bridging of vertical silicon nanowires and a universal capacitive force model for spontaneous attraction in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhelin; Wang, Deli; Xiang, Jie

    2014-11-25

    Spontaneous attractions between free-standing nanostructures have often caused adhesion or stiction that affects a wide range of nanoscale devices, particularly nano/microelectromechanical systems. Previous understandings of the attraction mechanisms have included capillary force, van der Waals/Casimir forces, and surface polar charges. However, none of these mechanisms universally applies to simple semiconductor structures such as silicon nanowire arrays that often exhibit bunching or adhesions. Here we propose a simple capacitive force model to quantitatively study the universal spontaneous attraction that often causes stiction among semiconductor or metallic nanostructures such as vertical nanowire arrays with inevitably nonuniform size variations due to fabrication. When nanostructures are uniform in size, they share the same substrate potential. The presence of slight size differences will break the symmetry in the capacitive network formed between the nanowires, substrate, and their environment, giving rise to electrostatic attraction forces due to the relative potential difference between neighboring wires. Our model is experimentally verified using arrays of vertical silicon nanowire pairs with varied spacing, diameter, and size differences. Threshold nanowire spacing, diameter, or size difference between the nearest neighbors has been identified beyond which the nanowires start to exhibit spontaneous attraction that leads to bridging when electrostatic forces overcome elastic restoration forces. This work illustrates a universal understanding of spontaneous attraction that will impact the design, fabrication, and reliable operation of nanoscale devices and systems.

  11. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  12. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  13. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  14. The Strong Nuclear Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-05-24

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  15. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  16. The Strong Nuclear Force

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  17. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  18. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  19. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  20. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  1. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such

  2. Entropic force between biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Song, Fan

    2016-10-01

    Undulation force, an entropic force, stems from thermally excited fluctuations, and plays a key role in the essential interactions between neighboring surfaces of objects. Although the characteristics of the undulation force have been widely studied theoretically and experimentally, the distance dependence of the force, which constitutes its most fundamental characteristic, remains poorly understood. In this paper, first, we obtain a novel expression for the undulation force by employing elasticity and statistical mechanics and prove it to be in good agreement with existing experimental results. Second, we clearly demonstrate that the two representative forms of the undulation force proposed by Helfrich and Freund were respectively the upper and lower bounds of the present expression when the separation between membranes is sufficiently small, which was intrinsically different from the existing results where Helfrich's and Freund's forms of the undulation force were only suitable for the intermediate and small separations. The investigations show that only in a sufficiently small separation does Helfrich's result stand for the undulation force with a large wave number and Freund's result express the force with a small wave number. Finally, a critical acting distance of the undulation force, beyond which the entropic force will rapidly decay approaching zero, is presented.

  3. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  4. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  5. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  6. No fifth force?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Hopes that geophysicists might be able to document a fifth force of nature have diminished, as new measurements and analyses of earlier geodetic experiments have yielded no solid evidence of a non-Newtonian component of gravity.Modern physics recognizes four fundamental forces with distinct spheres of influence: The strong and weak nuclear forces operate over the range of one atom, while gravity and electromagnetism have an infinite range. Gravity measurements over a few centimeters in laboratories and over millions of kilometers in space continue to buttress Issac Newton's conclusion that the gravitational force between two objects decreases as the square of the distance between them.

  7. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  8. Force Analysis of Qi Chaotic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Guoyuan; Liang, Xiyin

    2016-12-01

    The Qi chaotic system is transformed into Kolmogorov type of system. The vector field of the Qi chaotic system is decomposed into four types of torques: inertial torque, internal torque, dissipation and external torque. Angular momentum representing the physical analogue of the state variables of the chaotic system is identified. The Casimir energy law relating to the orbital behavior is identified and the bound of Qi chaotic attractor is given. Five cases of study have been conducted to discover the insights and functions of different types of torques of the chaotic attractor and also the key factors of producing different types of modes of dynamics.

  9. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  10. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang, Shuaiqi; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  11. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  12. Nanofluids mediating surface forces.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Georgia A; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2012-11-01

    Fluids containing nanostructures, known as nanofluids, are increasingly found in a wide array of applications due to their unique physical properties as compared with their base fluids and larger colloidal suspensions. With several tuneable parameters such as the size, shape and surface chemistry of nanostructures, as well as numerous base fluids available, nanofluids also offer a new paradigm for mediating surface forces. Other properties such as local surface plasmon resonance and size dependent magnetism of nanostructures also present novel mechanisms for imparting tuneable surface interactions. However, our fundamental understanding, experimentally and theoretically, of how these parameters might affect surface forces remains incomplete. Here we review recent results on equilibrium and dynamic surface forces between macroscopic surfaces in nanofluids, highlighting the overriding trends in the correlation between the physical parameters that characterise nanofluids and the surface forces they mediate. We also discuss the challenges that confront existing surface force knowledge as a result of this new paradigm.

  13. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  14. Multidomain proteins under force.

    PubMed

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-28

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91-two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins-ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  15. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  16. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  17. Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    Air Force Research Laboratory 8 June 2009 Mr. Leo Marple Ai F R h L b t r orce esearc a ora ory Leo.Marple@wpafb.af.mil DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Air Force Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory ,Wright

  18. Casimir effect for Dirac lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordag, M.; Pirozhenko, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    We consider polarizable sheets, which recently received some attention, especially in the context of the dispersion interaction of thin sheets like graphene. These sheets are modeled by a collection of delta function potentials and resemble zero-range potentials, which are known in quantum mechanics. We develop a theoretical description and apply the so-called TGTG formula to calculate the interaction of two such lattices. Thereby, we make use of the formulation of the scattering of waves off such sheets provided earlier. We consider all limiting cases, providing a link to earlier results. Also, we discuss the relation to the pairwise summation method.

  19. Dynamical casimir effect in braneworlds.

    PubMed

    Durrer, Ruth; Ruser, Marcus

    2007-08-17

    In braneworld cosmology the expanding Universe is realized as a brane moving through a warped higher-dimensional spacetime. Like a moving mirror causes the creation of photons out of vacuum fluctuations, a moving brane leads to graviton production. We show that, very generically, Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles scale like stiff matter with the expansion of the Universe and can therefore not represent the dark matter in a warped braneworld. We present results for the production of massless and KK gravitons for bouncing branes in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. We find that for a realistic bounce the back reaction from the generated gravitons will be most likely relevant. This Letter summarizes the main results and conclusions from numerical simulations which are presented in detail in a long paper [M. Ruser and R. Durrer, arXiv:0704.0790].

  20. Nongravitational forces on comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, B. G.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented and discussed for determining the effects of nongravitational forces on the orbits of comets. These methods are applied to short-period and long-period comets. Results are briefly described.

  1. Riveting-force gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Gage monitors riveting forces applied when components are mounted on printed-circuit boards. Correct swaging pressures have been established for specific substrate materials such as phenolics and ceramics.

  2. Air Force Junior ROTC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, James A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the Junior Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) program presently being operated in 275 units across the country. It is basically a three year course in aerospace studies and leadership education. (BR)

  3. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  4. Forces in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity to give students experience with the variables and forces impacting a moving body on an inclined plane by observing a ball as it rolls down an inclined PVC pipe of fixed length. Includes a student worksheet. (MKR)

  5. Force user's manual, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Ramanan, Aruna V.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for writing parallel programs for shared memory multiprocessors has been formalized as an extension to the Fortran language and implemented as a macro preprocessor. The extended language is known as the Force, and this manual describes how to write Force programs and execute them on the Flexible Computer Corporation Flex/32, the Encore Multimax and the Sequent Balance computers. The parallel extension macros are described in detail, but knowledge of Fortran is assumed.

  6. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  7. Measurement of Surface Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-16

    hydration forces were observed in solutions containing chloride salts of Li+ , K+ , Na 4 , and Cs+ , resulting from electrostatic binding of the cation...concentrated solutions of a series of tetraalkylammonium bromide salts [46] [Fig. 13]. In these measurements, the distance of closest approach of the two...solid metal electrodes separated by an electrolytic solution . Electrostatic forces, which are intimately related to electrode kinetics and adsorption

  8. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  9. The missing climate forcing

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Lacis, A.; Ruedy, R.

    1997-01-01

    Observed climate change is consistent with radiative forcings on several time-scales for which the dominant forcings are known, ranging from the few years after a large volcanic eruption to glacial-to-interglacial changes. In the period with most detailed data, 1979 to the present, climate observations contain clear signatures of both natural and anthropogenic forcings. But in the full period since the industrial revolution began, global warming is only about half of that expected due to the principal forcing, increasing greenhouse gases. The direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols contributes only little towards resolving this discrepancy. Unforced climate variability is an unlikely explanation. We argue on the basis of several lines of indirect evidence that aerosol effects on clouds have caused a large negative forcing, at least -1 Wm-2, which has substantially offset greenhouse warming. The tasks of observing this forcing and determining the microphysical mechanisms at its basis are exceptionally difficult, but they are essential for the prognosis of future climate change.

