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Sample records for cat motor cortex

  1. Linear summation of cat motor cortex outputs.

    PubMed

    Ethier, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent; Darling, Warren G; Capaday, Charles

    2006-05-17

    Recruitment of movement-related muscle synergies involves the functional linking of motor cortical points. We asked how the outputs of two simultaneously stimulated motor cortical points would interact. To this end, experiments were done in ketamine-anesthetized cats. When prolonged (e.g., 500 ms) trains of intracortical microstimulation were applied in the primary motor cortex, stimulus currents as low as 10-20 microA evoked coordinated movements of the contralateral forelimb. Paw kinematics in three dimensions and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of eight muscles were simultaneously recorded. We show that the EMG outputs of two cortical points simultaneously stimulated are additive. The movements were represented as displacement vectors pointing from initial to final paw position. The displacement vectors resulting from simultaneous stimulation of two cortical points pointed in nearly the same direction as the algebraic resultant vector. Linear summation of outputs was also found when inhibition at one of the cortical points was reduced by GABAA receptor antagonists. A simple principle emerges from these results. Notwithstanding the underlying complex neuronal circuitry, motor cortex outputs combine nearly linearly in terms of movement direction and muscle activation patterns. Importantly, simultaneous activation does not change the nature of the output at each point. An additional implication is that not all possible movements need be explicitly represented in the motor cortex; a large number of different movements may be synthesized from a smaller repertoire.

  2. Accurate stepping on a narrow path: mechanics, EMG, and motor cortex activity in the cat.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Brad J; Bulgakova, Margarita A; Sirota, Mikhail G; Prilutsky, Boris I; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2015-11-01

    How do cats manage to walk so graciously on top of narrow fences or windowsills high above the ground while apparently exerting little effort? In this study we investigated cat full-body mechanics and the activity of limb muscles and motor cortex during walking along a narrow 5-cm path on the ground. We tested the hypotheses that during narrow walking 1) lateral stability would be lower because of the decreased base-of-support area and 2) the motor cortex activity would increase stride-related modulation because of imposed demands on lateral stability and paw placement accuracy. We measured medio-lateral and rostro-caudal dynamic stability derived from the extrapolated center of mass position with respect to the boundaries of the support area. We found that cats were statically stable in the frontal plane during both unconstrained and narrow-path walking. During narrow-path walking, cats walked slightly slower with more adducted limbs, produced smaller lateral forces by hindlimbs, and had elevated muscle activities. Of 174 neurons recorded in cortical layer V, 87% of forelimb-related neurons (from 114) and 90% of hindlimb-related neurons (from 60) had activities during narrow-path walking distinct from unconstrained walking: more often they had a higher mean discharge rate, lower depth of stride-related modulation, and/or longer period of activation during the stride. These activity changes appeared to contribute to control of accurate paw placement in the medio-lateral direction, the width of the stride, rather than to lateral stability control, as the stability demands on narrow-path and unconstrained walking were similar.

  3. Accurate stepping on a narrow path: mechanics, EMG, and motor cortex activity in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Bulgakova, Margarita A.; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2015-01-01

    How do cats manage to walk so graciously on top of narrow fences or windowsills high above the ground while apparently exerting little effort? In this study we investigated cat full-body mechanics and the activity of limb muscles and motor cortex during walking along a narrow 5-cm path on the ground. We tested the hypotheses that during narrow walking 1) lateral stability would be lower because of the decreased base-of-support area and 2) the motor cortex activity would increase stride-related modulation because of imposed demands on lateral stability and paw placement accuracy. We measured medio-lateral and rostro-caudal dynamic stability derived from the extrapolated center of mass position with respect to the boundaries of the support area. We found that cats were statically stable in the frontal plane during both unconstrained and narrow-path walking. During narrow-path walking, cats walked slightly slower with more adducted limbs, produced smaller lateral forces by hindlimbs, and had elevated muscle activities. Of 174 neurons recorded in cortical layer V, 87% of forelimb-related neurons (from 114) and 90% of hindlimb-related neurons (from 60) had activities during narrow-path walking distinct from unconstrained walking: more often they had a higher mean discharge rate, lower depth of stride-related modulation, and/or longer period of activation during the stride. These activity changes appeared to contribute to control of accurate paw placement in the medio-lateral direction, the width of the stride, rather than to lateral stability control, as the stability demands on narrow-path and unconstrained walking were similar. PMID:26354314

  4. Topographical organization of projections to cat motor cortex from nucleus interpositus anterior and forelimb skin

    PubMed Central

    Jörntell, Henrik; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik

    1999-01-01

    The activation of the motor cortex from focal electrical stimulation of sites in the forelimb area of cerebellar nucleus interpositus anterior (NIA) was investigated in barbiturate-anaesthetized cats. Using a microelectrode, nuclear sites were identified by the cutaneous climbing fibre receptive fields of their afferent Purkinje cells. These cutaneous receptive fields can be identified by positive field potentials reflecting inhibition from Purkinje cells activated on natural stimulation of the skin. Thereafter, the sites were microstimulated and the evoked responses were systematically recorded over the cortical surface with a ball-tipped electrode. The topographical organization in the motor cortex of responses evoked by electrical stimulation of the forelimb skin was also analysed.Generally, sites in the forelimb area of NIA projected to the lateral part of the anterior sigmoid gyrus (ASG). Sites in the hindlimb area of NIA also projected to lateral ASG and in addition to a more medial region. Sites in the face area of NIA, however, projected mainly to the middle part of the posterior sigmoid gyrus (PSG).For sites in the forelimb area of NIA, the topographical organization and strength of the projections varied specifically with the cutaneous climbing fibre receptive field of the site. The largest cortical responses were evoked from sites with receptive fields on the distal or ventral skin of the forelimb.Microelectrode recordings in the depth of the motor cortex revealed that responses evoked by cerebellar nuclear stimulation were due to an excitatory process in layer III.Short latency surface responses evoked from the forelimb skin were found in the caudolateral part of the motor cortex. At gradually longer latencies, responses appeared in sequentially more rostromedial parts of the motor cortex. Since the responses displayed several temporal peaks that appeared in specific cortical regions for different areas of the forelimb skin, several somatotopic maps

  5. Effects of stimulation parameters and electrode location on thresholds for epidural stimulation of cat motor cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2011-12-01

    Epidural electrical stimulation (ECS) of the motor cortex is a developing therapy for neurological disorders. Both placement and programming of ECS systems may affect the therapeutic outcome, but the treatment parameters that will maximize therapeutic outcomes and minimize side effects are not known. We delivered ECS to the motor cortex of anesthetized cats and investigated the effects of electrode placement and stimulation parameters on thresholds for evoking motor responses in the contralateral forelimb. Thresholds were inversely related to stimulation frequency and the number of pulses per stimulus train. Thresholds were lower over the forelimb representation in motor cortex (primary site) than surrounding sites (secondary sites), and thresholds at sites <4 mm away from the primary site were significantly lower than at sites >4 mm away. Electrode location and montage influenced the effects of polarity on thresholds: monopolar anodic and cathodic thresholds were not significantly different over the primary site, cathodic thresholds were significantly lower than anodic thresholds over secondary sites and bipolar thresholds were significantly lower with the anode over the primary site than with the cathode over the primary site. A majority of bipolar thresholds were either between or equal to the respective monopolar thresholds, but several bipolar thresholds were greater than or less than the monopolar thresholds of both the anode and cathode. During bipolar stimulation, thresholds were influenced by both electric field superposition and indirect, synaptically mediated interactions. These results demonstrate the influence of stimulation parameters and electrode location during cortical stimulation, and these effects should be considered during the programming of systems for therapeutic cortical stimulation.

  6. The structure of EEG arousal as a dynamic ensemble of neuronal activities in cat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Ezure, K; Oshima, T

    1981-01-01

    1. Intracellular potentials were recorded from 164 cells in cat precruciate cortex, and their responses were examined during the phasic and tonic phases of EEG arousal. 2. According to the initial responses corresponding to phasic EEG arousal, these cells were classified into 71 E (excitation), 49 I (inhibition), 38 DF (disfacilitation), and 6 DI (disinhibition) cells. 3. The late responses corresponding to tonic EEG arousal varied among these cells. Thirty-two of the 164 cells were unresponsive. Of the remaining cells, 102 showed excitation, 16 inhibition, 12 disfacilitation, and 2 disinhibition. These cells were retermed +E, +I, +DF, and +DI cells, respectively. 4. +E cells were located at all depths through laminae I to VI, but the majority were found in laminae IIIb-VI. +I cells were between lamina I and the lower half of lamina III (IIIb), and +DF and +DI cells were between lamina I and the upper half of lamina III (IIIa). From these characteristic layer distributions it is postulated that an upward cascade transmission from deep to superficial layers occurs during tonic EEG arousal. 5. Nine types of combinations of the initial and late responses were found: E, I, DF or DI with +E, E or I with +I, E or I with +DF, and I with +DI. To explain these various activity patterns, an 'arousal' circuit model was proposed by combining the downward and upward cascade transmission patterns. The elementary structure of cortical arousal was thus formulated, and discussed from the development aspect of behavior.

  7. Differential involvement of excitatory and inhibitory neurons of cat motor cortex in coincident spike activity related to behavioral context.

    PubMed

    Putrino, David; Brown, Emery N; Mastaglia, Frank L; Ghosh, Soumya

    2010-06-01

    To assess temporal associations in spike activity between pairs of neurons in the primary motor cortex (MI) related to different behaviors, we compared the incidence of coincident spiking activity of task-related (TR) and non-task-related (NTR) neurons during a skilled motor task and sitting quietly in adult cats (Felis domestica). Chronically implanted microwires were used to record spike activity of MI neurons in four animals (two male and two female) trained to perform a skilled reaching task or sit quietly. Neurons were identified as TR if spike activity was modulated during the task (and NTR if not). Based on spike characteristics, they were also classified as either regular-spiking (RS, putatively excitatory) or fast-spiking (FS, putatively inhibitory) neurons. Temporal associations in the activities of simultaneously recorded neurons were evaluated using shuffle-corrected cross-correlograms. Pairs of NTR and TR neurons showed associations in their firing patterns over wide areas of MI (representing forelimb and hindlimb movements) during quiet sitting, more commonly involving RS neurons. During skilled task performance, however, significantly coincident firing was seen almost exclusively between TR neurons in a smaller part of MI (representing forelimb movements), involving mainly FS neurons. The findings of this study show evidence for widespread interactions in MI when the animal sits quietly, which changes to a more specific and restricted pattern of interactions during task performance. Different populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons appear to be synchronized during skilled movement and quiet sitting.

  8. On the nature of the intrinsic connectivity of the cat motor cortex: evidence for a recurrent neural network topology.

    PubMed

    Capaday, Charles; Ethier, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent; Sik, Attila; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Gingras, Denis

    2009-10-01

    The details and functional significance of the intrinsic horizontal connections between neurons in the motor cortex (MCx) remain to be clarified. To further elucidate the nature of this intracortical connectivity pattern, experiments were done on the MCx of three cats. The anterograde tracer biocytin was ejected iontophoretically in layers II, III, and V. Some 30-50 neurons within a radius of approximately 250 microm were thus stained. The functional output of the motor cortical point at which biocytin was injected, and of the surrounding points, was identified by microstimulation and electromyographic recordings. The axonal arborizations of the stained neurons were traced under camera lucida. The axon collaterals were extensive, reaching distances of motor output map revealed that motor cortical neurons don't make point-to-point connections but rather bind together the representations of a variety of muscles within a large neighborhood. This recurrent-network type connectivity strongly supports the hypothesis that the MCx controls the musculature in an integrated manner. PMID:19625531

  9. Central regulation of motor cortex neuronal responses to forelimb nerve inputs during precision walking in the cat.

    PubMed

    Marple-Horvat, D E; Armstrong, D M

    1999-08-15

    1. The responses of neurones in forelimb motor cortex to impulse volleys evoked by single pulse electrical stimulation (at 1.5 or 2 times the threshold for most excitable nerve fibres) of the superficial radial (SR) and ulnar (UL) nerves of the contralateral forelimb were studied in awake cats both resting quietly and walking on a horizontal ladder. Nerve volley amplitude was monitored by recording the compound action potential elicited by the stimulus. 2. In the resting animal 34/82 (41%) cells yielded statistically significant responses to SR stimulation, and 20/72 (28%) responded to UL stimulation. Some responses were confined to or began with an increase in firing probability ('excitatory' responses) and others with a decrease in firing ('inhibitory' responses), typically including a brief interruption of the spike train (zero rate). Cells responding to both nerves usually yielded responses similar in type. Most (78%) response onset latencies were less than 30 ms. Responses involved the addition or subtraction of from 3.4 to 0.1 impulses stimulus-1 (most <1 impulse stimulus-1). The distribution of response sizes was continuous down to the smallest values, i.e. there was no 'gap' which would represent a clear separation into 'responsive' and 'unresponsive' categories. Responses were commonest in the lateral part of the pericruciate cortex, and commoner among pyramidal tract neurones (PTNs) than non-PTNs. 3. During ladder walking most cells generated a rhythmic step-related discharge; in assessing the size of responses to nerve stimulation (20 studied, from 13 cells) this activity was first subtracted. Response onset latencies (90% <30 ms) and durations showed little or no change. Although most cells were overall more active than during rest both 'excitatory' and 'inhibitory' responses in both PTNs and non-PTNs were often markedly reduced in large parts of the step cycle; over some (usually brief) parts responses approached or exceeded their size during rest, i

  10. Patterns of spatio-temporal correlations in the neural activity of the cat motor cortex during trained forelimb movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumya; Putrino, David; Burro, Bianca; Ring, Alexander

    2009-06-01

    In order to study how neurons in the primary motor cortex (MI) are dynamically linked together during skilled movement, we recorded simultaneously from many cortical neurons in cats trained to perform a reaching and retrieval task using their forelimbs. Analysis of task-related spike activity in the MI of the hemisphere contralateral to the reaching forelimb (in identified forelimb or hindlimb representations) recorded through chronically implanted microwires, was followed by pairwise evaluation of temporally correlated activity in these neurons during task performance using shuffle corrected cross-correlograms. Over many months of recording, a variety of task-related modulations of neural activities were observed in individual efferent zones. Positively correlated activity (mainly narrow peaks at zero or short latencies) was seen during task performance frequently between neurons recorded within the forelimb representation of MI, rarely within the hindlimb area of MI, and never between forelimb and hindlimb areas. Correlated activity was frequently observed between neurons with different patterns of task-related activity or preferential activity during different task elements (reaching, feeding, etc.), and located in efferent zones with dissimilar representation as defined by intracortical microstimulation. The observed synchronization of action potentials among selected but functionally varied groups of MI neurons possibly reflects dynamic recruitment of network connections between efferent zones during skilled movement.

  11. The role of the motor cortex in the control of accuracy of locomotor movements in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Beloozerova, I N; Sirota, M G

    1993-01-01

    1. The impulse activity of single neurones in the motor cortex (MC) was recorded extracellularly, using movable varnish-insulated tungsten microelectrodes, in six adult, freely moving cats. Neuronal activity was recorded while the cats walked on a flat floor, as they stepped over a series of barriers, and as they walked on the flat rungs of a horizontal ladder. The mean discharge rate (mR) and the depth of frequency modulation (dM) in each cell were estimated over 10-100 steps. 2. The activity of ninety-eight MC cells (Including thirteen pyramidal tract neurones (PTNs)) was recorded during stepping over barriers 25 cm apart. The mR in 66% and the dM in 61% of these cells changed by more than 20% during locomotion with barriers compared to locomotion on the flat (an increase was more often the case). 3. The activity of nine cells was recorded during stepping over barriers 12 cm apart, and the activity of twenty-seven cells (including five PTNs) during walking with barriers only 6 cm apart. The mR in 67% and in 59% of the cells, respectively, and the dM in 56% and in 67% of the cells, respectively, were greater in these locomotor tasks than during locomotion on the flat. 4. The activity of twenty cells was recorded during walking and compared in experiments with different distances between barriers. The mR in 50% and the dM in 75% of the neurones progressively increased when the distance between successive barriers was diminished. 5. The discharge rates of thirteen cells were compared in two different locomotor tasks: (i) when the cat stepped over barriers requiring hyperflexion of the limbs and (ii) when it walked on the flat with loads attached to the distal forelimbs causing a hyperactivity of flexor muscles. The activity of nine cells was different during stepping over the barriers compared to locomotion with loadings on the forelimbs. 6. The activity of 108 cells (twenty-four PTNs) was recorded during walking along a horizontal ladder with flat rungs. The mR of

  12. Neural mechanism of activity spread in the cat motor cortex and its relation to the intrinsic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Capaday, Charles; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Ethier, Christian; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Weber, Doug

    2011-05-15

    Motor cortical points are linked by intrinsic horizontal connections having a recurrent network topology. However, it is not known whether neural activity can propagate over the area covered by these intrinsic connections and whether there are spatial anisotropies of synaptic strength, as opposed to synaptic density. Moreover, the mechanisms by which activity spreads have yet to be determined. To address these issues, an 8 × 8 microelectrode array was inserted in the forelimb area of the cat motor cortex (MCx). The centre of the array had a laser etched hole ∼500 μm in diameter. A microiontophoretic pipette, with a tip diameter of 2-3 μm, containing bicuculline methiodide (BIC) was inserted in the hole and driven to a depth of 1200-1400 μm from the cortical surface. BIC was ejected for ∼2min from the tip of the micropipette with positive direct current ranging between 20 and 40 nA in different experiments. This produced spontaneous nearly periodic bursts (0.2-1.0 Hz) of multi-unit activity in a radius of about 400 μm from the tip of the micropipette. The bursts of neural activity spread at a velocity of 0.11-0.24 ms⁻¹ (mean=0.14 mm ms⁻¹, SD=0.05)with decreasing amplitude.The area activated was on average 7.22 mm² (SD=0.91 mm²), or ∼92% of the area covered by the recording array. The mode of propagation was determined to occur by progressive recruitment of cortical territory, driven by a central locus of activity of some 400 μm in radius. Thus, activity did not propagate as a wave. Transection of the connections between the thalamus and MCx did not significantly alter the propagation velocity or the size of the recruited area, demonstrating that the bursts spread along the routes of intrinsic cortical connectivity. These experiments demonstrate that neural activity initiated within a small motor cortical locus (≤ 400 μm in radius) can recruit a relatively large neighbourhood in which a variety of muscles acting at several forelimb joints are

  13. Central regulation of motor cortex neuronal responses to forelimb nerve inputs during precision walking in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Marple-Horvat, D E; Armstrong, D M

    1999-01-01

    The responses of neurones in forelimb motor cortex to impulse volleys evoked by single pulse electrical stimulation (at 1.5 or 2 times the threshold for most excitable nerve fibres) of the superficial radial (SR) and ulnar (UL) nerves of the contralateral forelimb were studied in awake cats both resting quietly and walking on a horizontal ladder. Nerve volley amplitude was monitored by recording the compound action potential elicited by the stimulus. In the resting animal 34/82 (41 %) cells yielded statistically significant responses to SR stimulation, and 20/72 (28 %) responded to UL stimulation. Some responses were confined to or began with an increase in firing probability (‘excitatory’ responses) and others with a decrease in firing (‘inhibitory’ responses), typically including a brief interruption of the spike train (zero rate). Cells responding to both nerves usually yielded responses similar in type. Most (78 %) response onset latencies were less than 30 ms. Responses involved the addition or subtraction of from 3.4 to 0.1 impulses stimulus−1 (most < 1 impulse stimulus−1). The distribution of response sizes was continuous down to the smallest values, i.e. there was no ‘gap’ which would represent a clear separation into ‘responsive’ and ‘unresponsive’ categories. Responses were commonest in the lateral part of the pericruciate cortex, and commoner among pyramidal tract neurones (PTNs) than non-PTNs. During ladder walking most cells generated a rhythmic step-related discharge; in assessing the size of responses to nerve stimulation (20 studied, from 13 cells) this activity was first subtracted. Response onset latencies (90 % < 30 ms) and durations showed little or no change. Although most cells were overall more active than during rest both ‘excitatory’ and ‘inhibitory’ responses in both PTNs and non-PTNs were often markedly reduced in large parts of the step cycle; over some (usually brief) parts responses approached or

  14. Network activity in neurons of the motor and prefrontal areas of the cortex in trained cats in conditions of systemic administration of m-cholinoreceptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, V N; Merzhanova, G Kh; Dolbakyan, E E

    2002-01-01

    Experiments on five cats already trained to an operant conditioned food-procuring reflex to light were used to study the network activity of cells in the frontal and motor areas of the cortex accompanying disruption of conditioned reflex behavior in conditions of systemic administration of m-cholinoreceptor blockers. The activity of cortical neurons and their network properties were assessed using auto- and cross-correlation histograms. Doses of central m-cholinoreceptor blockers (the non-selective blocker scopolamine and the relatively selective m1-cholinoreceptor blocker trihexyphenidyl) disrupted performance of the operant motor reflex but had no effect on the appearance of contextual behavior and responses to switching on of the conditioned signal (standing up, elevating the paw). This was accompanied by 1) changes in the patterns of neuron activity in the moor and frontal areas of the cortex, with increases in train, rhythmic, and rhythmic train activity in cortical cells; 2) appearance of synchronicity in the operation of cortical neurons; 3) decreases in the numbers of direct interneuronal connections in the motor and frontal areas of the cortex and in the numbers of connections between these structures.

  15. Correspondence between climbing fibre input and motor output in eyeblink-related areas in cat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Hesslow, G

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to identify sites in the cerebellar cortex which are likely to control eyeblink. This work was motivated by findings suggesting that the cerebellum is involved in the learning and/or performance of the classically conditioned eyeblink response. The identification was based on climbing fibre input to the cortex and on the effects of electrical stimulation of the cerebellar cortex in cats decerebrated rostral to the red nucleus. The cerebellar surface was searched for areas receiving short latency climbing fibre input on periorbital electrical stimulation. Four such areas were found in the c1 and c3 zones of lobules VI and VII in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and in the c3 zone in the paramedian lobule. Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar cortex with trains (150-400 Hz) of at least 10 ms duration evoked two types of EMG response in the orbicularis oculi muscle. An early response, time-locked to the onset of the stimulation, was unrelated to climbing fibre input and a delayed response, time-locked to the termination of the stimulation, could only be evoked from areas which received short latency climbing fibre input from the eye, that is, the c1 and c3 zones. The delayed responses had long latencies (up to 50 ms) after the termination of the stimulus train and could be delayed further by prolonging the stimulation. Both types of response were abolished by injections of small amounts of lignocaine into the brachium conjunctivum. A number of characteristics of the delayed responses are described. They could be inhibited by a further shock to the same area of the cerebellar cortex. Their latency could be increased by increasing the stimulation frequency. The period between stimulation and appearance of the response often showed a decrease in spontaneous EMG activity. There was a close topographical correspondence between input and output. Delayed responses could be evoked from all four of the areas in the c1 and c3 zones

  16. Dissociating motor cortex from the motor

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Marc H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During closed-loop control of a brain–computer interface, neurons in the primary motor cortex can be intensely active even though the subject may be making no detectable movement or muscle contraction. How can neural activity in the primary motor cortex become dissociated from the movements and muscles of the native limb that it normally controls? Here we examine circumstances in which motor cortex activity is known to dissociate from movement – including mental imagery, visuo-motor dissociation and instructed delay. Many such motor cortex neurons may be related to muscle activity only indirectly. Furthermore, the integration of thousands of synaptic inputs by individual α-motoneurons means that under certain circumstances even cortico-motoneuronal cells, which make monosynaptic connections to α-motoneurons, can become dissociated from muscle activity. The natural ability of motor cortex neurons under voluntarily control to become dissociated from bodily movement may underlie the utility of this cortical area for controlling brain–computer interfaces. PMID:22005673

  17. Time organization of frontal-motor cortex interneuron interactions in the cat neocortex in conditions of different levels of food motivation.

    PubMed

    Merzhanova, G Kh; Dolbakyan, E E

    1997-01-01

    Studies were carried out in conscious cats with recording of multicellular activity in moderate hunger and after 24-h food deprivation. Cross-correlation analysis was used to assess statistical interneuron interactions between closely-located neurons in the frontal and sensorimotor regions of the neocortex (local networks), and between the cells of these regions (distributed networks). One-day food deprivation increased the number of interactions formed within both local and distributed neuron networks. Increases in intercortical connections between the frontal and motor regions was seen at all time intervals studied (0-100 msec), though the most significant changes occurred at time intervals of up to 30 msec.

  18. Electrophysiological characterization of different types of neurons recorded in vivo in the motor cortex of the cat. I. Patterns of firing activity and synaptic responses.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, A; Szente, M B; Woody, C D

    1993-06-01

    1. Patterns of firing activity and characteristics of antidromic and synaptic responses to stimulation of the pyramidal tract at peduncular level [peduncular pyramidal tract (PP)] and the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus (VL) were studied in neurons of area 4 gamma of the motor cortex of awake, chronic cats using intracellular microelectrode techniques. The results offer a new functional classification of neocortical neurons based on electrophysiological properties of the 640 recorded cells. 2. Four classes of neurons were distinguished: (class i) inactivating bursting (ib) neurons (n = 60) including fast antidromic response PP (fPP) (n = 0), slow antidromic response PP (sPP) (n = 11), and no antidromic response PP cells (nPP) (n = 49); (class ii) noninactivating bursting (nib) neurons (n = 79), including fPP (n = 23), sPP (n = 0), and nPP cells (n = 56); (class iii) fast-spiking (fsp) neurons (n = 56), including fPP (n = 0), sPP (n = 0), and nPP cells (n = 56); and (class iv) regular-spiking (rsp) neurons (n = 445), including fPP (n = 96), sPP (n = 38), and nPP cells (n = 311). (Neurons in each classification were further separated by their antidromic responses to PP stimulation: fast PP (fPP) slow PP (sPP), or nPP cells, the latter not responding antidromically to electrical stimulation of the peduncle.) 3. Recurrent monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) followed antidromic spikes elicited by PP stimulation in most (96%) fPP but much fewer (24%) sPP cells. In fPP cells, it was possible to separate the PP EPSPs into two monosynaptic EPSP components that were generated by other fPP and sPP cells, respectively. VL stimulation evoked monosynaptic EPSPs in 100% of fPP cells (vs. 63% of sPP cells) and antidromic action potentials in 16% of fPP cells (vs. 12% of sPP cells). 4. Firing activity consisted of single spike discharges in most PP cells; however, noninactivating bursting was observed in 19% of fPP cells, and inactivating bursting was observed in

  19. Somatosensory responses in a human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Donoghue, John P; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2013-04-01

    Somatic sensory signals provide a major source of feedback to motor cortex. Changes in somatosensory systems after stroke or injury could profoundly influence brain computer interfaces (BCI) being developed to create new output signals from motor cortex activity patterns. We had the unique opportunity to study the responses of hand/arm area neurons in primary motor cortex to passive joint manipulation in a person with a long-standing brain stem stroke but intact sensory pathways. Neurons responded to passive manipulation of the contralateral shoulder, elbow, or wrist as predicted from prior studies of intact primates. Thus fundamental properties and organization were preserved despite arm/hand paralysis and damage to cortical outputs. The same neurons were engaged by attempted arm actions. These results indicate that intact sensory pathways retain the potential to influence primary motor cortex firing rates years after cortical outputs are interrupted and may contribute to online decoding of motor intentions for BCI applications.

  20. Somatosensory responses in a human motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic sensory signals provide a major source of feedback to motor cortex. Changes in somatosensory systems after stroke or injury could profoundly influence brain computer interfaces (BCI) being developed to create new output signals from motor cortex activity patterns. We had the unique opportunity to study the responses of hand/arm area neurons in primary motor cortex to passive joint manipulation in a person with a long-standing brain stem stroke but intact sensory pathways. Neurons responded to passive manipulation of the contralateral shoulder, elbow, or wrist as predicted from prior studies of intact primates. Thus fundamental properties and organization were preserved despite arm/hand paralysis and damage to cortical outputs. The same neurons were engaged by attempted arm actions. These results indicate that intact sensory pathways retain the potential to influence primary motor cortex firing rates years after cortical outputs are interrupted and may contribute to online decoding of motor intentions for BCI applications. PMID:23343902

  1. Postnatal development of the motor representation in primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, S; Martin, J H

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine when the muscles and joints of the forelimb become represented in primary motor cortex (M1) during postnatal life and how local representation patterns change. We examined these questions in cats that were anesthetized (45-90 days, n = 14; adults, n = 3) and awake (n = 4; 52-86 days). We used intracortical microstimulation (45 ms duration train, 330 Hz, 0.2-ms balanced biphasic pulses, with a leading cathodic pulse; up to 100 microA). In young animals (less than day 70), we also used stimulus trains and pulses that could produce greater temporal summation (up to 200-ms train duration, down to 143-Hz stimulus frequency, up to 0.8-ms pulse width). Anesthetized animals were areflexic, and muscle tone was similar to that of the awake cats (i.e., relaxed, not weight or load bearing, with minimal resistance to passive stretch). We monitored the kinematic effects of microstimulation and changes in electromyographic (EMG) activity in forelimb muscles. There was an age-dependent reduction in the number of sites where microstimulation did not produce a motor effect (i.e., ineffective sites), from 95% in animals younger than 60 days to 33% between 81 and 90 days. In adults, 24% of sites were ineffective. Median current thresholds for evoking movements dropped from 79 microA in animals younger than day 60 to 38 and 28 microA in day 81-90 animals and adults, respectively. There was a proximal-to-distal development of the somatotopic organization of the motor map. Stimulation at the majority of sites in animals younger than day 71 produced shoulder and elbow movement. Wrist sites were first present by day 71, and digit sites by day 81. Sites at which multiple responses were evoked, between 1.0 and 1.5 times threshold, were present after day 71, and increased with age. A higher percentage of distal joints were co-represented with other joints, rather than being represented alone. We found that effective sites initially were scattered and

  2. A functional microcircuit for cat visual cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, R J; Martin, K A

    1991-01-01

    1. We have studied in vivo the intracellular responses of neurones in cat visual cortex to electrical pulse stimulation of the cortical afferents and have developed a microcircuit that simulates much of the experimental data. 2. Inhibition and excitation are not separable events, because individual neurones are embedded in microcircuits that contribute strong population effects. Synchronous electrical activation of the cortex inevitably set in motion a sequence of excitation and inhibition in every neurone we recorded. The temporal form of this response depends on the cortical layer in which the neurone is located. Superficial layer (layers 2+3) pyramidal neurones show a more marked polysynaptic excitatory phase than the pyramids of the deep layers (layers 5+6). 3. Excitatory effects on pyramidal neurones, particularly the superficial layer pyramids, are in general not due to monosynaptic input from thalamus, but polysynaptic input from cortical pyramids. Since the thalamic input is transient it does not provide the major, sustained excitation arriving at any cortical neurone. Instead the intracortical excitatory connections provide the major component of the excitation. 4. The polysynaptic excitatory response would be sustained well after the stimulus, were it not for the suppressive effect of intracortical inhibition induced by the pulse stimulation. 5. Intracellular recording combined with ionophoresis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists and antagonists showed that intracortical inhibition is mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors. The GABAA component occurs in the early phase of the impulse response. It is reflected in the strong hyperpolarization that follows the excitatory response and lasts about 50 ms. The GABAB component occurs in the late phase of the response, and is reflected in a sustained hyperpolarization that lasts some 200-300 ms. Both components are seen in all cortical pyramidal neurones. However, the GABAA component appears more powerful

  3. Corticocortical connections of cat primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Schwark, H D; Esteky, H; Jones, E G

    1992-01-01

    The organization of corticocortical connections in the representation of the forepaw in cat primary somatosensory cortex (SI) was studied following injections of various tracers into different cortical cytoarchitectonic areas. Small injections of horseradish peroxidase, wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated HRP, Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinin, or fast blue were placed into the representation of the forepaw in areas 3b, 1, or 2. The positions of labeled neurons in SI and the surrounding cortical areas were plotted on flattened surface reconstructions to determine the organization of the corticocortical connections within SI. A strong, reciprocal projection linked the two forepaw representations which have been described in area 3b and the part of area 2 which lies in the anterior bank of the lateral ansate sulcus (see Iwamura and Tanaka 1978a, b). Dense projections also linked these areas with SII, as previously reported (Burton and Kopf 1984a). Additional projections to area 3b arose primarily from areas 3a and 1. Projections to area 2 were more widespread than those to area 3b, and arose from all other areas of SI as well as from areas 4 and 5a. All injections into SI tended to label groups of neurons which lay in mediolateral strips. Corticocortical projection neurons which were most heavily labeled by SI injections were pyramidal cells in layer III. Additional projections from area 2 to 3b, area 5a to 2, and SII to areas 2 and 3b arose from layer VI as well. Although neurons of layers III and VI were always the most densely labeled, large injections into SI labeled neurons in layers II and V as well. PMID:1282890

  4. An immunocytochemical mapping of somatostatin in the cat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Martín, F; Coveñas, R; Narváez, J A; Tramu, G

    2003-10-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the localization of somatostatin-28 (1-12)-like immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies in the auditory cortex of the cat (anterior, primary, secondary, temporal, ventral, ventroposterior, posterior and dorsoposterior auditory fields) was studied. In general, the distribution of SOM-ir structures is widespread in the auditory cortex of the feline. A high density of immunoreactive fibers as well as a low density of cell bodies containing somatostatin were observed in all the layers of the eight above-mentioned auditory fields. These data indicate that somatostatin-28 (1-12) could act as a neurotransmitter and/or a neuromodulator in the auditory cortex of the cat. The origin of the SOM-ir fibers in the auditory cortex of the cat, as well as the issue of whether the cell bodies containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) are local or projecting neurons is discussed.

  5. Neuronal populations stained with the monoclonal antibody Cat-301 in the mammalian cerebral cortex and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Hendry, S H; Jones, E G; Hockfield, S; McKay, R D

    1988-02-01

    The monoclonal antibody Cat-301 was used to examine neurons in the cerebral cortex and dorsal thalamus of several mammalian species, including Old World monkeys, cats, bush babies, guinea pigs, and rats. In each species, subpopulations of cortical and thalamic neurons are stained along the surfaces of their somata and proximal dendrites. Cat-301-positive cortical neurons include specific groups of pyramidal cells (e.g., corticospinal but not corticobulbar or callosal neurons in the monkey sensory-motor areas) and certain GABA-immunoreactive nonpyramidal cells. In the thalamus, the relay neurons projecting to the cortex and not the intrinsic neurons are stained. The Cat-301-positive neurons are nonhomogeneously distributed in the cat and monkey cortex and thalamus. In the cortex, they are densely packed in 2 bands that in most areas include layers III and V, but that in primary sensory areas include layers IV and VI. Because the density of stained neurons, their distribution, and the intensity of their staining vary among cortical areas, the borders between neighboring areas can often be detected by the differences in Cat-301 staining. Broader, regional differences are also readily apparent, for areas in the parietal and occipital lobes contain large numbers of intensely stained cells, but most areas in the frontal and temporal lobes contain fewer, more lightly stained neurons. The same broad differences are seen within the thalamus: only those nuclei reciprocally connected with intensely stained cortical areas contain large numbers of Cat-301-positive neurons. Differences among species include variations in cell density and distribution when a given cortical area or thalamic nucleus is compared between cats and monkeys. Greater differences are seen among the other species. Immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral cortex are sparse and lightly stained in guinea pigs, are restricted to the hippocampal formation in rats, and are very rare and isolated in bush babies

  6. Motor Cortex Reorganization across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Emily K.; Kleim, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    The brain is a highly dynamic structure with the capacity for profound structural and functional change. Such neural plasticity has been well characterized within motor cortex and is believed to represent one of the neural mechanisms for acquiring and modifying motor behaviors. A number of behavioral and neural signals have been identified that…

  7. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  8. The left parietal cortex and motor attention.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, M F; Nixon, P D; Renowden, S; Wade, D T; Passingham, R E

    1997-09-01

    The posterior parietal cortex, particularly in the right hemisphere, is crucially important for covert orienting; lesions impair the ability to disengage the focus of covert orienting attention from one potential saccade target to another (Posner, M. I. et al., Journal of Neuroscience, 1984, 4, 1863-1874). We have developed a task where precues allow subjects to covertly prepare subsequent cued hand movements, as opposed to an orienting or eye movement. We refer to this process as motor attention to distinguish it from orienting attention. Nine subjects with lesions that included the left parietal cortex and nine subjects with lesions including the right parietal cortex were compared with control subjects on the task. The left hemisphere subjects showed the same ability as controls to engage attention to a movement when they were forewarned by a valid precue. The left hemisphere subjects, however, were impaired in their ability to disengage the focus of motor attention from one movement to another when the precue was incorrect. The results support the existence of two distinct attentional systems allied to the orienting and limb motor systems. Damage to either system causes analogous problems in disengaging from one orienting/movement target to another. The left parietal cortex, particularly the supramarginal gyrus, is associated with motor attention. All the left hemisphere subjects had ideomotor apraxia and had particular problems performing sequences of movements. We suggest that the well documented left hemisphere and apraxic impairment in movement sequencing is the consequence of a difficulty in shifting the focus of motor attention from one movement in a sequence to the next. PMID:9364496

  9. Fictive motor patterns in chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Pearson, K G; Rossignol, S

    1991-12-01

    1. Fictive motor patterns were recorded in hind leg nerves of 10 adult chronic spinal cats (spinalized at T13). Four of these animals had been trained to step with their hind legs on a treadmill (late-spinal animals), whereas the remainder received no training and were examined a short time after spinalization (early-spinal animals). 2. A fictive pattern resembling the locomotor pattern for stepping was evoked in all animals in response to stimulation of the skin of the perineal region. (2-[2,6-Dichloroaniline]-2-imidazoline) hydrochloride (Clonidine) at doses ranging from 100 to 500 micrograms/kg iv facilitated the production of this pattern, particularly in early-spinal animals. 3. The fictive locomotor pattern in late-spinal animals was more complex than that occurring in early-spinal animals. In the latter the pattern consisted of an alternation of activity in flexor and extensor nerves, and changing leg position did not qualitatively alter the pattern, whereas in late-spinal animals the relative durations of the bursts in different flexors were usually not the same, and the pattern of flexor activity was dependent on leg position. 4. Moving the legs from extension to flexion progressively decreased the duration of flexor bursts, increased the cycle period, and decreased the ease with which the pattern could be evoked in both early- and late-spinal animals. 5. 1-beta-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)/Isonocotinic acid 2-[(2-benzylcarbamoyl)ethyl]hydrazide (Nialamide) treatment following Clonidine in early-spinal animals increased the complexity of flexor burst activity. This, and other observations, indicates that DOPA and Clonidine do not have strictly identical actions on the locomotor pattern generator. 6. Stimulation of the paws in late-spinal animals produced two patterns of activity distinctly different from the locomotor pattern. of activity distinctly different from the locomotor pattern. One was a short sequence of high-frequency rhythmic activity (at

  10. Motor induced suppression of auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aliu, Sheye O.; Houde, John F.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory responses to stimuli that are triggered by a self-initiated motor act are suppressed when compared with the response to the same stimuli triggered externally, a phenomenon referred to as motor-induced suppression (MIS) of sensory cortical feedback. Studies in the somatosensory system suggest that such suppression might be sensitive to delays between the motor act and the stimulus-onset, and a recent study in the auditory system suggests that such MIS develops rapidly. In three MEG experiments, we characterize the properties of MIS, by examining the M100 response from the auditory cortex to a simple tone triggered by a button press. In Experiment 1, we found that MIS develops for zero-delays but does not generalize to non-zero delays. In Experiment 2, we found that MIS developed for 100 ms delays within 300 trials and occurs in excess of auditory habituation. In Experiment 3, we found that unlike MIS for zero-delays, MIS for non-zero delays does not exhibit sensitivity to sensory, delay or motor-command changes. These results are discussed in relation to suppression to self-produced speech and a general model of sensory motor control. PMID:18593265

  11. Activity of motor cortex neurons during backward locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zelenin, P V; Deliagina, T G; Orlovsky, G N; Karayannidou, A; Stout, E E; Sirota, M G; Beloozerova, I N

    2011-06-01

    Forward walking (FW) and backward walking (BW) are two important forms of locomotion in quadrupeds. Participation of the motor cortex in the control of FW has been intensively studied, whereas cortical activity during BW has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze locomotion-related activity of the motor cortex during BW and compare it with that during FW. For this purpose, we recorded activity of individual neurons in the cat during BW and FW. We found that the discharge frequency in almost all neurons was modulated in the rhythm of stepping during both FW and BW. However, the modulation patterns during BW and FW were different in 80% of neurons. To determine the source of modulating influences (forelimb controllers vs. hindlimb controllers), the neurons were recorded not only during quadrupedal locomotion but also during bipedal locomotion (with either forelimbs or hindlimbs walking), and their modulation patterns were compared. We found that during BW (like during FW), modulation in some neurons was determined by inputs from limb controllers of only one girdle, whereas the other neurons received inputs from both girdles. The combinations of inputs could depend on the direction of locomotion. Most often (in 51% of forelimb-related neurons and in 34% of the hindlimb-related neurons), the neurons received inputs only from their own girdle when this girdle was leading and from both girdles when this girdle was trailing. This reconfiguration of inputs suggests flexibility of the functional roles of individual cortical neurons during different forms of locomotion.

  12. Forelimb training drives transient map reorganization in ipsilateral motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, David T; Schmid, Ariel N; Danaphongse, Tanya T; Flanagan, Kate E; Morrison, Robert A; Kilgard, Michael P; Rennaker, Robert L; Hays, Seth A

    2016-10-15

    Skilled motor training results in reorganization of contralateral motor cortex movement representations. The ipsilateral motor cortex is believed to play a role in skilled motor control, but little is known about how training influences reorganization of ipsilateral motor representations of the trained limb. To determine whether training results in reorganization of ipsilateral motor cortex maps, rats were trained to perform the isometric pull task, an automated motor task that requires skilled forelimb use. After either 3 or 6 months of training, intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) mapping was performed to document motor representations of the trained forelimb in the hemisphere ipsilateral to that limb. Motor training for 3 months resulted in a robust expansion of right forelimb representation in the right motor cortex, demonstrating that skilled motor training drives map plasticity ipsilateral to the trained limb. After 6 months of training, the right forelimb representation in the right motor cortex was significantly smaller than the representation observed in rats trained for 3 months and similar to untrained controls, consistent with a normalization of motor cortex maps. Forelimb map area was not correlated with performance on the trained task, suggesting that task performance is maintained despite normalization of cortical maps. This study provides new insights into how the ipsilateral cortex changes in response to skilled learning and may inform rehabilitative strategies to enhance cortical plasticity to support recovery after brain injury.

  13. Forelimb training drives transient map reorganization in ipsilateral motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, David T; Schmid, Ariel N; Danaphongse, Tanya T; Flanagan, Kate E; Morrison, Robert A; Kilgard, Michael P; Rennaker, Robert L; Hays, Seth A

    2016-10-15

    Skilled motor training results in reorganization of contralateral motor cortex movement representations. The ipsilateral motor cortex is believed to play a role in skilled motor control, but little is known about how training influences reorganization of ipsilateral motor representations of the trained limb. To determine whether training results in reorganization of ipsilateral motor cortex maps, rats were trained to perform the isometric pull task, an automated motor task that requires skilled forelimb use. After either 3 or 6 months of training, intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) mapping was performed to document motor representations of the trained forelimb in the hemisphere ipsilateral to that limb. Motor training for 3 months resulted in a robust expansion of right forelimb representation in the right motor cortex, demonstrating that skilled motor training drives map plasticity ipsilateral to the trained limb. After 6 months of training, the right forelimb representation in the right motor cortex was significantly smaller than the representation observed in rats trained for 3 months and similar to untrained controls, consistent with a normalization of motor cortex maps. Forelimb map area was not correlated with performance on the trained task, suggesting that task performance is maintained despite normalization of cortical maps. This study provides new insights into how the ipsilateral cortex changes in response to skilled learning and may inform rehabilitative strategies to enhance cortical plasticity to support recovery after brain injury. PMID:27392641

  14. Long-Term Potentiation in the Motor Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriki, Atsushi; Pavlides, Constantine; Keller, Asaf; Asanuma, Hiroshi

    1989-09-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a model for learning and memory processes. Tetanic stimulation of the sensory cortex produces LTP in motor cortical neurons, whereas tetanization of the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus, which also projects to the motor cortex, does not. However, after simultaneous high-frequency stimulation of both the sensory cortex and the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus, LTP of thalamic input to motor cortical neurons is induced. This associative LTP occurs only in neurons in the superficial layers of the motor cortex that receive monosynaptic input from both the sensory cortex and the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus. Associative LTP in the motor cortex may constitute a basis for the retention of motor skills.

  15. Neuronal correlates of auditory induction in the cat cortex.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Y

    1997-03-24

    Cells in the cat primary auditory cortex (A1) were investigated to see whether they could integrate sound signals over time. A1 cells responded well to frequency-modulated sweeps. When a portion of the sweep was replaced by silence the response was weakened considerably. However, the response strength was restored when the silent portion was replaced by a burst of band noise, even though the cells did not respond to the burst of noise alone. These results indicate that A1 cells do not respond simply to instantaneous characteristics of acoustic stimuli but respond to those integrated over time. PMID:9175104

  16. Interhemispheric Synchronization of Oscillatory Neuronal Responses in Cat Visual Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas K.; Konig, Peter; Kreiter, Andreas K.; Singer, Wolf

    1991-05-01

    Neurons in area 17 of cat visual cortex display oscillatory responses that can synchronize across spatially separate columns in a stimulus-specific way. Response synchronization has now been shown to occur also between neurons in area 17 of the right and left cerebral hemispheres. This synchronization was abolished by section of the corpus callosum. Thus, the response synchronization is mediated by corticocortical connections. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that temporal synchrony of neuronal discharges serves to bind features within and between the visual hemifields.

  17. Signals from the ventrolateral thalamus to the motor cortex during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Marlinski, Vladimir; Nilaweera, Wijitha U.; Zelenin, Pavel V.; Sirota, Mikhail G.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of the motor cortex during locomotion is profoundly modulated in the rhythm of strides. The source of modulation is not known. In this study we examined the activity of one of the major sources of afferent input to the motor cortex, the ventrolateral thalamus (VL). Experiments were conducted in chronically implanted cats with an extracellular single-neuron recording technique. VL neurons projecting to the motor cortex were identified by antidromic responses. During locomotion, the activity of 92% of neurons was modulated in the rhythm of strides; 67% of cells discharged one activity burst per stride, a pattern typical for the motor cortex. The characteristics of these discharges in most VL neurons appeared to be well suited to contribute to the locomotion-related activity of the motor cortex. In addition to simple locomotion, we examined VL activity during walking on a horizontal ladder, a task that requires vision for correct foot placement. Upon transition from simple to ladder locomotion, the activity of most VL neurons exhibited the same changes that have been reported for the motor cortex, i.e., an increase in the strength of stride-related modulation and shortening of the discharge duration. Five modes of integration of simple and ladder locomotion-related information were recognized in the VL. We suggest that, in addition to contributing to the locomotion-related activity in the motor cortex during simple locomotion, the VL integrates and transmits signals needed for correct foot placement on a complex terrain to the motor cortex. PMID:21994259

  18. Quantification of motor cortex activity and full-body biomechanics during unconstrained locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, Boris I; Sirota, Mikhail G; Gregor, Robert J; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2005-10-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of motor cortex function has been achieved primarily by simultaneously recording motor cortex neuron activity and the movement kinematics of the corresponding limb. We have expanded this approach by combining high-quality cortical single-unit activity recordings with synchronized recordings of full-body kinematics and kinetics in the freely behaving cat. The method is illustrated by selected results obtained from two cats tested while walking on a flat surface. Using this method, the activity of 43 pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) was recorded, averaged over 10 bins of a locomotion cycle, and compared with full-body mechanics by means of principal component and multivariate linear regression analyses. Patterns of 24 PTNs (56%) and 219 biomechanical variables (73%) were classified into just four groups of inter-correlated variables that accounted for 91% of the total variance, indicating that many of the recorded variables had similar patterns. The ensemble activity of different groups of two to eight PTNs accurately predicted the 10-bin patterns of all biomechanical variables (neural decoding) and vice versa; different small groups of mechanical variables accurately predicted the 10-bin pattern of each PTN (neural encoding). We conclude that comparison of motor cortex activity with full-body biomechanics may be a useful tool in further elucidating the function of the motor cortex.

  19. Statistical Signal Processing and the Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Brockwell, A.E.; Kass, R.E.; Schwartz, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few decades, developments in technology have significantly improved the ability to measure activity in the brain. This has spurred a great deal of research into brain function and its relation to external stimuli, and has important implications in medicine and other fields. As a result of improved understanding of brain function, it is now possible to build devices that provide direct interfaces between the brain and the external world. We describe some of the current understanding of function of the motor cortex region. We then discuss a typical likelihood-based state-space model and filtering based approach to address the problems associated with building a motor cortical-controlled cursor or robotic prosthetic device. As a variation on previous work using this approach, we introduce the idea of using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for parameter estimation in this context. By doing this instead of performing maximum likelihood estimation, it is possible to expand the range of possible models that can be explored, at a cost in terms of computational load. We demonstrate results obtained applying this methodology to experimental data gathered from a monkey. PMID:21765538

  20. Motor cortex activity predicts response alternation during sensorimotor decisions

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Anna-Antonia; Siegel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Our actions are constantly guided by decisions based on sensory information. The motor cortex is traditionally viewed as the final output stage in this process, merely executing motor responses based on these decisions. However, it is not clear if, beyond this role, the motor cortex itself impacts response selection. Here, we report activity fluctuations over motor cortex measured using MEG, which are unrelated to choice content and predict responses to a visuomotor task seconds before decisions are made. These fluctuations are strongly influenced by the previous trial's response and predict a tendency to switch between response alternatives for consecutive decisions. This alternation behaviour depends on the size of neural signals still present from the previous response. Our results uncover a response-alternation bias in sensorimotor decision making. Furthermore, they suggest that motor cortex is more than an output stage and instead shapes response selection during sensorimotor decision making. PMID:27713396

  1. The auditory representation of speech sounds in human motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Connie; Hamilton, Liberty S; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    In humans, listening to speech evokes neural responses in the motor cortex. This has been controversially interpreted as evidence that speech sounds are processed as articulatory gestures. However, it is unclear what information is actually encoded by such neural activity. We used high-density direct human cortical recordings while participants spoke and listened to speech sounds. Motor cortex neural patterns during listening were substantially different than during articulation of the same sounds. During listening, we observed neural activity in the superior and inferior regions of ventral motor cortex. During speaking, responses were distributed throughout somatotopic representations of speech articulators in motor cortex. The structure of responses in motor cortex during listening was organized along acoustic features similar to auditory cortex, rather than along articulatory features as during speaking. Motor cortex does not contain articulatory representations of perceived actions in speech, but rather, represents auditory vocal information. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12577.001 PMID:26943778

  2. Population analysis of single neurons in cat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Warren, R A; Dykes, R W

    1992-01-01

    Single neurons in the somatosensory cortex are divisible into a population with receptive fields and a population without receptive fields. These two populations display different laminar distributions, and their respective functions are unknown. We compared other physiological characteristics of these two neuronal populations in an attempt to understand why some neurons lack a receptive field. Only 23% of 465 neurons isolated in the somatosensory cortex of halothane-anesthetized cats displayed a cutaneous receptive field. The iontophoretic administration of glutamate uncovered input from the periphery in another 34% of the sample, leaving 43% of the neurons without evidence of peripheral input under these experimental conditions. Neurons with a receptive field were spontaneously active much more often than neurons lacking peripheral inputs, and their rates of discharge were higher. No differences were found between neurons having a receptive field uncovered with glutamate and those unaffected by glutamate. In all classes of neurons, those cells with spontaneous activity were excited by smaller amounts of glutamate than were silent neurons, but sensitivity to glutamate was not correlated with the presence or absence of a receptive field. We infer that some classes of somatosensory cortical neurons receive strong thalamocortical inputs, whereas others have only relatively weak or no thalamocortical connections. In other experiments we have shown also that those neurons lacking a receptive field and/or spontaneous activity were more likely to be plastic than those with stronger inputs (see Warren and Dykes, 1993a,b), suggesting that neurons having weaker afferent inputs can be more readily modified under certain circumstances. PMID:1362827

  3. Postnatal development of differential projections from the caudal and rostral motor cortex subregions.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Martin, J H

    2000-09-01

    The primary motor cortex of cats, monkeys, and humans has distinct rostral and caudal subregions. In the cat, projections from the caudal subregion terminate predominantly in laminae 4-6 and, from the rostral subregion, in laminae 6-8. The purpose of this study was to determine if these distinctive termination patterns are present during early postnatal development, when corticospinal axons are establishing connections with spinal neurons, or if there was postnatal refinement of the distribution of terminations. We used the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) to label selectively projections from the two subregions in immature (postnatal days 25, 35 at time of analysis) and mature animals. We compared the distribution of spinal gray matter labeling from caudal and rostral motor cortex. In immature animals, substantial bilateral terminations were present after tracer injection into either subregion. Partial axon reconstructions revealed that individual axons terminated bilaterally. The dorso-ventral laminar distribution of contralateral labeling after caudal motor cortex injections was significantly more extensive for immature than mature animals. In immature animals, most of the labeling was present in laminae 5-7 (dorsal portion). with lesser amounts in laminae 1-4 and 7 (ventral portion), 8, and 9. In mature animals, there were significant reductions in the amount of label in laminae 7-9, resulting in contraction of the labeled territory. The distribution of dorsal horn-ventral horn labeling shifted from 41% and 59% in immature animals to 77% and 23% in maturity. The distribution of contralateral labeling after rostral motor cortex injections also was different in immature and mature animals, but the changes were less extensive than for the caudal motor cortex. In immature animals, the distribution of labeling was similar to that after caudal motor cortex injections in animals of the same age. In mature animals, there was a significant reduction

  4. Contribution of different limb controllers to modulation of motor cortex neurons during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zelenin, Pavel V; Deliagina, Tatiana G; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Karayannidou, Anastasia; Dasgupta, Namrata M; Sirota, Mikhail G; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2011-03-23

    During locomotion, neurons in motor cortex exhibit profound step-related frequency modulation. The source of this modulation is unclear. The aim of this study was to reveal the contribution of different limb controllers (locomotor mechanisms of individual limbs) to the periodic modulation of motor cortex neurons during locomotion. Experiments were conducted in chronically instrumented cats. The activity of single neurons was recorded during regular quadrupedal locomotion (control), as well as when only one pair of limbs (fore, hind, right, or left) was walking while another pair was standing. Comparison of the modulation patterns in these neurons (their discharge profile with respect to the step cycle) during control and different bipedal locomotor tasks revealed several groups of neurons that receive distinct combinations of inputs from different limb controllers. In the majority (73%) of neurons from the forelimb area of motor cortex, modulation during control was determined exclusively by forelimb controllers (right, left, or both), while in the minority (27%), hindlimb controllers also contributed. By contrast, only in 30% of neurons from the hindlimb area was modulation determined exclusively by hindlimb controllers (right or both), while in 70% of them, the controllers of forelimbs also contributed. We suggest that such organization of inputs allows the motor cortex to contribute to the right-left limbs' coordination within each of the girdles during locomotion, and that it also allows hindlimb neurons to participate in coordination of the movements of the hindlimbs with those of the forelimbs.

  5. Body stability and muscle and motor cortex activity during walking with wide stance

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Bulgakova, Margarita A.; Beloozerova, Irina N.; Sirota, Mikhail G.

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical and neural mechanisms of balance control during walking are still poorly understood. In this study, we examined the body dynamic stability, activity of limb muscles, and activity of motor cortex neurons [primarily pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs)] in the cat during unconstrained walking and walking with a wide base of support (wide-stance walking). By recording three-dimensional full-body kinematics we found for the first time that during unconstrained walking the cat is dynamically unstable in the forward direction during stride phases when only two diagonal limbs support the body. In contrast to standing, an increased lateral between-paw distance during walking dramatically decreased the cat's body dynamic stability in double-support phases and prompted the cat to spend more time in three-legged support phases. Muscles contributing to abduction-adduction actions had higher activity during stance, while flexor muscles had higher activity during swing of wide-stance walking. The overwhelming majority of neurons in layer V of the motor cortex, 82% and 83% in the forelimb and hindlimb representation areas, respectively, were active differently during wide-stance walking compared with unconstrained condition, most often by having a different depth of stride-related frequency modulation along with a different mean discharge rate and/or preferred activity phase. Upon transition from unconstrained to wide-stance walking, proximal limb-related neuronal groups subtly but statistically significantly shifted their activity toward the swing phase, the stride phase where most of body instability occurs during this task. The data suggest that the motor cortex participates in maintenance of body dynamic stability during locomotion. PMID:24790167

  6. Body stability and muscle and motor cortex activity during walking with wide stance.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Brad J; Bulgakova, Margarita A; Beloozerova, Irina N; Sirota, Mikhail G; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2014-08-01

    Biomechanical and neural mechanisms of balance control during walking are still poorly understood. In this study, we examined the body dynamic stability, activity of limb muscles, and activity of motor cortex neurons [primarily pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs)] in the cat during unconstrained walking and walking with a wide base of support (wide-stance walking). By recording three-dimensional full-body kinematics we found for the first time that during unconstrained walking the cat is dynamically unstable in the forward direction during stride phases when only two diagonal limbs support the body. In contrast to standing, an increased lateral between-paw distance during walking dramatically decreased the cat's body dynamic stability in double-support phases and prompted the cat to spend more time in three-legged support phases. Muscles contributing to abduction-adduction actions had higher activity during stance, while flexor muscles had higher activity during swing of wide-stance walking. The overwhelming majority of neurons in layer V of the motor cortex, 82% and 83% in the forelimb and hindlimb representation areas, respectively, were active differently during wide-stance walking compared with unconstrained condition, most often by having a different depth of stride-related frequency modulation along with a different mean discharge rate and/or preferred activity phase. Upon transition from unconstrained to wide-stance walking, proximal limb-related neuronal groups subtly but statistically significantly shifted their activity toward the swing phase, the stride phase where most of body instability occurs during this task. The data suggest that the motor cortex participates in maintenance of body dynamic stability during locomotion.

  7. Primary Motor Cortex Involvement in Initial Learning during Visuomotor Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riek, Stephan; Hinder, Mark R.; Carson, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Human motor behaviour is continually modified on the basis of errors between desired and actual movement outcomes. It is emerging that the role played by the primary motor cortex (M1) in this process is contingent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the task being performed, and the stage of learning. Here we used repetitive TMS to…

  8. Physiology of the motor cortex in polio survivors.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Vitalie D; Danielian, Laura; Johnsen, Jacqueline A; Vasconcelos, Olavo M; Prokhorenko, Olga A; Jabbari, Bahman; Campbell, William W; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2008-02-01

    We hypothesized that the corticospinal system undergoes functional changes in long-term polio survivors. Central motor conduction times (CMCTs) to the four limbs were measured in 24 polio survivors using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Resting motor thresholds and CMCTs were normal. In 17 subjects whose legs were affected by polio and 13 healthy controls, single- and paired-pulse TMS was used to assess motor cortex excitability while recording from tibialis anterior (TA) muscles at rest and following maximal contraction until fatigue. In polio survivors the slope of the recruitment curve was normal, but maximal motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were larger than in controls. MEPs were depressed after fatiguing exercise. Three patients with central fatigue by twitch interpolation had a trend toward slower recovery. There was no association with symptoms of post-polio syndrome. These changes occurring after polio may allow the motor cortex to activate a greater proportion of the motor neurons innervating affected muscles.

  9. The discovery of motor cortex and its background.

    PubMed

    Gross, Charles G

    2007-01-01

    In 1870 Gustav Fritsch and Edvard Hitzig showed that electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex of a dog produced movements. This was a crucial event in the development of modern neuroscience because it was the first good experimental evidence for a) cerebral cortex involvement in motor function, b) the electrical excitability of the cortex, c) topographic representation in the brain, and d) localization of function in different regions of the cerebral cortex. This paper discusses their experiment and some developments in the previous two centuries that led to it including the ideas of Thomas Willis and Emanuel Swedenborg, the widespread interest in electricity and the localizations of function of Franz Joseph Gall, John Hughlings Jackson, and Paul Broca. We also consider the subsequent study of the motor cortex by David Ferrier and others.

  10. Long-range neuronal circuits underlying the interaction between sensory and motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Mao, Tianyi; Kusefoglu, Deniz; Hooks, Bryan M; Huber, Daniel; Petreanu, Leopoldo; Svoboda, Karel

    2011-10-01

    In the rodent vibrissal system, active sensation and sensorimotor integration are mediated in part by connections between barrel cortex and vibrissal motor cortex. Little is known about how these structures interact at the level of neurons. We used Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expression, combined with anterograde and retrograde labeling, to map connections between barrel cortex and pyramidal neurons in mouse motor cortex. Barrel cortex axons preferentially targeted upper layer (L2/3, L5A) neurons in motor cortex; input to neurons projecting back to barrel cortex was particularly strong. Barrel cortex input to deeper layers (L5B, L6) of motor cortex, including neurons projecting to the brainstem, was weak, despite pronounced geometric overlap of dendrites with axons from barrel cortex. Neurons in different layers received barrel cortex input within stereotyped dendritic domains. The cortico-cortical neurons in superficial layers of motor cortex thus couple motor and sensory signals and might mediate sensorimotor integration and motor learning.

  11. Similarities between GCS and human motor cortex: complex movement coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos

    2014-07-01

    The "Gran Telescopio de Canarias" (GTC1) is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). The GTC control system (GCS), the brain of the telescope, is is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. On the other hand, the Human motor cortex (HMC) is a region of the cerebrum responsible for the coordination of planning, control, and executing voluntary movements. If we analyze both systems, as far as the movement control of their mechanisms and body parts is concerned, we can find extraordinary similarities in their architectures. Both are structured in layers, and their functionalities are comparable from the movement conception until the movement action itself: In the GCS we can enumerate the Sequencer high level components, the Coordination libraries, the Control Kit library and the Device Driver library as the subsystems involved in the telescope movement control. If we look at the motor cortex, we can also enumerate the primary motor cortex, the secondary motor cortices, which include the posterior parietal cortex, the premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area (SMA), the motor units, the sensory organs and the basal ganglia. From all these components/areas we will analyze in depth the several subcortical regions, of the the motor cortex, that are involved in organizing motor programs for complex movements and the GCS coordination framework, which is composed by a set of classes that allow to the high level components to transparently control a group of mechanisms simultaneously.

  12. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Primary Motor Cortex Interferes with Motor Learning by Observing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Liana E.; Wilson, Elizabeth T.; Gribble, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Neural representations of novel motor skills can be acquired through visual observation. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to test the idea that this "motor learning by observing" is based on engagement of neural processes for learning in the primary motor cortex (M1). Human subjects who observed another person learning…

  13. Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Antonio; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Arias, Pablo; Panyavin, Ivan; Foffani, Guglielmo; Aguilar, Juan

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in healthy humans the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of static magnetic fields through the scalp. Static magnetic fields were obtained by using cylindrical NdFeB magnets. We performed four sets of experiments. In Experiment 1, we recorded motor potentials evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex before and after 10 min of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in conscious subjects. We observed an average reduction of motor cortex excitability of up to 25%, as revealed by TMS, which lasted for several minutes after the end of tSMS, and was dose dependent (intensity of the magnetic field) but not polarity dependent. In Experiment 2, we confirmed the reduction of motor cortex excitability induced by tSMS using a double-blind sham-controlled design. In Experiment 3, we investigated the duration of tSMS that was necessary to modulate motor cortex excitability. We found that 10 min of tSMS (compared to 1 min and 5 min) were necessary to induce significant effects. In Experiment 4, we used transcranial electric stimulation (TES) to establish that the tSMS-induced reduction of motor cortex excitability was not due to corticospinal axon and/or spinal excitability, but specifically involved intracortical networks. These results suggest that tSMS using small static magnets may be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, and reversible way.

  14. Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Antonio; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Arias, Pablo; Panyavin, Ivan; Foffani, Guglielmo; Aguilar, Juan

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in healthy humans the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of static magnetic fields through the scalp. Static magnetic fields were obtained by using cylindrical NdFeB magnets. We performed four sets of experiments. In Experiment 1, we recorded motor potentials evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex before and after 10 min of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in conscious subjects. We observed an average reduction of motor cortex excitability of up to 25%, as revealed by TMS, which lasted for several minutes after the end of tSMS, and was dose dependent (intensity of the magnetic field) but not polarity dependent. In Experiment 2, we confirmed the reduction of motor cortex excitability induced by tSMS using a double-blind sham-controlled design. In Experiment 3, we investigated the duration of tSMS that was necessary to modulate motor cortex excitability. We found that 10 min of tSMS (compared to 1 min and 5 min) were necessary to induce significant effects. In Experiment 4, we used transcranial electric stimulation (TES) to establish that the tSMS-induced reduction of motor cortex excitability was not due to corticospinal axon and/or spinal excitability, but specifically involved intracortical networks. These results suggest that tSMS using small static magnets may be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, and reversible way. PMID:21807616

  15. Seeing fearful body language rapidly freezes the observer's motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Vitale, Francesca; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-04-01

    Fearful body language is a salient signal alerting the observer to the presence of a potential threat in the surrounding environment. Although detecting potential threats may trigger an immediate reduction of motor output in animals (i.e., freezing behavior), it is unclear at what point in time similar reductions occur in the human motor cortex and whether they originate from excitatory or inhibitory processes. Using single-pulse and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), here we tested the hypothesis that the observer's motor cortex implements extremely fast suppression of motor readiness when seeing emotional bodies - and fearful body expressions in particular. Participants observed pictures of body postures and categorized them as happy, fearful or neutral while receiving TMS over the right or left motor cortex at 100-125 msec after picture onset. In three different sessions, we assessed corticospinal excitability, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF). Independently of the stimulated hemisphere and the time of the stimulation, watching fearful bodies suppressed ICF relative to happy and neutral body expressions. Moreover, happy expressions reduced ICF relative to neutral actions. No changes in corticospinal excitability or SICI were found during the task. These findings show extremely rapid bilateral modulation of the motor cortices when seeing emotional bodies, with stronger suppression of motor readiness when seeing fearful bodies. Our results provide neurophysiological support for the evolutionary notions that emotion perception is inherently linked to action systems and that fear-related cues induce an urgent mobilization of motor reactions.

  16. Motor cortex guides selection of predictable movement targets.

    PubMed

    Woodgate, Philip J W; Strauss, Soeren; Sami, Saber A; Heinke, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The present paper asks whether the motor cortex contributes to prediction-based guidance of target selection. This question was inspired by recent evidence that suggests (i) recurrent connections from the motor system into the attentional system may extract movement-relevant perceptual information and (ii) that the motor cortex cannot only generate predictions of the sensory consequences of movements but may also operate as predictor of perceptual events in general. To test this idea we employed a choice reaching task requiring participants to rapidly reach and touch a predictable or unpredictable colour target. Motor cortex activity was modulated via transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In Experiment 1 target colour repetitions were predictable. Under such conditions anodal tDCS facilitated selection versus sham and cathodal tDCS. This improvement was apparent for trajectory curvature but not movement initiation. Conversely, where no predictability of colour was embedded reach performance was unaffected by tDCS. Finally, the results of a key-press experiment suggested that motor cortex involvement is restricted to tasks where the predictable target colour is movement-relevant. The outcomes are interpreted as evidence that the motor system contributes to the top-down guidance of selective attention to movement targets.

