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Sample records for catalyst precursor anions

  1. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1992-08-28

    The aims of the proposed project are to enrich our understanding of the roles of various aqueous soluble catalyst precursor anions on the surface electrical properties of coal and to ascertain the influence of the surface charge on the adsorption, dispersion, and activities of calcium and potassium. These goals will be achieved by impregnating a North Dakota lignite (PSOC 1482) and its demineralized derivative with calcium or potassium catalyst precursors containing acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), and carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) anions. Catalyst loading will be conducted under well-controlled conditions of solution pH and ionic strength. In the last quarter, the surface charge properties of the coal was determined as a function of acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sup 3}{sup {minus}}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) or sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}})concentration using the respective potassium salts of these anions. In general, low anion concentrations (10{sup {minus}3} or 10{sup {minus}2} mol/L) had little effect on the zeta potentials of the coals. However, the surface charge densities of the coal become less negative at 10-1 mol/L of the nitrate, carbonate or sulfate anions. These trends suggest that the surface charge density of the coal is controlled by the adsorption of potassium ions (K{sup +}) onto the coal particles. The net negative charge on the coal panicles creates a repulsive force between the anions and the coal surface and prevents the anions from exerting any significant effect on the coal's electrokinetic properties.

  2. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1992-08-28

    The aims of the proposed project are to enrich our understanding of the roles of various aqueous soluble catalyst precursor anions on the surface electrical properties of coal and to ascertain the influence of the surface charge on the adsorption, dispersion, and activities of calcium and potassium. These goals will be achieved by impregnating a North Dakota lignite (PSOC 1482) and its demineralized derivative with calcium or potassium catalyst precursors containing acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), and carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) anions. Catalyst loading will be conducted under well-controlled conditions of solution pH and ionic strength. In the last quarter, the surface charge properties of the coal was determined as a function of acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sup 3}{sup {minus}}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) or sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}})concentration using the respective potassium salts of these anions. In general, low anion concentrations (10{sup {minus}3} or 10{sup {minus}2} mol/L) had little effect on the zeta potentials of the coals. However, the surface charge densities of the coal become less negative at 10-1 mol/L of the nitrate, carbonate or sulfate anions. These trends suggest that the surface charge density of the coal is controlled by the adsorption of potassium ions (K{sup +}) onto the coal particles. The net negative charge on the coal panicles creates a repulsive force between the anions and the coal surface and prevents the anions from exerting any significant effect on the coal`s electrokinetic properties.

  3. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1991--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of coal is currently limited by several factors, including the environmental impacts of coal use and the lack of cost-effective technologies to convert coal into useful gaseous and liquid products. Several catalysts have been evaluated for coal gasification and liquefaction. The activities of the catalysts are dependent on many factors such as the method of catalyst addition to the coal and the catalyst precursor type. Since catalyst addition to coal is frequently conducted in aqueous solution, the surface chemistry of colloidal coal particles will be expected to exert an influence on catalyst uptake. However, the effects of the various coal gasification catalyst precursors on the interfacial properties of coal during catalyst loading from solution has received little attention. The aim of this study is to ascertain the influence of the metal salts (i): calcium acetate (Ca(OOCCH{sub 3}){sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) or calcium nitrate (Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and (ii): potassium acetate (KOOCCH{sub 3}), potassium chloride (KCl), potassium nitrate (KNO{sub 3}), potassium carbonate (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and potassium sulfate (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) on the electrokinetic and adsorptive properties of coal and determine the relationship, if any, between coal surface electrokinetic properties, and catalyst loading and eventually its effects on the reactivities of coal chars.

  4. Hydrodeoxygenation of coal using organometallic catalyst precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Stephen R.

    2002-04-01

    coals. Trends within the data were similar to those reported by other authors. Based on the conclusions from both the model compound studies and the coal analysis, predictions were made of the catalyst precursors' performance in the HDO of the three selected coals. It was concluded that CoMo-T2 is a desirable catalyst precursor for the HDO of coals (particularly low-rank coals), but that an optimum set of conditions must be determined to take full advantage of its HDO ability. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Sulfate as a precursor of catalyst poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Mador, I.L.; Rosan, A.M.; Crissey, R.K.

    1984-05-01

    The poisoning of noble metal catalysts of hydrogenation reactions by sulfur in various forms is discussed. The specific reaction investigated was the hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone over palladium. Catalyst pretreatments with NaHSO/sub 4/, PdSO/sub 4/, H/sub 2/, and He produced catalyst activities varying from inactive to unimpaired.

  6. Supported Oxide Catalysts from Chelating Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto-Centurion, Dario

    Supported Fe catalysts and, in particular, Fe and substituted MFI zeolites have attracted industrial and academic attention due to their ability to promote selective catalytic reduction of NOx and selective partial oxidation of hydrocarbons. It is generally accepted that some form of highly dispersed, binuclear or atomically-isolated metal species are involved in the selective processes catalyzed these materials. Several studies have sought to reproduce the structures and reactivity of these substituted zeolites on dierent supports. Given that specialized reagents or preparation conditions that are required in some of these preparation methods, and that multiple surface structures are often formed, this dissertation aimed to develop a route to highly dispersed supported transition metals using commonly available reactants and synthesis routes. Described here is a straightforward and effective procedure to control dispersion and surface speciation of Fe on SiO2 and CeO2 through incipient wetness impregnation (IWI) of the support with aqueous, anionic complexes of Fe3+ and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) followed by oxidative heat-treatment. On SiO2, this method preferentially creates isolated surface structures up to loading of 0.9 Fe nm-2 if using alkali counter-cations. This isolated species display classic 'single-site' behavior|constant turn over frequency (TOF) with increasing Fe surface density|in the oxidation of adamantane with H 2O2, indicating active sites are equally accessible and equally active within this range of surface density. Additionally, TOF increases linearly with electronegativity of the alkali counter-cation, suggesting electronic promotion. Conversely, IWI of unprotected Fe3+ produces agglomerates less active in this reaction. On CeO2, the sterics and negative charge imparted on Fe 3+ by EDTA4- inhibits incorporation of Fe into surface vacancies. Instead, formation of two-dimensional oligomeric structures which can undergo Fe3+-Fe2

  7. Photoacoustic infrared analysis of nickel catalysts precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasieczna, S.; Ryczkowski, J.

    2006-11-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (FT-IR/PAS) has been used for identification of different forms of nickel precursors formed during CIM (classical impregnation method) and DIM (double impregnation method) process and different pH of the solution containing nickel ions.

  8. Precursor anion states in dissociative electron attachment to chlorophenol isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossoski, F.; Varella, M. T. do N.

    2016-07-01

    We report a theoretical study on low-energy (<10 eV) elastic electron scattering from chlorophenol isomers, namely, para-chlorophenol (pCP), meta-chlorophenol (mCP), and ortho-chlorophenol (oCP). The calculations were performed with the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials, and analysis of the computed integral cross sections and virtual orbitals revealed one σCCl ∗ , one σOH ∗ , and three π∗ shape resonances. We show that electron capture into the two lower lying π∗ orbitals initiates dissociative processes that lead to the elimination of the chloride ion, accounting for the two overlapping peaks where this fragment was observed. Despite the relatively small differences on the energetics of the π∗ resonances, a major isomeric effect was found on their corresponding autodetachment lifetimes, which accounts for the observed increasing cross sections in the progression pCP < mCP < oCP. In particular, dissociation from the π1 ∗ anion of pCP is largely suppressed because of the unfavorable mixing with the σCCl ∗ state. We found the intramolecular hydrogen bond present in oCP to have the opposite effects of stabilizing the σCCl ∗ resonance and destabilizing the σOH ∗ resonance. We also suggest that the hydrogen abstraction observed in chlorophenols and phenol actually takes place by a mechanism in which the incoming electron is directly attached to the dissociative σOH ∗ orbital.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of alumina-supported nickel catalysts precursors. Part I. Catalysts prepared from acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasieczna-Patkowska, S.; Ryczkowski, J.

    2007-04-01

    Nickel alumina-supported catalysts were prepared from acidic solutions of nickel nitrate by the CIM and DIM methods (classical and double impregnation, respectively). The catalysts exhibited different nickel species due to the existence of various metal-support interaction strengths. As a consequence, the reducibility and other surface properties changed as a function of the preparation method. The aim of this work was to study the interaction between the metal precursor and the alumina surface by means of FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) and FT-IR/PAS (FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy).

  10. Precursor anion states in dissociative electron attachment to chlorophenol isomers.

    PubMed

    Kossoski, F; Varella, M T do N

    2016-07-28

    We report a theoretical study on low-energy (<10 eV) elastic electron scattering from chlorophenol isomers, namely, para-chlorophenol (pCP), meta-chlorophenol (mCP), and ortho-chlorophenol (oCP). The calculations were performed with the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials, and analysis of the computed integral cross sections and virtual orbitals revealed one σCCl (∗), one σOH (∗), and three π(∗) shape resonances. We show that electron capture into the two lower lying π(∗) orbitals initiates dissociative processes that lead to the elimination of the chloride ion, accounting for the two overlapping peaks where this fragment was observed. Despite the relatively small differences on the energetics of the π(∗) resonances, a major isomeric effect was found on their corresponding autodetachment lifetimes, which accounts for the observed increasing cross sections in the progression pCP < mCP < oCP. In particular, dissociation from the π1 (∗) anion of pCP is largely suppressed because of the unfavorable mixing with the σCCl (∗) state. We found the intramolecular hydrogen bond present in oCP to have the opposite effects of stabilizing the σCCl (∗) resonance and destabilizing the σOH (∗) resonance. We also suggest that the hydrogen abstraction observed in chlorophenols and phenol actually takes place by a mechanism in which the incoming electron is directly attached to the dissociative σOH (∗) orbital. PMID:27475364

  11. Transesterification of propylene glycol methyl ether in chromatographic reactors using anion exchange resin as a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungmin; Sreedhar, Balamurali; Donaldson, Megan E; Frank, Timothy C; Schultz, Alfred K; Bommarius, Andreas S; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki

    2016-09-30

    Reactive chromatography using an anion exchange resin is proposed for a transesterification reaction of propylene glycol methyl ether (DOWANOL™ PM) with ethyl acetate to produce propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (DOWANOL™ PMA). This reaction is studied in batch and chromatographic reactors catalyzed by an anion exchange resin. Several anion exchange resins are tested and compared based on the performance of resin as an adsorbent and a catalyst. A chromatographic column is packed with a selected catalyst, AMBERLITE™ IRA904, and both reaction and chromatographic elution are studied at different temperatures and feed concentrations. The resulting chromatograms are fitted to a mathematical model to obtain adsorption equilibrium and reaction kinetic parameters by the inverse method. Compared to esterification investigated in a previous study, transesterification has advantages such as a higher conversion at lower temperature and easy removal of the byproduct which may lead to higher productivity. Deactivation of anion exchange resins is observed and potential solutions are suggested.