  10. Polynomial force approximations and multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Forchheimer, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Haviland, David B

    2013-01-01

    We present polynomial force reconstruction from experimental intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM) data. We study the tip-surface force during a slow surface approach and compare the results with amplitude-dependence force spectroscopy (ADFS). Based on polynomial force reconstruction we generate high-resolution surface-property maps of polymer blend samples. The polynomial method is described as a special example of a more general approximative force reconstruction, where the aim is to determine model parameters that best approximate the measured force spectrum. This approximative approach is not limited to spectral data, and we demonstrate how it can be adapted to a force quadrature picture.

  11. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  12. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  13. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  14. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  15. Grinding forces and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brach, K.; Pai, D.M.; Ratterman, E.; Shaw, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    Grinding forces and energy plan an important role in all abrasive machining operations. While specific grinding energy may be obtained from workpiece dynamometer values or by measuring spindle power, care must be exercised in converting dynamometer reading into power consumed. This is particularly true for operations involving a large ratio of wheel depth of cut to wheel diameter or when the radial force on the wheel is large relative to the tangential component. Interpretation of workpiece dynamometer results are discussed and several specific examples are considered including the diamond sawing of granite and the creep feed grinding of metal.

  16. Grinding forces and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brach, K.; Pai, D.M.; Ratterman, E.; Shaw, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    Grinding forces and energy play an important role in all abrasive machining operations. While specific grinding energy may be obtained from workpiece dynamometer values or by measuring spindle power, care must be exercised in converting dynamometer reading into power consumed. This is particularly true for operations involving a large ratio of wheel depth of cut to wheel diameter or when the radial force on the wheel is large relative to the tangential component. Interpretation of workpiece dynamometer results are discussed and several specific examples are considered including the diamond sawing of granite and the creep feed grinding of metal.

  17. Force-free foliations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic field configurations with vanishing Lorentz force density are known as force-free and appear in terrestrial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. We explore a general method for finding such configurations based on formulating equations for the field lines rather than the field itself. The basic object becomes a foliation of spacetime or, in the stationary axisymmetric case, of the half-plane. We use this approach to find some new stationary and axisymmetric solutions, one of which could represent a rotating plasma vortex near a magnetic null point.

  18. Image Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksa, Indrajith

    In this thesis we describe an enhancement to the Atomic force microscope (AFM) to simultaneously gather topographic features and spectroscopic information .Compared to the current state of the art of near-field excitation and far-field detection AFM imaging techniques our system uses a radical new approach near-field excitation and near-field detection. By placing the detector in the near-field we achieve high signal to noise and single molecular resolution. The origin of our near-field detector signal is the image force gradient due to the interaction of the stimulated molecular dipole with its image on the metal probe. We designed and built an optical and electronic system to capture this signal and simultaneously image nano-scale surface topography and optical image force gradient. By varying the wavelength of the excitation beam we measure the induced optical image force gradient spectra of molecules on surface. These spectra show good agreement with the absorption spectra of the bulk molecules measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. We show that image force gradient is directly proportional to the optical absorption dipole strength. Using Finite Element 3D electromagnetic simulations and using Lorentz model for the excited molecular dipole we showed that the image force gradient has a decay length of 1nm, making the theoretical resolution of this microscopy technique approximately 1 nm. This rapid decay was measured experimentally .This resolution was seen by the high contrasting spectroscopic images of molecules on the surface. In follow on experiments this technique was extended to provide surface Raman spectroscopy and microscopy at molecular resolution. We create an image force gradient interaction through optical parametric down conversion between stimulated Raman excited molecules on a surface and a cantilevered nanometer scale probe brought very close to it. Spectroscopy and microscopy on clusters of molecules have been performed. Single

  19. Electrochemical force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  20. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  1. Amplification of actin polymerization forces.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-03-28

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments.

  2. The Four Forces Airpower Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    The Four Forces Airpower Theory A Monograph by MAJOR Brian P. O’Neill United States Air Force School of...Brian P. O’Neill Title of Monograph: The Four Forces Airpower Theory Approved by: __________________________________ Monograph Director Gerald S...Abstract THE FOUR FORCES AIRPOWER THEORY by MAJOR Brian P. O’Neill, USAF, 67 pages. This monograph suggests an airpower theory that

  3. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  4. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  5. Force Structure Valuation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    PTS,. Legena 6 ra 328X0 Force Structure pr.Jdotl- V.alu. Notes (After 2th "OSSoo re tent Ion c Mance i o 11th Year Retentton Chang e. _- 32SX0 Suo...Defense-Office of the Secretary of Defense. (1984). Military retirees’ and seoarates ’ post-service earnings (Fifth QRMC - Appendix Q). Flamholtz, E. G

  6. Mining Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Inst. of Applied Science and Technology, Saskatoon.

    In fall 1988, the Board of Directors of the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) created a task force to study the training needs of the mining industry in the province and evaluate SIAST's responsiveness to those needs. After assessing the technological changes taking place in the industry, surveying manpower needs,…

  7. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert

    Chapter 2 in a book on school law discusses the reasons for reduction in force (RIF) and presents a set of model regulations for school districts as the best means of minimizing legal problems resulting from RIF. The reasons for RIF include declining student enrollments; reduced turnover among teachers; changes in programs; and more constrained…

  8. Romanian Armed Forces Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    2’ .7k ingS q•_dns I MaNrtimeBase "* eliminating unnecessary 6 MbIdization Centers, 2Air Bann Rafts I . erlBasse redundancies or _ , _ # capabilities...will receive the highest priority for maintenance and repair. The majority of equipment for territorial forces will be stored and maintained. Note that

  9. BIA Reorganization Task Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Reporting on three hearings held this spring by the Bureau of Indian Affairs Reorganization Task Force, this article presents highlights from the testimony of Forrest Gerard, Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs and discusses the matrix system of organization currently under consideration by the BIA. (JC)

  10. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  11. The Force of Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    2005-01-01

    "The Force of Ideas" describes a little-known aspect of both educational history and Viennese psychoanalysis during the interwar years: the movement for psychoanalytic pedagogy. The author traces her father's own story, beginning with his application to the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society for training as a psychoanalytic pedagogue, as a…

  12. International Quick Response Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-06

    humaijitarian relief, maintenance of a cease-fire, and promocion of national reconciliation - and became a manhunt for Somali warlord Mohamed Farah...maritime components would accompany this 6 5This scheme is adopted from USPACOM’s and USACOM’s Joint Task Force and JuiiL AdapUiv= Fuce Packages

  13. Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Thess, André; Moreau, René; Tan, Yanqing; Dai, Shangjun; Tao, Zhen; Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    A new contactless technique is presented for the detection of micron-sized insulating particles in the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. A transverse magnetic field brakes this flow and tends to become entrained in the flow direction by a Lorentz force, whose reaction force on the magnetic-field-generating system can be measured. The presence of insulating particles suspended in the fluid produce changes in this Lorentz force, generating pulses in it; these pulses enable the particles to be counted and sized. A two-dimensional numerical model that employs a moving mesh method demonstrates the measurement principle when such a particle is present. Two prototypes and a three-dimensional numerical model are used to demonstrate the feasibility of a Lorentz force particle analyzer (LFPA). The findings of this study conclude that such an LFPA, which offers contactless and on-line quantitative measurements, can be applied to an extensive range of applications. These applications include measurements of the cleanliness of high-temperature and aggressive molten metal, such as aluminum and steel alloys, and the clean manufacturing of semiconductors.