  17. A little more conversation, a little less action - candidate roles for motor cortex in speech perception

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Sophie K; McGettigan, Carolyn; Eisner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The motor theory of speech perception assumes that activation of the motor system is essential in the perception of speech. However, deficits in speech perception and comprehension do not arise from damage that is restricted to the motor cortex, few functional imaging studies reveal activity in motor cortex during speech perception, and the motor cortex is strongly activated by many different sound categories. Here, we evaluate alternative roles for the motor cortex in spoken communication and suggest a specific role in sensorimotor processing in conversation. We argue that motor-cortex activation it is essential in joint speech, particularly for the timing of turn-taking. PMID:19277052

  18. Amphetamine accelerates recovery of locomotor function following bilateral frontal cortex ablation in cats.

    PubMed

    Sutton, R L; Hovda, D A; Feeney, D M

    1989-08-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that d-amphetamine hastens recovery of beam-walking ability following unilateral sensorimotor or frontal cortex ablation (Hovda & Feeney, 1984). In this study, after bilateral frontal cortex ablation, cats given injections of d-amphetamine showed an enduring acceleration of recovery of beam-walking ability relative to saline controls. In general, rates of spontaneous and drug-induced recovery in cats with bilateral lesions were similar to those previously reported for cats with unilateral ablations. These results indicate that the bilateral corticostriate and corticothalamic projections from the contralateral homotopic cortex do not mediate the beneficial effects of d-amphetamine on locomotor recovery after unilateral cortical ablation. PMID:2765187

  19. Motor field sensitivity for preoperative localization of motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter T.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2014-01-01

    Object In this study the role of magnetic source imaging for preoperative motor mapping was evaluated by using a single-dipole localization method to analyze motor field data in 41 patients. Methods Data from affected and unaffected hemispheres were collected in patients performing voluntary finger flexion movements. Somatosensory evoked field (SSEF) data were also obtained using tactile stimulation. Dipole localization using motor field (MF) data was successful in only 49% of patients, whereas localization with movement evoked field (MEF) data was successful in 66% of patients. When the spatial distribution of MF and MEF dipoles in relation to SSEF dipoles was analyzed, the motor dipoles were not spatially distinct from somatosensory dipoles. Conclusions The findings in this study suggest that single-dipole localization for the analysis of motor data is not sufficiently sensitive and is nonspecific, and thus not clinically useful. PMID:17044563

  20. Anatomy and innervation ratios in motor units of cat gastrocnemius

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R. E.; Tsairis, P.

    1973-01-01

    1. Muscle fibres belonging to single motor units of identified type were studied in frozen sections of cat medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. Reconstruction of the distribution of fibres in individual units showed that the territories of all three physiological types present in the cat medial gastrocnemius were quite extensive. Within its territory, fibres belonging to the studied unit were distributed more or less uniformly without localized collections. The density of unit fibres suggests that, in cat medial gastrocnemius, a given region of the muscle may be shared by as many as fifty different muscle units. 2. Direct determination of innervation ratios in identified muscle units required complete reconstruction of the three-dimensional distribution of unit fibres within the whole medial gastrocnemius. Satisfactory results were obtained with two type FF units and one type FR unit. 3. Indirect estimates of the average innervation ratios expected for muscle units of different physiological type were obtained using counts of muscle fibres with characteristic histochemical profiles and data on relative frequencies of motor units of known type in the medial gastrocnemius unit pool. Such indirect estimates of innervation ratios agreed with the results of direct fibre counts in identified units for types FF and FR muscle units. Taken in sum, the available evidence suggests that an average muscle unit in the cat medial gastrocnemius contains between 400 and 800 muscle fibres, irrespective of physiological type. 4. Tension production by single muscle units depends on a number of factors, including innervation ratio, the cross-sectional areas of unit fibres and the specific tension outputs of the unit fibres. The present results suggest that the specific tension output of gastrocnemius type S unit muscle fibres is considerably smaller (about 0·6 kg/cm2) than in either FF units (about 1·5-2·0 kg/cm2) or type FR units (2·6-2·9 kg/cm2). PMID:4148753

  1. Modification of motor cortex excitability during muscle relaxation in motor learning.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kenichi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Suzuki, Tomotaka; Saitoh, Kei; Higashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We postulated that gradual muscle relaxation during motor learning would dynamically change activity in the primary motor cortex (M1) and modify short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Thus, we compared changes in M1 excitability both pre and post motor learning during gradual muscle relaxation. Thirteen healthy participants were asked to gradually relax their muscles from an isometric right wrist extension (30% maximum voluntary contraction; MVC) using a tracking task for motor learning. Single or paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied at either 20% or 80% of the downward force output during muscle release from 30% MVC, and we compared the effects of motor learning immediately after the 1st and 10th blocks. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from the extensor and flexor carpi radialis (ECR and FCR) were then measured and compared to evaluate their relationship before and after motor learning. In both muscles and each downward force output, motor cortex excitability during muscle relaxation was significantly increased following motor learning. In the ECR, the SICI in the 10th block was significantly increased during the 80% waveform decline compared to the SICI in the 1st block. In the FCR, the SICI also exhibited a greater inhibitory effect when muscle relaxation was terminated following motor learning. During motor training, acquisition of the ability to control muscle relaxation increased the SICI in both the ECR and FCR during motor termination. This finding aids in our understanding of the cortical mechanisms that underlie muscle relaxation during motor learning.

  2. Cerebellar Processing of Sensory Inputs Primes Motor Cortex Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, B.; Hubsch, C.; Pradeep, S.; Roze, E.; Vidailhet, M.; Meunier, S.; Kishore, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity of the human primary motor cortex (M1) has a critical role in motor control and learning. The cerebellum facilitates these functions using sensory feedback. We investigated whether cerebellar processing of sensory afferent information influences the plasticity of the primary motor cortex (M1). Theta-burst stimulation protocols (TBS), both excitatory and inhibitory, were used to modulate the excitability of the posterior cerebellar cortex and to condition an ongoing M1 plasticity. M1 plasticity was subsequently induced in 2 different ways: by paired associative stimulation (PAS) involving sensory processing and TBS that exclusively involves intracortical circuits of M1. Cerebellar excitation attenuated the PAS-induced M1 plasticity, whereas cerebellar inhibition enhanced and prolonged it. Furthermore, cerebellar inhibition abolished the topography-specific response of PAS-induced M1 plasticity, with the effects spreading to adjacent motor maps. Conversely, cerebellar excitation had no effect on the TBS-induced M1 plasticity. This demonstrates the key role of the cerebellum in priming M1 plasticity, and we propose that it is likely to occur at the thalamic or olivo-dentate nuclear level by influencing the sensory processing. We suggest that such a cerebellar priming of M1 plasticity could shape the impending motor command by favoring or inhibiting the recruitment of several muscle representations. PMID:22351647

  3. Dopamine Promotes Motor Cortex Plasticity and Motor Skill Learning via PLC Activation.

    PubMed

    Rioult-Pedotti, Mengia-Seraina; Pekanovic, Ana; Atiemo, Clement Osei; Marshall, John; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, the major midbrain nucleus projecting to the motor cortex, play a key role in motor skill learning and motor cortex synaptic plasticity. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists exert parallel effects in the motor system: they impair motor skill learning and reduce long-term potentiation. Traditionally, D1 and D2 receptor modulate adenylyl cyclase activity and cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation in opposite directions via different G-proteins and bidirectionally modulate protein kinase A (PKA), leading to distinct physiological and behavioral effects. Here we show that D1 and D2 receptor activity influences motor skill acquisition and long term synaptic potentiation via phospholipase C (PLC) activation in rat primary motor cortex. Learning a new forelimb reaching task is severely impaired in the presence of PLC, but not PKA-inhibitor. Similarly, long term potentiation in motor cortex, a mechanism involved in motor skill learning, is reduced when PLC is inhibited but remains unaffected by the PKA inhibitor. Skill learning deficits and reduced synaptic plasticity caused by dopamine antagonists are prevented by co-administration of a PLC agonist. These results provide evidence for a role of intracellular PLC signaling in motor skill learning and associated cortical synaptic plasticity, challenging the traditional view of bidirectional modulation of PKA by D1 and D2 receptors. These findings reveal a novel and important action of dopamine in motor cortex that might be a future target for selective therapeutic interventions to support learning and recovery of movement resulting from injury and disease.

  4. Robust neuronal dynamics in premotor cortex during motor planning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nuo; Daie, Kayvon; Svoboda, Karel; Druckmann, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity maintains representations that bridge past and future events, often over many seconds. Network models can produce persistent and ramping activity, but the positive feedback that is critical for these slow dynamics can cause sensitivity to perturbations. Here we use electrophysiology and optogenetic perturbations in mouse premotor cortex to probe robustness of persistent neural representations during motor planning. Preparatory activity is remarkably robust to large-scale unilateral silencing: detailed neural dynamics that drive specific future movements were quickly and selectively restored by the network. Selectivity did not recover after bilateral silencing of premotor cortex. Perturbations to one hemisphere are thus corrected by information from the other hemisphere. Corpus callosum bisections demonstrated that premotor cortex hemispheres can maintain preparatory activity independently. Redundancy across selectively coupled modules, as we observed in premotor cortex, is a hallmark of robust control systems. Network models incorporating these principles show robustness that is consistent with data. PMID:27074502

  5. Motor cortex excitability in vascular depression.

    PubMed

    Bella, Rita; Ferri, Raffaele; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Pennisi, Manuela; Lanza, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Spampinato, Concetto; Giordano, Daniela; Raggi, Alberto; Pennisi, Giovanni

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate excitatory/inhibitory intracortical circuit changes in patients with vascular depression, and whether there are any interhemispheric differences of motor cortical excitability. Fifteen vascular depressed elderly (VD), ten nondepressed subcortical vascular disease patients (SVD) and ten age-matched controls underwent bilateral motor threshold and paired-pulse studies. They were also assessed for their brain vascular burden at MRI and neuropsychological profile. Executive dysfunction and apathy were significantly higher in VD; we were unable to find significant differences in resting motor threshold, cortical silent period and paired-pulse curves between VD, SVD and controls, and between the two hemispheres in the VD group. Our findings might suggest that neurophysiological mechanisms underlying VD differ from those previously reported in Major Depression (reduced excitability in the left hemisphere) and seem to be similar to those of patients with SVD. Our findings also, support the "vascular depression" hypothesis, suggesting that in VD patients the depressive syndrome is not the primary disease but can be considered as one of the clinical manifestations in the wide symptom spectrum of the cerebral small vessel disease.

  6. Evolution of somatosensory and motor cortex in primates.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Jon H

    2004-11-01

    Inferences about how the complex somatosensory systems of anthropoid primates evolved are based on comparative studies of such systems in extant mammals. Experimental studies of members of the major clades of extant mammals suggest that somatosensory cortex of early mammals consisted of only a few areas, including a primary area, S1, bordered by strip-like rostral and caudal somatosensory fields, SR and SC. In addition, the second somatosensory area, S2, and the parietal ventral area, PV, were probably present. S1, S2, and PV were activated independently via parallel projections from the ventroposterior nucleus, VP. Little posterior parietal cortex existed, and it was unlikely that a separate primary motor area, M1, existed until placental mammals evolved. Early primates retained this basic organization and also had a larger posterior parietal region that mediated sensorimotor functions via connections with motor and premotor areas. The frontal cortex included M1, dorsal and ventral premotor areas, supplementary motor area, and cingulate motor fields. Ventroposterior superior and ventroposterior inferior nuclei were distinct from the ventroposterior nucleus in the thalamus. In early anthropoid primates, areas S1, SR, and SC had differentiated into the fields now recognized as areas 3b, 3a, and 1. Areas 3b and 1 contained parallel mirror-image representations of cutaneous receptors and a parallel representation in area 2 was probable. Serial processing became dominant, so that neurons in areas 1, S2, and PV became dependent on area 3b for activation. Posterior parietal cortex expanded into more areas that related to frontal cortex. Less is known about changes that might have occurred with the emergence of apes and humans, but their brains were larger and posed scaling problems most likely solved by increasing the number of cortical areas and reducing the proportion of long connections.

  7. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System.

    PubMed

    Williams, Preston T J A; Martin, John H

    2015-09-30

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. Significance statement: Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  8. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Preston T.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  9. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System.

    PubMed

    Williams, Preston T J A; Martin, John H

    2015-09-30

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. Significance statement: Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  10. A systematic review of non-motor rTMS induced motor cortex plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Nordmann, Grégory; Azorina, Valeriya; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Motor cortex excitability can be measured by single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce neuroplastic effects in stimulated and in functionally connected cortical regions. Due to its ability to non-invasively modulate cortical activity, rTMS has been investigated for the treatment of various neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, such studies revealed a high variability of both clinical and neuronal effects induced by rTMS. In order to better elucidate this meta-plasticity, rTMS-induced changes in motor cortex excitability have been monitored in various studies in a pre-post stimulation design. Here, we give a literature review of studies investigating motor cortex excitability changes as a neuronal marker for rTMS effects over non-motor cortical areas. A systematic literature review in April 2014 resulted in 29 articles in which motor cortex excitability was assessed before and after rTMS over non-motor areas. The majority of the studies focused on the stimulation of one of three separate cortical areas: the prefrontal area (17 studies), the cerebellum (8 studies), or the temporal cortex (3 studies). One study assessed the effects of multi-site rTMS. Most studies investigated healthy controls but some also stimulated patients with neuropsychiatric conditions (e.g., affective disorders, tinnitus). Methods and findings of the identified studies were highly variable showing no clear systematic pattern of interaction of non-motor rTMS with measures of motor cortex excitability. Based on the available literature, the measurement of motor cortex excitability changes before and after non-motor rTMS has only limited value in the investigation of rTMS related meta-plasticity as a neuronal state or as a trait marker for neuropsychiatric diseases. Our results do not suggest that there are systematic alterations of cortical excitability changes during rTMS treatment, which calls

  11. Is one motor cortex enough for two hands?

    PubMed

    Fiori, Simona; Staudt, Martin; Pannek, Kerstin; Borghetti, Davide; Biagi, Laura; Scelfo, Danilo; Rose, Stephen E; Tosetti, Michela; Cioni, Giovanni; Guzzetta, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    We report on a patient with mirror movements sustained by a mono-hemispheric fast control of bilateral hand muscles and normal hand function. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the right motor cortex evoked contractions of muscles in both hands while no responses were observed from the left hemisphere. Somatosensory-evoked potentials, functional magnetic resonance, and diffusion tractography showed evidence of sensorimotor dissociation and asymmetry of corticospinal projections, suggestive of reorganization after early unilateral left brain lesion. This is the first evidence that, in certain rare conditions, good hand function is possible with ipsilateral corticospinal reorganization, supporting the role of unexplored mechanisms of motor recovery. PMID:26104046

  12. Measurements of evoked electroencephalograph by transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to motor cortex and posterior parietal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahashi, Masakuni; Koyama, Yohei; Hyodo, Akira; Hayami, Takehito; Ueno, Shoogo; Iramina, Keiji

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the functional connectivity, the evoked potentials by stimulating at the motor cortex, the posterior parietal cortex, and the cerebellum by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were measured. It is difficult to measure the evoked electroencephalograph (EEG) by the magnetic stimulation because of the large artifact induced by the magnetic pulse. We used an EEG measurement system with sample-and-hold circuit and an independent component analysis to eliminate the electromagnetic interaction emitted from TMS. It was possible to measure EEG signals from all electrodes over the head within 10 ms after applying the TMS. When the motor area was stimulated by TMS, the spread of evoked electrical activity to the contralateral hemisphere was observed at 20 ms after stimulation. However, when the posterior parietal cortex was stimulated, the evoked electrical activity to the contralateral hemisphere was not observed. When the cerebellum was stimulated, the cortical activity propagated from the stimulated point to the frontal area and the contralateral hemisphere at around 20 ms after stimulation. These results suggest that the motor area has a strong interhemispheric connection and the posterior parietal cortex has no interhemispheric connection.

  13. Magnetoelectrical stimulation of motor cortex in children with motor disturbances.

    PubMed

    Müller, K; Hömberg, V; Aulich, A; Lenard, H G

    1992-04-01

    Transcranial magnetoelectrical stimulation (TMS) is now widely used as a diagnostic tool in adults. In this study we report our experiences with this technique in children with central motor disturbances. We used a Cadwell MES10 magnetoelectrical stimulator with a maximal magnetic field of 2 tesla. The stimulation procedure followed a standardized protocol, with the patients being as relaxed as possible in order to avoid contamination of parameters with different preinnervational levels. Stimulation data were compared to a data base obtained in 58 normal children. The first group of patients consisted of 20 children aged from 7 months to 16 years with hemiparesis of different etiologies. Neuroimaging data were correlated with the results of magnetoelectrical stimulation. In 13 patients a pathological pattern of TMS could be detected, and in 7 of these a corresponding lesion of the cortico-spinal tract was found in CT or MRI scans. In 7 children TMS was normal, in spite of a clear-cut lesion of the cortico-spinal tract in CT or MRI scans in 4 of them. The second group of patients consisted of 16 children with extrapyramidal disease, mostly of hereditary origin, such as DOPA-responsive dystonia or benign hereditary chorea. TMS showed a normal response pattern in this group. We discuss problems and possible pitfalls in TMS in childhood in evaluating the diagnostic value of TMS. At the moment the diagnostic usefulness of TMS in children with motor disturbances appears limited and calls for careful interpretation. PMID:1373370

  14. Musical groove modulates motor cortex excitability: a TMS investigation.

    PubMed

    Stupacher, Jan; Hove, Michael J; Novembre, Giacomo; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone; Keller, Peter E

    2013-07-01

    Groove is often described as a musical quality that can induce movement in a listener. This study examines the effects of listening to groove music on corticospinal excitability. Musicians and non-musicians listened to high-groove music, low-groove music, and spectrally matched noise, while receiving single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex either on-beat or off-beat. We examined changes in the amplitude of the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), recorded from hand and arm muscles, as an index of activity within the motor system. Musicians and non-musicians rated groove similarly. MEP results showed that high-groove music modulated corticospinal excitability, whereas no difference occurred between low-groove music and noise. More specifically, musicians' MEPs were larger with high-groove than low-groove music, and this effect was especially pronounced for on-beat compared to off-beat pulses. These results indicate that high-groove music increasingly engages the motor system, and the temporal modulation of corticospinal excitability with the beat could stem from tight auditory-motor links in musicians. Conversely, non-musicians' MEPs were smaller for high-groove than low-groove music, and there was no effect of on- versus off-beat pulses, potentially stemming from suppression of overt movement. In sum, high-groove music engages the motor system, and previous training modulates how listening to music with a strong groove activates the motor system.

  15. Cerebellum to motor cortex paired associative stimulation induces bidirectional STDP-like plasticity in human motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Kuei; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is crucially important for motor control and adaptation. Recent non-invasive brain stimulation studies have indicated the possibility to alter the excitability of the cerebellum and its projections to the contralateral motor cortex, with behavioral consequences on motor control and adaptation. Here we sought to induce bidirectional spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP)-like modifications of motor cortex (M1) excitability by application of paired associative stimulation (PAS) in healthy subjects. Conditioning stimulation over the right lateral cerebellum (CB) preceded focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left M1 hand area at an interstimulus interval of 2 ms (CB→M1 PAS2 ms), 6 ms (CB→M1 PAS6 ms) or 10 ms (CB→M1 PAS10 ms) or randomly alternating intervals of 2 and 10 ms (CB→M1 PASControl). Effects of PAS on M1 excitability were assessed by the motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cerebellar-motor cortex inhibition (CBI) in the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the right hand. CB→M1 PAS2 ms resulted in MEP potentiation, CB→M1 PAS6 ms and CB→M1 PAS10 ms in MEP depression, and CB→M1 PASControl in no change. The MEP changes lasted for 30–60 min after PAS. SICI and CBI decreased non-specifically after all PAS protocols, while ICF remained unaltered. The physiological mechanisms underlying these MEP changes are carefully discussed. Findings support the notion of bidirectional STDP-like plasticity in M1 mediated by associative stimulation of the cerebello-dentato-thalamo-cortical pathway and M1. Future studies may investigate the behavioral significance of this plasticity. PMID:23049508

  16. Functional Plasticity in Somatosensory Cortex Supports Motor Learning by Observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Gribble, Paul L

    2016-04-01

    An influential idea in neuroscience is that the sensory-motor system is activated when observing the actions of others [1, 2]. This idea has recently been extended to motor learning, in which observation results in sensory-motor plasticity and behavioral changes in both motor and somatosensory domains [3-9]. However, it is unclear how the brain maps visual information onto motor circuits for learning. Here we test the idea that the somatosensory system, and specifically primary somatosensory cortex (S1), plays a role in motor learning by observing. In experiment 1, we applied stimulation to the median nerve to occupy the somatosensory system with unrelated inputs while participants observed a tutor learning to reach in a force field. Stimulation disrupted motor learning by observing in a limb-specific manner. Stimulation delivered to the right arm (the same arm used by the tutor) disrupted learning, whereas left arm stimulation did not. This is consistent with the idea that a somatosensory representation of the observed effector must be available during observation for learning to occur. In experiment 2, we assessed S1 cortical processing before and after observation by measuring somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) associated with median nerve stimulation. SEP amplitudes increased only for participants who observed learning. Moreover, SEPs increased more for participants who exhibited greater motor learning following observation. Taken together, these findings support the idea that motor learning by observing relies on functional plasticity in S1. We propose that visual signals about the movements of others are mapped onto motor circuits for learning via the somatosensory system.

  17. Functional Plasticity in Somatosensory Cortex Supports Motor Learning by Observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Gribble, Paul L

    2016-04-01

    An influential idea in neuroscience is that the sensory-motor system is activated when observing the actions of others [1, 2]. This idea has recently been extended to motor learning, in which observation results in sensory-motor plasticity and behavioral changes in both motor and somatosensory domains [3-9]. However, it is unclear how the brain maps visual information onto motor circuits for learning. Here we test the idea that the somatosensory system, and specifically primary somatosensory cortex (S1), plays a role in motor learning by observing. In experiment 1, we applied stimulation to the median nerve to occupy the somatosensory system with unrelated inputs while participants observed a tutor learning to reach in a force field. Stimulation disrupted motor learning by observing in a limb-specific manner. Stimulation delivered to the right arm (the same arm used by the tutor) disrupted learning, whereas left arm stimulation did not. This is consistent with the idea that a somatosensory representation of the observed effector must be available during observation for learning to occur. In experiment 2, we assessed S1 cortical processing before and after observation by measuring somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) associated with median nerve stimulation. SEP amplitudes increased only for participants who observed learning. Moreover, SEPs increased more for participants who exhibited greater motor learning following observation. Taken together, these findings support the idea that motor learning by observing relies on functional plasticity in S1. We propose that visual signals about the movements of others are mapped onto motor circuits for learning via the somatosensory system. PMID:26972317

  18. Cortical response field dynamics in cat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Dahlia; Jancke, Dirk; Chavane, Frédéric; Na'aman, Shmuel; Grinvald, Amiram

    2007-12-01

    Little is known about the "inverse" of the receptive field--the region of cortical space whose spatiotemporal pattern of electrical activity is influenced by a given sensory stimulus. We refer to this activated area as the cortical response field, the properties of which remain unexplored. Here, the dynamics of cortical response fields evoked in visual cortex by small, local drifting-oriented gratings were explored using voltage-sensitive dyes. We found that the cortical response field was often characterized by a plateau of activity, beyond the rim of which activity diminished quickly. Plateau rim location was largely independent of stimulus orientation. However, approximately 20 ms following plateau onset, 1-3 peaks emerged on it and were amplified for 25 ms. Spiking was limited to the peak zones, whose location strongly depended on stimulus orientation. Thus, alongside selective amplification of a spatially restricted suprathreshold response, wider activation to just below threshold encompasses all orientation domains within a well-defined retinotopic vicinity of the current stimulus, priming the cortex for processing of subsequent stimuli. PMID:17395608

  19. Transspinal direct current stimulation immediately modifies motor cortex sensorimotor maps

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiguo; Truong, Dennis Q.; Bikson, Marom

    2015-01-01

    Motor cortex (MCX) motor representation reorganization occurs after injury, learning, and different long-term stimulation paradigms. The neuromodulatory approach of transspinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) has been used to promote evoked cortical motor responses. In the present study, we used cathodal tsDCS (c-tsDCS) of the rat cervical cord to determine if spinal cord activation can modify the MCX forelimb motor map. We used a finite-element method model based on coregistered high-resolution rat MRI and microcomputed tomography imaging data to predict spinal current density to target stimulation to the caudal cervical enlargement. We examined the effects of cathodal and anodal tsDCS on the H-reflex and c-tsDCS on responses evoked by intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). To determine if cervical c-tsDCS also modified MCX somatic sensory processing, we examined sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) produced by wrist electrical stimulation and induced changes in ongoing activity. Cervical c-tsDCS enhanced the H-reflex, and anodal depressed the H-reflex. Using cathodal stimulation to examine cortical effects, we found that cervical c-tsDCS immediately modified the forelimb MCX motor map, with decreased thresholds and an expanded area. c-tsDCS also increased SEP amplitude in the MCX. The magnitude of changes produced by c-tsDCS were greater on the motor than sensory response. Cervical c-tsDCS more strongly enhanced forelimb than hindlimb motor representation and had no effect on vibrissal representation. The finite-element model indicated current density localized to caudal cervical segments, informing forelimb motor selectivity. Our results suggest that c-tsDCS augments spinal excitability in a spatially selective manner and may improve voluntary motor function through MCX representational plasticity. PMID:25673738

  20. Implementation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in visualization of functional structures of cat visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uma Maheswari, R.; Takaoka, H.; Homma, R.; Kadono, H.; Tanifuji, M.

    2002-02-01

    We report the application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for visualizing a 1D depth resolved functional structure of cat brain in vivo. The OCT system is based on the known fact that neural activation induces structural changes such as capillary dilation and cellular swelling. Detecting these changes as an amplitude change of the scattered light, an OCT signal reflecting neural activity, i.e., functional OCT (fOCT) could be obtained. Experiments have been done to obtain a depth resolved stimulus-specific profile of activation in cat visual cortex.

  1. Amphetamine with experience promotes recovery of locomotor function after unilateral frontal cortex injury in the cat.

    PubMed

    Hovda, D A; Fenney, D M

    1984-04-30

    In cats, a single dose of D-amphetamine (AMP) given at 10 days after unilateral frontal cortex ablation produced an immediate and enduring (60 day) acceleration of beam-walking ability compared to saline control animals. Four doses of AMP at 4-day intervals promoted recovery faster than a single dose of AMP. Subjects with no beam-walking experience while under AMP intoxication were not different from saline controls after two doses of AMP. However, after 4 doses these cats recovered significantly faster than saline controls and were comparable to animals that received AMP and experience under the drug. PMID:6722561

  2. Diseases of the adrenal cortex of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, J

    1984-06-01

    Of cases of hyperadrenocorticism in small animals 80-85% are the result of adrenocortical hyperplasia. Middle-aged or older Poodles, Dachshunds, Boston Terriers and Boxers are most commonly affected, and cats rarely. Clinical signs include polydipsia, polyuria, alopecia, abdominal distension, lethargy, weakness, hepatomegaly, calcinosis cutis, testicular atrophy and anestrus. Hematologic and biochemical changes may include neutrophilia, lymphopenia, monocytosis, eosinopenia, increased blood levels of alkaline phosphatase, SGPT, cholesterol, Na and glucose, and decreased K and T4 levels. The high-dosage dexamethasone suppression test helps differentiate pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism from that caused by adrenal tumors. The low-dosage dexamethasone suppression test, determination of plasma ACTH levels, and ACTH response test are additional diagnostic aids in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease. Medical treatment involves oral use of mitotane (o,p'-DDD) at 50 mg/kg/day for 7 days and prednisone or prednisolone at 0.05 mg/kg/day. Hypophysectomy has been used with only 5% mortality in cases of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Adrenalectomy is indicated in cases of adrenal neoplasia.

  3. Motor cortex electrical stimulation augments sprouting of the corticospinal tract and promotes recovery of motor function

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, Jason B.; Martin, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal system—with its direct spinal pathway, the corticospinal tract (CST) – is the primary system for controlling voluntary movement. Our approach to CST repair after injury in mature animals was informed by our finding that activity drives establishment of connections with spinal cord circuits during postnatal development. After incomplete injury in maturity, spared CST circuits sprout, and partially restore lost function. Our approach harnesses activity to augment this injury-dependent CST sprouting and to promote function. Lesion of the medullary pyramid unilaterally eliminates all CST axons from one hemisphere and allows examination of CST sprouting from the unaffected hemisphere. We discovered that 10 days of electrical stimulation of either the spared CST or motor cortex induces CST axon sprouting that partially reconstructs the lost CST. Stimulation also leads to sprouting of the cortical projection to the magnocellular red nucleus, where the rubrospinal tract originates. Coordinated outgrowth of the CST and cortical projections to the red nucleus could support partial re-establishment of motor systems connections to the denervated spinal motor circuits. Stimulation restores skilled motor function in our animal model. Lesioned animals have a persistent forelimb deficit contralateral to pyramidotomy in the horizontal ladder task. Rats that received motor cortex stimulation either after acute or chronic injury showed a significant functional improvement that brought error rate to pre-lesion control levels. Reversible inactivation of the stimulated motor cortex reinstated the impairment demonstrating the importance of the stimulated system to recovery. Motor cortex electrical stimulation is an effective approach to promote spouting of spared CST axons. By optimizing activity-dependent sprouting in animals, we could have an approach that can be translated to the human for evaluation with minimal delay. PMID:24994971

  4. Kick with the finger: symbolic actions shape motor cortex excitability.

    PubMed

    Betti, Sonia; Castiello, Umberto; Sartori, Luisa

    2015-11-01

    A large body of research indicates that observing actions made by others is associated with corresponding motor facilitation of the observer's corticospinal system. However, it is still controversial whether this matching mechanism strictly reflects the kinematics of the observed action or its meaning. To test this issue, motor evoked potentials induced by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded from hand and leg muscles while participants observed a symbolic action carried out with the index finger, but classically performed with the leg (i.e., a soccer penalty kick). A control condition in which participants observed a similar (but not symbolic) hand movement was also included. Results showed that motor facilitation occurs both in the observer's hand (first dorsal interosseous) and leg (quadriceps femoris) muscles. The present study provides evidence that both the kinematics and the symbolic value of an observed action are able to modulate motor cortex excitability. The human motor system is thus not only involved in mirroring observed actions but is also finely tuned to their symbolic value. PMID:26354677

  5. Long-Range Neuronal Circuits Underlying the Interaction between Sensory and Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Tianyi; Kusefoglu, Deniz; Hooks, Bryan M.; Huber, Daniel; Petreanu, Leopoldo; Svoboda, Karel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY In the rodent vibrissal system, active sensation and sensorimotor integration are mediated in part by connections between barrel cortex and vibrissal motor cortex. Little is known about how these structures interact at the level of neurons. We used Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expression, combined with anterograde and retrograde labeling, to map connections between barrel cortex and pyramidal neurons in mouse motor cortex. Barrel cortex axons preferentially targeted upper layer (L2/3, L5A) neurons in motor cortex; input to neurons projecting back to barrel cortex was particularly strong. Barrel cortex input to deeper layers (L5B, L6) of motor cortex, including neurons projecting to the brainstem, was weak, despite pronounced geometric overlap of dendrites with axons from barrel cortex. Neurons in different layers received barrel cortex input within stereotyped dendritic domains. The cortico-cortical neurons in superficial layers of motor cortex thus couple motor and sensory signals and might mediate sensorimotor integration and motor learning. PMID:21982373

  6. From motor cortex to visual cortex: the application of noninvasive brain stimulation to amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin; Mansouri, Behzad; Koski, Lisa; Hess, Robert F

    2012-04-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation is a technique for inducing changes in the excitability of discrete neural populations in the human brain. A current model of the underlying pathological processes contributing to the loss of motor function after stroke has motivated a number of research groups to investigate the potential therapeutic application of brain stimulation to stroke rehabilitation. The loss of motor function is modeled as resulting from a combination of reduced excitability in the lesioned motor cortex and an increased inhibitory drive from the nonlesioned hemisphere over the lesioned hemisphere. This combination of impaired neural function and pathological suppression resonates with current views on the cause of the visual impairment in amblyopia. Here, we discuss how the rationale for using noninvasive brain stimulation in stroke rehabilitation can be applied to amblyopia, review a proof-of-principle study demonstrating that brain stimulation can temporarily improve amblyopic eye function, and propose future research avenues. PMID:22415915

  7. Ocular dominance and disparity coding in cat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    LeVay, S; Voigt, T

    1988-01-01

    The orientation selectivity, ocular dominance, and binocular disparity tuning of 272 cells in areas 17 and 18 of barbiturate-anesthetized, paralyzed cats were studied with automated, quantitative techniques. Disparity was varied along the axis orthogonal to each cell's best orientation. Binocular correspondence was established by means of a reference electrode positioned at the boundary of lamina A and A1 in the area centralis representation of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Measures were derived that expressed each cell's disparity sensitivity and best disparity and the shape and slope of its tuning curve. Cells were found that corresponded to categories described by previous authors ("disparity-insensitive," "tuned excitatory," "near," and "far" cells), but many others had intermediate response patterns, or patterns that were difficult to categorize. Quantitative analysis suggested that the various types belong to a continuum. No relationship could be established between a cell's best orientation and its ocular dominance or any aspect of its disparity tuning. There was no relationship between a cell's ocular dominance and its sensitivity to disparity. Ocular dominance and best disparity were related. As reported by others, cells with best disparities close to zero (the fixation plane) tended to have balanced ocularity, while cells with best disparities in the near or far range had a broad distribution of ocular dominance. Among cells with receptive fields near the vertical meridian, those preferring far disparities tended to be dominated by the contralateral eye, and those preferring near disparities by the ipsilateral eye. It is suggested that this relationship follows from the geometry of near and far images and the pattern of decussation in the visual pathway. There was a significant grouping of cells with similar best disparities along tangential electrode tracks. We believe that this grouping is due to the columnar organization for ocular dominance and the

  8. Therapy induces widespread reorganization of motor cortex after complete spinal transection that supports motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, Patrick D; Manohar, Anitha; Shumsky, Jed S; Moxon, Karen A

    2016-05-01

    Reorganization of the somatosensory system and its relationship to functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been well studied. However, little is known about the impact of SCI on organization of the motor system. Recent studies suggest that step-training paradigms in combination with spinal stimulation, either electrically or through pharmacology, are more effective than step training alone at inducing recovery and that reorganization of descending corticospinal circuits is necessary. However, simpler, passive exercise combined with pharmacotherapy has also shown functional improvement after SCI and reorganization of, at least, the sensory cortex. In this study we assessed the effect of passive exercise and serotonergic (5-HT) pharmacological therapies on behavioral recovery and organization of the motor cortex. We compared the effects of passive hindlimb bike exercise to bike exercise combined with daily injections of 5-HT agonists in a rat model of complete mid-thoracic transection. 5-HT pharmacotherapy combined with bike exercise allowed the animals to achieve unassisted weight support in the open field. This combination of therapies also produced extensive expansion of the axial trunk motor cortex into the deafferented hindlimb motor cortex and, surprisingly, reorganization within the caudal and even the rostral forelimb motor cortex areas. The extent of the axial trunk expansion was correlated to improvement in behavioral recovery of hindlimbs during open field locomotion, including weight support. From a translational perspective, these data suggest a rationale for developing and optimizing cost-effective, non-invasive, pharmacological and passive exercise regimes to promote plasticity that supports restoration of movement after spinal cord injury. PMID:26826448

  9. Therapy induces widespread reorganization of motor cortex after complete spinal transection that supports motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, Patrick D; Manohar, Anitha; Shumsky, Jed S; Moxon, Karen A

    2016-05-01

    Reorganization of the somatosensory system and its relationship to functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been well studied. However, little is known about the impact of SCI on organization of the motor system. Recent studies suggest that step-training paradigms in combination with spinal stimulation, either electrically or through pharmacology, are more effective than step training alone at inducing recovery and that reorganization of descending corticospinal circuits is necessary. However, simpler, passive exercise combined with pharmacotherapy has also shown functional improvement after SCI and reorganization of, at least, the sensory cortex. In this study we assessed the effect of passive exercise and serotonergic (5-HT) pharmacological therapies on behavioral recovery and organization of the motor cortex. We compared the effects of passive hindlimb bike exercise to bike exercise combined with daily injections of 5-HT agonists in a rat model of complete mid-thoracic transection. 5-HT pharmacotherapy combined with bike exercise allowed the animals to achieve unassisted weight support in the open field. This combination of therapies also produced extensive expansion of the axial trunk motor cortex into the deafferented hindlimb motor cortex and, surprisingly, reorganization within the caudal and even the rostral forelimb motor cortex areas. The extent of the axial trunk expansion was correlated to improvement in behavioral recovery of hindlimbs during open field locomotion, including weight support. From a translational perspective, these data suggest a rationale for developing and optimizing cost-effective, non-invasive, pharmacological and passive exercise regimes to promote plasticity that supports restoration of movement after spinal cord injury.

  10. Motor activity and muscle properties in the hemidecerebellate cat.

    PubMed

    Stenvers, J W; Eerbeek, O; de Jong, J M; Meijer, A E

    1983-09-01

    Luciani's ipsilaterally acting 'trophic' cerebellar influence on striated muscle was reinvestigated in hemidecerebellate preparations of varying extent. Cats with hindlimb postural asymmetries for 4 or more days after the lesion developed a bilateral reduction of maximum tetanic tension and increased twitch/tetanus ratios of soleus. In addition, soleus on the side of the lesion lost force and weight, showed decreased twitch contraction and half-relaxation times, elevated myosin ATPase activity in part of its fibres, occasional fibre necrosis and a few snake coils. Protracted postural asymmetry occurred only if complete hemicerebellectomy included ablation of the lateral vestibular nucleus and extended for at least 3.0 mm across the midline into the contralateral vermal and intermediate cortex, especially of Larsell's lobuli IV and V. Most simply, the cerebellar effect on muscle is explained as the result of altered motoneuronal activation patterns. Comparison of the experimental soleus changes with Holmes's clinical findings in cases of cerebellar injury suggests that muscle itself participates in experimental and human cerebellar asthenia.

  11. [The mechanism of movement instrumental learning in a Hopfield environment in the feline motor cortex].

    PubMed

    Maĭorov, V I

    1998-01-01

    A model of the neuronal processes in the motor cortex is proposed, which provides the mechanism for instrumentalization (voluntary reproduction) of movements primarily evoked by stimulation of the parietal cortex. The main propositions of the model are as follows: the late NMDA-dependent response of the motor cortex neurons to stimulation of the parietal cortex reflects the discharges in the recurrent collaterals of the pyramidal cell axons; learning processes in the motor cortex are based on the long-term potentiation of the efficiency of the recurrent collaterals; the Hopfield's theory of neuronal nets is applied to the processes of motor learning in the cortex. The movement instrumentalization is viewed as the stable state formation in the collaterally linked neuronal structure; the voluntary reproduction of the previously learned movement in considered as the process of transition of the neuronal structure into the stable state. The data on acetylcholine and dopamine modulatory influences on the reactions of motor cortex neurons are discussed.

  12. High-Field Functional Imaging of Pitch Processing in Auditory Cortex of the Cat.

    PubMed

    Butler, Blake E; Hall, Amee J; Lomber, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    The perception of pitch is a widely studied and hotly debated topic in human hearing. Many of these studies combine functional imaging techniques with stimuli designed to disambiguate the percept of pitch from frequency information present in the stimulus. While useful in identifying potential "pitch centres" in cortex, the existence of truly pitch-responsive neurons requires single neuron-level measures that can only be undertaken in animal models. While a number of animals have been shown to be sensitive to pitch, few studies have addressed the location of cortical generators of pitch percepts in non-human models. The current study uses high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the feline brain in an attempt to identify regions of cortex that show increased activity in response to pitch-evoking stimuli. Cats were presented with iterated rippled noise (IRN) stimuli, narrowband noise stimuli with the same spectral profile but no perceivable pitch, and a processed IRN stimulus in which phase components were randomized to preserve slowly changing modulations in the absence of pitch (IRNo). Pitch-related activity was not observed to occur in either primary auditory cortex (A1) or the anterior auditory field (AAF) which comprise the core auditory cortex in cats. Rather, cortical areas surrounding the posterior ectosylvian sulcus responded preferentially to the IRN stimulus when compared to narrowband noise, with group analyses revealing bilateral activity centred in the posterior auditory field (PAF). This study demonstrates that fMRI is useful for identifying pitch-related processing in cat cortex, and identifies cortical areas that warrant further investigation. Moreover, we have taken the first steps in identifying a useful animal model for the study of pitch perception. PMID:26225563

  13. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex modulates supplementary motor area in coordinated unimanual motor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Asemi, Avisa; Ramaseshan, Karthik; Burgess, Ashley; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Bressler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Motor control is integral to all types of human behavior, and the dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex (dACC) is thought to play an important role in the brain network underlying motor control. Yet the role of the dACC in motor control is under-characterized. Here we aimed to characterize the dACC’s role in adolescent brain network interactions during a simple motor control task involving visually coordinated unimanual finger movements. Network interactions were assessed using both undirected and directed functional connectivity analysis of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent (BOLD) signals, comparing the task with a rest condition. The relation between the dACC and Supplementary Motor Area (SMA) was compared to that between the dACC and Primary Motor Cortex (M1). The directed signal from dACC to SMA was significantly elevated during motor control in the task. By contrast, the directed signal from SMA to dACC, both directed signals between dACC and M1, and the undirected functional connections of dACC with SMA and M1, all did not differ between task and rest. Undirected coupling of dACC with both SMA and dACC, and only the dACC-to-SMA directed signal, were significantly greater for a proactive than a reactive task condition, suggesting that dACC plays a role in motor control by maintaining stimulus timing expectancy. Overall, these results suggest that the dACC selectively modulates the SMA during visually coordinated unimanual behavior in adolescence. The role of the dACC as an important brain area for the mediation of task-related motor control may be in place in adolescence, continuing into adulthood. The task and analytic approach described here should be extended to the study of healthy adults to examine network profiles of the dACC during basic motor behavior. PMID:26089783

  14. Counterfactual thinking affects the excitability of the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Carmelo M; Rafal, Robert D; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-04-01

    Evidence suggests that monetary reward and affective experiences induce activity in the cortical motor system. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether counterfactual thinking related to wrong choices that lead to monetary loss and regret affects motor excitability. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex, we measured corticospinal excitability of 2 groups of healthy humans asked to actively guess the winning key among two possible alternatives (choice group); or passively assist to monetary outcomes randomly selected by the computer program (follow group). Results document a selective increment of the corticospinal excitability when a monetary loss outcome followed the key selection (i.e., in the choice group). On the other hand, no change in corticospinal excitability was found when participants passively assisted to a monetary loss randomly selected by the computer program (i.e., follow group). These findings suggest that counterfactual thinking and the negative emotional experiences arising from choices causing monetary loss--i.e., "I would have won instead of lost money if I'd made a different choice"--are mapped in the motor system.

  15. Areas of cat auditory cortex as defined by neurofilament proteins expressing SMI-32.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Jeffrey G; Van der Gucht, Estel; Lee, Charles C; Carrasco, Andres; Winer, Jeffery A; Lomber, Stephen G

    2010-08-01

    The monoclonal antibody SMI-32 was used to characterize and distinguish individual areas of cat auditory cortex. SMI-32 labels non-phosphorylated epitopes on the high- and medium-molecular weight subunits of neurofilament proteins in cortical pyramidal cells and dendritic trees with the most robust immunoreactivity in layers III and V. Auditory areas with unique patterns of immunoreactivity included: primary auditory cortex (AI), second auditory cortex (AII), dorsal zone (DZ), posterior auditory field (PAF), ventral posterior auditory field (VPAF), ventral auditory field (VAF), temporal cortex (T), insular cortex (IN), anterior auditory field (AAF), and the auditory field of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (fAES). Unique patterns of labeling intensity, soma shape, soma size, layers of immunoreactivity, laminar distribution of dendritic arbors, and labeled cell density were identified. Features that were consistent in all areas included: layers I and IV neurons are immunonegative; nearly all immunoreactive cells are pyramidal; and immunoreactive neurons are always present in layer V. To quantify the results, the numbers of labeled cells and dendrites, as well as cell diameter, were collected and used as tools for identifying and differentiating areas. Quantification of the labeling patterns also established profiles for ten auditory areas/layers and their degree of immunoreactivity. Areal borders delineated by SMI-32 were highly correlated with tonotopically-defined areal boundaries. Overall, SMI-32 immunoreactivity can delineate ten areas of cat auditory cortex and demarcate topographic borders. The ability to distinguish auditory areas with SMI-32 is valuable for the identification of auditory cerebral areas in electrophysiological, anatomical, and/or behavioral investigations.

  16. Investigation of frontal cortex, motor cortex and systemic haemodynamic changes during anagram solving.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Leung, Terence S; Tisdall, Martin M; Devendra, Presheena; Smith, Martin; Delpy, David T; Elwell, Clare E

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported changes in the concentrations of oxy-(delta[HbO2]) deoxy- (delta[HHb]) and total haemoglobin (delta[HbT] = delta[HbO2] + delta[HHb]) measured using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) over the frontal cortex (FC) during an anagram solving task. These changes were associated with a significant increase in both mean blood pressure (MBP) and heart rate (HR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the changes in MBP previously recorded during an anagram solving task produces associated changes in scalp blood flow (flux) measured by laser Doppler and whether any changes are seen in NIRS haemodynamic measurements over a control region of the brain (motor cortex: MC). During the 4-Letter anagram task significant changes were observed in the delta[HbO2], delta[HHb] and delta[HbT] in both the frontal and motor cortex (n = 11, FC p < 0.01, MC p < 0.01). These changes were accompanied by significant changes in both MBP (n = 11, p < 0.01) and scalp flux (n = 9, p = 0.01). During the 7-Letter anagram task significant changes were observed in the delta[HbO2] and delta[HbT] (n = 11, FC p < 0.01, MC p < 0.01), which were accompanied by significant changes in both MBP (n = 11, p = 0.05) and flux (n = 9, p = 0.05). The task-related changes seen in MBP and flux in this study appear to contribute to the changes in the NIRS signals over both the activated and control regions of the cortex.

  17. Influence of the midbrain reticular formation irradiation with luminescent incoherent light on evoked potential of cerebral cortex in cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana L.; Abakarov, Asadulla; Monich, Victor A.

    1996-11-01

    In acute experiments on cats it is shown, that direct, of- low-intensity incoherent light exposure on midbrain reticular formation, cases brain cortex projection areas functional state changes, which find expression in shifting amplitude of both positive and negative components of cortex evoked potentials on visual stimuli.

  18. Different motor learning effects on excitability changes of motor cortex in muscle contraction state.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kenichi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Suzuki, Tomotaka; Higashi, Toshio

    2013-09-01

    We aimed to investigate whether motor learning induces different excitability changes in the human motor cortex (M1) between two different muscle contraction states (before voluntary contraction [static] or during voluntary contraction [dynamic]). For the same, using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) obtained by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we compared excitability changes during these two states after pinch-grip motor skill learning. The participants performed a force output tracking task by pinch grip on a computer screen. TMS was applied prior to the pinch grip (static) and after initiation of voluntary contraction (dynamic). MEPs of the following muscles were recorded: first dorsal interosseous (FDI), thenar muscle (Thenar), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles. During both the states, motor skill training led to significant improvement of motor performance. During the static state, MEPs of the FDI muscle were significantly facilitated after motor learning; however, during the dynamic state, MEPs of the FDI, Thenar, and FCR muscles were significantly decreased. Based on the results of this study, we concluded that excitability changes in the human M1 are differentially influenced during different voluntary contraction states (static and dynamic) after motor learning.

  19. Reduced motor cortex activity during movement preparation following a period of motor skill practice.

    PubMed

    Wright, David J; Holmes, Paul; Di Russo, Francesco; Loporto, Michela; Smith, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Experts in a skill produce movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) of smaller amplitude and later onset than novices. This may indicate that, following long-term training, experts require less effort to plan motor skill performance. However, no longitudinal evidence exists to support this claim. To address this, EEG was used to study the effect of motor skill training on cortical activity related to motor planning. Ten non-musicians took part in a 5-week training study learning to play guitar. At week 1, the MRCP was recorded from motor areas whilst participants played the G Major scale. Following a period of practice of the scale, the MRCP was recorded again at week 5. Results showed that the amplitude of the later pre-movement components were smaller at week 5 compared to week 1. This may indicate that, following training, less activity at motor cortex sites is involved in motor skill preparation. This supports claims for a more efficient motor preparation following motor skill training. PMID:23251647

  20. Modeling the motor cortex: Optimality, recurrent neural networks, and spatial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirokazu

    2016-03-01

    Specialization of motor function in the frontal lobe was first discovered in the seminal experiments by Fritsch and Hitzig and subsequently by Ferrier in the 19th century. It is, however, ironical that the functional and computational role of the motor cortex still remains unresolved. A computational understanding of the motor cortex equals to understanding what movement variables the motor neurons represent (movement representation problem) and how such movement variables are computed through the interaction with anatomically connected areas (neural computation problem). Electrophysiological experiments in the 20th century demonstrated that the neural activities in motor cortex correlated with a number of motor-related and cognitive variables, thereby igniting the controversy over movement representations in motor cortex. Despite substantial experimental efforts, the overwhelming complexity found in neural activities has impeded our understanding of how movements are represented in the motor cortex. Recent progresses in computational modeling have rekindled this controversy in the 21st century. Here, I review the recent developments in computational models of the motor cortex, with a focus on optimality models, recurrent neural network models and spatial dynamics models. Although individual models provide consistent pictures within their domains, our current understanding about functions of the motor cortex is still fragmented.

  1. Laterality affects spontaneous recovery of contralateral hand motor function following motor cortex injury in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Darling, Warren G; Helle, Nicole; Pizzimenti, Marc A; Rotella, Diane L; Hynes, Stephanie M; Ge, Jizhi; Stilwell-Morecraft, Kimberly S; Morecraft, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether brain laterality influences spontaneous recovery of hand motor function after controlled brain injuries to arm areas of M1 and lateral premotor cortex (LPMC) of the hemisphere contralateral to the preferred hand in rhesus monkeys. We hypothesized that monkeys with stronger hand preference would exhibit poorer recovery of skilled hand use after such brain injury. Degree of handedness was assessed using a standard dexterity board task in which subjects could use either hand to retrieve small food pellets. Fine hand/digit motor function was assessed using a modified dexterity board before and after the M1 and LPMC lesions in ten monkeys. We found a strong negative relationship between the degree of handedness and the recovery of manipulation skill, demonstrating that higher hand preference was associated with poorer recovery of hand fine motor function. We also observed that monkeys with larger lesions within M1 and LPMC had greater initial impairment of manipulation and poorer recovery of reaching skill. We conclude that monkeys with a stronger hand preference are likely to show poorer recovery of contralesional hand fine motor skill after isolated brain lesions affecting the lateral frontal motor areas. These data may be extended to suggest that humans who exhibit weak hand dominance, and perhaps individuals who use both hands for fine motor tasks, may have a more favorable potential for recovery after a unilateral stroke or brain injury affecting the lateral cortical motor areas than individuals with a high degree of hand dominance.

  2. Concurrent TMS to the primary motor cortex augments slow motor learning.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Shalini; Zhang, Wei; Rogers, William; Strickland, Casey; Franklin, Crystal; Lancaster, Jack L; Fox, Peter T

    2014-01-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has shown promise as a treatment tool, with one FDA approved use. While TMS alone is able to up- (or down-) regulate a targeted neural system, we argue that TMS applied as an adjuvant is more effective for repetitive physical, behavioral and cognitive therapies, that is, therapies which are designed to alter the network properties of neural systems through Hebbian learning. We tested this hypothesis in the context of a slow motor learning paradigm. Healthy right-handed individuals were assigned to receive 5 Hz TMS (TMS group) or sham TMS (sham group) to the right primary motor cortex (M1) as they performed daily motor practice of a digit sequence task with their non-dominant hand for 4 weeks. Resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by H2(15)O PET at baseline and after 4 weeks of practice. Sequence performance was measured daily as the number of correct sequences performed, and modeled using a hyperbolic function. Sequence performance increased significantly at 4 weeks relative to baseline in both groups. The TMS group had a significant additional improvement in performance, specifically, in the rate of skill acquisition. In both groups, an improvement in sequence timing and transfer of skills to non-trained motor domains was also found. Compared to the sham group, the TMS group demonstrated increases in resting CBF specifically in regions known to mediate skill learning namely, the M1, cingulate cortex, putamen, hippocampus, and cerebellum. These results indicate that TMS applied concomitantly augments behavioral effects of motor practice, with corresponding neural plasticity in motor sequence learning network. These findings are the first demonstration of the behavioral and neural enhancing effects of TMS on slow motor practice and have direct application in neurorehabilitation where TMS could be applied in conjunction with physical therapy.

  3. Concurrent TMS to the primary motor cortex augments slow motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Shalini; Zhang, Wei; Rogers, William; Strickland, Casey; Franklin, Crystal; Lancaster, Jack L.; Fox, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has shown promise as a treatment tool, with one FDA approved use. While TMS alone is able to up- (or down-) regulate a targeted neural system, we argue that TMS applied as an adjuvant is more effective for repetitive physical, behavioral and cognitive therapies, that is, therapies which are designed to alter the network properties of neural systems through Hebbian learning. We tested this hypothesis in the context of a slow motor learning paradigm. Healthy right-handed individuals were assigned to receive 5 Hz TMS (TMS group) or sham TMS (sham group) to the right primary motor cortex (M1) as they performed daily motor practice of a digit sequence task with their non-dominant hand for 4 weeks. Resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by H215O PET at baseline and after 4 weeks of practice. Sequence performance was measured daily as the number of correct sequences performed, and modeled using a hyperbolic function. Sequence performance increased significantly at 4 weeks relative to baseline in both groups. The TMS group had a significant additional improvement in performance, specifically, in the rate of skill acquisition. In both groups, an improvement in sequence timing and transfer of skills to non-trained motor domains was also found. Compared to the sham group, the TMS group demonstrated increases in resting CBF specifically in regions known to mediate skill learning namely, the M1, cingulate cortex, putamen, hippocampus, and cerebellum. These results indicate that TMS applied concomitantly augments behavioral effects of motor practice, with corresponding neural plasticity in motor sequence learning network. These findings are the first demonstration of the behavioral and neural enhancing effects of TMS on slow motor practice and have direct application in neurorehabilitation where TMS could be applied in conjunction with physical therapy. PMID:23867557

  4. Functional imaging of cat primary visual cortex with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, Uma M.; Takaoka, Hideyuki; Homma, Ryota; Kadono, Hirofumi; Tanifuji, Manabu

    2002-06-01

    We report the application of Optical coherence tomography (OCT) for visualizing a one dimensional depth resolved functional structure of cat brain in vivo. The OCT system is based on the known fact that neural activation induces structural changes such as capillary dilation and cellular swelling. Detecting these changes as an amplitude change of the scattered light, an OCT signal reflecting neural activity i.e., fOCT (functional OCT) could be obtained. Experiments have been done to obtain a depth resolved stimulus-specific profile of activation in cat visual cortex. Our results in one dimension indicate that indeed an orientation dependent functional signal could be obtained. Further, we show that this depth resolved fOCT signal is well correlated with the stimulus dependent column determined by OISI. Based on the results, the smallest functional unit in depth, resolved by the proposed system is around 40 micrometers . We are extending our system to perform two dimensional functional imaging.

  5. Modulation of the ∽20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm to passive movement and tactile stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Parkkonen, Eeva; Laaksonen, Kristina; Piitulainen, Harri; Parkkonen, Lauri; Forss, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Background Integration of afferent somatosensory input with motor-cortex output is essential for accurate movements. Prior studies have shown that tactile input modulates motor-cortex excitability, which is reflected in the reactivity of the ∽20-Hz motor-cortex rhythm. ∽20-Hz rebound is connected to inhibition or deactivation of motor cortex whereas suppression has been associated with increased motor cortex activity. Although tactile sense carries important information for controlling voluntary actions, proprioception likely provides the most essential feedback for motor control. Methods To clarify how passive movement modulates motor-cortex excitability, we studied with magnetoencephalography (MEG) the amplitudes and peak latencies of suppression and rebound of the ∽20-Hz rhythm elicited by tactile stimulation and passive movement of right and left index fingers in 22 healthy volunteers. Results Passive movement elicited a stronger and more robust ∽20-Hz rebound than tactile stimulation. In contrast, the suppression amplitudes did not differ between the two stimulus types. Conclusion Our findings suggest that suppression and rebound represent activity of two functionally distinct neuronal populations. The ∽20-Hz rebound to passive movement could be a suitable tool to study the functional state of the motor cortex both in healthy subjects and in patients with motor disorders. PMID:25874163

  6. Disrupting the ipsilateral motor cortex interferes with training of a complex motor task in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zimerman, Máximo; Heise, Kirstin-F; Gerloff, Christian; Cohen, Leonardo G; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2014-04-01

    Performance of unimanual movements is associated with bihemispheric activity in the motor cortex in old adults. However, the causal functional role of the ipsilateral MC (iMC) for motor control is still not completely known. Here, the behavioral consequences of interference of the iMC during training of a complex motor skill were tested. Healthy old (58-85 years) and young volunteers (22-35 years) were tested in a double-blind, cross-over, sham-controlled design. Participants attended 2 different study arms with either cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (ctDCS) or sham concurrent with training. Motor performance was evaluated before, during, 90 min, and 24 h after training. During training, a reduced slope of performance with ctDCS relative to sham was observed in old compared with young (F = 5.8, P = 0.02), with a decrease of correctly rehearsed sequences, an effect that was evident even after 2 consecutive retraining periods without intervention. Furthermore, the older the subject, the more prominent was the disruptive effect of ctDCS (R(2) = 0.50, P = 0.01). These data provide direct evidence for a causal functional link between the iMC and motor skill acquisition in old subjects pointing toward the concept that the recruitment of iMC in old is an adaptive process in response to age-related declines in motor functions.

  7. Fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an awake cat using a chronic microelectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Russell S.; Rousche, Patrick J.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2007-06-01

    We investigated fast wave propagation in auditory cortex of an alert cat using a chronically implanted microelectrode array. A custom, real-time imaging template exhibited wave dynamics within the 33-microwire array (3 mm2) during ten recording sessions spanning 1 month post implant. Images were based on the spatial arrangement of peri-stimulus time histograms at each recording site in response to auditory stimuli consisting of tone pips between 1 and 10 kHz at 75 dB SPL. Functional images portray stimulus-locked spiking activity and exhibit waves of excitation and inhibition that evolve during the onset, sustained and offset period of the tones. In response to 5 kHz, for example, peak excitation occurred at 27 ms after onset and again at 15 ms following tone offset. Variability of the position of the centroid of excitation during ten recording sessions reached a minimum at 31 ms post onset (σ = 125 µm) and 18 ms post offset (σ = 145 µm), suggesting a fine place/time representation of the stimulus in the cortex. The dynamics of these fast waves also depended on stimulus frequency, likely reflecting the tonotopicity in auditory cortex projected from the cochlea. Peak wave velocities of 0.2 m s-1 were also consistent with those purported across horizontal layers of cat visual cortex. The fine resolution offered by microimaging may be critical for delivering optimal coding strategies used with an auditory prosthesis. Based on the initial results, future studies seek to determine the relevance of these waves to sensory perception and behavior. The work was performed at Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, ECG 334 MS-9709 Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-9709, USA.

  8. Role of motor cortex NMDA receptors in learning-dependent synaptic plasticity of behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Mazahir T.; Hernández-González, Samuel; Dogbevia, Godwin; Treviño, Mario; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary motor cortex has an important role in the precise execution of learned motor responses. During motor learning, synaptic efficacy between sensory and primary motor cortical neurons is enhanced, possibly involving long-term potentiation and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-specific glutamate receptor function. To investigate whether NMDA receptor in the primary motor cortex can act as a coincidence detector for activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength and associative learning, here we generate mice with deletion of the Grin1 gene, encoding the essential NMDA receptor subunit 1 (GluN1), specifically in the primary motor cortex. The loss of NMDA receptor function impairs primary motor cortex long-term potentiation in vivo. Importantly, it impairs the synaptic efficacy between the primary somatosensory and primary motor cortices and significantly reduces classically conditioned eyeblink responses. Furthermore, compared with wild-type littermates, mice lacking primary motor cortex show slower learning in Skinner-box tasks. Thus, primary motor cortex NMDA receptors are necessary for activity-dependent synaptic strengthening and associative learning. PMID:23978820

  9. Motor Cortex Stimulation for Pain Relief: Do Corollary Discharges Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Brasil-Neto, Joaquim P.

    2016-01-01

    Both invasive and non-invasive motor cortex stimulation techniques have been successfully employed in the treatment of chronic pain, but the precise mechanism of action of such treatments is not fully understood. It has been hypothesized that a mismatch of normal interaction between motor intention and sensory feedback may result in central pain. Sensory feedback may come from peripheral nerves, vision and also from corollary discharges originating from the motor cortex itself. Therefore, a possible mechanism of action of motor cortex stimulation might be corollary discharge reinforcement, which could counterbalance sensory feedback deficiency. In other instances, primary deficiency in the production of corollary discharges by the motor cortex might be the culprit and stimulation of cortical motor areas might then be beneficial by enhancing production of such discharges. Here we review evidence for a possible role of motor cortex corollary discharges upon both the pathophysiology and the response to motor cortex stimulation of different types of chronic pain. We further suggest that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPC), thought to constantly monitor incongruity between corollary discharges, vision and proprioception, might be an interesting target for non-invasive neuromodulation in cases of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:27445763

  10. Contributions of the cerebellum and the motor cortex to acquisition and retention of motor memories

    PubMed Central

    Herzfeld, David J.; Pastor, Damien; Haith, Adrian M.; Rossetti, Yves; Shadmehr, Reza; O’Shea, Jacinta

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the contributions of the cerebellum and the motor cortex (M1) to acquisition and retention of human motor memories in a force field reaching task. We found that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the cerebellum, a technique that is thought to increase neuronal excitability, increased the ability to learn from error and form an internal model of the field, while cathodal cerebellar stimulation reduced this error-dependent learning. In addition, cathodal cerebellar stimulation disrupted the ability to respond to error within a reaching movement, reducing the gain of the sensory-motor feedback loop. By contrast, anodal M1 stimulation had no significant effects on these variables. During sham stimulation, early in training the acquired motor memory exhibited rapid decay in error-clamp trials. With further training the rate of decay decreased, suggesting that with training the motor memory was transformed from a labile to a more stable state. Surprisingly, neither cerebellar nor M1 stimulation altered these decay patterns. Participants returned 24 hours later and were re-tested in error-clamp trials without stimulation. The cerebellar group that had learned the task with cathodal stimulation exhibited significantly impaired retention, and retention was not improved by M1 anodal stimulation. In summary, non-invasive cerebellar stimulation resulted in polarity-dependent up- or down-regulation of error-dependent motor learning. In addition, cathodal cerebellar stimulation during acquisition impaired the ability to retain the motor memory overnight. Thus, in the force field task we found a critical role for the cerebellum in both formation of motor memory and its retention. PMID:24816533

  11. Frequency of gamma activity is modulated by motivation in the auditory cortex of cat.

    PubMed

    Karmos, G; Lakatos, P; Pincze, Zsuzsanna; Rajkai, Cs; Ulbert, I

    2002-01-01

    Repetitive acoustic stimuli elicit steady-state response (SSR) in the gamma-band both in humans and in mammals. Our aim was to investigate changes of the spontaneous gamma activity and the SSR in the auditory cortex of cats in the background of an instrumental conditioning situation. Epidural electrodes were chronically implanted above the auditory neocortex. The presentation rate of the clicks varied between 20 and 65/s. Spontaneous EEG and SSR were collected in three behavioral states: in an indifferent environment, in the instrumental cage while the cat was waiting for the light CS, and when she stepped on the pedal and was waiting for the meat reward. Using different repetition rate clicks we determined which stimulus rate elicited the largest SSR in these three situations. In quiet animal the highest SSR appeared at 28-30/s. Before and during the CS the optimal stimulus rate shifted to 32-38/s. The frequency of the spontaneous gamma activity changed in parallel way depending on the situation. We conclude that both the SSR and the spontaneous gamma activity reflect resonant activity of the same neuronal circuit of the auditory cortex, and it is modulated by the motivational state of the animal.

  12. Effect of tactile stimulation on primary motor cortex excitability during action observation combined with motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Megumi; Kubota, Shinji; Onmyoji, Yusuke; Hirano, Masato; Uehara, Kazumasa; Morishita, Takuya; Funase, Kozo

    2015-07-23

    We aimed to investigate the effects of the tactile stimulation to an observer's fingertips at the moment that they saw an object being pinched by another person on the excitability of observer's primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, the above effects were also examined during action observation combined with the motor imagery. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were evoked from the subjects' right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles. Electrical stimulation (ES) inducing tactile sensation was delivered to the subjects' first and second fingertips at the moment of pinching action performed by another person. Although neither the ES nor action observation alone had significant effects on the MEP amplitude of the FDI or ADM, the FDI MEP amplitude which acts as the prime mover during pinching was reduced when ES and action observation were combined; however, no such changes were seen in the ADM. Conversely, that reduced FDI MEP amplitude was increased during the motor imagery. These results indicated that the M1 excitability during the action observation of pinching action combined with motor imagery could be enhanced by the tactile stimulation delivered to the observer's fingertips at the moment corresponding to the pinching being observed.

  13. Absence of cross-modal reorganization in the primary auditory cortex of congenitally deaf cats.

    PubMed

    Kral, A; Schröder, J-H; Klinke, R; Engel, A K

    2003-12-01

    To investigate possible cross-modal reorganization of the primary auditory cortex (field A1) in congenitally deaf cats, after years of auditory deprivation, multiunit activity and local field potentials were recorded in lightly anesthetized animals and compared with responses obtained in hearing cats. Local field potentials were also used for current source-density analyses. For visual stimulation, phase-reversal gratings of three to five different spatial frequencies and three to five different orientations were presented at the point of central vision. Peripheral visual field was tested using hand-held stimuli (light bar-shaped stimulus of different orientations, moved in different directions and flashed) typically used for neurophysiological characterization of visual fields. From 200 multiunit recordings, no response to visual stimuli could be found in A1 of any of the investigated animals. Using the current source-density analysis of local field potentials, no local generators of field potentials could be found within A1, despite of the presence of small local field potentials. No multiunit responses to somatosensory stimulation (whiskers, face, pinna, head, neck, all paws, back, tail) could be obtained. In conclusion, there were no indications for a cross-modal reorganization (visual, somatosensory) of area A1 in congenitally deaf cats. PMID:12961053

  14. Behavioral detection of intra-cortical microstimulation in the primary and secondary auditory cortex of cats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenling; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Lanlan; Sato, Yu; Qin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Although neural responses to sound stimuli have been thoroughly investigated in various areas of the auditory cortex, the results electrophysiological recordings cannot establish a causal link between neural activation and brain function. Electrical microstimulation, which can selectively perturb neural activity in specific parts of the nervous system, is an important tool for exploring the organization and function of brain circuitry. To date, the studies describing the behavioral effects of electrical stimulation have largely been conducted in the primary auditory cortex. In this study, to investigate the potential differences in the effects of electrical stimulation on different cortical areas, we measured the behavioral performance of cats in detecting intra-cortical microstimulation (ICMS) delivered in the primary and secondary auditory fields (A1 and A2, respectively). After being trained to perform a Go/No-Go task cued by sounds, we found that cats could also learn to perform the task cued by ICMS; furthermore, the detection of the ICMS was similarly sensitive in A1 and A2. Presenting wideband noise together with ICMS substantially decreased the performance of cats in detecting ICMS in A1 and A2, consistent with a noise masking effect on the sensation elicited by the ICMS. In contrast, presenting ICMS with pure-tones in the spectral receptive field of the electrode-implanted cortical site reduced ICMS detection performance in A1 but not A2. Therefore, activation of A1 and A2 neurons may produce different qualities of sensation. Overall, our study revealed that ICMS-induced neural activity could be easily integrated into an animal’s behavioral decision process and had an implication for the development of cortical auditory prosthetics. PMID:25964744

  15. Rat whisker motor cortex is subdivided into sensory-input and motor-output areas

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jared B.; Alloway, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent whisking is an exploratory behavior that can be modified by sensory feedback. Consistent with this, many whisker-sensitive cortical regions project to agranular motor [motor cortex (MI)] cortex, but the relative topography of these afferent projections has not been established. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) evokes whisker movements that are used to map the functional organization of MI, but no study has compared the whisker-related inputs to MI with the ICMS sites that evoke whisker movements. To elucidate this relationship, anterograde tracers were placed in posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and in the primary somatosensory (SI) and secondary somatosensory (SII) cortical areas so that their labeled projections to MI could be analyzed with respect to ICMS sites that evoke whisker movements. Projections from SI and SII terminate in a narrow zone that marks the transition between the medial agranular (AGm) and lateral agranular (AGl) cortical areas, but PPC projects more medially and terminates in AGm proper. Paired recordings of MI neurons indicate that the region between AGm and AGl is highly responsive to whisker deflections, but neurons in AGm display negligible responses to whisker stimulation. By contrast, AGm microstimulation is more effective in evoking whisker movements than microstimulation of the transitional region between AGm and AGl. The AGm region was also found to contain a larger concentration of corticotectal neurons, which could convey whisker-related information to the facial nucleus. These results indicate that rat whisker MI is comprised of at least two functionally distinct subregions: a sensory processing zone in the transitional region between AGm and AGl, and a motor-output region located more medially in AGm proper. PMID:23372545

  16. Neuronal activity in the primary visual cortex of the cat freely viewing natural images.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, P E; Babul, C M

    2007-02-23

    Many studies have now demonstrated that neurons in the visual cortex of cats and monkeys change their activity when stimuli are presented beyond their classical receptive field, and that these responses are not readily apparent from their receptive field properties. However few studies have been conducted to investigate the discharge properties of neurons in the visual cortex of animals when they are allow to freely view natural images. We employ tetrodes, which enable simultaneous and separable recordings of small numbers of neighboring neurons, to record 102 single units from 59 sites from areas 17 and 18 of two alert cats. While the animals viewed either natural images or black screens, they made frequent saccadic eye movements and gaze fixations. Fixations onto an image's location increased neuronal firing peaking at 80-100 ms after the fixation onset, to then decrease steadily with time despite continuous fixation. Saccades trigger a fast decrease in firing rate for both images and darkness. When we examined the incidence of correlated firing, we observed significant synchrony during the initial phases of visual fixations when the animals viewed natural scenes. Such synchrony was absent during saccadic eye movements and during eye movements in darkness. Our data revealed that scanning of natural scenes is associated with a rapid succession of distinct fixation-related activation patterns that included transient rate changes and excess coincident firing. The transient nature of these synchronization phenomena suggests a fast acting mechanism, which is in good agreement with the evidence that basic operations of scene analysis must be accomplished within a few tens of milliseconds in primary visual cortex.