  12. Transesterification of propylene glycol methyl ether in chromatographic reactors using anion exchange resin as a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungmin; Sreedhar, Balamurali; Donaldson, Megan E; Frank, Timothy C; Schultz, Alfred K; Bommarius, Andreas S; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki

    2016-09-30

    Reactive chromatography using an anion exchange resin is proposed for a transesterification reaction of propylene glycol methyl ether (DOWANOL™ PM) with ethyl acetate to produce propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (DOWANOL™ PMA). This reaction is studied in batch and chromatographic reactors catalyzed by an anion exchange resin. Several anion exchange resins are tested and compared based on the performance of resin as an adsorbent and a catalyst. A chromatographic column is packed with a selected catalyst, AMBERLITE™ IRA904, and both reaction and chromatographic elution are studied at different temperatures and feed concentrations. The resulting chromatograms are fitted to a mathematical model to obtain adsorption equilibrium and reaction kinetic parameters by the inverse method. Compared to esterification investigated in a previous study, transesterification has advantages such as a higher conversion at lower temperature and easy removal of the byproduct which may lead to higher productivity. Deactivation of anion exchange resins is observed and potential solutions are suggested. PMID:27623064

  13. Salts of highly fluorinated weakly coordinating anions as versatile precursors towards hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Starobrat, A; Tyszkiewicz, M J; Wegner, W; Pancerz, D; Orłowski, P A; Leszczyński, P J; Fijalkowski, K J; Jaroń, T; Grochala, W

    2015-12-01

    We report the most recent results related to application of a metathetic pathway towards mixed-metal borohydrides. The synthetic protocol utilizes highly-fluorinated weakly coordinating anion salts as precursors. We discuss the technicalities related to the use of fluorine-rich anions as well as the improvements which are still needed to deliver high-purity materials with potential applications for hydrogen storage. The applicability of the method is expanded beyond the previously described complex borohydrides of alkali metal Zn or Y, towards the systems containing Mg(II), Sc(III), Mn(II), or Eu(III). We have prepared for the first time [Ph4P]2[Mn(BH4)4] and [Me4N]2[Mg(BH4)4], solved their crystal structures from powder x-ray diffraction, and used selected organic metal borohydride derivatives as precursors towards mixed-metal borohydrides (K2Mn(BH4)4, Rb3Mg(BH4)5, etc.). We have also prepared [Ph4P][Eu(BH4)4], which is the first derivative of Eu(III) in the homoleptic environment of borohydride anions.

  14. Subeutectic Synthesis of Epitaxial Si-NWs with Diverse Catalysts Using a Novel Si Precursor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of a novel silicon precursor with respect to reasonable nanowire (NW) growth rates, feasibility of epitaxial NW growth and versatility with respect to diverse catalysts was investigated. Epitaxial growth of Si-NWs was achieved using octochlorotrisilane (OCTS) as Si precursor and Au as catalyst. In contrast to the synthesis approach with SiCl4 as precursor, OCTS provides Si without the addition of H2. By optimizing the growth conditions, effective NW synthesis is shown for alternative catalysts, in particular, Cu, Ag, Ni, and Pt with the latter two being compatible to complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. As for these catalysts, the growth temperatures are lower than the lowest liquid eutectic; we suggest that the catalyst particle is in the solid state during NW growth and that a solid-phase diffusion process, either in the bulk, on the surface, or both, must be responsible for NW nucleation. PMID:20843058

  15. Non-platinum group metal oxgyen reduction catalysts and their mechanism in both acid and alkaline media: The effect of the catalyst precursor and the ionomer on oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Michael H.

    Non-platinum catalysts are an attractive strategy for lowering the cost of fuel cells, but much more development is needed in order to replace platinum, especially at the cathode where oxygen is reduced. Research groups worldwide have donated material for a study in which precursor structure to catalyst activity correlations are made. The donated samples have been divided into three classes based on their precursor; macrocyclic chelates, small molecule, and polymeric precursors. The precursor is one activity-dictating factor among many, but it is one of the most influential. It was found that macrocyclic chelates on average produced the most active catalysts, having the highest limiting, diffusion-limited, kinetic, and exchange current densities, as well as the lowest overpotentials and H2O2 production. This suggests that the M-N4 atomic structure of the precursor remains largely static throughout heat treatment, as the M-Nx motif is the accepted active site conformation. The other classes were somewhat less active, but the breadth of precursor materials that range in structure and functionality, as well as low associated costs, make them attractive precursor materials. Careful precursor selection based on this analysis was applied to a new generation of catalyst derived from iron salt and 4-aminoantipyrine. An extensive investigation of the reduction of oxygen on the material performed in both acid and alkaline media, and it was found that reduction follows a two-step pathway. While the peroxide reducing step is also very fast, the first step is so rapid that, even at low active site density, the material is almost as active as platinum if all diffusion limitations are removed. In addition to bottom-up catalyst design, the catalyst:ionomer complex, by which catalyst is incorporated into the membrane electrode assembly, also affects reductive kinetics. A series of novel anionically conductive ionomers have been evaluated using a well-described cyanamide derived

  16. Fabrication of CdS nanowires with increasing anionic precursor by SILAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariani, R. S.; Salehi, F.

    2016-05-01

    CdS nanowires were fabricated on glass substrate at room temperature by SILAR method with cadmium nitrate cationic and sodium sulfide anionic precursors. The deposition were done at different S:Cd concentration ratios of 1:1, 3:1, 5:1, and 7:1. Nanowires growth procedure was studied in the mentioned concentrations. The number of immersion cycles was kept constant at 15 cycles. EDX analysis showed that in all stoichiometric ratios, S/Cd composition ratio remains at about unity. Our results indicated that S:Cd concentration ratio of 7:1 had the longest nanowires with hexagonal structure. The main objective of this paper was to produce CdS nanowires with increasing concentration of sulfur.

  17. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, Simon A.; Smith, Paul J.; Wells, Peter P.; Chater, Philip A.; Carter, James H.; Morgan, David J.; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M.; Wagner, Jakob B.; Davies, Thomas E.; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K.; Taylor, Stuart H.; Spencer, Michael S.; Kiely, Christopher J.; Kelly, Gordon J.; Park, Colin W.; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable—and hence little known and largely ignored—georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions—a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts.

  18. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondrat, Simon A; Smith, Paul J; Wells, Peter P; Chater, Philip A; Carter, James H; Morgan, David J; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M; Wagner, Jakob B; Davies, Thomas E; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K; Taylor, Stuart H; Spencer, Michael S; Kiely, Christopher J; Kelly, Gordon J; Park, Colin W; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable--and hence little known and largely ignored--georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions--a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts. PMID:26878237

  19. Non-precious metal catalysts prepared from precursor comprising cyanamide

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-10-27

    Catalyst comprising graphitic carbon and methods of making thereof; said graphitic carbon comprising a metal species, a nitrogen-containing species and a sulfur containing species. A catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction for an alkaline fuel cell was prepared by heating a mixture of cyanamide, carbon black, and a salt selected from an iron sulfate salt and an iron acetate salt at a temperature of from about 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. under an inert atmosphere. Afterward, the mixture was treated with sulfuric acid at elevated temperature to remove acid soluble components, and the resultant mixture was heated again under an inert atmosphere at the same temperature as the first heat treatment step.

  20. Syntheses of biodiesel precursors: sulfonic acid catalysts for condensation of biomass-derived platform molecules.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R; Bell, Alexis T

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis of transportation fuel from lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive solution to the green alternative-energy problem. The production of biodiesel, in particular, involves the process of upgrading biomass-derived small molecules to diesel precursors containing a specific carbon range (C11 -C23). Herein, a carbon-upgrading process utilizing an acid-catalyzed condensation of furanic platform molecules from biomass is described. Various types of sulfonic acid catalysts have been evaluated for this process, including biphasic and solid supported catalysts. A silica-bound alkyl sulfonic acid catalyst has been developed for promoting carbon-carbon bond formation of biomass-derived carbonyl compounds with 2-methylfuran. This hydrophobic solid acid catalyst exhibits activity and selectivity that are comparable to those of a soluble acid catalyst. The catalyst can be readily recovered and recycled, possesses appreciable hydrolytic stability in the presence of water, and retains its acidity over multiple reaction cycles. Application of this catalyst to biomass-derived platform molecules led to the synthesis of a variety of furanic compounds, which are potential biodiesel precursors.

  1. Hydrodeoxygenation in low-rank coal liquefaction systems using novel organometallic catalyst precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, S.R.; Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-12-31

    Oxygen functionalities, especially phenols, are undesirable components of coal derived liquids. Removal of these compounds from the products of coal liquefaction is required. A beneficial alternative would be the removal of these functionalities, or the prevention of their formation, during the liquefaction process. Organometallic precursors of Co, Ni and Mo have been studied as catalysts. To ascertain the hydrodeoxygenation properties of these catalysts under liquefaction conditions, model compounds were investigated. Anthrone, Dibutylmethyl phenol, dinaphthyl ether and xanthene were studied to provide a comparison of conversions of deoxygenated products. Studies of the deoxygenating abilities of these catalyst precursors in coal liquefaction systems have also been performed. Improvements in conversion and product quality are observed. Both these factors are dependent on the coal used.