  14. Reaction Based Grasp Force Assignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    position and internal force trajectory [32]. Yoshikawa et al. have proposed using forms of the so called hybrid position/force control; this method...object. Yoshikawa et al. have defined grasping and manipulative forces similar to the internal and external forces described above [63]. Some authors...methods to solve the problem [42]. Nakamura, Yoshikawa , and other authors have defined optimal contact forces as those which seek to minimize the

  15. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Lizhe

    2010-05-01

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  16. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-05-28

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  17. Force reflection with compliance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  18. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  19. Force Feedback Joystick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  20. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  1. Stochastically forced zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Kaushik

    This thesis investigates the dynamics of multiple zonal jets, that spontaneously emerge on the barotropic beta-plane, driven by a homogenous and rapidly decorrelating forcing and damped by bottom drag. Decomposing the barotropic vorticity equation into the zonal-mean and eddy equations, and neglecting the eddy-eddy interactions, defines the quasi-linear (QL) system. Numerical solution of the QL system shows zonal jets with length scales comparable to jets obtained by solving the nonlinear (NL) system. Starting with the QL system, one can construct a deterministic equation for the evolution of the two-point single-time correlation function of the vorticity, from which one can obtain the Reynolds stress that drives the zonal mean flow. This deterministic system has an exact nonlinear solution, which is a homogenous eddy field with no jets. When the forcing is also isotropic in space, we characterize the linear stability of this jetless solution by calculating the critical stability curve in the parameter space and successfully comparing this analytic result with numerical solutions of the QL system. But the critical drag required for the onset of NL zonostrophic instability is up to a factor of six smaller than that for QL zonostrophic instability. The constraint of isotropic forcing is then relaxed and spatially anisotropic forcing is used to drive the jets. Meridionally drifting jets are observed whenever the forcing breaks an additional symmetry that we refer to as mirror, or reflexional symmetry. The magnitude of drift speed in our results shows a strong variation with both mu and beta: while the drift speed decreases almost linearly with decreasing mu, it actually increases as beta decreases. Similar drifting jets are also observed in QL, with the same direction (i.e. northward or southward) and similar magnitude as NL jet-drift. Starting from the laminar solution, and assuming a mean-flow that varies slowly with reference to the scale of the eddies, we obtain

  2. Suicide and Forced Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of “predicaments”, in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Methods: Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Results: Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. Conclusion: These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder. PMID:23983577

  3. Joint Forces Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in space. The Space Operations Center ( SPOC ), USSPACECOM is the single point...of contact for assessing space capabilities. Combatant commanders, subordinate JFCs, and Services can access this information from the SPOC via the...special operations forces SPOC Space Operations Center SSBN fleet ballistic missile submarine SST space support team UJTL Universal Joint Task List UN

  4. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  5. The task force process

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, J.S.

    1995-01-31

    This paper focuses on the unique aspects of the Fernald Citizens Task Force process that have contributed to a largely successful public participation effort at Fernald. The Fernald Citizens Task Force passed quickly by many procedural issues. Instead, the Task Force concentrated on (a) educating itself about the site, its problems, and possible solutions, and (b) choosing a directed way to approach its mandate: To make recommendations on several {open_quotes}big picture{close_quotes} issues, including future use of the site, cleanup levels, waste disposition, and cleanup priorities. This paper presents the approach used at Fernald for establishing and running a focused site-specific advisory board, the key issues that have been faced, and how these issues were resolved. The success of Fernald in establishing a strong and functioning site-specific advisory board serves as a useful model for other DOE facilities, although the Fernald model is just one of many approaches that can be taken. However, the approach presented here has worked extremely well for Fernald.

  6. Modified entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun

    2010-04-15

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration g{sub D}. It is found the Debye acceleration is g{sub D}=10{sup -15} N kg{sup -1}. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -4} N kg{sup -1} which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -10} N kg{sup -1} felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  7. ``Force,'' ontology, and language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, David T.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a linguistic framework through which one can interpret systematically students’ understanding of and reasoning about force and motion. Some researchers have suggested that students have robust misconceptions or alternative frameworks grounded in everyday experience. Others have pointed out the inconsistency of students’ responses and presented a phenomenological explanation for what is observed, namely, knowledge in pieces. We wish to present a view that builds on and unifies aspects of this prior research. Our argument is that many students’ difficulties with force and motion are primarily due to a combination of linguistic and ontological difficulties. It is possible that students are primarily engaged in trying to define and categorize the meaning of the term “force” as spoken about by physicists. We found that this process of negotiation of meaning is remarkably similar to that engaged in by physicists in history. In this paper we will describe a study of the historical record that reveals an analogous process of meaning negotiation, spanning multiple centuries. Using methods from cognitive linguistics and systemic functional grammar, we will present an analysis of the force and motion literature, focusing on prior studies with interview data. We will then discuss the implications of our findings for physics instruction.

  8. Quantum thermal machines driven by vacuum forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terças, Hugo; Ribeiro, Sofia; Pezzutto, Marco; Omar, Yasser

    2017-02-01

    We propose a quantum thermal machine composed of two nanomechanical resonators (two membranes suspended over a trench in a substrate) placed a few μ m from each other. The quantum thermodynamical cycle is powered by the Casimir interaction between the resonators and the working fluid is the polariton resulting from the mixture of the flexural (out-of-plane) vibrations. With the help of piezoelectric cells, we select and sweep the polariton frequency cyclically. We calculate the performance of the proposed quantum thermal machines and show that high efficiencies are achieved thanks to (i) the strong coupling between the resonators and (ii) the large difference between the membrane stiffnesses. Our findings can be of particular importance for applications in nanomechanical technologies where a sensitive control of temperature is needed.

  9. Quantum thermal machines driven by vacuum forces.

    PubMed

    Terças, Hugo; Ribeiro, Sofia; Pezzutto, Marco; Omar, Yasser

    2017-02-01

    We propose a quantum thermal machine composed of two nanomechanical resonators (two membranes suspended over a trench in a substrate) placed a few μm from each other. The quantum thermodynamical cycle is powered by the Casimir interaction between the resonators and the working fluid is the polariton resulting from the mixture of the flexural (out-of-plane) vibrations. With the help of piezoelectric cells, we select and sweep the polariton frequency cyclically. We calculate the performance of the proposed quantum thermal machines and show that high efficiencies are achieved thanks to (i) the strong coupling between the resonators and (ii) the large difference between the membrane stiffnesses. Our findings can be of particular importance for applications in nanomechanical technologies where a sensitive control of temperature is needed.

  10. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-05-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area.1-4 Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams,4-6 and over recent years a rich variety of approaches has been proposed to add value to force diagrams. Suggestions include strategies for identifying candidate forces,6,7 emphasizing the distinction between "contact" and "noncontact" forces,5,8 and the use of computer-based tutorials.9,10 Instructors have suggested a variety of conventions for constructing force diagrams, including approaches to arrow placement and orientation2,11-13 and proposed notations for locating forces or marking action-reaction force pairs.8,11,14,15

  11. Force transmission in epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Martin, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    In epithelial tissues, cells constantly generate and transmit forces between each other. Forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton regulate tissue shape and structure and also provide signals that influence cells' decisions to divide, die, or differentiate. Forces are transmitted across epithelia because cells are mechanically linked through junctional complexes, and forces can propagate through the cell cytoplasm. Here, we review some of the molecular mechanisms responsible for force generation, with a specific focus on the actomyosin cortex and adherens junctions. We then discuss evidence for how these mechanisms promote cell shape changes and force transmission in tissues.

  12. Air Force Security Forces Professionalism: Useful Insights for Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    perceived ground force within an air force also renders its development analysis worthy. By careful study of Security Forces history , both written and...social science works, historical accounts of each period, and personal interviews. Additionally, Defenders of the Force: The History of the United...29 years in this period hold remarkably significant events in US history , they also hold events significant to the professionalization of Air Police

  13. State Defense Forces: Forces for NORTHCOM and Homeland Security?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-26

    Listing of State Defense Forces: 1. Alabama State Defense Force (ALSDF). http://www.alsdf.org 2. Alaska State Defense Force ( ASDF ) http://www.ak...prepared.com/ asdf 3. California State Military Reserve (CASMR) http://www.militarymuseum.org/CASMR.html 4. Connecticut State Militia http://ctarng

  14. Understanding Forces: What's the Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    2006-01-01

    Misconceptions about forces are very common and seem to arise from everyday experience and use of words. Ways to improve students' understanding of forces, as used in recent a IOP CD-Rom, are discussed here.

  15. Uncertainty in NIST Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the uncertainty of force calibration measurements at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The uncertainty of the realization of force for the national deadweight force standards at NIST is discussed, as well as the uncertainties associated with NIST's voltage-ratio measuring instruments and with the characteristics of transducers being calibrated. The combined uncertainty is related to the uncertainty of dissemination for force transfer standards sent to NIST for calibration.

  16. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  17. Congress and the Air Force.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    know where to go to find out that information. The "Congress and the Air Force" Internet web page serves as a " one - stop shop" where Air Force personnel...Congress. The need for a " one - stop " guide is clear. The literature on this topic is not readily accessible by the Air Force member out in the field who

  18. Radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanswamy, V.; Shine, Keith; Leovy, Conway; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Rodhe, Henning; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Ding, M.; Lelieveld, Joseph; Edmonds, Jae A.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    An update of the scientific discussions presented in Chapter 2 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report is presented. The update discusses the atmospheric radiative and chemical species of significance for climate change. There are two major objectives of the present update. The first is an extension of the discussion on the Global Warming Potentials (GWP's), including a reevaluation in view of the updates in the lifetimes of the radiatively active species. The second important objective is to underscore major developments in the radiative forcing of climate due to the observed stratospheric ozone losses occurring between 1979 and 1990.