  17. Influence of dominant motivation on the functional organization of auditory input to the sensorimotor cortex of the cat brain.

    PubMed

    Ivanova YuV; Vasil'eva, L A; Kulikov, G A

    1990-01-01

    The results of experiments reviewed in this article demonstrate the possibility of the transformation of the frequency tuning of the auditory input into the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) of the cat under the influence of a dominant motivation. Similar changes took place in the parietal cortex (PC) but they were significantly less in absolute magnitude. The identified transformation of the frequency tuning of the auditory input into the SMC and the PC is in agreement with a change in the biological significance of the auditory signals of kittens for females in the period of lactation, and corresponds for each cat to the spectral composition of the vocalizations of its own kittens.

  18. Neural population dynamics in human motor cortex during movements in people with ALS

    PubMed Central

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Gilja, Vikash; Blabe, Christine H; Nuyujukian, Paul; Sarma, Anish A; Sorice, Brittany L; Eskandar, Emad N; Hochberg, Leigh R; Henderson, Jaimie M; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing view of motor cortex holds that motor cortical neural activity represents muscle or movement parameters. However, recent studies in non-human primates have shown that neural activity does not simply represent muscle or movement parameters; instead, its temporal structure is well-described by a dynamical system where activity during movement evolves lawfully from an initial pre-movement state. In this study, we analyze neuronal ensemble activity in motor cortex in two clinical trial participants diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We find that activity in human motor cortex has similar dynamical structure to that of non-human primates, indicating that human motor cortex contains a similar underlying dynamical system for movement generation. Clinical trial registration: NCT00912041. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07436.001 PMID:26099302

  19. Computer-assisted morphometric analysis of intrinsic axon terminals in the supragranular layers of cat striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Leal, Walace; Silva, G Jesus; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam W

    2002-07-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of terminal arborizations of biocytin-labeled axon terminals were carried out in the cat primary visual cortex (V1). Extracellular iontophoretic injections of 5% biocytin were made into V1 of five adult cats. The animals were perfused 24-48 h after the injections. Labeled-axon fragments were considered to comprise two presumptive groups, according to the qualitative features, thickness, bouton features and appearance of terminal arbors. Forty axon fragments (20 for each presumptive group) were digitized using a microscope with motorized stage and a z-encoder, attached to a microcomputer. The densities of boutons, branching points and axon segments per mm of axon as well as axon segment length were used for comparison of the two groups. The two qualitative groups were confirmed to contain two axon types (I and II), according to cluster analysis of characteristics of the 40 axons in our sample. Forward stepwise discriminant analysis retained two variables as predictors of group membership: axonal length and bouton density. Parametric and non-parametric tests were employed for statistical comparisons (significance at P < 0.01). Type II axon fragments showed the greatest densities of boutons, axonal segments and branching points and the smallest values of length of segments ( P < 0.01). Both the qualitative and quantitative differences found for both types of axons suggest that they belong to different functional classes of neurons, namely spiny (type I) and smooth neurons (type II). Computer-assisted morphometric analysis of individual axon fragments seems to be a suitable approach with which different axon types can be objectively distinguished from each other.

  20. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Motor Cortex: Hemispheric Asymmetry and Handedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Ashe, James; Hendrich, Kristy; Ellermann, Jutta M.; Merkle, Hellmut; Ugurbil, Kamil; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    1993-07-01

    A hemispheric asymmetry in the functional activation of the human motor cortex during contralateral (C) and ipsilateral (I) finger movements, especially in right-handed subjects, was documented with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength (4 tesla). Whereas the right motor cortex was activated mostly during contralateral finger movements in both right-handed (C/I mean area of activation = 36.8) and left-handed (C/I = 29.9) subjects, the left motor cortex was activated substantially during ipsilateral movements in left-handed subjects (C/I = 5.4) and even more so in right-handed subjects (C/I = 1.3).

  1. Increased resting state connectivity between ipsilesional motor cortex and contralesional premotor cortex after transcranial direct current stimulation with physical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joyce L; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive stimulation of the brain using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) during motor rehabilitation can improve the recovery of movements in individuals with stroke. However, the neural substrates that underlie the clinical improvements are not well understood. In this proof-of-principle open-label pilot study, five individuals with stroke received 10 sessions of tDCS while undergoing usual care physical/occupational therapy for the arm and hand. Motor impairment as indexed by the Upper Extremity Fugl Meyer assessment was significantly reduced after the intervention. Resting state fMRI connectivity increased between ipsilesional motor cortex and contralesional premotor cortex after the intervention. These findings provide preliminary evidence that the neural underpinnings of tDCS coupled with rehabilitation exercises, may be mediated by interactions between motor and premotor cortex. The latter, of which has been shown to play an important role in the recovery of movements post-stroke. Our data suggest premotor cortex could be tested as a target region for non-invasive brain-stimulation to enhance connectivity between regions that might be beneficial for stroke motor recovery. PMID:26980052

  2. Interactions between Pain and the Motor Cortex: Insights from Research on Phantom Limb Pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Léonard, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Pain is a significantly disabling problem that often interacts with other deficits during the rehabilitation process. The aim of this paper is to review evidence of interactions between pain and the motor cortex in order to attempt to answer the following questions: (1) Does acute pain interfere with motor-cortex activity? (2) Does chronic pain interfere with motor-cortex activity, and, conversely, does motor-cortex plasticity contribute to chronic pain? (3) Can the induction of motor plasticity by means of motor-cortex stimulation decrease pain? (4) Can motor training result in both motor-cortex reorganization and pain relief? Summary of Key Points: Acute experimental pain has been clearly shown to exert an inhibitory influence over the motor cortex, which can interfere with motor learning capacities. Current evidence also suggests a relationship between chronic pain and motor-cortex reorganization, but it is still unclear whether one causes the other. However, there is growing evidence that interventions aimed at normalizing motor-cortex organization can lead to pain relief. Conclusions: Interactions between pain and the motor cortex are complex, and more studies are needed to understand these interactions in our patients, as well as to develop optimal rehabilitative strategies. PMID:22654236

  3. Cardiovascular and respiratory responses evoked from the posterior cerebellar cortex and fastigial nucleus in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D J; Pascoe, J P; Paton, J F; Spyer, K M

    1987-01-01

    1. In both anaesthetized and decerebrate cats the cerebellar cortex (lobules VI, VII, VIII, IX and X) and the fastigial nucleus (f.n.) have been stimulated electrically, and chemically, while recording changes in phrenic nerve discharge, heart rate, arterial blood pressure and renal and femoral blood flow. 2. Stimulation of lobules VI, VII, VIII and Xb failed to elicit any cardiovascular or respiratory changes. Activation of lobule IX (the uvula), and in some preparations sub-lobule Xa, evoked cardiovascular and respiratory responses consistently. In the anaesthetized cat, electrical stimulation of the uvula evoked apnoea, a small bradycardia and a depressor response associated with vasodilatation in the hindlimb vascular bed. In contrast, stimulation in an equivalent region in a decerebrate preparation elicited an apneustic discharge, a pronounced tachycardia and a rise in arterial pressure with vasoconstriction in both renal and femoral vascular beds. In both the anaesthetized and decerebrate animals the pattern of response elicited by chemical activation was identical to that seen with electrical stimulation. 3. Electrical, or chemical, stimulation after administration of anaesthetic to the decerebrate cat then evoked an identical pattern of response to that seen in the 'intact' anaesthetized animal. This evidence suggests that the reversal in the pattern of the response in an effect of the anaesthetic agent and not the decerebration itself. 4. The only area of the f.n. to produce cardiovascular effects was the rostral region. Electrical stimulation of the rostral f.n. in both anaesthetized and decerebrate preparations inhibited central inspiratory activity and evoked tachycardia, along with a pressor response associated with vasoconstriction in both renal and femoral vascular beds. In contrast, chemical excitation of those sites in the rostral f.n. shown previously to produce pronounced cardiovascular and respiratory changes failed to elicit any changes in the

  4. Protein Synthesis Inhibition in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Slows Motor Recovery in Rats.

    PubMed

    Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Leemburg, Susan; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger; Hosp, Jonas Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity and reorganization of brain motor networks are thought to enable recovery of motor function after ischemic stroke. Especially in the cortex surrounding the ischemic scar (i.e., peri-infarct cortex), evidence for lasting reorganization has been found at the level of neurons and networks. This reorganization depends on expression of specific genes and subsequent protein synthesis. To test the functional relevance of the peri-infarct cortex for recovery we assessed the effect of protein synthesis inhibition within this region after experimental stroke. Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a skilled-reaching task (SRT) until they reached plateau performance. A photothrombotic stroke was induced in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the trained paw. The SRT was re-trained after stroke while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) or saline were injected into the peri-infarct cortex through implanted cannulas. ANI injections reduced protein synthesis within the peri-infarct cortex by 69% and significantly impaired recovery of reaching performance through re-training. Improvement of motor performance within a single training session remained intact, while improvement between training sessions was impaired. ANI injections did not affect infarct size. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition within the peri-infarct cortex impairs recovery of motor deficits after ischemic stroke by interfering with consolidation of motor memory between training sessions but not short-term improvements within one session. PMID:27314672

  5. Protein Synthesis Inhibition in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Slows Motor Recovery in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Leemburg, Susan; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger; Hosp, Jonas Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity and reorganization of brain motor networks are thought to enable recovery of motor function after ischemic stroke. Especially in the cortex surrounding the ischemic scar (i.e., peri-infarct cortex), evidence for lasting reorganization has been found at the level of neurons and networks. This reorganization depends on expression of specific genes and subsequent protein synthesis. To test the functional relevance of the peri-infarct cortex for recovery we assessed the effect of protein synthesis inhibition within this region after experimental stroke. Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a skilled-reaching task (SRT) until they reached plateau performance. A photothrombotic stroke was induced in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the trained paw. The SRT was re-trained after stroke while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) or saline were injected into the peri-infarct cortex through implanted cannulas. ANI injections reduced protein synthesis within the peri-infarct cortex by 69% and significantly impaired recovery of reaching performance through re-training. Improvement of motor performance within a single training session remained intact, while improvement between training sessions was impaired. ANI injections did not affect infarct size. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition within the peri-infarct cortex impairs recovery of motor deficits after ischemic stroke by interfering with consolidation of motor memory between training sessions but not short-term improvements within one session. PMID:27314672

  6. A threat to a virtual hand elicits motor cortex activation.

    PubMed

    González-Franco, Mar; Peck, Tabitha C; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Slater, Mel

    2014-03-01

    We report an experiment where participants observed an attack on their virtual body as experienced in an immersive virtual reality (IVR) system. Participants sat by a table with their right hand resting upon it. In IVR, they saw a virtual table that was registered with the real one, and they had a virtual body that substituted their real body seen from a first person perspective. The virtual right hand was collocated with their real right hand. Event-related brain potentials were recorded in two conditions, one where the participant's virtual hand was attacked with a knife and a control condition where the knife only struck the virtual table. Significantly greater P450 potentials were obtained in the attack condition confirming our expectations that participants had a strong illusion of the virtual hand being their own, which was also strongly supported by questionnaire responses. Higher levels of subjective virtual hand ownership correlated with larger P450 amplitudes. Mu-rhythm event-related desynchronization in the motor cortex and readiness potential (C3-C4) negativity were clearly observed when the virtual hand was threatened-as would be expected, if the real hand was threatened and the participant tried to avoid harm. Our results support the idea that event-related potentials may provide a promising non-subjective measure of virtual embodiment. They also support previous experiments on pain observation and are placed into context of similar experiments and studies of body perception and body ownership within cognitive neuroscience.

  7. Pallidal stimulation suppresses pathological dysrhythmia in the parkinsonian motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that deep brain stimulation (DBS) yields substantial clinical benefit in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the therapeutic mechanism of DBS remains a matter of debate. Recent studies demonstrate that DBS targeting the globus pallidus internus (GPi-DBS) suppresses pathological oscillations in firing rate and between-cell spike synchrony in the vicinity of the electrode but has negligible effects on population-level firing rate or the prevalence of burst firing. The present investigation examines the downstream consequences of GPi-DBS at the level of the primary motor cortex (M1). Multielectrode, single cell recordings were conducted in the M1 of two parkinsonian nonhuman primates (Macaca fasicularis). GPi-DBS that induced significant reductions in muscular rigidity also reduced the prevalence of both beta (12–30 Hz) oscillations in single unit firing rates and of coherent spiking between pairs of M1 neurons. In individual neurons, GPi-DBS-induced increases in mean firing rate were three times more common than decreases; however, averaged across the population of M1 neurons, GPi-DBS induced no net change in mean firing rate. The population-level prevalence of burst firing was also not affected by GPi-DBS. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that suppression of both pathological, beta oscillations and synchronous activity throughout the cortico-basal ganglia network is a major therapeutic mechanism of GPi-DBS. PMID:25652922

  8. Caudate nucleus and programming behaviour in cats: role of dopamine in switching motor patterns.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, R; Schwarz, M; Sontag, K H; Cools, A R

    1984-10-01

    Cats were trained to walk on a specially designed treadmill: the cats were able to collect food pellets by switching motor patterns with or without the help of exteroceptive stimuli inherent to the treadmill. To study the involvement of the caudate nucleus in switching motor patterns cats received intracaudate bilateral injections of haloperidol. In addition, in a final series of experiments, EMG recordings of two antagonistic muscles, together with recordings of characteristic changes in the length of one muscle, were made before and after the haloperidol treatment. Haloperidol treatment resulted in a decreased number of motor patterns which were not directed by exteroceptive stimuli (non-exteroceptively directed motor patterns). This haloperidol-induced effect was dose-dependently counteracted by the additional intracaudate injections of apomorphine which per se remained ineffective. Haloperidol neither altered the number of food collecting attempts nor reduced the number of exteroceptively directed motor patterns. Furthermore, haloperidol did not affect the capacity to switch to proprioceptively directed motor patterns. Finally, haloperidol did not produce abnormalities in EMG and length signals recorded from hindlimb muscles. It is concluded that haloperidol selectively reduced the animal's capacity to 'programme non-stimulus directed motor behaviour'. The data are discussed in view of their significance for therapy of patients with basal ganglia disorders, such as patients suffering from Parkinson's disease.

  9. Recurrent Supplementary Motor Area Syndrome Following Repeat Brain Tumor Resection Involving Supplementary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Taylor J.; Buckley, Robert T.; Morton, Ryan; Gabikian, Patrik; Silbergeld, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Supplementary motor area (SMA) syndrome occurs after surgery involving the SMA and is characterized by contralateral hemiparesis with or without speech impairment (dependent on involvement of the dominant SMA), which is transient and characteristically resolves over the course of weeks to months. Objective Recurrent SMA syndrome after repeat craniotomy has not been previously described. In this manuscript, we describe the presentation and clinical course of patients who developed recurrent SMA syndrome after redo resection of tumors involving the SMA. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 15 patients who underwent repeated resection of low grade glioma from the superior and middle frontal gyrus (SFG, MFG). Of these patients we identified six cases of recurrent SMA syndrome. Results Six patient had a documented SMA syndrome occurring after initial and subsequent resection of tumor in proximity to the SMA. Intraoperative localization of eloquent motor and language cortex was achieved in each patient using a combination of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and electrocortical stimulation mapping. Location of tumor and extent of resection was examined with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Conclusion This series demonstrates that recurrent SMA syndrome occurs in patients undergoing repeat resection of tumors involving the SMA. The presence of recurrent SMA syndrome provides support for reorganization of SMA function to adjacent ipsilateral cortex after resection. Patients with recurrent neoplasms of the SMA should be counseled on the possibility of recurrent SMA syndrome. PMID:26087004

  10. The importance of being agranular: a comparative account of visual and motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shipp, Stewart

    2005-01-01

    The agranular cortex is an important landmark—anatomically, as the architectural flag of mammalian motor cortex, and historically, as a spur to the development of theories of localization of function. But why, exactly, do agranularity and motor function go together? To address this question, it should be noted that not only does motor cortex lack granular layer four, it also has a relatively thinner layer three. Therefore, it is the two layers which principally constitute the ascending pathways through the sensory (granular) cortex that have regressed in motor cortex: simply stated, motor cortex does not engage in serial reprocessing of incoming sensory data. But why should a granular architecture not be demanded by the downstream relay of motor instructions through the motor cortex? The scant anatomical evidence available regarding laminar patterns suggests that the pathways from frontal and premotor areas to the primary motor cortex actually bear a greater resemblance to the descending, or feedback connections of sensory cortex that avoid the granular layer. The action of feedback connections is generally described as ‘modulatory’ at a cellular level, or ‘selective’ in terms of systems analysis. By contrast, ascending connections may be labelled ‘driving’ or ‘instructive’. Where the motor cortex uses driving inputs, they are most readily identified as sensory signals instructing the visual location of targets and the kinaesthetic state of the body. Visual signals may activate motor concepts, e.g. ‘mirror neurons’, and the motor plan must select the appropriate muscles and forces to put the plan into action, if the decision to move is taken. This, perhaps, is why ‘driving’ motor signals might be inappropriate—the optimal selection and its execution are conditional upon both kinaesthetic and motivational factors. The argument, summarized above, is constructed in honour of Korbinian Brodmann's centenary, and follows two of the fundamental

  11. Photoacoustic imaging of functional domains in primary motor cortex in rhesus macaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheney, Paul; Yang, Xinmai

    2012-02-01

    Functional detection in primate brains has particular advantages because of the similarity between non-human primate brain and human brain and the potential for relevance to a wide range of conditions such as stroke and Parkinson's disease. In this research, we used photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technique to detect functional changes in primary motor cortex of awake rhesus monkeys. We observed strong increases in photoacoustic signal amplitude during both passive and active forelimb movement, which indicates an increase in total hemoglobin concentration resulting from activation of primary motor cortex. Further, with PAI approach, we were able to obtain depthresolved functional information from primary motor cortex. The results show that PAI can reliably detect primary motor cortex activation associated with forelimb movement in rhesus macaques with a minimal-invasive approach.

  12. Causal Influence of Articulatory Motor Cortex on Comprehending Single Spoken Words: TMS Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Schomers, Malte R.; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Weigand, Anne; Bajbouj, Malek; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Classic wisdom had been that motor and premotor cortex contribute to motor execution but not to higher cognition and language comprehension. In contrast, mounting evidence from neuroimaging, patient research, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) suggest sensorimotor interaction and, specifically, that the articulatory motor cortex is important for classifying meaningless speech sounds into phonemic categories. However, whether these findings speak to the comprehension issue is unclear, because language comprehension does not require explicit phonemic classification and previous results may therefore relate to factors alien to semantic understanding. We here used the standard psycholinguistic test of spoken word comprehension, the word-to-picture-matching task, and concordant TMS to articulatory motor cortex. TMS pulses were applied to primary motor cortex controlling either the lips or the tongue as subjects heard critical word stimuli starting with bilabial lip-related or alveolar tongue-related stop consonants (e.g., “pool” or “tool”). A significant cross-over interaction showed that articulatory motor cortex stimulation delayed comprehension responses for phonologically incongruent words relative to congruous ones (i.e., lip area TMS delayed “tool” relative to “pool” responses). As local TMS to articulatory motor areas differentially delays the comprehension of phonologically incongruous spoken words, we conclude that motor systems can take a causal role in semantic comprehension and, hence, higher cognition. PMID:25452575

  13. Functional networks of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in cat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kexin; Shih, Jonathan Y; Winer, Jeffery A; Schreiner, Christoph E

    2011-09-14

    Inhibitory interneurons constitute ∼20% of auditory cortical cells and are essential for shaping sensory processing. Connectivity patterns of interneurons in relation to functional organization principles are not well understood. We contrasted the connection patterns of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells in two functionally distinct cortical regions: the tonotopic, narrowly frequency-tuned module [central narrow band (cNB)] of cat central primary auditory cortex (AI) and the nontonotopic, broadly tuned second auditory field (AII). Interneuronal connectivity patterns and laminar distribution were identified by combining a retrograde tracer (wheat-germ agglutinin apo-horseradish peroxidase colloidal gold) with labeling of the Ca(2+) binding protein parvalbumin (Pv), a marker for the GABAergic interneurons usually described physiologically as fast-spiking neurons. In AI, parvalbumin-positive (Pv+) cells constituted 13% of the retrograde labeled cells in the immediate vicinity of the injection site, compared to 10% in AII. The retrograde labeling of Pv+ cells along isofrequency countours was confined to the cNB. The spatial spread of labeled excitatory neurons in AI was more than twice that found for Pv+ cells. By contrast, in the AII, the spread of Pv+ cells was nearly equal to that of excitatory neurons. The retrograde labeling of Pv+ cells was anisotropic in AI and isotropic in AII. This demonstration of inhibitory networks in auditory cortex reveals that the connections of cat GABAergic AI and AII cells follow different anatomical plans and thus contribute differently to the shaping of neural response properties. The finding that local connectivity of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in AI is closely aligned with spectral integration properties demonstrates the critical role of inhibition in creating distinct processing modules in AI.

  14. 3D visualization of movements can amplify motor cortex activation during subsequent motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Sollfrank, Teresa; Hart, Daniel; Goodsell, Rachel; Foster, Jonathan; Tan, Tele

    2015-01-01

    A repetitive movement practice by motor imagery (MI) can influence motor cortical excitability in the electroencephalogram (EEG). This study investigated if a realistic visualization in 3D of upper and lower limb movements can amplify motor related potentials during subsequent MI. We hypothesized that a richer sensory visualization might be more effective during instrumental conditioning, resulting in a more pronounced event related desynchronization (ERD) of the upper alpha band (10-12 Hz) over the sensorimotor cortices thereby potentially improving MI based brain-computer interface (BCI) protocols for motor rehabilitation. The results show a strong increase of the characteristic patterns of ERD of the upper alpha band components for left and right limb MI present over the sensorimotor areas in both visualization conditions. Overall, significant differences were observed as a function of visualization modality (VM; 2D vs. 3D). The largest upper alpha band power decrease was obtained during MI after a 3-dimensional visualization. In total in 12 out of 20 tasks the end-user of the 3D visualization group showed an enhanced upper alpha ERD relative to 2D VM group, with statistical significance in nine tasks.With a realistic visualization of the limb movements, we tried to increase motor cortex activation during subsequent MI. The feedback and the feedback environment should be inherently motivating and relevant for the learner and should have an appeal of novelty, real-world relevance or aesthetic value (Ryan and Deci, 2000; Merrill, 2007). Realistic visual feedback, consistent with the participant's MI, might be helpful for accomplishing successful MI and the use of such feedback may assist in making BCI a more natural interface for MI based BCI rehabilitation.

  15. 3D visualization of movements can amplify motor cortex activation during subsequent motor imagery

    PubMed Central

    Sollfrank, Teresa; Hart, Daniel; Goodsell, Rachel; Foster, Jonathan; Tan, Tele

    2015-01-01

    A repetitive movement practice by motor imagery (MI) can influence motor cortical excitability in the electroencephalogram (EEG). This study investigated if a realistic visualization in 3D of upper and lower limb movements can amplify motor related potentials during subsequent MI. We hypothesized that a richer sensory visualization might be more effective during instrumental conditioning, resulting in a more pronounced event related desynchronization (ERD) of the upper alpha band (10–12 Hz) over the sensorimotor cortices thereby potentially improving MI based brain-computer interface (BCI) protocols for motor rehabilitation. The results show a strong increase of the characteristic patterns of ERD of the upper alpha band components for left and right limb MI present over the sensorimotor areas in both visualization conditions. Overall, significant differences were observed as a function of visualization modality (VM; 2D vs. 3D). The largest upper alpha band power decrease was obtained during MI after a 3-dimensional visualization. In total in 12 out of 20 tasks the end-user of the 3D visualization group showed an enhanced upper alpha ERD relative to 2D VM group, with statistical significance in nine tasks.With a realistic visualization of the limb movements, we tried to increase motor cortex activation during subsequent MI. The feedback and the feedback environment should be inherently motivating and relevant for the learner and should have an appeal of novelty, real-world relevance or aesthetic value (Ryan and Deci, 2000; Merrill, 2007). Realistic visual feedback, consistent with the participant’s MI, might be helpful for accomplishing successful MI and the use of such feedback may assist in making BCI a more natural interface for MI based BCI rehabilitation. PMID:26347642

  16. Multisynaptic projections from the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex to hand and mouth representations of the monkey primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Shigehiro; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Lu, Xiaofeng; Nambu, Atsushi; Takada, Masahiko

    2013-07-01

    Different sectors of the prefrontal cortex have distinct neuronal connections with higher-order sensory areas and/or limbic structures and are related to diverse aspects of cognitive functions, such as visual working memory and reward-based decision-making. Recent studies have revealed that the prefrontal cortex (PF), especially the lateral PF, is also involved in motor control. Hence, different sectors of the PF may contribute to motor behaviors with distinct body parts. To test this hypothesis anatomically, we examined the patterns of multisynaptic projections from the PF to regions of the primary motor cortex (MI) that represent the arm, hand, and mouth, using retrograde transsynaptic transport of rabies virus. Four days after rabies injections into the hand or mouth region, particularly dense neuron labeling was observed in the ventrolateral PF, including the convexity part of ventral area 46. After the rabies injections into the mouth region, another dense cluster of labeled neurons was seen in the orbitofrontal cortex (area 13). By contrast, rabies labeling of PF neurons was rather sparse in the arm-injection cases. The present results suggest that the PF-MI multisynaptic projections may be organized such that the MI hand and mouth regions preferentially receive cognitive information for execution of elaborate motor actions. PMID:23664864

  17. Postnatal accumulation of intermediate filaments in the cat and human primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Song, Seoho; Mitchell, Donald E; Crowder, Nathan A; Duffy, Kevin R

    2015-10-01

    A principal characteristic of the mammalian visual system is its high capacity for plasticity in early postnatal development during a time commonly referred to as the critical period. The progressive diminution of plasticity with age is linked to the emergence of a collection of molecules called molecular brakes that reduce plasticity and stabilize neural circuits modified by earlier visual experiences. Manipulation of braking molecules either pharmacologically or though experiential alteration enhances plasticity and promotes recovery from visual impairment. The stability of neural circuitry is increased by intermediate filamentous proteins of the cytoskeleton such as neurofilaments and α-internexin. We examined levels of these intermediate filaments within cat and human primary visual cortex (V1) across development to determine whether they accumulate following a time course consistent with a molecular brake. In both species, levels of intermediate filaments increased considerably throughout early postnatal life beginning shortly after the peak of the critical period, with the highest levels measured in adults. Neurofilament phosphorylation was also observed to increase throughout development, raising the possibility that posttranslational modification by phosphorylation reduces plasticity due to increased protein stability. Finally, an approach to scale developmental time points between species is presented that compares the developmental profiles of intermediate filaments between cats and humans. Although causality between intermediate filaments and plasticity was not directly tested in this study, their accumulation relative to the critical period indicates that they may contribute to the decline in plasticity with age, and may also constrain the success of treatments for visual disorders applied in adulthood.

  18. Effects of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal response characteristics in cat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K; Nayagam, David A X; Wise, Andrew K; Heffer, Leon F; Landry, Thomas G; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that neonatal deafness of 7-13 months duration leads to loss of cochleotopy in the primary auditory cortex (AI) that can be reversed by cochlear implant use. Here we describe the effects of a similar duration of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal processing. Specifically, we compared the temporal resolution of neurons in AI of young adult normal-hearing cats that were acutely deafened and implanted immediately prior to recording with that in three groups of neonatally deafened cats. One group of neonatally deafened cats received no chronic stimulation. The other two groups received up to 8 months of either low- or high-rate (50 or 500 pulses per second per electrode, respectively) stimulation from a clinical cochlear implant, initiated at 10 weeks of age. Deafness of 7-13 months duration had no effect on the duration of post-onset response suppression, latency, latency jitter, or the stimulus repetition rate at which units responded maximally (best repetition rate), but resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the ability of units to respond to every stimulus in a train (maximum following rate). None of the temporal response characteristics of the low-rate group differed from those in acutely deafened controls. In contrast, high-rate stimulation had diverse effects: it resulted in decreased suppression duration, longer latency and greater jitter relative to all other groups, and an increase in best repetition rate and cut-off rate relative to acutely deafened controls. The minimal effects of moderate-duration deafness on temporal processing in the present study are in contrast to its previously-reported pronounced effects on cochleotopy. Much longer periods of deafness have been reported to result in significant changes in temporal processing, in accord with the fact that duration of deafness is a major factor influencing outcome in human cochlear implantees.

  19. Effect of intracaudate haloperidol and apomorphine on switching motor patterns upon current behaviour of cats.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, M; Cools, A

    1988-07-01

    Previous studies using various experimental set-ups, have shown that the dopaminergic activity in the caudate nucleus (CN) is involved in the organism's ability to switch from one motor or behavioural program to another without the help of external stimuli (switching arbitrarily). The main purpose of the present study was to investigate how arbitrarily switching motor patterns manifests itself in an 'open field situation'. Therefore, the effects of CN application of haloperidol (12.5 micrograms/5 microliter) and apomorphine (0.6 micrograms/5 microliter) were analyzed on the ability to switch from one motor program to any other program in cats habituated to an observation cage. Application of haloperidol decreased switching. In addition the number of distinct motor patterns declined after injecting haloperidol into the CN. The haloperidol-induced effect, however, was not selectively restricted to any particular motor pattern. Switching from one motor pattern to another increased after CN injection of apomorphine. Moreover, the number of distinct motor patterns increased after CN injection of apomorphine. However, the effect of CN application of apomorphine was not selectively restricted to any particular motor pattern. Since previous studies have demonstrated that various expressions of dopaminergic CN activity are funnelled through the deeper layers of the superior colliculus (dl-SC), it was hypothesized that switching induced by CN application of apomorphine may also be channelled through the dl-SC. Therefore the effect of dl-SC-injected muscimol (75 ng/1 microliter) was analyzed on the ability to switch motor programs in cats pretreated with apomorphine. Injection of muscimol into the dl-SC reduced both the number of distinct motor patterns and the number of switchings in cats pretreated with apomorphine.

  20. Developmental changes in motor cortex activity as infants develop functional motor skills.

    PubMed

    Nishiyori, Ryota; Bisconti, Silvia; Meehan, Sean K; Ulrich, Beverly D

    2016-09-01

    Despite extensive research examining overt behavioral changes of motor skills in infants, the neural basis underlying the emergence of functional motor control has yet to be determined. We used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to record hemodynamic activity of the primary motor cortex (M1) from 22 infants (11 six month-olds, 11 twelve month-olds) as they reached for an object, and stepped while supported over a treadmill. Based on the developmental systems framework, we hypothesized that as infants increased goal-directed experience, neural activity shifts from a diffused to focal pattern. Results showed that for reaching, younger infants showed diffuse areas of M1 activity that became focused by 12 months. For elicited stepping, younger infants produced much less M1 activity which shifted to diffuse activity by 12 months. Thus, the data suggest that as infants gain goal-directed experience, M1 activity emerges, initially showing a diffuse area of activity, becoming refined as the behavior stabilizes. Our data begin to document the cortical activity underlying early functional skill acquisition.

  1. Redundant information encoding in primary motor cortex during natural and prosthetic motor control.

    PubMed

    So, Kelvin; Ganguly, Karunesh; Jimenez, Jessica; Gastpar, Michael C; Carmena, Jose M

    2012-06-01

    Redundant encoding of information facilitates reliable distributed information processing. To explore this hypothesis in the motor system, we applied concepts from information theory to quantify the redundancy of movement-related information encoded in the macaque primary motor cortex (M1) during natural and neuroprosthetic control. Two macaque monkeys were trained to perform a delay center-out reaching task controlling a computer cursor under natural arm movement (manual control, 'MC'), and using a brain-machine interface (BMI) via volitional control of neural ensemble activity (brain control, 'BC'). During MC, we found neurons in contralateral M1 to contain higher and more redundant information about target direction than ipsilateral M1 neurons, consistent with the laterality of movement control. During BC, we found that the M1 neurons directly incorporated into the BMI ('direct' neurons) contained the highest and most redundant target information compared to neurons that were not incorporated into the BMI ('indirect' neurons). This effect was even more significant when comparing to M1 neurons of the opposite hemisphere. Interestingly, when we retrained the BMI to use ipsilateral M1 activity, we found that these neurons were more redundant and contained higher information than contralateral M1 neurons, even though ensembles from this hemisphere were previously less redundant during natural arm movement. These results indicate that ensembles most associated to movement contain highest redundancy and information encoding, which suggests a role for redundancy in proficient natural and prosthetic motor control.

  2. A linear model fails to predict orientation selectivity of cells in the cat visual cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Volgushev, M; Vidyasagar, T R; Pei, X

    1996-01-01

    1. Postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) evoked by visual stimulation in simple cells in the cat visual cortex were recorded using in vivo whole-cell technique. Responses to small spots of light presented at different positions over the receptive field and responses to elongated bars of different orientations centred on the receptive field were recorded. 2. To test whether a linear model can account for orientation selectivity of cortical neurones, responses to elongated bars were compared with responses predicted by a linear model from the receptive field map obtained from flashing spots. 3. The linear model faithfully predicted the preferred orientation, but not the degree of orientation selectivity or the sharpness of orientation tuning. The ratio of optimal to non-optimal responses was always underestimated by the model. 4. Thus non-linear mechanisms, which can include suppression of non-optimal responses and/or amplification of optimal responses, are involved in the generation of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex. PMID:8930828

  3. Vestibular, cochlear and trigeminal projections to the cortex in the anterior suprasylvian sulcus of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Landgren, S.; Silfvenius, H.; Wolsk, D.

    1967-01-01

    1. Cats anaesthetized with chloralose were used. Potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the vestibular, cochlear, facial, trigeminal and chorda tympani nerves were recorded with micro-electrodes in the cortex in the anterior syprasylvian sulcus. 2. Negative focal potentials with a latency of 3 msec were evoked by stimulation of the contralateral and ipsilateral vestibular nerves. These potentials were located in the lower and upper banks of the sulcus at a level just caudal to the projection of the Group I muscle afferents to the lower bank. 3. The cochlear projections were located mainly in the lower bank partially overlapping the vestibular and the Group I fields. 4. Trigeminal responses were recorded in both banks of the sulcus but were of largest amplitude and shortest latency rostrally in the upper bank. The potentials evoked by the chorda tympani had a similar distribution but were of low amplitude. 5. The hypothesis is suggested, that the cortex in the anterior suprasylvian sulcus plays a role in the orientation of the body and head towards auditory stimuli. PMID:4860992

  4. Cooling in cat visual cortex: stability of orientation selectivity despite changes in responsiveness and spike width.

    PubMed

    Girardin, C C; Martin, K A C

    2009-12-01

    Cooling is one of several reversible methods used to inactivate local regions of the brain. Here the effect of cooling was studied in the primary visual cortex (area 17) of anaesthetized and paralyzed cats. When the cortical surface temperature was cooled to about 0 degrees C, the temperature 2 mm below the surface was 20 degrees C. The lateral spread of cold was uniform over a distance of at least approximately 700 microm from the cooling loop. When the cortex was cooled the visually evoked responses to drifting sine wave gratings were strongly reduced in proportion to the cooling temperature, but the mean spontaneous activity of cells decreased only slightly. During cooling the strongest effect on the orientation tuning curve was on the peak response and the orientation bandwidth did not change, suggesting a divisive mechanism. Our results show that the cortical circuit is robust in the face of cooling and retains its essential functionality, albeit with reduced responsiveness. The width of the extracellular spike waveform measured at half height increased by 50% on average during cooling in almost all cases and recovered after re-warming. The increase in spike width was inversely correlated with the change in response amplitude to the optimal stimulus. The extracellular spike shape can thus be used as a reliable and fast method to assess whether changes in the responses of a neuron are due to direct cooling or distant effects on a source of its afferents.

  5. Effect of Contrast on Visual Spatial Summation in Different Cell Categories in Cat Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Ding, Ai-Min; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Li-Peng; Wang, Ling; Song, Xue-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cell classes have been found in the primary visual cortex, but the relationship between cell types and spatial summation has seldom been studied. Parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons can be distinguished from pyramidal neurons based on their briefer action potential durations. In this study, we classified V1 cells into fast-spiking units (FSUs) and regular-spiking units (RSUs) and then examined spatial summation at high and low contrast. Our results revealed that the excitatory classical receptive field and the suppressive non-classical receptive field expanded at low contrast for both FSUs and RSUs, but the expansion was more marked for the RSUs than for the FSUs. For most V1 neurons, surround suppression varied as the contrast changed from high to low. However, FSUs exhibited no significant difference in the strength of suppression between high and low contrast, although the overall suppression decreased significantly at low contrast for the RSUs. Our results suggest that the modulation of spatial summation by stimulus contrast differs across populations of neurons in the cat primary visual cortex. PMID:26636580

  6. Putting an "end" to the motor cortex representations of action words.

    PubMed

    de Zubicaray, Greig; Arciuli, Joanne; McMahon, Katie

    2013-11-01

    Language processing is an example of implicit learning of multiple statistical cues that provide probabilistic information regarding word structure and use. Much of the current debate about language embodiment is devoted to how action words are represented in the brain, with motor cortex activity evoked by these words assumed to selectively reflect conceptual content and/or its simulation. We investigated whether motor cortex activity evoked by manual action words (e.g., caress) might reflect sensitivity to probabilistic orthographic-phonological cues to grammatical category embedded within individual words. We first review neuroimaging data demonstrating that nonwords evoke activity much more reliably than action words along the entire motor strip, encompassing regions proposed to be action category specific. Using fMRI, we found that disyllabic words denoting manual actions evoked increased motor cortex activity compared with non-body-part-related words (e.g., canyon), activity which overlaps that evoked by observing and executing hand movements. This result is typically interpreted in support of language embodiment. Crucially, we also found that disyllabic nonwords containing endings with probabilistic cues predictive of verb status (e.g., -eve) evoked increased activity compared with nonwords with endings predictive of noun status (e.g., -age) in the identical motor area. Thus, motor cortex responses to action words cannot be assumed to selectively reflect conceptual content and/or its simulation. Our results clearly demonstrate motor cortex activity reflects implicit processing of ortho-phonological statistical regularities that help to distinguish a word's grammatical class. PMID:23806137

  7. Role of the cerebellum and motor cortex in the regulation of visually controlled locomotion.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D M; Marple-Horvat, D E

    1996-04-01

    An account is given of the current state of knowledge of the contributions of the cerebellum and the forelimb motor cortex (MC) to the neural control of walking movements in the cat. The main emphasis is on information obtained by recording from single MC and cerebellar neurones in chronically instrumented cats engaged in walking on the rungs of a horizontal ladder, a form of locomotion that is heavily dependent on visual input and for which the integrity of MC is essential. Evidence from the authors' laboratory and from other studies is presented which establishes that MC neurones, including pyramidal tract neurones, show higher levels of activity during ladder walking than during overground walking (i.e., when less constraint exists over the locus of footfall) and that this increase is greatest in late swing-early stance in the contralateral forelimb, consistent with one role of MC being to help determine the locus of footfall. However, many MC neurones develop peak activity at other times in the step cycle, and a comparison with recordings during treadmill walking suggests MC may also help regulate stance duration when walking speed is an important performance variable. Recordings from Purkinje cells and cerebellar nuclear neurones show that during ladder walking step-related activity is widespread in the vermal, paravermal, and crural regions of cortex and in the interposed and dentate nuclei. Nuclear cell activity is so timed that it could be contributing to producing the locomotor rhythms evident in MC cells, although this is not yet proven. Results are also presented and discussed relating to MC and cerebellar neuronal responses that occur when a step onto an unstable rung results in an unexpected external perturbation of the forelimb step cycle. MC responses begin with onset latency as short as 20 ms so that MC may assist spinal reflex mechanisms to produce a post hoc compensatory change in motor output. However, work in progress suggests that corresponding

  8. Absolute Depth Sensitivity in Cat Primary Visual Cortex under Natural Viewing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pigarev, Ivan N; Levichkina, Ekaterina V

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of 3D perception, investigated in many laboratories, have defined depth either relative to the fixation plane or to other objects in the visual scene. It is obvious that for efficient perception of the 3D world, additional mechanisms of depth constancy could operate in the visual system to provide information about absolute distance. Neurons with properties reflecting some features of depth constancy have been described in the parietal and extrastriate occipital cortical areas. It has also been shown that, for some neurons in the visual area V1, responses to stimuli of constant angular size differ at close and remote distances. The present study was designed to investigate whether, in natural free gaze viewing conditions, neurons tuned to absolute depths can be found in the primary visual cortex (area V1). Single-unit extracellular activity was recorded from the visual cortex of waking cats sitting on a trolley in front of a large screen. The trolley was slowly approaching the visual scene, which consisted of stationary sinusoidal gratings of optimal orientation rear-projected over the whole surface of the screen. Each neuron was tested with two gratings, with spatial frequency of one grating being twice as high as that of the other. Assuming that a cell is tuned to a spatial frequency, its maximum response to the grating with a spatial frequency twice as high should be shifted to a distance half way closer to the screen in order to attain the same size of retinal projection. For hypothetical neurons selective to absolute depth, location of the maximum response should remain at the same distance irrespective of the type of stimulus. It was found that about 20% of neurons in our experimental paradigm demonstrated sensitivity to particular distances independently of the spatial frequencies of the gratings. We interpret these findings as an indication of the use of absolute depth information in the primary visual cortex. PMID:27547179

  9. Absolute Depth Sensitivity in Cat Primary Visual Cortex under Natural Viewing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pigarev, Ivan N.; Levichkina, Ekaterina V.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of 3D perception, investigated in many laboratories, have defined depth either relative to the fixation plane or to other objects in the visual scene. It is obvious that for efficient perception of the 3D world, additional mechanisms of depth constancy could operate in the visual system to provide information about absolute distance. Neurons with properties reflecting some features of depth constancy have been described in the parietal and extrastriate occipital cortical areas. It has also been shown that, for some neurons in the visual area V1, responses to stimuli of constant angular size differ at close and remote distances. The present study was designed to investigate whether, in natural free gaze viewing conditions, neurons tuned to absolute depths can be found in the primary visual cortex (area V1). Single-unit extracellular activity was recorded from the visual cortex of waking cats sitting on a trolley in front of a large screen. The trolley was slowly approaching the visual scene, which consisted of stationary sinusoidal gratings of optimal orientation rear-projected over the whole surface of the screen. Each neuron was tested with two gratings, with spatial frequency of one grating being twice as high as that of the other. Assuming that a cell is tuned to a spatial frequency, its maximum response to the grating with a spatial frequency twice as high should be shifted to a distance half way closer to the screen in order to attain the same size of retinal projection. For hypothetical neurons selective to absolute depth, location of the maximum response should remain at the same distance irrespective of the type of stimulus. It was found that about 20% of neurons in our experimental paradigm demonstrated sensitivity to particular distances independently of the spatial frequencies of the gratings. We interpret these findings as an indication of the use of absolute depth information in the primary visual cortex. PMID:27547179

  10. Absolute Depth Sensitivity in Cat Primary Visual Cortex under Natural Viewing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pigarev, Ivan N; Levichkina, Ekaterina V

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of 3D perception, investigated in many laboratories, have defined depth either relative to the fixation plane or to other objects in the visual scene. It is obvious that for efficient perception of the 3D world, additional mechanisms of depth constancy could operate in the visual system to provide information about absolute distance. Neurons with properties reflecting some features of depth constancy have been described in the parietal and extrastriate occipital cortical areas. It has also been shown that, for some neurons in the visual area V1, responses to stimuli of constant angular size differ at close and remote distances. The present study was designed to investigate whether, in natural free gaze viewing conditions, neurons tuned to absolute depths can be found in the primary visual cortex (area V1). Single-unit extracellular activity was recorded from the visual cortex of waking cats sitting on a trolley in front of a large screen. The trolley was slowly approaching the visual scene, which consisted of stationary sinusoidal gratings of optimal orientation rear-projected over the whole surface of the screen. Each neuron was tested with two gratings, with spatial frequency of one grating being twice as high as that of the other. Assuming that a cell is tuned to a spatial frequency, its maximum response to the grating with a spatial frequency twice as high should be shifted to a distance half way closer to the screen in order to attain the same size of retinal projection. For hypothetical neurons selective to absolute depth, location of the maximum response should remain at the same distance irrespective of the type of stimulus. It was found that about 20% of neurons in our experimental paradigm demonstrated sensitivity to particular distances independently of the spatial frequencies of the gratings. We interpret these findings as an indication of the use of absolute depth information in the primary visual cortex.

  11. Laterality of movement-related activity reflects transformation of coordinates in ventral premotor cortex and primary motor cortex of monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Kiyoshi

    2007-10-01

    The ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and the primary motor cortex (MI) of monkeys participate in various sensorimotor integrations, such as the transformation of coordinates from visual to motor space, because the areas contain movement-related neuronal activity reflecting either visual or motor space. In addition to relationship to visual and motor space, laterality of the activity could indicate stages in the visuomotor transformation. Thus we examined laterality and relationship to visual and motor space of movement-related neuronal activity in the PMv and MI of monkeys performing a fast-reaching task with the left or right arm, toward targets with visual and motor coordinates that had been dissociated by shift prisms. We determined laterality of each activity quantitatively and classified it into four types: activity that consistently depended on target locations in either head-centered visual coordinates (V-type) or motor coordinates (M-type) and those that had either differential or nondifferential activity for both coordinates (B- and N-types). A majority of M-type neurons in the areas had preferences for reaching movements with the arm contralateral to the hemisphere where neuronal activity was recorded. In contrast, most of the V-type neurons were recorded in the PMv and exhibited less laterality than the M-type. The B- and N-types were recorded in the PMv and MI and exhibited intermediate properties between the V- and M-types when laterality and correlations to visual and motor space of them were jointly examined. These results suggest that the cortical motor areas contribute to the transformation of coordinates to generate final motor commands.

  12. Cortical spreading depression and involvement of the motor cortex, auditory cortex, and cerebellum in eyeblink classical conditioning of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Case, Gilbert R; Lavond, David G; Thompson, Richard F

    2002-09-01

    The interrelationships of cerebellar and cerebral neural circuits in the eyeblink paradigm were explored with the controlled application of cortical spreading depression (CSD) and lidocaine in the New Zealand albino rabbit. The initial research focus was directed toward the involvement of the motor cortex in the conditioned eyeblink response. However, CSD timing and triangulation results indicate that other areas in the cerebral cortex, particularly the auditory cortex (acoustic conditioned stimulus), appear to be critical for the CSD effect on the eyeblink response. In summary: (1) CSD can be elicited, monitored, and timed and its side effects controlled in 97% of awake rabbits in the right and/or left cerebral hemisphere(s) during eyeblink conditioning. (2) The motor cortex appears to play little or no part in classical conditioning of the eyeblink in the rabbit in the delay paradigm. (3) Inactivating the auditory cortex with CSD or lidocaine temporarily impairs the conditioned response during the first 5 to 15 days of training, but has little effect past that point.

  13. Activation of the motor cortex during phasic rapid eye movement sleep

    PubMed Central

    De Carli, Fabrizio; Proserpio, Paola; Morrone, Elisa; Sartori, Ivana; Ferrara, Michele; Gibbs, Steve Alex; De Gennaro, Luigi; Lo Russo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    When dreaming during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, we can perform complex motor behaviors while remaining motionless. How the motor cortex behaves during this state remains unknown. Here, using intracerebral electrodes sampling the human motor cortex in pharmacoresistant epileptic patients, we report a pattern of electroencephalographic activation during REM sleep similar to that observed during the performance of a voluntary movement during wakefulness. This pattern is present during phasic REM sleep but not during tonic REM sleep, the latter resembling relaxed wakefulness. This finding may help clarify certain phenomenological aspects observed in REM sleep behavior disorder. Ann Neurol 2016;79:326–330 PMID:26575212

  14. Oscillations in local field potentials of the primate motor cortex during voluntary movement.

    PubMed Central

    Sanes, J N; Donoghue, J P

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence and distribution of oscillatory activity in local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the frontal motor cortex of behaving monkeys performing skilled voluntary movements. LFPs were recorded simultaneously from up to 12 sites distributed throughout motor cortex while monkeys performed a visually guided, instructed delay task using the wrist or digits. Oscillatory activity between 15 and 50 Hz was evident in the LFP recorded from both primary motor cortex and premotor areas. Oscillations occurred preferentially before the visual cue to initiate movement but were infrequent during movement. Oscillations typically stopped before movement initiation during the wrist task, although they often continued into the initial phases of movement during the digit task. The relationship of oscillations to task performance was consistent across trials over periods of many months, although the amplitude and duration of oscillations varied across trials and days. Interactions between pairs of LFP recordings, evaluated with cross-correlation analysis, revealed synchronous oscillations over long distances (> 7 mm) and across primary motor cortex and premotor recording sites. These studies demonstrate that oscillations recorded in the LFP in motor cortex during trained motor tasks are not related to the details of movement execution but may be related to aspects of movement preparation. PMID:8506287

  15. Laminar and regional distribution of galanin binding sites in cat and monkey visual cortex determined by in vitro receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Rosier, A.M.; Vandesande, F.; Orban, G.A. )

    1991-03-08

    The distribution of galanin (GAL) binding sites in the visual cortex of cat and monkey was determined by autoradiographic visualization of ({sup 125}I)-GAL binding to tissue sections. Binding conditions were optimized and, as a result, the binding was saturable and specific. In cat visual cortex, GAL binding sites were concentrated in layers I, IVc, V, and VI. Areas 17, 18, and 19 exhibited a similar distribution pattern. In monkey primary visual cortex, the highest density of GAL binding sites was observed in layers II/III, lower IVc, and upper V. Layers IVA and VI contained moderate numbers of GAL binding sites, while layer I and the remaining parts of layer IV displayed the lowest density. In monkey secondary visual cortex, GAL binding sites were mainly concentrated in layers V-VI. Layer IV exhibited a moderate density, while the supragranular layers contained the lowest proportion of GAL binding sites. In both cat and monkey, we found little difference between regions subserving central and those subserving peripheral vision. Similarities in the distribution of GAL and acetylcholine binding sites are discussed.

  16. Complex Organization of Human Primary Motor Cortex: A High-Resolution fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Jeffrey D.; Aflalo, Tyson N.; Kastner, Sabine; Graziano, Michael S. A.

    2008-01-01

    A traditional view of the human motor cortex is that it contains an overlapping sequence of body part representations from the tongue in a ventral location to the foot in a dorsal location. In this study, high-resolution functional MRI (1.5 × 1.5 × 2 mm) was used to examine the somatotopic map in the lateral motor cortex of humans, to determine whether it followed the traditional somatotopic order or whether it contained any violations of that somatotopic order. The arm and hand representation had a complex organization in which the arm was relatively emphasized in two areas: one dorsal and the other ventral to a region that emphasized the fingers. This violation of a traditional somatotopic order suggests that the motor cortex is not merely a map of the body but is topographically shaped by other influences, perhaps including correlations in the use of body parts in the motor repertoire. PMID:18684903

  17. Postnatal accumulation of intermediate filaments in the cat and human primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Song, Seoho; Mitchell, Donald E; Crowder, Nathan A; Duffy, Kevin R

    2015-10-01

    A principal characteristic of the mammalian visual system is its high capacity for plasticity in early postnatal development during a time commonly referred to as the critical period. The progressive diminution of plasticity with age is linked to the emergence of a collection of molecules called molecular brakes that reduce plasticity and stabilize neural circuits modified by earlier visual experiences. Manipulation of braking molecules either pharmacologically or though experiential alteration enhances plasticity and promotes recovery from visual impairment. The stability of neural circuitry is increased by intermediate filamentous proteins of the cytoskeleton such as neurofilaments and α-internexin. We examined levels of these intermediate filaments within cat and human primary visual cortex (V1) across development to determine whether they accumulate following a time course consistent with a molecular brake. In both species, levels of intermediate filaments increased considerably throughout early postnatal life beginning shortly after the peak of the critical period, with the highest levels measured in adults. Neurofilament phosphorylation was also observed to increase throughout development, raising the possibility that posttranslational modification by phosphorylation reduces plasticity due to increased protein stability. Finally, an approach to scale developmental time points between species is presented that compares the developmental profiles of intermediate filaments between cats and humans. Although causality between intermediate filaments and plasticity was not directly tested in this study, their accumulation relative to the critical period indicates that they may contribute to the decline in plasticity with age, and may also constrain the success of treatments for visual disorders applied in adulthood. PMID:25823892

  18. Inhibitory and Excitatory Motor Cortex Dysfunction Persists in the Chronic Post-Stroke Recovery Phase

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, M.P.; Vaughn, H.N.; Greene, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Establish differences in intracortical facilitation (ICF) and inhibition (ICI) between survivors of stroke and healthy individuals. Methods Fourteen chronic stroke survivors and 19 healthy subjects were investigated using single and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). TMS was applied over the motor cortex in thelesioned (stroke survivors) or left (healthy subjects) hemisphere. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were collected from the contra lateral first dorsal interosseus. Subjects received 40 pseudo-randomized trials consisting of 10 trials for each: conditioning stimulus, test stimulus (TS), ICF, and ICI. Between the groups, we compared MEP amplitudes for TS, ICF, and ICI, motor threshold (MT), and ICF/ICI ratio. Results Compared to healthy individuals, the stroke group exhibited higher MT and lower ICI; the difference ICF neared significance. The ICF/ICI ratio was significantly lower in the stroke group and close to 1, indicating little difference between ICF and ICI responses. These differences demonstrate that motor cortex excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms are impaired for individuals in the chronic post-stroke recovery phase. Conclusions Compared to healthy individuals, both global and intracortical TMS measures reveal reduced motor cortex excitability in survivors of stroke. Interventions that normalize motor cortex excitability may promote better neurophysiological conditions for motor recovery to occur. PMID:25350636

  19. Patterns of axon collateralization of identified supragranular pyramidal neurons in the cat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Ojima, H; Honda, C N; Jones, E G

    1991-01-01

    Nine pyramidal neurons in layers II and III of cat primary auditory cortex (AI) were fully reconstructed after intracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase or biocytin. Each neuron was functionally characterized according to its position relative to an anteroposterior sequence of best frequency responses. All labeled somata were in layers II or III and gave rise to typical apical and basal dendritic arbors as well as to extensive systems of axon collaterals. The primary axon of all except 1 cell entered the white matter and was probably directed toward other cortical areas ipsi- or contralaterally. Two major intracortical collateral systems emerged from the main axon in AI, one ending in the vicinity of the cell and the second at a distance. (1) Many local and recurrent collaterals, given off in layers III and V, contributed terminal branches to the formation of a columnar pattern of terminations extending superficially and deeply into the soma. The column extended through layers I-V, with some constriction in the middle portion corresponding to layer IV. (2) The axon of each cell also gave rise to 2-5 thick, long-range collaterals in layers III and/or V. These ran parallel to the pial surface for several millimeters. At several points along these long horizontal collaterals, vertically directed branches emerged to form columnar terminations, again extending through layers I-V. These columns did not overlap with that formed in the vicinity of the cell, and were situated at distances 500-1200 microns from the cell body. When viewed in the tangential plane, horizontal collaterals were oriented, on the whole, dorsoventrally with respect to the surface of the cortex. This may correspond to the organization of isofrequency bands previously described in cats. The results suggest that the major spread of excitation in AI is mediated by horizontal collaterals of pyramidal cells and that it occurs along the lines of isofrequency domains. Within the latter the

  20. The effects of localized inactivation of somatosensory cortex, area 3a, on area 2 in cats.

    PubMed

    Porter, L L; Izraeli, R

    1993-01-01

    In cats and primates, area 3a of the somatosensory cortex is the primary recipient of proprioceptive input (Phillips et al., 1971). Neurons in area 3a project to area 2 (Pons and Kaas, 1986; Porter, 1991), where somatic input relayed from the cortex and the thalamus may be integrated (Iwamura and Tanaka, 1978a,c). The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of area 3a input on neuronal activity in area 2 of cats. Extracellular recording techniques were used to identify neurons in area 2 that responded to deep stimulation of the contralateral forepaw. Neurons in area 3a that responded to the same receptive field modality and location as those in area 2 were also isolated. Single-unit or multiunit responses and evoked potentials to electrical stimulation of the shared peripheral receptive field and spontaneous activity were recorded from areas 2 and 3a. Lidocaine, a local anesthetic, was injected at the area 3a recording site to block neuronal activity. Spontaneous activity and receptive fields were abolished and evoked potentials were considerably diminished at the injection site, immediately after lidocaine was administered. Changes in unit responses, spontaneous activity, and evoked potentials in area 2 were monitored following inactivation of the somatotopically "matched" site in area 3a. Unit activity was recorded at 15 matched sites. In area 2, changes in unit responses to the peripheral stimulation and/or in spontaneous activity were observed at most of the recording sites following inactivation of area 3a. Spontaneous activity rates changed at 63% of the sites (mean change = 85%). Unit responses to the peripheral stimulation changed at 57% of the recording sites (mean change = 47%). The remaining sites in area 2 did not show lidocaine-induced changes. These sites may not have been connected with the matched sites in area 3a. Spontaneous activity and unit responses were not always similarly altered at a given site; sometimes one increased while

  1. A Dendritic Mechanism for Decoding Traveling Waves: Principles and Applications to Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Heitmann, Stewart; Boonstra, Tjeerd; Breakspear, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Traveling waves of neuronal oscillations have been observed in many cortical regions, including the motor and sensory cortex. Such waves are often modulated in a task-dependent fashion although their precise functional role remains a matter of debate. Here we conjecture that the cortex can utilize the direction and wavelength of traveling waves to encode information. We present a novel neural mechanism by which such information may be decoded by the spatial arrangement of receptors within the dendritic receptor field. In particular, we show how the density distributions of excitatory and inhibitory receptors can combine to act as a spatial filter of wave patterns. The proposed dendritic mechanism ensures that the neuron selectively responds to specific wave patterns, thus constituting a neural basis of pattern decoding. We validate this proposal in the descending motor system, where we model the large receptor fields of the pyramidal tract neurons — the principle outputs of the motor cortex — decoding motor commands encoded in the direction of traveling wave patterns in motor cortex. We use an existing model of field oscillations in motor cortex to investigate how the topology of the pyramidal cell receptor field acts to tune the cells responses to specific oscillatory wave patterns, even when those patterns are highly degraded. The model replicates key findings of the descending motor system during simple motor tasks, including variable interspike intervals and weak corticospinal coherence. By additionally showing how the nature of the wave patterns can be controlled by modulating the topology of local intra-cortical connections, we hence propose a novel integrated neuronal model of encoding and decoding motor commands. PMID:24204220

  2. Motor, cognitive, and affective areas of the cerebral cortex influence the adrenal medulla

    PubMed Central

    Dum, Richard P.; Levinthal, David J.; Strick, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Modern medicine has generally viewed the concept of “psychosomatic” disease with suspicion. This view arose partly because no neural networks were known for the mind, conceptually associated with the cerebral cortex, to influence autonomic and endocrine systems that control internal organs. Here, we used transneuronal transport of rabies virus to identify the areas of the primate cerebral cortex that communicate through multisynaptic connections with a major sympathetic effector, the adrenal medulla. We demonstrate that two broad networks in the cerebral cortex have access to the adrenal medulla. The larger network includes all of the cortical motor areas in the frontal lobe and portions of somatosensory cortex. A major component of this network originates from the supplementary motor area and the cingulate motor areas on the medial wall of the hemisphere. These cortical areas are involved in all aspects of skeletomotor control from response selection to motor preparation and movement execution. The second, smaller network originates in regions of medial prefrontal cortex, including a major contribution from pregenual and subgenual regions of anterior cingulate cortex. These cortical areas are involved in higher-order aspects of cognition and affect. These results indicate that specific multisynaptic circuits exist to link movement, cognition, and affect to the function of the adrenal medulla. This circuitry may mediate the effects of internal states like chronic stress and depression on organ function and, thus, provide a concrete neural substrate for some psychosomatic illness. PMID:27528671

  3. Motor, cognitive, and affective areas of the cerebral cortex influence the adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Dum, Richard P; Levinthal, David J; Strick, Peter L

    2016-08-30

    Modern medicine has generally viewed the concept of "psychosomatic" disease with suspicion. This view arose partly because no neural networks were known for the mind, conceptually associated with the cerebral cortex, to influence autonomic and endocrine systems that control internal organs. Here, we used transneuronal transport of rabies virus to identify the areas of the primate cerebral cortex that communicate through multisynaptic connections with a major sympathetic effector, the adrenal medulla. We demonstrate that two broad networks in the cerebral cortex have access to the adrenal medulla. The larger network includes all of the cortical motor areas in the frontal lobe and portions of somatosensory cortex. A major component of this network originates from the supplementary motor area and the cingulate motor areas on the medial wall of the hemisphere. These cortical areas are involved in all aspects of skeletomotor control from response selection to motor preparation and movement execution. The second, smaller network originates in regions of medial prefrontal cortex, including a major contribution from pregenual and subgenual regions of anterior cingulate cortex. These cortical areas are involved in higher-order aspects of cognition and affect. These results indicate that specific multisynaptic circuits exist to link movement, cognition, and affect to the function of the adrenal medulla. This circuitry may mediate the effects of internal states like chronic stress and depression on organ function and, thus, provide a concrete neural substrate for some psychosomatic illness. PMID:27528671

  4. Short-latency projections to the cat cerebral cortex from skin and muscle afferents in the contralateral forelimb

    PubMed Central

    Oscarsson, O.; Rosén, I.

    1966-01-01

    1. The potentials evoked in the first sensorimotor area on stimulation of muscle and skin nerves in the contralateral forelimb were recorded in preparations with either the dorsal funiculus (DF) or the spinocervical tract (SCT) interrupted. 2. The short-latency, surface-positive potentials in these preparations are mediated by the remaining path, either the DF or SCT. 3. Cutaneous afferents project through both paths to two discrete areas which correspond to the classical sensory and motor cortices (Fig. 10 A and B). The projection areas are not identical: the DF path seems to activate most effectively the sensory cortex; and the SCT path, most effectively the motor cortex. 4. The potentials evoked from cutaneous nerves have a similar latency in the two areas. On stimulation of the superficial radial nerve the latency was about 4·5 msec in preparations with intact DF, and about 5·3 msec in preparations with intact SCT. 5. High threshold muscle afferents project to the same areas as the cutaneous afferents. 6. Group I muscle afferents project, exclusively through the DF path, to an area distinct from the two cutaneous projection areas (Fig. 10C). It occupies a caudal part of the motor cortex and an intermediate zone between the sensory and motor cortices. 7. The projection areas are compared with the recent cytoarchitectonic map of Hassler & Muhs-Clement (1964) (Fig. 10D). 8. It is suggested that the afferent projections to the motor cortex and the intermediate zone are used in the integration of movements elicited from the cortex. The general similarity in the organization of afferent paths to the motor cortex and the cerebellum is pointed out. PMID:5937410

  5. Differential grey matter changes in sensorimotor cortex related to exceptional fine motor skills.

    PubMed

    Stoeckel, M Cornelia; Morgenroth, Farina; Buetefisch, Cathrin M; Seitz, Rüdiger J

    2012-01-01

    Functional changes in sensorimotor representation occur in response to use and lesion throughout life. Emerging evidence suggests that functional changes are paralleled by respective macroscopic structural changes. In the present study we used voxel-based morphometry to investigate sensorimotor cortex in subjects with congenitally malformed upper extremities. We expected increased or decreased grey matter to parallel the enlarged or reduced functional representations we reported previously. More specifically, we expected decreased grey matter values in lateral sensorimotor cortex related to compromised hand function and increased grey matter values in medial sensorimotor cortex due to compensatory foot use. We found a medial cluster of grey matter increase in subjects with frequent, hand-like compensatory foot use. This increase was predominantly seen for lateral premotor, supplementary motor, and motor areas and only marginally involved somatosensory cortex. Contrary to our expectation, subjects with a reduced number of fingers, who had shown shrinkage of the functional hand representation previously, did not show decreased grey matter values within lateral sensorimotor cortex. Our data suggest that functional plastic changes in sensorimotor cortex can be associated with increases in grey matter but may also occur in otherwise macroscopically normal appearing grey matter volumes. Furthermore, macroscopic structural changes in motor and premotor areas may be observed without respective changes in somatosensory cortex.

  6. Sexual motivation is reflected by stimulus-dependent motor cortex excitability

    PubMed Central

    Schecklmann, Martin; Engelhardt, Kristina; Konzok, Julian; Rupprecht, Rainer; Greenlee, Mark W.; Mokros, Andreas; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Sexual behavior involves motivational processes. Findings from both animal models and neuroimaging in humans suggest that the recruitment of neural motor networks is an integral part of the sexual response. However, no study so far has directly linked sexual motivation to physiologically measurable changes in cerebral motor systems in humans. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation in hetero- and homosexual men, we here show that sexual motivation modulates cortical excitability. More specifically, our results demonstrate that visual sexual stimuli corresponding with one’s sexual orientation, compared with non-corresponding visual sexual stimuli, increase the excitability of the motor cortex. The reflection of sexual motivation in motor cortex excitability provides evidence for motor preparation processes in sexual behavior in humans. Moreover, such interrelationship links theoretical models and previous neuroimaging findings of sexual behavior. PMID:25556214

  7. Sexual motivation is reflected by stimulus-dependent motor cortex excitability.

    PubMed

    Schecklmann, Martin; Engelhardt, Kristina; Konzok, Julian; Rupprecht, Rainer; Greenlee, Mark W; Mokros, Andreas; Langguth, Berthold; Poeppl, Timm B

    2015-08-01

    Sexual behavior involves motivational processes. Findings from both animal models and neuroimaging in humans suggest that the recruitment of neural motor networks is an integral part of the sexual response. However, no study so far has directly linked sexual motivation to physiologically measurable changes in cerebral motor systems in humans. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation in hetero- and homosexual men, we here show that sexual motivation modulates cortical excitability. More specifically, our results demonstrate that visual sexual stimuli corresponding with one's sexual orientation, compared with non-corresponding visual sexual stimuli, increase the excitability of the motor cortex. The reflection of sexual motivation in motor cortex excitability provides evidence for motor preparation processes in sexual behavior in humans. Moreover, such interrelationship links theoretical models and previous neuroimaging findings of sexual behavior. PMID:25556214

  8. Sexual motivation is reflected by stimulus-dependent motor cortex excitability.

    PubMed

    Schecklmann, Martin; Engelhardt, Kristina; Konzok, Julian; Rupprecht, Rainer; Greenlee, Mark W; Mokros, Andreas; Langguth, Berthold; Poeppl, Timm B

    2015-08-01

    Sexual behavior involves motivational processes. Findings from both animal models and neuroimaging in humans suggest that the recruitment of neural motor networks is an integral part of the sexual response. However, no study so far has directly linked sexual motivation to physiologically measurable changes in cerebral motor systems in humans. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation in hetero- and homosexual men, we here show that sexual motivation modulates cortical excitability. More specifically, our results demonstrate that visual sexual stimuli corresponding with one's sexual orientation, compared with non-corresponding visual sexual stimuli, increase the excitability of the motor cortex. The reflection of sexual motivation in motor cortex excitability provides evidence for motor preparation processes in sexual behavior in humans. Moreover, such interrelationship links theoretical models and previous neuroimaging findings of sexual behavior.