  2. Thermal Decomposition of Bulk K-CoMoSx Mixed Alcohol Catalyst Precursors and Effects on Catalyst Morphology and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Menart, M. J.; Hensley, J. E.; Costelow, K. E.

    2012-09-26

    Cobalt molybdenum sulfide-type mixed alcohol catalysts were synthesized via calcination of precipitated bulk sulfides and studied with temperature programmed decomposition analysis. Precursors containing aqueous potassium were also considered. Precipitates thermally decomposed in unique events which released ammonia, carbon dioxide, and sulfur. Higher temperature treatments led to more crystalline and less active catalysts in general with ethanol productivity falling from 203 to 97 g (kg cat){sup -1} h{sup -1} when the calcination temperature was increased from 375 to 500 C. The addition of potassium to the precursor led to materials with crystalline potassium sulfides and good catalytic performance. In general, less potassium was required to promote alcohol selectivity when added before calcination. At calcination temperatures above 350 C, segregated cobalt sulfides were observed, suggesting that thermally decomposed sulfide precursors may contain a mixture of molybdenum and cobalt sulfides instead of a dispersed CoMoS type of material. When dimethyl disulfide was fed to the precursor during calcination, crystalline cobalt sulfides were not detected, suggesting an important role of free sulfur during decomposition.

  3. Biodiesel production using anionic ion-exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Honda, Hiroki; Kuribayashi, Homare; Toda, Takuji; Fukumura, Takuya; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2007-01-01

    The transesterification reactions of triolein with ethanol using various ion-exchange resin catalysts were conducted to produce ethyl oleate as a biodiesel. The anion-exchange resins exhibited much higher catalytic activities than the cation-exchange resin. The anion-exchange resin with a lower cross-linking density and a smaller particle size gave a high reaction rate as well as a high conversion. By combining the three-step regeneration method, the resin could be repeatedly used for the batch transesterification without any loss in the catalytic activity. A continuous transesterification reaction was carried out using an expanded bed reactor packed with the most active resin. The reactor system permitted the continuous production of ethyl oleate with a high conversion.

  4. Diphenylamido Precursors to Bisalkoxide Molybdenum Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Amritanshu; Müller, Peter; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2008-01-01

    We have found that Mo(NAr)(CHR′)(NPh2)2 (R′ = t-Bu or CMe2Ph) and Mo(NAr′)(CHCMe2Ph)(NPh2)2 (Ar = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3; Ar′ = 2,6-Me2C6H3) can be prepared through addition of two equivalents of LiNPh2 to Mo(NR″)(CHR′)(OTf)2(dme) species (R″ = Ar or Ar′ dme = 1,2-dimethoxyethane), although yields are low. A high yield route consists of addition of LiNPh2 to bishexafluro-t-butoxide species. An X-ray structure of Mo(NAr)(CHCMe2Ph)(NPh2)2 reveals that the two diphenylamido groups are oriented in a manner that allows an 18 electron count to be achieved. The diphenylamido complexes react readily with t-BuOH and (CF3)2MeCOH, but not readily with the sterically demanding biphenol H2[Biphen] (Biphen2- = 3,3′-Di-t-butyl-5,5′,6,6′-tetramethyl-1,1′-Biphenyl-2,2′-diolate). The diphenylamido complexes do react with various 3,3′-disubstituted binaphthols to yield binaphtholate catalysts that can be prepared in situ and employed for a simple asymmetric ring-closing metathesis reaction. In several cases conversions and enantioselectivities were comparable to reactions in which isolated catalysts were employed. PMID:19030118

  5. Silica coated noble metal nanoparticle hydrosols as supported catalyst precursors.

    PubMed

    Kong, Tung Shing Adam; Yu, Kai Man Kerry; Tsang, Shik Chi

    2006-04-01

    Synthesis of well-defined nanoparticles has been intensively pursued not only for their fundamental scientific interest, but also for many technological applications. One important development of the nanomaterial is in the area of chemical catalysis. We have now developed a new aqueous-based method for the synthesis of silica encapsulated noble metal nanoparticles in controlled dimensions. Thus, colloid stable silica encapsulated approximately 5 nm platinum nanoparticle is synthesized by a multi-step method. The thickness of the silica coating could be controlled using a different amount of silica precursor. These particles supported on a high surface area alumina are also demonstrated to display a superior hydrogenation activity and stability against metal sintering after thermal activation.

  6. Anodic Deposition of a Robust Iridium-Based Water-Oxidation Catalyst from Organometallic Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Olack, G.; Incarvito, Christopher D; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Artificial photosynthesis, modeled on natural light-driven oxidation of water in Photosystem II, holds promise as a sustainable source of reducing equivalents for producing fuels. Few robust water-oxidation catalysts capable of mediating this difficult four-electron, four-proton reaction have yet been described. We report a new method for generating an amorphous electrodeposited material, principally consisting of iridium and oxygen, which is a robust and long-lived catalyst for water oxidation, when driven electrochemically. The catalyst material is generated by a simple anodic deposition from Cp*Ir aqua or hydroxo complexes in aqueous solution. This work suggests that organometallic precursors may be useful in electrodeposition of inorganic heterogeneous catalysts.

  7. An evaluation of Pt sulfite acid (PSA) as precursor for supported Pt catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Regalbuto, J.R.; Ansel, O.; Miller, J.T.

    2010-11-12

    As a catalyst precursor, platinum sulfite acid (PSA) is easy to use and not relatively expensive, and is a potentially attractive precursor for many types of supported catalysts. The ultimate usefulness for many catalyst applications will depend on the extent that Pt can be dispersed and sulfur eliminated. To our knowledge, there exists no detailed characterization in the catalysis literature of PSA and the nanoparticulate Pt phases derived from it during catalyst pretreatment. To this end a series of supports including alumina, silica, magnesia, niobia, titania, magnesia and carbon were contacted with PSA solutions and subsequently analyzed with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to characterize the Pt species formed upon impregnation, calcination, and reduction. While all catalysts show retention of some S, reasonably small particle sizes with relatively little Pt-S can in some instances be produced using PSA. The amount of retained sulfur appears to decrease with decreasing surface acidity, although even the most acidic supports (niobia and silica) display some storage of S even while only Pt-O bands are observed after calcination or reoxidation. More sulfur was eliminated by high temperature calcinations followed by reduction in hydrogen, at the expense of increasing Pt particle size.

  8. Stereoselective Catalysis Achieved through in Situ Desymmetrization of an Achiral Iron Catalyst Precursor.

    PubMed

    Manna, Cesar M; Kaur, Aman; Yablon, Lauren M; Haeffner, Fredrik; Li, Bo; Byers, Jeffery A

    2015-11-18

    Stereoselective catalysis is described that proceeds with catalyst control but without the need to synthesize preformed chiral catalysts or ligands. Iron-based catalysts were discovered to effect the stereoselective polymerization of lactides starting from a single achiral precursor and the proper choice of an achiral silanol additive. Spectroscopic analysis of the polymer revealed that the stereoselectivity originates from an enantiomorphic site rather than a chain end stereocontrol mechanism. Iron intermediates that are stereogenic at iron are proposed to form in situ as a result of desymmetrization that occurs from a change in the metal coordination number. The proposed mechanism is supported by a combination of spectroscopic measurements, model complexes, kinetic measurements, and DFT calculations.

  9. Alumoxane precursors to designer catalysts and catalyst supports: Catalytic oxidation of dichloromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.L.; Wong, C.; Harlan, C.J.; Kareiva, A.; Barron, A.R.

    1997-12-31

    Carboxylato-alumoxanes are aluminum-oxygen macromolecules consisting of a boehmite-like core surrounded by a sheath of carboxylate groups. The alumoxanes may be processed like organic polymers yet when fired are readily transformed into ceramic oxides. The alumoxanes can be precisely doped at room temperature in aqueous solution with a range of metal cations to prepare novel catalyst and catalyst support materials. The ease of introduction of multiple cations into the alumina lattice via the alumoxane approach provides a method for fine-tuning catalyst support properties and the fabrication of new catalyst materials themselves. Manganese-doped alumina (Mn-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), formed via the doping of an alumoxane with Mn at room temperature, is presented as an example where the alumoxane route provides enhanced catalytic performance over traditional approaches for the low temperature catalytic oxidation of chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs). The Mn-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed from the Mn-doped alumoxane is compared with MnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} prepared by the incipient wetness method, and commercial Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the oxidation/destruction of dichloromethane (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}).

  10. Cationic and anionic vacancies in the crystalline phases of sol-gel magnesia-alumina catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.; Morales, A.; Bokhimi, X.; Navaro, O.; Lopez, T.; Gomez, R.

    1999-02-01

    Magnesium-alumina mixed oxide catalysts at Mg:Al atomic ratios of 3:1, 2:1.8, and 1:2.8 were synthesized by using the sol-gel technique. Dehydroxylation and phase transformations were studied with thermogravimetry. Crystalline structures were measured with X-ray powder diffraction. Position and concentration of anionic and cationic vacancies were obtained by refining crystalline structures with the Rietveld technique. When samples were annealed below 400 C, boehmite, brucite, hydrotalcite, and glushinskite were formed. When they calcined at 600 C, boehmite was transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and brucite, hydrotalcite, and glushinskite into periclase. In magnesium-rich samples, magnesium ions were incorporated into the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} lattice, expanding its unit cell. Sample dehydroxylation produced oxygen vacancies in boehmite, brucite, and {theta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Periclase and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, however, had cationic vacancies in concentrations that depended on calcining temperature. Different models are proposed for explaining the formation mechanisms of the anionic and cationic vacancies.

  11. Methanol-reforming reaction over copper-containing catalysts: the effects of anions and copper loading in the preparation of the catalysts by kneading method

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Takezawa, N.; Minochi, C.