  19. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  20. Mobile Strike force 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-23

    ofDirectots (BOD) meein. However, this schdule was preempted by the CSA’s desir to begin msakng decisions on Force = Ol in July3 1994. In order to...two MSGs And three OPPOR regiments. ____ a aw-i In alternatives 5 And 6, the OPFOR reduced the V.i + 8,4U. 6 two Sstoan aveaeof 92pern U___ 9 Ol 7 U...to the MSF. The MSG commander has his own deep fight and sould be asking for MSF support if needed. The MSF fight must be tied into the corps ble espa

  1. Automated connector force testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmons, L. A.

    1992-11-01

    A gaging system was developed to modernize the force testing of electrical connectors and components using an IBM personal computer based data acquisition system. Two mechanical fixtures were fabricated using load cells and LVDT transducers to perform the measurements. General purpose software routines perform the operator interface, data acquisition, storage, retrieval, and printout. The system will perform statistical analysis of the part data to aid in evaluation of the manufacturing process. The modular software concept allows the system to be tailored for many other applications using a text editor.

  2. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-10

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  3. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli–Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip–sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  4. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  5. Overestimation of force during matching of externally generated forces.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lee D; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2011-02-01

    If a weight is applied to a finger and the subject asked to produce the same force, the subject generates a force larger than the weight. That is, subjects overestimate the force applied by an external target when matching it. Details of this force overestimation are not well understood. We show that subjects overestimate small target weights, but not larger ones. Furthermore we show for the first time that the force overestimation consists of two components. The first component is a constant. The second component depends on the precise magnitude of the weight and is only present when subjects hold the target weight against gravity. We suggest that the two components are generated in different phases of the force-matching task, are due to different processes, and must have an influence on all proprioceptive judgements of force.

  6. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Billy C; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-10-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio).

  7. Bisensory force feedback in telerobotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Lorraine E. P.

    2001-11-01

    Effectively controlling a robot remotely to perform a desired task---teleoperation---offers benefits in improving human safety, reducing workload, providing location accessibility, and in convenience. Because these benefits become more evident under the extreme environmental conditions of space operations, NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching the usage of and improvements in teleoperations. Teleoperator task performance has been shown to improve with the addition of sensory feedback. In particular, providing force-feedback to a human operator, has been shown to decrease task completion times and lessen potentially damaging contact forces between the slave robot and its target work environment. We summarize the design, development, and usage of a human interface system built to provide position control as well as both kinesthetic and visual six-axis force-feedback displays to a human teleoperator of a remote manipulator. The system developed is utilized as an experimentation platform evaluating the merit of providing force feedback through both kinesthetic (muscular position and force) and substituted visual displays on a typical space operations task utilizing an anthropomorphic slave robot called "Robonaut". Teleoperator performance of a drill task is measured under four different display scenarios: no force display, visual force display, kinesthetic, and both. Task completion times and contact forces are measured, and subjective questionnaire responses collected. Our results indicate lower maximum force/torque, lower cumulative force/torque, and a greater task consistency with any type of feedback, with no significant differences in task completion time. Cumulative force/torque was reduced between 46--51% with visually substituted force feedback, 69--81% with kinesthetic feedback and 63--92% with both forms of feedback. Maximum force/torque variance between subjects was reduced between 61--90% with any type of force display, indicating improved

  8. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas A. (Inventor); Snow, Edward R. (Inventor); Townsend, William T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  9. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  10. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  11. How vinculin regulates force transmission.

    PubMed

    Dumbauld, David W; Lee, Ted T; Singh, Ankur; Scrimgeour, Jan; Gersbach, Charles A; Zamir, Evan A; Fu, Jianping; Chen, Christopher S; Curtis, Jennifer E; Craig, Susan W; García, Andrés J

    2013-06-11

    Focal adhesions mediate force transfer between ECM-integrin complexes and the cytoskeleton. Although vinculin has been implicated in force transmission, few direct measurements have been made, and there is little mechanistic insight. Using vinculin-null cells expressing vinculin mutants, we demonstrate that vinculin is not required for transmission of adhesive and traction forces but is necessary for myosin contractility-dependent adhesion strength and traction force and for the coupling of cell area and traction force. Adhesion strength and traction forces depend differentially on vinculin head (V(H)) and tail domains. V(H) enhances adhesion strength by increasing ECM-bound integrin-talin complexes, independently from interactions with vinculin tail ligands and contractility. A full-length, autoinhibition-deficient mutant (T12) increases adhesion strength compared with VH, implying roles for both vinculin activation and the actin-binding tail. In contrast to adhesion strength, vinculin-dependent traction forces absolutely require a full-length and activated molecule; V(H) has no effect. Physical linkage of the head and tail domains is required for maximal force responses. Residence times of vinculin in focal adhesions, but not T12 or V(H), correlate with applied force, supporting a mechanosensitive model for vinculin activation in which forces stabilize vinculin's active conformation to promote force transfer.

  12. Force oscillations simulating breathing maneuvers do not prevent force adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Chris; Jiao, Yuekan; Seow, Chun Y; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2012-07-01

    Airway inflammation in patients with asthma exposes the airway smooth muscle (ASM) to a variety of spasmogens. These spasmogens increase ASM tone, which can lead to force adaptation. Length oscillations of ASM, which occur in vivo due to breathing maneuvers, can attenuate force adaptation. However, in the presence of tone, the force oscillations required to achieve these length oscillations may be unphysiologic (i.e., magnitude greater than the ones achieved due to the swings in transpulmonary pressure required for breathing). In the present study, we applied force oscillations simulating the tension oscillations experienced by the wall of a fourth-generation airway during tidal breathing with or without deep inspirations (DI) to ASM. The goal was to investigate whether force adaptation occurs in conditions mimicking breathing maneuvers. Tone was induced by carbachol (average, 20 nM), and the force-generating capacity of the ASM was assessed at 5-minute intervals before and after carbachol administration using electrical field stimulations (EFS). The results show that force oscillations applied before the introduction of tone had a small effect on the force produced by EFS (declined to 96.8% [P > 0.05] and 92.3% [P < 0.05] with and without DI, respectively). The tone induced by carbachol transiently decreased after a DI and declined significantly (P < 0.05) due to tidal breathing oscillations (25%). These force oscillations did not prevent force adaptation (gain of force of 11.2 ± 2.2 versus 13.5 ± 2.7 and 11.2 ± 3.0% in static versus dynamic conditions with or without DI, respectively). The lack of effect of simulated breathing maneuvers on force adaptation suggests that this gain in ASM force may occur in vivo and could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  13. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars.

  14. Forced to be right.

    PubMed

    Trout, J D

    2014-05-01

    In "Forced to be Free", Neil Levy surveys the raft of documented decision-making biases that humans are heir to, and advances several bold proposals designed to enhance the patient's judgment. Gratefully, Levy is moved by the psychological research on judgment and decision-making that documents people's inaccuracy when identifying courses of action will best promote their subjective well-being. But Levy is quick to favour the patient's present preferences, to ensure they get "final say" about their treatment. I urge the opposite inclination, raising doubts about whether the patient's "present preferences" are the best expression of their "final say". When there is adequate evidence that people, by their own lights, overemphasize their present preferences about the future, we should carefully depreciate those preferences, in effect biasing them to make the right decision by their own lights.

  15. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  16. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  17. Forced cocurrent smoldering combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, S.S.; Pagni, P.J.; Fernandez-Pello, A.C.

    1987-05-01

    An analytic model of the propagation of smoldering combustion through a very porous solid fuel is presented. Here smoldering is initiated at the top of a long, radially insulated, uniform fuel cylinder, so that the smolder wave propagates downward, opposing an upward forced flow of oxidizer. Because the solid fuel and the gaseous oxidizer enter the reaction zone from the same direction, this configuration is referred to as cocurrent (or premixed-flame-like). It is assumed that the propagation of the smolder wave is one-dimensional and steady in a frame of reference moving with the wave. Buoyancy is included and shown to be negligible in the proposed application of a smoldering combustion experiment for use on the Space Shuttle. Radiation heat transfer is incorporated using the diffusion approximation and smoldering combustion is modeled by a finite rate, one-step reaction mechanism.

  18. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  19. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  20. Future Air Force systems.

    PubMed

    Tremaine, S A

    1986-10-01

    Planning for the future is under way in earnest at the Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It has been statistically established that it takes from 14-16 years from the generation of a new system idea to enter into engineering development. With this unpleasing, but realistic, schedule in mind, ASD has, during the last 3 years, been initiating long-term planning projects that are pre-starts for new system ideas. They are generated from throughout the Air Force and are locally managed and funded. Through this process, which spans from 12-14 months, specific and revolutionary new ideas for the systems of the future are generated. This article addresses more than a dozen specific new ideas in work at ASD today. These ideas range from a need to replace the C-130 type aircraft after the year 2000 to planning a follow-on to the B-18 well into the 21st century. Among other specific projects are investigation into an immortal fighter intended to be free of reliability and maintenance demands for an especially long period of operation, a new training system and advanced trainer to replace the T-38, a transatmospheric vehicle that could operate in the 100,000-500,000 foot flight region (30,480-152,400 m), and a new means of defending against hostile cruise missile launchers and cruise missiles. Other ideas are also addressed. The article concludes with emphasis on systems that can operate hypersonically in and out of the known atmosphere and greater use of airbreathing propulsion systems operating between Mach 3 and Mach 6.