  9. Functional lateralization in cingulate cortex predicts motor recovery after basal ganglia stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Chen, Zengai; Su, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Yajing; Xu, Qun; Xu, Jianrong; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-02-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) is involved in higher order motor control such as movement planning and execution of complex motor synergies. Neuroimaging study on stroke patients specifically with BG lesions would help to clarify the consequence of BG damage on motor control. In this paper, we performed a longitudinal study in the stroke patients with lesions in BG regions across three motor recovery stages, i.e., less than 2week (Session 1), 1-3m (Session 2) and more than 3m (Session 3). The patients showed an activation shift from bilateral hemispheres during early sessions (<3m) to the ipsilesional cortex in late session (>3m), suggesting a compensation effect from the contralesional hemisphere during motor recovery. We found that the lateralization of cerebellum(CB) for affected hand task correlated with patients' concurrent Fugl-Meyer index (FMI) in Session 2. Moreover, the cingulate cortex lateralization index in Session 2 was shown to significantly correlate with subsequent FMI change between Session 3 and Session 2, which serves as a prognostic marker for motor recovery. Our findings consolidated the close interactions between BG and CB during the motor recovery after stroke. The dominance of activation in contralateral cingulate cortex was associated with a better motor recovery, suggesting the important role of ipsilesional attention modulation in the early stage after BG stroke. PMID:26742641

  10. Action Verbs and the Primary Motor Cortex: A Comparative TMS Study of Silent Reading, Frequency Judgments, and Motor Imagery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasino, Barbara; Fink, Gereon R.; Sparing, Roland; Dafotakis, Manuel; Weiss, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied to the hand area of the left primary motor cortex or, as a control, to the vertex (STIMULATION: TMS[subscript M1] vs. TMS[subscript vertex]) while right-handed volunteers silently read verbs related to hand actions. We examined three different tasks and time points for stimulation…

  11. Spectrotemporal Processing in Spectral Tuning Modules of Cat Primary Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Atencio, Craig A.; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral integration properties show topographical order in cat primary auditory cortex (AI). Along the iso-frequency domain, regions with predominantly narrowly tuned (NT) neurons are segregated from regions with more broadly tuned (BT) neurons, forming distinct processing modules. Despite their prominent spatial segregation, spectrotemporal processing has not been compared for these regions. We identified these NT and BT regions with broad-band ripple stimuli and characterized processing differences between them using both spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) and nonlinear stimulus/firing rate transformations. The durations of STRF excitatory and inhibitory subfields were shorter and the best temporal modulation frequencies were higher for BT neurons than for NT neurons. For NT neurons, the bandwidth of excitatory and inhibitory subfields was matched, whereas for BT neurons it was not. Phase locking and feature selectivity were higher for NT neurons. Properties of the nonlinearities showed only slight differences across the bandwidth modules. These results indicate fundamental differences in spectrotemporal preferences - and thus distinct physiological functions - for neurons in BT and NT spectral integration modules. However, some global processing aspects, such as spectrotemporal interactions and nonlinear input/output behavior, appear to be similar for both neuronal subgroups. The findings suggest that spectral integration modules in AI differ in what specific stimulus aspects are processed, but they are similar in the manner in which stimulus information is processed. PMID:22384036

  12. tDCS-induced alterations in GABA concentration within primary motor cortex predict motor learning and motor memory: a 7 T magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyoung; Stephenson, Mary C; Morris, Peter G; Jackson, Stephen R

    2014-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability in a polarity specific manner and has been shown to influence learning and memory. tDCS may have both on-line and after-effects on learning and memory, and the latter are thought to be based upon tDCS-induced alterations in neurochemistry and synaptic function. We used ultra-high-field (7 T) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), together with a robotic force adaptation and de-adaptation task, to investigate whether tDCS-induced alterations in GABA and Glutamate within motor cortex predict motor learning and memory. Note that adaptation to a robot-induced force field has long been considered to be a form of model-based learning that is closely associated with the computation and 'supervised' learning of internal 'forward' models within the cerebellum. Importantly, previous studies have shown that on-line tDCS to the cerebellum, but not to motor cortex, enhances model-based motor learning. Here we demonstrate that anodal tDCS delivered to the hand area of the left primary motor cortex induces a significant reduction in GABA concentration. This effect was specific to GABA, localised to the left motor cortex, and was polarity specific insofar as it was not observed following either cathodal or sham stimulation. Importantly, we show that the magnitude of tDCS-induced alterations in GABA concentration within motor cortex predicts individual differences in both motor learning and motor memory on the robotic force adaptation and de-adaptation task.

  13. Dynamic Re-wiring of Neural Circuits in the Motor Cortex in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lalchandani, Rupa R.; Cui, Yuting; Shu, Yu; Xu, Tonghui; Ding, Jun B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Dynamic adaptations in synaptic plasticity are critical for learning new motor skills and maintaining memory throughout life, which rapidly decline with Parkinson's disease (PD). Plasticity in the motor cortex is important for acquisition and maintenance of novel motor skills, but how the loss of dopamine in PD leads to disrupted structural and functional plasticity in the motor cortex is not well understood. Here, we utilized mouse models of PD and 2-photon imaging to show that dopamine depletion resulted in structural changes in the motor cortex. We further discovered that dopamine D1 and D2 receptor signaling were linked to selectively and distinctly regulating these aberrant changes in structural and functional plasticity. Our findings suggest that both D1 and D2 receptor signaling regulate motor cortex plasticity, and loss of dopamine results in atypical synaptic adaptations that may contribute to the impairment of motor performance and motor memory observed in PD. PMID:26237365

  14. Differential Modification of Cortical and Thalamic Projections to Cat Primary Auditory Cortex Following Early- and Late-Onset Deafness.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Nicole; Butler, Blake E; Lomber, Stephen G

    2015-10-15

    Following sensory deprivation, primary somatosensory and visual cortices undergo crossmodal plasticity, which subserves the remaining modalities. However, controversy remains regarding the neuroplastic potential of primary auditory cortex (A1). To examine this, we identified cortical and thalamic projections to A1 in hearing cats and those with early- and late-onset deafness. Following early deafness, inputs from second auditory cortex (A2) are amplified, whereas the number originating in the dorsal zone (DZ) decreases. In addition, inputs from the dorsal medial geniculate nucleus (dMGN) increase, whereas those from the ventral division (vMGN) are reduced. In late-deaf cats, projections from the anterior auditory field (AAF) are amplified, whereas those from the DZ decrease. Additionally, in a subset of early- and late-deaf cats, area 17 and the lateral posterior nucleus (LP) of the visual thalamus project concurrently to A1. These results demonstrate that patterns of projections to A1 are modified following deafness, with statistically significant changes occurring within the auditory thalamus and some cortical areas. Moreover, we provide anatomical evidence for small-scale crossmodal changes in projections to A1 that differ between early- and late-onset deaf animals, suggesting that potential crossmodal activation of primary auditory cortex differs depending on the age of deafness onset.

  15. Properties of motor units in the first deep lumbrical muscle of the cat's foot.

    PubMed

    Kernell, D; Ducati, A; Sjöholm, H

    1975-11-01

    Isometric contractions of single motor units were studied in the first deep lumbrical muscle of the cat's hind-foot. Motor units with short twitch contraction times (15-20 msec) generally differed from those with longer ones (23-50 msec; contraction time measured in unpotentiated twitches) in showing (1) a greater maximum tetanic tension, (2) a smaller resistance to fatigue, (3) more post-tetanic potentiation of twitch tension, and (4) no post-tetanic occurrence of repetitive activity in response to single nerve stimuli (such "post-tetanic repetitive activity" was seen in several of the slower units). The ratio between unpotentiated twitch tension and maximum tetanic tension was similar for units with brief and long contraction times. The peak-to-peak amplitude of a single motor unit spike, recorded with gross electrodes, tended to be directly proportional to the maximum tetanic tension of the same motor unit.

  16. Motor cortex bilateral motor representation depends on subcortical and interhemispheric interactions.

    PubMed

    Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Carmel, Jason B; Martin, John H

    2009-05-13

    The corticospinal tract is a predominantly crossed pathway. Nevertheless, the primary motor cortex (M1) is activated bilaterally during unilateral movements and several animal studies showed that M1 has a bilateral motor representation. A better understanding of the uncrossed corticospinal system is especially important for elucidating its role in recovery of limb control after unilateral injury. We used intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) to determine the representation of contralateral and ipsilateral forelimb joints at single M1 sites in the rat. Most sites representing an ipsilateral joint corepresented the same joint contralaterally. We next determined whether ipsilateral responses evoked in one hemisphere depended on the function of M1 in the opposite hemisphere using reversible inactivation and pyramidal tract lesion. Ipsilateral responses were eliminated when the homotopic forelimb area of M1 in the opposite hemisphere was inactivated or when the pyramidal tract on the nonstimulated side was sectioned. To determine the role of transfer between M1 in each hemisphere we sectioned the corpus callosum, which produced a 33% increase in ipsilateral ICMS thresholds. Neither M1 inactivation nor callosal section changed contralateral response thresholds, indicating the absence of tonic excitatory or inhibitory drive to the opposite M1. Finally, ipsilateral responses following M1 inactivation and pyramidal tract lesion could be evoked after systemic administration of the K(+) channel blocker 4-aminopyridine, suggesting the presence of latent connections. Our findings show important interactions between the corticospinal systems from each side, especially at the spinal level. This has important implications for recruiting the ipsilateral corticospinal system after injury. PMID:19439597

  17. [Participation of the primary motor cortex in programming of muscle activity during catching of falling object].

    PubMed

    Kazennikov, O V; Lipshits, M I

    2011-01-01

    Object fell into the cup that sitting subject held between thumb and index fingers. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor cortex was performed early before and during anticipatory grip force increasing. Comparison of current EMG activity of adductor pollicis brevis and first dorsal interosseous muscles and responses of these muscles on TMS showed that responses were increased before the raising of muscle activity. From the other side only slight augmentation of responses was observed during subsequent strong muscle activation. It is assumed that the increasing of the TMS responses that occurred before the initiation of muscle activity reflects the enhancement ofthe motor cortex excitability associated to specific processes related to the motor cortex participation in programming of the muscles activities. PMID:22117465

  18. A computational role for bistability and traveling waves in motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Heitmann, Stewart; Gong, Pulin; Breakspear, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive changes in behavior require rapid changes in brain states yet the brain must also remain stable. We investigated two neural mechanisms for evoking rapid transitions between spatiotemporal synchronization patterns of beta oscillations (13–30 Hz) in motor cortex. Cortex was modeled as a sheet of neural oscillators that were spatially coupled using a center-surround connection topology. Manipulating the inhibitory surround was found to evoke reliable transitions between synchronous oscillation patterns and traveling waves. These transitions modulated the simulated local field potential in agreement with physiological observations in humans. Intermediate levels of surround inhibition were also found to produce bistable coupling topologies that supported both waves and synchrony. State-dependent perturbation between bistable states produced very rapid transitions but were less reliable. We surmise that motor cortex may thus employ state-dependent computation to achieve very rapid changes between bistable motor states when the demand for speed exceeds the demand for accuracy. PMID:22973223

  19. Reversible worsening of Parkinson disease motor symptoms after oral intake of Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw).

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (UT), also known as cat's claw, isa Peruvian Rubiaceae species widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide range of health problems. There is no report about the use, safety, and efficacy of UT in neurological disorders. We describe reversible worsening of motor signs in a patient with Parkinson disease after oral intake of UT, and some possible explanations are discussed.

  20. Oscillatory dynamics track motor performance improvement in human cortex.

    PubMed

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Quandt, Fanny; Krämer, Ulrike M; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schulz, Reinhard; Pannek, Heinz; Chang, Edward F; Knight, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Improving performance in motor skill acquisition is proposed to be supported by tuning of neural networks. To address this issue we investigated changes of phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (paCFC) in neuronal networks during motor performance improvement. We recorded intracranially from subdural electrodes (electrocorticogram; ECoG) from 6 patients who learned 3 distinct motor tasks requiring coordination of finger movements with an external cue (serial response task, auditory motor coordination task, go/no-go). Performance improved in all subjects and all tasks during the first block and plateaued in subsequent blocks. Performance improvement was paralled by increasing neural changes in the trial-to-trial paCFC between theta ([Formula: see text]; 4-8 Hz) phase and high gamma (HG; 80-180 Hz) amplitude. Electrodes showing this covariation pattern (Pearson's r ranging up to .45) were located contralateral to the limb performing the task and were observed predominantly in motor brain regions. We observed stable paCFC when task performance asymptoted. Our results indicate that motor performance improvement is accompanied by adjustments in the dynamics and topology of neuronal network interactions in the [Formula: see text] and HG range. The location of the involved electrodes suggests that oscillatory dynamics in motor cortices support performance improvement with practice. PMID:24586885

  1. Oscillatory Dynamics Track Motor Performance Improvement in Human Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Quandt, Fanny; Krämer, Ulrike M.; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schulz, Reinhard; Pannek, Heinz; Chang, Edward F.; Knight, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Improving performance in motor skill acquisition is proposed to be supported by tuning of neural networks. To address this issue we investigated changes of phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (paCFC) in neuronal networks during motor performance improvement. We recorded intracranially from subdural electrodes (electrocorticogram; ECoG) from 6 patients who learned 3 distinct motor tasks requiring coordination of finger movements with an external cue (serial response task, auditory motor coordination task, go/no-go). Performance improved in all subjects and all tasks during the first block and plateaued in subsequent blocks. Performance improvement was paralled by increasing neural changes in the trial-to-trial paCFC between theta (; 4–8 Hz) phase and high gamma (HG; 80–180 Hz) amplitude. Electrodes showing this covariation pattern (Pearson's r ranging up to .45) were located contralateral to the limb performing the task and were observed predominantly in motor brain regions. We observed stable paCFC when task performance asymptoted. Our results indicate that motor performance improvement is accompanied by adjustments in the dynamics and topology of neuronal network interactions in the and HG range. The location of the involved electrodes suggests that oscillatory dynamics in motor cortices support performance improvement with practice. PMID:24586885

  2. Oscillatory dynamics track motor performance improvement in human cortex.

    PubMed

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Quandt, Fanny; Krämer, Ulrike M; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schulz, Reinhard; Pannek, Heinz; Chang, Edward F; Knight, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Improving performance in motor skill acquisition is proposed to be supported by tuning of neural networks. To address this issue we investigated changes of phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (paCFC) in neuronal networks during motor performance improvement. We recorded intracranially from subdural electrodes (electrocorticogram; ECoG) from 6 patients who learned 3 distinct motor tasks requiring coordination of finger movements with an external cue (serial response task, auditory motor coordination task, go/no-go). Performance improved in all subjects and all tasks during the first block and plateaued in subsequent blocks. Performance improvement was paralled by increasing neural changes in the trial-to-trial paCFC between theta ([Formula: see text]; 4-8 Hz) phase and high gamma (HG; 80-180 Hz) amplitude. Electrodes showing this covariation pattern (Pearson's r ranging up to .45) were located contralateral to the limb performing the task and were observed predominantly in motor brain regions. We observed stable paCFC when task performance asymptoted. Our results indicate that motor performance improvement is accompanied by adjustments in the dynamics and topology of neuronal network interactions in the [Formula: see text] and HG range. The location of the involved electrodes suggests that oscillatory dynamics in motor cortices support performance improvement with practice.

  3. The ipsilateral motor cortex contributes to cross-limb transfer of performance gains after ballistic motor practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael; Hinder, Mark R; Gandevia, Simon C; Carroll, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Although it has long been known that practicing a motor task with one limb can improve performance with the limb opposite, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that improved performance with the untrained limb on a fastest possible (i.e. ballistic) movement task depends partly on cortical circuits located ipsilateral to the trained limb. The idea that crossed effects, which are important for the learning process, might occur in the 'untrained' hemisphere following ballistic training is based on the observation that tasks requiring strong descending drive generate extensive bilateral cortical activity. Twenty-one volunteers practiced a ballistic index finger abduction task with their right hand, and corticospinal excitability was assessed in two hand muscles (first dorsal interosseus, FDI; adductor digiti minimi, ADM). Eight control subjects did not train. After training, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS; 15 min at 1 Hz) was applied to the left (trained) or right (untrained) motor cortex to induce a 'virtual lesion'. A third training group received sham rTMS, and control subjects received rTMS to the right motor cortex. Performance and corticospinal excitability (for FDI) increased in both hands for training but not control subjects. rTMS of the left, trained motor cortex specifically reduced training-induced gains in motor performance for the right, trained hand, and rTMS of the right, untrained motor cortex specifically reduced performance gains for the left, untrained hand. Thus, cortical processes within the untrained hemisphere, ipsilateral to the trained hand, contribute to early retention of ballistic performance gains for the untrained limb.

  4. Motor Cortex Plasticity during Unilateral Finger Movement with Mirror Visual Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Kumru, Hatice; Albu, Sergiu; Pelayo, Raul; Rothwell, John; Opisso, Eloy; Leon, Daniel; Soler, Dolor; Tormos, Josep Maria

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity is one of the most important physiological mechanisms underlying motor recovery from brain lesions. Rehabilitation methods, such as mirror visual feedback therapy, which are based on multisensory integration of motor, cognitive, and perceptual processes, are considered effective methods to induce cortical reorganization. The present study investigated 3 different types of visual feedback (direct, mirrored, and blocked visual feedback: DVF, MVF, and BVF, resp.) on M1 cortex excitability and intracortical inhibition/facilitation at rest and during phasic unimanual motor task in 11 healthy individuals. The excitability of the ipsilateral M1 cortex and the intracortical facilitation increased during motor task performance in the DVF and MVF but not in the BVF condition. In addition, MVF induced cortical disinhibition of the ipsilateral hemisphere to the index finger performing the motor task, which was greater when compared to the BVF and restricted to the homologue first dorsal interosseous muscle. The visual feedback is relevant to M1 cortex excitability modulation but the MVF plays a crucial role in promoting changes in intracortical inhibition in comparison to BVF. Altogether, it can be concluded that a combination of motor training with MVF therapy may induce more robust neuroplastic changes through multisensory integration that is relevant to motor rehabilitation. PMID:26881121

  5. Dr. Otto Soltmann (1876) on development of the motor cortex and recovery after its removal in infancy.

    PubMed

    Finger, S; Beyer, T; Koehler, P J

    2000-09-15

    In 1870, Fritsch and Hitzig demonstrated that dogs have a motor cortex. In a chapter published 6 years later, Otto Soltmann studied the functional development of the motor cortex, which he believed functioned in willed movement. He was the first to show that the dog's motor cortex becomes electrically excitable at about 10 days of age, with the contralateral forepaw area appearing first. He also studied the effects of ablating the cortical motor regions unilaterally and bilaterally, and encountered a remarkable degree of sparing of function in his animals operated on as newborns, but not in older-operated dogs. Soltmann turned to the theory of functional take-over (vicariation) to account for the absence of deficits in his young animals. He was especially intrigued by the fact that electrical stimulation of a healthy motor cortex could produce bilateral matched movements, but only in dogs that sustained opposite motor cortex lesions very early in life.

  6. Motor skills training promotes motor functional recovery and induces synaptogenesis in the motor cortex and striatum after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Tamakoshi, Keigo; Ishida, Akimasa; Takamatsu, Yasuyuki; Hamakawa, Michiru; Nakashima, Hiroki; Shimada, Haruka; Ishida, Kazuto

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the effects of motor skills training on several types of motor function and synaptic plasticity following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with collagenase into the left striatum to induce ICH, and they were randomly assigned to the ICH or sham groups. Each group was divided into the motor skills training (acrobatic training) and control (no exercise) groups. The acrobatic group performed acrobatic training from 4 to 28 days after surgery. Motor functions were assessed by motor deficit score, the horizontal ladder test and the wide or narrow beam walking test at several time points after ICH. The number of ΔFosB-positive cells was counted using immunohistochemistry to examine neuronal activation, and the PSD95 protein levels were analyzed by Western blotting to examine synaptic plasticity in the bilateral sensorimotor cortices and striata at 14 and 29 days after ICH. Motor skills training following ICH significantly improved gross motor function in the early phase after ICH and skilled motor coordinated function in the late phase. The number of ΔFosB-positive cells in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex in the acrobatic group significantly increased compared to the control group. PSD95 protein expression in the motor cortex significantly increased in the late phase, and in the striatum, the protein level significantly increased in the early phase by motor skills training after ICH compared to no training after ICH. We demonstrated that motor skills training improved motor function after ICH in rats and enhanced the neural activity and synaptic plasticity in the striatum and sensorimotor cortex. PMID:24304717

  7. Event-related desynchronization reflects downregulation of intracortical inhibition in human primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Takemi, Mitsuaki; Masakado, Yoshihisa; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2013-09-01

    There is increasing interest in electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) as a tool for rehabilitation of upper limb motor functions in hemiplegic stroke patients. This type of BCI often exploits mu and beta oscillations in EEG recorded over the sensorimotor areas, and their event-related desynchronization (ERD) following motor imagery is believed to represent increased sensorimotor cortex excitability. However, it remains unclear whether the sensorimotor cortex excitability is actually correlated with ERD. Thus we assessed the association of ERD with primary motor cortex (M1) excitability during motor imagery of right wrist movement. M1 excitability was tested by motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), and intracortical facilitation (ICF) with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twenty healthy participants were recruited. The participants performed 7 s of rest followed by 5 s of motor imagery and received online visual feedback of the ERD magnitude of the contralateral hand M1 while performing the motor imagery task. TMS was applied to the right hand M1 when ERD exceeded predetermined thresholds during motor imagery. MEP amplitudes, SICI, and ICF were recorded from the agonist muscle of the imagined hand movement. Results showed that the large ERD during wrist motor imagery was associated with significantly increased MEP amplitudes and reduced SICI but no significant changes in ICF. Thus ERD magnitude during wrist motor imagery represents M1 excitability. This study provides electrophysiological evidence that a motor imagery task involving ERD may induce changes in corticospinal excitability similar to changes accompanying actual movements.

  8. Homuncular organization of human motor cortex as indicated by neuromagnetic recordings.

    PubMed

    Cheyne, D; Kristeva, R; Deecke, L

    1991-01-14

    Sources of neural activity identified using non-invasive measurements of cerebral magnetic fields (magnetoencephalography) were found to confirm the somatotopic organization of primary motor cortex for movements of different parts of the body in normal human subjects. Somatotopic maps produced with this technique showed slight differences to the 'classic' homunculus obtained from studies using direct cortical stimulation. These findings indicate that neuromagnetic recordings are capable of localizing cortical activity associated with voluntarily produced movements without the use of external stimulation and provide a new method for studying the functional organization of human motor cortex and its role in voluntary movement.

  9. Multiple representations of information in the primary auditory cortex of cats. I. Stability and change in slow components of unit activity after conditioning with a click conditioned stimulus.

    PubMed

    Woody, C D; Zotova, E; Gruen, E

    2000-06-16

    Recordings of activity were made from 647 single units of the A(I) cortex of awake cats to evaluate behavioral state-dependent changes in the population response to a 70-dB click. Averages of PST histograms of unit activity were used to assess the changes in response. This report focuses on slow components of the responses disclosed by averages employing bin widths of 16 ms. Responses were compared before and after a Pavlovian blink CR was produced by forward pairing of click conditioned stimuli (CSs) with USs. A backward-paired 70-dB hiss was presented as a discriminative stimulus. Studies were also done after backward pairing of the click CSs (backward conditioning) that produced weak sensitization instead of a conditioned response. There were four main findings. First, components of activity elicited 32-160 ms after presenting the hiss decreased significantly after conditioning and after backward conditioning. The decreases after conditioning represented the most pronounced changes in activity evoked by either clicks or hisses in this behavioral state. Second, baseline firing decreased after both conditioning and backward conditioning. The direction of baseline change was opposite that found in adjacent cortical regions and in A(I) cortex after operant conditioning employing an acoustic cue. Third, prior to conditioning, unit activity in response to the hiss declined before the sound of the hiss reached its peak or terminated. This decrease was thought to represent a habituatory adaptation of response to a prolonged acoustic stimulus. This type of habituation to a lengthy stimulus has been recognized, behaviorally, but has not been observed previously in the activity of units of the auditory receptive cortex. Fourth, the percentage of click responsive units did not change significantly after the click was used as a CS for conditioning, and despite the accompanying changes in baseline activity, the absolute levels of activity summed in the first 16 ms after click

  10. The spinothalamic system targets motor and sensory areas in the cerebral cortex of monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dum, Richard P; Levinthal, David J; Strick, Peter L

    2009-11-11

    Classically, the spinothalamic (ST) system has been viewed as the major pathway for transmitting nociceptive and thermoceptive information to the cerebral cortex. There is a long-standing controversy about the cortical targets of this system. We used anterograde transneuronal transport of the H129 strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 in the Cebus monkey to label the cortical areas that receive ST input. We found that the ST system reaches multiple cortical areas located in the contralateral hemisphere. The major targets are granular insular cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex and several cortical areas in the cingulate sulcus. It is noteworthy that comparable cortical regions in humans consistently display activation when subjects are acutely exposed to painful stimuli. We next combined anterograde transneuronal transport of virus with injections of a conventional tracer into the ventral premotor area (PMv). We used the PMv injection to identify the cingulate motor areas on the medial wall of the hemisphere. This combined approach demonstrated that each of the cingulate motor areas receives ST input. Our meta-analysis of imaging studies indicates that the human equivalents of the three cingulate motor areas also correspond to sites of pain-related activation. The cingulate motor areas in the monkey project directly to the primary motor cortex and to the spinal cord. Thus, the substrate exists for the ST system to have an important influence on the cortical control of movement. PMID:19906970

  11. Motor-unit force potentiation in adult cats during a standard fatigue test.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D A; Enoka, R M; Stuart, D G

    1990-02-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to examine the time course of tetanic force during a standard fatigue test and to distinguish between the appearance of potentiation and fatigue among the four motor-unit types of a cat hindlimb muscle. 2. Motor units of the tibialis posterior muscle in the adult cat were assigned to four categories (i.e. types S, FR, FI, FF) based on conventional criteria (Burke, Levine, Tsairis & Zajac, 1973). The mean (+/- S.D.) time course of peak force was constructed for each motor-unit type and, within each type, for those units that potentiated (a greater than 3% increase in peak force compared to the initial value) and those that did not potentiate. 3. The average time courses of force differed between motor-unit types. There was, however, considerable variability within each motor-unit type. For the same relative force output, the forces exerted by slow-twitch units were less variable than those exerted by fast-twitch units. In addition, the variability among slow-twitch units was relatively constant during the fatigue test while variability among fast-twitch units either increased or decreased with time. 4. For a given motor-unit type, the average time course of force did not depend on whether force in each tetanus was expressed as a peak value, an average peak value, or a force-time integral. 5. Some motor units within each type exhibited potentiation. Most of the variability in the time course of the peak force for each motor-unit type could be accounted for by the potentiating units. Motor units that exhibited only force decline (i.e. fatigue), regardless of unit type, had less variable time courses of peak force. Since potentiation was transient in some unit types, it was assumed that at least two opposing processes (i.e. fatigue and potentiation) occurred simultaneously in these units (see also, Krarup, 1981; Rankin, Enoka, Volz & Stuart, 1988; Garner, Hicks & McComas, 1989). 6. It is concluded that the expression of force

  12. Cats

    MedlinePlus

    ... found on the skin of people and animals. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the same bacterium that has become resistant to some antibiotics. Cats and other animals often can carry MRSA ...

  13. Non-motoneurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei projecting to the cerebellar flocculus in the cat. A fluorescent double-labelling and WGA-HRP study.

    PubMed

    Røste, G K

    1989-01-01

    The cerebellar projection from the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei was studied in the cat by means of retrograde axonal transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent tracers. The feline facial nucleus was cytoarchitectonically subdivided into ventromedial, ventrolateral, lateral, dorsal, intermediate and medial divisions (see Papez 1927), and the motor trigeminal nucleus into medial, ventral, intermediate, lateral and dorsal divisions. The neurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei were classified as small (ovoid to round cells with a maximum diameter of the cell body of about 20 microns) or large (polygonal to round cells with maximum diameter of about 40 microns). After floccular injections of the wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase complex, retrogradely labelled cells were found throughout the facial nucleus, but especially in its medial and dorsal divisions. In the motor trigeminal nucleus, labelled neurons were found only in the ventral, intermediate and lateral divisions. Cases with tracer deposition (implants or injections) in other parts of the cerebellar cortex or nuclei were all negative. All facial and motor trigeminal neurons labelled after floccular injections were smaller than the neurons labelled after injections in the facial mimic and masticatory muscles, and only single-labelled neurons were found following floccular injections of Fluoro-Gold and muscular injections of rhodamine-B-isothiocyanate in the same animals. These observations strongly suggest that the neurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei which project to flocculus are of the non-motoneuron type. PMID:2470610

  14. Laminar Diversity of Dynamic Sound Processing in Cat Primary Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2010-01-01

    For primary auditory cortex (AI) laminae, there is little evidence of functional specificity despite clearly expressed cellular and connectional differences. Natural sounds are dominated by dynamic temporal and spectral modulations and we used these properties to evaluate local functional differences or constancies across laminae. To examine the layer-specific processing of acoustic modulation information, we simultaneously recorded from multiple AI laminae in the anesthetized cat. Neurons were challenged with dynamic moving ripple stimuli and we subsequently computed spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs). From the STRFs, temporal and spectral modulation transfer functions (tMTFs, sMTFs) were calculated and compared across layers. Temporal and spectral modulation properties often differed between layers. On average, layer II/III and VI neurons responded to lower temporal modulations than those in layer IV. tMTFs were mainly band-pass in granular layer IV and became more low-pass in infragranular layers. Compared with layer IV, spectral MTFs were broader and their upper cutoff frequencies higher in layers V and VI. In individual penetrations, temporal modulation preference was similar across layers for roughly 70% of the penetrations, suggesting a common, columnar functional characteristic. By contrast, only about 30% of penetrations showed consistent spectral modulation preferences across layers, indicative of functional laminar diversity or specialization. Since local laminar differences in stimulus preference do not always parallel the main flow of information in the columnar cortical microcircuit, this indicates the influence of additional horizontal or thalamocortical inputs. AI layers that express differing modulation properties may serve distinct roles in the extraction of dynamic sound information, with the differing information specific to the targeted stations of each layer. PMID:19864440

  15. Fetal frontal cortex transplant (/sup 14/C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake and histology: survival in cavities of host rat brain motor cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, F.R.; Gonzalez, M.F.

    1984-10-01

    Fetal frontal neocortex from 18-day-old rat embryonic brain was transplanted into cavities in 30-day-old host motor cortex. Sixty days after transplantation, 5 of 15 transplanted rats had surviving fetal transplants. The fetal cortex transplants were physically attached to the host brain, completely filled the original cavity, and had numerous surviving cells including pyramidal neurons. Cell lamination within the fetal transplant was abnormal. The (/sup 14/C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake of all five of the fetal neocortex transplants was less than adjacent cortex and contralateral host motor-sensory cortex, but more than adjacent corpus callosum white matter. The results indicate that fetal frontal neocortex can be transplanted into damaged rat motor cortex. The metabolic rate of the transplants suggests they could be partially functional.

  16. Development of closed-loop neural interface technology in a rat model: combining motor cortex operant conditioning with visual cortex microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, Timothy Charles; Lehmkuhle, Mark J; Gage, Gregory J; Kipke, Daryl R

    2010-04-01

    Closed-loop neural interface technology that combines neural ensemble decoding with simultaneous electrical microstimulation feedback is hypothesized to improve deep brain stimulation techniques, neuromotor prosthetic applications, and epilepsy treatment. Here we describe our iterative results in a rat model of a sensory and motor neurophysiological feedback control system. Three rats were chronically implanted with microelectrode arrays in both the motor and visual cortices. The rats were subsequently trained over a period of weeks to modulate their motor cortex ensemble unit activity upon delivery of intra-cortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the visual cortex in order to receive a food reward. Rats were given continuous feedback via visual cortex ICMS during the response periods that was representative of the motor cortex ensemble dynamics. Analysis revealed that the feedback provided the animals with indicators of the behavioral trials. At the hardware level, this preparation provides a tractable test model for improving the technology of closed-loop neural devices.

  17. Improvement in precision grip force control with self-modulation of primary motor cortex during motor imagery

    PubMed Central

    Blefari, Maria L.; Sulzer, James; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kollias, Spyros; Gassert, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) has shown effectiveness in enhancing motor performance. This may be due to the common neural mechanisms underlying MI and motor execution (ME). The main region of the ME network, the primary motor cortex (M1), has been consistently linked to motor performance. However, the activation of M1 during motor imagery is controversial, which may account for inconsistent rehabilitation therapy outcomes using MI. Here, we examined the relationship between contralateral M1 (cM1) activation during MI and changes in sensorimotor performance. To aid cM1 activity modulation during MI, we used real-time fMRI neurofeedback-guided MI based on cM1 hand area blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in healthy subjects, performing kinesthetic MI of pinching. We used multiple regression analysis to examine the correlation between cM1 BOLD signal and changes in motor performance during an isometric pinching task of those subjects who were able to activate cM1 during motor imagery. Activities in premotor and parietal regions were used as covariates. We found that cM1 activity was positively correlated to improvements in accuracy as well as overall performance improvements, whereas other regions in the sensorimotor network were not. The association between cM1 activation during MI with performance changes indicates that subjects with stronger cM1 activation during MI may benefit more from MI training, with implications toward targeted neurotherapy. PMID:25762907

  18. Cerebellar vermis is a target of projections from the motor areas in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Keith A; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2011-09-20

    The cerebellum has a medial, cortico-nuclear zone consisting of the cerebellar vermis and the fastigial nucleus. Functionally, this zone is concerned with whole-body posture and locomotion. The vermis classically is thought to be included within the "spinocerebellum" and to receive somatic sensory input from ascending spinal pathways. In contrast, the lateral zone of the cerebellum is included in the "cerebro-cerebellum" because it is densely interconnected with the cerebral cortex. Here we report the surprising result that a portion of the vermis receives dense input from the cerebral cortex. We injected rabies virus into lobules VB-VIIIB of the vermis and used retrograde transneuronal transport of the virus to define disynaptic inputs to it. We found that large numbers of neurons in the primary motor cortex and in several motor areas on the medial wall of the hemisphere project to the vermis. Thus, our results challenge the classical view of the vermis and indicate that it no longer should be considered as entirely isolated from the cerebral cortex. Instead, lobules VB-VIIIB represent a site where the cortical motor areas can influence descending control systems involved in the regulation of whole-body posture and locomotion. We argue that the projection from the cerebral cortex to the vermis is part of the neural substrate for anticipatory postural adjustments and speculate that dysfunction of this system may underlie some forms of dystonia. PMID:21911381

  19. Influence of the amount of use on hand motor cortex representation: effects of immobilization and motor training.

    PubMed

    Ngomo, S; Leonard, G; Mercier, C

    2012-09-18

    Converging evidence from animal and human studies has revealed that increased or decreased use of an extremity can lead to changes in cortical representation of the involved muscles. However, opposite experimental manipulations such as immobilization and motor training have sometimes been associated with similar cortical changes. Therefore, the behavioral relevance of these changes remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of the amount of use on hand muscle motor cortex representation by contrasting the effect of unspecific motor training and immobilization. Nine healthy volunteers were tested prior and after a 4-day exposure to two experimental conditions using a randomized cross-over design: a motor training condition (to play Guitar Hero 2h/day with the tested (nondominant) hand on the fret board) and an immobilization condition (to wear an immobilization splint 24h/day). Before and after each condition, motor cortex representation of the nondominant first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle was mapped using image-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). At the behavioral level, results show that the training condition led to a 20% improvement in the trained task, while the immobilization condition resulted in a 36% decrease in the FDI maximal voluntary contraction. At the neurophysiological level, corticospinal excitability (e.g. Motor-evoked potential amplitude) was found to be decreased in response to immobilization, while no change was observed in response to motor training. No change was found for other TMS variables (motor thresholds or map location/volume/area) in either condition. In conclusion, our results indicate that a 4-day decrease, but not increase, in the amount of use of nondominant hand muscles is sufficient to induce a change in corticospinal excitability. The lack of a training effect might be explained by the use of an unspecific task (that is nevertheless representative of "real-life" training situations) and

  20. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails. PMID:27378922

  1. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Stern, William M.; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Hoad, Damon; Jaffer, Fatima; Strigaro, Gionata; Sander, Josemir W.; Rothwell, John C.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a very rare and serious neurodevelopmental syndrome; its genetic basis has recently been established. Its characteristic features include typically-unprovoked episodes of hemiplegia and other transient or more persistent neurological abnormalities. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation to assess the effect of the condition on motor cortex neurophysiology both during and between attacks of hemiplegia. Nine people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood were recruited; eight were successfully tested using transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability, using single and paired pulse paradigms. For comparison, data from ten people with epilepsy but not alternating hemiplegia, and ten healthy controls, were used. Results One person with alternating hemiplegia tested during the onset of a hemiplegic attack showed progressively diminishing motor cortex excitability until no response could be evoked; a second person tested during a prolonged bilateral hemiplegic attack showed unusually low excitability. Three people tested between attacks showed asymptomatic variation in cortical excitability, not seen in controls. Paired pulse paradigms, which probe intracortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits, gave results similar to controls. Conclusions We report symptomatic and asymptomatic fluctuations in motor cortex excitability in people with alternating hemiplegia of childhood, not seen in controls. We propose that such fluctuations underlie hemiplegic attacks, and speculate that the asymptomatic fluctuation we detected may be useful as a biomarker for disease activity. PMID:26999520

  2. The Somatotopy of Speech: Phonation and Articulation in the Human Motor Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven; Laird, Angela R.; Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Thelen, Sarah M.; Turkeltaub, Peter; Liotti, Mario

    2009-01-01

    A sizable literature on the neuroimaging of speech production has reliably shown activations in the orofacial region of the primary motor cortex. These activations have invariably been interpreted as reflecting "mouth" functioning and thus articulation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare an overt speech task with tongue…

  3. Representation of the Speech Effectors in the Human Motor Cortex: Somatotopy or Overlap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takai, Osamu; Brown, Steven; Liotti, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Somatotopy within the orofacial region of the human motor cortex has been a central concept in interpreting the results of neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies of normal and disordered speech. Yet, somatotopy has been challenged by studies showing overlap among the effectors within the homunculus. In order to address this…

  4. Alterations of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juanita; Karadayian, Analia G; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2012-08-01

    Ethanol has been known to affect various behavioral parameters in experimental animals, even several hours after ethanol (EtOH) is absent from blood circulation, in the period known as hangover. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute ethanol hangover on motor performance in association with the brain cortex energetic metabolism. Evaluation of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during alcohol hangover was performed in mice 6 hours after a high ethanol dose (hangover onset). Animals were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8 g/kg BW) (hangover group). Ethanol hangover group showed a bad motor performance compared with control animals (p < .05). Oxygen uptake in brain cortex mitochondria from hangover animals showed a 34% decrease in the respiratory control rate as compared with the control group. Mitochondrial complex activities were decreased being the complex I-III the less affected by the hangover condition; complex II-III was markedly decreased by ethanol hangover showing 50% less activity than controls. Complex IV was 42% decreased as compared with control animals. Hydrogen peroxide production was 51% increased in brain cortex mitochondria from the hangover group, as compared with the control animals. Quantification of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential indicated that ethanol injected animals presented 17% less ability to maintain the polarized condition as compared with controls. These results indicate that a clear decrease in proton motive force occurs in brain cortex mitochondria during hangover conditions. We can conclude that a decreased motor performance observed in the hangover group of animals could be associated with brain cortex mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting impairment of its energetic metabolism.

  5. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the motor cortex in cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Izabela; Duggal, Neil; Bartha, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Alterations in motor function in cervical myelopathy secondary to degenerative disease may be due to local effects of spinal compression or distal effects related to cortical reorganization. This prospective study characterizes differences in metabolite levels in the motor cortex, specifically N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, myo-inositol and glutamate plus glutamine, due to alterations in cortical function in patients with reversible spinal cord compression compared with healthy controls. We hypothesized that N-acetylaspartate/creatine levels would be decreased in the motor cortex of patients with cervical myelopathy due to reduced neuronal integrity/function and myo-inositol/creatine levels would be increased due to reactive gliosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical myelopathy and 11 healthy controls underwent proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 3.0 Tesla Siemens Magnetom Tim Trio MRI. Areas of activation from functional magnetic resonance imaging scans of a finger-tapping paradigm were used to localize a voxel on the side of greater motor deficit in the myelopathy group (n = 10 on right side and n = 14 on left side of the brain) and on each side of the motor cortex in controls. Neurological function was measured with the Neck Disability Index, modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association and American Spinal Injury Association questionnaires. Metabolite levels were measured relative to total creatine within the voxel of interest. No metabolite differences were detected between the right side and left side of the motor cortex in controls. The myelopathy group had significantly decreased neurological function compared with the control group (Neck Disability Index: P < 0.001 and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association: P < 0.001). There was a significant decrease in the N-acetylaspartate/creatine metabolite ratio in the motor cortex of the myelopathy group (1.21 ± 0.07) compared with the right (1.37 ± 0.03; P = 0.01) and

  6. Lower layers in the motor cortex are more effective targets for penetrating microelectrodes in cortical prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Hirak; Marzullo, Timothy C.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2009-04-01

    Improving cortical prostheses requires the development of recording neural interfaces that are efficient in terms of providing maximal control information with minimal interface complexity. While the typical approaches have targeted neurons in the motor cortex with multiple penetrating shanks, an alternative approach is to determine an efficient distribution of electrode sites within the layers of the cortex with fewer penetrating shanks. The objective of this study was to compare unit activity in the upper and lower layers of the cortex with respect to movement and direction in order to inform the design of penetrating microelectrodes. Four rats were implanted bilaterally with multi-site single-shank silicon microelectrode arrays in the neck/shoulder region of the motor cortex. We simultaneously recorded unit activity across all layers of the motor cortex while the animal was engaged in a movement direction task. Localization of the electrode array within the different layers of the cortex was determined by histology. We denoted units from layers 2 and 3 and units as upper layer units, and units from layers 5 and 6 as lower layer units. Analysis of unit spiking activity demonstrated that both the upper and lower layers encode movement and direction information. Unit responses in either cortical layer of the cortex were not preferentially associated with contralateral or ipsilateral movement. Aggregate analysis (633 neurons) and best session analysis (75 neurons) indicated that units in the lower layers (layers 5, 6) are more likely to encode direction information when compared to units in the upper layers (layers 2, 3) (p< 0.05). These results suggest that electrode sites clustered in the lower layers provide access to more salient control information for cortical neuroprostheses.

  7. Transformation of a virtual action plan into a motor plan in the premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshihisa; Yamagata, Tomoko; Tanji, Jun; Hoshi, Eiji

    2008-10-01

    Before preparing to initiate a forthcoming motion, we often acquire information about the future action without specifying actual motor parameters. The information for planning an action at this conceptual level can be provided with verbal commands or nonverbal signals even before the associated motor targets are visible. Under these conditions, the information signifying a virtual action plan must be transformed to information that can be used for constructing a motor plan to initiate specific movements. To determine whether the premotor cortex is involved in this process, we examined neuronal activity in the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) of monkeys performing a behavioral task designed to isolate the behavioral stages of the acquisition of information for a future action and the construction of a motor plan. We trained the animals to receive a symbolic instruction (color and shape of an instruction cue) to determine whether to select the right or left of targets to reach, despite the physical absence of targets. Subsequently, two targets appeared on a screen at different locations. The animals then determined the correct target (left or right) based on the previous instruction and prepared to initiate a reaching movement to an actual target. The experimental design dissociated the selection of the right/left at an abstract level (action plan) from the physical motor plan. Here, we show that activity of individual PMd neurons initially reflects a virtual action plan transcending motor specifics, before these neurons contribute to a transformation process that leads to activity encoding a motor plan. PMID:18842888

  8. Temporal plasticity involved in recovery from manual dexterity deficit after motor cortex lesion in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yumi; Higo, Noriyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Nishimura, Yukio; Sugiyama, Yoko; Oishi, Takao; Tsukada, Hideo; Isa, Tadashi; Onoe, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    The question of how intensive motor training restores motor function after brain damage or stroke remains unresolved. Here we show that the ipsilesional ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and perilesional primary motor cortex (M1) of rhesus macaque monkeys are involved in the recovery of manual dexterity after a lesion of M1. A focal lesion of the hand digit area in M1 was made by means of ibotenic acid injection. This lesion initially caused flaccid paralysis in the contralateral hand but was followed by functional recovery of hand movements, including precision grip, during the course of daily postlesion motor training. Brain imaging of regional cerebral blood flow by means of H2 (15)O-positron emission tomography revealed enhanced activity of the PMv during the early postrecovery period and increased functional connectivity within M1 during the late postrecovery period. The causal role of these areas in motor recovery was confirmed by means of pharmacological inactivation by muscimol during the different recovery periods. These findings indicate that, in both the remaining primary motor and premotor cortical areas, time-dependent plastic changes in neural activity and connectivity are involved in functional recovery from the motor deficit caused by the M1 lesion. Therefore, it is likely that the PMv, an area distant from the core of the lesion, plays an important role during the early postrecovery period, whereas the perilesional M1 contributes to functional recovery especially during the late postrecovery period.

  9. [THE DISTRIBUTION OF CORTICO-THALAMIC PROJECTIONS OF DIFFERENT OF DIFFERENT SOMATOTOPIC REPRESENTATIONS OF PRIMARY MOTOR AND SENSORY CORTEX].

    PubMed

    Ipekchyan, N M; Badalyan, S A

    2016-01-01

    The peculiarities of localization and distribution of cortico-thalamic efferents of different somatotopical representations of primary motor (MI) and sensory (SI) cortex were studied in cat brain. MI efferent fibers (4y, 6ab areas) preferentially projected to ventral posterolateral and medial (VPL, VPM), ventrolateral (VL), and reticular (R) nuclei, localized in rostral part of the thalamus (T), as opposed to SI (areas 1, 2, 3a, 3b), which projected preferentially to caudal part of T, VPL, VPM and R nuclei. Latero-medial organization of cortico-thalamic connections was demonstrated, with predominant localization of cortical representation of hindlimbs in the lateral part of VPL, of forelimbs--in the medial part of VPL, of face and head--also in VM and VPM. Quantitative analysis of the distribution of corticothalamic efferents of different somatotopical representations of MI has demonstrated the most extensive, massive connections with T nuclei (VPL, VL, R) of the motor representation of forelimb, followed by the representation of hindlimb, trunk and, finally, the minimal projection of the representation of face and head. As opposed to motor representation of the forelimb and also of the face and head, with uniform distribution of fibers in VPL, VL and R, the number of efferents of motor representation of hindlimb, passing in VL, was almost 2.5 time lower than in VPL and R, whereas the representation of trunk had the predominant projection to VL. Dominant cortico-thalamic connection suggests greater involvement of T nuclei studied in the realization of functional specialization of certain somatotopical representations of MI. PMID:27487657

  10. Microscale recording from human motor cortex: implications for minimally invasive electrocorticographic brain-computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Leuthardt, Eric C.; Freudenberg, Zac; Bundy, David; Roland, Jarod

    2010-01-01

    Object There is a growing interest in the use of recording from the surface of the brain, known as electrocorticography (ECoG), as a practical signal platform for brain-computer interface application. The signal has a combination of high signal quality and long-term stability that may be the ideal intermediate modality for future application. The research paradigm for studying ECoG signals uses patients requiring invasive monitoring for seizure localization. The implanted arrays span cortex areas on the order of centimeters. Currently, it is unknown what level of motor information can be discerned from small regions of human cortex with microscale ECoG recording. Methods In this study, a patient requiring invasive monitoring for seizure localization underwent concurrent implantation with a 16-microwire array (1-mm electrode spacing) placed over primary motor cortex. Microscale activity was recorded while the patient performed simple contra- and ipsilateral wrist movements that were monitored in parallel with electromyography. Using various statistical methods, linear and nonlinear relationships between these microcortical changes and recorded electromyography activity were defined. Results Small regions of primary motor cortex (< 5 mm) carry sufficient information to separate multiple aspects of motor movements (that is, wrist flexion/extension and ipsilateral/contralateral movements). Conclusions These findings support the conclusion that small regions of cortex investigated by ECoG recording may provide sufficient information about motor intentions to support brain-computer interface operations in the future. Given the small scale of the cortical region required, the requisite implanted array would be minimally invasive in terms of surgical placement of the electrode array. PMID:19569885

  11. Linear summation of outputs in a balanced network model of motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Capaday, Charles; van Vreeswijk, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Given the non-linearities of the neural circuitry's elements, we would expect cortical circuits to respond non-linearly when activated. Surprisingly, when two points in the motor cortex are activated simultaneously, the EMG responses are the linear sum of the responses evoked by each of the points activated separately. Additionally, the corticospinal transfer function is close to linear, implying that the synaptic interactions in motor cortex must be effectively linear. To account for this, here we develop a model of motor cortex composed of multiple interconnected points, each comprised of reciprocally connected excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We show how non-linearities in neuronal transfer functions are eschewed by strong synaptic interactions within each point. Consequently, the simultaneous activation of multiple points results in a linear summation of their respective outputs. We also consider the effects of reduction of inhibition at a cortical point when one or more surrounding points are active. The network response in this condition is linear over an approximately two- to three-fold decrease of inhibitory feedback strength. This result supports the idea that focal disinhibition allows linear coupling of motor cortical points to generate movement related muscle activation patterns; albeit with a limitation on gain control. The model also explains why neural activity does not spread as far out as the axonal connectivity allows, whilst also explaining why distant cortical points can be, nonetheless, functionally coupled by focal disinhibition. Finally, we discuss the advantages that linear interactions at the cortical level afford to motor command synthesis. PMID:26097452

  12. Effects of high frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by mobile phones on the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Inomata-Terada, Satomi; Okabe, Shingo; Arai, Noritoshi; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Frubayashi, Toshiaki; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2007-10-01

    We investigated whether the pulsed high frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by a mobile phone has short term effects on the human motor cortex. We measured motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), before and after mobile phone exposure (active and sham) in 10 normal volunteers. Three sites were stimulated (motor cortex (CTX), brainstem (BST) and spinal nerve (Sp)). The short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the motor cortex reflecting GABAergic interneuronal function was also studied by paired pulse TMS method. MEPs to single pulse TMS were also recorded in two patients with multiple sclerosis showing temperature dependent neurological symptoms (hot bath effect). Neither MEPs to single pulse TMS nor the SICI was affected by 30 min of EMF exposure from mobile phones or sham exposure. In two MS patients, mobile phone exposure had no effect on any parameters of MEPs even though conduction block occurred at the corticospinal tracts after taking a bath. As far as available methods are concerned, we did not detect any short-term effects of 30 min mobile phone exposure on the human motor cortical output neurons or interneurons even though we can not exclude the possibility that we failed to detect some mild effects due to a small sample size in the present study. This is the first study of MEPs after electromagnetic exposure from a mobile phone in neurological patients. PMID:17516508

  13. [Quality of neuronal signal registered in the monkey motor cortex with chronically implanted multiple microwires].

    PubMed

    Bondar', I V; Vasil'eva, L N; Badakva, A M; Miller, N V; Zobova, L N; Roshchin, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    Disconnection of central and peripheral parts of motor system leads to severe forms of disability. However, current research of brain-computer interfaces will solve the problem of rehabilitation of patients with motor disorders in future. Chronic recordings of single-unit activity in specialized areas of cerebral cortex could provide appropriate control signal for effectors with multiple degrees of freedom. In present article we evaluated the quality of chronic single-unit recordings in the primary motor cortex of awake behaving monkeys obtained with bundles of multiple microwires. Action potentials of proper quality were recorded from single units during three months. In some cases up to 7 single units could be extracted on a channel. Recording quality stabilized after 40 days since electrodes were implanted. Ultimately, functionality of multiple electrodes bundle makes it highly usable and reliable instrument for obtaining of control neurophysiologic signal from populations of neurons for brain-computer interfaces.

  14. Primary motor cortex reports efferent control of vibrissa motion on multiple time scales

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Daniel N.; Curtis, John C.; Moore, Jeffrey D.; Kleinfeld, David

    2011-01-01

    Exploratory whisking in rat is an example of self-generated movement on multiple time scales, from slow variations in the envelope of whisking to the rapid sequence of muscle contractions during a single whisk cycle. We find that, as a population, spike trains of single units in primary vibrissa motor cortex report the absolute angle of vibrissa position. This representation persists after sensory nerve transection, indicating an efferent source. About two-thirds of the units are modulated by slow variations in the envelope of whisking while relatively few units report rapid changes in position within the whisk cycle. The combined results from this study and past measurements, which show that primary sensory cortex codes the whisking envelope as a motor copy signal, imply that signals present in both sensory and motor cortices are necessary to compute coordinates based on vibrissa touch. PMID:22017992

  15. Constructing Visual Perception of Body Movement with the Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Orgs, Guido; Dovern, Anna; Hagura, Nobuhiro; Haggard, Patrick; Fink, Gereon R; Weiss, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    The human brain readily perceives fluent movement from static input. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated brain mechanisms that mediate fluent apparent biological motion (ABM) perception from sequences of body postures. We presented body and nonbody stimuli varying in objective sequence duration and fluency of apparent movement. Three body postures were ordered to produce a fluent (ABC) or a nonfluent (ACB) apparent movement. This enabled us to identify brain areas involved in the perceptual reconstruction of body movement from identical lower-level static input. Participants judged the duration of a rectangle containing body/nonbody sequences, as an implicit measure of movement fluency. For body stimuli, fluent apparent motion sequences produced subjectively longer durations than nonfluent sequences of the same objective duration. This difference was reduced for nonbody stimuli. This body-specific bias in duration perception was associated with increased blood oxygen level-dependent responses in the primary (M1) and supplementary motor areas. Moreover, fluent ABM was associated with increased functional connectivity between M1/SMA and right fusiform body area. We show that perceptual reconstruction of fluent movement from static body postures does not merely enlist areas traditionally associated with visual body processing, but involves cooperative recruitment of motor areas, consistent with a "motor way of seeing". PMID:26534907

  16. Action verbs and the primary motor cortex: a comparative TMS study of silent reading, frequency judgments, and motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Tomasino, Barbara; Fink, Gereon R; Sparing, Roland; Dafotakis, Manuel; Weiss, Peter H

    2008-01-01

    Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied to the hand area of the left primary motor cortex or, as a control, to the vertex (STIMULATION: TMS(M1) vs. TMS(vertex)) while right-handed volunteers silently read verbs related to hand actions. We examined three different tasks and time points for stimulation within the same experiment: subjects indicated with their left foot when they (i) had finished reading, (ii) had judged whether the corresponding movement involved a hand rotation after simulating the hand movement, and (iii) had judged whether they would frequently encounter the action verb in a newspaper (TASK: silent reading, motor imagery, and frequency judgment). Response times were compared between TMS(M1) and TMS(vertex), both applied at different time points after stimulus onset (DELAY: 150, 300, 450, 600, and 750 ms). TMS(M1) differentially modulated task performance: there was a significant facilitatory effect of TMS(M1) for the imagery task only (about 88 ms), with subjects responding about 10% faster (compared to TMS(vertex)). In contrast, response times for silent reading and frequency judgments were unaffected by TMS(M1). No differential effect of the time point of TMS(M1) was observed. The differential effect of TMS(M1) when subjects performed a motor imagery task (relative to performing silent reading or frequency judgments with the same set of verbs) suggests that the primary motor cortex is critically involved in processing action verbs only when subjects are simulating the corresponding movement. This task-dependent effect of hand motor cortex TMS on the processing of hand-related action verbs is discussed with respect to the notion of embodied cognition and the associationist theory. PMID:18328510

  17. Speed of processing in the primary motor cortex: a continuous theta burst stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Bimal; Bolton, David A E; Miyasike-Dasilva, Veronica; Vette, Albert H; McIlroy, William E

    2014-03-15

    'Temporally urgent' reactions are extremely rapid, spatially precise movements that are evoked following discrete stimuli. The involvement of primary motor cortex (M1) and its relationship to stimulus intensity in such reactions is not well understood. Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) suppresses focal regions of the cortex and can assess the involvement of motor cortex in speed of processing. The primary objective of this study was to explore the involvement of M1 in speed of processing with respect to stimulus intensity. Thirteen healthy young adults participated in this experiment. Behavioral testing consisted of a simple button press using the index finger following median nerve stimulation of the opposite limb, at either high or low stimulus intensity. Reaction time was measured by the onset of electromyographic activity from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of each limb. Participants completed a 30 min bout of behavioral testing prior to, and 15 min following, the delivery of cTBS to the motor cortical representation of the right FDI. The effect of cTBS on motor cortex was measured by recording the average of 30 motor evoked potentials (MEPs) just prior to, and 5 min following, cTBS. Paired t-tests revealed that, of thirteen participants, five demonstrated a significant attenuation, three demonstrated a significant facilitation and five demonstrated no significant change in MEP amplitude following cTBS. Of the group that demonstrated attenuated MEPs, there was a biologically significant interaction between stimulus intensity and effect of cTBS on reaction time and amplitude of muscle activation. This study demonstrates the variability of potential outcomes associated with the use of cTBS and further study on the mechanisms that underscore the methodology is required. Importantly, changes in motor cortical excitability may be an important determinant of speed of processing following high intensity stimulation.

  18. PSA-NCAM is Expressed in Immature, but not Recently Generated, Neurons in the Adult Cat Cerebral Cortex Layer II

    PubMed Central

    Varea, Emilio; Belles, Maria; Vidueira, Sandra; Blasco-Ibáñez, José M.; Crespo, Carlos; Pastor, Ángel M.; Nacher, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal production persists during adulthood in the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb, where substantial numbers of immature neurons can be found. These cells can also be found in the paleocortex layer II of adult rodents, but in this case most of them have been generated during embryogenesis. Recent reports have described the presence of similar cells, with a wider distribution, in the cerebral cortex of adult cats and primates and have suggested that they may develop into interneurons. The objective of this study is to verify this hypothesis and to explore the origin of these immature neurons in adult cats. We have analyzed their distribution using immunohistochemical analysis of the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and their phenotype using markers of mature neurons and different interneuronal populations. Additionally, we have explored the origin of these cells administering 5′bromodeoxyuridine (5′BrdU) during adulthood. Immature neurons were widely dispersed in the cerebral cortex layers II and upper III, being specially abundant in the piriform and entorhinal cortices, in the ventral portions of the frontal and temporoparietal lobes, but relatively scarce in dorsal regions, such as the primary visual areas. Only a small fraction of PSA-NCAM expressing cells in layer II expressed the mature neuronal marker NeuN and virtually none of them expressed calcium binding proteins or neuropeptides. By contrast, most, if not all of these cells expressed the transcription factor Tbr-1, specifically expressed by pallium-derived principal neurons, but not CAMKII, a marker of mature excitatory neurons. Absence of PSA-NCAM/5′BrdU colocalization suggests that, as in rats, these cells were not generated during adulthood. Together, these results indicate that immature neurons in the adult cat cerebral cortex layer II are not recently generated and that they may differentiate into principal neurons. PMID:21415912

  19. Characteristics of intracellularly injected infragranular pyramidal neurons in cat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Ojima, H; Honda, C N; Jones, E G

    1992-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in layers V and VI of cat primary auditory cortex (AI) were intracellularly injected with biocytin after functional characterization according to a position relative to an anteroposterior sequence of best-frequency responses. A sample of 19 completely filled neurons was analyzed, and a preliminary classification was made on the basis of dendritic morphology and axon collateral distribution. Layer V cells could be divided into two types. Cells in the upper part of layer V and projecting toward the diencephalon had a large cell body and an apical dendrite with extensive branches in layer I. These cells had few recurrent axon collaterals, and no terminal axonal bushes were formed in the vicinity of the dendritic field. Long horizontal collaterals with many boutons, however, extended in various directions parallel to the cortical surface. By contrast, cells in the lower part of layer V and sending an axon into the putamen, or without an obvious subcortical axon, had a medium soma and an apical dendrite with few branches in layer I. These cells had a dense bush of recurrent collaterals extending into layers II and III and surrounding the dendritic field, but few or no horizontal collaterals. Layer VI injected neurons were more heterogeneous. All had a thin ascending dendrite with oblique branches both ending in layer III. Axon collateral distributions varied from cell to cell. Relatively small cells with an apical dendrite that branched frequently in layers III and IV had a dense network of recurrent collaterals in the dendritic field, but virtually no horizontal collaterals. This type projected toward the diencephalon. Cells with relatively long horizontal collaterals and a weak recurrent system confined to layers V and VI had a unique arborization pattern of basal dendrites. This type may have projected to the claustrum or other cortical areas. One cell with dendritic branches restricted to layer VI had horizontal collaterals predominantly in layer

  20. Reversible Deactivation of Motor Cortex Reveals Functional Connectivity with Posterior Parietal Cortex in the Prosimian Galago (Otolemur garnettii)

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Dylan F.; Stepniewska, Iwona; Miller, Daniel J.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the functional macrocircuitry of frontoparietal networks in the neocortex of prosimian primates (Otolemur garnettii) using a microfluidic thermal regulator to reversibly deactivate selected regions of motor cortex (M1). During deactivation of either forelimb or mouth/face movement domains within M1, we used long-train intracortical microstimulation techniques to evoke movements from the rostral division of posterior parietal cortex (PPCr). We found that deactivation of M1 movement domains in most instances abolished movements evoked in PPCr. The most common effect of deactivating M1 was to abolish evoked movements in a homotopic domain in PPCr. For example, deactivating M1 forelimb lift domains resulted in loss of evoked movement in forelimb domains in PPCr. However, at some sites, we also observed heterotopic effects; deactivating a specific domain in M1 (e.g., forelimb lift) resulted in loss of evoked movement in a different movement domain in PPCr (e.g., hand-to-mouth or eye-blink). At most sites examined in PPCr, rewarming M1 resulted in a reestablishment of the baseline movement at the same amplitude as that observed before cooling. However, at some sites, reactivation did not result in a return to baseline movement or to the full amplitude of the baseline movement. We discuss our findings in the context of frontoparietal circuits and how they may subserve a repertoire of ecologically relevant behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) of primates integrates sensory information used to guide movements. Different modules within PPC and motor cortex (M1) appear to control various motor behaviors (e.g., reaching, defense, and feeding). How these modules work together may vary across species and may explain differences in dexterity and even the capacity for tool use. We investigated the functional connectivity of these modules in galagos, a prosimian primate with relatively simple frontoparietal circuitry. By deactivating a

  1. [Effect of food motivation on the impulse activity of neurons of the somatic cortex of the cat].

    PubMed

    Busel', B I; Moldavan, M G

    1987-01-01

    Spike reactions of the same somatic cortex neurons (areas 3 and 4) were analyzed during unconditioned stimulation. They were registered in the untrained hungry cats under conditions of rest and with food motivation. A decrease of the intensity of initial spike reactions, disappearance of the late neuronal responses following electro-cutaneous stimulation as well as changes in the level of the background activity were observed during emergence of food motivation. Resemblance and correlation between time of appearance of neuronal reactions and respected movements during conditioned stimulation under various levels of food motivational excitation were shown. This correlation depended on the level of the animal satiation. The results show the possibility of considerable influence of food motivation on the patterns of spike reactions in the somatic cortex neurons.

  2. [Overlapping of optical answers for cross-like figures and oriented bars in the cats primary visual cortex].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, R S; Liamzin, D R; Bondar', I V; Kulikov, M A; Shevelev, I A

    2010-01-01

    For the first time by the optical method the population activity of neurons in cat primary visual cortex was observed simultaneously for detectors participating in analysis of first-order (orientation) and second-order (line intersection) features. The maps for cross-like figures and oriented single bars were compared. The comparative analysis allowed us to estimate the degree of overlapping of the activated regions and parts of cortex that were free from overlap. Overlapping zones provided the evidence for the fact that neuronal detectors for line intersections are located in the same neuronal columns as neurons detecting orientations. Differences were observed between maps for vertically oriented and oblique crosses. Those differences were pronounced not only in topography but also in degree of overlapping of activity zones. This may evidence on different contribution of neurons detecting basic and intermediate orientations. PMID:20469587

  3. Neutralization of Nogo-A Enhances Synaptic Plasticity in the Rodent Motor Cortex and Improves Motor Learning in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weinmann, Oliver; Kellner, Yves; Yu, Xinzhu; Vicente, Raul; Gullo, Miriam; Kasper, Hansjörg; Lussi, Karin; Ristic, Zorica; Luft, Andreas R.; Rioult-Pedotti, Mengia; Zuo, Yi; Zagrebelsky, Marta; Schwab, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane protein Nogo-A is known as an inhibitor of axonal outgrowth and regeneration in the CNS. However, its physiological functions in the normal adult CNS remain incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of Nogo-A in cortical synaptic plasticity and motor learning in the uninjured adult rodent motor cortex. Nogo-A and its receptor NgR1 are present at cortical synapses. Acute treatment of slices with function-blocking antibodies (Abs) against Nogo-A or against NgR1 increased long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by stimulation of layer 2/3 horizontal fibers. Furthermore, anti-Nogo-A Ab treatment increased LTP saturation levels, whereas long-term depression remained unchanged, thus leading to an enlarged synaptic modification range. In vivo, intrathecal application of Nogo-A-blocking Abs resulted in a higher dendritic spine density at cortical pyramidal neurons due to an increase in spine formation as revealed by in vivo two-photon microscopy. To investigate whether these changes in synaptic plasticity correlate with motor learning, we trained rats to learn a skilled forelimb-reaching task while receiving anti-Nogo-A Abs. Learning of this cortically controlled precision movement was improved upon anti-Nogo-A Ab treatment. Our results identify Nogo-A as an influential molecular modulator of synaptic plasticity and as a regulator for learning of skilled movements in the motor cortex. PMID:24966370

  4. Healthy and diseased corticospinal motor neurons are selectively transduced upon direct AAV2-2 injection into the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Jara, J H; Stanford, M J; Zhu, Y; Tu, M; Hauswirth, W W; Bohn, M C; DeVries, S H; Özdinler, P H

    2016-03-01

    Direct gene delivery to the neurons of interest, without affecting other neuron populations in the cerebral cortex, represent a challenge owing to the heterogeneity and cellular complexity of the brain. Genetic modulation of corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) is required for developing effective and long-term treatment strategies for motor neuron diseases, in which voluntary movement is impaired. Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have been widely used for neuronal transduction studies owing to long-term and stable gene expression as well as low immunoreactivity in humans. Here we report that AAV2-2 transduces CSMN with high efficiency upon direct cortex injection and that transduction efficiencies are similar during presymptomatic and symptomatic stages in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mice. Our findings reveal that choice of promoter improves selectivity as AAV2-2 chicken β-actin promoter injection results in about 70% CSMN transduction, the highest percentage reported to date. CSMN transduction in both wild-type and transgenic ALS mice allows detailed analysis of single axon fibers within the corticospinal tract in both cervical and lumbar spinal cord and reveals circuitry defects, which mainly occur between CSMN and spinal motor neurons in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic ALS mice. Our findings set the stage for CSMN gene therapy in ALS and related motor neuron diseases. PMID:26704722

  5. Healthy and diseased corticospinal motor neurons are selectively transduced upon direct AAV2-2 injection into the motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jara, J H; Stanford, M J; Zhu, Y; Tu, M; Hauswirth, W W; Bohn, M C; DeVries, S H; Özdinler, P H

    2016-01-01

    Direct gene delivery to the neurons of interest, without affecting other neuron populations in the cerebral cortex, represent a challenge owing to the heterogeneity and cellular complexity of the brain. Genetic modulation of corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) is required for developing effective and long-term treatment strategies for motor neuron diseases, in which voluntary movement is impaired. Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have been widely used for neuronal transduction studies owing to long-term and stable gene expression as well as low immunoreactivity in humans. Here we report that AAV2-2 transduces CSMN with high efficiency upon direct cortex injection and that transduction efficiencies are similar during presymptomatic and symptomatic stages in hSOD1G93A transgenic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mice. Our findings reveal that choice of promoter improves selectivity as AAV2-2 chicken β-actin promoter injection results in about 70% CSMN transduction, the highest percentage reported to date. CSMN transduction in both wild-type and transgenic ALS mice allows detailed analysis of single axon fibers within the corticospinal tract in both cervical and lumbar spinal cord and reveals circuitry defects, which mainly occur between CSMN and spinal motor neurons in hSOD1G93A transgenic ALS mice. Our findings set the stage for CSMN gene therapy in ALS and related motor neuron diseases. PMID:26704722

  6. Trunk robot rehabilitation training with active stepping reorganizes and enriches trunk motor cortex representations in spinal transected rats.