    1981-06-01

    Methanol-reforming reaction CH/sub 3/OH + H/sub 2/O = 3H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ was carried out over copper-containing catalysts which were prepared from hydroxides of copper or from the hydroxide kneaded with various metal oxides. The specific activity (activity per weight of copper used) either of supported or support-free catalyst was markedly increased when the hydroxide was prepared from alkali solution with addition of copper salt solution at higher pH or when the weight percentage of copper on the support was decreased. However, other kinetic parameters such as activation energy and selectivity of the reaction were unaffected by the preparation of the catalyst unless copper chloride was employed as a starting material of the hydroxide preparation at lower pH. DTA, ir, XPS, AES and other chemical analyses of the catalysts revealed that hydroxide ion in the hydroxide precipitate prepared at lower pH exchanged in part with the anionic group of its starting material during the course of the preparation. The anion or its fragment was found to be strongly held on the surface and inhibited the reaction to a great extent. On the other hand, the anion held was markedly decreased when the catalyst was prepared at higher pH. This catalyst was found to be highly active for the title reaction. The surface areas of metallic copper were considerably increased when copper was kneaded with the support. This gave rise to the increase in the specific activity of the catalyst.

  12. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nanocarbon on Electroless NiB Catalyst Using Ethanol Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toru; Sato, Tomomi; Karasawa, Yusuke; Ueno, Kazuyoshi

    2011-05-01

    Nanocarbon materials have been expected as post-Cu interconnect materials for large-scale integrated circuits (LSIs). In this paper, we present a nanocarbon deposition process using electroless plated NiB as the catalyst, which features conformal deposition on patterned dielectric surfaces. It was found that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic films were deposited on the electroless NiB by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using ethanol as the precursor. The graphitic quality estimated from the Raman spectra of the nanocarbon on the NiB catalyst was equivalent to that on a sputter-deposited pure Ni catalyst. The nanocarbon shape was dependent on NiB thickness, and CNTs were grown on 10-nm-thick NiB and graphitic films were grown on 30 nm or thicker NiB. The deposition temperature can be lowered to 505 °C, although the graphitic quality was degraded. It is considered that the electroless catalysts can be effective for nanocarbon deposition on patterned dielectric surfaces.

  13. Directed deposition of silicon nanowires using neopentasilane as precursor and gold as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kämpken, Britta; Wulf, Verena; Auner, Norbert; Winhold, Marcel; Huth, Michael; Rhinow, Daniel; Terfort, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In this work the applicability of neopentasilane (Si(SiH(3))(4)) as a precursor for the formation of silicon nanowires by using gold nanoparticles as a catalyst has been explored. The growth proceeds via the formation of liquid gold/silicon alloy droplets, which excrete the silicon nanowires upon continued decomposition of the precursor. This mechanism determines the diameter of the Si nanowires. Different sources for the gold nanoparticles have been tested: the spontaneous dewetting of gold films, thermally annealed gold films, deposition of preformed gold nanoparticles, and the use of "liquid bright gold", a material historically used for the gilding of porcelain and glass. The latter does not only form gold nanoparticles when deposited as a thin film and thermally annealed, but can also be patterned by using UV irradiation, providing access to laterally structured layers of silicon nanowires.

  14. Ni-based heterogeneous catalyst from a designed molecular precursor for the efficient electrochemical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Denis A; Konev, Dmitry V; Komarova, Natal'ya S; Ionov, Andrey M; Mozhchil, Rais N; Fedyanin, Ivan V

    2016-07-28

    Bimetallic Ni-Mo alkoxide was synthesized and exploited as the single-source precursor for the solution-processed deposition of the mixed-oxide layers on different conducting surfaces. Upon potential cycling in 1 M NaOH, these composites convert, in situ, into highly porous NiOx/NiOOH catalysts characterized by the high electrocatalytic activity for water oxidation under both basic (pH 13.6) and near neutral (pH 9.2) conditions. PMID:27354324

  15. A Molecular Precursor to Phosphaethyne and Its Application in Synthesis of the Aromatic 1,2,3,4-Phosphatriazolate Anion.

    PubMed

    Transue, Wesley J; Velian, Alexandra; Nava, Matthew; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Womack, Caroline C; Jiang, Jun; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; McCarthy, Michael C; Field, Robert W; Cummins, Christopher C

    2016-06-01

    Dibenzo-7-phosphanorbornadiene Ph3PC(H)PA (1, A = C14H10, anthracene) is reported here as a molecular precursor to phosphaethyne (HC≡P), produced together with anthracene and triphenylphosphine. HCP generated by thermolysis of 1 has been observed by molecular beam mass spectrometry, laser-induced fluorescence, microwave spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In toluene, fragmentation of 1 has been found to proceed with activation parameters of ΔH(⧧) = 25.5 kcal/mol and ΔS(⧧) = -2.43 eu and is accompanied by formation of an orange insoluble precipitate. Results from computational studies of the mechanism of HCP generation are in good agreement with experimental data. This high-temperature method of HCP generation has pointed to new reaction chemistry with azide anion to produce the 1,2,3,4-phosphatriazolate anion, HCPN3(-), for which structural data have been obtained in a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. Negative-ion photoelectron spectroscopy has shown the adiabatic detachment energy for this anion to be 3.555(10) eV. The aromaticity of HCPN3(-) has been assessed using nucleus-independent chemical shift, quantum theory of atoms in molecules, and natural bond orbital methods. PMID:27171847

  16. Copper complexes as catalyst precursors in the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Merle; Scholz, Julius; Kronz, Andreas; Siewert, Inke

    2016-04-28

    Herein, we report the synthesis and species distribution of copper(ii) complexes based on two different ligand scaffolds and the application of the two complexes in the electrochemical proton reduction catalysis. The ligands bind to one or two copper(II) ions and the pH-dependent mono/dinuclear equilibrium depends on the steric bulk of the ligands. The two water soluble copper(II) complexes were investigated for their activities in the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In both complexes the copper(ii) ions have a N4-coordination environment composed of N-heterocycles, although in different coordination geometries (SPY-5 and TBPY-5). The solutions of the complexes were highly active catalysts in water at acidic pH but the complexes decompose under catalytic conditions. They act as precursors for highly active copper(0) and Cu2O deposits at the electrode surface, which are in turn the active catalysts. The absence or presence of the ligands has neither an influence on the catalytic activity of the solutions nor an influence on the activity of the deposit formed during controlled potential electrolysis. Finally, we can draw some conclusions on the stability of copper catalysts in the aqueous electrochemical HER. PMID:26986849

  17. Enhanced photodegradation of pentachlorophenol by single and mixed nonionic and anionic surfactants using graphene-TiO₂ as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxin; He, Xin; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Tan; Zhou, Zeyu; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2015-11-01

    The photodegradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a surfactant-containing (single and mixed) complex system using graphene-TiO2 (GT) as catalyst was investigated. The objective was to better understand the behavior of surfactants in a GT catalysis system for its possible use in remediation technology of soil contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). In a single-surfactant system, surfactant molecules aggregated on GT via hydrogen bonding and electrostatic force; nonideal mixing between nonionic and anionic surfactants rendered GT surface with mixed admicelles in a mixed surfactant system. Both effects helped incorporating PCP molecules into surfactant aggregates on catalyst surface. Hence, the targeted pollutants were rendered easily available to photo-yielded oxidative radicals, and photodegradation efficiency was significantly enhanced. Finally, real soil washing-photocatalysis trials proved that anionic-nonionic mixed surfactant soil washing coupled with graphene-TiO2 photocatalysis can be one promising technology for HOC-polluted soil remediation. PMID:26194233

  18. Amino acids, precursors for cationic and anionic intercalation synthesis and characterization of amino acid pillared materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudala, Á.; Pálinkó, I.; Kiricsi, I.

    1999-05-01

    The preparation and characterization of amino acid pillared materials are reported in this contribution. Host substances were Na-montmorillonite for cationic and hydrotalcite for anionic pillaring. Guest molecules were L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine. The pillared materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, BET measurements and FT-IR spectroscopy. Pillaring was successful: the layers propped open and the basal distances increased significantly. For hydrotalcite this increase was always significantly larger than for montmorillonite. This fact indicated that the spatial arrangement of the amino acid moieties is widely different. A model for this arrangement is given.

  19. The effect of catalyst preparation on the performance of alumina-supported ruthenium catalysts. I. The impact of catalytic precursor on particle size and catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mieth, J.A.; Schwarz, J.A. )

    1989-07-01

    The effect of preparation method and the choice of metallic precursor on the performance of a series of Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were studied. Wet impregnation and incipient wetness were the methods employed; ruthenium nitrosylnitrate and ruthenium trichloride were the reagents. In the latter case, either Ru(III)/Ru(IV) chlorospecies or mixtures of Ru(II) hydrazine complexes were the catalytic precursors. The series of Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, with metal loadings from 0.7-5% by weight, were subjected to a battery of performance tests: CO temperature-programmed reaction, steady-state CO hydrogenation, and temperature-programmed surface reaction. The methanation activity and carbon deposited during steady-state reaction varied systematically with the dispersion of Ru on the alumina. High rates of methane production were found on catalysts containing a large reservoir of carbon-containing reaction intermediates. The performance of these catalysts depended on the precursor used in their preparation. The effects of weight loading, method of preparation, and variations in the impregnant pH were small within a group prepared from a common precursor.

  20. The Influence of the Anionic Counter-Ion on the Activity of Ammonium Substituted Hoveyda-Type Olefin Metathesis Catalysts in Aqueous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gułajski, Łukasz; Grela, Karol

    Polar olefin metathesis catalysts, bearing an ammonium group are presented. The electron withdrawing ammonium group not only activates the catalysts electronically, but at the same time makes the catalysts more hydrophilic. Catalysts can be therefore efficiently used not only in traditional media, such as methylene chloride and toluene, but also in technical-grade alcohols, alcohol— water mixtures and in neat water. Finally, in this overview the influence of the anionic counter-ion on the activity of ammonium substituted Hoveyda-type olefin metathesis catalysts in aqueous media is presented.