  1. Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-27

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 1 Ara Road Edwards AFB CA 93524-7013 AFRL -RZ-ED-VG-2011-269 9...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 11. SPONSOR...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Air Force Research Laboratory Ed d Ai F B CA Col Mike Platt war s r orce

  2. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  3. Entropic force and entanglement system

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2010-05-15

    We introduce the isothermal cavity, static holographic screen, and accelerating surface as holographic screen to study the entropic force in the presence of the Schwarzschild black hole. These may merge to provide a consistent holographic screen to define the entropic force on the stretched horizon near the event horizon. Considering the similarity between the stretched horizon of black hole and the entanglement system, we may define the entropic force in the entanglement system without referring to the source mass.

  4. Forces between membranes approaching contact.

    PubMed

    Parsegian, V A

    1981-01-01

    Cell stickiness to surfaces is recognized as an important concern in tests of red cell filterability. Many forces need to be considered in order to think about the sources of cell sticking. As cell membranes are brought together they experience successively the domination of several classes of forces van der Waals attraction, electrostatic repulsion, hydration repulsion, and specific charge-charge interactions at contact. The behaviour of each of these forces is described in the context of red cell adhesion.

  5. Collision forces for compliant projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1990-01-01

    Force histories resulting from the impact of compliant projectiles were determined experimentally. A long instrumented rod was used as the target, and the impact force was calculated directly from the measured strain response. Results from a series of tests on several different sized impactors were used to define four dimensionless parameters that determine, for a specified impactor velocity and size, the amplitude, duration, shape, and impulse of the impact force history.

  6. Force As A Momentum Current

    SciTech Connect

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-07-28

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  7. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  8. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  9. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area. Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams, and over recent years a rich variety of…

  10. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  11. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  12. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  13. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Branderhorst, W. Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van; Grimbergen, C. A.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; Heeten, G. J. den; Neeleman, C.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. Methods: A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. Results: For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. Conclusions: In mammographic breast

  14. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  16. Service Excellence Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Buffalo. Univ. Libraries.

    A task force was appointed to measure user satisfaction with library services, establish a university libraries' service excellence philosophy and policy, bring the service excellence concept to the attention of every library employee, and recommend approaches for recognizing outstanding staff service. The members of the task force--two library…

  17. Grasp force control in telemanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Steven F.; Duffie, Neil A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two experiments which focus upon the issue of grasp force control in telemanipulation. The first experiment examines the ability to control and stabilize master-controller grasp force during a 30-s compensatory tracking task under different levels of master controller digit mass, friction, and backlash. The second experiment explores the potential for substituting tactile feedback in lieu of direct force-feedback to gage and control remote grasp force. Results show that subjects were better able to control force when mass and friction levels were increased. Even when perceptual gains between tactile and direct force feedback displays were matched, force reflection produced better grasp control. The lack of backlash effects and improvements in performance with direct force reflection in comparison to tactile feedback are attributable to reflexive short-loop adjustment of grasp tension afforded by the muscle's length-tension control system. The criterion of acceptable operator performance, dependent upon both the quality of the transmission of control commands and feedback, and the response of the remote device, is discussed.

  18. How Does Force Affect Motion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Whether playing soccer at recess, walking to lunch, or sitting at their desk, children encounter forces every moment of their lives. The connection between force and motion is absolutely amazing to children, so anyone working with them better be prepared for the battery of tough questions they ask: "What made the ball move that way? Why does a…

  19. Force approach to radiation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-15

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  20. Force approach to radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-01

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  1. Force Generation by Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Donnelly, M.

    1996-11-01

    Aquatic animals like fish use flapping caudal fins to produce axial and cross-stream forces. During WW2, German scientists had built and tested an underwater vehicle powered by similar flapping foils. We have examined the forces produced by a pair of flapping foils. We have examined the forced produced by a pair of flapping foils attached to the tail end of a small axisymmetric cylinder. The foils operate in-phase (called waving), or in anti-phase (called clapping). In a low-speed water tunnel, we have undertaken time-dependent measurements of axial and cross-stream forces and moments that are exerted by the vortex shedding process over the entire body. Phase-matched LDV measurements of vorticity-velocity vectors, as well as limited flow visualization of the periodic vortex shedding process have also been carried out. The direction of the induced velocity within a pair of shed vortices determines the nature of the forces produced, viz., thrust or drag or cross-stream forces. The clapping mode produces a widely dispersed symmetric array of vortices which results in axial forces only (thrust and rag). On the other hand, the vortex array is staggered in the waving mode and cross-stream (maneuvering) forces are then generated.

  2. Jaw bite force measurement device.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis; Ilies, Horea; O'Brien, Brendan; McManus, Anne; Larrow, Beau

    2012-08-01

    We describe a cost-effective device that uses an off-the-shelf force transducer to measure patient bite force as a diagnostic aid in determining dental implant size, number of implants, and prosthetic design for restoring partial edentulism. The main advantages of the device are its accuracy, simplicity, modularity, ease of manufacturing, and low cost.

  3. Minorities in the Armed Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Anthony

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of the Congressional Black Caucus and the specially formed task force; reports that high ranking officers have pledged to attack racial discrimination; and describes an association of minority officers whose purpose is to enhance the image of the armed forces within the minority community. (Author/JM)

  4. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  5. Simulated 2050 aviation radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gettelman, A.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative forcing from aviation is investigated by using a comprehensive general circulation model in the present (2006) and the future (2050). Global flight distance is projected to increase by a factor of 4 between 2006 and 2050. However, simulated contrail cirrus radiative forcing can increase by a factor of 7, and thus does not scale linearly with fuel emission mass. Simulations indicate negative radiative forcing induced by the indirect effect of aviation sulfate aerosols on liquid clouds that increasesby a factor of 4 in 2050. As a result, the net 2050 aviation radiative forcing is a cooling. Aviation sulfates emitted at cruise altitude canbe transported down to the lowest troposphere, increasing the aerosolconcentration, thus increasing the cloud drop number concentration and persistenceof low-level clouds. Aviation black carbon aerosols produce a negligible forcing.

  6. Eccentric Inspirals with Self-Force and Spin-Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles; Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Eccentric inspirals of a small mass about a more massive Schwarzschild black hole (EMRIs or IMRIs) are calculated using the gravitational self-force and the Mathisson-Papapetrou spin-force. These calculations include all dissipative and conservative effects that are first order in the mass ratio. We compute systems with initial eccentricities as high as e = 0.8, initial separations as large as 50 M, and arbitrary spin orientations. Including the spin-force causes the orbital plane to precess. Inspirals are calculated using an osculating-orbits scheme that is driven by self-force data from a hybrid self-force code and time-domain spin-force calculations. The hybrid approach uses both self-force data from a Lorenz gauge code and highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code, allowing the hybrid model to track orbital phase of inspirals to within 0.1 radians or better over hundreds or thousands of orbits. NSF PHY15-06182.

  7. Rolling Contact Force Energy Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BRACCIALI, A.; CASCINI, G.

    2000-09-01

    Knowledge of the forces at the wheel-rail contact is fundamental to estimate the consequences in terms of noise and vibration. The traditional use of strain gauges mounted on the wheel web and axle is not capable of determining the high-frequency content of the contact force. Measurements made on the rail are characterized by the spatial variability of input-output transfer functions which makes it difficult to estimate the contact force by simple inversion of the point frequency response function. In this study the problem of rolling contact force reconstruction has been approached through the following steps: (i) the track has been characterized precisely for a finite length by the analysis of the time series of several impacts supplied with an instrumented hammer by using an ARMAX model that proved to be capable of modelling the vertical dynamics of the rail up to 5 kHz; (ii) the response of the rail has been simulated with a random force acting on the system, and the variability of the transfer function has been taken into account by distributing the force on adjacent elements; (iii) the simulated response has been compared with the rail acceleration measured for the passage of several trains; (iv) the wheel-rail contact force has been estimated with a closed-loop algorithm. It has thus been possible to reconstruct the13octave power spectrum of contact forces with a simple and stable iterative procedure. Forces reconstructed from different sensors were found to be practically the same for a given wheel; forces from nominally similar wheels are statistically examined and partial results of comparisons made on different rolling stock are shown.