    PubMed

    Oza, Chintan S; Giszter, Simon F

    2015-05-01

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we examine effects of robot rehabilitation that promotes recovery of hindlimb weight support functions on trunk motor cortex representations. Adult rats spinal transected as neonates (NTX rats) at the T9/10 level significantly improve function with our robot rehabilitation paradigm, whereas treadmill-only trained do not. We used intracortical microstimulation to map motor cortex in two NTX groups: (1) treadmill trained (control group); and (2) robot-assisted treadmill trained (improved function group). We found significant robot rehabilitation-driven changes in motor cortex: (1) caudal trunk motor areas expanded; (2) trunk coactivation at cortex sites increased; (3) richness of trunk cortex motor representations, as examined by cumulative entropy and mutual information for different trunk representations, increased; (4) trunk motor representations in the cortex moved toward more normal topography; and (5) trunk and forelimb motor representations that SCI-driven plasticity and compensations had caused to overlap were segregated. We conclude that effective robot rehabilitation training induces significant reorganization of trunk motor cortex and partially reverses some plastic changes that may be adaptive in non-stepping paraplegia after SCI.

  7. Trunk Robot Rehabilitation Training with Active Stepping Reorganizes and Enriches Trunk Motor Cortex Representations in Spinal Transected Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Chintan S.

    2015-01-01

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we examine effects of robot rehabilitation that promotes recovery of hindlimb weight support functions on trunk motor cortex representations. Adult rats spinal transected as neonates (NTX rats) at the T9/10 level significantly improve function with our robot rehabilitation paradigm, whereas treadmill-only trained do not. We used intracortical microstimulation to map motor cortex in two NTX groups: (1) treadmill trained (control group); and (2) robot-assisted treadmill trained (improved function group). We found significant robot rehabilitation-driven changes in motor cortex: (1) caudal trunk motor areas expanded; (2) trunk coactivation at cortex sites increased; (3) richness of trunk cortex motor representations, as examined by cumulative entropy and mutual information for different trunk representations, increased; (4) trunk motor representations in the cortex moved toward more normal topography; and (5) trunk and forelimb motor representations that SCI-driven plasticity and compensations had caused to overlap were segregated. We conclude that effective robot rehabilitation training induces significant reorganization of trunk motor cortex and partially reverses some plastic changes that may be adaptive in non-stepping paraplegia after SCI. PMID:25948267

  8. Aberrant Neuromagnetic Activation in the Motor Cortex in Children with Acute Migraine: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinyao; Xiang, Jing; Wang, Yingying; O’Brien, Hope; Kabbouche, Marielle; Horn, Paul; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine attacks have been shown to interfere with normal function in the brain such as motor or sensory function. However, to date, there has been no clinical neurophysiology study focusing on the motor function in children with migraine during headache attacks. To investigate the motor function in children with migraine, twenty-six children with acute migraine, meeting International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria and age- and gender-matched healthy children were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography system. A finger-tapping paradigm was designed to elicit neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex. Children with migraine showed significantly prolonged latency of movement-evoked magnetic fields (MEF) during finger movement compared with the controls. The correlation coefficient of MEF latency and age in children with migraine was significantly different from that in healthy controls. The spectral power of high gamma (65–150 Hz) oscillations during finger movement in the primary motor cortex is also significantly higher in children with migraine than in controls. The alteration of responding latency and aberrant high gamma oscillations suggest that the developmental trajectory of motor function in children with migraine is impaired during migraine attacks and/or developmentally delayed. This finding indicates that childhood migraine may affect the development of brain function and result in long-term problems. PMID:23185541

  9. Aberrant neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex in children with acute migraine: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinyao; Xiang, Jing; Wang, Yingying; O'Brien, Hope; Kabbouche, Marielle; Horn, Paul; Powers, Scott W; Hershey, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Migraine attacks have been shown to interfere with normal function in the brain such as motor or sensory function. However, to date, there has been no clinical neurophysiology study focusing on the motor function in children with migraine during headache attacks. To investigate the motor function in children with migraine, twenty-six children with acute migraine, meeting International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria and age- and gender-matched healthy children were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography system. A finger-tapping paradigm was designed to elicit neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex. Children with migraine showed significantly prolonged latency of movement-evoked magnetic fields (MEF) during finger movement compared with the controls. The correlation coefficient of MEF latency and age in children with migraine was significantly different from that in healthy controls. The spectral power of high gamma (65-150 Hz) oscillations during finger movement in the primary motor cortex is also significantly higher in children with migraine than in controls. The alteration of responding latency and aberrant high gamma oscillations suggest that the developmental trajectory of motor function in children with migraine is impaired during migraine attacks and/or developmentally delayed. This finding indicates that childhood migraine may affect the development of brain function and result in long-term problems.

  10. Human Motor Cortex Functional Changes in Acute Stroke: Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Pino, Giovanni; Ranieri, Federico; Lotti, Fiorenza; Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante

    2016-01-01

    The acute phase of stroke is accompanied by functional changes in the activity and interplay of both hemispheres. In healthy subjects, gender is known to impact the functional brain organization. We investigated whether gender influences also acute stroke functional changes. In thirty-five ischemic stroke patients, we evaluated the excitability of the affected (AH) and unaffected hemisphere (UH) by measuring resting and active motor threshold (AMT) and motor-evoked potential amplitude under baseline conditions and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) of AH. We also computed an index of the excitability balance between the hemispheres, laterality indexes (LI), to evidence hemispheric asymmetry. AMT differed significantly between AH and UH only in the male group (p = 0.004), not in females (p > 0.200), and both LIAMT and LIRMT were significantly higher in males than in females (respectively p = 0.033 and p = 0.042). LTP-like activity induced by iTBS in AH was more frequent in females. Gender influences the functional excitability changes that take place after human stroke and the level of LTP that can be induced by repetitive stimulation. This knowledge is of high value in the attempt of individualizing to different genders any non-invasive stimulation strategy designed to foster stroke recovery. PMID:26858590

  11. Photoacoustic detection of functional responses in the motor cortex of awake behaving monkey during forelimb movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheney, Paul D.; Yang, Xinmai

    2012-11-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging was applied to detect the neuronal activity in the motor cortex of an awake, behaving monkey during forelimb movement. An adult macaque monkey was trained to perform a reach-to-grasp task while PA images were acquired through a 30-mm diameter implanted cranial chamber. Increased PA signal amplitude results from an increase in regional blood volume and is interpreted as increased neuronal activity. Additionally, depth-resolved PA signals enabled the study of functional responses in deep cortical areas. The results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing PA imaging for studies of functional activation of cerebral cortex in awake monkeys performing behavioral tasks.

  12. Interaction between visual and motor cortex: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    PubMed Central

    Strigaro, Gionata; Ruge, Diane; Chen, Jui-Cheng; Marshall, Louise; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Cantello, Roberto; Rothwell, John C

    2015-01-01

    The major link between the visual and motor systems is via the dorsal stream pathways from visual to parietal and frontal areas of the cortex. Although the pathway appears to be indirect, there is evidence that visual input can reach the motor cortex at relatively short latency. To shed some light on its neural basis, we studied the visuomotor interaction using paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous in sixteen healthy volunteers. A conditioning stimulus (CS) was applied over the phosphene hotspot of the visual cortex, followed by a test stimulus over the left primary motor cortex (M1) with a random interstimulus interval (ISI)  in range 12–40 ms. The effects of paired stimulation were retested during visual and auditory reaction-time tasks (RT). Finally, we measured the effects of a CS on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). At rest, a CS over the occiput significantly (P < 0.001) suppressed test MEPs with an ISI in the range 18–40 ms. In the visual RT, inhibition with an ISI of 40 ms (but not 18 ms) was replaced by a time-specific facilitation (P < 0.001), whereas, in the auditory RT, the CS no longer had any effect on MEPs. Finally, an occipital CS facilitated SICI with an ISI of 40 ms (P < 0.01). We conclude that it is possible to study separate functional connections from visual to motor cortices using paired-TMS with an ISI in the range 18–40 ms. The connections are inhibitory at rest and possibly mediated by inhibitory interneurones in the motor cortex. The effect with an ISI of 40 ms reverses into facilitation during a visuomotor RT but not an audiomotor RT. This suggests that it plays a role in visuomotor integration. Key points We studied the interaction between the primary visual cortex and the primary motor cortex using paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with an interstimulus interval (ISI) in the range 12–40

  13. Probing the corticospinal link between the motor cortex and motoneurones: some neglected aspects of human motor cortical function.

    PubMed

    Petersen, N C; Butler, J E; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2010-04-01

    This review considers the operation of the corticospinal system in primates. There is a relatively widespread cortical area containing corticospinal outputs to a single muscle and thus a motoneurone pool receives corticospinal input from a wide region of the cortex. In addition, corticospinal cells themselves have divergent intraspinal branches which innervate more than one motoneuronal pool but the synergistic couplings involving the many hand muscles are likely to be more diverse than can be accommodated simply by fixed patterns of corticospinal divergence. Many studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human motor cortex have highlighted the capacity of the cortex to modify its apparent excitability in response to altered afferent inputs, training and various pathologies. Studies using cortical stimulation at 'very low' intensities which elicit only short-latency suppression of the discharge of motor units have revealed that the rapidly conducting corticospinal axons (stimulated at higher intensities) drive motoneurones in normal voluntary contractions. There are also major non-linearities generated at a spinal level in the relation between corticospinal output and the output from the motoneurone pool. For example, recent studies have revealed that the efficacy of the human corticospinal connection with motoneurones undergoes activity-dependent changes which influence the size of voluntary contractions. Hence, corticospinal drives must be sculpted continuously to compensate for the changing functional efficacy of the descending systems which activate the motoneurones. This highlights the need for proprioceptive monitoring of movements to ensure their accurate execution. PMID:20003100

  14. Dissociable somatotopic representations of Chinese action verbs in the motor and premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyan; Mai, Xiaoqin; Tang, Honghong; Ge, Yue; Luo, Yue-Jia; Liu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    The embodied view of language processing holds that language comprehension involves the recruitment of sensorimotor information, as evidenced by the somatotopic representation of action verbs in the motor system. However, this review has not yet been examined in logographic scripts such as Chinese, in which action verbs can provide explicit linguistic cues to the effectors (arm, leg, mouth) that conduct the action (hit, jump, drink). We compared the somatotopic representation of Chinese verbs that contain such effector cues and those that do not. The results showed that uncued verbs elicited similar somatotopic representation in the motor and premotor cortex as found in alphabetic scripts. However, effector-cued verbs demonstrated an inverse somatotopic pattern by showing reduced activation in corresponding motor areas, despite that effector-cued verbs actually are rated higher in imageability than uncued verbs. Our results support the universality of somatotopic representation of action verbs in the motor system.

  15. Language and motor cortex response to comprehending accidental and intentional action sentences.

    PubMed

    Kana, Rajesh K; Ammons, Carla J; Doss, Constance F; Waite, Megan E; Kana, Bhumika; Herringshaw, Abbey J; Ver Hoef, Lawrence

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the meaning of others' actions involves mentally simulating those actions by oneself. Embodied theories of language espouse a prominent role for motor simulation in reading comprehension, especially when words, sentences, or narratives portray everyday actions. Inherent in these actions is the level of agency of the actor. Motor cortex activity in response to processing action verbs has been relatively well-established. What has been less explored, however, are: (1) the neural bases of determining whether an action is intentional or accidental (agency); and (2) whether agency influences level of motor simulation. This functional MRI study investigated how language and motor areas of the brain respond to sentences depicting intentional versus accidental action. 25 healthy adults read a series of sentences in the MRI scanner and determined whether the actions described were accidental or intentional. The main results include: (1) left hemisphere language areas (left inferior frontal gyrus, LIFG; left superior temporal gyrus, LSTG), premotor cortex (PM), and presupplementary motor area (pSMA) were strongly activated by both sentence types; (2) processing accidental action, relative to intentional action, elicited greater activity in LIFG, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), and left amygdala; no statistically significant activity was found in the opposite contrast; and (3) greater percent signal change was observed in LIFG while processing accidental action and in right precentral gyrus for intentional action. The results of this study support language and motor region involvement in action sentence comprehension in accordance with embodiment theories. Additionally, it provides new insight into the linguistic, integrative, and emotional demands of comprehending accidental action, its underlying neural circuitry, and its relationship to intentionality bias: the predisposition to ascribe purpose to action. PMID:26300387

  16. Parallel pathways from motor and somatosensory cortex for controlling whisker movements in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Varun; Karmakar, Kajari; Rijli, Filippo M; Petersen, Carl C H

    2015-01-01

    Mice can gather tactile sensory information by actively moving their whiskers to palpate objects in their immediate surroundings. Whisker sensory perception therefore requires integration of sensory and motor information, which occurs prominently in the neocortex. The signalling pathways from the neocortex for controlling whisker movements are currently poorly understood in mice. Here, we delineate two pathways, one originating from primary whisker somatosensory cortex (wS1) and the other from whisker motor cortex (wM1), that control qualitatively distinct movements of contralateral whiskers. Optogenetic stimulation of wS1 drove retraction of contralateral whiskers while stimulation of wM1 drove rhythmic whisker protraction. To map brainstem pathways connecting these cortical areas to whisker motor neurons, we used a combination of anterograde tracing using adenoassociated virus injected into neocortex and retrograde tracing using monosynaptic rabies virus injected into whisker muscles. Our data are consistent with wS1 driving whisker retraction by exciting glutamatergic premotor neurons in the rostral spinal trigeminal interpolaris nucleus, which in turn activate the motor neurons innervating the extrinsic retractor muscle nasolabialis. The rhythmic whisker protraction evoked by wM1 stimulation might be driven by excitation of excitatory and inhibitory premotor neurons in the brainstem reticular formation innervating both intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Our data therefore begin to unravel the neuronal circuits linking the neocortex to whisker motor neurons. PMID:25476605

  17. Comparison of abstract decision encoding in the monkey prefrontal cortex, the presupplementary, and cingulate motor areas.

    PubMed

    Merten, Katharina; Nieder, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Deciding between alternatives is a critical element of flexible behavior. Perceptual decisions have been studied extensively in an action-based framework. Recently, we have shown that abstract perceptual decisions are encoded in prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons (Merten and Nieder 2012). However, the role of other frontal cortex areas remained elusive. Here, we trained monkeys to perform a rule-based visual detection task that disentangled abstract perceptual decisions from motor preparation. We recorded the single-neuron activity in the presupplementary (preSMA) and the rostral part of the cingulate motor area (CMAr) and compared it to the results previously found in the PFC. Neurons in both areas traditionally identified with motor planning process the abstract decision independently of any motor preparatory activity by similar mechanisms as the PFC. A larger proportion of decision neurons and a higher strength of decision encoding was found in the preSMA than in the PFC. Neurons in both areas reliably predicted the monkeys' decisions. The fraction of CMAr decision neurons and their strength of the decision encoding were comparable to the PFC. Our findings highlight the role of both preSMA and CMAr in abstract cognitive processing and emphasize that both frontal areas encode decisions prior to the preparation of a motor output.

  18. Response of serotonergic caudal raphe neurons in relation to specific motor activities in freely moving cats.

    PubMed

    Veasey, S C; Fornal, C A; Metzler, C W; Jacobs, B L

    1995-07-01

    Serotonergic neuronal responses during three specific motor activities were studied in nuclei raphe obscurus (NRO) and raphe pallidus (NRP) of freely moving cats by means of extracellular single-unit recordings. Responses to treadmill-induced locomotion were primarily excitatory, with 21 of 24 neurons displaying increased firing rates, directly related to treadmill speed. Individual regression analyses determined three response patterns: maximal activation at low speed (0.25 m/sec), augmentation of neuronal activity only at high treadmill speed (0.77 m/sec), and a linear increase. A smaller fraction of NRO and NRP serotonergic neurons (6 of 27) also responded to hypercarbic ventilatory challenge with increased firing rates. The magnitude of neuronal response was dependent upon the fraction of inspired CO2 and was related to ventilatory motor output, specifically, inspiratory amplitude. A subgroup of neurons responsive to hypercarbia in wakefulness demonstrated significant reductions in neuronal response to hypercarbia in slow-wave sleep. Finally, unit activity for 12 of 29 cells increased in response to spontaneous feeding, displaying two distinct patterns of neuronal response in relation to onset and termination of feeding: rapid activation and deactivation versus a gradual increase and decrease. More than half of the cells studied under all three conditions were responsive to more than one motor task. These results indicate that serotonergic caudal raphe neurons are responsive to specific motor system challenges, with many neurons responsive to multiple motor tasks, and that the responsiveness of serotonergic neurons to at least one motor task, hypercarbic ventilatory challenge, is state dependent.

  19. Large-scale spatiotemporal spike patterning consistent with wave propagation in motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazutaka; Kim, Sanggyun; Coleman, Todd P; Brown, Kevin A; Suminski, Aaron J; Best, Matthew D; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G

    2015-05-21

    Aggregate signals in cortex are known to be spatiotemporally organized as propagating waves across the cortical surface, but it remains unclear whether the same is true for spiking activity in individual neurons. Furthermore, the functional interactions between cortical neurons are well documented but their spatial arrangement on the cortical surface has been largely ignored. Here we use a functional network analysis to demonstrate that a subset of motor cortical neurons in non-human primates spatially coordinate their spiking activity in a manner that closely matches wave propagation measured in the beta oscillatory band of the local field potential. We also demonstrate that sequential spiking of pairs of neuron contains task-relevant information that peaks when the neurons are spatially oriented along the wave axis. We hypothesize that the spatial anisotropy of spike patterning may reflect the underlying organization of motor cortex and may be a general property shared by other cortical areas.

  20. [Instrumentalization of movements induced by stimulation of motor cortex with food reinforcement in dogs].

    PubMed

    Frolov, A G; Pavlova, O G

    2002-01-01

    Contrary to some literature data, the possibility to instrumentalize the movements (liftings) of the hind limb elicited by stimulation of the corresponding contralateral area of the motor cortex was shown. The instrumental reflex (spontaneous high lifting of the hind limb) was acquired after a number of uniform trials: cortical stimulation--movement--food. Food delivery was preceded by a click, which was presented during the hind limb lifting and served as a secondary reinforcement. The acquisition was rather prolonged (50-200 trials) and demanded some special conditions. The results count in favor of the viewpoint that the motor cortex can directly participate in establishing the instrumental conditioned connection (motivation--movement), and simple instrumental movements can be initiated through this connection.

  1. Instrumentalization of movements evoked by stimulation of the motor cortex by food reinforcement in dogs.

    PubMed

    Frolov, A G; Pavlova, O G

    2003-03-01

    The possibility that hindlimb movements (elevations) evoked by stimulation of the corresponding contralateral area of the motor cortex could be instrumentalized by reinforcement with food was demonstrated, contradicting some previously published data. Operant movements (interstimulus voluntary high elevations of the hindlimb) were acquired as a result of consistent combinations: cortical stimulation - movement - food. Acquisition required more than 50-200 combinations. Delivery of food was accompanied by a click at exactly the moment at which the hindlimb reached the required height. The click became the food-related conditioned signal and served as a secondary operant reinforcement, which facilitated acquisition of the operant movement. These results support the view that the motor cortex can have an immediate role in forming "operant" temporary connections (motivation-movement) and that simple operant movements can be initiated via this arc.

  2. Large-scale spatiotemporal spike patterning consistent with wave propagation in motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazutaka; Kim, Sanggyun; Coleman, Todd P; Brown, Kevin A; Suminski, Aaron J; Best, Matthew D; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G

    2015-01-01

    Aggregate signals in cortex are known to be spatiotemporally organized as propagating waves across the cortical surface, but it remains unclear whether the same is true for spiking activity in individual neurons. Furthermore, the functional interactions between cortical neurons are well documented but their spatial arrangement on the cortical surface has been largely ignored. Here we use a functional network analysis to demonstrate that a subset of motor cortical neurons in non-human primates spatially coordinate their spiking activity in a manner that closely matches wave propagation measured in the beta oscillatory band of the local field potential. We also demonstrate that sequential spiking of pairs of neuron contains task-relevant information that peaks when the neurons are spatially oriented along the wave axis. We hypothesize that the spatial anisotropy of spike patterning may reflect the underlying organization of motor cortex and may be a general property shared by other cortical areas. PMID:25994554

  3. Effects of chronic cochlear electrical stimulation after an extended period of profound deafness on primary auditory cortex organization in cats.

    PubMed

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2014-03-01

    Extended periods of deafness have profound effects on central auditory system function and organization. Neonatal deafening results in loss of the normal cochleotopic organization of the primary auditory cortex (AI), but environmentally-derived intracochlear electrical stimulation, via a cochlear implant, initiated shortly after deafening, can prevent this loss. We investigated whether such stimulation initiated after an extended period of deafness can restore cochleotopy. In two groups of neonatally-deafened cats, a multi-channel intracochlear electrode array was implanted at 8 weeks of age. One group received only minimal stimulation, associated with brief recordings at 4-6-week intervals, over the following 6 months to check the efficacy of the implant. In the other group, this 6-month period was followed by 6 months of near-continuous intracochlear electrical stimulation from a modified clinical cochlear implant system. We recorded multi-unit clusters in the auditory cortex and used two different methods to define the region of interest in the putative AI. There was no evidence of cochleotopy in any of the minimally stimulated animals, confirming our earlier finding. In three of six chronically stimulated cats there was clear evidence of AI cochleotopy, and in a fourth cat in which the majority of penetrations were in the anterior auditory field there was clear evidence of cochleotopy in that field. The finding that chronic intracochlear electrical stimulation after an extended period of deafness is able to restore cochleotopy in some (but not all) cases has implications for the performance of patients implanted after an extended period of deafness.

  4. Dorsal premotor cortex is involved in switching motor plans

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Bernier, Alexandre; Tremblay, Elsa; Cisek, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that neural activity in primate dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) can simultaneously represent multiple potential movement plans, and that activity related to these movement options is modulated by their relative subjective desirability. These findings support the hypothesis that decisions about actions are made through a competition within the same circuits that guide the actions themselves. This hypothesis further predicts that the very same cells that guide initial decisions will continue to update their activities if an animal changes its mind. For example, if a previously selected movement option suddenly becomes unavailable, the correction will be performed by the same cells that selected the initial movement, as opposed to some different group of cells responsible for online guidance. We tested this prediction by recording neural activity in the PMd of a monkey performing an instructed-delay reach selection task. In the task, two targets were simultaneously presented and their border styles indicated whether each would be worth 1, 2, or 3 juice drops. In a random subset of trials (FREE), the monkey was allowed a choice while in the remaining trials (FORCED) one of the targets disappeared at the time of the GO signal. In FORCED-LOW trials the monkey was forced to move to the less valuable target and started moving either toward the new target (Direct) or toward the target that vanished and then curved to reach the remaining one (Curved). Prior to the GO signal, PMd activity clearly reflected the monkey's subjective preference, predicting his choices in FREE trials even with equally valued options. In FORCED-LOW trials, PMd activity reflected the switch of the monkey's plan as early as 100 ms after the GO signal, well before movement onset (MO). This confirms that the activity is not related to feedback from the movement itself, and suggests that PMd continues to participate in action selection even when the animal changes its mind on

  5. Motor Training Promotes Both Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity of Layer II/III Pyramidal Neurons in the Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Yasumasa; Ito, Nana; Yamamoto, Yui; Owada, Yuji; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Mitsushima, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Motor skill training induces structural plasticity at dendritic spines in the primary motor cortex (M1). To further analyze both synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in the layer II/III area of M1, we subjected rats to a rotor rod test and then prepared acute brain slices. Motor skill consistently improved within 2 days of training. Voltage clamp analysis showed significantly higher α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/N-methyl-d-aspartate (AMPA/NMDA) ratios and miniature EPSC amplitudes in 1-day trained rats compared with untrained rats, suggesting increased postsynaptic AMPA receptors in the early phase of motor learning. Compared with untrained controls, 2-days trained rats showed significantly higher miniature EPSC amplitude and frequency. Paired-pulse analysis further demonstrated lower rates in 2-days trained rats, suggesting increased presynaptic glutamate release during the late phase of learning. One-day trained rats showed decreased miniature IPSC frequency and increased paired-pulse analysis of evoked IPSC, suggesting a transient decrease in presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release. Moreover, current clamp analysis revealed lower resting membrane potential, higher spike threshold, and deeper afterhyperpolarization in 1-day trained rats—while 2-days trained rats showed higher membrane potential, suggesting dynamic changes in intrinsic properties. Our present results indicate dynamic changes in glutamatergic, GABAergic, and intrinsic plasticity in M1 layer II/III neurons after the motor training. PMID:27193420

  6. Laminar differences in receptive field properties of cells in cat primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Charles D.

    1977-01-01

    1. Cells in area 17 of the cat visual cortex were studied with a view towards correlating receptive field properties with layering. A number of receptive field parameters were measured for all units, and nearly every unit was marked with a microlesion to determine accurately the layer in which it was found. 2. Cells were defined as simple or complex by mapping with stationary stimuli, using the criteria of Hubel & Wiesel (1962). Complex cells fell into two groups: those that showed summation for increased slit length (standard complex) and those that did not (special complex). 3. The simple cells were located in the deep part of layer 3, in layer 4, and in layer 6. This corresponds to the distribution of afferents from the dorsal layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus. In these cortical layers the simple cells differed primarily with respect to their receptive field size, cells in layer 4 having the smallest, layer 3 intermediate, and layer 6 the largest fields. Layer 4 was the only layer in which simple cells showed end-inhibition (a reduction in response to slits extending beyond the excitatory portion of the receptive field). 4. The standard complex cells were found in all layers, but were quite scarce in layer 4. As with the simple cells, field size varied with layer: in layer 2+3 they had small to intermediate field sizes, in layer 5 intermediate, and in layer 6 very large. Layer 6 cells showed summation for slits of increased length up to very large values, and responded best when the slits were centred in the receptive field. The only standard complex cells that showed end-inhibition were those in layer 2+3, and these were similar to the layer 4 simple cells in terms of proportion of end-inhibited units and degree of end-inhibition. 5. The special complex cells, originally described by Palmer & Rosenquist (1974), were found in two tiers: the upper one at the layer 3/layer 4 border and the lower one in layer 5. They were different from the standard complex

  7. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  8. Fezf2 expression in layer 5 projection neurons of mature mouse motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Tantirigama, Malinda L S; Oswald, Manfred J; Clare, Alison J; Wicky, Hollie E; Day, Robert C; Hughes, Stephanie M; Empson, Ruth M

    2016-03-01

    The mature cerebral cortex contains a wide diversity of neuron phenotypes. This diversity is specified during development by neuron-specific expression of key transcription factors, some of which are retained for the life of the animal. One of these key developmental transcription factors that is also retained in the adult is Fezf2, but the neuron types expressing it in the mature cortex are unknown. With a validated Fezf2-Gfp reporter mouse, whole-cell electrophysiology with morphology reconstruction, cluster analysis, in vivo retrograde labeling, and immunohistochemistry, we identify a heterogeneous population of Fezf2(+) neurons in both layer 5A and layer 5B of the mature motor cortex. Functional electrophysiology identified two distinct subtypes of Fezf2(+) neurons that resembled pyramidal tract projection neurons (PT-PNs) and intratelencephalic projection neurons (IT-PNs). Retrograde labeling confirmed the former type to include corticospinal projection neurons (CSpPNs) and corticothalamic projection neurons (CThPNs), whereas the latter type included crossed corticostriatal projection neurons (cCStrPNs) and crossed-corticocortical projection neurons (cCCPNs). The two Fezf2(+) subtypes expressed either CTIP2 or SATB2 to distinguish their physiological identity and confirmed that specific expression combinations of key transcription factors persist in the mature motor cortex. Our findings indicate a wider role for Fezf2 within gene expression networks that underpin the diversity of layer 5 cortical projection neurons.

  9. Hemispheric asymmetry in cerebrovascular reactivity of the human primary motor cortex: an in vivo study at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Driver, Ian D; Andoh, Jamila; Blockley, Nicholas P; Francis, Susan T; Gowland, Penny A; Paus, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    Current functional MRI (fMRI) approaches assess underlying neuronal activity through monitoring the related local variations in cerebral blood oxygenation, blood volume and blood flow. This vascular response is likely to vary across brain regions and across individuals, depending on the composition of the local vascular bed and on the vascular capacity to dilate. The most widely used technique uses the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal, which arises from a complex combination of all of these factors. The model of handedness provides a case where one brain region (dominant motor cortex) is known to have a stronger BOLD response over another (non-dominant motor cortex) during hand motor task performance. We predict that this is accompanied by a higher vascular reactivity in the dominant motor cortex, when compared with the non-dominant motor cortex. Precise measurement of end-tidal CO2 and a novel sinusoidal CO2 respiratory challenge were combined with the high sensitivity and finer spatial resolution available for fMRI at 7 T to measure BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in eight healthy male participants. BOLD CVR was compared between the left (dominant) and right (non-dominant) primary motor cortices of right-handed adults. Hemispheric asymmetry in vascular reactivity was predicted and observed in the primary motor cortex (left CVR = 0.60 ± 0.15%/mm Hg; right CVR = 0.47 ± 0.08%/mm Hg; left CVR > right CVR, P = 0.04), the first reported evidence of such a vascular difference. These findings demonstrate a cerebral vascular asymmetry between the left and right primary motor cortex. The origin of this asymmetry largely arises from the contribution of large draining veins. This work has implications for future motor laterality studies that use BOLD, and it is also suggestive of a vascular plasticity in the human primary motor cortex. PMID:25788020

  10. The neurophysiology of response competition: motor cortex activation and inhibition following subliminal response priming.

    PubMed

    Praamstra, Peter; Seiss, Ellen

    2005-03-01

    Some widely used tasks in cognitive neuroscience depend on the induction of a response conflict between choice alternatives, involving partial activation of the incorrect response before the correct response is emitted. Although such ''conflict tasks'' are often used to investigate frontal-lobe-based conflict-monitoring processes, it is not known how response competition evolves in the motor cortex. To investigate the dynamics of motor cortex activation during response competition, we used a subliminal priming task that induced response competition while bypassing pre-response stage processing conflict. Analyses of movement-related EEG potentials supported an interaction between competing responses characterized by reciprocal inhibition. Inhibitory interactions between response channels contribute to the resolution of response conflict. However, the reciprocal inhibition at motor cortex level seemed to operate independent of higher level conflict-monitoring processes, which were relatively insensitive to response conflict induced by subliminal priming. These results elucidate how response conflict causes interference as well as the conditions under which frontal-lobe-based interference control processes are engaged.

  11. Physical activity-associated gene expression signature in nonhuman primate motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Amanda C; Leak, Rehana K; Garbett, Krassimira; Zigmond, Michael J; Cameron, Judy L; Mirnics, Károly

    2012-03-01

    It has been established that weight gain and weight loss are heavily influenced by activity level. In this study, we hypothesized that the motor cortex exhibits a distinct physical activity-associated gene expression profile, which may underlie changes in weight associated with movement. Using DNA microarrays we profiled gene expression in the motor cortex of a group of 14 female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with a wide range of stable physical activity levels. We found that neuronal growth factor signaling and nutrient sensing transcripts in the brain were highly correlated with physical activity. A follow-up of AKT3 expression changes (a gene at the apex of neuronal survival and nutrient sensing) revealed increased protein levels of total AKT, phosphorylated AKT, and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3), one of AKT's main downstream effectors. In addition, we successfully validated three other genes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (cereblon (CRBN), origin recognition complex subunit 4-like, and pyruvate dehydrogenase 4 (PDK4)). We conclude that these genes are important in the physical activity-associated pathway in the motor cortex, and may be critical for physical activity-associated changes in body weight and neuroprotection.

  12. Temporal dynamics of motor cortex excitability during perception of natural emotional scenes.

    PubMed

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    Although it is widely assumed that emotions prime the body for action, the effects of visual perception of natural emotional scenes on the temporal dynamics of the human motor system have scarcely been investigated. Here, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess motor excitability during observation and categorization of positive, neutral and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System database. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from TMS of the left motor cortex were recorded from hand muscles, at 150 and 300 ms after picture onset. In the early temporal condition we found an increase in hand motor excitability that was specific for the perception of negative pictures. This early negative bias was predicted by interindividual differences in the disposition to experience aversive feelings (personal distress) in interpersonal emotional contexts. In the later temporal condition, we found that MEPs were similarly increased for both positive and negative pictures, suggesting an increased reactivity to emotionally arousing scenes. By highlighting the temporal course of motor excitability during perception of emotional pictures, our study provides direct neurophysiological support for the evolutionary notions that emotion perception is closely linked to action systems and that emotionally negative events require motor reactions to be more urgently mobilized.

  13. Temporal dynamics of motor cortex excitability during perception of natural emotional scenes

    PubMed Central

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely assumed that emotions prime the body for action, the effects of visual perception of natural emotional scenes on the temporal dynamics of the human motor system have scarcely been investigated. Here, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess motor excitability during observation and categorization of positive, neutral and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System database. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from TMS of the left motor cortex were recorded from hand muscles, at 150 and 300 ms after picture onset. In the early temporal condition we found an increase in hand motor excitability that was specific for the perception of negative pictures. This early negative bias was predicted by interindividual differences in the disposition to experience aversive feelings (personal distress) in interpersonal emotional contexts. In the later temporal condition, we found that MEPs were similarly increased for both positive and negative pictures, suggesting an increased reactivity to emotionally arousing scenes. By highlighting the temporal course of motor excitability during perception of emotional pictures, our study provides direct neurophysiological support for the evolutionary notions that emotion perception is closely linked to action systems and that emotionally negative events require motor reactions to be more urgently mobilized. PMID:23945998

  14. [Percutaneous electric and magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in man. Physiological aspects and clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Maertens de Noordhout, A; Rothwell, J C; Day, B L; Thompson, P D; Delwaide, P J; Marsden, C D

    1989-01-01

    The new techniques of percutaneous electric and magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in conscious man provide a unique opportunity of functional testing of the central motor pathways. These techniques seem to be safe and no immediate or delayed adverse reactions have been reported. The physiological studies so far performed suggest that the structures which are preferentially excited by these methods are the fast conducting pyramidal neurones. It has been shown that a single cortical stimulus is able to activate spinal motoneurones repeatedly. This phenomenon can easily be explained if the cortical stimulus generates multiple descending volleys in the central motor pathways. By comparison with experiments of stimulation of the exposed motor cortex in animals, it is likely that electric brain stimulation directly activates the axons of the pyramidal neurons at their origin and to a lesser extent also recruits these neurons transsynaptically, via some cortical interneurones. Magnetic stimulation of the brain at the vertex seems to act mostly by the latter mechanism. These different modes of action of the two methods of cortical stimulation explain the latency differences of the EMG responses obtained with either technique. Increased excitability of the spinal motoneurones and the existence of multiple descending volleys in response to a single cortical stimulus result in shortening of the latencies and greater amplitude of the responses recorded during voluntary contraction of the target muscle. Stimulation of the motor cortex has been used in pilot studies conducted on patients suffering from various disorders of the central motor pathways, such as multiple sclerosis, cervical spondylosis, motor neurone disease or stroke. The sensitivity of the technique looks promising. In M.S., the EMG responses usually show an increased central conduction latency, a reduced amplitude and a prolonged duration. The severity of the electrophysiological abnormalities is not very

  15. Functional connectivity of primary motor cortex is dependent on genetic burden in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Katherine A; Lowe, Mark J; Harrington, Deborah L; Lin, Jian; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Paulsen, Jane S; Rao, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Subtle changes in motor function have been observed in individuals with prodromal Huntington disease (prHD), but the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood nor is the cumulative effect of the disease (disease burden) on functional connectivity. The present study examined the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) connectivity of the primary motor cortex (M1) in 16 gene-negative (NEG) controls and 48 gene-positive prHD participants with various levels of disease burden. The results showed that the strength of the left M1 connectivity with the ipsilateral M1 and somatosensory areas decreased as disease burden increased and correlated with motor symptoms. Weakened M1 connectivity within the motor areas was also associated with abnormalities in long-range connections that evolved with disease burden. In this study, M1 connectivity was decreased with visual centers (bilateral cuneus), but increased with a hub of the default mode network (DMN; posterior cingulate cortex). Changes in connectivity measures were associated with worse performance on measures of cognitive-motor functioning. Short- and long-range functional connectivity disturbances were also associated with volume loss in the basal ganglia, suggesting that weakened M1 connectivity is partly a manifestation of striatal atrophy. Altogether, the results indicate that the prodromal phase of HD is associated with abnormal interhemispheric interactions among motor areas and disturbances in the connectivity of M1 with visual centers and the DMN. These changes may, respectively, contribute to increased motor symptoms, visuomotor integration problems, and deficits in the executive control of movement as individuals approach a manifest diagnosis.

  16. Primary Motor Cortex Representation of Handgrip Muscles in Patients with Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Maria Luíza Sales; Sanchez, Tiago Arruda; Moreira, Filipe Azaline; Hoefle, Sebastian; Souto, Inaiacy Bittencourt; da Cunha, Antônio José Ledo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an endemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that predominantly attacks the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to progressive impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic function. Little is known about how this peripheral neuropathy affects corticospinal excitability of handgrip muscles. Our purpose was to explore the motor cortex organization after progressive peripheral nerve injury and upper-limb dysfunction induced by leprosy using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods In a cross-sectional study design, we mapped bilaterally in the primary motor cortex (M1) the representations of the hand flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), as well as of the intrinsic hand muscles abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). All participants underwent clinical assessment, handgrip dynamometry and motor and sensory nerve conduction exams 30 days before mapping. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were performed with an alpha-value of p<0.05. Findings Dynamometry performance of the patients’ most affected hand (MAH), was worse than that of the less affected hand (LAH) and of healthy controls participants (p = 0.031), confirming handgrip impairment. Motor threshold (MT) of the FDS muscle was higher in both hemispheres in patients as compared to controls, and lower in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH when compared to that of the LAH. Moreover, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes collected in the FDS of the MAH were higher in comparison to those of controls. Strikingly, MEPs in the intrinsic hand muscle FDI had lower amplitudes in the hemisphere contralateral to MAH as compared to those of the LAH and the control group. Taken together, these results are suggestive of a more robust representation of an extrinsic hand flexor and impaired intrinsic hand muscle function in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH due to leprosy. Conclusion Decreased

  17. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the primary motor cortex improves word-retrieval in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Meinzer, Marcus; Lindenberg, Robert; Sieg, Mira M.; Nachtigall, Laura; Ulm, Lena; Flöel, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Language facilitation by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in healthy individuals has generated hope that tDCS may also allow improving language impairment after stroke (aphasia). However, current stimulation protocols have yielded variable results and may require identification of residual language cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which complicates incorporation into clinical practice. Based on previous behavioral studies that demonstrated improved language processing by motor system pre-activation, the present study assessed whether tDCS administered to the primary motor cortex (M1) can enhance language functions. This proof-of-concept study employed a sham-tDCS controlled, cross-over, within-subject design and assessed the impact of unilateral excitatory (anodal) and bihemispheric (dual) tDCS in 18 healthy older adults during semantic word-retrieval and motor speech tasks. Simultaneous fMRI scrutinized the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS effects. Both active tDCS conditions significantly improved word-retrieval compared to sham-tDCS. The direct comparison of activity elicited by word-retrieval vs. motor-speech trials revealed bilateral frontal activity increases during both anodal- and dual-tDCS compared to sham-tDCS. This effect was driven by more pronounced deactivation of frontal regions during the motor-speech task, while activity during word-retrieval trials was unaffected by the stimulation. No effects were found in M1 and secondary motor regions. Our results show that tDCS administered to M1 can improve word-retrieval in healthy individuals, thereby providing a rationale to explore whether M1-tDCS may offer a novel approach to improve language functions in aphasia. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed neural facilitation specifically during motor speech trials, which may have reduced switching costs between the overlapping neural systems for lexical retrieval and speech processing, thereby resulting in

  18. Cortical oscillatory activity and the induction of plasticity in the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Suzanne M; Rothwell, John C; Ridding, Michael C

    2011-05-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigms such as continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) induce long-term potentiation- and long-term depression-like plasticity in the human motor cortex. However, responses to cTBS are highly variable and may depend on the activity of the cortex at the time of stimulation. We investigated whether power in different electroencephalogram (EEG) frequency bands predicted the response to subsequent cTBS, and conversely whether cTBS had after-effects on the EEG. cTBS may utilize similar mechanisms of plasticity to motor learning; thus, we conducted a parallel set of experiments to test whether ongoing electroencephalography could predict performance of a visuomotor training task, and whether training itself had effects on the EEG. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) provided an index of cortical excitability pre- and post-intervention. The EEG was recorded over the motor cortex pre- and post-intervention, and power spectra were computed. cTBS reduced MEP amplitudes; however, baseline power in the delta, theta, alpha or beta frequencies did not predict responses to cTBS or learning of the visuomotor training task. cTBS had no effect on delta, theta, alpha or beta power. In contrast, there was an increase in alpha power following visuomotor training that was positively correlated with changes in MEP amplitude post-training. The results suggest that the EEG is not a useful state-marker for predicting responses to plasticity-inducing paradigms. The correlation between alpha power and changes in corticospinal excitability following visuomotor training requires further investigation, but may be related to disengagement of the somatosensory system important for motor memory consolidation. PMID:21488985

  19. Effects of morphine, physostigmine and raphe nuclei stimulation on 5-hydroxytryptamine release from the cerebral cortex of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Aiello-Malmberg, P; Bartolini, A; Bartolini, R; Galli, A

    1979-01-01

    1. The release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from the cerebral cortex and caudate nucleus of brainstem-transected cats and from the cerebral cortex of rats anaesthetized with urethane was determined by radioenzymatic and biological assay. 2. The stimulation of nucleus linearis intermedius of raphe doubles the basal 5-HT release in the caudate nucleus and increases it 3 fold in the cerebral cortex. The effects of the electrical stimulation of the raphe are potentiated by chlorimipramine. 3. Brain 5-HT release is greatly increased by morphine hydrochloride (6 mg/kg i.v.) and by physostigmine (100 microgram/kg i.v.), but not by DL-DOPA (50 mg/kg i.v.). 4. It is suggested that the 5-HT releasing action of physostigmine can contribute to some of its pharmacological effects such as the analgesic effect so far attributed exclusively to its indirect cholinomimetic activity. 5. The 5-HT releasing action of physostigmine seems unrelated to its anticholinesterase activity. PMID:435680

  20. Speech dynamics are coded in the left motor cortex in fluent speakers but not in adults who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, T. N. Linh; Neef, Andreas; Paulus, Walter; Sommer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The precise excitability regulation of neuronal circuits in the primary motor cortex is central to the successful and fluent production of speech. Our question was whether the involuntary execution of undesirable movements, e.g. stuttering, is linked to an insufficient excitability tuning of neural populations in the orofacial region of the primary motor cortex. We determined the speech-related time course of excitability modulation in the left and right primary motor tongue representation. Thirteen fluent speakers (four females, nine males; aged 23–44) and 13 adults who stutter (four females, nine males, aged 21–55) were asked to build verbs with the verbal prefix ‘auf’. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied over the primary motor cortex during the transition phase between a fixed labiodental articulatory configuration and immediately following articulatory configurations, at different latencies after transition onset. Bilateral electromyography was recorded from self-adhesive electrodes placed on the surface of the tongue. Off-line, we extracted the motor evoked potential amplitudes and normalized these amplitudes to the individual baseline excitability during the fixed configuration. Fluent speakers demonstrated a prominent left hemisphere increase of motor cortex excitability in the transition phase (P = 0.009). In contrast, the excitability of the right primary motor tongue representation was unchanged. Interestingly, adults afflicted with stuttering revealed a lack of left-hemisphere facilitation. Moreover, the magnitude of facilitation was negatively correlated with stuttering frequency. Although orofacial midline muscles are bilaterally innervated from corticobulbar projections of both hemispheres, our results indicate that speech motor plans are controlled primarily in the left primary speech motor cortex. This speech motor planning-related asymmetry towards the left orofacial motor cortex is missing in stuttering. Moreover, a

  1. Speech dynamics are coded in the left motor cortex in fluent speakers but not in adults who stutter.

    PubMed

    Neef, Nicole E; Hoang, T N Linh; Neef, Andreas; Paulus, Walter; Sommer, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The precise excitability regulation of neuronal circuits in the primary motor cortex is central to the successful and fluent production of speech. Our question was whether the involuntary execution of undesirable movements, e.g. stuttering, is linked to an insufficient excitability tuning of neural populations in the orofacial region of the primary motor cortex. We determined the speech-related time course of excitability modulation in the left and right primary motor tongue representation. Thirteen fluent speakers (four females, nine males; aged 23-44) and 13 adults who stutter (four females, nine males, aged 21-55) were asked to build verbs with the verbal prefix 'auf'. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied over the primary motor cortex during the transition phase between a fixed labiodental articulatory configuration and immediately following articulatory configurations, at different latencies after transition onset. Bilateral electromyography was recorded from self-adhesive electrodes placed on the surface of the tongue. Off-line, we extracted the motor evoked potential amplitudes and normalized these amplitudes to the individual baseline excitability during the fixed configuration. Fluent speakers demonstrated a prominent left hemisphere increase of motor cortex excitability in the transition phase (P = 0.009). In contrast, the excitability of the right primary motor tongue representation was unchanged. Interestingly, adults afflicted with stuttering revealed a lack of left-hemisphere facilitation. Moreover, the magnitude of facilitation was negatively correlated with stuttering frequency. Although orofacial midline muscles are bilaterally innervated from corticobulbar projections of both hemispheres, our results indicate that speech motor plans are controlled primarily in the left primary speech motor cortex. This speech motor planning-related asymmetry towards the left orofacial motor cortex is missing in stuttering. Moreover, a negative

  2. The effect of the stimulation pattern on the fatigue of single motor units in adult cats.

    PubMed Central

    Bevan, L; Laouris, Y; Reinking, R M; Stuart, D G

    1992-01-01

    1. The main purpose of this study was to examine the effects of two subtly different stimulus patterns on the force developed by fast-twitch, fatiguable motor units in a cat hindlimb muscle during control (pre-fatigue) and fatiguing contractions. 2. The peak force and the force-time integral responses of nineteen high fatigue (FF) and three intermediate fatigue (FI) motor units of the tibialis posterior muscle in five deeply anaesthetized adult cats were measured at selected times during the course of a 360-s fatigue test. 3. The fatigue test involved a pseudo-random alternation of two patterns of stimulation. One pattern (regular) was composed of a train of stimuli with constant interpulse intervals, set at 1.8 x the twitch contraction time of each unit (interval range, 27-51 ms), and delivered for 500 (or 400) ms. For the total (FF + FI) motor-unit sample, the mean (+/- S.D.) stimulation frequency was 26 +/- 4 Hz (range, 19-37 Hz). The other stimulus pattern (optimized) consisted of three initial stimuli with short (10 ms) interpulse intervals, followed by a constant interpulse-interval train that was adjusted (interval range, 29-62 ms; frequency, 23 +/- 5 Hz; frequency range, 16-36 Hz) such that the total train had the same number of pulses, and the same average frequency and duration as the regular train. 4. The stimulus trains were delivered at 1 s-1 for 360 s, using three-train sequences of each pattern, randomly alternating with one another. The response of the third train in each sequence was selected for the force measurements. The force profile obtained from the fatigue test was subsequently decomposed into two profiles: one attributable to regular and one to optimized stimulation. 5. During the initial responses to the fatigue test, the optimized stimulus pattern produced significantly more force than the regular stimulus pattern. For FF units, the mean increase in peak force (141%) was significantly greater than the increase in the force-time integral

  3. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination.

  4. Two whisker motor areas in the rat cortex: evidence from thalamocortical connections.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Hisham; Jain, Neeraj

    2014-02-15

    In primates, the motor cortex consists of at least seven different areas, which are involved in movement planning, coordination, initiation, and execution. However, for rats, only the primary motor cortex has been well described. A rostrally located second motor area has been proposed, but its extent, organization, and even definitive existence remain uncertain. Only a rostral forelimb area (RFA) has been definitively described, besides few reports of a rostral hindlimb area. We have previously proposed existence of a second whisker area, which we termed the rostral whisker area (RWA), based on its differential response to intracortical microstimulation compared with the caudal whisker area (CWA) in animals under deep anesthesia (Tandon et al. [2008] Eur J Neurosci 27:228). To establish that RWA is distinct from the caudally contiguous CWA, we determined sources of thalamic inputs to the two proposed whisker areas. Sources of inputs to RFA, caudal forelimb area (CFA), and caudal hindlimb region were determined for comparison. The results show that RWA and CWA can be distinguished based on differences in their thalamic inputs. RWA receives major projections from mediodorsal and ventromedial nuclei, whereas the major projections to CWA are from the ventral anterior, ventrolateral, and posterior nuclei. Moreover, the thalamic nuclei that provide major inputs to RWA are the same as for RFA, and the nuclei projecting to CWA are same as for CFA. The results suggest that rats have a second rostrally located motor area with RWA and RFA as its constituents. PMID:23853077

  5. [Primary motor cortex as one of the levels of the construction of movements].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, O G

    2014-01-01

    The data obtained during the recent decades led to revision of the dominant in neurophysiology view of primary motor cortex as "the cord area" which transfers the motor commands to the spinal cord. Contrary to this point of view, it was shown that MI primates neurons participate in all stages of organization of motor behavior and that the final postures of complex coordinated movements are represented in the MI map. Characteristics of movements controlled by MI revealed by currently available methods were predicted and explained by N.A. Bernstein about 70 years ago. According to his concept, there are some levels of the construction of movements that exist in the central nervous system. Area 4 (i.e. MI), which is one of them, appeared on the definite stage of evolution for resolving the particular movement tasks. In support of this conception we are showing that: 1) MI controls the movements that differ from the movements of other levels by their characteristics (the mode of operating and the sense content); 2) some voluntary movements can be executed without participation of MI; 3) different motor areas of the cortex are coupled with different aspects of movement behavior.

  6. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over premotor cortex facilitates observational learning of a motor sequence.

    PubMed

    Wade, Stephanie; Hammond, Geoff

    2015-06-01

    Motor skills, including complex movement sequences, can be acquired by observing a model without physical practice of the skill, a phenomenon known as observational learning. Observational learning of motor skills engages the same memory substrate as physical practice, and is thought to be mediated by the action observation network, a bilateral fronto-parietal circuit with mirror-like properties. We examined the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over premotor cortex, a key node of the action observation network, on observational learning of a serial response time task. Results showed that anodal tDCS during observation of the to-be-learned sequence facilitated reaction times in the subsequent behavioral test. The study provides evidence that increasing excitability of the action observation network during observation can facilitate later motor skill acquisition.

  7. Modulation of motor cortex neuronal activity and motor behavior during subthalamic nucleus stimulation in the normal primate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Luke A; Xu, Weidong; Baker, Kenneth B; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L

    2015-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established surgical therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). An emerging hypothesis is that the therapeutic benefit of DBS is derived from direct modulation of primary motor cortex (M1), yet little is known about the influence of STN DBS on individual neurons in M1. We investigated the effect of STN DBS, delivered at discrete interval intensities (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100%) of corticospinal tract threshold (CSTT), on motor performance and M1 neuronal activity in a naive nonhuman primate. Motor performance during a food reach and retrieval task improved during low-intensity stimulation (20% CSTT) but worsened as intensity approached the threshold for activation of corticospinal fibers (80% and 100% CSTT). To assess cortical effects of STN DBS, spontaneous, extracellular neuronal activity was collected from M1 neurons before, during, and after DBS at the same CSTT stimulus intensities. STN DBS significantly modulated the firing of a majority of M1 neurons; however, the direction of effect varied with stimulus intensity such that, at 20% CSTT, most neurons were suppressed, whereas at the highest stimulus intensities the majority of neurons were activated. At a population level, firing rates increased as stimulus intensity increased. These results show that STN DBS influences both motor performance and M1 neuronal activity systematically according to stimulus intensity. In addition, the unanticipated reduction in reach times suggests that STN DBS, at stimulus intensities lower than typically used for treatment of PD motor signs, can enhance normal motor performance.

  8. Melodic Priming of Motor Sequence Performance: The Role of the Dorsal Premotor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Marianne A; Brown, Rachel; Lega, Carlotta; Penhune, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to specific auditory sequences leads to the induction of new motor memories and to investigate the role of the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC) in this crossmodal learning process. Fifty-two young healthy non-musicians were familiarized with the sound to key-press mapping on a computer keyboard and tested on their baseline motor performance. Each participant received subsequently either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) or sham stimulation over the dPMC and was then asked to remember a 12-note melody without moving. For half of the participants, the contour of the melody memorized was congruent to a subsequently performed, but never practiced, finger movement sequence (Congruent group). For the other half, the melody memorized was incongruent to the subsequent finger movement sequence (Incongruent group). Hearing a congruent melody led to significantly faster performance of a motor sequence immediately thereafter compared to hearing an incongruent melody. In addition, cTBS speeded up motor performance in both groups, possibly by relieving motor consolidation from interference by the declarative melody memorization task. Our findings substantiate recent evidence that exposure to a movement-related tone sequence can induce specific, crossmodal encoding of a movement sequence representation. They further suggest that cTBS over the dPMC may enhance early offline procedural motor skill consolidation in cognitive states where motor consolidation would normally be disturbed by concurrent declarative memory processes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of auditory-motor system interactions and have implications for the development of new motor rehabilitation approaches using sound and non-invasive brain stimulation as neuromodulatory tools. PMID:27242414

  9. Melodic Priming of Motor Sequence Performance: The Role of the Dorsal Premotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Brown, Rachel; Lega, Carlotta; Penhune, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to specific auditory sequences leads to the induction of new motor memories and to investigate the role of the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC) in this crossmodal learning process. Fifty-two young healthy non-musicians were familiarized with the sound to key-press mapping on a computer keyboard and tested on their baseline motor performance. Each participant received subsequently either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) or sham stimulation over the dPMC and was then asked to remember a 12-note melody without moving. For half of the participants, the contour of the melody memorized was congruent to a subsequently performed, but never practiced, finger movement sequence (Congruent group). For the other half, the melody memorized was incongruent to the subsequent finger movement sequence (Incongruent group). Hearing a congruent melody led to significantly faster performance of a motor sequence immediately thereafter compared to hearing an incongruent melody. In addition, cTBS speeded up motor performance in both groups, possibly by relieving motor consolidation from interference by the declarative melody memorization task. Our findings substantiate recent evidence that exposure to a movement-related tone sequence can induce specific, crossmodal encoding of a movement sequence representation. They further suggest that cTBS over the dPMC may enhance early offline procedural motor skill consolidation in cognitive states where motor consolidation would normally be disturbed by concurrent declarative memory processes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of auditory-motor system interactions and have implications for the development of new motor rehabilitation approaches using sound and non-invasive brain stimulation as neuromodulatory tools. PMID:27242414

  10. Antinociception induced by motor cortex stimulation: somatotopy of behavioral response and profile of neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    França, Nubia R M; Toniolo, Elaine F; Franciosi, Adriano C; Alves, Adilson S; de Andrade, Daniel C; Fonoff, Erich T; Britto, Luiz R; Dale, Camila S

    2013-08-01

    Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is used as a therapy for patients with refractory neuropathic pain. Experimental evidence suggests that the motor cortex (MC) is involved in the modulation of normal nociceptive response, but the underlying mechanisms have not been clarified yet. In previous studies, we demonstrated that MCS increases the nociceptive threshold of naive conscious rats by inhibiting thalamic sensory neurons and disinhibiting the neurons in periaqueductal gray (PAG), with the involvement of the opioid system. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible somatotopy of the motor cortex on MCS-induced antinociception and the pattern of neuronal activation evaluated by Fos and Egr-1 immunolabel in an attempt to better understand the relation between MC and analgesia. Rats received epidural electrode implants placed over the MC, in three distinct areas (forelimb, hindlimb or tail), according to a functional mapping established in previous studies. Nociceptive threshold was evaluated under 15-min electrical stimulating sessions. MCS induced selective antinociception in the limb related to the stimulated cortex, with no changes in other evaluated areas. MCS decreased Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord for all evaluated groups and increased Fos-IR in the PAG, although no changes were observed in the PAG for the tail group. Egr-1 results were similar to those obtained for Fos. Data shown herein demonstrate that MCS elicits a substantial and selective antinociceptive effect, which is mediated, at least in part, by the activation of descendent inhibitory pain pathway.

  11. Impairment of auditory-motor timing and compensatory reorganization after ventral premotor cortex stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kornysheva, Katja; Schubotz, Ricarda I

    2011-01-01

    Integrating auditory and motor information often requires precise timing as in speech and music. In humans, the position of the ventral premotor cortex (PMv) in the dorsal auditory stream renders this area a node for auditory-motor integration. Yet, it remains unknown whether the PMv is critical for auditory-motor timing and which activity increases help to preserve task performance following its disruption. 16 healthy volunteers participated in two sessions with fMRI measured at baseline and following rTMS (rTMS) of either the left PMv or a control region. Subjects synchronized left or right finger tapping to sub-second beat rates of auditory rhythms in the experimental task, and produced self-paced tapping during spectrally matched auditory stimuli in the control task. Left PMv rTMS impaired auditory-motor synchronization accuracy in the first sub-block following stimulation (p<0.01, Bonferroni corrected), but spared motor timing and attention to task. Task-related activity increased in the homologue right PMv, but did not predict the behavioral effect of rTMS. In contrast, anterior midline cerebellum revealed most pronounced activity increase in less impaired subjects. The present findings suggest a critical role of the left PMv in feed-forward computations enabling accurate auditory-motor timing, which can be compensated by activity modulations in the cerebellum, but not in the homologue region contralateral to stimulation. PMID:21738657

  12. Neuromuscular Plasticity: Disentangling Stable and Variable Motor Maps in the Human Sensorimotor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Dominic; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Motor maps acquired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are evolving as a biomarker for monitoring disease progression or the effects of therapeutic interventions. High test-retest reliability of this technique for long observation periods is therefore required to differentiate daily or weekly fluctuations from stable plastic reorganization of corticospinal connectivity. In this study, a novel projection, interpolation, and coregistration technique, which considers the individual gyral anatomy, was applied in healthy subjects for biweekly acquired TMS motor maps over a period of twelve weeks. The intraclass correlation coefficient revealed long-term reliability of motor maps with relevant interhemispheric differences. The sensorimotor cortex and nonprimary motor areas of the dominant hemisphere showed more extended and more stable corticospinal connectivity. Long-term correlations of the MEP amplitudes at each stimulation site revealed mosaic-like clusters of consistent corticospinal excitability. The resting motor threshold, centre of gravity, and mean MEPs across all TMS sites, as highly reliable cortical map parameters, could be disentangled from more variable parameters such as MEP area and volume. Cortical TMS motor maps provide high test-retest reliability for long-term monitoring when analyzed with refined techniques. They may guide restorative interventions which target dormant corticospinal connectivity for neurorehabilitation.

  13. Neuromuscular Plasticity: Disentangling Stable and Variable Motor Maps in the Human Sensorimotor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Dominic; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Motor maps acquired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are evolving as a biomarker for monitoring disease progression or the effects of therapeutic interventions. High test-retest reliability of this technique for long observation periods is therefore required to differentiate daily or weekly fluctuations from stable plastic reorganization of corticospinal connectivity. In this study, a novel projection, interpolation, and coregistration technique, which considers the individual gyral anatomy, was applied in healthy subjects for biweekly acquired TMS motor maps over a period of twelve weeks. The intraclass correlation coefficient revealed long-term reliability of motor maps with relevant interhemispheric differences. The sensorimotor cortex and nonprimary motor areas of the dominant hemisphere showed more extended and more stable corticospinal connectivity. Long-term correlations of the MEP amplitudes at each stimulation site revealed mosaic-like clusters of consistent corticospinal excitability. The resting motor threshold, centre of gravity, and mean MEPs across all TMS sites, as highly reliable cortical map parameters, could be disentangled from more variable parameters such as MEP area and volume. Cortical TMS motor maps provide high test-retest reliability for long-term monitoring when analyzed with refined techniques. They may guide restorative interventions which target dormant corticospinal connectivity for neurorehabilitation. PMID:27610248

  14. Neuromuscular Plasticity: Disentangling Stable and Variable Motor Maps in the Human Sensorimotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Motor maps acquired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are evolving as a biomarker for monitoring disease progression or the effects of therapeutic interventions. High test-retest reliability of this technique for long observation periods is therefore required to differentiate daily or weekly fluctuations from stable plastic reorganization of corticospinal connectivity. In this study, a novel projection, interpolation, and coregistration technique, which considers the individual gyral anatomy, was applied in healthy subjects for biweekly acquired TMS motor maps over a period of twelve weeks. The intraclass correlation coefficient revealed long-term reliability of motor maps with relevant interhemispheric differences. The sensorimotor cortex and nonprimary motor areas of the dominant hemisphere showed more extended and more stable corticospinal connectivity. Long-term correlations of the MEP amplitudes at each stimulation site revealed mosaic-like clusters of consistent corticospinal excitability. The resting motor threshold, centre of gravity, and mean MEPs across all TMS sites, as highly reliable cortical map parameters, could be disentangled from more variable parameters such as MEP area and volume. Cortical TMS motor maps provide high test-retest reliability for long-term monitoring when analyzed with refined techniques. They may guide restorative interventions which target dormant corticospinal connectivity for neurorehabilitation. PMID:27610248

  15. Sleep-Dependent Reactivation of Ensembles in Motor Cortex Promotes Skill Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Dhakshin S.; Gulati, Tanuj; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Despite many prior studies demonstrating offline behavioral gains in motor skills after sleep, the underlying neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. To investigate the neurophysiological basis for offline gains, we performed single-unit recordings in motor cortex as rats learned a skilled upper-limb task. We found that sleep improved movement speed with preservation of accuracy. These offline improvements were linked to both replay of task-related ensembles during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and temporal shifts that more tightly bound motor cortical ensembles to movements; such offline gains and temporal shifts were not evident with sleep restriction. Interestingly, replay was linked to the coincidence of slow-wave events and bursts of spindle activity. Neurons that experienced the most consistent replay also underwent the most significant temporal shift and binding to the motor task. Significantly, replay and the associated performance gains after sleep only occurred when animals first learned the skill; continued practice during later stages of learning (i.e., after motor kinematics had stabilized) did not show evidence of replay. Our results highlight how replay of synchronous neural activity during sleep mediates large-scale neural plasticity and stabilizes kinematics during early motor learning. PMID:26382320

  16. Neuromuscular Plasticity: Disentangling Stable and Variable Motor Maps in the Human Sensorimotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Motor maps acquired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are evolving as a biomarker for monitoring disease progression or the effects of therapeutic interventions. High test-retest reliability of this technique for long observation periods is therefore required to differentiate daily or weekly fluctuations from stable plastic reorganization of corticospinal connectivity. In this study, a novel projection, interpolation, and coregistration technique, which considers the individual gyral anatomy, was applied in healthy subjects for biweekly acquired TMS motor maps over a period of twelve weeks. The intraclass correlation coefficient revealed long-term reliability of motor maps with relevant interhemispheric differences. The sensorimotor cortex and nonprimary motor areas of the dominant hemisphere showed more extended and more stable corticospinal connectivity. Long-term correlations of the MEP amplitudes at each stimulation site revealed mosaic-like clusters of consistent corticospinal excitability. The resting motor threshold, centre of gravity, and mean MEPs across all TMS sites, as highly reliable cortical map parameters, could be disentangled from more variable parameters such as MEP area and volume. Cortical TMS motor maps provide high test-retest reliability for long-term monitoring when analyzed with refined techniques. They may guide restorative interventions which target dormant corticospinal connectivity for neurorehabilitation.

  17. The Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Neuroplasticity within the Motor Cortex following Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Kate; Buckley, Jonathan D.; McDonnell, Michelle N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aerobic exercise is associated with enhanced plasticity in the motor cortex of healthy individuals, but the effect of aerobic exercise on neuroplasticity following a stroke is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to compare corticomotoneuronal excitability and neuroplasticity in the upper limb cortical representation following a single session of low intensity lower limb cycling, or a rest control condition. Methods We recruited chronic stroke survivors to take part in three experimental conditions in a randomised, cross-over design. Corticomotoneuronal excitability was examined using transcranial magnetic stimulation to elicit motor evoked potentials in the affected first dorsal interosseus muscle. Following baseline measures, participants either cycled on a stationary bike at a low exercise intensity for 30 minutes, or remained resting in a seated position for 30 minutes. Neuroplasticity within the motor cortex was then examined using an intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) paradigm. During the third experimental condition, participants cycled for the 30 minutes but did not receive any iTBS. Results Twelve participants completed the study. We found no significant effect of aerobic exercise on corticomotoneuronal excitability when compared to the no exercise condition (P > 0.05 for all group and time comparisons). The use of iTBS did not induce a neuroplastic-like response in the motor cortex with or without the addition of aerobic exercise. Conclusions Our results suggest that following a stroke, the brain may be less responsive to non-invasive brain stimulation paradigms that aim to induce short-term reorganisation, and aerobic exercise was unable to induce or improve this response. PMID:27018862

  18. Tracing inputs to inhibitory or excitatory neurons of mouse and cat visual cortex with a targeted rabies virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jun; Ehrengruber, Markus U.; Negwer, Moritz; Shao, Han-Juan; Cetin, Ali H.; Lyon, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cortical inhibition plays a critical role in controlling and modulating cortical excitation and a more detailed understanding of the neuronal circuits contributing to each will provide more insight into their roles in complex cortical computations. Traditional neuronal tracers lack a means for easily distinguishing between circuits of inhibitory and excitatory neurons. To overcome this limitation, we developed a technique for retrogradely labeling inputs to local clusters of inhibitory or excitatory neurons, but not both, using neurotropic adeno-associated and lentiviral vectors, cell-type specific promoters and a modified rabies virus. Results Applied to primary visual cortex (V1) in mouse, the cell-type specific tracing technique labeled thousands of presynaptically connected neurons, and revealed that the dominant source of input to inhibitory and excitatory neurons is local in origin. Neurons in other visual areas are also labeled; the percentage of these inter-cortical inputs to excitatory neurons is somewhat higher (~20%) than to inhibitory neurons (<10%), suggesting that inter-cortical connections have less direct control over inhibition. The inputs to inhibitory neurons were also traced in cat V1, and when aligned with the orientation preference map, revealed for the first time that long-range inputs to inhibitory neurons are well tuned to orientation. Conclusions These novel findings for inhibitory and excitatory circuits in the visual cortex demonstrate the efficacy of our new technique and its ability to work across species, including larger-brained mammals such as the cat. This paves the way for better understanding the roles of specific cell-types in higher-order perceptual and cognitive processes. PMID:23993841

  19. Motor Cortex Excitability and BDNF Levels in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain According to Structural Pathology.