  1. Heterogenized Water Oxidation Catalysts Prepared by Immobilizing Kläui-Type Organometallic Precursors.

    PubMed

    Pastori, Gabriele; Wahab, Khaja; Bucci, Alberto; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Llorca, Jordi; Idriss, Hicham; Macchioni, Alceo

    2016-09-12

    An efficient heterogenized water oxidation catalyst (2_TiO2 ) has been synthesized by immobilizing the Kläui-type organometallic precursor [Cp*Ir{P(O)(OH)2 }3 ]Na (2, Cp*=1,2,3,4,5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl ligand) onto rutile TiO2 . Iridium is homogeneously distributed at the molecular and atomic/small cluster level in 2_TiO2 and 2'_TiO2 (solid catalyst recovered after the first catalytic run), respectively, as indicated by STEM-HAADF (scanning transmission electron microscopy - high angle annular dark field) studies. 2'_TiO2 exhibits TOF values up to 23.7 min(-1) in the oxidation of water to O2 driven by NaIO4 at nearly neutral pH, and a TON only limited by the amount of NaIO4 used, as indicated by multiple run experiments. Furthermore, while roughly 40 % leaching is observed during the first catalytic run, 2'_TiO2 does not undergo any further leaching even when in contact with strongly basic solutions and completely maintains its activity for thousands of cycles. NMR studies, in combination with ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry), indicate that the activation of 2_TiO2 occurs through the initial oxidative dissociation of PO4 (3-) , ultimately leading to active centers in which a 1:1 P/Ir ratio is present (derived from the removal of two PO4 (3-) units) likely missing the Cp* ligand. PMID:27246987

  2. Fundamental Difference in Reductive Lithiations with Preformed Radical Anions versus Catalytic Aromatic Electron-Transfer Agents: N,N-Dimethylaniline as an Advantageous Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicole; Liu, Peng; Cohen, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    The reductive lithiation of phenyl thioethers, or alkyl chlorides, by either preformed aromatic radical anions or by lithium metal and an aromatic electron-transfer catalyst, is commonly used to prepare organolithiums. Revealed herein is that these two methods are fundamentally different. Reductions with radical anions occur in solution, whereas the catalytic reaction occurs on the surface of lithium, which is constantly reactivated by the catalyst, an unconventional catalyst function. The order of relative reactivity is reversed in the two methods as the dominating factor switches from electronic to steric effects of the alkyl substituent. A catalytic amount of N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) and Li ribbon can achieve reductive lithiation. DMA is significantly cheaper than alternative catalysts, and conveniently, the Li ribbon does not require the removal of the oxide coating when DMA is used as the catalyst.

  3. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. PMID:25044528

  4. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers.

  5. Diacetylenes with Ionic-Liquid-Like Substituents: Associating a Polymerizing Cation with a Polymerizing Anion in a Single Precursor for the Synthesis of N-Doped Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Fahsi, Karim; Dumail, Xavier; Dutremez, Sylvain G; van der Lee, Arie; Vioux, André; Viau, Lydie

    2016-01-26

    Imidazolium- and benzimidazolium-substituted diacetylenes with bromide or nitrogen-rich dicyanamide and tricyanomethanide anions were synthesized and used as precursors for the preparation of N-doped carbon materials. On pyrolysis under argon at 800 °C both halide precursors afforded graphite-like structures with nitrogen contents of about 8.5%. When the dicyanamide and tricyanomethanide precursors were thermolyzed at the same temperature, graphite-like structures were obtained that exhibit nitrogen contents in the range 17-20 wt%; thereby, the benefit of associating a polymerizing cation with a polymerizing anion in a single precursor was demonstrated. On pyrolysis at 1100 °C the nitrogen contents of the latter pyrolysates remain high (ca. 6 wt%). Adsorption measurements with krypton at 77 K indicated that the materials are nonporous. The highest electrical conductivity was observed for a pyrolysate with one of the lowest nitrogen contents, which also has the highest degree of graphitization. Thus, the quest for N-rich carbons with high electrical conductivities should include both maximization of the nitrogen content and optimization of the degree of graphitization. Crystallographic investigation of the precursors and spectroscopic characterization of the pyrolysates prepared by heating at 220 °C indicate that construction of the final carbon framework does not involve the intermediate formation of a polydiacetylene. PMID:26695842

  6. Characterization of different precursors and activated vanadium phosphate catalysts by [sup 31]P NMR spin echo mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Sananes, M.T. Univ. of Liverpool ); Tuel, A.; Volta, J.C. ); Hutchings, G.J. )

    1994-07-01

    In a previous publication, the authors emphasized the use of the spin echo mapping technique applied to [sup 31]P NMR to obtain information on the valence state of vanadium in different environments of phosphorus for several VPO reference structures. In this paper, the authors describe the use of this technique, combined with knowledge of reference phases, to study VPO catalysts prepared from different precursors and used for the oxidation of n-butane into maleic anhydride. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Infrared investigations on metal-support interactions in Ni-SiO{sub 2} catalyst precursors: Role of silica

    SciTech Connect

    Ghuge, K.D.; Babu, G.P.

    1995-02-01

    In a Ni-silica catalyst system prepared by the precipitation/deposition method the silica is reported to play a role in forming the {open_quotes}support{close_quotes} to nickel carbonate (or hydroxide) species. The support formed is identified as various types of nickel silicate species and also as the species comprising -Ni-O-Si- linkages. Further, the support is shown to (i) provide the definite porous structure to the catalyst and (ii) influence the reducibility of nickel species. Also, in nickel catalyst system prepared by impregnation method, formation of silicate species on surface and its influence on reduction of nickel and restriction in metal sintering is well established. However, the mechanism of silica conversion to support species and influence on metal dispersion, the formation of a definite porous network and catalytic activity in Ni-silica catalyst system prepared by precipitation is not well established. In this paper Ni-silica catalyst precursors were prepared by adding separate solutions of nickel sulfate and sodium carbonate simultaneously to the precipitation vessel containing a silica slurry as described by Nitta et al. and maintaining a SiO{sub 2}/Ni ratio of 0.5, precipitation temperature = 92{degrees}C, and pH = 8.5. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Nickel-carbon nanocomposites prepared using castor oil as precursor: A novel catalyst for ethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, Neftalí L. V.; Garcia, Irene T. S.; Raubach, Cristiane W.; Krolow, Mateus; Santos, Cláudia C. G.; Probst, Luiz F. D.; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    A novel and simple method to prepare nickel-based catalysts for ethanol steam reforming is proposed. The present method was developed using castor oil as a precursor. The results clarify that the nickel-carbon (Ni/C) catalyst has a high activity for ethanol steam reforming. It was observed that the catalytic behavior could be modified according to the experimental conditions employed. Moreover, it is interesting to note that the increase in the catalytic activity of the Ni/C nanocomposite over time, at 500 and 600 °C of reaction temperature, may be associated with the formation of filamentous carbon. The preliminary results indicate that the novel methodology used, led to the obtainment of materials with important properties that can be extended to applications in different catalytic process.

  9. Chloride-Bridged Dinuclear Rhodium(III) Complexes Bearing Chiral Diphosphine Ligands: Catalyst Precursors for Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Simple Olefins.

    PubMed

    Kita, Yusuke; Hida, Shoji; Higashihara, Kenya; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Higashida, Kosuke; Mashima, Kazushi

    2016-07-11

    Efficient rhodium(III) catalysts were developed for asymmetric hydrogenation of simple olefins. A new series of chloride-bridged dinuclear rhodium(III) complexes 1 were synthesized from the rhodium(I) precursor [RhCl(cod)]2 , chiral diphosphine ligands, and hydrochloric acid. Complexes from the series acted as efficient catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of (E)-prop-1-ene-1,2-diyldibenzene and its derivatives without any directing groups, in sharp contrast to widely used rhodium(I) catalytic systems that require a directing group for high enantioselectivity. The catalytic system was applied to asymmetric hydrogenation of allylic alcohols, alkenylboranes, and unsaturated cyclic sulfones. Control experiments support the superiority of dinuclear rhodium(III) complexes 1 over typical rhodium(I) catalytic systems. PMID:27088539

  10. Influence of the metal precursor on the catalytic behavior of Pt/ceria catalysts in the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of H₂ (PROX).

    PubMed

    Jardim, Erika O; Rico-Francés, Soledad; Coloma, Fernando; Anderson, James A; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The effect of the metal precursor (presence or absence of chlorine) on the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of H2 over Pt/CeO2 catalysts has been studied. The catalysts are prepared using (Pt(NH3)4)(NO3)2 and H2PtCl6, as precursors, in order to ascertain the effect of the chlorine species on the chemical properties of the support and on the catalytic behavior of these systems in the PROX reaction. The results show that chloride species exert an important effect on the redox properties of the oxide support due to surface chlorination. Consequently, the chlorinated catalyst exhibits a poorer catalytic activity at low temperatures compared with the chlorine-free catalyst, and this is accompanied by a higher selectivity to CO2 even at high reaction temperatures. It is proposed that the CO oxidation mechanism follows different pathways on each catalyst.

  11. Influence of the metal precursor on the catalytic behavior of Pt/ceria catalysts in the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of H₂ (PROX).