  8. Force Sensing in Surgical Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Horeman, Tim; Meijer, Evert-jan; Harlaar, Joris J.; Lange, Johan F.; van den Dobbelsteen, John J.; Dankelman, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The tension in a suture is an important factor in the process of wound healing. If there is too much tension in the suture, the blood flow is restricted and necrosis can occur. If the tension is too low, the incision opens up and cannot heal properly. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and evaluation of the Stitch Force (SF) sensor and the Hook-In Force (HIF) sensor. These sensors were developed to measure the force on a tensioned suture inside a closed incision and to measure the pulling force used to close the incision. The accuracy of both sensors is high enough to determine the relation between the force in the thread of a stitch and the pulling force applied on the suture by the physician. In a pilot study, a continuous suture of 7 stitches was applied on the fascia of the abdominal wall of multiple pigs to study this relationship. The results show that the max force in the thread of the second stitch drops from 3 (SD 1.2) to 1 (SD 0.3) newton after the 4th stitch was placed. During placement of the 5th, 6th and 7th stitch, the force in the 2nd stitch was not influenced anymore. This study indicates that in a continuous suture the force in the thread remains constant up to more than 3 stiches away from the pulled loose end of the suture. When a force feedback tool is developed specially for suturing in surgery on patients, the proposed sensors can be used to determine safety threshold for different types of tissue and sutures. PMID:24376812

  9. Gravity Forcing Of Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, K. E.

    2005-12-01

    Surface waves in deep water are forced entirely by gravity at the air-sea interface when no other forces act tangent to the surface. Then according to Newton's second law, the fluid acceleration parallel to the surface must equal the component of gravity parallel to the surface. Between crest and trough the fluid accelerates; between trough and crest the fluid decelerates. By replacing Bernoulli's law, gravity forcing becomes the dynamic boundary condition needed to solve the mathematical problem of these waves. Irrotational waves with a sinusoidal profile satisfy the gravity forcing condition, with the usual dispersion relation, provided the slope is small compared to one, as is true also of the Stokes development. However, the exact wave shape can be calculated using the gravity forcing method in a way that is less complex and less time consuming than that of the Stokes perturbation expansion. To the second order the surface elevation is the same as the Stokes result; the third order calculation has not been made yet. Extensions of the gravity forcing method can easily be carried out for multiple wave trains, solitary waves and bores, waves in finite constant mean depths, and internal waves in a two-layer system. For shoaling surface waves gravity forcing provides a physical understanding of the progressive steepening often observed near shore.

  10. Aberrant Force Processing in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Cristina; Rigoli, Francesco; Shergill, Sukhwinder S

    2016-07-06

    Initially considered as mere side effects of antipsychotic medication, there is now evidence that motor and somatosensory disturbances precede the onset of the illness and can be found in drug-naive patients. However, research on the topic is scarce. Here, we were interested in assessing the accuracy of the neural signal in detecting parametric variations of force linked to a voluntary motor act and a received tactile sensation, either self-generated or externally generated. Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while asked to press, or abstain from pressing, a lever in order to match a visual target force. Forces, exerted and received, varied on 10 levels from 0.5 N to 5 N in 0.5 N increments. Healthy participants revealed a positive correlation between force and activity in contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) when performing a movement as well as when receiving a tactile sensation but only when this was externally, and not self-, generated. Patients showed evidence of altered force signaling in both motor and tactile conditions, as well as increased correlation with force when tactile sensation was self-generated. Findings are interpreted in line with accounts of predictive and sensory integration mechanisms and point toward alterations in the encoding of parametric forces in the motor and somatosensory domain in patients affected by schizophrenia.

  11. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, in particular, has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  12. Force reconstruction from tapping mode force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payam, Amir F.; Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and robust nanomechanical measurements are intensely studied in materials science, applied physics, and molecular biology. Amplitude modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) is the most established nanoscale characterization technique of surfaces for air and liquid environments. However, its quantitative capabilities lag behind its high spatial resolution and robustness. We develop a general method to transform the observables into quantitative force measurements. The force reconstruction algorithm has been deduced on the assumption that the observables (amplitude and phase shift) are slowly varying functions of the tip-surface separation. The accuracy and applicability of the method is validated by numerical simulations and experiments. The method is valid for liquid and air environments, small and large free amplitudes, compliant and rigid materials, and conservative and non-conservative forces.

  13. Air Force Enlisted Force Management: System Interactions and Synchronization Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    NCO noncommissioned officer NPS non-prior service OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense OSI Office of Special Investigations PFE Promotion Fitness Exam...of airmen with disciplinary or low performance issues. 44 Air Force Enlisted Force Management ness exam ( PFE ), score on the Skills Knowledge Test...serpentine logic trail: Suppose an AFSC has a difficult SKT or a difficult version of the PFE . Tests that are more difficult lead to a wider range of

  14. ForceViewer: A Starting Point Force Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    to assemble the list of capabilities forming the Starting Point Force ( SPF ). This SPF is used by a number of organisations within Defence and in...particular by the Force Structure Review (FSR) team. The SPF is usually assembled using Microsoft Word and Excel to store and derive which capability...better tool that delivers the SPF was identified by Joint Operations Divi- sion, Joint Decisions Support Centre (JDSC) task. This was translated into

  15. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation - Forces Unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    With Nuclear Quantum Gravitation, the Forces are plainly and coherently unified. This most certainly is the missing link in Newtonian Gravitation explaining clearly the internal workings based in the Atomic Nucleus. The gravitational force between two gravitating masses is because of alternating electromagnetic functions in nuclei in matter. The Cavendish Experiment - Demonstration clearly shows the Gravitational attraction between two masses, which is a force proportional to the Newtonian Mechanics. General Relativity fails this real, physical test. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 logical proofs and 21 more indications. It is Scientifically logical and is compatible with Quantum Mechanics and Newtonian Mechanics.

  16. Vibrational force constants for acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, B.

    1990-05-01

    The vibrational force field of ethanal (acetaldehyde), CH 3CHO, is refined by using procedures with differential increments for the force constants (Commun. Dep. Chem., Bulg. Acad. Sci., 21/3 (1988) 433). The characteristics general valence force constants of the high-dimensional symmetry classes of ethanal, A' of tenth and A″ of fifth order, are determined for the experimental assignment of bands. The low barrier to hindered internal rotation about the single carbon—carbon bond is quantitatively estimated on the grounds of normal vibrational analysis.

  17. Force measurement enabling precise analysis by dynamic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) makes it possible to investigate specific interactions between two molecules such as ligand-receptor pairs at the single-molecule level. In the DFS method based on the Bell-Evans model, the unbinding force applied to a molecular bond is increased at a constant rate, and the force required to rupture the molecular bond is measured. By analyzing the relationship between the modal rupture force and the logarithm of the loading rate, microscopic potential barrier landscapes and the lifetimes of bonds can be obtained. However, the results obtained, for example, in the case of streptavidin/biotin complexes, have differed among previous studies and some results have been inconsistent with theoretical predictions. In this study, using an atomic force microscopy technique that enables the precise analysis of molecular interactions on the basis of DFS, we investigated the effect of the sampling rate on DFS analysis. The shape of rupture force histograms, for example, was significantly deformed at a sampling rate of 1 kHz in comparison with that of histograms obtained at 100 kHz, indicating the fundamental importance of ensuring suitable experimental conditions for further advances in the DFS method.

  18. Calibration of frictional forces in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.; Carpick, R.W.; Salmeron, M.

    1996-09-01

    The atomic force microscope can provide information on the atomic-level frictional properties of surfaces, but reproducible quantitative measurements are difficult to obtain. Parameters that are either unknown or difficult to precisely measure include the normal and lateral cantilever force constants (particularly with microfabricated cantilevers), the tip height, the deflection sensor response, and the tip structure and composition at the tip-surface contact. We present an {ital in} {ital situ} experimental procedure to determine the response of a cantilever to lateral forces in terms of its normal force response. This procedure is quite general. It will work with any type of deflection sensor and does not require the knowledge or direct measurement of the lever dimensions or the tip height. In addition, the shape of the tip apex can be determined. We also discuss a number of specific issues related to force and friction measurements using optical lever deflection sensing. We present experimental results on the lateral force response of commercially available V-shaped cantilevers. Our results are consistent with estimates of lever mechanical properties using continuum elasticity theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. 32 CFR 632.4 - Deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Deadly force. 632.4 Section 632.4 National... INVESTIGATIONS USE OF FORCE BY PERSONNEL ENGAGED IN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SECURITY DUTIES § 632.4 Deadly force. (a) Deadly force is destructive physical force directed against a person or persons (e.g., firing a...

  20. 32 CFR 632.4 - Deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deadly force. 632.4 Section 632.4 National... INVESTIGATIONS USE OF FORCE BY PERSONNEL ENGAGED IN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SECURITY DUTIES § 632.4 Deadly force. (a) Deadly force is destructive physical force directed against a person or persons (e.g., firing a...

  1. Teleoperation with virtual force feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.J.

    1993-08-01

    In this paper we describe an algorithm for generating virtual forces in a bilateral teleoperator system. The virtual forces are generated from a world model and are used to provide real-time obstacle avoidance and guidance capabilities. The algorithm requires that the slaves tool and every object in the environment be decomposed into convex polyhedral Primitives. Intrusion distance and extraction vectors are then derived at every time step by applying Gilbert`s polyhedra distance algorithm, which has been adapted for the task. This information is then used to determine the compression and location of nonlinear virtual spring-dampers whose total force is summed and applied to the manipulator/teleoperator system. Experimental results validate the whole approach, showing that it is possible to compute the algorithm and generate realistic, useful psuedo forces for a bilateral teleoperator system using standard VME bus hardware.