    PubMed

    Caumo, Wolnei; Deitos, Alícia; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Fabiana; Dussán-Sarria, Jairo Alberto; Lopes Tarragó, Maria da Graça; Souza, Andressa; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The central sensitization syndrome (CSS) encompasses disorders with overlapping symptoms in a structural pathology spectrum ranging from persistent nociception [e.g., osteoarthritis (OA)] to an absence of tissue injuries such as the one presented in fibromyalgia (FM) and myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). First, we hypothesized that these syndromes present differences in their cortical excitability parameters assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), namely motor evoked potential (MEP), cortical silent period (CSP), short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and short intracortical facilitation (SICF). Second, considering that the presence of tissue injury could be detected by serum neurotrophins, we hypothesized that the spectrum of structural pathology (i.e., from persistent nociception like in OA, to the absence of tissue injury like in FM and MPS), could be detected by differential efficiency of their descending pain inhibitory system, as assessed by the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigm. Third, we explored whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) had an influence on the relationship between motor cortex excitability and structural pathology. This cross-sectional study pooled baseline data from three randomized clinical trials. We included females (n = 114), aged 19-65 years old with disability by chronic pain syndromes (CPS): FM (n = 19), MPS (n = 54), OA (n = 27) and healthy subjects (n = 14). We assessed the serum BDNF, the motor cortex excitability by parameters the TMS measures and the change on numerical pain scale [NPS (0-10)] during CPM-task. The adjusted mean (SD) on the SICI observed in the absence of tissue injury was 56.36% lower than with persistent nociceptive input [0.31(0.18) vs. 0.55 (0.32)], respectively. The BDNF was inversely correlated with the SICI and with the change on NPS (0-10)during CPM-task. These findings suggest greater disinhibition in the motor cortex and the descending pain inhibitory system in FM and MPS

  20. Motor Cortex Excitability and BDNF Levels in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain According to Structural Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Caumo, Wolnei; Deitos, Alícia; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Fabiana; Dussán-Sarria, Jairo Alberto; Lopes Tarragó, Maria da Graça; Souza, Andressa; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The central sensitization syndrome (CSS) encompasses disorders with overlapping symptoms in a structural pathology spectrum ranging from persistent nociception [e.g., osteoarthritis (OA)] to an absence of tissue injuries such as the one presented in fibromyalgia (FM) and myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). First, we hypothesized that these syndromes present differences in their cortical excitability parameters assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), namely motor evoked potential (MEP), cortical silent period (CSP), short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and short intracortical facilitation (SICF). Second, considering that the presence of tissue injury could be detected by serum neurotrophins, we hypothesized that the spectrum of structural pathology (i.e., from persistent nociception like in OA, to the absence of tissue injury like in FM and MPS), could be detected by differential efficiency of their descending pain inhibitory system, as assessed by the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigm. Third, we explored whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) had an influence on the relationship between motor cortex excitability and structural pathology. This cross-sectional study pooled baseline data from three randomized clinical trials. We included females (n = 114), aged 19–65 years old with disability by chronic pain syndromes (CPS): FM (n = 19), MPS (n = 54), OA (n = 27) and healthy subjects (n = 14). We assessed the serum BDNF, the motor cortex excitability by parameters the TMS measures and the change on numerical pain scale [NPS (0–10)] during CPM-task. The adjusted mean (SD) on the SICI observed in the absence of tissue injury was 56.36% lower than with persistent nociceptive input [0.31(0.18) vs. 0.55 (0.32)], respectively. The BDNF was inversely correlated with the SICI and with the change on NPS (0–10)during CPM-task. These findings suggest greater disinhibition in the motor cortex and the descending pain inhibitory system in FM and

  1. Motor Cortex Excitability and BDNF Levels in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain According to Structural Pathology.

    PubMed

    Caumo, Wolnei; Deitos, Alícia; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Fabiana; Dussán-Sarria, Jairo Alberto; Lopes Tarragó, Maria da Graça; Souza, Andressa; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The central sensitization syndrome (CSS) encompasses disorders with overlapping symptoms in a structural pathology spectrum ranging from persistent nociception [e.g., osteoarthritis (OA)] to an absence of tissue injuries such as the one presented in fibromyalgia (FM) and myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). First, we hypothesized that these syndromes present differences in their cortical excitability parameters assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), namely motor evoked potential (MEP), cortical silent period (CSP), short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and short intracortical facilitation (SICF). Second, considering that the presence of tissue injury could be detected by serum neurotrophins, we hypothesized that the spectrum of structural pathology (i.e., from persistent nociception like in OA, to the absence of tissue injury like in FM and MPS), could be detected by differential efficiency of their descending pain inhibitory system, as assessed by the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigm. Third, we explored whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) had an influence on the relationship between motor cortex excitability and structural pathology. This cross-sectional study pooled baseline data from three randomized clinical trials. We included females (n = 114), aged 19-65 years old with disability by chronic pain syndromes (CPS): FM (n = 19), MPS (n = 54), OA (n = 27) and healthy subjects (n = 14). We assessed the serum BDNF, the motor cortex excitability by parameters the TMS measures and the change on numerical pain scale [NPS (0-10)] during CPM-task. The adjusted mean (SD) on the SICI observed in the absence of tissue injury was 56.36% lower than with persistent nociceptive input [0.31(0.18) vs. 0.55 (0.32)], respectively. The BDNF was inversely correlated with the SICI and with the change on NPS (0-10)during CPM-task. These findings suggest greater disinhibition in the motor cortex and the descending pain inhibitory system in FM and MPS

  2. Maximum tension predicts relative endurance of fast-twitch motor units in the cat.

    PubMed

    Botterman, B R; Cope, T C

    1988-10-01

    1. The relationships between maximum tetanic tension (P0), endurance time, and axonal conduction velocity (CV) were investigated in fast-twitch motor units of the cat flexor carpi radialis (FCR) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, and in one flexor digitorum longus (FDL) muscle. Endurance time was the length of time that a unit could maintain 25% of its maximum tetanic tension during a sustained contraction. Motor-unit tension was "clamped" at 25% of maximum by altering the stimulation rate of a unit's motor axon through computer feedback control. 2. In individual experiments, including the one investigated FDL muscle, an inverse relation was consistently found between maximum tension and endurance time. Pooled data from the FCR and MG muscles also resulted in significant correlations between maximum tetanic tension and endurance time. 3. Following the force-clamp contraction, some motor units were subjected to the standard fatigue test of Burke and colleagues (6). Motor units were classified as type FR (fast twitch, fatigue resistant) or type FF* (fast twitch, fast fatiguing after the force-clamp contraction). For both type FR and FF* units, maximum tetanic tension and endurance time were found to be inversely related. However, no correlation was found between maximum tetanic tension and fatigue index for type FR units. Only when all type F (FR + FF*) units were considered as a population was there a significant correlation between these two properties. 4. Other investigators have shown that maximum tetanic tension and axonal conduction velocity are highly correlated with the recruitment order of motoneurons (e.g., Refs. 2, 26). Endurance time was found to be more tightly coupled with contraction strength than with conduction velocity. In 12 of 14 experiments, significant Spearman rank correlation coefficients were found between endurance time and tension, whereas significant correlations were found in only 3 of 14 experiments for endurance time and conduction

  3. Learning-Dependent Potentiation in the Vibrissal Motor Cortex Is Closely Related to the Acquisition of Conditioned Whisker Responses in Behaving Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    The role of the primary motor cortex in the acquisition of new motor skills was evaluated during classical conditioning of vibrissal protraction responses in behaving mice, using a trace paradigm. Conditioned stimulus (CS) presentation elicited a characteristic field potential in the vibrissal motor cortex, which was dependent on the synchronized…

  4. Motor Cortex Stimulation: Mild Transient Benefit in a Primate Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Alex K.; McCairn, Kevin W.; Zada, Gabriel; Wu, Tiffany; Turner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine the therapeutic efficacy of motor cortex stimulation (MCS) in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated macaques, and to characterize therapeutic differences with varying modes, frequencies, and durations of stimulation. Methods MCS was delivered at currents below motor threshold and at frequencies between 5Hz and 150Hz through epidural electrodes over primary motor cortex. The animals were studied on and off MCS using video analysis, activity logging, and food retrieval tasks. Animals were examined using two different stimulation protocols. The first protocol consisted of one hour of MCS therapy daily. The second protocol exposed the animal to continuous MCS for over 24 hours with at least 2 weeks between MCS therapy. Conclusions Daily MCS revealed no consistent change in symptoms, but MCS at two-week intervals resulted in significant increases in activity. Effects of biweekly MCS disappeared, however, within 24 hours of the onset of continuous MCS. In this study, MCS only temporarily reduced the severity of MPTP-induced parkinsonism. PMID:17432724

  5. Continuous Force Decoding from Local Field Potentials of the Primary Motor Cortex in Freely Moving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Abed; Heydari Beni, Nargess; Shalchyan, Vahid; Daliri, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Local field potential (LFP) signals recorded by intracortical microelectrodes implanted in primary motor cortex can be used as a high informative input for decoding of motor functions. Recent studies show that different kinematic parameters such as position and velocity can be inferred from multiple LFP signals as precisely as spiking activities, however, continuous decoding of the force magnitude from the LFP signals in freely moving animals has remained an open problem. Here, we trained three rats to press a force sensor for getting a drop of water as a reward. A 16-channel micro-wire array was implanted in the primary motor cortex of each trained rat, and obtained LFP signals were used for decoding of the continuous values recorded by the force sensor. Average coefficient of correlation and the coefficient of determination between decoded and actual force signals were r = 0.66 and R2 = 0.42, respectively. We found that LFP signal on gamma frequency bands (30–120 Hz) had the most contribution in the trained decoding model. This study suggests the feasibility of using low number of LFP channels for the continuous force decoding in freely moving animals resembling BMI systems in real life applications. PMID:27767063

  6. Training the motor cortex by observing the actions of others during immobilization.

    PubMed

    Bassolino, Michela; Campanella, Martina; Bove, Marco; Pozzo, Thierry; Fadiga, Luciano

    2014-12-01

    Limb immobilization and nonuse are well-known causes of corticomotor depression. While physical training can drive the recovery from nonuse-dependent corticomotor effects, it remains unclear if it is possible to gain access to motor cortex in alternative ways, such as through motor imagery (MI) or action observation (AO). Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to study the excitability of the hand left motor cortex in normal subjects immediately before and after 10 h of right arm immobilization. During immobilization, subjects were requested either to imagine to act with their constrained limb or to observe hand actions performed by other individuals. A third group of control subjects watched a nature documentary presented on a computer screen. Hand corticomotor maps and recruitment curves reliably showed that AO, but not MI, prevented the corticomotor depression induced by immobilization. Our results demonstrate the existence of a visuomotor mechanism in humans that links AO and execution which is able to effect cortical plasticity in a beneficial way. This facilitation was not related to the action simulation, because it was not induced by explicit MI.

  7. Motor overflow in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is associated with decreased extent of neural activation in the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Gaddis, Andrew; Rosch, Keri S; Dirlikov, Benjamin; Crocetti, Deana; MacNeil, Lindsey; Barber, Anita D; Muschelli, John; Caffo, Brian; Pekar, James J; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2015-09-30

    Motor overflow is a developmental phenomenon that typically disappears by late childhood. Abnormal persistence of motor overflow is often present in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a finger-sequencing task to examine whether excessive motor overflow in children with ADHD is associated with decreased extent of motor circuit activation. Thirty-four right-handed children (18 typically developing controls, 16 ADHD) completed fMRI while performing a finger-sequencing task. Motor overflow was evaluated during a finger-sequencing task and a motor examination (the PANESS) performed outside the scanner. Diagnostic differences in behavioral measures of overflow and extent of activation in the contralateral and ipsilateral motor network ROIs were examined, along with correlations between overflow and extent of activation. Children with ADHD demonstrated greater overflow and lesser extent of activation in left primary motor cortex (BA4) and bilateral premotor cortex (BA6) and supplementary motor area (SMA) during right-hand finger-sequencing compared to controls. Decreased extent of primary motor and premotor activation correlated with increased hand-related overflow movements in children with ADHD but not controls. These findings suggest that overflow movements in children with ADHD may reflect decreased recruitment of neural circuitry involved in active inhibition of homologous motor circuitry unnecessary to task execution.

  8. Stimulus-response profile during single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Mima, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Abe, Mitsunari; Inouchi, Morito; Urayama, Shin-Ichi; Anami, Kimitaka; Honda, Manabu; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2009-11-01

    We examined the stimulus-response profile during single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) by measuring motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) with electromyographic monitoring and hemodynamic responses with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3 Tesla. In 16 healthy subjects, single TMS pulses were irregularly delivered to the left primary motor cortex at a mean frequency of 0.15 Hz with a wide range of stimulus intensities. The measurement of MEP proved a typical relationship between stimulus intensity and MEP amplitude in the concurrent TMS-fMRI environment. In the population-level analysis of the suprathreshold stimulation conditions, significant increases in hemodynamic responses were detected in the motor/somatosensory network, reflecting both direct and remote effects of TMS, and also the auditory/cognitive areas, perhaps related to detection of clicks. The stimulus-response profile showed both linear and nonlinear components in the direct and remote motor/somatosensory network. A detailed analysis suggested that the nonlinear components of the motor/somatosensory network activity might be induced by nonlinear recruitment of neurons in addition to sensory afferents resulting from movement. These findings expand our basic knowledge of the quantitative relationship between TMS-induced neural activations and hemodynamic signals measured by neuroimaging techniques.

  9. [The functional role of the motor area of the cortex in the acquisition of escape reactions in dogs].

    PubMed

    Frolov, A G; Maslov, A V; Pavlova, O G

    1993-01-01

    The model of escape conditioning similar to classical (pavlovian) was proposed. During shock application to the hind limb (a conditioned stimulus) the ipsilateral foreleg flexion was elicited by a stimulation of the motor cortex (an unconditioned stimulus); both stimuli were turned off in the course of the forepaw lifting. Such uniform pairings resulted in elaboration of a reaction of the foreleg flexion in response to the shock. Prolonging the shock by 3 s after the cortical stimulation led to a rapid extinction of the acquired response. So a possibility to instrumentalize movements elicited by stimulation of the motor cortex (MI) was proved. This is in argument in favour of an assumption that the established "instrumental" connection (drive-motor structures) can be addressed directly to the motor cortex.

  10. Unexpected motor patterns for hindlimb muscles during slope walking in the cat.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Carlson-Kuhta, P

    1995-11-01

    1. Hindlimb kinematics and motor patterns were assessed from high-speed ciné film synchronized with electromyographic (EMG) data from cats trained to walk on a walkway placed at four grades (25, 50, 75, and 100%). 2. Flexor muscles of the hip (iliopsoas) and ankle (tibialis anterior) had similar activity patterns for the swing phase of up- and down-slope walking; both flexor muscles also had stance-related activity during down-slope walking and this was unexpected. Extensor muscles of the hip (anterior biceps femoris and anterior semimembranosus), knee [vastus lateralis (VL)], and ankle [lateral gastrocnemius (LG)] were active during the stance phase of up-slope walking. The VL and LG activity was reduced in duration during stance of down-slope walking and centered around paw contact. Hip extensors, however, were totally inactive during stance of down-slope walking, and this was not expected. 3. Flexor muscles at the hip and ankle (not extensor muscles) dominated the stance phase of down-slope walking, especially at the steeper slopes. This switch in motor patterns may be required to counterbalance external forces that produced extension at the hip and ankle joints during the stance phase of down-slope walking. Neural mechanisms for programming stance-related activity of flexor muscles are discussed.

  11. The effects of acute alcohol exposure on the response properties of neurons in visual cortex area 17 of cats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bo; Xia Jing; Li Guangxing; Zhou Yifeng

    2010-03-15

    Physiological and behavioral studies have demonstrated that a number of visual functions such as visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and motion perception can be impaired by acute alcohol exposure. The orientation- and direction-selective responses of cells in primary visual cortex are thought to participate in the perception of form and motion. To investigate how orientation selectivity and direction selectivity of neurons are influenced by acute alcohol exposure in vivo, we used the extracellular single-unit recording technique to examine the response properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (A17) of adult cats. We found that alcohol reduces spontaneous activity, visual evoked unit responses, the signal-to-noise ratio, and orientation selectivity of A17 cells. In addition, small but detectable changes in both the preferred orientation/direction and the bandwidth of the orientation tuning curve of strongly orientation-biased A17 cells were observed after acute alcohol administration. Our findings may provide physiological evidence for some alcohol-related deficits in visual function observed in behavioral studies.

  12. Distribution of neurons immunoreactive for calcium-binding proteins varies across areas of cat primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Schwark, H D; Li, J

    2000-03-15

    The primary somatosensory (SI) cortex in the cat contains four cytoarchitectonic areas that appear to contain separate body representations and have different functions. We tested whether functional differences among these areas are reflected in the densities of neurons containing each of three calcium-binding proteins: parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB), and calretinin (CR). Colocalization experiments revealed that CR was localized in a population of neurons distinct from those containing PV or CB. The general laminar distributions of the three calcium-binding proteins were similar to those described in other species and cortical areas, but there were significant density differences in layers II and III across SI. The density of PV-immunoreactive neurons was higher in areas 3b and 1 than in areas 3a and 2. CB-immunoreactive neurons were found in higher densities in anterior SI than in posterior SI, and the pattern of CR-immunoreactive neurons was reciprocal to that of CB, with significantly higher densities in posterior regions of SI. Since the firing characteristics of nonpyramidal neurons appear to be related to their calcium-binding protein content, differences in regional distributions of these neurons in layers II and III may contribute to functional differences between the cytoarchitectonic areas of SI cortex.

  13. Shaping the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, M A; Doemkes, S; Karaköse, T; Antal, A; Liebetanz, D; Lang, N; Tergau, F; Paulus, W

    2007-04-01

    Transcranial DC stimulation (tDCS) induces stimulation polarity-dependent neuroplastic excitability shifts in the human brain. Because it accomplishes long-lasting effects and its application is simple, it is used increasingly. However, one drawback is its low focality, caused by 1) the large stimulation electrode and 2) the functionally effective reference electrode, which is also situated on the scalp. We aimed to increase the focality of tDCS, which might improve the interpretation of the functional effects of stimulation because it will restrict its effects to more clearly defined cortical areas. Moreover, it will avoid unwanted reversed effects of tDCS under the reference electrode, which is of special importance in clinical settings, when a homogeneous shift of cortical excitability is needed. Because current density (current strength/electrode size) determines the efficacy of tDCS, increased focality should be accomplished by 1) reducing stimulation electrode size, but keeping current density constant; or 2) increasing reference electrode size under constant current strength. We tested these hypotheses for motor cortex tDCS. The results show that reducing the size of the motor cortex DC-stimulation electrode focalized the respective tDCS-induced excitability changes. Increasing the size of the frontopolar reference electrode rendered stimulation over this cortex functionally inefficient, but did not compromise the tDCS-generated motor cortical excitability shifts. Thus tDCS-generated modulations of cortical excitability can be focused by reducing the size of the stimulation electrode and by increasing the size of the reference electrode. For future applications of tDCS, such paradigms may help to achieve more selective tDCS effects.

  14. Principal components of hand kinematics and neurophysiological signals in motor cortex during reach to grasp movements.

    PubMed

    Mollazadeh, Mohsen; Aggarwal, Vikram; Thakor, Nitish V; Schieber, Marc H

    2014-10-15

    A few kinematic synergies identified by principal component analysis (PCA) account for most of the variance in the coordinated joint rotations of the fingers and wrist used for a wide variety of hand movements. To examine the possibility that motor cortex might control the hand through such synergies, we collected simultaneous kinematic and neurophysiological data from monkeys performing a reach-to-grasp task. We used PCA, jPCA and isomap to extract kinematic synergies from 18 joint angles in the fingers and wrist and analyzed the relationships of both single-unit and multiunit spike recordings, as well as local field potentials (LFPs), to these synergies. For most spike recordings, the maximal absolute cross-correlations of firing rates were somewhat stronger with an individual joint angle than with any principal component (PC), any jPC or any isomap dimension. In decoding analyses, where spikes and LFP power in the 100- to 170-Hz band each provided better decoding than other LFP-based signals, the first PC was decoded as well as the best decoded joint angle. But the remaining PCs and jPCs were predicted with lower accuracy than individual joint angles. Although PCs, jPCs or isomap dimensions might provide a more parsimonious description of kinematics, our findings indicate that the kinematic synergies identified with these techniques are not represented in motor cortex more strongly than the original joint angles. We suggest that the motor cortex might act to sculpt the synergies generated by subcortical centers, superimposing an ability to individuate finger movements and adapt the hand to grasp a wide variety of objects.

  15. Potential Mechanisms Supporting the Value of Motor Cortex Stimulation to Treat Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    DosSantos, Marcos F.; Ferreira, Natália; Toback, Rebecca L.; Carvalho, Antônio C.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary MCS to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1) modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate, GABA, and serotonin) as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of MCS to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g., tDCS and TMS), which are analyzed comparatively. PMID:26903788

  16. Corticospinal activity evoked and modulated by non-invasive stimulation of the intact human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John C

    2014-10-01

    A number of methods have been developed recently that stimulate the human brain non-invasively through the intact scalp. The most common are transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial electric stimulation (TES) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS). They are widely used to probe function and connectivity of brain areas as well as therapeutically in a variety of conditions such as depression or stroke. They are much less focal than conventional invasive methods which use small electrodes placed on or in the brain and are often thought to activate all classes of neurones in the stimulated area. However, this is not true. A large body of evidence from experiments on the motor cortex shows that non-invasive methods of brain stimulation can be surprisingly selective and that adjusting the intensity and direction of stimulation can activate different classes of inhibitory and excitatory inputs to the corticospinal output cells. Here we review data that have elucidated the action of TMS and TES, concentrating mainly on the most direct evidence available from spinal epidural recordings of the descending corticospinal volleys. The results show that it is potentially possible to test and condition specific neural circuits in motor cortex that could be affected differentially by disease, or be used in different forms of natural behaviour. However, there is substantial interindividual variability in the specificity of these protocols. Perhaps in the future it will be possible, with the advances currently being made to model the electrical fields induced in individual brains, to develop forms of stimulation that can reliably target more specific populations of neurones, and open up the internal circuitry of the motor cortex for study in behaving humans. PMID:25172954

  17. Skilled Bimanual Training Drives Motor Cortex Plasticity in Children With Unilateral Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Friel, Kathleen M; Kuo, Hsing-Ching; Fuller, Jason; Ferre, Claudio L; Brandão, Marina; Carmel, Jason B; Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Gowatsky, Jaimie L; Stanford, Arielle D; Rowny, Stefan B; Luber, Bruce; Bassi, Bruce; Murphy, David L K; Lisanby, Sarah H; Gordon, Andrew M

    2016-10-01

    Background Intensive bimanual therapy can improve hand function in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP). We compared the effects of structured bimanual skill training versus unstructured bimanual practice on motor outcomes and motor map plasticity in children with USCP. Objective We hypothesized that structured skill training would produce greater motor map plasticity than unstructured practice. Methods Twenty children with USCP (average age 9.5; 12 males) received therapy in a day camp setting, 6 h/day, 5 days/week, for 3 weeks. In structured skill training (n = 10), children performed progressively more difficult movements and practiced functional goals. In unstructured practice (n = 10), children engaged in bimanual activities but did not practice skillful movements or functional goals. We used the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA), Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function (JTTHF), and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) to measure hand function. We used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to map the representation of first dorsal interosseous and flexor carpi radialis muscles bilaterally. Results Both groups showed significant improvements in bimanual hand use (AHA; P < .05) and hand dexterity (JTTHF; P < .001). However, only the structured skill group showed increases in the size of the affected hand motor map and amplitudes of motor evoked potentials (P < .01). Most children who showed the most functional improvements (COPM) had the largest changes in map size. Conclusions These findings uncover a dichotomy of plasticity: the unstructured practice group improved hand function but did not show changes in motor maps. Skill training is important for driving motor cortex plasticity in children with USCP.

  18. Contribution of LFP dynamics to single-neuron spiking variability in motor cortex during movement execution

    PubMed Central

    Rule, Michael E.; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Donoghue, John P.; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the sources of variability in single-neuron spiking responses is an important open problem for the theory of neural coding. This variability is thought to result primarily from spontaneous collective dynamics in neuronal networks. Here, we investigate how well collective dynamics reflected in motor cortex local field potentials (LFPs) can account for spiking variability during motor behavior. Neural activity was recorded via microelectrode arrays implanted in ventral and dorsal premotor and primary motor cortices of non-human primates performing naturalistic 3-D reaching and grasping actions. Point process models were used to quantify how well LFP features accounted for spiking variability not explained by the measured 3-D reach and grasp kinematics. LFP features included the instantaneous magnitude, phase and analytic-signal components of narrow band-pass filtered (δ,θ,α,β) LFPs, and analytic signal and amplitude envelope features in higher-frequency bands. Multiband LFP features predicted single-neuron spiking (1ms resolution) with substantial accuracy as assessed via ROC analysis. Notably, however, models including both LFP and kinematics features displayed marginal improvement over kinematics-only models. Furthermore, the small predictive information added by LFP features to kinematic models was redundant to information available in fast-timescale (<100 ms) spiking history. Overall, information in multiband LFP features, although predictive of single-neuron spiking during movement execution, was redundant to information available in movement parameters and spiking history. Our findings suggest that, during movement execution, collective dynamics reflected in motor cortex LFPs primarily relate to sensorimotor processes directly controlling movement output, adding little explanatory power to variability not accounted by movement parameters. PMID:26157365

  19. Dynamic reorganization of neural activity in motor cortex during new sequence production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Ashe, James

    2015-09-01

    Although previous studies have shown that primary motor cortex (M1) neurons are modulated during the performance of a sequence of movements, it is not known how this neural activity in the M1 reorganizes during new learning of sequence-dependent motor skills. Here we trained monkeys to move to each of four spatial targets to produce multiple distinct sequences of movements in which the spatial organization of the targets determined uniquely the serial order of the movements. After the monkeys memorized the sequences, we changed one element of these over-practised sequences and the subjects were required to learn the new sequence through trial and error. When one element in an over-learned four-element sequence was changed, the sequence-specific neural activity was totally disrupted, but relatively minor changes in the direction-specific activity were observed. The data suggest that sequential motor skills are represented within M1 in the context of the complete sequential behavior rather than as a series of single consecutive movements; and sequence-specific neurons in the M1 are involved in new learning of sequence by using memorized knowledge to acquire complex motor skill efficiently.

  20. Dynamic reorganization of neural activity in motor cortex during new sequence production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Ashe, James

    2015-09-01

    Although previous studies have shown that primary motor cortex (M1) neurons are modulated during the performance of a sequence of movements, it is not known how this neural activity in the M1 reorganizes during new learning of sequence-dependent motor skills. Here we trained monkeys to move to each of four spatial targets to produce multiple distinct sequences of movements in which the spatial organization of the targets determined uniquely the serial order of the movements. After the monkeys memorized the sequences, we changed one element of these over-practised sequences and the subjects were required to learn the new sequence through trial and error. When one element in an over-learned four-element sequence was changed, the sequence-specific neural activity was totally disrupted, but relatively minor changes in the direction-specific activity were observed. The data suggest that sequential motor skills are represented within M1 in the context of the complete sequential behavior rather than as a series of single consecutive movements; and sequence-specific neurons in the M1 are involved in new learning of sequence by using memorized knowledge to acquire complex motor skill efficiently. PMID:26202600

  1. Recovery of motor deficit, cerebellar serotonin and lipid peroxidation levels in the cortex of injured rats.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Gonzalez-Pina, Rigoberto; Alfaro-Rodriguez, Alfonso; Nekrassov-Protasova, Vladimir; Durand-Rivera, Alfredo; Montes, Sergio; Ayala-Guerrero, Fructuoso

    2010-10-01

    The sensorimotor cortex and the cerebellum are interconnected by the corticopontocerebellar (CPC) pathway and by neuronal groups such as the serotonergic system. Our aims were to determine the levels of cerebellar serotonin (5-HT) and lipid peroxidation (LP) after cortical iron injection and to analyze the motor function produced by the injury. Rats were divided into the following three groups: control, injured and recovering. Motor function was evaluated using the beam-walking test as an assessment of overall locomotor function and the footprint test as an assessment of gait. We also determined the levels of 5-HT and LP two and twenty days post-lesion. We found an increase in cerebellar 5-HT and a concomitant increase in LP in the pons and cerebellum of injured rats, which correlated with their motor deficits. Recovering rats showed normal 5-HT and LP levels. The increase of 5-HT in injured rats could be a result of serotonergic axonal injury after cortical iron injection. The LP and motor deficits could be due to impairments in neuronal connectivity affecting the corticospinal and CPC tracts and dysmetric stride could be indicative of an ataxic gait that involves the cerebellum. PMID:20535555

  2. Labelling and optical erasure of synaptic memory traces in the motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Yagishita, Sho; Nakamura, Mayumi; Shirai, Fukutoshi; Wu, Yi; Loshbaugh, Amanda L.; Kuhlman, Brian; Hahn, Klaus M.; Kasai, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dendritic spines are the major loci of synaptic plasticity and are considered as possible structural correlates of memory. Nonetheless, systematic manipulation of specific subsets of spines in the cortex has been unattainable, and thus, the link between spines and memory has been correlational. We developed a novel synaptic optoprobe, AS-PaRac1 (activated synapse targeting photoactivatable Rac1), which can label recently potentiated spines specifically, and induce the selective shrinkage of AS-PaRac1-containing spines. In vivo imaging of AS-PaRac1 revealed that a motor learning induced substantial synaptic remodelling in a small subset of neurons. The acquired motor learning was disrupted by the optical shrinkage of the potentiated spines, whereas it was not affected by the identical manipulation of spines evoked by a distinct motor task in the same cortical region. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a newly acquired motor skill depends on the formation of a task-specific dense synaptic ensemble. PMID:26352471

  3. Are there excitability changes in the hand motor cortex during speech in left-handed subjects?

    PubMed

    Tokimura, Hiroshi; Tokimura, Yoshika; Arita, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    Hemispheric dominance was investigated in left-handed subjects using single transcranial magnetic stimulation to assess the possible effect of forced change in the dominant hand. Single transcranial magnetic stimuli were delivered randomly over the hand area of the left or right motor cortex of 8 Japanese self-declared left-handed adult volunteers. Electromyographic responses were recorded in the relaxed first dorsal interosseous muscle while the subjects read aloud. Laterality quotient calculated by the Edinburgh Inventory ranged from -100 to -5.26 and laterality index calculated from motor evoked potentials ranged from -86.2 to 38.8. There was no significant correlation between laterality quotient and laterality index. Mean data values across all 8 subjects indicated significant increases only in the left hand. Our ratio analysis of facilitation of the hand motor potentials showed that 2 each of the 8 self-declared left-handers were right- and left-hand dominant and the other 4 were bilateral-hand dominant. Speech dominancy was localized primarily in the right cerebral hemisphere in left-handed subjects, but some individuals exhibited bilateral or left dominance, possibly attributable to the forced change of hand preference for writing in childhood. Our findings suggest changes in the connections between the speech and hand motor areas.

  4. Plasticity and alterations of trunk motor cortex following spinal cord injury and non-stepping robot and treadmill training.

    PubMed

    Oza, Chintan S; Giszter, Simon F

    2014-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces significant reorganization in the sensorimotor cortex. Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic SCI and several rehabilitative strategies are aimed at trunk stability and control. However little is known about the effect of SCI and rehabilitation training on trunk motor representations and their plasticity in the cortex. Here, we used intracortical microstimulation to examine the motor cortex representations of the trunk in relation to other representations in three groups of chronic adult complete low thoracic SCI rats: chronic untrained, treadmill trained (but 'non-stepping') and robot assisted treadmill trained (but 'non-stepping') and compared with a group of normal rats. Our results demonstrate extensive and significant reorganization of the trunk motor cortex after chronic adult SCI which includes (1) expansion and rostral displacement of trunk motor representations in the cortex, with the greatest significant increase observed for rostral (to injury) trunk, and slight but significant increase of motor representation for caudal (to injury) trunk at low thoracic levels in all spinalized rats; (2) significant changes in coactivation and the synergy representation (or map overlap) between different trunk muscles and between trunk and forelimb. No significant differences were observed between the groups of transected rats for the majority of the comparisons. However, (3) the treadmill and robot-treadmill trained groups of rats showed a further small but significant rostral migration of the trunk representations, beyond the shift caused by transection alone. We conclude that SCI induces a significant reorganization of the trunk motor cortex, which is not qualitatively altered by non-stepping treadmill training or non-stepping robot assisted treadmill training, but is shifted further from normal topography by the training. This shift may potentially make subsequent rehabilitation with

  5. Enhancing Motor Network Activity Using Real-Time Functional MRI Neurofeedback of Left Premotor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Marins, Theo F; Rodrigues, Erika C; Engel, Annerose; Hoefle, Sebastian; Basílio, Rodrigo; Lent, Roberto; Moll, Jorge; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of potential therapeutic relevance that allows individuals to be aware of their own neurophysiological responses and to voluntarily modulate the activity of specific brain regions, such as the premotor cortex (PMC), important for motor recovery after brain injury. We investigated (i) whether healthy human volunteers are able to up-regulate the activity of the left PMC during a right hand finger tapping motor imagery (MI) task while receiving continuous fMRI-neurofeedback, and (ii) whether successful modulation of brain activity influenced non-targeted motor control regions. During the MI task, participants of the neurofeedback group (NFB) received ongoing visual feedback representing the level of fMRI responses within their left PMC. Control (CTL) group participants were shown similar visual stimuli, but these were non-contingent on brain activity. Both groups showed equivalent levels of behavioral ratings on arousal and MI, before and during the fMRI protocol. In the NFB, but not in CLT group, brain activation during the last run compared to the first run revealed increased activation in the left PMC. In addition, the NFB group showed increased activation in motor control regions extending beyond the left PMC target area, including the supplementary motor area, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Moreover, in the last run, the NFB group showed stronger activation in the left PMC/inferior frontal gyrus when compared to the CTL group. Our results indicate that modulation of PMC and associated motor control areas can be achieved during a single neurofeedback-fMRI session. These results contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MI-based neurofeedback training, with direct implications for rehabilitation strategies in severe brain disorders, such as stroke. PMID:26733832

  6. The Importance of Lateral Connections in the Parietal Cortex for Generating Motor Plans

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Derrik E.; Oros, Nicolas; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence has highlighted the significant role of associative brain areas, such as the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in transforming multimodal sensory information into motor plans. However, little is known about how different sensory information, which can have different delays or be absent, combines to produce a motor plan, such as executing a reaching movement. To address these issues, we constructed four biologically plausible network architectures to simulate PPC: 1) feedforward from sensory input to the PPC to a motor output area, 2) feedforward with the addition of an efference copy from the motor area, 3) feedforward with the addition of lateral or recurrent connectivity across PPC neurons, and 4) feedforward plus efference copy, and lateral connections. Using an evolutionary strategy, the connectivity of these network architectures was evolved to execute visually guided movements, where the target stimulus provided visual input for the entirety of each trial. The models were then tested on a memory guided motor task, where the visual target disappeared after a short duration. Sensory input to the neural networks had sensory delays consistent with results from monkey studies. We found that lateral connections within the PPC resulted in smoother movements and were necessary for accurate movements in the absence of visual input. The addition of lateral connections resulted in velocity profiles consistent with those observed in human and non-human primate visually guided studies of reaching, and allowed for smooth, rapid, and accurate movements under all conditions. In contrast, Feedforward or Feedback architectures were insufficient to overcome these challenges. Our results suggest that intrinsic lateral connections are critical for executing accurate, smooth motor plans. PMID:26252871

  7. Enhancing Motor Network Activity Using Real-Time Functional MRI Neurofeedback of Left Premotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Marins, Theo F.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Engel, Annerose; Hoefle, Sebastian; Basílio, Rodrigo; Lent, Roberto; Moll, Jorge; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of potential therapeutic relevance that allows individuals to be aware of their own neurophysiological responses and to voluntarily modulate the activity of specific brain regions, such as the premotor cortex (PMC), important for motor recovery after brain injury. We investigated (i) whether healthy human volunteers are able to up-regulate the activity of the left PMC during a right hand finger tapping motor imagery (MI) task while receiving continuous fMRI-neurofeedback, and (ii) whether successful modulation of brain activity influenced non-targeted motor control regions. During the MI task, participants of the neurofeedback group (NFB) received ongoing visual feedback representing the level of fMRI responses within their left PMC. Control (CTL) group participants were shown similar visual stimuli, but these were non-contingent on brain activity. Both groups showed equivalent levels of behavioral ratings on arousal and MI, before and during the fMRI protocol. In the NFB, but not in CLT group, brain activation during the last run compared to the first run revealed increased activation in the left PMC. In addition, the NFB group showed increased activation in motor control regions extending beyond the left PMC target area, including the supplementary motor area, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Moreover, in the last run, the NFB group showed stronger activation in the left PMC/inferior frontal gyrus when compared to the CTL group. Our results indicate that modulation of PMC and associated motor control areas can be achieved during a single neurofeedback-fMRI session. These results contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MI-based neurofeedback training, with direct implications for rehabilitation strategies in severe brain disorders, such as stroke. PMID:26733832

  8. Early-onset motor impairment and increased accumulation of phosphorylated α-synuclein in the motor cortex of normal aging mice are ameliorated by coenzyme Q.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Shirasawa, Takuji; Takahashi, Mayumi

    2016-08-01

    Brain mitochondrial function declines with age; however, the accompanying behavioral and histological alterations that are characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD) are poorly understood. We found that the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and coenzyme Q (CoQ) content were reduced in aged (15-month-old) male mice compared to those in young (6-month-old) male mice. Concomitantly, motor functions, including the rate of movement and exploratory and voluntary motor activities, were significantly reduced in the aged mice compared to the young mice. In the motor cortex of the aged mouse brain, the accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn) phosphorylated at serine129 (Ser129) significantly increased, and the level of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1) decreased compared with that in the young mouse brain. The administration of exogenous water-soluble CoQ10 to aged mice via drinking water restored the mitochondrial OCR, motor function, and phosphorylated α-syn and VGluT1 levels in the motor cortex. These results suggest that early-onset motor impairment and the increased accumulation of Ser129-phosphorylated α-syn in the motor cortex are ameliorated by the exogenous administration of CoQ10. PMID:27143639

  9. Cell and neuron densities in the primary motor cortex of primates

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nicole A.; Collins, Christine E.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2013-01-01

    Cell and neuron densities vary across the cortical sheet in a predictable manner across different primate species (Collins et al., 2010b). Primary motor cortex, M1, is characterized by lower neuron densities relative to other cortical areas. M1 contains a motor representation map of contralateral body parts from tail to tongue in a mediolateral sequence. Different functional movement representations within M1 likely require specialized microcircuitry for control of different body parts, and these differences in circuitry may be reflected by variation in cell and neuron densities. Here we determined cell and neuron densities for multiple sub-regions of M1 in six primate species, using the semi-automated flow fractionator method. The results verify previous reports of lower overall neuron densities in M1 compared to other parts of cortex in the six primate species examined. The most lateral regions of M1 that correspond to face and hand movement representations, are more neuron dense relative to medial locations in M1, which suggests differences in cortical circuitry within movement zones. PMID:23450743

  10. Motor Cortex Stimulation Reduces Hyperalgesia in an Animal Model of Central Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Jessica M; Ji, Yadong; Masri, Radi

    2011-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex has been used since 1991 to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Since its inception, motor cortex stimulation (MCS) treatment has had varied clinical outcomes. Until this point, there has not been a systematic study of the stimulation parameters that most effectively treat chronic pain, or of the mechanisms by which MCS relieves pain. Here, using a rodent model of central pain, we perform a systematic study of stimulation parameters used for MCS and investigate the mechanisms by which MCS reduces hyperalgesia. Specifically, we study the role of the inhibitory nucleus zona incerta (ZI) in mediating the analgesic effects of MCS. In animals with mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, we find that stimulation at 50 µA, 50 Hz, and 300 µs square pulses, for 30 minutes is sufficient to reverse mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. We also find that stimulation of the ZI mimics the effects of MCS and that reversible inactivation of ZI blocks the effects of MCS. These findings suggest that the reduction of hyperalgesia maybe due to MCS effects on ZI. PMID:21396776

  11. Modulation of Cortical Inhibitory Circuits after Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over the Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ryoki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Kojima, Sho; Kirimoto, Hikari; Onishi, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we aimed to evaluate whether cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) and primary somatosensory cortex (S1) can modulate cortical inhibitory circuits. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in this study. Cathodal tDCS was positioned over the left M1 (M1 cathodal) or left S1 (S1 cathodal) with an intensity of 1 mA for 10 min. Sham tDCS was applied for 10 min over the left M1 (sham). Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were recorded from the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle before the intervention (pre) and 10 and 30 min after the intervention (post 1 and post 2, respectively). Cortical inhibitory circuits were evaluated using short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI). M1 cathodal decreased single-pulse MEP amplitudes at post 1 and decreased SAI at post 1 and post 2; however, SICI did not exhibit any change. S1 cathodal and sham did not show any changes in MEP amplitudes at any of the three time points. These results demonstrated that cathodal tDCS over the M1 not only decreases the M1 excitability but also affects the cortical inhibitory circuits related to SAI. PMID:26869909

  12. Functional network reorganization in motor cortex can be explained by reward-modulated Hebbian learning

    PubMed Central

    Legenstein, Robert; Chase, Steven M.; Schwartz, Andrew B.; Maass, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The control of neuroprosthetic devices from the activity of motor cortex neurons benefits from learning effects where the function of these neurons is adapted to the control task. It was recently shown that tuning properties of neurons in monkey motor cortex are adapted selectively in order to compensate for an erroneous interpretation of their activity. In particular, it was shown that the tuning curves of those neurons whose preferred directions had been misinterpreted changed more than those of other neurons. In this article, we show that the experimentally observed self-tuning properties of the system can be explained on the basis of a simple learning rule. This learning rule utilizes neuronal noise for exploration and performs Hebbian weight updates that are modulated by a global reward signal. In contrast to most previously proposed reward-modulated Hebbian learning rules, this rule does not require extraneous knowledge about what is noise and what is signal. The learning rule is able to optimize the performance of the model system within biologically realistic periods of time and under high noise levels. When the neuronal noise is fitted to experimental data, the model produces learning effects similar to those found in monkey experiments. PMID:25284966

  13. Role of the motor cortex in the rearrangement of a natural movement coordination in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, O G; Mats, V N; Ponomarev, V N

    2008-07-01

    Chronic experiments on dogs were performed to study the activity of the shoulder muscles involved in elevating the forelimb used by the animal to lift a food-containing cup and keep it elevated during eating. At the early stage of acquisition of this operant reaction, limb-lifting occurred with an anticipatory upward head movement; lowering of the head to the feeder was associated with lowering of the lifted limb. The new coordination required for food to be obtained, i.e., maintaining the elevated limb in a posture with the head lowered, could only be achieved as a result of learning. In untrained dogs with the natural coordination, elevation of the limb occurred with activation of the deltoid and teres major muscles, teres minor being active on standing but ceasing its activity before limb elevation. During training the activity of the teres minor muscle changed to the opposite pattern. Limb elevation in the learned coordination was accompanied by activation of all three shoulder flexors. Lesioning of the motor cortex in the projection area of the "working" limb, but not in other areas, led to impairments of the acquired coordination and a new pattern of shoulder muscle activity. These data led to the conclusion that rearrangement of the initial coordination was linked with the formation of a new means of elevating the limb in which the muscle pattern was supported by the motor cortex.

  14. Development and Maturation of Embryonic Cortical Neurons Grafted into the Damaged Adult Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ballout, Nissrine; Frappé, Isabelle; Péron, Sophie; Jaber, Mohamed; Zibara, Kazem; Gaillard, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the human central nervous system can lead to devastating consequences due to its poor ability to self-repair. Neural transplantation aimed at replacing lost neurons and restore functional circuitry has proven to be a promising therapeutical avenue. We previously reported in adult rodent animal models with cortical lesions that grafted fetal cortical neurons could effectively re-establish specific patterns of projections and synapses. The current study was designed to provide a detailed characterization of the spatio-temporal in vivo development of fetal cortical transplanted cells within the lesioned adult motor cortex and their corresponding axonal projections. We show here that as early as 2 weeks after grafting, cortical neuroblasts transplanted into damaged adult motor cortex developed appropriate projections to cortical and subcortical targets. Grafted cells initially exhibited characteristics of immature neurons, which then differentiated into mature neurons with appropriate cortical phenotypes where most were glutamatergic and few were GABAergic. All cortical subtypes identified with the specific markers CTIP2, Cux1, FOXP2, and Tbr1 were generated after grafting as evidenced with BrdU co-labeling. The set of data provided here is of interest as it sets biological standards for future studies aimed at replacing fetal cells with embryonic stem cells as a source of cortical neurons. PMID:27536221

  15. Automatic detection and quantitative analysis of cells in the mouse primary motor cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yunlong; He, Yong; Wu, Jingpeng; Chen, Shangbin; Li, Anan; Gong, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Neuronal cells play very important role on metabolism regulation and mechanism control, so cell number is a fundamental determinant of brain function. Combined suitable cell-labeling approaches with recently proposed three-dimensional optical imaging techniques, whole mouse brain coronal sections can be acquired with 1-μm voxel resolution. We have developed a completely automatic pipeline to perform cell centroids detection, and provided three-dimensional quantitative information of cells in the primary motor cortex of C57BL/6 mouse. It involves four principal steps: i) preprocessing; ii) image binarization; iii) cell centroids extraction and contour segmentation; iv) laminar density estimation. Investigations on the presented method reveal promising detection accuracy in terms of recall and precision, with average recall rate 92.1% and average precision rate 86.2%. We also analyze laminar density distribution of cells from pial surface to corpus callosum from the output vectorizations of detected cell centroids in mouse primary motor cortex, and find significant cellular density distribution variations in different layers. This automatic cell centroids detection approach will be beneficial for fast cell-counting and accurate density estimation, as time-consuming and error-prone manual identification is avoided.

  16. Upper alpha neurofeedback training over the motor cortex increases SMR desynchronization in motor tasks.

    PubMed

    López-Larraz, Eduardo; Escolano, Carlos; Minguez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR) is a distinctive feature that provides a discriminative pattern for BCI operation. However, individuals such as BCI illiterates can not produce these discriminable patterns with sufficient reliability. Additionally, SMR desynchronization can become deteriorated or extinct in patients with spinal cord injury or a cerebrovascular accident. In all these situations BCI usage is compromised. This paper proposes an intervention based on neurofeedback training of the upper alpha band to improve SMR desynchronization. The feasibility of this intervention is demonstrated in a preliminary study in which five healthy subjects were trained to increase their upper alpha band power. Such increases produced higher SMR desynchronization and better discrimination between rest and execution states of a motor task.

  17. Transdural motor cortex stimulation reverses neuropathic pain in rats: a profile of neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Rosana L; Assis, Danielle V; Clara, Joseph A; Alves, Adilson S; Dale, Camila S; Teixeira, Manoel J; Fonoff, Erich T; Britto, Luiz R

    2011-03-01

    Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) has been used to treat patients with neuropathic pain resistant to other therapeutic approaches; however, the mechanisms of pain control by MCS are still not clearly understood. We have demonstrated that MCS increases the nociceptive threshold of naive conscious rats, with opioid participation. In the present study, the effect of transdural MCS on neuropathic pain in rats subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve was investigated. In addition, the pattern of neuronal activation, evaluated by Fos and Zif268 immunolabel, was performed in the spinal cord and brain sites associated with the modulation of persistent pain. MCS reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by peripheral neuropathy. After stimulation, Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) decreased in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the ventral posterior lateral and medial nuclei of the thalamus, when compared to animals with neuropathic pain. Furthermore, the MCS increased the Fos-IR in the periaqueductal gray, the anterior cingulate cortex and the central and basolateral amygdaloid nuclei. Zif268 results were similar to those obtained for Fos, although no changes were observed for Zif268 in the anterior cingulate cortex and the central amygdaloid nucleus after MCS. The present findings suggest that MCS reverts neuropathic pain phenomena in rats, mimicking the effect observed in humans, through activation of the limbic and descending pain inhibitory systems. Further investigation of the mechanisms involved in this effect may contribute to the improvement of the clinical treatment of persistent pain.

  18. The afferent and efferent callosal connections of retinotopically defined areas in cat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Segraves, M.A.; Rosenquist, A.C.

    1982-08-01

    We compared the callosal afferent and efferent connections of different retinotopic loci within a given visual cortical area as well as the connectivity patterns among similar retinotopic loci in different visual areas. Small injections (75 nl) of a mixture of horseradish peroxidase and (/sup 3/H)leucine were made through a recording pipette at injection sites identified by retinotopic mapping. A small locus of cortex within a callosally connected region had precise reciprocal connections with the homotopic locus in the contralateral hemisphere. This small locus also was callosally connected with a variable number of heterotopic loci. Both reciprocal and nonreciprocal heterotopic callosal connections were found. Homotopic and heterotopic connections appeared to have a high degree of retinotopic fidelity. Precisely homotopic connections were present not only between locations on the vertical meridian representations at the left and right area 17/18 borders but also, for example, between mirror-symmetrical points on the peripheral horizontal meridian representation in the left and right posteromedial lateral suprasylvian areas. In several experiments, we found that both callosal neurons and terminals in the homotopic cortex were grouped into two to three distinct clusters ranging from 600 to 900 micrometers in width. Callosal neurons with homotopic connections were primarily pyramidal cells in lower layer III and upper layer IV. Outside of areas 17 and 18, there was a significant number of pyramidal and fusiform-shaped callosal neurons in layers V and VI. The majority of callosal terminals were located in layers II, III, and IV.

  19. Low Doses of Ethanol Enhance LTD-like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fuhl, Anna; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Lücke, Caroline; Toennes, Stefan W; Ziemann, Ulf

    2015-12-01

    Humans liberally use ethanol for its facilitating effects on social interactions but its effects on central nervous system function remain underexplored. We have recently described that very low doses of ethanol abolish long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in human cortex, most likely through enhancement of tonic inhibition [Lücke et al, 2014, Neuropsychopharmacology 39:1508-18]. Here, we studied the effects of low-dose ethanol on long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity. LTD-like plasticity was induced in human motor cortex by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PASLTD), and measured as decreases of motor evoked potential input-output curve (IO-curve). In addition, sedation was measured by decreases in saccade peak velocity (SPV). Ethanol in two low doses (EtOH<10mM, EtOH<20mM) was compared to single oral doses of alprazolam (APZ, 1mg) a classical benzodiazepine, and zolpidem (ZLP, 10 mg), a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic, in a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in ten healthy human subjects. EtOH<10mM and EtOH<20mM but not APZ or ZLP enhanced the PASLTD-induced LTD-like plasticity, while APZ and ZLP but not EtOH<10mM or EtOH<20mM decreased SPV. Non-sedating low doses of ethanol, easily reached during social drinking, enhance LTD-like plasticity in human cortex. This effect is most likely explained by the activation of extrasynaptic α4-subunit containing gamma-aminobutyric type A receptors by low-dose EtOH, resulting in increased tonic inhibition. Findings may stimulate cellular research on the role of tonic inhibition in regulating excitability and plasticity of cortical neuronal networks. PMID:26038159

  20. Low Doses of Ethanol Enhance LTD-like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fuhl, Anna; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Lücke, Caroline; Toennes, Stefan W; Ziemann, Ulf

    2015-12-01

    Humans liberally use ethanol for its facilitating effects on social interactions but its effects on central nervous system function remain underexplored. We have recently described that very low doses of ethanol abolish long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in human cortex, most likely through enhancement of tonic inhibition [Lücke et al, 2014, Neuropsychopharmacology 39:1508-18]. Here, we studied the effects of low-dose ethanol on long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity. LTD-like plasticity was induced in human motor cortex by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PASLTD), and measured as decreases of motor evoked potential input-output curve (IO-curve). In addition, sedation was measured by decreases in saccade peak velocity (SPV). Ethanol in two low doses (EtOH<10mM, EtOH<20mM) was compared to single oral doses of alprazolam (APZ, 1mg) a classical benzodiazepine, and zolpidem (ZLP, 10 mg), a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic, in a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in ten healthy human subjects. EtOH<10mM and EtOH<20mM but not APZ or ZLP enhanced the PASLTD-induced LTD-like plasticity, while APZ and ZLP but not EtOH<10mM or EtOH<20mM decreased SPV. Non-sedating low doses of ethanol, easily reached during social drinking, enhance LTD-like plasticity in human cortex. This effect is most likely explained by the activation of extrasynaptic α4-subunit containing gamma-aminobutyric type A receptors by low-dose EtOH, resulting in increased tonic inhibition. Findings may stimulate cellular research on the role of tonic inhibition in regulating excitability and plasticity of cortical neuronal networks.

  1. Reliability of directional information in unsorted spikes and local field potentials recorded in human motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Perge, János A.; Zhang, Shaomin; Malik, Wasim Q.; Homer, Mark L.; Cash, Sydney; Friehs, Gerhard; Eskandar, Emad N.; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Action potentials and local field potentials (LFPs) recorded in primary motor cortex contain information about the direction of movement. LFPs are assumed to be more robust to signal instabilities than action potentials, which makes LFPs along with action potentials a promising signal source for brain-computer interface applications. Still, relatively little research has directly compared the utility of LFPs to action potentials in decoding movement direction in human motor cortex. Approach We conducted intracortical multielectrode recordings in motor cortex of two persons (T2 and [S3]) as they performed a motor imagery task. We then compared the offline decoding performance of LFPs and spiking extracted from the same data recorded across a one-year period in each participant. Main results We obtained offline prediction accuracy of movement direction and endpoint velocity in multiple LFP bands, with the best performance in the highest (200–400Hz) LFP frequency band, presumably also containing low-pass filtered action potentials. Cross-frequency correlations of preferred directions and directional modulation index showed high similarity of directional information between action potential firing rates (spiking) and high frequency LFPs (70–400Hz), and increasing disparity with lower frequency bands (0–7, 10–40 and 50–65Hz). Spikes predicted the direction of intended movement more accurately than any individual LFP band, however combined decoding of all LFPs was statistically indistinguishable from spike based performance. As the quality of spiking signals (i.e. signal amplitude) and the number of significantly modulated spiking units decreased, the offline decoding performance decreased 3.6[5.65]%/month (for T2 and [S3] respectively). The decrease in the number of significantly modulated LFP signals and their decoding accuracy followed a similar trend (2.4[2.85]%/month, ANCOVA, p=0.27[0.03]). Significance Field potentials provided comparable

  2. Combined motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promotes corticospinal system functional and structural plasticity and motor function after injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiguo; Amer, Alzahraa; Ryan, Daniel; Martin, John H

    2016-03-01

    An important strategy for promoting voluntary movements after motor system injury is to harness activity-dependent corticospinal tract (CST) plasticity. We combine forelimb motor cortex (M1) activation with co-activation of its cervical spinal targets in rats to promote CST sprouting and skilled limb movement after pyramidal tract lesion (PTX). We used a two-step experimental design in which we first established the optimal combined stimulation protocol in intact rats and then used the optimal protocol in injured animals to promote CST repair and motor recovery. M1 was activated epidurally using an electrical analog of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS). The cervical spinal cord was co-activated by trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) that was targeted to the cervical enlargement, simulated from finite element method. In intact rats, forelimb motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were strongly facilitated during iTBS and for 10 min after cessation of stimulation. Cathodal, not anodal, tsDCS alone facilitated MEPs and also produced a facilitatory aftereffect that peaked at 10 min. Combined iTBS and cathodal tsDCS (c-tsDCS) produced further MEP enhancement during stimulation, but without further aftereffect enhancement. Correlations between forelimb M1 local field potentials and forelimb electromyogram (EMG) during locomotion increased after electrical iTBS alone and further increased with combined stimulation (iTBS+c-tsDCS). This optimized combined stimulation was then used to promote function after PTX because it enhanced functional connections between M1 and spinal circuits and greater M1 engagement in muscle contraction than either stimulation alone. Daily application of combined M1 iTBS on the intact side and c-tsDCS after PTX (10 days, 27 min/day) significantly restored skilled movements during horizontal ladder walking. Stimulation produced a 5.4-fold increase in spared ipsilateral CST terminations. Combined neuromodulation achieves optimal motor

  3. Parallel Cortical Networks Formed by Modular Organization of Primary Motor Cortex Outputs.

    PubMed

    Hamadjida, Adjia; Dea, Melvin; Deffeyes, Joan; Quessy, Stephan; Dancause, Numa

    2016-07-11

    In primates, the refinement of motor behaviors, in particular hand use, is associated with the establishment of more direct projections from primary motor cortex (M1) onto cervical motoneurons [1, 2] and the appearance of additional premotor and sensory cortical areas [3]. All of these areas have reciprocal connections with M1 [4-7]. Thus, during the evolution of the sensorimotor network, the number of interlocutors with which M1 interacts has tremendously increased. It is not clear how these additional interconnections are organized in relation to one another within the hand representation of M1. This is important because the organization of connections between M1 and phylogenetically newer and specialized cortical areas is likely to be key to the increased repertoire of hand movements in primates. In cebus monkeys, we used injections of retrograde tracers into the hand representation of different cortical areas of the sensorimotor network (ventral and dorsal premotor areas [PMv and PMd], supplementary motor area [SMA], and posterior parietal cortex [area 5]), and we analyzed the pattern of labeled neurons within the hand representation of M1. Instead of being uniformly dispersed across M1, neurons sending projections to each distant cortical area were largely segregated in different subregions of M1. These data support the view that primates split the cortical real estate of M1 into modules, each preferentially interconnected with a particular cortical area within the sensorimotor network. This modular organization could sustain parallel processing of interactions with multiple specialized cortical areas to increase the behavioral repertoire of the hand. PMID:27322001

  4. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on associative LTP-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Tonio; Krakow, Karsten; Ziemann, Ulf

    2010-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively in clinical practice but relatively little is known on their specific effects at the systems level of human cortex. Here we tested, using a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in healthy subjects, the effects of a single therapeutic oral dose of seven AEDs with different modes of action (tiagabine, diazepam, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam and piracetam) on long-term potentiation (LTP)-like motor cortical plasticity induced by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PAS). PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity was assessed from the increase in motor evoked potential amplitude in a hand muscle contralateral to the stimulated motor cortex. Levetiracetam significantly reduced LTP-like plasticity when compared to the placebo condition. Tiagabine, diazepam, lamotrigine and piracetam resulted in nonsignificant trends towards reduction of LTP-like plasticity while gabapentin and topiramate had no effect. The particularly depressant effect of levetiracetam is probably explained by its unique mode of action through binding at the vesicle membrane protein SV2A. Enhancement of gamma-amino butyric acid-dependent cortical inhibition by tiagabine, diazepam and possibly levetiracetam, and blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels by lamotrigine, may also depress PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity but these mechanisms appear to be less relevant. Findings may inform about AED-related adverse effects on important LTP-dependent central nervous systems processes such as learning or memory formation. The particular depressant effect of levetiracetam on LTP-like plasticity may also relate to the unique properties of this drug to inhibit epileptogenesis, a potentially LTP-associated process.

  5. Parallel Cortical Networks Formed by Modular Organization of Primary Motor Cortex Outputs.

    PubMed

    Hamadjida, Adjia; Dea, Melvin; Deffeyes, Joan; Quessy, Stephan; Dancause, Numa

    2016-07-11

    In primates, the refinement of motor behaviors, in particular hand use, is associated with the establishment of more direct projections from primary motor cortex (M1) onto cervical motoneurons [1, 2] and the appearance of additional premotor and sensory cortical areas [3]. All of these areas have reciprocal connections with M1 [4-7]. Thus, during the evolution of the sensorimotor network, the number of interlocutors with which M1 interacts has tremendously increased. It is not clear how these additional interconnections are organized in relation to one another within the hand representation of M1. This is important because the organization of connections between M1 and phylogenetically newer and specialized cortical areas is likely to be key to the increased repertoire of hand movements in primates. In cebus monkeys, we used injections of retrograde tracers into the hand representation of different cortical areas of the sensorimotor network (ventral and dorsal premotor areas [PMv and PMd], supplementary motor area [SMA], and posterior parietal cortex [area 5]), and we analyzed the pattern of labeled neurons within the hand representation of M1. Instead of being uniformly dispersed across M1, neurons sending projections to each distant cortical area were largely segregated in different subregions of M1. These data support the view that primates split the cortical real estate of M1 into modules, each preferentially interconnected with a particular cortical area within the sensorimotor network. This modular organization could sustain parallel processing of interactions with multiple specialized cortical areas to increase the behavioral repertoire of the hand.

  6. Topographic shear and the relation of ocular dominance columns to orientation columns in primate and cat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard J.; Schwartz, Eric L.

    1999-03-01

    Shear has been known to exist for many years in the topographic structure of the primary visual cortex, but has received little attention in the modeling literature. Although the topographic map of V1 is largely conformal (i.e. zero shear), several groups have observed topographic shear in the region of the V1/V2 border. Furthermore, shear has also been revealed by anisotropy of cortical magnification factor within a single ocular dominance column. In the present paper, we make a functional hypothesis: the major axis of the topographic shear tensor provides cortical neurons with a preferred direction of orientation tuning. We demonstrate that isotropic neuronal summation of a sheared topographic map, in the presence of additional random shear, can provide the major features of cortical functional architecture with the ocular dominance column system acting as the principal source of the shear tensor. The major principal axis of the shear tensor determines the direction and its eigenvalues the relative strength of cortical orientation preference. This hypothesis is then shown to be qualitatively consistent with a variety of experimental results on cat and monkey orientation column properties obtained from optical recording and from other anatomical and physiological techniques. In addition, we show that a recent result of Das and Gilbert (Das, A., & Gilbert, C. D., 1997. Distortions of visuotopic map match orientation singularities in primary visual cortex. Nature, 387, 594-598) is consistent with an infinite set of parameterized solutions for the cortical map. We exploit this freedom to choose a particular instance of the Das-Gilbert solution set which is consistent with the full range of local spatial structure in V1. These results suggest that further relationships between ocular dominance columns, orientation columns, and local topography may be revealed by experimental testing.

  7. Stimulation over primary motor cortex during action observation impairs effector recognition.

    PubMed

    Naish, Katherine R; Barnes, Brittany; Obhi, Sukhvinder S

    2016-04-01

    Recent work suggests that motor cortical processing during action observation plays a role in later recognition of the object involved in the action. Here, we investigated whether recognition of the effector making an action is also impaired when transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) - thought to interfere with normal cortical activity - is applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) during action observation. In two experiments, single-pulse TMS was delivered over the hand area of M1 while participants watched short clips of hand actions. Participants were then asked whether an image (experiment 1) or a video (experiment 2) of a hand presented later in the trial was the same or different to the hand in the preceding video. In Experiment 1, we found that participants' ability to recognise static images of hands was significantly impaired when TMS was delivered over M1 during action observation, compared to when no TMS was delivered, or when stimulation was applied over the vertex. Conversely, stimulation over M1 did not affect recognition of dot configurations, or recognition of hands that were previously presented as static images (rather than action movie clips) with no object. In Experiment 2, we found that effector recognition was impaired when stimulation was applied part way through (300ms) and at the end (500ms) of the action observation period, indicating that 200ms of action-viewing following stimulation was not long enough to form a new representation that could be used for later recognition. The findings of both experiments suggest that interfering with cortical motor activity during action observation impairs subsequent recognition of the effector involved in the action, which complements previous findings of motor system involvement in object memory. This work provides some of the first evidence that motor processing during action observation is involved in forming representations of the effector that are useful beyond the action observation period

  8. Motor learning and modulation of prefrontal cortex: an fNIRS assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yumie; Noah, Jack Adam; Zhang, Xian; Nomoto, Yasunori; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Shimada, Sotaro; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Bronner, Shaw; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Prefrontal hemodynamic responses are observed during performance of motor tasks. Using a dance video game (DVG), a complex motor task that requires temporally accurate footsteps with given visual and auditory cues, we investigated whether 20 h of DVG training modified hemodynamic responses of the prefrontal cortex in six healthy young adults. Approach. Fronto-temporal activity during actual DVG play was measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) pre- and post-training. To evaluate the training-induced changes in the time-courses of fNIRS signals, we employed a regression analysis using the task-specific template fNIRS signals that were generated from alternate well-trained and/or novice DVG players. The HRF was also separately incorporated as a template to construct an alternate regression model. Change in coefficients for template functions at pre- and post- training were determined and compared among different models. Main results. Training significantly increased the motor performance using the number of temporally accurate steps in the DVG as criteria. The mean oxygenated hemoglobin (ΔoxyHb) waveform changed from an activation above baseline pattern to that of a below baseline pattern. Participants showed significantly decreased coefficients for regressors of the ΔoxyHb response of novice players and HRF. The model using ΔoxyHb responses from both well-trained and novice players of DVG as templates showed the best fit for the ΔoxyHb responses of the participants at both pre- and post-training when analyzed with Akaike information criteria. Significance. These results suggest that the coefficients for the template ΔoxyHb responses of the novice players are sensitive indicators of motor learning during the initial stage of training and thus clinically useful to determine the improvement in motor performance when patients are engaged in a specific rehabilitation program.

  9. An unusual form of motor neuron disease following a cat bite.

    PubMed

    Hudson, A J; Vinters, H V; Povey, R C; Hatch, L A; Percy, D H; Noseworthy, J H; Kaufmann, J C

    1986-05-01

    A case of motor neuron disease with clinical and pathological resemblance to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a woman who was severely bitten on the ankle by a cat is described. Weakness first appeared at the ankles and relentlessly advanced proximally, terminating in death from pulmonary failure in a year. A number of unusual features that are uncharacteristic of ALS were found that included a markedly elevated antinuclear antibody titre in the serum and the presence of prominent oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid. The spinal cord showed loss of anterior horn cells and pyramidal degeneration that are characteristic of ALS, but an extraordinary finding was the presence of transmural granulomatous inflammation of numerous small and medium sized vessels, especially veins, in the subarachnoid space around the cord. There were also inflammatory changes in the brainstem and spinal cord consisting of microglial and astrocytic nodules and perivenous cuffing by mononuclear cells. Ill-defined hyaline eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions were seen in some remaining anterior horn cells. No viral particles were found by electron microscopy despite an extensive search. Virological studies were inconclusive but there is reason to believe that this patient's illness was caused by an as yet unidentified virus.

  10. Encoding of temporal information by timing, rate, and place in cat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Kazuo; Priebe, Nicholas J; Sharpee, Tatyana O; Cheung, Steven W; Schreiner, Christoph E

    2010-07-19

    A central goal in auditory neuroscience is to understand the neural coding of species-specific communication and human speech sounds. Low-rate repetitive sounds are elemental features of communication sounds, and core auditory cortical regions have been implicated in processing these information-bearing elements. Repetitive sounds could be encoded by at least three neural response properties: 1) the event-locked spike-timing precision, 2) the mean firing rate, and 3) the interspike interval (ISI). To determine how well these response aspects capture information about the repetition rate stimulus, we measured local group responses of cortical neurons in cat anterior auditory field (AAF) to click trains and calculated their mutual information based on these different codes. ISIs of the multiunit responses carried substantially higher information about low repetition rates than either spike-timing precision or firing rate. Combining firing rate and ISI codes was synergistic and captured modestly more repetition information. Spatial distribution analyses showed distinct local clustering properties for each encoding scheme for repetition information indicative of a place code. Diversity in local processing emphasis and distribution of different repetition rate codes across AAF may give rise to concurrent feed-forward processing streams that contribute differently to higher-order sound analysis.