    PubMed

    Jardim, Erika O; Rico-Francés, Soledad; Coloma, Fernando; Anderson, James A; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The effect of the metal precursor (presence or absence of chlorine) on the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of H2 over Pt/CeO2 catalysts has been studied. The catalysts are prepared using (Pt(NH3)4)(NO3)2 and H2PtCl6, as precursors, in order to ascertain the effect of the chlorine species on the chemical properties of the support and on the catalytic behavior of these systems in the PROX reaction. The results show that chloride species exert an important effect on the redox properties of the oxide support due to surface chlorination. Consequently, the chlorinated catalyst exhibits a poorer catalytic activity at low temperatures compared with the chlorine-free catalyst, and this is accompanied by a higher selectivity to CO2 even at high reaction temperatures. It is proposed that the CO oxidation mechanism follows different pathways on each catalyst. PMID:25531415

  12. Structural Characterization of Alumina-Supported Rh Catalysts: Effects of Ceriation and Zirconiation by using Metal–Organic Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kroner, Anna B; Newton, Mark A; Tromp, Moniek; Russell, Andrea E; Dent, Andrew J; Evans, John

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the addition of ceria and zirconia on the structural properties of supported rhodium catalysts (1.6 and 4 wt % Rh/γ-Al2O3) are studied. Ceria and zirconia are deposited by using two preparation methods. Method I involves the deposition of ceria on γ-Al2O3 from Ce(acac)3, and the rhodium metal is subsequently added, whereas method II is based on a controlled surface reaction technique, that is, the decomposition of metal–organic M(acac)x (in which M=Ce, x=3 and M=Zr, x=4) on Rh/γ-Al2O3. The structures of the prepared catalyst materials are characterized ex situ by using N2 physisorption, transmission electron microscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission election microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS). All supported rhodium systems readily oxidize in air at room temperature. By using ceriated and zirconiated precursors, a larger rhodium-based metallic core fraction is obtained in comparison to the undoped rhodium catalysts, suggesting that ceria and zirconia protect the rhodium particles against extensive oxidation. XPS results indicate that after the calcination and reduction treatments, a small amount of chlorine is retained on the support of all rhodium catalysts. EXAFS analysis shows significant Rh—Cl interactions for Rh/Al2O3 and Rh/CeOx/Al2O3 (method I) catalysts. After reaction with H2/He in situ, for series of samples with 1.6 wt % Rh, the EXAFS first shell analysis affords a mean size of approximately 30 atoms. A broader spread is evident with a 4 wt % rhodium loading (ca. 30–110 atoms), with the incorporation of zirconium providing the largest particle sizes. PMID:23943563

  13. A novel semiconductor compatible path for nano-graphene synthesis using CBr4 precursor and Ga catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. M.; Gong, Q.; Li, Y. Y.; Cao, C. F.; Zhou, H. F.; Yan, J. Y.; Liu, Q. B.; Zhang, L. Y.; Ding, G. Q.; Di, Z. F.; Xie, X. M.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel semiconductor compatible path for nano-graphene synthesis using precursors containing C-Br bonding and liquid catalyst. The unique combination of CBr4 as precursor and Ga as catalyst leads to efficient C precipitation at a synthesis temperature of 200°C or lower. The non-wetting nature of liquid Ga on tested substrates limits nano-scale graphene to form on Ga droplets and substrate surfaces at low synthesis temperatures of T ≤ 450°C and at droplet/substrate interfaces by C diffusion via droplet edges when T ≥ 400°C. Good quality interface nano-graphene is demonstrated and the quality can be further improved by optimization of synthesis conditions and proper selection of substrate type and orientation. The proposed method provides a scalable and transfer-free route to synthesize graphene/semiconductor heterostructures, graphene quantum dots as well as patterned graphene nano-structures at a medium temperature range of 400–700°C suitable for most important elementary and compound semiconductors. PMID:24722194

  14. Carbon supported Ag nanoparticles as high performance cathode catalyst for H2/O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Le; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhichao; Qi, Ji; Li, Wenzhen

    2013-01-01

    A solution phase-based nanocapsule method was successfully developed to synthesize non-platinum metal catalyst—carbon supported Ag nanoparticles (Ag/C). XRD patterns and TEM image show Ag nanoparticles with a small average size (5.4 nm) and narrow size distribution (2–9 nm) are uniformly dispersed on the carbon black Vulcan XC-72 support. The intrinsic activity and pathway of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the Ag/C and commercial Pt/C were investigated using rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) tests at room temperature. The results confirmed that the 4-electron pathway of ORR proceeds on small Ag nanoparticles, and showed comparable ORR activities on the self-prepared Ag/C and a commercial Pt/C. A single H2-O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) with the Ag/C cathode catalyst exhibited an open circuit potential of 0.98 V and a peak power density of 190 mW/cm2 at 80°C. PMID:24790944

  15. Delamination of layered zeolite precursors under mild conditions: synthesis of UCB-1 via fluoride/chloride anion-promoted exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Isao; Nigra, Michael M; Hwang, Son-Jong; Ha, Jeong-Myeong; Rea, Thomas; Zones, Stacey I; Katz, Alexander

    2011-03-16

    New material UCB-1 is synthesized via the delamination of zeolite precursor MCM-22 (P) at pH 9 using an aqueous solution of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, tetrabutylammonium fluoride, and tetrabutylammonium chloride at 353 K. Characterization by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen physisorption at 77 K indicates the same degree of delamination in UCB-1 as previously reported for delaminated zeolite precursors, which require a pH of greater than 13.5 and sonication in order to achieve exfoliation. UCB-1 consists of a high degree of structural integrity via (29)Si MAS NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, and no detectable formation of amorphous silica phase via transmission electron microscopy. Porosimetry measurements demonstrate a lack of hysteresis in the N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and macroporosity in UCB-1. The new method is generalizable to a variety of Si:Al ratios and leads to delaminated zeolite precursor materials lacking amorphization. PMID:21341663

  16. Selenium-containing organic nanoparticles as silent precursors for ultra-sensitive thiol-responsive transmembrane anion transport.

    PubMed

    Lang, Chao; Zhang, Xin; Dong, Zeyuan; Luo, Quan; Qiao, Shanpeng; Huang, Zupeng; Fan, Xiaotong; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-01

    An anion transporter with a selenoxide group was able to form nanoparticles in water, whose activity was fully turned off due to the aggregation effect. The formed nanoparticles have a uniform size and can be readily dispersed in water at high concentrations. Turn-on of the nanoparticles by reducing molecules is proposed to be a combined process, including the reduction of selenoxide to selenide, disassembly of the nanoparticles and location of the transporter to the lipid membrane. Accordingly, a special acceleration phase can be observed in the turn-on kinetic curves. Since turn-on of the nanoparticles is quantitatively related to the amount of reductant, the nanoparticles can be activated in a step-by-step manner. Due to the sensibility of this system to thiols, cysteine can be detected at low nanomolar concentrations. This ultra-sensitive thiol-responsive transmembrane anion transport system is quite promising in biological applications. PMID:26783054

  17. Selenium-containing organic nanoparticles as silent precursors for ultra-sensitive thiol-responsive transmembrane anion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Chao; Zhang, Xin; Dong, Zeyuan; Luo, Quan; Qiao, Shanpeng; Huang, Zupeng; Fan, Xiaotong; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-01-01

    An anion transporter with a selenoxide group was able to form nanoparticles in water, whose activity was fully turned off due to the aggregation effect. The formed nanoparticles have a uniform size and can be readily dispersed in water at high concentrations. Turn-on of the nanoparticles by reducing molecules is proposed to be a combined process, including the reduction of selenoxide to selenide, disassembly of the nanoparticles and location of the transporter to the lipid membrane. Accordingly, a special acceleration phase can be observed in the turn-on kinetic curves. Since turn-on of the nanoparticles is quantitatively related to the amount of reductant, the nanoparticles can be activated in a step-by-step manner. Due to the sensibility of this system to thiols, cysteine can be detected at low nanomolar concentrations. This ultra-sensitive thiol-responsive transmembrane anion transport system is quite promising in biological applications.An anion transporter with a selenoxide group was able to form nanoparticles in water, whose activity was fully turned off due to the aggregation effect. The formed nanoparticles have a uniform size and can be readily dispersed in water at high concentrations. Turn-on of the nanoparticles by reducing molecules is proposed to be a combined process, including the reduction of selenoxide to selenide, disassembly of the nanoparticles and location of the transporter to the lipid membrane. Accordingly, a special acceleration phase can be observed in the turn-on kinetic curves. Since turn-on of the nanoparticles is quantitatively related to the amount of reductant, the nanoparticles can be activated in a step-by-step manner. Due to the sensibility of this system to thiols, cysteine can be detected at low nanomolar concentrations. This ultra-sensitive thiol-responsive transmembrane anion transport system is quite promising in biological applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic procedure and

  18. Unveiling N-protonation and anion-binding effects on Fe/N/C-catalysts for O2 reduction in PEM fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Juan; Jaouen, Frédéric; Lefèvre, Michel; Kramm, Ulrike I; Proietti, Eric; Dodelet, Jean-Pol; Bogdanoff, Peter; Fiechter, Sebastian; Abs-Wurmbach, Irmgard; Bertrand, Patrick; Arruda, Thomas M; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2011-11-18

    The high cost of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells would be considerably reduced if platinumbased catalysts were replaced by iron-based substitutes, which have recently demonstrated comparable activity for oxygen reduction, but whose cause of activity decay in acidic medium has been elusive. Here, we reveal that the activity of Fe/N/C-catalysts prepared through a pyrolysis in NH3 is mostly imparted by acid-resistant FeN4-sites whose turnover frequency for the O2 reduction can be regulated by fine chemical changes of the catalyst surface. We show that surface N-groups protonate at pH 1 and subsequently bind anions. This results in decreased activity for the O2 reduction. The anions can be removed chemically or thermally, which restores the activity of acid-resistant FeN4-sites. These results are interpreted as an increased turnover frequency of FeN4-sites when specific surface N-groups protonate. These unprecedented findings provide new perspective for stabilizing the most active Fe/N/C-catalysts known to date.

  19. Unveiling N-Protonation and Anion-Binding Effects on Fe/N/C Catalysts for O2 Reduction in Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    J Herranz; F Jaouen; M Lefevre; U Kramm; E Proietti; J Dodelet; P Bogdanoff; S Fiechter; I Abs-Wurbach; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The high cost of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells would be considerably reduced if platinum-based catalysts were replaced by iron-based substitutes, which have recently demonstrated comparable activity for oxygen reduction but whose cause of activity decay in acidic medium has been elusive. Here, we reveal that the activity of Fe/N/C catalysts prepared through a pyrolysis in NH{sub 3} is mostly imparted by acid-resistant FeN{sub 4} sites whose turnover frequency for the O{sub 2} reduction can be regulated by fine chemical changes of the catalyst surface. We show that surface N-groups protonate at pH 1 and subsequently bind anions. This results in decreased activity for the O{sub 2} reduction. The anions can be removed chemically or thermally, which restores the activity of acid-resistant FeN{sub 4} sites. These results are interpreted as an increased turnover frequency of FeN{sub 4} sites when specific surface N-groups protonate. These unprecedented findings provide a new perspective for stabilizing the most active Fe/N/C catalysts known to date.