  2. HRP ForceShoe Evaluation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Maintaining astronaut bone and muscle health in microgravity is an ongoing concern for NASA. In May of 2014, NASA delivered the ForceShoe, designed by XSENS, to the International Space Station (ISS...

  3. Optical dipole forces: Working together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Clarice D.

    2016-12-01

    Strength lies in numbers and in teamwork: tens of thousands of artificial atoms tightly packed in a nanodiamond act cooperatively, enhancing the optical trapping forces beyond the expected classical bulk polarizability contribution.

  4. Dissipative Forces and Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, John S.; Thompson, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to include the dissipative forces of classical mechanics in quantum mechanics by the use of non-Hermetian Hamiltonians. The Ehrenfest theorem for such Hamiltonians is derived, and simple examples which show the classical correspondences are given. (MLH)

  5. Plasma forces on deposited particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, Lucas; Nijdam, Sander

    2016-09-01

    A plasma can have many effects on a substrate. In this contribution we focus on its effects on micrometer sized particles on the substrate. We are especially interested in forces acting on these particles. These have been suggested to be responsible for the lunar glow observed by the Apollo mission astronauts. They have recently also attracted interest as a possible cleaning mechanism for the high-tech industry. We will present experimental measurements of the forces acting on a particle on a substrate under influence of a plasma. To this extend we have developed two specialised experimental setups. They use extreme accelerations (up to one million times the earth gravitational acceleration) to balance forces on the particle. We will show quantitative measurements of the plasma force effects, and show what underlying physical effects cause them.

  6. Labor Force Trends: A Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devens, Richard M.

    1977-01-01

    This annotated bibliography reflects relevant issues covered in the accompanying article in this issue (CE 506 866). It presents a general outline of recent literature on labor force participation, including underlying secular movements and cyclical analysis. (MF)

  7. Molecular force spectroscopy on cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Molecular force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to study how mechanics regulates biology, especially the mechanical regulation of molecular interactions and its impact on cellular functions. This force-driven methodology has uncovered a wealth of new information of the physical chemistry of molecular bonds for various biological systems. The new concepts, qualitative and quantitative measures describing bond behavior under force, and structural bases underlying these phenomena have substantially advanced our fundamental understanding of the inner workings of biological systems from the nanoscale (molecule) to the microscale (cell), elucidated basic molecular mechanisms of a wide range of important biological processes, and provided opportunities for engineering applications. Here, we review major force spectroscopic assays, conceptual developments of mechanically regulated kinetics of molecular interactions, and their biological relevance. We also present current challenges and highlight future directions.

  8. Shaping the Future Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    quickly to fast -developing events should, for instance, China attempt to resolve the Taiwan question by force of arms in a matter of days instead of...increasing capabilities of enemy “anti-access” weapons and the lack of available time to forward deploy forces during fast -moving crises and conflicts...as in the Korean case, the United States could find itself having only a limited ability to prevent the enemy from achieving its goals. The loss of

  9. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis.

  10. Cooling Force Measurements at CELSIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Ga ring lnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-20

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  11. COOLING FORCE MEASUREMENTS IN CELSIUS.

    SciTech Connect

    GALNANDER, B.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; ET AL.

    2005-09-18

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  12. Forced Changes of Combat Posture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-30

    effectiveness. Adkins’s thesi-s on modeling battlefield decision-making provided additional factors. M& Quic addressed the questien of posture change directly in...the study was to gain increased knowledge of the fac- - tors associated with forced changes in combat posture, in order to develop a model of forced...posture change model for use, with appro- priate parameter values, at the divisional and regimental levels. Principles guiding the model development may

  13. Electrostatic forces for personnel restraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, N.; Ciciora, J.; Gardner, R.; Porter, K.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing electrostatic forces for personnel retention devices on exterior spacecraft surfaces was analyzed. The investigation covered: (1) determination of the state of the art; (2) analysis of potential adhesion surfaces; (3) safety considerations for personnel; (4) electromagnetic force field determination and its effect on spacecraft instrumentation; and (5) proposed advances to current technology based on documentation review, analyses, and experimental test data.

  14. US Home Defense Forces Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Groups and Length of Service. ....... . . . 69 Figure 16- Connecticut State Guard Personnel, 1940-1945 - Losses August 1940-1944...sought authority to form a cohesive group . In the East mayors, businessmen, and professionals formed Committees for Public Safety, Home Defense...forces that could apply for such support was as shown in Figure 2. The difficulty of grouping the various types of home defense forces in the 48 states in

  15. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 35

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    necessary to know your friends. Making ene- mies is easy, but it is harder to make friends. The wrong approach to allied or occupied countries can...members of the Armed Forces will be familiar with cultural traditions of the countries in which they operate. Yet violation of local norms and...tive lessons from Afghanistan or Iraq, it is clear that the Armed Forces lack sophisticated knowl- edge of foreign countries . That does not dishonor

  16. Forced motion near black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Drasco, Steve; Hinderer, Tanja; Babak, Stanislav

    2011-02-15

    We present two methods for integrating forced geodesic equations in the Kerr spacetime. The methods can accommodate arbitrary forces. As a test case, we compute inspirals caused by a simple drag force, mimicking motion in the presence of gas. We verify that both methods give the same results for this simple force. We find that drag generally causes eccentricity to increase throughout the inspiral. This is a relativistic effect qualitatively opposite to what is seen in gravitational-radiation-driven inspirals, and similar to what others have observed in hydrodynamic simulations of gaseous binaries. We provide an analytic explanation by deriving the leading order relativistic correction to the Newtonian dynamics. If observed, an increasing eccentricity would thus provide clear evidence that the inspiral was occurring in a nonvacuum environment. Our two methods are especially useful for evolving orbits in the adiabatic regime. Both use the method of osculating orbits, in which each point on the orbit is characterized by the parameters of the geodesic with the same instantaneous position and velocity. Both methods describe the orbit in terms of the geodesic energy, axial angular momentum, Carter constant, azimuthal phase, and two angular variables that increase monotonically and are relativistic generalizations of the eccentric anomaly. The two methods differ in their treatment of the orbital phases and the representation of the force. In the first method, the geodesic phase and phase constant are evolved together as a single orbital phase parameter, and the force is expressed in terms of its components on the Kinnersley orthonormal tetrad. In the second method, the phase constants of the geodesic motion are evolved separately and the force is expressed in terms of its Boyer-Lindquist components. This second approach is a direct generalization of earlier work by Pound and Poisson [A. Pound and E. Poisson, Phys. Rev. D 77, 044013 (2008).] for planar forces in a

  17. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  18. Radiative Screening of Fifth Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Millington, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We describe a symmetron model in which the screening of fifth forces arises at the one-loop level through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We show that such a theory can avoid current constraints on the existence of fifth forces but still has the potential to give rise to observable deviations from general relativity, which could be seen in cold atom experiments.

  19. Visualizing enantioselective optical forces with chiral force microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Saleh, Amr; van de Haar, Marie-Anne; Polman, Albert; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-09-01

    Enantiomer separation is a critical step in many chemical syntheses, particularly for pharmaceuticals, but prevailing chemical methods remain inefficient. Here, we introduce an optical technique to sort chiral specimens using coaxial plasmonic apertures. These apertures are composed of a deeply subwavelength dielectric channel embedded in silver (or gold) and can stably trap sub-20-nm dielectric specimens. Using both full-field simulations and analytic calculations, we first show that selective trapping of enantiomers can be achieved with circularly polarized illumination and proper index-matching of the immersed liquid with the particles being trapped. Opposite enantiomers experience distinct trapping forces in both sign and magnitude: one is trapped in a deep potential well while the other is repelled with a potential barrier. These potentials maintain opposite signs across a range of chiral polarizabilities and enantiomer-aperture separations. We also demonstrate how atomic force microscopy can be used to directly probe the near field optical forces from our coaxial nano-aperture. Our measurement reveals the spatial distribution of the optical near-field forces on a nanometer-sized dielectric specimen. To directly visualize the enantio-selective optical forces, we pattern silicon AFM-probes with chiral patterns. Our near-field force mapping indicates a differentiable force in the piconewton range on the chiral probes, exerted by our coaxial aperture with circularly polarized illumination. Our theoretical and experimental demonstrations indicate that the interaction of chiral light and chiral specimens can be mediated by achiral plasmonic apertures, providing a possible route toward all-optical enantiopure syntheses.