  11. Spatial sensitivity of neurons in the anterior, posterior, and primary fields of cat auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Ian A.; Stecker, G. Christopher; Macpherson, Ewan A.; Middlebrooks, John C.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the spatial-tuning properties of units in the cat’s anterior auditory field (AAF) and compared them with those observed previously in the primary (A1) and posterior auditory fields (PAF). Multi-channel, silicon-substrate probes were used to record single- and multi-unit activity from the right hemispheres of α-chloralose-anesthetized cats. Spatial tuning was assessed using broadband noise bursts that varied in azimuth or elevation. Response latencies were slightly, though significantly shorter in AAF than A1, and considerably shorter in both of those fields than in PAF. Compared to PAF, spike counts and latencies were more poorly modulated by changes in stimulus location in AAF and A1, particularly at higher sound pressure levels. Moreover, units in AAF and A1 demonstrated poorer level tolerance than units in PAF with spike rates modulated as much by changes in stimulus intensity as changes in stimulus location. Finally, spike-pattern-recognition analyses indicated that units in AAF transmitted less spatial information, on average, than did units in PAF—an observation consistent with recent evidence that PAF is necessary for sound-localization behavior, whereas AAF is not. PMID:18359176

  12. Primary motor cortex underlies multi-joint integration for fast feedback control.

    PubMed

    Pruszynski, J Andrew; Kurtzer, Isaac; Nashed, Joseph Y; Omrani, Mohsen; Brouwer, Brenda; Scott, Stephen H

    2011-10-20

    A basic difficulty for the nervous system is integrating locally ambiguous sensory information to form accurate perceptions about the outside world. This local-to-global problem is also fundamental to motor control of the arm, because complex mechanical interactions between shoulder and elbow allow a particular amount of motion at one joint to arise from an infinite combination of shoulder and elbow torques. Here we show, in humans and rhesus monkeys, that a transcortical pathway through primary motor cortex (M1) resolves this ambiguity during fast feedback control. We demonstrate that single M1 neurons of behaving monkeys can integrate shoulder and elbow motion information into motor commands that appropriately counter the underlying torque within about 50 milliseconds of a mechanical perturbation. Moreover, we reveal a causal link between M1 processing and multi-joint integration in humans by showing that shoulder muscle responses occurring ∼50 milliseconds after pure elbow displacement can be potentiated by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Taken together, our results show that transcortical processing through M1 permits feedback responses to express a level of sophistication that rivals voluntary control; this provides neurophysiological support for influential theories positing that voluntary movement is generated by the intelligent manipulation of sensory feedback. PMID:21964335

  13. Neural Summation in Human Motor Cortex by Subthreshold Transcranial Magnetic Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoming; Choa, Fow-Sen; Summerfelt, Ann; Tagamets, Malle A.; Rowland, Laura M.; Kochunov, Peter; Shepard, Paul; Hong, L. Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Integration of diverse synaptic inputs is a basic neuronal operation that relies on many neurocomputational principles, one of which is neural summation. However, we lack empirical understanding of neuronal summation in the human brains in vivo. Here we explored the effect of neural summation in the motor cortex using two subthreshold pulses of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), each with intensities ranging from 60% - 95% of the resting motor threshold (RMT) and interstimulus intervals (ISI) varying from 1 – 25 ms. We found that two subthreshold TMS pulses can produce supra threshold motor response when ISIs were less than 10 ms, most prominent at 1, 1.5 and 3 ms. This facilitatory, above threshold response was evident when the intensity of the subthreshold pulses were above 80% of RMT but was absent as the intensity was 70% or below. Modeling of the summation data across intensity suggested that they followed an exponential function with excellent model fitting. Understanding the constraints for inducing summation of subthreshold stimulations to generate above threshold response may have implications in modeling neural operations and potential clinical applications. PMID:25399245

  14. Diversity of layer 5 projection neurons in the mouse motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Manfred J.; Tantirigama, Malinda L. S.; Sonntag, Ivo; Hughes, Stephanie M.; Empson, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    In the primary motor cortex (M1), layer 5 projection neurons signal directly to distant motor structures to drive movement. Despite their pivotal position and acknowledged diversity these neurons are traditionally separated into broad commissural and corticofugal types, and until now no attempt has been made at resolving the basis for their diversity. We therefore probed the electrophysiological and morphological properties of retrogradely labeled M1 corticospinal (CSp), corticothalamic (CTh), and commissural projecting corticostriatal (CStr) and corticocortical (CC) neurons. An unsupervised cluster analysis established at least four phenotypes with additional differences between lumbar and cervical projecting CSp neurons. Distinguishing parameters included the action potential (AP) waveform, firing behavior, the hyperpolarisation-activated sag potential, sublayer position, and soma and dendrite size. CTh neurons differed from CSp neurons in showing spike frequency acceleration and a greater sag potential. CStr neurons had the lowest AP amplitude and maximum rise rate of all neurons. Temperature influenced spike train behavior in corticofugal neurons. At 26°C CTh neurons fired bursts of APs more often than CSp neurons, but at 36°C both groups fired regular APs. Our findings provide reliable phenotypic fingerprints to identify distinct M1 projection neuron classes as a tool to understand their unique contributions to motor function. PMID:24137110

  15. Perturbation-evoked responses in primary motor cortex are modulated by behavioral context.

    PubMed

    Omrani, Mohsen; Pruszynski, J Andrew; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Scott, Stephen H

    2014-12-01

    Corrective responses to external perturbations are sensitive to the behavioral task being performed. It is believed that primary motor cortex (M1) forms part of a transcortical pathway that contributes to this sensitivity. Previous work has identified two distinct phases in the perturbation response of M1 neurons, an initial response starting ∼20 ms after perturbation onset that does not depend on the intended motor action and a task-dependent response that begins ∼40 ms after perturbation onset. However, this invariant initial response may reflect ongoing postural control or a task-independent response to the perturbation. The present study tested these two possibilities by examining if being engaged in an ongoing postural task before perturbation onset modulated the initial perturbation response in M1. Specifically, mechanical perturbations were applied to the shoulder and/or elbow while the monkey maintained its hand at a central target or when it was watching a movie and not required to respond to the perturbation. As expected, corrective movements, muscle stretch responses, and M1 population activity in the late perturbation epoch were all significantly diminished in the movie task. Strikingly, initial perturbation responses (<40 ms postperturbation) remained the same across tasks, suggesting that the initial phase of M1 activity constitutes a task-independent response that is sensitive to the properties of the mechanical perturbation but not the goal of the ongoing motor task.

  16. Intrinsic inter- and intralaminar connections and their relationship to the tonotopic map in cat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Wallace, M N; Kitzes, L M; Jones, E G

    1991-01-01

    Small iontophoretic injections of the lectin, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), were made into different layers of the primary auditory cortex (AI) of cats. Injections in layer I labeled two types of morphologically distinct fibers in layer I as well as a smaller number of axons in layers II and III. Layer II injections labeled descending axons that produced a dense plexus of terminal fibers in layers I-III of both AI and adjacent auditory fields. Injections in layer III also labeled a dense plexus of axon collaterals at the junction of layers V and VI and labeled patches of terminal fibers in both AI and adjacent auditory fields. These were densest in layers I-III but usually extended into layers IV and V as well. The patches were partly formed by axon collaterals of layer III pyramidal cells that traveled for over 4 mm in the gray matter. Injections confined to layer IV labeled axons in all layers of the cortex but none of these axons appeared to reach the white matter. The axons spread laterally in layer IV and up into the superficial layers and ramified especially layer I. Injections in layers V and VI labeled axons in all layers' of the cortex but these were densest in the deep layers where labeling was fairly homogeneous. In the upper layers the labeling was arranged in semi-discrete patches. Large injections involving layers I-III were studied in tangential sections. Between 3 and 8 patches of terminal labeling were observed in AI and these were mainly arranged in a band with its long axis aligned approximately in the dorsoventral direction. However dense patches of terminal labeling also occurred both anterior and posterior to the injection site. In selected experiments portions of the tonotopic map in AI were mapped by single unit recording and subsequently the map was related to patches of anterogradely labeled fibers that surrounded injections of PHA-L. Rows of dorsoventrally oriented patches were among cells with a similar best frequency to

  17. [Dynamics of tuning to orientation of cross-like figures in neurons from the cat visual cortex].

    PubMed

    Lazareva, N A; Tsutskiridze, D Iu; Shevelev, I A; Novikova, R V; Tikhomirov, A S; Sharaev, G A

    2003-01-01

    Dynamics of tuning to orientation of flashing light bar and to orientation of cross-like figure was studied by a temporal slices method in 87 neurons of the cat primary visual cortex. Tuning was plotted by spikes number in the entire response and in its successive fragments with a step of 20 ms. It was found that successive dynamic shift of preferred orientation of a bar was typical for 87% units, white such shift of preferred orientation of a cross was met in 75% of cases. Comparison of tuning dynamics for bar and cross allowed to separate units into three groups: the first one (58.6% of cases) with larger dynamic shift of a bar preferred orientation then of a cross (74.9 +/- 5.8 degrees [symbol: see text] 29.8 +/- 4.1 degrees, correspondingly, p < 0.00001), the second group (21.5%) with opposite effect (24.2 +/- 5.2 degrees and 69.2 +/- 10.0 degrees, p < 0.0002) and the third group (19.8%) without significant shift of preferred orientation of bar and cross and without difference in their dynamics. Possible mechanisms of the preferred orientation dynamics and its difference for bar and cross are discussed. PMID:14959486

  18. Contrast-dependent OFF-dominance in cat primary visual cortex facilitates discrimination of stimuli with natural contrast statistics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kefei; Yao, Haishan

    2014-06-01

    Both theoretical and experimental studies suggest that response properties in the visual system are shaped by signals in the natural environment. Recent studies showed that, in the primary visual cortex (V1), neurons preferring light decrements (OFF stimuli) outnumber those preferring light increments (ON stimuli). However, it is not clear whether the OFF-dominance in V1 neurons is related to the contrast statistics in natural images. By analysing the distribution of negative and positive contrasts in natural images at several spatial scales, we showed that optimal coding of the natural contrast signals would lead to a contrast-dependent OFF-dominant response, with a stronger degree of OFF-dominance at a higher contrast. Using bright and dark stimuli at various contrast levels to measure the receptive fields of neurons in cat V1, we found an increasing degree of OFF-dominance of the neuronal population as the contrast was increased. By modeling receptive fields exhibiting OFF- and ON-dominance, we found that contrast-dependent OFF-dominance facilitated the discrimination of stimuli with natural contrast distribution. Thus, by matching contrast-dependent OFF-dominance to the statistics of contrast distribution in natural images, V1 neurons may better discriminate contrast information in natural scenes.

  19. Responses of neurons in cat striate cortex to vernier offsets in reverse contrast stimuli.

    PubMed

    Swindale, N V

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines how the responses of cells in area 17 of the cat vary as a function of the vernier offset between a bright and a dark bar. The study was prompted by the finding that human vernier acuity is reduced for bars or edges of opposite contrast sign (Mather & Morgan, 1986; O'Shea & Mitchell, 1990). Both simple and complex cells showed V-shaped tuning curves for reverse contrast stimuli: i.e. response was minimum at alignment, and increased with increasing vernier offset. For vernier bars with the same contrast sing, v-shaped tuning curves were found, as reported earlier (Swindale & Cynader, 1986). Sensitivity to offset was inversely correlated in the two paradigms. However, complex cells with high sensitivity to offsets in a normal vernier stimulus were significantly less sensitive to offsets in reverse contrast stimuli. A cell's response to a vernier stimulus in which both bars are bright can be predicted by the shape of its orientation tuning curve, if the vernier stimulus is approximated by a single bar with an orientation equal to that of a line joining the midpoints of the two component bars (Swindale & Cynader, 1986). This approximation did not hold for the reverse contrast condition: orientation tuning curves for compound bars were broad and shallow, rather than bimodal, with peaks up to 40 deg from the preferred orientation. Results from simple cells were compared with predictions made by a linear model of the receptive field. The model predicted the [symbol: see text]-shaped tuning curves found for reverse contrast stimuli. It also predicted that absolute values of tuning slopes for vernier offsets in reverse contrast stimuli might sometimes be higher than with normal stimuli. This was observed in some simple cells. The model was unable to explain the shape of orientation tuning curves for compound bars, nor could it explain the breakdown of the equivalent orientation approximation. PMID:8924405

  20. Analysis of neural activity in human motor cortex -- Towards brain machine interface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secundo, Lavi

    The discovery of directional tuned neurons in the primary motor cortex has advanced motor research in several domains. For instance, in the area of brain machine interface (BMI), researchers have exploited the robust characteristic of tuned motor neurons to allow monkeys to learn control of various machines. In the first chapter of this work we examine whether this phenomena can be observed using the less invasive method of recording electrocorticographic signals (ECoG) from the surface of a human's brain. Our findings reveal that individual ECoG channels contain complex movement information about the neuronal population. While some ECoG channels are tuned to hand movement direction (direction specific channels), others are associated to movement but do not contain information regarding movement direction (non-direction specific channels). More specifically, directionality can vary temporally and by frequency within one channel. In addition, a handful of channels contain no significant information regarding movement at all. These findings strongly suggest that directional and non-directional regions of cortex can be identified with ECoG and provide solutions to decoding movement at the signal resolution provided by ECoG. In the second chapter we examine the influence of movement context on movement reconstruction accuracy. We recorded neuronal signals recorded from electro-corticography (ECoG) during performance of cued- and self-initiated movements. ECoG signals were used to train a reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct continuous hand movement. We found that both cued- and self-initiated movements could be reconstructed with similar accuracy from the ECoG data. However, while an algorithm trained on the cued task could reconstruct performance on a subsequent cued trial, it failed to reconstruct self-initiated arm movement. The same task-specificity was observed when the algorithm was trained with self-initiated movement data and tested on the cued task. Thus

  1. Reappraisal of field dynamics of motor cortex during self-paced finger movements

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Wasaka, Toshiaki; Inui, Koji; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2013-01-01

    Background The exact origin of neuronal responses in the human sensorimotor cortex subserving the generation of voluntary movements remains unclear, despite the presence of characteristic but robust waveforms in the records of electroencephalography or magnetoencephalography (MEG). Aims To clarify this fundamental and important problem, we analyzed MEG in more detail using a multidipole model during pulsatile extension of the index finger, and made some important new findings. Results Movement-related cerebral fields (MRCFs) were confirmed over the sensorimotor region contralateral to the movement, consisting of a temporal succession of the first premovement component termed motor field, followed by two or three postmovement components termed movement evoked fields. A source analysis was applied to separately model each of these field components. Equivalent current diploes of all components of MRCFs were estimated to be located in the same precentral motor region, and did not differ with respect to their locations and orientations. The somatosensory evoked fields following median nerve stimulation were used to validate these findings through comparisons of the location and orientation of composite sources with those specified in MRCFs. The sources for the earliest components were evoked in Brodmann's area 3b located lateral to the sources of MRCFs, and those for subsequent components in area 5 and the secondary somatosensory area were located posterior to and inferior to the sources of MRCFs, respectively. Another component peaking at a comparable latency with the area 3b source was identified in the precentral motor region where all sources of MRCFs were located. Conclusion These results suggest that the MRCF waveform reflects a series of responses originating in the precentral motor area. PMID:24363977

  2. On the functional organization and operational principles of the motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Capaday, Charles; Ethier, Christian; Van Vreeswijk, Carl; Darling, Warren G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on the functional organization and operational principles of the motor cortex (MCx), taken together, strongly support the notion that the MCx controls the muscle synergies subserving movements in an integrated manner. For example, during pointing the shoulder, elbow and wrist muscles appear to be controlled as a coupled functional system, rather than singly and separately. The recurrent pattern of intrinsic synaptic connections between motor cortical points is likely part of the explanation for this operational principle. So too is the reduplicated, non-contiguous and intermingled representation of muscles in the MCx. A key question addressed in this article is whether the selection of movement related muscle synergies is a dynamic process involving the moment to moment functional linking of a variety of motor cortical points, or rather the selection of fixed patterns embedded in the MCx circuitry. It will be suggested that both operational principles are probably involved. We also discuss the neural mechanisms by which cortical points may be dynamically linked to synthesize movement related muscle synergies. Separate corticospinal outputs sum linearly and lead to a blending of the movements evoked by activation of each point on its own. This operational principle may simplify the synthesis of motor commands. We will discuss two possible mechanisms that may explain linear summation of outputs. We have observed that the final posture of the arm when pointing to a given spatial location is relatively independent of its starting posture. From this observation and the recurrent nature of the MCx intrinsic connectivity we hypothesize that the basic mode of operation of the MCx is to associate spatial location to final arm posture. We explain how the recurrent network connectivity operates to generate the muscle activation patterns (synergies) required to move the arm and hold it in its final position. PMID:23616749

  3. Non-stationary discharge patterns in motor cortex under subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Santaniello, Sabato; Montgomery, Erwin B; Gale, John T; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) directly modulates the basal ganglia (BG), but how such stimulation impacts the cortex upstream is largely unknown. There is evidence of cortical activation in 6-hydroxydopamine (OHDA)-lesioned rodents and facilitation of motor evoked potentials in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, but the impact of the DBS settings on the cortical activity in normal vs. Parkinsonian conditions is still debated. We use point process models to analyze non-stationary activation patterns and inter-neuronal dependencies in the motor and sensory cortices of two non-human primates during STN DBS. These features are enhanced after treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which causes a consistent PD-like motor impairment, while high-frequency (HF) DBS (i.e., ≥100 Hz) strongly reduces the short-term patterns (period: 3-7 ms) both before and after MPTP treatment, and elicits a short-latency post-stimulus activation. Low-frequency DBS (i.e., ≤50 Hz), instead, has negligible effects on the non-stationary features. Finally, by using tools from the information theory [i.e., receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and information rate (IR)], we show that the predictive power of these models is dependent on the DBS settings, i.e., the probability of spiking of the cortical neurons (which is captured by the point process models) is significantly conditioned on the timely delivery of the DBS input. This dependency increases with the DBS frequency and is significantly larger for high- vs. low-frequency DBS. Overall, the selective suppression of non-stationary features and the increased modulation of the spike probability suggest that HF STN DBS enhances the neuronal activation in motor and sensory cortices, presumably because of reinforcement mechanisms, which perhaps involve the overlap between feedback antidromic and feed-forward orthodromic responses along the BG-thalamo-cortical loop.

  4. Reinforcement learning of targeted movement in a spiking neuronal model of motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Chadderdon, George L; Neymotin, Samuel A; Kerr, Cliff C; Lytton, William W

    2012-01-01

    Sensorimotor control has traditionally been considered from a control theory perspective, without relation to neurobiology. In contrast, here we utilized a spiking-neuron model of motor cortex and trained it to perform a simple movement task, which consisted of rotating a single-joint "forearm" to a target. Learning was based on a reinforcement mechanism analogous to that of the dopamine system. This provided a global reward or punishment signal in response to decreasing or increasing distance from hand to target, respectively. Output was partially driven by Poisson motor babbling, creating stochastic movements that could then be shaped by learning. The virtual forearm consisted of a single segment rotated around an elbow joint, controlled by flexor and extensor muscles. The model consisted of 144 excitatory and 64 inhibitory event-based neurons, each with AMPA, NMDA, and GABA synapses. Proprioceptive cell input to this model encoded the 2 muscle lengths. Plasticity was only enabled in feedforward connections between input and output excitatory units, using spike-timing-dependent eligibility traces for synaptic credit or blame assignment. Learning resulted from a global 3-valued signal: reward (+1), no learning (0), or punishment (-1), corresponding to phasic increases, lack of change, or phasic decreases of dopaminergic cell firing, respectively. Successful learning only occurred when both reward and punishment were enabled. In this case, 5 target angles were learned successfully within 180 s of simulation time, with a median error of 8 degrees. Motor babbling allowed exploratory learning, but decreased the stability of the learned behavior, since the hand continued moving after reaching the target. Our model demonstrated that a global reinforcement signal, coupled with eligibility traces for synaptic plasticity, can train a spiking sensorimotor network to perform goal-directed motor behavior.

  5. Mirror illusion reduces motor cortical inhibition in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during forceful unilateral muscle contractions.

    PubMed

    Zult, Tjerk; Goodall, Stuart; Thomas, Kevin; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-04-01

    Forceful, unilateral contractions modulate corticomotor paths targeting the resting, contralateral hand. However, it is unknown whether mirror-viewing of a slowly moving but forcefully contracting hand would additionally affect these paths. Here we examined corticospinal excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the right-ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy young adults under no-mirror and mirror conditions at rest and during right wrist flexion at 60% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During the no-mirror conditions neither hand was visible, whereas in the mirror conditions participants looked at the right hand's reflection in the mirror. Corticospinal excitability increased during contractions in the left flexor carpi radialis (FCR) (contraction 0.41 mV vs. rest 0.21 mV) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) (contraction 0.56 mV vs. rest 0.39 mV), but there was no mirror effect (FCR: P = 0.743, ηp (2) = 0.005; ECR: P = 0.712, ηp (2) = 0.005). However, mirror-viewing of the contracting and moving wrist attenuated SICI relative to test pulse in the left FCR by ∼9% compared with the other conditions (P < 0.05, d ≥ 0.62). Electromyographic activity in the resting left hand prior to stimulation was not affected by the mirror (FCR: P = 0.255, ηp (2) = 0.049; ECR: P = 0.343, ηp (2) = 0.035) but increased twofold during contractions. Thus viewing the moving hand in the mirror and not just the mirror image of the nonmoving hand seems to affect motor cortical inhibitory networks in the M1 associated with the mirror image. Future studies should determine whether the use of a mirror could increase interlimb transfer produced by cross-education, especially in patient groups with unilateral orthopedic and neurological conditions.

  6. Mirror illusion reduces motor cortical inhibition in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during forceful unilateral muscle contractions.

    PubMed

    Zult, Tjerk; Goodall, Stuart; Thomas, Kevin; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-04-01

    Forceful, unilateral contractions modulate corticomotor paths targeting the resting, contralateral hand. However, it is unknown whether mirror-viewing of a slowly moving but forcefully contracting hand would additionally affect these paths. Here we examined corticospinal excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the right-ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy young adults under no-mirror and mirror conditions at rest and during right wrist flexion at 60% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During the no-mirror conditions neither hand was visible, whereas in the mirror conditions participants looked at the right hand's reflection in the mirror. Corticospinal excitability increased during contractions in the left flexor carpi radialis (FCR) (contraction 0.41 mV vs. rest 0.21 mV) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) (contraction 0.56 mV vs. rest 0.39 mV), but there was no mirror effect (FCR: P = 0.743, ηp (2) = 0.005; ECR: P = 0.712, ηp (2) = 0.005). However, mirror-viewing of the contracting and moving wrist attenuated SICI relative to test pulse in the left FCR by ∼9% compared with the other conditions (P < 0.05, d ≥ 0.62). Electromyographic activity in the resting left hand prior to stimulation was not affected by the mirror (FCR: P = 0.255, ηp (2) = 0.049; ECR: P = 0.343, ηp (2) = 0.035) but increased twofold during contractions. Thus viewing the moving hand in the mirror and not just the mirror image of the nonmoving hand seems to affect motor cortical inhibitory networks in the M1 associated with the mirror image. Future studies should determine whether the use of a mirror could increase interlimb transfer produced by cross-education, especially in patient groups with unilateral orthopedic and neurological conditions. PMID:25632077

  7. Actions of compounds manipulating the nitric oxide system in the cat primary visual cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Cudeiro, J; Rivadulla, C; Rodríguez, R; Grieve, K L; Martínez-Conde, S; Acuña, C

    1997-01-01

    1. We iontophoretically applied NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOArg), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), to cells (n = 77) in area 17 of anaesthetized and paralysed cats while recording single-unit activity extracellularly. In twenty-nine out of seventy-seven cells (38%), compounds altering NO levels affected visual responses. 2. In twenty-five out of twenty-nine cells, L-NOArg non-selectively reduced visually elicited responses and spontaneous activity. These effects were reversed by co-application of L-arginine (L-Arg), which was without effect when applied alone. Application of the NO donor diethylamine-nitric oxide (DEA-NO) produced excitation in three out of eleven cells, all three cells showing suppression by L-NOArg. In ten cells the effect of the soluble analogue of cGMP, 8-bromo-cGMP, was tested. In three of those in which L-NOArg application reduced firing, 8-bromo-cGMP had an excitatory effect. In six out of fifteen cells tested, L-NOArg non-selectively reduced responses to NMDA and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxasole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). Again, co-application of L-Arg reversed this effect, without enhancing activity beyond control values. 3. In a further subpopulation of ten cells, L-NOArg decreased responses to ACh in five. 4. In four out of twenty-nine cells L-NOArg produced the opposite effect and increased visual responses. This was reversed by co-application of L-Arg. Some cells were also affected by 8-bromo-cGMP and DEA-NO in ways opposite to those described above. It is possible that the variety of effects seen here could also reflect trans-synaptic activation, or changes in local circuit activity. However, the most parsimonious explanation for our data is that NO differentially affects the activity of two populations of cortical cells, in the main causing a non-specific excitation. PMID:9365918

  8. Predicting hand orientation in reach-to-grasp tasks using neural activities from primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, Xuan; Huang, Hailong; He, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Hand orientation is an important control parameter during reach-to-grasp task. In this paper, we presented a study for predicting hand orientation of non-human primate by decoding neural activities from primary motor cortex (M1). A non-human primate subject was guided to do reaching and grasping tasks meanwhile neural activities were acquired by chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. A Support Vector Machines (SVMs) classifier has been trained for predicting three different hand orientations using these M1 neural activities. Different number of neurons were selected and analyzed; the classifying accuracy was 94.1% with 2 neurons and was 100% with 8 neurons. Data from highly event related neuron units contribute a lot to the accuracy of hand orientation prediction. These results indicate that three different hand orientations can be predicted accurately and effectively before the actual movements occurring with a small number of related neurons in M1.

  9. Neurophysiology. Decoding motor imagery from the posterior parietal cortex of a tetraplegic human.

    PubMed

    Aflalo, Tyson; Kellis, Spencer; Klaes, Christian; Lee, Brian; Shi, Ying; Pejsa, Kelsie; Shanfield, Kathleen; Hayes-Jackson, Stephanie; Aisen, Mindy; Heck, Christi; Liu, Charles; Andersen, Richard A

    2015-05-22

    Nonhuman primate and human studies have suggested that populations of neurons in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) may represent high-level aspects of action planning that can be used to control external devices as part of a brain-machine interface. However, there is no direct neuron-recording evidence that human PPC is involved in action planning, and the suitability of these signals for neuroprosthetic control has not been tested. We recorded neural population activity with arrays of microelectrodes implanted in the PPC of a tetraplegic subject. Motor imagery could be decoded from these neural populations, including imagined goals, trajectories, and types of movement. These findings indicate that the PPC of humans represents high-level, cognitive aspects of action and that the PPC can be a rich source for cognitive control signals for neural prosthetics that assist paralyzed patients.

  10. Laminar-specific distribution of zinc: evidence for presence of layer IV in forelimb motor cortex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Hackett, Mark J; Pickering, Ingrid J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2014-12-01

    The rat is the most widely studied pre-clinical model system of various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders affecting hand function. Although brain injury to the forelimb region of the motor cortex in rats mostly induces behavioral abnormalities in motor control of hand movements, behavioral deficits in the sensory-motor domain are also observed. This questions the prevailing view that cortical layer IV, a recipient of sensory information from the thalamus, is absent in rat motor cortex. Because zinc-containing neurons are generally not found in pathways that run from the thalamus, an absence of zinc (Zn) in a cortical layer would be suggestive of sensory input from the thalamus. To test this hypothesis, we used synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence imaging to measure Zn distribution across cortical layers. Zn maps revealed a heterogeneous layered Zn distribution in primary and secondary motor cortices of the forelimb region in the adult rat. Two wider bands with elevated Zn content were separated by a narrow band having reduced Zn content, and this was evident in two rat strains. The Zn distribution pattern was comparable to that in sensorimotor cortex, which is known to contain a well demarcated layer IV. Juxtaposition of Zn maps and the images of brain stained for Nissl bodies revealed a "Zn valley" in primary motor cortex, apparently starting at the ventral border of pyramidal layer III and ending at the close vicinity of layer V. This finding indicates the presence of a conspicuous cortical layer between layers III and V, i.e. layer IV, the presence of which previously has been disputed. The results have implications for the use of rat models to investigate human brain function and neuropathology, such as after stroke. The presence of layer IV in the forelimb region of the motor cortex suggests that therapeutic interventions used in rat models of motor cortex injury should target functional abnormalities in both motor and sensory domains. The finding

  11. Laminar-specific distribution of zinc: Evidence for presence of layer IV in forelimb motor cortex in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Hackett, Mark J.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Paterson, Phyllis G.

    2015-01-01

    The rat is the most widely studied pre-clinical model system of various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders affecting hand function. Although brain injury to the forelimb region of the motor cortex in rats mostly induces behavioral abnormalities in motor control of hand movements, behavioral deficits in the sensory-motor domain are also observed. This questions the prevailing view that cortical layer IV, a recipient of sensory information from the thalamus, is absent in rat motor cortex. Because zinc-containing neurons are generally not found in pathways that run from the thalamus, an absence of zinc (Zn) in a cortical layer would be suggestive of sensory input from the thalamus. To test this hypothesis, we used synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence imaging to measure Zn distribution across cortical layers. Zn maps revealed a heterogeneous layered Zn distribution in primary and secondary motor cortices of the forelimb region in the adult rat. Two wider bands with elevated Zn content were separated by a narrow band having reduced Zn content, and this was evident in two rat strains. The Zn distribution pattern was comparable to that in sensorimotor cortex, which is known to contain a well demarcated layer IV. Juxtaposition of Zn maps and the images of brain stained for Nissl bodies revealed a “Zn valley” in primary motor cortex, apparently starting at the ventral border of pyramidal layer III and ending at the close vicinity of layer V. This finding indicates the presence of a conspicuous cortical layer between layers III and V, i.e. layer IV, the presence of which previously has been disputed. The results have implications for the use of rat models to investigate human brain function and neuropathology, such as after stroke. The presence of layer IV in the forelimb region of the motor cortex suggests that therapeutic interventions used in rat models of motor cortex injury should target functional abnormalities in both motor and sensory domains. The

  12. [Morphometric study of motor cortex in acute focal epilepsy rat induced by coriaria lactone].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Z; Liao, D; Wu, L; Chen, S; Li, X; Ma, Y

    1994-09-01

    Twenty adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups (10 rats for LM, 10 rats for EM). The experimental rats were injected with convulsive dosage 3.8 microliters (19 micrograms) of coriaria lactone (CL) in the left cerebral motor cortex of the fore limb to induce acute focal epilepsy. The control rats were injected with normal saline of the same volume and at the same location. Motor cortex was cut coronally 2 hours after seizure and the layer V was studied morphometrically. Under x400 and x7000, take photos of focus, parafocus areas respectively for morphometric study. The number of neurons and neuroglias of layer V was counted in the LM photos. The number of presynaptic terminals of the neuropil was counted in the x7000 EM photos and the area fraction of each constitute in the neuropil was measured. The positive results demonstrated that the number of neurons and neuroglias in the focus and parafocus areas of the experimental animals was significantly lower than that in the control group, the side injected was lower than the other side and it was the lowest in the focus. The number and area fraction of the presynaptic terminals of the experimental rats at the focus neuropil decreased significantly, but the area fraction of neuroglial components increased significantly. The authors suggest that the convulsive dosage of CL may have toxic effect on some neurons and neuroglias and therefore to decrease the number of both types of cells and the number and area fraction of presynaptic terminals in the neuropil.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Coherent oscillations in monkey motor cortex and hand muscle EMG show task-dependent modulation.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S N; Olivier, E; Lemon, R N

    1997-01-01

    1. Recordings were made of local field potential (slow waves) and pyramidal tract neurone (PTN) discharge from pairs of sites separated by a horizontal distance of up to 1.5 mm in the primary motor cortex of two conscious macaque monkeys performing a precision grip task. 2. In both monkeys, the slow wave recordings showed bursts of oscillations in the 20-30 Hz range. Spectral analysis revealed that the oscillations were coherent between the two simultaneously recorded cortical sites. In the monkey from which most data were recorded, the mean frequency of peak coherence was 23.4 Hz. 3. Coherence in this frequency range was also seen between cortical slow wave recordings and rectified EMG of hand and forearm muscles active during the task, and between pairs of rectified EMGs. 4. The dynamics of the coherence were investigated by analysing short, quasi-stationary data segments aligned relative to task performance. This revealed that the 20-30 Hz coherent oscillations were present mainly during the hold phase of the precision grip task. 5. The spikes of identified PTNs were used to compile spike-triggered averages of the slow wave recordings. Oscillations were seen in 11/17 averages of the slow wave recorded on the same electrode as the triggering spike, and 11/17 averages of the slow wave recorded on the distant electrode. The mean period of these oscillations was 45.8 ms. 6. It is concluded that oscillations in the range 20-30 Hz are present in monkey motor cortex, are coherent between spatially separated cortical sites, and encompass the pyramidal tract output neurones. They are discernable in the EMG of active muscles, and show a consistent task-dependent modulation. Images Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9175005

  14. Sensorimotor restriction affects complex movement topography and reachable space in the rat motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Budri, Mirco; Lodi, Enrico; Franchi, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) studies with 500 ms of current pulses suggest that the forelimb area of the motor cortex is organized into several spatially distinct functional zones that organize movements into complex sequences. Here we studied how sensorimotor restriction modifies the extent of functional zones, complex movements, and reachable space representation in the rat forelimb M1. Sensorimotor restriction was achieved by means of whole-forelimb casting of 30 days duration. Long-duration ICMS was carried out 12 h and 14 days after cast removal. Evoked movements were measured using a high-resolution 3D optical system. Long-term cast caused: (i) a reduction in the number of sites where complex forelimb movement could be evoked; (ii) a shrinkage of functional zones but no change in their center of gravity; (iii) a reduction in movement with proximal/distal coactivation; (iv) a reduction in maximal velocity, trajectory and vector length of movement, but no changes in latency or duration; (v) a large restriction of reachable space. Fourteen days of forelimb freedom after casting caused: (i) a recovery of the number of sites where complex forelimb movement could be evoked; (ii) a recovery of functional zone extent and movement with proximal/distal coactivation; (iii) an increase in movement kinematics, but only partial restoration of control rat values; (iv) a slight increase in reachability parameters, but these remained far below baseline values. We pose the hypothesis that specific aspects of complex movement may be stored within parallel motor cortex re-entrant systems. PMID:25565987

  15. A combined TMS-EEG study of short-latency afferent inhibition in the motor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yoshihiro; Cash, Robin F H; Zomorrodi, Reza; Dominguez, Luis Garcia; Farzan, Faranak; Rajji, Tarek K; Barr, Mera S; Chen, Robert; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Blumberger, Daniel M

    2016-09-01

    Combined transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) enables noninvasive neurophysiological investigation of the human cortex. A TMS paradigm of short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) is characterized by attenuation of the motor-evoked potential (MEP) and modulation of N100 of the TMS-evoked potential (TEP) when TMS is delivered to motor cortex (M1) following median nerve stimulation. SAI is a marker of cholinergic activity in the motor cortex; however, the SAI has not been tested from the prefrontal cortex. We aimed to explore the effect of SAI in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). SAI was examined in 12 healthy subjects with median nerve stimulation and TMS delivered to M1 and DLPFC at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) relative to the individual N20 latency. SAI in M1 was tested at the optimal ISI of N20 + 2 ms. SAI in DLPFC was investigated at a range of ISI from N20 + 2 to N20 + 20 ms to explore its temporal profile. For SAI in M1, the attenuation of MEP amplitude was correlated with an increase of TEP N100 from the left central area. A similar spatiotemporal neural signature of SAI in DLPFC was observed with a marked increase of N100 amplitude. SAI in DLPFC was maximal at ISI N20 + 4 ms at the left frontal area. These findings establish the neural signature of SAI in DLPFC. Future studies could explore whether DLPFC-SAI is neurophysiological marker of cholinergic dysfunction in cognitive disorders.

  16. The Largest Response Component in the Motor Cortex Reflects Movement Timing but Not Movement Type

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Ryu, Stephen I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural activity in monkey motor cortex (M1) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) can reflect a chosen movement well before that movement begins. The pattern of neural activity then changes profoundly just before movement onset. We considered the prediction, derived from formal considerations, that the transition from preparation to movement might be accompanied by a large overall change in the neural state that reflects when movement is made rather than which movement is made. Specifically, we examined “components” of the population response: time-varying patterns of activity from which each neuron’s response is approximately composed. Amid the response complexity of individual M1 and PMd neurons, we identified robust response components that were “condition-invariant”: their magnitude and time course were nearly identical regardless of reach direction or path. These condition-invariant response components occupied dimensions orthogonal to those occupied by the “tuned” response components. The largest condition-invariant component was much larger than any of the tuned components; i.e., it explained more of the structure in individual-neuron responses. This condition-invariant response component underwent a rapid change before movement onset. The timing of that change predicted most of the trial-by-trial variance in reaction time. Thus, although individual M1 and PMd neurons essentially always reflected which movement was made, the largest component of the population response reflected movement timing rather than movement type. PMID:27761519

  17. Altered Modulation of Silent Period in Tongue Motor Cortex of Persistent Developmental Stuttering in Relation to Stuttering Severity

    PubMed Central

    Busan, Pierpaolo; Del Ben, Giovanni; Bernardini, Simona; Natarelli, Giulia; Bencich, Marco; Monti, Fabrizio; Manganotti, Paolo; Battaglini, Piero Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Motor balance in developmental stuttering (DS) was investigated with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), with the aim to define novel neural markers of persistent DS in adulthood. Eleven DS adult males were evaluated with TMS on tongue primary motor cortex, compared to 15 matched fluent speakers, in a “state” condition (i.e. stutterers vs. fluent speakers, no overt stuttering). Motor and silent period thresholds (SPT), recruitment curves, and silent period durations were acquired by recording tongue motor evoked potentials. Tongue silent period duration was increased in DS, especially in the left hemisphere (P<0.05; Hedge’s g or Cohen’s dunbiased = 1.054, i.e. large effect size), suggesting a “state” condition of higher intracortical inhibition in left motor cortex networks. Differences in motor thresholds (different excitatory/inhibitory ratios in DS) were evident, as well as significant differences in SPT. In fluent speakers, the left hemisphere may be marginally more excitable than the right one in motor thresholds at lower muscular activation, while active motor thresholds and SPT were higher in the left hemisphere of DS with respect to the right one, resulting also in a positive correlation with stuttering severity. Pre-TMS electromyography data gave overlapping evidence. Findings suggest the existence of a complex intracortical balance in DS tongue primary motor cortex, with a particular interplay between excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, also in neural substrates related to silent periods. Findings are discussed with respect to functional and structural impairments in stuttering, and are also proposed as novel neural markers of a stuttering “state” in persistent DS, helping to define more focused treatments (e.g. neuro-modulation). PMID:27711148

  18. Differential modulation of motor cortex excitability in BDNF Met allele carriers following experimentally induced and use-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, John; Hughes, James; Ridding, Michael; Thomas, Paul Q; Semmler, John G

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how healthy young subjects with one of three variants of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene modulate motor cortex excitability following experimentally induced and use-dependent plasticity interventions. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of 12 Val/Val, ten Val/Met and seven Met/Met genotypes (aged 18-39 years). Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left hemisphere was used to assess changes in FDI motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) following three separate interventions involving paired associative stimulation, a simple ballistic task and complex visuomotor tracking task using the index finger. Val/Val subjects increased FDI MEPs following all interventions (≥ 25%, P < 0.01), whereas the Met allele carriers only showed increased MEPs after the simple motor task (≥ 26%, P < 0.01). In contrast to the simple motor task, there was no significant change in MEPs for the Val/Met subjects (7%, P = 0.50) and a reduction in MEPs for the Met/Met group (-38%, P < 0.01) following the complex motor task. Despite these differences in use-dependent plasticity, the performance of both motor tasks was not different between BDNF genotypes. We conclude that modulation of motor cortex excitability is strongly influenced by the BDNF polymorphism, with the greatest differences observed for the complex motor task. We also found unique motor cortex plasticity in the rarest form of the BDNF polymorphism (Met/Met subjects), which may have implications for functional recovery after disease or injury to the nervous system in these individuals. PMID:22694150

  19. The Contribution of Primary Motor Cortex Is Essential for Probabilistic Implicit Sequence Learning: Evidence from Theta Burst Magnetic Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Leonora; Teo, James T.; Obeso, Ignacio; Rothwell, John C.; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2010-01-01

    Theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS) is considered to produce plastic changes in human motor cortex. Here, we examined the inhibitory and excitatory effects of TBS on implicit sequence learning using a probabilistic serial reaction time paradigm. We investigated the involvement of several cortical regions associated with implicit…

  20. Medullary raphe neurones and baroreceptor modulation of the respiratory motor pattern in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, B G; Arata, A; Morris, K F; Hernandez, Y M; Shannon, R

    1998-01-01

    Perturbations of arterial blood pressure change medullary raphe neurone activity and the respiratory motor pattern. This study sought evidence for actions of baroresponsive raphe neurones on the medullary respiratory network.Blood pressure was perturbed by intravenous injection of an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, unilateral pressure changes in the carotid sinus, or occlusion of the descending aorta in thirty-six Dial-urethane-anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed, artificially ventilated cats. Neurones were monitored with microelectrode arrays in two or three of the following domains: nucleus raphe obscurus-nucleus raphe pallidus, nucleus raphe magnus, and rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla. Data were analysed with cycle-triggered histograms, peristimulus time and cumulative sum histograms, cross-correlograms and spike-triggered averages of efferent phrenic nerve activity.Prolongation of the expiratory phase and decreased peak integrated phrenic amplitude were most frequently observed. Of 707 neurones studied, 310 had altered firing rates during stimulation; changes in opposite directions were monitored simultaneously in fifty-six of eighty-seven data sets with at least two baroresponsive neurones.Short time scale correlations were detected between neurones in 347 of 3388 pairs. Seventeen pairs of baroresponsive raphe neurones exhibited significant offset correlogram features indicative of paucisynaptic interactions. In correlated raphe-ventrolateral medullary neurone pairs with at least one baroresponsive neurone, six of seven ventrolateral medullary decrementing expiratory (E-Decr) neurones increased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation. Thirteen of fifteen ventrolateral medullary inspiratory neurones correlated with raphe cells decreased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation.The results support the hypothesis that raphe neuronal assemblies transform and transmit information from baroreceptors to neurones in the ventral

  1. Physiological types and histochemical profiles in motor units of the cat gastrocnemius

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R. E.; Levine, D. N.; Tsairis, P.; Zajac, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    1. A variety of physiological properties of single motor units have been studied in the gastrocnemius muscle (primarily in the medial head) of pentobarbitone-anaesthetized cats. Intracellular stimulation of individual motoneurones ensured functional isolation of the muscle units innervated by them. 2. A system for muscle unit classification was developed using a combination of two physiological properties. Almost all of the units studied could be classified into one of three major types, including two groups with relatively short twitch contraction times (types FF and FR, which were differentiable from one another on the basis of sensitivity to fatigue) and one group with relatively long contraction times (type S, which were extremely resistant to fatigue and were differentiable from FF and FR units on the basis of the shape of unfused tetani). Post-tetanic potentiation of twitch responses was observed in all three muscle unit types. The distributions of axonal conduction velocities for motoneurones innervating FF and FR muscle units were essentially the same, while conduction velocities for motoneurones innervating type S units were, in general, slower. 3. Histochemical profiles of muscle units representative of each of the physiological classes present in the gastrocnemius pool were determined using a method of glycogen depletion for muscle unit identification. Each of the physiological categories of muscle units exhibited a corresponding unique set of muscle fibre staining reactions, or histochemical profile. Within each physiological type, all of the units examined had the same histochemical profile. The results generally support the hypothesis that the histochemical characteristics of muscle fibres are meaningfully related to the physiological properties of the same fibres. However, certain limitations in the detailed application of the hypothesis were also apparent. 4. Systematic assessment of the histochemical profiles of relatively large numbers of fibres

  2. Distinctive patterns of static and dynamic gamma motor activity during locomotion in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Ellaway, P H; Durbaba, R; Rawlinson, S

    2000-12-15

    Simultaneous recordings were made from gamma (gamma) motor axons and from muscle spindle afferents of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle during locomotion in decerebrate cats. The gamma-neurons were identified as static or dynamic (gammas or gammad) by correlating their behaviour during midbrain stimulation with changes in muscle spindle afferent responses to muscle stretch. On the basis of their behaviour during locomotion, gammas neurons could be divided into two groups. One group (type-1) showed strongly and smoothly modulated discharge increasing in parallel with the active muscle shortening in ankle extension, but with phase advance. The other group (type-2) also showed a modulated pattern, but with increased firing centred on the flexion phase. The proportions of the two were 13 type-1 and 7 type-2. The type-1 firing pattern accurately predicted the difference in firing frequency for secondary afferents obtained by subtracting from the recordings made during active movements the response of the same units to the movements repeated passively in the absence of fusimotor activity. The type-2 pattern also became consistent with the difference signal, when operated on by a phase lag appropriate to the effects of bag2 intrafusal fibres. These results suggest that there may be some degree of separate control of chain and bag2 intrafusal fibres. The discharge of gammad axons was also found to fluctuate with the locomotor cycle, with a pattern very distinct from that of the gammas records. The gammad firing frequency rose very suddenly from zero to a maximum at the onset of muscle shortening and continued into the beginning of lengthening. The term 'interrupted' discharge is suggested as a useful description. The timing of this discharge was shown to be appropriate for sensitising the primary afferents to detect the onset of stretch.

  3. Costs of control: decreased motor cortex engagement during a Go/NoGo task in Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomalla, Götz; Jonas, Melanie; Bäumer, Tobias; Siebner, Hartwig R; Biermann-Ruben, Katja; Ganos, Christos; Orth, Michael; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Gerloff, Christian; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten; Schnitzler, Alfons; Münchau, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by an impaired ability to inhibit unwanted behaviour. Although the presence of chronic motor and vocal tics defines Tourette's syndrome, other distinctive behavioural features like echo- and coprophenomena, and non-obscene socially inappropriate behaviour are also core features. We investigated neuronal activation during stimulus-driven execution and inhibition of prepared movements in Tourette's syndrome. To this end, we performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and structural diffusion tensor imaging in 15 moderately affected uncomplicated patients with 'pure' Tourette's syndrome and 15 healthy control participants matched for age and gender. Subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a Go/NoGo reaction time task. They had to withhold a prepared finger movement for a variable time until a stimulus instructed them to either execute (Go) or inhibit it (NoGo). Tics were monitored throughout the experiments, combining surface electromyogram, video recording, and clinical assessment in the scanner. Patients with Tourette's syndrome had longer reaction times than healthy controls in Go trials and made more errors in total. Their functional brain activation was decreased in left primary motor cortex and secondary motor areas during movement execution (Go trials) but not during response inhibition (NoGo trials) compared with healthy control subjects. Volume of interest analysis demonstrated less task-related activation in patients with Tourette's syndrome in primary and secondary motor cortex bilaterally, but not in the basal ganglia and cortical non-motor areas. They showed reduced co-activation between the left primary sensory-motor hand area and a network of contralateral sensory-motor areas and ipsilateral cerebellar regions. There were no between-group differences in structural connectivity of the left primary sensory-motor cortex as measured by

  4. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies. PMID:27547727

  5. Motor cortex single-neuron and population contributions to compensation for multiple dynamic force fields.

    PubMed

    Addou, Touria; Krouchev, Nedialko I; Kalaska, John F

    2015-01-15

    To elucidate how primary motor cortex (M1) neurons contribute to the performance of a broad range of different and even incompatible motor skills, we trained two monkeys to perform single-degree-of-freedom elbow flexion/extension movements that could be perturbed by a variety of externally generated force fields. Fields were presented in a pseudorandom sequence of trial blocks. Different computer monitor background colors signaled the nature of the force field throughout each block. There were five different force fields: null field without perturbing torque, assistive and resistive viscous fields proportional to velocity, a resistive elastic force field proportional to position and a resistive viscoelastic field that was the linear combination of the resistive viscous and elastic force fields. After the monkeys were extensively trained in the five field conditions, neural recordings were subsequently made in M1 contralateral to the trained arm. Many caudal M1 neurons altered their activity systematically across most or all of the force fields in a manner that was appropriate to contribute to the compensation for each of the fields. The net activity of the entire sample population likewise provided a predictive signal about the differences in the time course of the external forces encountered during the movements across all force conditions. The neurons showed a broad range of sensitivities to the different fields, and there was little evidence of a modular structure by which subsets of M1 neurons were preferentially activated during movements in specific fields or combinations of fields.

  6. Fast and Slow Oscillations in Human Primary Motor Cortex Predict Oncoming Behaviorally Relevant Cues

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maryam; Reimer, Jacob; Penn, Richard; Ojakangas, Catherine L.; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Beta oscillations (12-30Hz) in local field potentials are prevalent in the motor system, yet their functional role within the context of planning a movement is still debated. In this study, a human participant implanted with a multi-electrode array in the hand area of primary motor cortex (MI) was instructed to plan a movement using either the second or fourth of five sequentially presented instruction cues. The beta amplitude increased from the start of the trial until the informative (second or fourth) cue, and was diminished afterwards. Moreover, the beta amplitude peaked just prior to each instruction cue and the delta frequency (0.5-1.5Hz) entrained to the interval between the cues - but only until the informative cue. This result suggests that the beta amplitude and delta phase in MI reflect the subject’s engagement with the rhythmically-presented cues and work together to enhance sensitivity to predictable and task-relevant visual cues. PMID:20188651

  7. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of primary motor cortex activity produced by ventral tegmental area stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kunori, Nobuo; Kajiwara, Riichi; Takashima, Ichiro

    2014-06-25

    The primary motor cortex (M1) receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) through the mesocortical dopamine pathway. However, few studies have focused on changes in M1 neuronal activity caused by VTA activation. To address this issue, we used voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD) to reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of M1 activity induced by single-pulse stimulation of VTA in anesthetized rats. VSD imaging showed that brief electrical stimulation of unilateral VTA elicited a short-latency excitatory-inhibitory sequence of neuronal activity not only in the ipsilateral but also in the contralateral M1. The contralateral M1 response was not affected by pharmacological blockade of ipsilateral M1 activity, but it was completely abolished by corpus callosum transection. Although the VTA-evoked neuronal activity extended throughout the entire M1, we found the most prominent activity in the forelimb area of M1. The 6-OHDA-lesioned VTA failed to evoke M1 activity. Furthermore, both excitatory and inhibitory intact VTA-induced activity was entirely extinguished by blocking glutamate receptors in the target M1. When intracortical microstimulation of M1 was paired with VTA stimulation, the evoked forelimb muscle activity was facilitated or inhibited, depending on the interval between the two stimuli. These findings suggest that VTA neurons directly modulate the excitability of M1 neurons via fast glutamate signaling and, consequently, may control the last cortical stage of motor command processing. PMID:24966388

  8. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation suppresses specific excitatory circuits in the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, V; Pilato, F; Dileone, M; Profice, P; Oliviero, A; Mazzone, P; Insola, A; Ranieri, F; Tonali, P A; Rothwell, J C

    2008-09-15

    Previous studies have shown that low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) suppresses motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) evoked by single pulse TMS. The aim of the present paper was to investigate the central nervous system level at which rTMS produces a suppression of MEP amplitude. We recorded corticospinal volleys evoked by single pulse TMS of the motor cortex before and after 1 Hz rTMS in five conscious subjects who had an electrode implanted in the cervical epidural space for the control of pain. One of the patients had Parkinson's disease and was studied on medication. Repetitive TMS significantly suppressed the amplitude of later I-waves, and reduced the amplitude of concomitantly recorded MEPs. The earliest I-wave was not significantly modified by rTMS. The present results show that 1 Hz rTMS may decrease the amplitude of later descending waves, consistent with a cortical origin of the effect of 1 Hz rTMS on MEPs. PMID:18653655

  9. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies.

  10. Vacillation, indecision and hesitation in moment-by-moment decoding of monkey motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Matthew T; Churchland, Mark M; Ryu, Stephen I; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2015-01-01

    When choosing actions, we can act decisively, vacillate, or suffer momentary indecision. Studying how individual decisions unfold requires moment-by-moment readouts of brain state. Here we provide such a view from dorsal premotor and primary motor cortex. Two monkeys performed a novel decision task while we recorded from many neurons simultaneously. We found that a decoder trained using ‘forced choices’ (one target viable) was highly reliable when applied to ‘free choices’. However, during free choices internal events formed three categories. Typically, neural activity was consistent with rapid, unwavering choices. Sometimes, though, we observed presumed ‘changes of mind’: the neural state initially reflected one choice before changing to reflect the final choice. Finally, we observed momentary ‘indecision’: delay forming any clear motor plan. Further, moments of neural indecision accompanied moments of behavioral indecision. Together, these results reveal the rich and diverse set of internal events long suspected to occur during free choice. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04677.001 PMID:25942352

  11. Assistive technology and robotic control using motor cortex ensemble-based neural interface systems in humans with tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, John P; Nurmikko, Arto; Black, Michael; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the rationale, early stage development, and initial human application of neural interface systems (NISs) for humans with paralysis. NISs are emerging medical devices designed to allow persons with paralysis to operate assistive technologies or to reanimate muscles based upon a command signal that is obtained directly from the brain. Such systems require the development of sensors to detect brain signals, decoders to transform neural activity signals into a useful command, and an interface for the user. We review initial pilot trial results of an NIS that is based on an intracortical microelectrode sensor that derives control signals from the motor cortex. We review recent findings showing, first, that neurons engaged by movement intentions persist in motor cortex years after injury or disease to the motor system, and second, that signals derived from motor cortex can be used by persons with paralysis to operate a range of devices. We suggest that, with further development, this form of NIS holds promise as a useful new neurotechnology for those with limited motor function or communication. We also discuss the additional potential for neural sensors to be used in the diagnosis and management of various neurological conditions and as a new way to learn about human brain function. PMID:17272345

  12. Primary motor cortex activity reduction under the regulation of SMA by real-time fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jia; Zhao, Xiaojie; Li, Yi; Yao, Li; Chen, Kewei

    2012-03-01

    Real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) is a new technology which allows human subjects to observe and control their own BOLD signal change from one or more localized brain regions during scanning. Current rtfMRI-neurofeedback studies mainly focused on the target region itself without considering other related regions influenced by the real-time feedback. However, there always exits important directional influence between many of cooperative regions. On the other hand, rtfMRI based on motor imagery mainly aimed at somatomotor cortex or primary motor area, whereas supplement motor area (SMA) was a relatively more integrated and pivotal region. In this study, we investigated whether the activities of SMA can be controlled utilizing different motor imagery strategies, and whether there exists any possible impact on an unregulated but related region, primary motor cortex (M1). SMA was first localized using overt finger tapping task, the activities of SMA were feedback to subjects visually on line during each of two subsequent imagery motor movement sessions. All thirteen healthy participants were found to be able to successfully control their SMA activities by self-fit imagery strategies which involved no actual motor movements. The activation of right M1 was also found to be significantly reduced in both intensity and extent with the neurofeedback process targeted at SMA, suggestive that not only the part of motor cortex activities were influenced under the regulation of a key region SMA, but also the increased difference between SMA and M1 might reflect the potential learning effect.

  13. Motor cortex involvement during choice reaction time: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study in man.

    PubMed

    Romaiguère, P; Possamaï, C A; Hasbroucq, T

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation can delay simple reaction time; this happens when the stimulation is delivered during the reaction time and over the cortical area which commands the prime mover of the required response. Although it is agreed that magnetic stimulation could be a useful tool for studying information processing in man, we argue that, because of the use of simple reaction time, the results reported so far are difficult to interpret within this theoretical framework. In the present paper, three experiments are reported. Six subjects participated in experiment 1 in which magnetic stimulation was delivered, at different times, during choice reaction time. The effects of the magnetic stimulation of the cortical area involved in the response (induced current passing forward over the motor representation of the responding hand), were compared to the effects of an electrical stimulation of the median nerve (H-reflex). In a first control experiment (experiment 2a; 5 subjects), the coil was placed over the ipsilateral motor cortex (induced current passing backward over the motor representation of the non-responding hand) thus minimizing the probability to excite the same neural nets as in the first experiment. In a second control experiment (experiment 2b; 4 subjects), the coil was placed a few centimeters away from the subject's scalp thus ensuring no stimulation of any neural nets. The results show that: (1) the noise and the smarting of the skin associated with the coil discharge produce an intersensory facilitation thereby shortening reaction time (experiment 2a), (2) actually, the noise produced by the stimulation is sufficient to produce such a facilitatory effect (experiment 2b), (3) a stimulation over the area at the origin of the motor command causes a reaction time delay which counteracts this intersensory facilitation effect (experiment 1), (4) in this latter case, the closer the stimulation to the actual overt response, the

  14. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Motor Cortex Biases Action Choice in a Perceptual Decision Task.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Beyko, Angeliki; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-11-01

    One of the multiple interacting systems involved in the selection and execution of voluntary actions is the primary motor cortex (PMC). We aimed to investigate whether the transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of this area can modulate hand choice. A perceptual decision-making task was administered. Participants were asked to classify rectangles with different height-to-width ratios into horizontal and vertical rectangles using their right and left index fingers while their PMC was stimulated either bilaterally or unilaterally. Two experiments were conducted with different stimulation conditions: the first experiment (n = 12) had only one stimulation condition (bilateral stimulation), and the second experiment (n = 45) had three stimulation conditions (bilateral, anodal unilateral, and cathodal unilateral stimulations). The second experiment was designed to confirm the results of the first experiment and to further investigate the effects of anodal and cathodal stimulations alone in the observed effects. Each participant took part in two sessions. The laterality of stimulation was reversed over the two sessions. Our results showed that anodal stimulation of the PMC biases participants' responses toward using the contralateral hand whereas cathodal stimulation biases responses toward the ipsilateral hand. Brain stimulation also modulated the RT of the left hand in all stimulation conditions: Responses were faster when the response bias was in favor of the left hand and slower when the response bias was against it. We propose two possible explanations for these findings: the perceptual bias account (bottom-up effects of stimulation on perception) and the motor-choice bias account (top-down modulation of the decision-making system by facilitation of response in one hand over the other). We conclude that motor responses and the choice of hand can be modulated using tDCS. PMID:26151605

  15. Olivocerebellar modulation of motor cortex ability to generate vibrissal movements in rat.

    PubMed

    Lang, Eric J; Sugihara, Izumi; Llinás, Rodolfo

    2006-02-15

    The vibrissal movements known as whisking are generated in a pulsatile, or non-continuous, fashion and comprise sequences of brief regularly spaced movements. These rhythmic timing sequences imply the existence of periodically issued motor commands. As inferior olivary (IO) neurones generate periodic synchronous discharges that could provide the underlying timing signal, this possibility was tested by determining whether the olivocerebellar system modulates motor cortex (MCtx)-triggered whisker movements in rats. Trains of current pulses were applied to MCtx, and the resulting whisker movements were recorded using a high speed video camera. The evoked movement patterns demonstrated properties consistent with the existence of an oscillatory motor driving rhythm. In particular, movement amplitude showed a bell-shaped dependence on stimulus frequency, with a peak at 11.5+/-2.3 Hz. Moreover, movement trajectories showed harmonic and subharmonic entrainment patterns within specific stimulus frequency ranges. By contrast, movements evoked by facial nerve stimulation showed no such frequency-dependent properties. To test whether the IO was the oscillator in question, IO neuronal properties were modified in vivo by intra-IO picrotoxin injection, which enhances synchronous oscillatory IO activity and reduces its natural frequency. The ensuing changes in the evoked whisker patterns were consistent with these pharmacological effects. Furthermore, in cerebellectomized rats, oscillatory modulation of MCtx-evoked movements was greatly reduced, and intra-IO picrotoxin injections did not affect the evoked movement patterns. Additionally, multielectrode recording of Purkinje cell complex spikes showed a temporal correlation of olivocerebellar activity during MCtx stimulus trains to evoked movement patterns. In sum, the results indicate that MCtx's ability to generate movements is modulated by an oscillatory signal arising in the olivocerebellar system. PMID:16357010

  16. Local field potentials in primate motor cortex encode grasp kinetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Milekovic, Tomislav; Truccolo, Wilson; Grün, Sonja; Riehle, Alexa; Brochier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Reach and grasp kinematics are known to be encoded in the spiking activity of neuronal ensembles and in local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from primate motor cortex during movement planning and execution. However, little is known, especially in LFPs, about the encoding of kinetic parameters, such as forces exerted on the object during the same actions. We implanted two monkeys with microelectrode arrays in the motor cortical areas MI and PMd to investigate encoding of grasp-related parameters in motor cortical LFPs during planning and execution of reach-and-grasp movements. We identified three components of the LFP that modulated during grasps corresponding to low (0.3 - 7Hz), intermediate (∼10 - ∼40Hz) and high (∼80 - 250Hz) frequency bands. We show that all three components can be used to classify not only grip types but also object loads during planning and execution of a grasping movement. In addition, we demonstrate that all three components recorded during planning or execution can be used to continuously decode finger pressure forces and hand position related to the grasping movement. Low and high frequency components provide similar classification and decoding accuracies, which were substantially higher than those obtained from the intermediate frequency component. Our results demonstrate that intended reach and grasp kinetic parameters are encoded in multiple LFP bands during both movement planning and execution. These findings also suggest that the LFP is a reliable signal for the control of parameters related to object load and applied pressure forces in brain-machine interfaces. PMID:25869861

  17. Optogenetically induced spatiotemporal gamma oscillations and neuronal spiking activity in primate motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Truccolo, Wilson; Wagner, Fabien B; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E; Ozden, Ilker; Zimmermann, Jonas B; May, Travis; Agha, Naubahar S; Wang, Jing; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2015-06-01

    Transient gamma-band (40-80 Hz) spatiotemporal patterns are hypothesized to play important roles in cortical function. Here we report the direct observation of gamma oscillations as spatiotemporal waves induced by targeted optogenetic stimulation, recorded by intracortical multichannel extracellular techniques in macaque monkeys during their awake resting states. Microelectrode arrays integrating an optical fiber at their center were chronically implanted in primary motor (M1) and ventral premotor (PMv) cortices of two subjects. Targeted brain tissue was transduced with the red-shifted opsin C1V1(T/T). Constant (1-s square pulses) and ramp stimulation induced narrowband gamma oscillations during awake resting states. Recordings across 95 microelectrodes (4 × 4-mm array) enabled us to track the transient gamma spatiotemporal patterns manifested, e.g., as concentric expanding and spiral waves. Gamma oscillations were induced well beyond the light stimulation volume, via network interactions at distal electrode sites, depending on optical power. Despite stimulation-related modulation in spiking rates, neuronal spiking remained highly asynchronous during induced gamma oscillations. In one subject we examined stimulation effects during preparation and execution of a motor task and observed that movement execution largely attenuated optically induced gamma oscillations. Our findings demonstrate that, beyond previously reported induced gamma activity under periodic drive, a prolonged constant stimulus above a certain threshold may carry primate motor cortex network dynamics into gamma oscillations, likely via a Hopf bifurcation. More broadly, the experimental capability in combining microelectrode array recordings and optogenetic stimulation provides an important approach for probing spatiotemporal dynamics in primate cortical networks during various physiological and behavioral conditions. PMID:25761956

  18. Excitability of the Motor Cortex in De Novo Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Giovanni; Lanza, Giuseppe; Giuffrida, Salvatore; Vinciguerra, Luisa; Puglisi, Valentina; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Pennisi, Manuela; D'Agate, Carmela Cinzia; Naso, Pietro; Aprile, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Ferri, Raffaele; Bella, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) may initially present as a neurological disorder or may be complicated by neurological changes. To date, neurophysiological studies aiming to an objective evaluation of the potential central nervous system involvement in CD are lacking. Objective To assess the profile of cortical excitability to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in a group of de novo CD patients. Materials and methods Twenty CD patients underwent a screening for cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms by means of the Mini Mental State Examination and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, respectively. Instrumental exams, including electroencephalography and brain computed tomography, were also performed. Cortico-spinal excitability was assessed by means of single and paired-pulse TMS using the first dorsal interosseus muscle of the dominant hand. TMS measures consisted of resting motor threshold, motor evoked potentials, cortical silent period (CSP), intracortical inhibition (ICI) and facilitation (ICF). None of the CD was on gluten-free diet. A group of 20 age-matched healthy controls was used for comparisons. Results CD showed a significantly shorter CSP (78.0 vs 125.0 ms, p<0.025), a reduced ICI (0.3 vs 0.2, p<0.045) and an enhanced ICF (1.1 vs 0.7, p<0.042) compared to controls. A dysthymic disorder was identified in five patients. The effect size between dysthymic and non-dysthymic CD patients indicated a low probability of interference with the CSP (Cohen's d -0.414), ICI (-0.278) and ICF (-0.292) measurements. Conclusion A pattern of cortical excitability characterized by “disinhibition” and “hyperfacilitation” was found in CD patients. Immune system dysregulation might play a central role in triggering changes of the motor cortex excitability. PMID:25062250

  19. Disrupting prefrontal cortex prevents performance gains from sensory-motor training.

    PubMed

    Filmer, Hannah L; Mattingley, Jason B; Marois, René; Dux, Paul E

    2013-11-20

    Humans show large and reliable performance impairments when required to make more than one simple decision simultaneously. Such multitasking costs are thought to largely reflect capacity limits in response selection (Welford, 1952; Pashler, 1984, 1994), the information processing stage at which sensory input is mapped to a motor response. Neuroimaging has implicated the left posterior lateral prefrontal cortex (pLPFC) as a key neural substrate of response selection (Dux et al., 2006, 2009; Ivanoff et al., 2009). For example, activity in left pLPFC tracks improvements in response selection efficiency typically observed following training (Dux et al., 2009). To date, however, there has been no causal evidence that pLPFC contributes directly to sensory-motor training effects, or the operations through which training occurs. Moreover, the left hemisphere lateralization of this operation remains controversial (Jiang and Kanwisher, 2003; Sigman and Dehaene, 2008; Verbruggen et al., 2010). We used anodal (excitatory), cathodal (inhibitory), and sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to left and right pLPFC and measured participants' performance on high and low response selection load tasks after different amounts of training. Both anodal and cathodal stimulation of the left pLPFC disrupted training effects for the high load condition relative to sham. No disruption was found for the low load and right pLPFC stimulation conditions. The findings implicate the left pLPFC in both response selection and training effects. They also suggest that training improves response selection efficiency by fine-tuning activity in pLPFC relating to sensory-motor translations.