  20. Performance of supported catalysts based on a new copper vanadate-type precursor for catalytic oxidation of toluene.

    PubMed

    Palacio, L A; Silva, E R; Catalão, R; Silva, J M; Hoyos, D A; Ribeiro, F R; Ribeiro, M F

    2008-05-01

    A new copper vanadate precursor with the formula NH(4)[Cu(2.5)V(2)O(7)(OH)(2)] . H(2)O was synthesized and deposited on two different supports, ZSM-5 and amorphous SiO(2), by a hydrothermal method or by mechanical mixture. The catalytic behaviour was evaluated in the total oxidation of toluene and the characterization was performed by H(2)-temperature-programmed reduction (H(2)-TPR), thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the copper vanadate phase comprises two mixed oxides, one of them crystalline, the Ziesite phase, and the other one amorphous. The supported catalysts presented a content of copper vanadate phase of about 9-11 wt.%. The copper vanadate deposited on ZSM-5 by the hydrothermal method evidences the best performance in the oxidation of toluene. This behaviour can be associated with the smaller size and higher dispersion of the particles on the support, which was confirmed by their better reducibility and higher band gap energy value compared with the other series of studied catalysts.

  1. An acetate bound cobalt oxide catalyst for water oxidation: role of monovalent anions and cations in lowering overpotential.

    PubMed

    Dey, Subal; Mondal, Biswajit; Dey, Abhishek

    2014-06-28

    A homogeneous solution of Co(II) in acetate buffer at pH 7 is found to be an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC) showing significantly greater current density than Co(II) in phosphate buffer (Co-Pi) under identical conditions owing to the higher solubility of the former. When electrodeposited on ITO/FTO electrodes it forms acetate bound cobalt(II)-oxide materials (Co-Ac-WOC) showing a catalytic current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2) at 830 mV and 1 mA cm(-2) at 1 V in a pH 7 buffer solution. The morphology of Co-Ac-WOC and its evolution with time and deposition potential is investigated with AFM, HR-TEM and SEM. The chemical composition of Co-Ac-WOC is investigated using XPS, EDX, ATR-FTIR and combustion analysis which indicate that this material has a CoO core with chloride and acetate anions bound to the Co center. Sodium is found to be integrated in the Co-Ac-WOC. The presence of the sodium and chloride ions lowers the onset potential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) by 240 mV relative to the classic Co-Pi at pH 7. The lower onset potential and higher OER current lowers the exchange current density to 10(-6.7) A cm(-2) in Co-Ac-WOC relative to 10(-8)-10(-10) A cm(-2) in Co-Pi and its derivatives.

  2. Water oxidation by electrodeposited cobalt oxides--role of anions and redox-inert cations in structure and function of the amorphous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Risch, Marcel; Klingan, Katharina; Ringleb, Franziska; Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Fischer, Anna; Dau, Holger

    2012-03-12

    For the production of nonfossil fuels, water oxidation by inexpensive cobalt-based catalysts is of high interest. Films for the electrocatalysis of water oxidation were obtained by oxidative self-assembly (electrodeposition) from aqueous solutions containing, apart from Co, either K, Li or Ca with either a phosphate, acetate or chloride anion. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Co K-edge revealed clusters of edge-sharing CoO(6) octahedra in all films, but the size or structural disorder of the Co-oxido clusters differed. Whereas potassium binding is largely unspecific, CaCo(3) O(4) cubanes, which resemble the CaMn(3) O(4) cubane of the biological catalyst in oxygenic photosynthesis, may form, as suggested by XAS at the Ca K-edge. Cyclic voltammograms in a potassium phosphate buffer at pH 7 revealed that no specific combination of anions and redox-inactive cations is required for catalytic water oxidation. However, the anion type modulates not only the size (or order) of the Co-oxido clusters, but also electrodeposition rates, redox potentials, the capacity for oxidative charging, and catalytic currents. On these grounds, structure-activity relations are discussed.

  3. Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation over La-M-Cu-Zn-O (M = Y, Ce, Mg, Zr) catalysts derived from perovskite-type precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Haijuan; Li, Feng; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Ning; Xiao, Fukui; Wei, Wei; Zhong, Liangshu; Sun, Yuhan

    2014-04-01

    A series of La-M-Cu-Zn-O (M = Y, Ce, Mg, Zr) based perovskite-type catalysts are prepared by sol-gel method and characterized by XRD, BET, TPR, N2O-adsorption, XPS and TPD techniques. The results indicate that all the catalysts exhibit La2CuO4 perovskite structure. The addition of Ce, Mg and Zr lead to smaller particles, lower reduction temperature, higher Cu dispersion, larger amount of hydrogen desorption at low temperature and more amount of basic sites. However, Y has less affects on the physicochemical properties. The catalysts derived from perovskite-type precursors show high selectivity for methanol, which is correlated with the Cuα+ species that exists in the reduced catalysts. More exposed Cu surface area is favorable for high CO2 conversion.

  4. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of nanostructured copper substituted ZnM2O4 (M = Al, Ga) spinels as precursors for thermally stable Cu catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Franziska; Massue, Cyriac; Kühl, Stefanie; Kunkes, Edward; Girgsdies, Frank; Kasatkin, Igor; Zhang, Bingsen; Friedrich, Matthias; Luo, Yuan; Armbrüster, Marc; Patzke, Greta R.; Behrens, Malte

    2012-03-01

    Nanostructured CuxZn1-xAl2O4 with a Cu : Zn ratio of ¼ : ¾ has been prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis at 150 °C and used as a precursor for Cu/ZnO/Al2O3-based catalysts. The spinel nanoparticles exhibit an average size of approximately 5 nm and a high specific surface area (above 250 m2 g-1). Cu nanoparticles of an average size of 3.3 nm can be formed by reduction of the spinel precursor in hydrogen and the accessible metallic Cu(0) surface area of the reduced catalyst was 8 m2 g-1. The catalytic performance of the material in CO2 hydrogenation and methanol steam reforming was compared with conventionally prepared Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 reference catalysts. The observed lower performance of the spinel-based samples is attributed to a lack of synergetic interaction of the Cu nanoparticles with ZnO due to the incorporation of Zn2+ in the stable spinel lattice. Despite its lower performance, however, the nanostructured nature of the spinel catalyst was stable after thermal treatment up to 500 °C in contrast to other Cu-based catalysts. Furthermore, a large fraction of the re-oxidized copper migrates back into the spinel upon calcination of the reduced catalyst, thereby enabling a regeneration of sintered catalysts after prolonged usage at high temperatures. Similarly prepared samples with Ga instead of Al exhibit a more crystalline catalyst with a spinel particle size around 20 nm. The slightly decreased Cu(0) surface area of 3.2 m2 g-1 due to less copper incorporation is not a significant drawback for the methanol steam reforming.Nanostructured CuxZn1-xAl2O4 with a Cu : Zn ratio of ¼ : ¾ has been prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis at 150 °C and used as a precursor for Cu/ZnO/Al2O3-based catalysts. The spinel nanoparticles exhibit an average size of approximately 5 nm and a high specific surface area (above 250 m2 g-1). Cu nanoparticles of an average size of 3.3 nm can be formed by reduction of the spinel precursor in hydrogen

  5. Engineering Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Growth by Decoupled Thermal Treatment of Precursor and Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Meshot, E.; Plata, D; Tawfick, S; Zhang, Y; Verploegen, E; Hart, A

    2009-01-01

    We study synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) 'forests' by a decoupled method that facilitates control of the mean diameter and structural quality of the CNTs and enables tuning of the kinetics for efficient growth to forest heights of several millimeters. The growth substrate temperature (Ts) primarily determines the CNT diameter, whereas independent and rapid thermal treatment (Tp) of the C2H4/H2 reactant mixture significantly changes the growth rate and terminal forest height but does not change the CNT diameter. Synchrotron X-ray scattering is utilized for precise, nondestructive measurement of CNT diameter in large numbers of samples. CNT structural quality monotonically increases with Ts yet decreases with Tp, and forests grown by this decoupled method have significantly higher quality than those grown using a conventional single-zone tube furnace. Chemical analysis reveals that the thermal treatment generates a broad population of hydrocarbon species, and a nonmonotonic relationship between catalyst lifetime and Tp suggests that certain carbon species either enhance or inhibit CNT growth. However, the forest height kinetics, as measured in real-time during growth, are self-similar, thereby indicating that a common mechanism of growth termination may be present over a wide range of process conditions.

  6. Water-Soluble Pd Nanoparticles Synthesized from ω-Carboxyl-S-Alkanethiosulfate Ligand Precursors as Unimolecular Micelle Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Gavia, Diego J.; Maung, May S.; Shon, Young-Seok

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a two-phase synthesis of water-soluble carboxylate-functionalized alkanethiolate-capped Pd nanoparticles from ω-carboxyl-S-alkanethiosulfate sodium salts. The two-phase methodology using the thiosulfate ligand passivation protocol allowed a highly specific control over the surface ligand coverage of these nanoparticles, which are lost in a one-phase aqueous system because of the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of thiosulfate to thiolate. Systematic synthetic variations investigated in this study included the concentration of ω-carboxyl-S-alkanethiosulfate ligand precursors and reducing agent, NaBH4, and the overall ligand chain length. The resulting water-soluble Pd nanoparticles were isolated and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), 1H NMR, UV–vis, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Among different variations, a decrease in the molar equivalent of NaBH4 resulted in a reduction in the surface ligand density while maintaining a similar particle core size. Additionally, reducing the chain length of the thiosulfate ligand precursor also led to the formation of stable nanoparticles with a lower surface coverage. Since the metal core size of these Pd nanoparticle variations remained quite consistent, direct correlation studies between ligand properties and catalytic activities against hydrogenation/isomerization of allyl alcohol could be performed. Briefly, Pd nanoparticles dissolved in water favored the hydrogenation of allyl alcohol to 1-propanol whereas Pd nanoparticles heterogeneously dispersed in chloroform exhibited a rather high selectivity towards the isomerization product (propanal). The results suggested that the surrounding ligand environments, such as the ligand structure, conformation, and surface coverage, were crucial in determining the overall activity and selectivity of the Pd nanoparticle catalysts. PMID:24246150

  7. Mulliken Hush elucidation of the encounter (precursor) complex in intermolecular electron transfer via self-exchange of tetracyanoethylene anion-radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosokha, S. V.; Newton, M. D.; Head-Gordon, M.; Kochi, J. K.