  20. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  1. Force transmission in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauser, Roger; Ambrosi, Davide; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    During cell migration, forces generated by the actin cytoskeleton are transmitted through adhesion complexes to the substrate. To investigate the mechanism of force generation and transmission, we analyzed the relationship between actin network velocity and traction forces at the substrate in a model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. Front and lateral sides of the cell exhibited much stronger coupling between actin motion and traction forces than the trailing cell body. Further analysis of the traction–velocity relationship suggested that the force transmission mechanisms were different in different cell regions: at the front, traction was generated by a gripping of the actin network to the substrate, whereas at the sides and back, it was produced by the network’s slipping over the substrate. Treatment with inhibitors of the actin–myosin system demonstrated that the cell body translocation could be powered by either of the two different processes, actomyosin contraction or actin assembly, with the former associated with significantly larger traction forces than the latter. PMID:20100912

  2. Logic circuits from zero forcing.

    PubMed

    Burgarth, Daniel; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Hogben, Leslie; Severini, Simone; Young, Michael

    We design logic circuits based on the notion of zero forcing on graphs; each gate of the circuits is a gadget in which zero forcing is performed. We show that such circuits can evaluate every monotone Boolean function. By using two vertices to encode each logical bit, we obtain universal computation. We also highlight a phenomenon of "back forcing" as a property of each function. Such a phenomenon occurs in a circuit when the input of gates which have been already used at a given time step is further modified by a computation actually performed at a later stage. Finally, we show that zero forcing can be also used to implement reversible computation. The model introduced here provides a potentially new tool in the analysis of Boolean functions, with particular attention to monotonicity. Moreover, in the light of applications of zero forcing in quantum mechanics, the link with Boolean functions may suggest a new directions in quantum control theory and in the study of engineered quantum spin systems. It is an open technical problem to verify whether there is a link between zero forcing and computation with contact circuits.

  3. The Community College of the Air Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaapke, Lyle D.; Wojciechowske, William A.

    1977-01-01

    The Community College of the Air Force is unique as a postsecondary occupational education institution because it integrates Air Force technical education and civilian-related education into programs which are totally responsive to the Air Force community. (JG)

  4. Method of Calibrating a Force Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Peter A. (Inventor); Rhew, Ray D. (Inventor); Johnson, Thomas H. (Inventor); Landman, Drew (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A calibration system and method utilizes acceleration of a mass to generate a force on the mass. An expected value of the force is calculated based on the magnitude and acceleration of the mass. A fixture is utilized to mount the mass to a force balance, and the force balance is calibrated to provide a reading consistent with the expected force determined for a given acceleration. The acceleration can be varied to provide different expected forces, and the force balance can be calibrated for different applied forces. The acceleration may result from linear acceleration of the mass or rotational movement of the mass.

  5. 78 FR 63208 - UPDATE-Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... Services Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of... Force (Task Force). The in-person Task Force meeting is being replaced by an abbreviated conference call... necessary scientific and logistical support for the meeting. The Task Force is an independent,...

  6. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  7. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10-10 Pa-1), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (˜10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (˜20 μm without the plug-in support), light (˜5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (˜μN) and high resolution (˜nN) force sensors.

  8. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  9. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

  10. Constructing the Self-Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric

    I present an overview of the methods involved in the computation of the scalar, electromagnetic, and gravitational self-forces acting on a point particle moving in a curved spacetime. For simplicity, the focus here will be on the scalar self-force. The lecture follows closely my review article on this subject [E. Poisson, Living Rev. Relativ. 7 (2004), http://www.livingreviews.org/lrr-2004-6]. I begin with a review of geometrical elements (Synge's world function, the parallel propagator). Next I introduce useful coordinate systems (Fermi normal coordinates and retarded light-cone coordinates) in a neighborhood of the particle's world line. I then present the wave equation for a scalar field in curved spacetime and the equations of motion for a particle endowed with a scalar charge. The wave equation is solved by means of a Green's function, and the self-force is constructed from the field gradient. Because the retarded field is singular on the world line, the self-force must involve a regularized version of the field gradient, and I describe how the regular piece of the self-field can be identified. In the penultimate section of the lecture I put the construction of the self-force on a sophisticated axiomatic basis, and in the concluding section I explain how one can do better by abandoning the dangerous fiction of a point particle.

  11. Sideways Force Produced During Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, H. R.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.; Jardin, S.; Sugiyama, L.

    2012-10-01

    We extend previous studies [1] of vertical displacement events (VDE) which can produce disruptions. The emphasis is on the non axisymmetric ``sideways'' wall force Fx. Simulations are performed using the M3D [2] code. A VDE expels magnetic flux through the resistive wall until the last closed flux surface has q < 3. At this point the plasma is unstable to an (m,n) = (2,1) mode. A theory of sideways force produced by this mode in the presence of a VDE is presented. The wall force depends strongly on γτw, where γ is the mode growth rate and τw is the wall resistive penetration time. The force Fx is largest when γτw is a constant of order unity, which depends on the initial conditions. For large values of γτw, the wall force asymptotes to a relatively smaller value, well below the critical value ITER is designed to withstand. The principle of disruption mitigation by massive gas injection is to cause a disruption with large γτw. [4pt] [1] H. R. Strauss, R. Paccagnella, and J. Breslau,Phys. Plasmas 17, 082505 (2010) [2] W. Park, E.V. Belova, G.Y. Fu, X. Tang, H.R. Strauss, L.E. Sugiyama, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999).

  12. Force Spectroscopy in Studying Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools-for example, optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy-have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here, we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case, we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  13. Global forcing and regional interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1992-01-01

    The Climate System Modeling Program (CSMP) sponsored a “Global Forcing and Regional Interaction Workshop” from October 21 to 23, 1991, at Colorado State University's Pingree Park campus, to evaluate the relationship between global climate forcing and the response of the land surface on a regional scale. The general aim of the workshop was to develop specific action plans and preliminary science research strategies for regional-global interactions. Each participant was invited to identify tractable, high pay-off science issues related to global forcing and regional interactions. The workshop, with twenty-six participants about evenly split between atmospheric scientists, hydrologists, and ecologists, was also designed to facilitate a network of collaborators to prepare multidisciplinary research proposals. Discussion also focused on regional climate over the last 200 years and included the influence of atmosphere-land surface processes on natural climate variability. Several major recommendations were made on topics discussed.

  14. Mechanical Force Sensing in Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chanet, Soline; Martin, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue size, shape, and organization reflect individual cell behaviors such as proliferation, shape change, and movement. Evidence suggests that mechanical signals operate in tandem with biochemical cues to properly coordinate cell behavior and pattern tissues. The objective of this chapter is to present recent evidence demonstrating that forces transmitted between cells act as signals that coordinate cell behavior across tissues. We first briefly summarize molecular and cellular mechanisms by which forces are sensed by cells with an emphasis on forces generated and transmitted by cytoskeletal networks. We then discuss evidence for these mechanisms operating in multicellular contexts to coordinate complex cell and tissue behaviors that occur during embryonic development: specifically growth and morphogenesis. PMID:25081624

  15. The Mouse Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T.; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed. PMID:22314943

  16. The mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Piantadosi, Sean C; Gould, Todd D

    2012-01-29

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed.

  17. Protonmotive force and bacterial sensing.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J B; Koshland, D E

    1980-01-01

    The role of the proton gradient and external pH in the motility and chemotaxis of Bacillus subtilis was investigated. Presence of a substantial proton gradient is not necessary for motility or chemotaxis, as long as the electrical potential is sufficient to maintain motility. Changes in the proton gradient do, however, lead to changes in swimming behavior, and these changes are mediated by two processes. One is sensitive to external pH and probably operates through a pH receptor. The second is sensitive to changes in the proton gradient. When the level of the protonmotive force is high enough to maintain motiligy, changes in the components of the protonmotive force are sensed by the bacteria and lead to behavioral changes, but changes in the protonmotive force are not necessary for chemotaxis. PMID:6766440

  18. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  19. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding.

  20. The Astronomical Forcing of Climate Change: Forcings and Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, M. P.; Broccoli, A. J.; Clement, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the role that orbital forcing played in driving climate change over the Pleistocene has been a matter of ongoing research. While it is undeniable that variations in Earth’s orbit result in changes in the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of insolation, the specifics of how this forcing leads to the climate changes seen in the paleo record are not fully understood. To research this further, climate simulations have been conducted with the GFDL CM2.1, a coupled atmosphere-ocean GCM. Two simulations represent the extremes of obliquity during the past 600 kyr and four others show key times in the precessional cycle. All non-orbital variables are set to preindustrial levels to isolate the effects of astronomical forcing alone. It is expected that feedbacks should play a large role in dictating climate change, so to investigate this, the so-called “kernel method” is used to calculate the lapse rate, water vapor, albedo, and cloud feedbacks. Preliminary results of these experiments confirm that feedbacks are important in explaining the nature and, in places, even the sign of climate response to orbital forcing. In the case of low obliquity, for instance, a combination of climate feedbacks lead to global cooling in spite of zero global-average top of atmosphere insolation change. Feedbacks will be analyzed in the obliquity and precession experiments so that the role of feedbacks in contributing to climate change may be better understood.