  20. Optogenetically induced spatiotemporal gamma oscillations and neuronal spiking activity in primate motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Truccolo, Wilson; Wagner, Fabien B.; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E.; Ozden, Ilker; Zimmermann, Jonas B.; May, Travis; Agha, Naubahar S.; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Transient gamma-band (40–80 Hz) spatiotemporal patterns are hypothesized to play important roles in cortical function. Here we report the direct observation of gamma oscillations as spatiotemporal waves induced by targeted optogenetic stimulation, recorded by intracortical multichannel extracellular techniques in macaque monkeys during their awake resting states. Microelectrode arrays integrating an optical fiber at their center were chronically implanted in primary motor (M1) and ventral premotor (PMv) cortices of two subjects. Targeted brain tissue was transduced with the red-shifted opsin C1V1(T/T). Constant (1-s square pulses) and ramp stimulation induced narrowband gamma oscillations during awake resting states. Recordings across 95 microelectrodes (4 × 4-mm array) enabled us to track the transient gamma spatiotemporal patterns manifested, e.g., as concentric expanding and spiral waves. Gamma oscillations were induced well beyond the light stimulation volume, via network interactions at distal electrode sites, depending on optical power. Despite stimulation-related modulation in spiking rates, neuronal spiking remained highly asynchronous during induced gamma oscillations. In one subject we examined stimulation effects during preparation and execution of a motor task and observed that movement execution largely attenuated optically induced gamma oscillations. Our findings demonstrate that, beyond previously reported induced gamma activity under periodic drive, a prolonged constant stimulus above a certain threshold may carry primate motor cortex network dynamics into gamma oscillations, likely via a Hopf bifurcation. More broadly, the experimental capability in combining microelectrode array recordings and optogenetic stimulation provides an important approach for probing spatiotemporal dynamics in primate cortical networks during various physiological and behavioral conditions. PMID:25761956

  1. Bilateral tDCS on Primary Motor Cortex: Effects on Fast Arm Reaching Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Pablo; Corral-Bergantiños, Yoanna; Robles-García, Verónica; Madrid, Antonio; Oliviero, Antonio; Cudeiro, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects produced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the motor system have been widely studied in the past, chiefly focused on primary motor cortex (M1) excitability. However, the effects on functional tasks are less well documented. Objective This study aims to evaluate the effect of tDCS-M1 on goal-oriented actions (i.e., arm-reaching movements; ARM), in a reaction-time protocol. Methods 13 healthy subjects executed dominant ARM as fast as possible to one of two targets in front of them while surface EMG was recorded. Participants performed three different sessions. In each session they first executed ARM (Pre), then received tDCS, and finally executed Post, similar to Pre. Subjects received three different types of tDCS, one per session: In one session the anode was on right-M1 (AR), and the cathode on the left-M1 (CL), thus termed AR-CL; AL-CR reversed the montage; and Sham session was applied likewise. Real stimulation was 1mA-10min while subjects at rest. Three different variables and their coefficients of variation (CV) were analyzed: Premotor times (PMT), reaction-times (RT) and movement-times (MT). Results triceps-PMT were significantly increased at Post-Sham, suggesting fatigue. Results obtained with real tDCS were not different depending on the montage used, in both cases PMT were significantly reduced in all recorded muscles. RT and MT did not change for real or sham stimulation. RT-CV and PMT-CV were reduced after all stimulation protocols. Conclusion tDCS reduces premotor time and fatigability during the execution of fast motor tasks. Possible underlying mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27490752

  2. Electrical stimulation of motor cortex in the uninjured hemisphere after chronic unilateral injury promotes recovery of skilled locomotion through ipsilateral control.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Jason B; Kimura, Hiroki; Martin, John H

    2014-01-01

    Partial injury to the corticospinal tract (CST) causes sprouting of intact axons at their targets, and this sprouting correlates with functional improvement. Electrical stimulation of motor cortex augments sprouting of intact CST axons and promotes functional recovery when applied soon after injury. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation of motor cortex in the intact hemisphere after chronic lesion of the CST in the other hemisphere would restore function through ipsilateral control. To test motor skill, rats were trained and tested to walk on a horizontal ladder with irregularly spaced rungs. Eight weeks after injury, produced by pyramidal tract transection, half of the rats received forelimb motor cortex stimulation of the intact hemisphere. Rats with injury and stimulation had significantly improved forelimb control compared with rats with injury alone and achieved a level of proficiency similar to uninjured rats. To test whether recovery of forelimb function was attributable to ipsilateral control, we selectively inactivated the stimulated motor cortex using the GABA agonist muscimol. The dose of muscimol we used produces strong contralateral but no ipsilateral impairments in naive rats. In rats with injury and stimulation, but not those with injury alone, inactivation caused worsening of forelimb function; the initial deficit was reinstated. These results demonstrate that electrical stimulation can promote recovery of motor function when applied late after injury and that motor control can be exerted from the ipsilateral motor cortex. These results suggest that the uninjured motor cortex could be targeted for brain stimulation in people with large unilateral CST lesions. PMID:24403146

  3. Age-related changes in soma size of neurons in the spinal cord motor column of the cat.

    PubMed

    Liu, R H; Bertolotto, C; Engelhardt, J K; Chase, M H

    1996-06-28

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of the aging process on the soma size and number of motoneurons and interneurons in the motor column of the spinal cord of old cats. Neurons in the motor column were divided into small and large populations based on a bimodal distribution of their soma cross-sectional areas. A 17% decrease in the cross-sectional area of small neurons was observed, this decrease was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The cross-sectional area of large neurons decreased by only 6%, which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the number of large, small or of these combined population of ventral horn neurons in the aged cats compared with the control animals. This data suggest that neurons in the motor column are not uniformly affected by the aging process because morphological changes are proportionally greater in small neurons than in large neurons. PMID:8817566

  4. Motoneuron properties during motor inhibition produced by microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation of the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Morales, F R; Engelhardt, J K; Soja, P J; Pereda, A E; Chase, M H

    1987-04-01

    It is well established that cholinergic agonists, when injected into the pontine reticular formation in cats, produce a generalized suppression of motor activity (1, 3, 6, 14, 18, 27, 33, 50). The responsible neuronal mechanisms were explored by measuring ventral root activity, the amplitude of the Ia-monosynaptic reflex, and the basic electrophysiological properties of hindlimb motoneurons before and after carbachol was microinjected into the pontine reticular formation of decerebrate cats. Intrapontine microinjections of carbachol (0.25-1.0 microliter, 16 mg/ml) resulted in the tonic suppression of ventral root activity and a decrease in the amplitude of the Ia-monosynaptic reflex. An analysis of intracellular records from lumbar motoneurons during the suppression of motor activity induced by carbachol revealed a considerable decrease in input resistance and membrane time constant as well as a reduction in motoneuron excitability, as evidenced by a nearly twofold increase in rheobase. Discrete inhibitory postsynaptic potentials were also observed following carbachol administration. The changes in motoneuron properties (rheobase, input resistance, and membrane time constant), as well as the development of discrete inhibitory postsynaptic potentials, indicate that spinal cord motoneurons were postsynaptically inhibited following the pontine administration of carbachol. In addition, the inhibitory processes that arose after carbachol administration in the decerebrate cat were remarkably similar to those that are present during active sleep in the chronic cat. These findings suggest that the microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation activates the same brain stem-spinal cord system that is responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of alpha-motoneurons that occurs during active sleep. PMID:3585456

  5. A quantitative comparison of the hemispheric, areal, and laminar origins of sensory and motor cortical projections to the superior colliculus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Butler, Blake E; Chabot, Nicole; Lomber, Stephen G

    2016-09-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain structure central to orienting behaviors. The organization of descending projections from sensory cortices to the SC has garnered much attention; however, rarely have projections from multiple modalities been quantified and contrasted, allowing for meaningful conclusions within a single species. Here, we examine corticotectal projections from visual, auditory, somatosensory, motor, and limbic cortices via retrograde pathway tracers injected throughout the superficial and deep layers of the cat SC. As anticipated, the majority of cortical inputs to the SC originate in the visual cortex. In fact, each field implicated in visual orienting behavior makes a substantial projection. Conversely, only one area of the auditory orienting system, the auditory field of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (fAES), and no area involved in somatosensory orienting, shows significant corticotectal inputs. Although small relative to visual inputs, the projection from the fAES is of particular interest, as it represents the only bilateral cortical input to the SC. This detailed, quantitative study allows for comparison across modalities in an animal that serves as a useful model for both auditory and visual perception. Moreover, the differences in patterns of corticotectal projections between modalities inform the ways in which orienting systems are modulated by cortical feedback. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2623-2642, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A quantitative comparison of the hemispheric, areal, and laminar origins of sensory and motor cortical projections to the superior colliculus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Butler, Blake E; Chabot, Nicole; Lomber, Stephen G

    2016-09-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain structure central to orienting behaviors. The organization of descending projections from sensory cortices to the SC has garnered much attention; however, rarely have projections from multiple modalities been quantified and contrasted, allowing for meaningful conclusions within a single species. Here, we examine corticotectal projections from visual, auditory, somatosensory, motor, and limbic cortices via retrograde pathway tracers injected throughout the superficial and deep layers of the cat SC. As anticipated, the majority of cortical inputs to the SC originate in the visual cortex. In fact, each field implicated in visual orienting behavior makes a substantial projection. Conversely, only one area of the auditory orienting system, the auditory field of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (fAES), and no area involved in somatosensory orienting, shows significant corticotectal inputs. Although small relative to visual inputs, the projection from the fAES is of particular interest, as it represents the only bilateral cortical input to the SC. This detailed, quantitative study allows for comparison across modalities in an animal that serves as a useful model for both auditory and visual perception. Moreover, the differences in patterns of corticotectal projections between modalities inform the ways in which orienting systems are modulated by cortical feedback. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2623-2642, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850989

  7. Electrophysiological properties of lumbar motoneurons in the alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cat during carbachol-induced motor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xi, M C; Liu, R H; Yamuy, J; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1997-07-01

    The present study was undertaken 1) to examine the neuronal mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of spinal cord motoneurons that occurs in alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats following the microinjection of carbachol into the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO), and 2) to determine whether the inhibitory mechanisms are the same as those that are responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of motoneurons that is present during naturally occurring active sleep. Accordingly, the basic electrophysiological properties of lumbar motoneurons were examined, with the use of intracellular recording techniques, in cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose and compared with those present during naturally occurring active sleep. The intrapontine administration of carbachol resulted in a sustained reduction in the amplitude of the spinal cord Ia monosynaptic reflex. Discrete large-amplitude inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs), which are only present during the state of active sleep in the chronic cat, were also observed in high-gain recordings from lumbar motoneurons after the injection of carbachol. During carbachol-induced motor inhibition, lumbar motoneurons exhibited a statistically significant decrease in input resistance, membrane time constant and a reduction in the amplitude of the action potential's afterhyperpolarization. In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in rheobase and in the delay between the initial-segment (IS) and somadendritic (SD) portions of the action potential (IS-SD delay). There was a significant increase in the mean motoneuron resting membrane potential (i.e., hyperpolarization). The preceding changes in the electrophysiological properties of motoneurons, as well as the development of discrete IPSPs, indicate that lumbar motoneurons are postsynaptically inhibited after the intrapontine administration of carbachol in cats that are anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. These changes in the electrophysiological properties of lumbar

  8. Sensory-Motor Interactions for Vocal Pitch Monitoring in Non-Primary Human Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles R.; Jackson, Adam W.; Chen, Fangxiang; Hansen, Daniel R.; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying processing of auditory feedback during self-vocalization are poorly understood. One technique used to study the role of auditory feedback involves shifting the pitch of the feedback that a speaker receives, known as pitch-shifted feedback. We utilized a pitch shift self-vocalization and playback paradigm to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of audio-vocal interaction. High-resolution electrocorticography (ECoG) signals were recorded directly from auditory cortex of 10 human subjects while they vocalized and received brief downward (−100 cents) pitch perturbations in their voice auditory feedback (speaking task). ECoG was also recorded when subjects passively listened to playback of their own pitch-shifted vocalizations. Feedback pitch perturbations elicited average evoked potential (AEP) and event-related band power (ERBP) responses, primarily in the high gamma (70–150 Hz) range, in focal areas of non-primary auditory cortex on superior temporal gyrus (STG). The AEPs and high gamma responses were both modulated by speaking compared with playback in a subset of STG contacts. From these contacts, a majority showed significant enhancement of high gamma power and AEP responses during speaking while the remaining contacts showed attenuated response amplitudes. The speaking-induced enhancement effect suggests that engaging the vocal motor system can modulate auditory cortical processing of self-produced sounds in such a way as to increase neural sensitivity for feedback pitch error detection. It is likely that mechanisms such as efference copies may be involved in this process, and modulation of AEP and high gamma responses imply that such modulatory effects may affect different cortical generators within distinctive functional networks that drive voice production and control. PMID:23577157

  9. Event-related near-infrared spectroscopy detects conflict in the motor cortex in a Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Dénes; Killikelly, Clare; Cutini, Simone

    2012-10-01

    The Stroop effect is one of the most popular models of conflict processing in neuroscience and psychology. The response conflict theory of the Stroop effect explains decreased performance in the incongruent condition of Stroop tasks by assuming that the task-relevant and the task-irrelevant stimulus features elicit conflicting response tendencies. However, to date, there is not much explicit neural evidence supporting this theory. Here we used functional near-infrared imaging (fNIRS) to examine whether conflict at the level of the motor cortex can be detected in the incongruent relative to the congruent condition of a Stroop task. Response conflict was determined by comparing the activity of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the response hand in the congruent and incongruent conditions. First, results provided explicit hemodynamic evidence supporting the response conflict theory of the Stroop effect: there was greater motor cortex activation in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the response hand in the incongruent than in the congruent condition during the initial stage of the hemodynamic response. Second, as fNIRS is still a relatively novel technology, it is methodologically significant that our data shows that fNIRS is able to detect a brief and transient increase in hemodynamic activity localized to the motor cortex, which in this study is related to subthreshold motor response activation.

  10. Age-dependent changes in the midsized neurofilament subunit in sensory-motor systems of the cat brainstem: an immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J H; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2000-05-01

    This study documents age-related changes in the immunoreactivity of the medium-molecular weight subunit of neurofilaments in sensory and motor neurons in the brainstem of the cat. In old age, there was a clear decrease in immunoreactivity in the following brainstem sensory and motor nuclei: sensory trigeminal, gracile, cuneate, and facial motor. Only a few neuronal perikarya and dendrites were labeled in these nuclei in old cats; moreover, when present, the labeling was weak. In contrast, in adult cats, these nuclei contained intensely stained neuronal perikarya and dendrites. In other sensory and motor nuclei of the brainstem, there was an obvious age-related increase in the immunoreactivity of the medium-molecular weight subunit of neurofilaments in the perikarya. Despite different patterns of age-related alterations in immunoreactivity within perikarya and dendrites in distinct brainstem regions, most sensory and motor axons in old cats were smaller than those in adult cats. A decrease in the medium-molecular weight neurofilament subunit in the dendrites may be the basis for the dendritic atrophy that has been shown to occur in sensory nuclei in old animals. The decrease in axonal size is likely to be one of the causes of the decrease in axonal conduction velocity, in these neurons, that was reported in our previous studies. PMID:10819310

  11. Activity of neurons of the subthalamic nucleus in relation to motor performance in the cat.

    PubMed

    Cheruel, F; Dormont, J F; Farin, D

    1996-03-01

    The activity of subthalamic nucleus neurons related to motor performance was studied in three unrestrained cats operantly conditioned to perform a lever-release movement. The movement was initiated either rapidly after the trigger stimulus (a brief sound) in a simple reaction-time paradigm or after a delay in trials identified by a tone cue. These paradigms were randomly presented. The activity of 171 neurons was recorded in the contralateral and in the ipsilateral subthalamic nucleus, with respect to the performing limb. The mean spontaneous activity of cells in the ipsilateral side (18.5 +/- 13.8 imp/s, mean +/- SD) was higher than that in the contralateral side (8.5 +/- 8.1 imp/s). A total of 145 cells (85%) presented significant changes in activity in relation to the lever-release movement (task-related cells). The remaining 26 cells were either related to other events of the task (n = 15; lever-press or reinforcement occurrence) or not related at all to the task performance (n = 11). The majority of changes of activity of task-related cells were initial increases in discharge, which started on average, 127 ms before movement onset and lasted several hundreds of milliseconds. These increases in discharge were more frequent in the contralateral side (75 of 80 task-related cells, 94%) than in the ipsilateral side (43 of 65 task-related cells, 66%). The changes in activity, either increases or decreases, occurred early after the trigger stimulus, since 62% of them had a latency of less than 100 ms. Although the mean latency of initial increases was rather similar in both sides (97 ms contralateral versus 104 ms ipsilateral), the contralateral side was characterized by a high proportion of very early responses (less than 20 ms). For most neurons, the early changes in activity described above were absent after the trigger stimulus in the delayed condition. For certain neurons, the changes in activity prior to movement were different in reaction-time condition and in

  12. Magnetic stimulation of human premotor or motor cortex produces interhemispheric facilitation through distinct pathways.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Tobias; Bock, Franka; Koch, Giacomo; Lange, Rüdiger; Rothwell, John C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Münchau, Alexander

    2006-05-01

    We explored interhemispheric facilitation (IHF) between (a) left and right primary motor cortex (M1) and (b) left dorsal premotor (dPM) and right M1 in 20 right-handed healthy human subjects using a paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol. A conditioning TMS pulse (CP) applied to left M1 or dPM with an intensity of 80% and 60% active motor threshold (CP(80%AMT) and CP(60%AMT), respectively) was followed by a test pulse (TP) over right M1 induced by anterior-posterior- or posterior-anterior- (TP(AP), TP(PA)) directed currents in the brain at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 3-8 and 10 ms. EMG was recorded from left first dorsal interosseous muscle. In the main experimental condition IHF was evoked by CP(80%AMT) over left M1 and TPAP at ISIs of 6 and 8 ms. The same CP(80%AMT) produced IHF at an ISI of 8 ms when applied over left dPM but only with TP(PA). In addition, when CP(60%AMT) was given to M1, IHF was present at an ISI of 6 ms (but not 8 ms) when followed by TP(PA), indicating that IHF elicited over dPM was not caused by current spread of the conditioning pulse to M1. We conclude that IHF can be induced differentially by conditioning M1 and dPM using subthreshold CP. These facilitatory interactions depended on the intensity and ISI of the CP as well as the current flow direction of the TP. We suggest that not only do the CPs activate separate anatomical pathways but also that these pathways project to different populations ofinterneurons in the receiving M1. These may correspond to elements involved in the generation of I3 and I1 waves, respectively. PMID:16497712

  13. Abnormal motor cortex excitability during linguistic tasks in adductor-type spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Suppa, A; Marsili, L; Giovannelli, F; Di Stasio, F; Rocchi, L; Upadhyay, N; Ruoppolo, G; Cincotta, M; Berardelli, A

    2015-08-01

    In healthy subjects (HS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied during 'linguistic' tasks discloses excitability changes in the dominant hemisphere primary motor cortex (M1). We investigated 'linguistic' task-related cortical excitability modulation in patients with adductor-type spasmodic dysphonia (ASD), a speech-related focal dystonia. We studied 10 ASD patients and 10 HS. Speech examination included voice cepstral analysis. We investigated the dominant/non-dominant M1 excitability at baseline, during 'linguistic' (reading aloud/silent reading/producing simple phonation) and 'non-linguistic' tasks (looking at non-letter strings/producing oral movements). Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the contralateral hand muscles. We measured the cortical silent period (CSP) length and tested MEPs in HS and patients performing the 'linguistic' tasks with different voice intensities. We also examined MEPs in HS and ASD during hand-related 'action-verb' observation. Patients were studied under and not-under botulinum neurotoxin-type A (BoNT-A). In HS, TMS over the dominant M1 elicited larger MEPs during 'reading aloud' than during the other 'linguistic'/'non-linguistic' tasks. Conversely, in ASD, TMS over the dominant M1 elicited increased-amplitude MEPs during 'reading aloud' and 'syllabic phonation' tasks. CSP length was shorter in ASD than in HS and remained unchanged in both groups performing 'linguistic'/'non-linguistic' tasks. In HS and ASD, 'linguistic' task-related excitability changes were present regardless of the different voice intensities. During hand-related 'action-verb' observation, MEPs decreased in HS, whereas in ASD they increased. In ASD, BoNT-A improved speech, as demonstrated by cepstral analysis and restored the TMS abnormalities. ASD reflects dominant hemisphere excitability changes related to 'linguistic' tasks; BoNT-A returns these excitability changes to normal.

  14. Motor Cortex-Evoked Activity in Reciprocal Muscles Is Modulated by Reward Probability

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kirimoto, Hikari; Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Oyama, Mineo; Yamada, Sumio; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Fukuda, Michinari; Onishi, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal intracortical projections for agonist and antagonist muscles exist in the primary motor cortex (M1), and reward may induce a reinforcement of transmission efficiency of intracortical circuits. We investigated reward-induced change in M1 excitability for agonist and antagonist muscles. Participants were 8 healthy volunteers. Probabilistic reward tasks comprised 3 conditions of 30 trials each: 30 trials contained 10% reward, 30 trials contained 50% reward, and 30 trials contained 90% reward. Each trial began with a cue (red fixation cross), followed by blue circle for 1 s. The subjects were instructed to perform wrist flexion and press a button with the dorsal aspect of middle finger phalanx as quickly as possible in response to disappearance of the blue circle without looking at their hand or the button. Two seconds after the button press, reward/non-reward stimulus was randomly presented for 2-s duration. The reward stimulus was a picture of Japanese 10-yen coin, and each subject received monetary reward at the end of experiment. Subjects were not informed of the reward probabilities. We delivered transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left M1 at the midpoint between center of gravities of agonist flexor carpi radialis (FCR) and antagonist extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles at 2 s after the red fixation cross and 1 s after the reward/non-reward stimuli. Relative motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes at 2 s after the red fixation cross were significantly higher for 10% reward probability than for 90% reward probability, whereas relative MEP amplitudes at 1 s after reward/non-reward stimuli were significantly higher for 90% reward probability than for 10% and 50% reward probabilities. These results implied that reward could affect the horizontal intracortical projections in M1 for agonist and antagonist muscles, and M1 excitability including the reward-related circuit before and after reward stimulus could be differently altered by reward

  15. Direction of Movement Is Encoded in the Human Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Toxopeus, Carolien M.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right) was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left) and 270° (down) elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180°) and vertical (90°+270°) axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1. PMID:22110768

  16. Direction of movement is encoded in the human primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Toxopeus, Carolien M; de Jong, Bauke M; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A; Leenders, Klaus L; Maurits, Natasha M

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right) was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left) and 270° (down) elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180°) and vertical (90°+270°) axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1.

  17. Testing the Role of Dorsal Premotor Cortex in Auditory-Motor Association Learning Using Transcranical Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

    PubMed Central

    Lega, Carlotta; Stephan, Marianne A.; Zatorre, Robert J.; Penhune, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the auditory and the motor systems are critical in music as well as in other domains, such as speech. The premotor cortex, specifically the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC), seems to play a key role in auditory-motor integration, and in mapping the association between a sound and the movement used to produce it. In the present studies we tested the causal role of the dPMC in learning and applying auditory-motor associations using 1 Hz repetitive Transcranical Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS). In this paradigm, non-musicians learn a set of auditory-motor associations through melody training in two contexts: first when the sound to key-press mapping was in a conventional sequential order (low to high tones mapped onto keys from left to right), and then when it was in a novel scrambled order. Participant’s ability to match the four pitches to four computer keys was tested before and after the training. In both experiments, the group that received 1 Hz rTMS over the dPMC showed no significant improvement on the pitch-matching task following training, whereas the control group (who received rTMS to visual cortex) did. Moreover, in Experiment 2 where the pitch-key mapping was novel, rTMS over the dPMC also interfered with learning. These findings suggest that rTMS over dPMC disturbs the formation of auditory-motor associations, especially when the association is novel and must be learned rather explicitly. The present results contribute to a better understanding of the role of dPMC in auditory-motor integration, suggesting a critical role of dPMC in learning the link between an action and its associated sound. PMID:27684369

  18. Intracisternal delivery of AAV9 results in oligodendrocyte and motor neuron transduction in the whole central nervous system of cats

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, T; Dubreil, L; Colle, M-A; Maquigneau, M; Deniaud, J; Ledevin, M; Moullier, P; Joussemet, B

    2014-01-01

    Systemic and intracerebrospinal fluid delivery of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to achieve widespread gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). However, after systemic injection, the neurotropism of the vector has been reported to vary according to age at injection, with greater neuronal transduction in newborns and preferential glial cell tropism in adults. This difference has not yet been reported after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) delivery. The present study analyzed both neuronal and glial cell transduction in the CNS of cats according to age of AAV9 CSF injection. In both newborns and young cats, administration of AAV9-GFP in the cisterna magna resulted in high levels of motor neurons (MNs) transduction from the cervical (84±5%) to the lumbar (99±1%) spinal cord, demonstrating that the remarkable tropism of AAV9 for MNs is not affected by age at CSF delivery. Surprisingly, numerous oligodendrocytes were also transduced in the brain and in the spinal cord white matter of young cats, but not of neonates, indicating that (i) age of CSF delivery influences the tropism of AAV9 for glial cells and (ii) AAV9 intracisternal delivery could be relevant for both the treatment of MN and demyelinating disorders. PMID:24572783

  19. Increased facilitation of the primary motor cortex following 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the contralateral cerebellum in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Torriero, Sara; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2005-03-16

    Connections between the cerebellum and the contralateral motor cortex are dense and important, but their physiological significance is difficult to measure in humans. We have studied a group of 10 healthy subjects to test whether a modulation of the excitability of the left cerebellum can affect the excitability of the contralateral motor cortex. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 1 Hz frequency to transiently depress the excitability of the left cerebellar cortex and paired-pulse TMS testing of intracortical inhibition (ICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) to probe the excitability of cortico-cortical connections in the right motor cortex. The cortical silent period was also measured before and after cerebellar rTMS. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were significantly larger after than before conditioning rTMS trains (p < 0.01). Moreover, left cerebellar rTMS increased the ICF of the right motor cortex as measured with paired-pulses separated by an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 15 ms. The effect lasted for up to 30 min afterward and was specific for the contralateral (right) motor cortex. The cortical silent period was unaffected by cerebellar rTMS. The implication is that rTMS of the cerebellar cortex can shape the flowing of inhibition from Purkinje cells toward deep nuclei, thereby increasing the excitability of interconnected brain areas.

  20. Effects of narcotic analgesics and antagonists on the in vivo release of acetylcholine from the cerebral cortex of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Jhamandas, K.; Phillis, J. W.; Pinsky, C.

    1971-01-01

    1. In cats under light allobarbitone anaesthesia, the effects of intravenous injections of narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics, of a general depressant, and of narcotic antagonists were investigated on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the surface of the sensorimotor cortex. 2. The narcotic analgesics morphine (0·1, 1·0 and 5 mg/kg), meperidine (1·0 and 2·0 mg/kg), methadone (1·0 mg/kg) and codeine (5·0 and 10·0 mg/kg) greatly reduced ACh release. 3. The non-narcotic analgesics pentazocine (1·0 and 2·0 mg/kg) and propoxyphene (5·0 and 10·0 mg/kg) as well as the depressant chlorpromazine (0·25, 0·5 and 1·0 mg/kg) also greatly reduced ACh release. 4. Two of the three narcotic antagonists examined, levallorphan (0·1, 1·0 and 5 mg/kg) and nalorphine (1·0 mg/kg) had the property of reducing ACh release. They were thus partial agonists. With levallorphan the greatest reduction occurred with the smallest dose injected and the effect was regularly obtained, whereas with nalorphine a reduction was obtained in some experiments only. The third, naloxone, was a specific narcotic antagonist and did not reduce the ACh release in any dose (0·01, 0·1, 0·5 and 1·0 mg/kg) examined. In a dose of 1·0 mg/kg it actually produced a small increase in Ach release. 5. Naloxone (0·1-1·0 mg/kg) restored the reduction in ACh release produced by the narcotic analgesics and by the partial agonist levallorphan. It partially restored the reduction produced by the non-narcotic analgesics and by nalorphine, but had no effect on the reduction produced by chlorpromazine. 6. The relevance of these results with regard to analgesia and to the narcotic abstinence syndrome is discussed. PMID:5136464

  1. Measurement of voluntary activation based on transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Todd, Gabrielle; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex to make estimates of the level of voluntary drive to muscles. The method, described in 2003 (Todd et al. J Physiol 551: 661-671, 2003), uses a TMS pulse to produce descending corticospinal volleys that synaptically activate motoneurons, resulting in a muscle twitch. Linear regression of the superimposed twitch amplitude and voluntary force (or torque) can generate an "estimated" resting twitch for muscles involved in a task. This procedure has most commonly been applied to elbow flexors but also to knee extensors and other muscle groups. Data from 44 papers using the method were tabulated. We identify and discuss five major technical challenges, and the frequency with which they are addressed. The technical challenges include inadvertent activation of the cortical representation of antagonist muscles, the role of antagonist torques at the studied joint, uncertainty about the effectiveness of the TMS pulse in activating the motoneuron pool, the linearity of the voluntary force (or torque) and superimposed twitch relationship, and variability in the TMS-evoked EMG and force/torque responses. The ideal situation in which the descending corticospinal volleys recruit all of the agonist motoneurons and none of the antagonist motoneurons is unlikely to ever occur, and hence results must be carefully examined to assess the authenticity of the voluntary activation estimates in the context of the experimental design. A partial compromise lies in the choice of stimulus intensity. We also identify aspects of the procedure that require further investigation.

  2. Neurochemical Analysis of Primary Motor Cortex in Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neena K.; Brooks, William M.; Popescu, Anda E.; VanDillen, Linda; George, Steven Z.; McCarson, Kenneth E.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Gorman, Patrick; Cirstea, Carmen M.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in chronic low back pain (LBP) is a relatively new concept. Decreased M1 excitability and an analgesic effect after M1 stimulation have been recently reported. However, the neurochemical changes underlying these functional M1 changes are unknown. The current study investigated whether neurochemicals specific to neurons and glial cells in both right and left M1 are altered. N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) and myo-inositol (mI) were measured with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 19 subjects with chronic LBP and 14 healthy controls. We also examined correlations among neurochemicals within and between M1 and relationships between neurochemical concentrations and clinical features of pain. Right M1 NAA was lower in subjects with LBP compared to controls (p = 0.008). Left M1 NAA and mI were not significantly different between LBP and control groups. Correlations between neurochemical concentrations across M1s were different between groups (p = 0.008). There were no significant correlations between M1 neurochemicals and pain characteristics. These findings provide preliminary evidence of neuronal depression and altered neuronal-glial interactions across M1 in chronic LBP. PMID:23766894

  3. Prediction of hand trajectory from electrocorticography signals in primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Shin, Duk; Watanabe, Hidenori; Nakanishi, Yasuhiko; Kambara, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Natsue; Nambu, Atsushi; Isa, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yukio; Koike, Yasuharu

    2013-01-01

    Due to their potential as a control modality in brain-machine interfaces, electrocorticography (ECoG) has received much focus in recent years. Studies using ECoG have come out with success in such endeavors as classification of arm movements and natural grasp types, regression of arm trajectories in two and three dimensions, estimation of muscle activity time series and so on. However, there still remains considerable work to be done before a high performance ECoG-based neural prosthetic can be realized. In this study, we proposed an algorithm to decode hand trajectory from 15 and 32 channel ECoG signals recorded from primary motor cortex (M1) in two primates. To determine the most effective areas for prediction, we applied two electrode selection methods, one based on position relative to the central sulcus (CS) and another based on the electrodes' individual prediction performance. The best coefficients of determination for decoding hand trajectory in the two monkeys were 0.4815 ± 0.0167 and 0.7780 ± 0.0164. Performance results from individual ECoG electrodes showed that those with higher performance were concentrated at the lateral areas and areas close to the CS. The results of prediction according with different numbers of electrodes based on proposed methods were also shown and discussed. These results also suggest that superior decoding performance can be achieved from a group of effective ECoG signals rather than an entire ECoG array.

  4. Multi-channel NIRS of the primary motor cortex to discriminate hand from foot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenraadt, K. L. M.; Duysens, J.; Smeenk, M.; Keijsers, N. L. W.

    2012-08-01

    The poor spatial resolution of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) makes it difficult to distinguish two closely located cortical areas from each other. Here, a combination of multi-channel NIRS and a centre of gravity (CoG) approach (widely accepted in the field of transcranial magnetic stimulation; TMS) was used to discriminate between closely located cortical areas activated during hand and foot movements. Similarly, the possibility of separating the more anteriorly represented discrete movements from rhythmic movements was studied. Thirteen healthy right-handed subjects performed rhythmic or discrete (‘task’) hand or foot (‘extremity’) tapping. Hemodynamic responses were measured using an 8-channel NIRS setup. For oxyhemoglobin (OHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb), a CoG was determined for each condition using the mean hemodynamic responses and the coordinates of the channels. Significant hemodynamic responses were found for hand and foot movements. Based on the HHb responses, the NIRS-CoG of hand movements was located 0.6 cm more laterally compared to the NIRS-CoG of foot movements. For OHb responses no difference in NIRS-CoG was found for ‘extremity’ nor for ‘task’. This is the first NIRS study showing hemodynamic responses for isolated foot movements. Furthermore, HHb responses have the potential to be used in multi-channel NIRS experiments requiring differential activation of motor cortex areas linked to either hand or foot movements.

  5. Lamina-dependent calibrated BOLD response in human primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Maria; Huber, Laurentius; Lampe, Leonie; Gauthier, Claudine J; Möller, Harald E

    2016-11-01

    Disentangling neural activity at different cortical depths during a functional task has recently generated growing interest, since this would allow to separate feedforward and feedback activity. The majority of layer-dependent studies have, so far, relied on gradient-recalled echo (GRE) blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) acquisitions, which are weighted towards the large draining veins at the cortical surface. The current study aims to obtain quantitative brain activity responses in the primary motor cortex on a laminar scale without the contamination due to accompanying secondary vascular effects. Evoked oxidative metabolism was evaluated using the Davis model, to investigate its applicability, advantages, and limits in lamina-dependent fMRI. Average values for the calibration parameter, M, and for changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) during a unilateral finger-tapping task were (11±2)% and (30±7)%, respectively, with distinct variation features across the cortical depth. The results presented here showed an uncoupling between BOLD-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and metabolic changes across cortical depth, while the tight coupling between CMRO2 and CBV was conserved across cortical layers. We conclude that the Davis model can help to obtain estimates of lamina-dependent metabolic changes without contamination from large draining veins, with high consistency and reproducibility across participants.

  6. Information transfer between neurons in the motor cortex triggered by visual cues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanggyun; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Coleman, Todd P

    2011-01-01

    It was previously shown that beta oscillations of local field potentials in the arm area of the primary motor cortex (MI) of nonhuman primates propagate as travelling waves across MI of monkeys during movement preparation and execution and are believed to subserve cortical information transfer. To investigate the information transfer and its change over time at the single-cell level, we analyzed simultaneously recorded multiple MI neural spike trains of a monkey using a Granger causality measure for point process models before and after visual cues instructing the onset of reaching movements. In this analysis, we found that more pairs of neurons showed information transfer between them after appearances of upcoming movement targets than before, and the directions of the information transfer across neurons in MI were coincident with the directions of the propagating waves. These results suggest that the neuron pairs identified in the current study are the candidates of neurons that travel with spatiotemporal dynamics of beta oscillations in the MI.

  7. Lamina-dependent calibrated BOLD response in human primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Maria; Huber, Laurentius; Lampe, Leonie; Gauthier, Claudine J; Möller, Harald E

    2016-11-01

    Disentangling neural activity at different cortical depths during a functional task has recently generated growing interest, since this would allow to separate feedforward and feedback activity. The majority of layer-dependent studies have, so far, relied on gradient-recalled echo (GRE) blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) acquisitions, which are weighted towards the large draining veins at the cortical surface. The current study aims to obtain quantitative brain activity responses in the primary motor cortex on a laminar scale without the contamination due to accompanying secondary vascular effects. Evoked oxidative metabolism was evaluated using the Davis model, to investigate its applicability, advantages, and limits in lamina-dependent fMRI. Average values for the calibration parameter, M, and for changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) during a unilateral finger-tapping task were (11±2)% and (30±7)%, respectively, with distinct variation features across the cortical depth. The results presented here showed an uncoupling between BOLD-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and metabolic changes across cortical depth, while the tight coupling between CMRO2 and CBV was conserved across cortical layers. We conclude that the Davis model can help to obtain estimates of lamina-dependent metabolic changes without contamination from large draining veins, with high consistency and reproducibility across participants. PMID:27364473

  8. Disinhibition in the human motor cortex is enhanced by synchronous upper limb movements

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, James W; Byblow, Winston D

    2002-01-01

    The phasic modulation of wrist flexor corticomotor disinhibition has previously been demonstrated during the flexion phase of rhythmical passive flexion-extension of the human wrist. Here we ask if rhythmical bimanual flexion-extension movements of the wrists of neurologically intact subjects, modulate inhibitory activity in the motor cortex. In the first experiment intracortical inhibition was assessed when one wrist was passively flexed and extended on its own, with the addition of the opposite limb voluntarily moving synchronously in a mirror symmetric pattern, and also in a near-symmetric asynchronous pattern. Two subsequent experiments investigated firstly the modulation of spinal reflex pathway activity during the same three movement conditions, and secondly the effect of contralateral wrist movement alone on the excitability of corticomotoneuronal pathways to a static test limb. When the wrist flexors of both upper limbs were shortening simultaneously (i.e. synchronously), intracortical inhibition associated with flexor representations was suppressed to a greater extent than when the two muscles were shortening asynchronously. The results of the three experiments indicate that modulation of inhibitory activity was taking place at the cortical level. These findings may have further application in the study of rehabilitation procedures where the effects of simultaneous activation of affected and unaffected upper limbs in hemiparetic patients are to be investigated. PMID:12181301

  9. Tuning Curves for Arm Posture Control in Motor Cortex Are Consistent with Random Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, L. F.; Vaadia, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal responses characterized by regular tuning curves are typically assumed to arise from structured synaptic connectivity. However, many responses exhibit both regular and irregular components. To address the relationship between tuning curve properties and underlying circuitry, we analyzed neuronal activity recorded from primary motor cortex (M1) of monkeys performing a 3D arm posture control task and compared the results with a neural network model. Posture control is well suited for examining M1 neuronal tuning because it avoids the dynamic complexity of time-varying movements. As a function of hand position, the neuronal responses have a linear component, as has previously been described, as well as heterogeneous and highly irregular nonlinearities. These nonlinear components involve high spatial frequencies and therefore do not support explicit encoding of movement parameters. Yet both the linear and nonlinear components contribute to the decoding of EMG of major muscles used in the task. Remarkably, despite the presence of a strong linear component, a feedforward neural network model with entirely random connectivity can replicate the data, including both the mean and distributions of the linear and nonlinear components as well as several other features of the neuronal responses. This result shows that smoothness provided by the regularity in the inputs to M1 can impose apparent structure on neural responses, in this case a strong linear (also known as cosine) tuning component, even in the absence of ordered synaptic connectivity. PMID:27224735

  10. Biological factors and age-dependence of primary motor cortex experimental plasticity.

    PubMed

    Polimanti, Renato; Simonelli, Ilaria; Zappasodi, Filippo; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Pellicciari, Maria Concetta; Benussi, Luisa; Squitti, Rosanna; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Tecchio, Franca

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate whether the age-dependence of brain plasticity correlates with the levels of proteins involved in hormone and brain functions we executed a paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocol and blood tests. We measured the PAS-induced plasticity in the primary motor cortex. Blood levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), estradiol, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3, progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone, and the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) were determined in 15 healthy men and 20 healthy women. We observed an age-related reduction of PAS-induced plasticity in females that it is not present in males. In females, PAS-induced plasticity displayed a correlation with testosterone (p = 0.006) that became a trend after the adjustment for the age effect (p = 0.078). In males, IGF-1 showed a nominally significant correlation with the PAS-induced plasticity (p = 0.043). In conclusion, we observed that hormone blood levels (testosterone in females and IGF-1 in males) may be involved in the age-dependence of brain plasticity.

  11. Different Current Intensities of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Do Not Differentially Modulate Motor Cortex Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kidgell, Dawson J.; Daly, Robin M.; Young, Kayleigh; Lum, Jarrod; Tooley, Gregory; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Zoghi, Maryam; Pearce, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive technique that modulates the excitability of neurons within the motor cortex (M1). Although the aftereffects of anodal tDCS on modulating cortical excitability have been described, there is limited data describing the outcomes of different tDCS intensities on intracortical circuits. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying the aftereffects of M1 excitability following anodal tDCS, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the effect of different intensities on cortical excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Using a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover design, with a one-week wash-out period, 14 participants (6 females and 8 males, 22–45 years) were exposed to 10 minutes of anodal tDCS at 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 mA. TMS was used to measure M1 excitability and SICI of the contralateral wrist extensor muscle at baseline, immediately after and 15 and 30 minutes following cessation of anodal tDCS. Cortical excitability increased, whilst SICI was reduced at all time points following anodal tDCS. Interestingly, there were no differences between the three intensities of anodal tDCS on modulating cortical excitability or SICI. These results suggest that the aftereffect of anodal tDCS on facilitating cortical excitability is due to the modulation of synaptic mechanisms associated with long-term potentiation and is not influenced by different tDCS intensities. PMID:23577272

  12. Primary motor cortex of the parkinsonian monkey: altered neuronal responses to muscle stretch

    PubMed Central

    Pasquereau, Benjamin; Turner, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Exaggeration of the long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is a characteristic neurophysiologic feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) that contributes to parkinsonian rigidity. To explore one frequently-hypothesized mechanism, we studied the effects of fast muscle stretches on neuronal activity in the macaque primary motor cortex (M1) before and after the induction of parkinsonism by unilateral administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). We compared results from the general population of M1 neurons and two antidromically-identified subpopulations: distant-projecting pyramidal-tract type neurons (PTNs) and intra-telecenphalic-type corticostriatal neurons (CSNs). Rapid rotations of elbow or wrist joints evoked short-latency responses in 62% of arm-related M1 neurons. As in PD, the late electromyographic responses that constitute the LLSR were enhanced following MPTP. This was accompanied by a shortening of M1 neuronal response latencies and a degradation of directional selectivity, but surprisingly, no increase in single unit response magnitudes. The results suggest that parkinsonism alters the timing and specificity of M1 responses to muscle stretch. Observation of an exaggerated LLSR with no change in the magnitude of proprioceptive responses in M1 is consistent with the idea that the increase in LLSR gain that contributes to parkinsonian rigidity is localized to the spinal cord. PMID:24324412

  13. Motor cortex rTMS improves dexterity in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Elzamarany, Eman; Afifi, Lamia; El-Fayoumy, Neveen M; Salah, Husam; Nada, Mona

    2016-06-01

    The motor cortex (MC) receives an excitatory input from the cerebellum which is reduced in patients with cerebellar lesions. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces cortical facilitation which can counteract the reduced cerebellar drive to the MC. Our study included 24 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients with dysmetria. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A received two sessions of real MC rTMS and Group B received one session of real rTMS and one session of sham rTMS. Ten healthy volunteers formed group C. Evaluation was carried out using the nine-hole pegboard task and the cerebellar functional system score (FSS) of the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Group A patients showed a significant improvement in the time required to finish the pegboard task (P = 0.002) and in their cerebellar FSS (P = 0.000) directly after the second session and 1 month later. The RRMS patients showed more improvement than the SPMS patients. Group B patients did not show any improvement in the pegboard task or the cerebellar FSS. These results indicate that MC rTMS can be a promising option in treating both RRMS or SPMS patients with cerebellar impairment and that its effect can be long-lasting.

  14. Prediction of Hand Trajectory from Electrocorticography Signals in Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Yasuhiko; Kambara, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Natsue; Nambu, Atsushi; Isa, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yukio; Koike, Yasuharu

    2013-01-01

    Due to their potential as a control modality in brain-machine interfaces, electrocorticography (ECoG) has received much focus in recent years. Studies using ECoG have come out with success in such endeavors as classification of arm movements and natural grasp types, regression of arm trajectories in two and three dimensions, estimation of muscle activity time series and so on. However, there still remains considerable work to be done before a high performance ECoG-based neural prosthetic can be realized. In this study, we proposed an algorithm to decode hand trajectory from 15 and 32 channel ECoG signals recorded from primary motor cortex (M1) in two primates. To determine the most effective areas for prediction, we applied two electrode selection methods, one based on position relative to the central sulcus (CS) and another based on the electrodes' individual prediction performance. The best coefficients of determination for decoding hand trajectory in the two monkeys were 0.4815±0.0167 and 0.7780±0.0164. Performance results from individual ECoG electrodes showed that those with higher performance were concentrated at the lateral areas and areas close to the CS. The results of prediction according with different numbers of electrodes based on proposed methods were also shown and discussed. These results also suggest that superior decoding performance can be achieved from a group of effective ECoG signals rather than an entire ECoG array. PMID:24386223

  15. Evidence for high-fidelity timing-dependent synaptic plasticity of human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Cash, R F H; Mastaglia, F L; Thickbroom, G W

    2013-01-01

    A single transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse typically evokes a short series of spikes in corticospinal neurons [known as indirect (I)-waves] which are thought to arise from transynaptic input. Delivering a second pulse at inter-pulse intervals (IPIs) corresponding to the timing of these I-waves leads to a facilitation of the response, and if stimulus pairs are delivered repeatedly, a persistent LTP-like increase in excitability can occur. This has been demonstrated at an IPI of 1.5 ms, which corresponds to the first I-wave interval, in an intervention referred to as ITMS (I-wave TMS), and it has been argued that this may have similarities with timing-dependent plasticity models. Consequently, we hypothesized that if the second stimulus is delivered so as not to coincide with I-wave timing, it should lead to LTD. We performed a crossover study in 10 subjects in which TMS doublets were timed to coincide (1.5-ms IPI, ITMS(1.5)) or not coincide (2-ms IPI, ITMS(2)) with I-wave firing. Single pulse motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, resting motor threshold (RMT), and short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI) were measured from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. After ITMS(1.5) corticomotor excitability was increased by ~60% for 15 min (P < 0.05) and returned to baseline by 20 min. Increasing the IPI by just 500 μs to 2 ms reversed the aftereffect, and MEP amplitude was significantly reduced (~35%, P < 0.05) for 15 min before returning to baseline. This reduction was not associated with an increase in SICI, suggesting a reduction in excitatory transmission rather than an increase in inhibitory efficacy. RMT also remained unchanged, suggesting that these changes were not due to changes in membrane excitability. Amplitude-matching ITMS(2) did not modulate excitability. The results are consistent with timing-dependent synaptic LTP/D-like effects and suggest that there are plasticity mechanisms operating in the human motor cortex with a temporal

  16. Short-term restoration of facial sensory loss by motor cortex stimulation in peripheral post-traumatic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Denys; Bruneto, Jean Louis; El Fakir, Hasna; Paquis, Philippe; Lanteri-Minet, Michel

    2009-06-01

    We report a case in which motor cortex stimulation (MCS) improved neuropathic facial pain due to peripheral nerve injury and restored tactile and thermal sensory loss. A 66-year-old man developed intractable trigeminal neuropathic pain after trauma of the supraorbital branch of the Vth nerve, associated with tactile and thermal sensory loss in the painful area. MCS was performed using neuronavigation and transdural electric stimulation to localize the upper facial area on the motor cortex. One month after surgery, pain was decreased from 80/100 to 20/100 on visual analogic scale, and sensory discrimination improved in the painful area. Two months after surgery, quantitative sensory testing confirmed the normalization of thermal detection thresholds. This case showed that MCS could restore tactile and thermal sensory loss, resulting from peripheral nerve injury. Although the mechanisms leading to this effect remain unclear, this observation enhanced the hypothesis that MCS acts through modulation of the sensory processing.

  17. Cross-Modal Plasticity in Higher-Order Auditory Cortex of Congenitally Deaf Cats Does Not Limit Auditory Responsiveness to Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baumhoff, Peter; Tillein, Jochen; Lomber, Stephen G.; Hubka, Peter; Kral, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Congenital sensory deprivation can lead to reorganization of the deprived cortical regions by another sensory system. Such cross-modal reorganization may either compete with or complement the “original“ inputs to the deprived area after sensory restoration and can thus be either adverse or beneficial for sensory restoration. In congenital deafness, a previous inactivation study documented that supranormal visual behavior was mediated by higher-order auditory fields in congenitally deaf cats (CDCs). However, both the auditory responsiveness of “deaf” higher-order fields and interactions between the reorganized and the original sensory input remain unknown. Here, we studied a higher-order auditory field responsible for the supranormal visual function in CDCs, the auditory dorsal zone (DZ). Hearing cats and visual cortical areas served as a control. Using mapping with microelectrode arrays, we demonstrate spatially scattered visual (cross-modal) responsiveness in the DZ, but show that this did not interfere substantially with robust auditory responsiveness elicited through cochlear implants. Visually responsive and auditory-responsive neurons in the deaf auditory cortex formed two distinct populations that did not show bimodal interactions. Therefore, cross-modal plasticity in the deaf higher-order auditory cortex had limited effects on auditory inputs. The moderate number of scattered cross-modally responsive neurons could be the consequence of exuberant connections formed during development that were not pruned postnatally in deaf cats. Although juvenile brain circuits are modified extensively by experience, the main driving input to the cross-modally (visually) reorganized higher-order auditory cortex remained auditory in congenital deafness. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In a common view, the “unused” auditory cortex of deaf individuals is reorganized to a compensatory sensory function during development. According to this view, cross-modal plasticity takes

  18. Why I tense up when you watch me: Inferior parietal cortex mediates an audience’s influence on motor performance

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, Michiko; Nagai, Yoko; Critchley, Hugo D.; Harrison, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an evaluative audience can alter skilled motor performance through changes in force output. To investigate how this is mediated within the brain, we emulated real-time social monitoring of participants’ performance of a fine grip task during functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging. We observed an increase in force output during social evaluation that was accompanied by focal reductions in activity within bilateral inferior parietal cortex. Moreover, deactivation of the left inferior parietal cortex predicted both inter- and intra-individual differences in socially-induced change in grip force. Social evaluation also enhanced activation within the posterior superior temporal sulcus, which conveys visual information about others’ actions to the inferior parietal cortex. Interestingly, functional connectivity between these two regions was attenuated by social evaluation. Our data suggest that social evaluation can vary force output through the altered engagement of inferior parietal cortex; a region implicated in sensorimotor integration necessary for object manipulation, and a component of the action-observation network which integrates and facilitates performance of observed actions. Social-evaluative situations may induce high-level representational incoherence between one’s own intentioned action and the perceived intention of others which, by uncoupling the dynamics of sensorimotor facilitation, could ultimately perturbe motor output. PMID:26787326

  19. Why I tense up when you watch me: Inferior parietal cortex mediates an audience's influence on motor performance.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Michiko; Nagai, Yoko; Critchley, Hugo D; Harrison, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an evaluative audience can alter skilled motor performance through changes in force output. To investigate how this is mediated within the brain, we emulated real-time social monitoring of participants' performance of a fine grip task during functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging. We observed an increase in force output during social evaluation that was accompanied by focal reductions in activity within bilateral inferior parietal cortex. Moreover, deactivation of the left inferior parietal cortex predicted both inter- and intra-individual differences in socially-induced change in grip force. Social evaluation also enhanced activation within the posterior superior temporal sulcus, which conveys visual information about others' actions to the inferior parietal cortex. Interestingly, functional connectivity between these two regions was attenuated by social evaluation. Our data suggest that social evaluation can vary force output through the altered engagement of inferior parietal cortex; a region implicated in sensorimotor integration necessary for object manipulation, and a component of the action-observation network which integrates and facilitates performance of observed actions. Social-evaluative situations may induce high-level representational incoherence between one's own intentioned action and the perceived intention of others which, by uncoupling the dynamics of sensorimotor facilitation, could ultimately perturbe motor output. PMID:26787326

  20. Exposure to Music and Noise During Pregnancy Influences Neurogenesis and Thickness in Motor and Somatosensory Cortex of Rat Pups

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Hee; Lee, Sang-Chul; Shin, Je Wook; Chung, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Shin-Ho; Shin, Mal-Soon; Baek, Sang-Bin; Sung, Yun-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Prenatal environmental conditions affect the development of the fetus. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exposure to music and noise during pregnancy on neurogenesis and thickness in the motor and somatosensory cortex of rat pups. Methods The pregnant rats in the music-applied group were exposed to 65 dB of comfortable music for 1 hour, once per day, from the 15th day of pregnancy until delivery. The pregnant rats in the noise-applied group were exposed to 95 dB of sound from a supersonic sound machine for 1 hour, once per day, from the 15th day of pregnancy until delivery. After birth, the offspring were left undisturbed together with their mother. The rat pups were sacrificed at 21 days after birth. Results Exposure to music during pregnancy increased neurogenesis in the motor and somatosensory cortex of rat pups. In contrast, rat pups exposed to noise during pregnancy showed decreased neurogenesis and thickness in the motor and somatosensory cortex. Conclusions Our study suggests that music and noise during the developmental period are important factors influencing brain development and urogenital disorders. PMID:24143288

  1. [Disruption of acquired head and paw movement coordination after unilateral lesioning of the motor cortex in dogs (a kinematic analysis)].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, O G; Mats, V N

    2001-01-01

    Dogs were trained to remove a cup with meat to the head bent down to the feeder and hold the limb flexed during eating. At the early stage of learning, the stable innate head-forelimb coordination characteristic for untrained animals was manifest. The forelimb flexion was accompanied by anticipatory lifting of the bent head, and the following bending of the head led to an extension of the flexed forelimb. The opposite coordination, i.e., the lifting and holding of the forelimb when the head is bent down, was achieved only by training. The lesion of the motor cortex contralateral to the working forelimb in the trained dogs led to a prolonged disturbance of the simultaneous holding of the flexed forelimb and the head bent down. The lesion of the motor cortex did not affect the individual movements but disturbed their coordination. In the operated dogs the innate relationships between the head and forelimb movement recovered. The results support the previous finding that the lesion of the motor cortex led to recovery of the innate coordination transformed in the process of learning.

  2. Supplementary motor area and primary auditory cortex activation in an expert break-dancer during the kinesthetic motor imagery of dance to music.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, Michael P; Bar, Rachel J; Fogarty, Mary; DeSouza, Joseph F X

    2015-01-01

    The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural activity of an expert dancer with 35 years of break-dancing experience during the kinesthetic motor imagery (KMI) of dance accompanied by highly familiar and unfamiliar music. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of musical familiarity on neural activity underlying KMI within a highly experienced dancer. In order to investigate this in both primary sensory and motor planning cortical areas, we examined the effects of music familiarity on the primary auditory cortex [Heschl's gyrus (HG)] and the supplementary motor area (SMA). Our findings reveal reduced HG activity and greater SMA activity during imagined dance to familiar music compared to unfamiliar music. We propose that one's internal representations of dance moves are influenced by auditory stimuli and may be specific to a dance style and the music accompanying it.

  3. Functional connectivity delineates distinct roles of the inferior frontal cortex and pre-supplementary motor area in stop signal inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duann, Jeng-Ren; Ide, Jaime S.; Luo, Xi; Li, Chiang-shan Ray

    2009-01-01

    The neural basis of motor response inhibition has drawn considerable attention in recent imaging literature. Many studies have employed the go/no-go or stop signal task to examine the neural processes underlying motor response inhibition. In particular, showing greater activity during no-go (stop) as compared to go trials and during stop success as compared to stop error trials, the right inferior prefrontal cortex (IFC) has been suggested by numerous studies as the cortical area mediating response inhibition. Many of these same studies as well as others have also implicated the pre-supplementary motor area (preSMA) in this process, in accord with a function of the medial prefrontal cortex in goal-directed action. Here we employed connectivity analyses to delineate the roles of IFC and preSMA during stop signal inhibition. Specifically, we hypothesized that, as an integral part of the ventral attention system, the IFC responds to a stop signal and expedites the stop process in the preSMA, the primary site of motor response inhibition. This hypothesis predicted that preSMA and primary motor cortex would show functional interconnectivity via the basal ganglia circuitry to mediate response execution or inhibition, whereas the IFC would influence the basal ganglia circuitry via connectivity with preSMA. The results of Granger causality analyses in 57 participants confirmed this hypothesis. Furthermore, psychophysiological interaction showed that, as compared to stop errors, stop successes evoked greater effective connectivity between the IFC and preSMA, providing additional support for this hypothesis. These new findings provided evidence critically differentiating the roles of IFC and preSMA during stop signal inhibition and have important implications for our understanding of the component processes of inhibitory control. PMID:19675251

  4. Unilateral striatal lesions in the cat disrupt well-learned motor plans in a GO/NO-GO reaching task.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, J W; Thompson, J F; Gilman, S

    1997-03-01

    We examined the changes in learned and spontaneous motor behavior after a unilateral excitotoxin lesion of the neostriatum. Cats were trained to perform a sensory-cued GO/NO-GO reaching task. Success rate, reaction time, movement speed and kinematic patterns were used to characterize motor system properties. In addition, motor properties before and after the lesion were compared by clinical neurological examinations and video tape observations of free-range behavior. We found that in normal animals motor performance in the task was fluent, highly automatic and skillful with consistent patterns from trial to trial and day to day. The striatal lesion resulted in a marked impairment in the animals' ability to perform the automatic response to the sensory cues in the motor task. In contrast, sensorimotor behavior in contexts apart from the task was altered minimally, with changes that were often difficult to detect. The animals recovered their ability to perform the task gradually, although they never reached prelesion performance levels in up to 24 weeks of evaluation. The animals had difficulty making reaching movements in GO trials and, in NO-GO trials failures to withhold movements were more frequent. Failures were due to a specific inability to execute previously well-learned movements in response to cues and not to an inability to recognize and interpret the cues. The lesion effects were restricted to the automatic motor response to the learned cues, as the animals could make reaching movements to the target without obvious impairment in response to novel stimuli. They also made similar spontaneous movements apart from the motor task that appeared to be unimpaired. The unique motor style and strategies that characterized the behavior of individual animals prior to the lesion were still evident after the lesion, even though they were superimposed on lower success rates and slower movement speeds. Our findings suggest that the basal ganglia facilitate the fluent

  5. Topographical linkage of tecto-thalamo-anterior ectosylvian sulcal cortex in the cat: an /sup 125/I-WGA autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Higo, S.; Kawamura, S.

    1984-06-01

    Following injection of /sup 125/I-WGA into various parts of the caudal thalamus in the cat, the distribution of orthograde and retrograde labels in the cortex around the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AESS) and the superior colliculus (SC) was examined autoradiographically. When /sup 125/I-WGA injections involved the medial part of nucleus lateralis posterior (Lp) of the thalamus, both orthograde and retrograde labels consistently appeared in the cortex around AESS, and retrograde labels in the SC. The topographical organization of the cortical connections with the medial part of Lp can be well correlated with that of the tecto-thalamic projections, in such a way that the dorsal portion of the medial part of Lp which receives fibers from the rostromedial part of SC is connected reciprocally with the lateral lip of AESS and the crown of the anterior sylvian gyrus; whereas, the most ventral portion of the medial part of Lp which receives tectal afferents from the caudolateral part of SC is connected with the dorsal bank and fundus of AESS. These results suggest the existence of retinotopically ordered linkage between the tecto-Lp and the Lp-AESS connections in the cat.

  6. Transient inhibition of primary motor cortex suppresses hand muscle responses during a reactive reach to grasp.

    PubMed

    Bolton, David A E; Patel, Rupesh; Staines, W Richard; McIlroy, William E

    2011-10-24

    Rapid balance reactions such as compensatory reach to grasp represent important response strategies following unexpected loss of balance. While it has been assumed that early corrective actions arise from subcortical networks, recent research has prompted speculation about the potential role of cortical involvement. With reach to grasp reactions there is evidence of parallels in the control of perturbation-evoked reaching versus rapid voluntary reaching. However, the potential role of cortical involvement in such rapid balance reactions remains speculative. To test if cortical motor regions are involved we used continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to temporarily suppress the hand area of primary motor cortex (M1) in participants involved in two reaching conditions: (1) rapid compensatory perturbation-evoked reach to grasp and (2) voluntary reach to grasp in response to an auditory cue. We hypothesized that following cTBS to the left M1 hand area we would find diminished EMG responses in the reaching (right) hand for both compensatory and voluntary movements. To isolate balance reactions to the upper limb participants were seated in an elevated tilt-chair with a stable handle positioned in front of their right shoulder. The chair was held vertical by a magnet and triggered to fall backward randomly. To regain balance, participants were instructed to reach for the handle as quickly as possible with the right hand upon chair release. Intermixed with perturbation trials, participants were also required to reach for the same handle but in response to an auditory tone. Muscle activity was recorded from several muscles of the right arm/hand using electromyography. As expected, movement time and muscle onsets were much faster following perturbation versus auditory-cued reaching. The novel finding from our study was the reduced amplitude of hand muscle activity post-cTBS for both perturbation-cued and auditory-cued reaches. Moreover, this reduction was specific to the

  7. Motor cortex stimulation for the treatment of refractory peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Drouot, Xavier; Cunin, Patrick; Bruckert, Rémy; Lepetit, Hélène; Créange, Alain; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Maison, Patrick; Keravel, Yves; Nguyen, Jean-Paul

    2009-06-01

    Epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS) has been proposed as a treatment for chronic, drug-resistant neuropathic pain of various origins. Regarding pain syndromes due to peripheral nerve lesion, only case series have previously been reported. We present the results of the first randomized controlled trial using chronic MCS in this indication. Sixteen patients were included with pain origin as follows: trigeminal neuralgia (n = 4), brachial plexus lesion (n = 4), neurofibromatosis type-1 (n = 3), upper limb amputation (n = 2), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (n = 1), atypical orofacial pain secondary to dental extraction (n = 1) and traumatic nerve trunk transection in a lower limb (n = 1). A quadripolar lead was implanted, under radiological and electrophysiological guidance, for epidural cortical stimulation. A randomized crossover trial was performed between 1 and 3 months postoperative, during which the stimulator was alternatively switched 'on' and 'off' for 1 month, followed by an open phase during which the stimulator was switched 'on' in all patients. Clinical assessment was performed up to 1 year after implantation and was based on the following evaluations: visual analogue scale (VAS), brief pain inventory, McGill Pain questionnaire, sickness impact profile and medication quantification scale. The crossover trial included 13 patients and showed a reduction of the McGill Pain questionnaire-pain rating index (P = 0.0166, Wilcoxon test) and McGill Pain questionnaire sensory subscore (P = 0.01) when the stimulator was switched 'on' compared to the 'off-stimulation' condition. However, these differences did not persist after adjustment for multiple comparisons. In the 12 patients who completed the open study, the VAS and sickness impact profile scores varied significantly in the follow-up and were reduced at 9-12 months postoperative, compared to the preoperative baseline. At final examination, the mean rate of pain relief on VAS scores was 48% (individual results

  8. Hand Preference for Tool-Use in Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella) is Associated with Asymmetry of the Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kimberley A.; Thompson, Claudia R.

    2012-01-01

    Skilled motor actions are associated with handedness and neuroanatomical specializations in humans. Recent reports have documented similar neuroanatomical asymmetries and their relationship to hand preference in some nonhuman primate species, including chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys. We investigated whether capuchins displayed significant hand preferences for a tool use task and whether such preferences were associated with motor-processing regions of the brain. Handedness data on a dipping tool-use task and high-resolution 3T MRI scans were collected from 15 monkeys. Capuchins displayed a significant group-level left-hand preference for this type of tool use, and handedness was associated with asymmetry of the primary motor cortex. Left-hand preferent individuals displayed a deeper central sulcus in the right hemisphere. Our results suggest that capuchins show an underlying right-hemisphere bias for skilled movement. PMID:22987442

  9. Whisker motor cortex reorganization after superior colliculus output suppression in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Carlo; Maggiolini, Emma; Franchi, Gianfranco

    2013-10-01

    The effect of unilateral superior colliculus (SC) output suppression on the ipsilateral whisker motor cortex (WMC) was studied at different time points after tetrodotoxin and quinolinic acid injections, in adult rats. The WMC output was assessed by mapping the movement evoked by intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and by recording the ICMS-evoked electromyographic (EMG) responses from contralateral whisker muscles. At 1 h after SC injections, the WMC showed: (i) a strong decrease in contralateral whisker sites, (ii) a strong increase in ipsilateral whisker sites and in ineffective sites, and (iii) a strong increase in threshold current values. At 6 h after injections, the WMC size had shrunk to 60% of the control value and forelimb representation had expanded into the lateral part of the normal WMC. Thereafter, the size of the WMC recovered, returning to nearly normal 12 h later (94% of control) and persisted unchanged over time (1-3 weeks). The ICMS-evoked EMG response area decreased at 1 h after SC lesion and had recovered its baseline value 12 h later. Conversely, the latency of ICMS-evoked EMG responses had increased by 1 h and continued to increase for as long as 3 weeks following the lesion. These findings provide physiological evidence that SC output suppression persistently withdrew the direct excitatory drive from whisker motoneurons and induced changes in the WMC. We suggest that the changes in the WMC are a form of reversible short-term reorganization that is induced by SC lesion. The persistent latency increase in the ICMS-evoked EMG response suggested that the recovery of basic WMC excitability did not take place with the recovery of normal explorative behaviour. PMID:23895333

  10. Measurement of voluntary activation based on transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Todd, Gabrielle; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex to make estimates of the level of voluntary drive to muscles. The method, described in 2003 (Todd et al. J Physiol 551: 661-671, 2003), uses a TMS pulse to produce descending corticospinal volleys that synaptically activate motoneurons, resulting in a muscle twitch. Linear regression of the superimposed twitch amplitude and voluntary force (or torque) can generate an "estimated" resting twitch for muscles involved in a task. This procedure has most commonly been applied to elbow flexors but also to knee extensors and other muscle groups. Data from 44 papers using the method were tabulated. We identify and discuss five major technical challenges, and the frequency with which they are addressed. The technical challenges include inadvertent activation of the cortical representation of antagonist muscles, the role of antagonist torques at the studied joint, uncertainty about the effectiveness of the TMS pulse in activating the motoneuron pool, the linearity of the voluntary force (or torque) and superimposed twitch relationship, and variability in the TMS-evoked EMG and force/torque responses. The ideal situation in which the descending corticospinal volleys recruit all of the agonist motoneurons and none of the antagonist motoneurons is unlikely to ever occur, and hence results must be carefully examined to assess the authenticity of the voluntary activation estimates in the context of the experimental design. A partial compromise lies in the choice of stimulus intensity. We also identify aspects of the procedure that require further investigation. PMID:27418687

  11. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and locomotor function after motor-sensory cortex impact injury.

    PubMed

    Holschneider, Daniel P; Guo, Yumei; Roch, Margareth; Norman, Keith M; Scremin, Oscar U

    2011-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces transient or persistent dysfunction of gait and balance. Enhancement of cholinergic transmission has been reported to accelerate recovery of cognitive function after TBI, but the effects of this intervention on locomotor activity remain largely unexplored. The hypothesis that enhancement of cholinergic function by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) improves locomotion following TBI was tested in Sprague-Dawley male rats after a unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury of the motor-sensory cortex. Locomotion was tested by time to fall on the constant speed and accelerating Rotarod, placement errors and time to cross while walking through a horizontal ladder, activity monitoring in the home cages, and rearing behavior. Assessments were performed the 1st and 2nd day and the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd week after TBI. The AChE inhibitor physostigmine hemisulfate (PHY) was administered continuously via osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously at the rates of 1.6-12.8 μmol/kg/day. All measures of locomotion were impaired by TBI and recovered to initial levels between 1 and 3 weeks post-TBI, with the exception of the maximum speed achievable on the accelerating Rotarod, as well as rearing in the open field. PHY improved performance in the accelerating Rotarod at 1.6 and 3.2 μmol/kg/day (AChE activity 95 and 78% of control, respectively), however, higher doses induced progressive deterioration. No effect or worsening of outcomes was observed at all PHY doses for home cage activity, rearing, and horizontal ladder walking. Potential benefits of cholinesterase inhibition on locomotor function have to be weighed against the evidence of the narrow range of useful doses. PMID:21787180

  12. Cellular and Laminar Expression of Dab-1 during the Postnatal Critical Period in Cat Visual Cortex and the Effects of Dark Rearing

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Paul J.; Liu, Zijing; Wilt, Steven D.; Mower, George D.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes postnatal critical period changes in cellular and laminar expression of Dab-1, a gene shown to play a role in controlling neuronal positioning during embryonic brain development, in cat visual cortex and the effects of dark rearing (DR). At 1 week, there is dense cellular staining which is uniform across cortical layers and very light neuropil staining. At the peak of the critical period (5 weeks), dense cell staining is largely restricted to large pyramidal cells of deep layer III and layer V, there is faint cell body staining throughout all cortical layers, neuropil staining is markedly increased and uniform in layers III to VI. This dramatic change in laminar and cellular labeling is independent of visual input, since immunostaining is similar in 5 week DR cats. By 10 weeks, the mature laminar and cellular staining pattern is established and the major subsequent change is a further reduction in the density of cellular staining in all cortical layers. Neuropil staining is pronounced and uniform across cortical layers. These developmental changes are altered by DR. Quantification by cell counts indicated that age and DR interact such that differences in cellular expression are opposite in direction between 5 week old and 20 week old cats. This bidirectional regulation of cellular expression is the same in all cortical laminae. The bidirectional regulation of cellular expression matches the effects of age and DR on physiological plasticity during the critical period as assessed by ocular dominance shifts in response to monocular deprivation. PMID:21303666

  13. Tracing thalamo-cortical connections in tenrecA further attempt to characterize poorly differentiated neocortical regions, particularly the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Künzle, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    The hedgehog tenrec (Afrosoricidae) has a very poorly differentiated neocortex. Previously its primary sensory regions have been characterized with hodological and electrophysiological techniques. Unlike the marsupial opossum the tenrec may also have a separate motor area as far as there are cortico-spinal cells located rostral to the primary somatosensory cortex. However, not knowing its thalamic input it may be premature to correlate this area with the true (mirror-image-like) primary motor cortex in higher mammals. For this reason the tenrec's thalamo-cortical connections were studied following tracer injections into various neocortical regions. The main sensory areas were confirmed by their afferents from the principal thalamic nuclei. The dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, in addition, was connected with the retrosplenial area and a rostromedial visual region. Unlike the somatosensory cortex the presumed motor area did not receive afferents from the ventrobasal thalamus but fibers from the cerebello-thalamic target regions. These projections, however, were not restricted to the motor area, but involved the entire somatosensorimotor field as well as adjacent regions. The projections appeared similar to those arising in the rat thalamic ventromedial nucleus known to have a supporting function rather than a specific motor task. The question was raised whether the input from the basal ganglia might play a crucial role in the evolution of the mammalian motor cortex? Certainly, in the tenrec, the poor differentiation of the motor cortex coincides with the virtual absence of an entopeduncular projection to the ventrolateral thalamus.

  14. The Effect of Visual and Auditory Enhancements on Excitability of the Primary Motor Cortex during Motor Imagery: A Pilot Study