    2006-05-01

    The paramagnetic [1:1] encounter complex (TCNE)2-rad is established as the important precursor in the kinetics and mechanism of electron-transfer for the self-exchange between tetracyanoethylene acceptor ( TCNE) and its radical-anion as the donor. Spectroscopic observation of the dimeric complex (TCNE)2-rad by its intervalence absorption band at the solvent-dependent wavelength of λIV ˜ 1500 nm facilitates the application of Mulliken-Hush theory which reveals the significant electronic interaction extant between the pair of cofacial TCNE moieties with the sizable coupling of HDA = 1000 cm -1. The transient existence of such an encounter complex provides the critical link in the electron-transfer kinetics by lowering the classical Marcus reorganization barrier by the amount of HDA in this strongly adiabatic system. Ab initio quantum-mechanical methods as applied to independent theoretical computations of both the reorganization energy ( λ) and the electronic coupling element ( HDA) confirm the essential correctness of the Mulliken-Hush formalism for fast electron transfer via strongly coupled donor/acceptor encounter complexes.

  8. Effect of cobalt precursors on the dispersion, reduction, and CO oxidation of CoO(x)/γ-Al2O3 catalysts calcined in N2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Dong, Lihui; Yu, Wujiang; Liu, Lianjun; Deng, Yu; Liu, Bin; Wan, Haiqin; Gao, Fei; Sun, Keqin; Dong, Lin

    2011-03-15

    The present work tentatively investigated the effect of cobalt precursors (cobalt acetate and cobalt nitrate) on the physicochemical properties of CoO(x)/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalysts calcined in N(2). XRD, Raman, XPS, FTIR, and UV-vis DRS results suggested that CoO/γ-Al(2)O(3) was obtained from cobalt acetate precursors and CoO was dispersed on γ-Al(2)O(3) below its dispersion capacity of 1.50 mmol/(100 m(2) γ-Al(2)O(3)), whereas Co(3)O(4)/γ-Al(2)O(3) was obtained from cobalt nitrate precursors and Co(3)O(4) preferred to agglomerate above the dispersion capacity of 0.15 mmol/(100m(2) γ-Al(2)O(3)). Compared with Co(3)O(4)/γ-Al(2)O(3), CoO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalysts were difficult to be reduced and easy to desorb oxygen species at low temperatures and presented high activities for CO oxidation as proved by H(2)-TPR, O(2)-TPD, and CO oxidation model reaction results. A surface incorporation model was proposed to explain the dispersion and reduction properties of CoO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalysts.

  9. Effect of cobalt precursors on the dispersion, reduction, and CO oxidation of CoO(x)/γ-Al2O3 catalysts calcined in N2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Dong, Lihui; Yu, Wujiang; Liu, Lianjun; Deng, Yu; Liu, Bin; Wan, Haiqin; Gao, Fei; Sun, Keqin; Dong, Lin

    2011-03-15

    The present work tentatively investigated the effect of cobalt precursors (cobalt acetate and cobalt nitrate) on the physicochemical properties of CoO(x)/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalysts calcined in N(2). XRD, Raman, XPS, FTIR, and UV-vis DRS results suggested that CoO/γ-Al(2)O(3) was obtained from cobalt acetate precursors and CoO was dispersed on γ-Al(2)O(3) below its dispersion capacity of 1.50 mmol/(100 m(2) γ-Al(2)O(3)), whereas Co(3)O(4)/γ-Al(2)O(3) was obtained from cobalt nitrate precursors and Co(3)O(4) preferred to agglomerate above the dispersion capacity of 0.15 mmol/(100m(2) γ-Al(2)O(3)). Compared with Co(3)O(4)/γ-Al(2)O(3), CoO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalysts were difficult to be reduced and easy to desorb oxygen species at low temperatures and presented high activities for CO oxidation as proved by H(2)-TPR, O(2)-TPD, and CO oxidation model reaction results. A surface incorporation model was proposed to explain the dispersion and reduction properties of CoO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalysts. PMID:21216407

  10. Dry reforming of methane on Ni-Mg-Al nano-spheroid oxide catalysts prepared by the sol-gel method from hydrotalcite-like precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Albert R.; Asencios, Yvan J. O.; Assaf, Elisabete M.; Assaf, José M.

    2013-09-01

    Nanocapsular hydrotalcites (layered double hydroxides - LDHs) were synthesized by the sol-gel method and used as precursors of nano-structured mixed oxides containing various nickel loads (4, 15 and 19 wt%). The best conditions for the preparation of LDHs were analyzed and the structures of the resulting mixed oxides were studied. The optimal nickel load and calcining conditions were optimized. Finally, the resulting catalysts were tested in the dry reforming of methane for 8 h at 800 °C under atmospheric pressure. These materials showed high activity and stability, and the coke deposits were minimal on the catalyst prepared under optimal conditions (19 wt% nickel load and thermal treatment at 650 °C). The best catalyst formed amorphous carbon, which seems not to be prejudicial to the reaction.

  11. Molybdenum(VI) catalysts obtained from η3-allyl dicarbonyl precursors: synthesis, characterization and catalytic performance in cyclooctene epoxidation.

    PubMed

    Gamelas, Carla A; Gomes, Ana C; Bruno, Sofia M; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Valente, Anabela A; Pillinger, Martyn; Romão, Carlos C; Gonçalves, Isabel S

    2012-03-28

    The oxidative decarbonylation of the η(3)-allyl dicarbonyl complexes [Mo(η(3)-C(3)H(5))Cl(CO)(2)(L)] (L = 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) (1), 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine (di-tBu-bipy) (2)) by reaction with aqueous tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) or H(2)O(2) gave the following compounds in good to excellent yields: the oxo-bridged dimers [MoO(2)Cl(L)](2)O (L = bipy (3), di-tBu-bipy (6)) using TBHP(10 equiv.)/CH(3)CN/r.t.; the molybdenum oxide/bipyridine hybrid material {[MoO(3)(bipy)][MoO(3)(H(2)O)]}(n) (4) and the octanuclear complex [Mo(8)O(24)(di-tBu-bipy)(4)] (7) using TBHP(50 equiv.)/H(2)O/70 °C; the oxodiperoxo complexes MoO(O(2))(2)(L) (L = bipy (5), di-tBu-bipy (8)) using H(2)O(2)(10 equiv.)/CH(3)CN/r.t. The structure of 7·x(solvent) (where solvent = CH(2)Cl(2) and/or diethyl ether) was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Despite possessing the same windmill-type complex as that described previously for 7·10CH(2)Cl(2), the crystal structure of 7·x(solvent) is unique due to differences in the crystal packing. Compounds 1-8 were examined as catalysts or catalyst precursors for the epoxidation of cyclooctene using aqueous TBHP or H(2)O(2) as oxidant at 55 or 70 °C. Reactions were performed without co-solvent or with the addition of water, ethanol or acetonitrile. Cyclooctene oxide was always the only reaction product. Solids recovered after 24 h reaction at 70 °C were identified by FT-IR spectroscopy as the hybrid 4 from (1,3-5)/TBHP, complex 5 from (1,3-5)/H(2)O(2), and complex 8 from (2,6-8)/H(2)O(2). With TBHP as oxidant, the highest epoxide yields (for 24 h reaction at 70 °C) were obtained using excess H(2)O as solvent (28-38% for 1,3-5; 87-98% for 2,6-8), while with H(2)O(2) as oxidant, the highest epoxide yields were obtained using CH(3)CN as solvent (54-81% for 3-8).

  12. Dimethyl carbonate production via the oxidative carbonylation ofmethanol over Cu/SiO2 catalysts prepared via molecular precursor graftingand chemical vapor deposition approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Ian J.; Fujdala, Kyle L.; Bell, Alexis T.; Tilley, T. Don

    2004-09-27

    The influence of catalyst synthesis method and Cu source on the activity and selectivity of Cu/SiO2 catalysts for the gas-phase oxidative carbonylation of methanol to dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is reported. [CuOSi(O tBu)3]4, [CuO tBu]4, and CuCl were used as precursors to produce highly dispersed silica-supported copper. XANES and EXAFS characterization prior to reaction (but after thermal treatment under He) showed that Cu in the catalysts prepared with CuCl and [CuOSi(O tBu)3]4 was present primarily as isolated Cu(I) species, whereas [CuO tBu]4 produced 1-nm Cu particles. During the catalytic reaction, the Cu in catalysts prepared from CuCl and [CuOSi(O tBu)3]4 formed highly dispersed CuO moieties, whereas the Cu in catalysts prepared from [CuO tBu]4 formed a cuprous oxide layer over a Cu(0) core. For comparison, poorly dispersed Cu on silica was prepared via traditional incipient wetness impregnation with Cu(NO3)2. It was found that activity for DMC formation increased with increasing Cu dispersion. The selectivity for DMC formation (relative to CO) decreased with decreasing Cu dispersion when the original state of the Cu was Cu(0) directly preceding reaction conditions.

  13. Temperature-programmed sulfiding of precursor cobalt oxide genesis of highly active sites on sulfided cobalt catalyst for hydrogenation and isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Inamura, Kazuhiro; Takyu, Toshiyuki ); Okamoto, Yasuaki; Nagata, Kozo; Imanaka, Toshinobu )

    1992-02-01

    It was found that the method of sulfidation of cobalt oxide strongly affects the catalytic activities and selectivities of the resultant cobalt sulfide catalyst, as well as the calcination temperature of the cobalt oxide. When cobalt oxide was sulfided at 673 K by a temperature-programmed sulfiding method (a heating rate of 6 K/min), catalytic activities for the hydrogenation of butadiene and the isomerization of 1-butene were considerably enhanced compared with those for cobalt sulfide prepared by isothermal sulfidation at 673 K. Results of temperature-programmed sulfiding (TPS), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) suggest that the catalysts showing high catalytic activities after sulfidation are partially sulfided at 673 K and consist of the unsulfided cobalt core phases (CoO or metallic Co). The sulfidation property of precursor cobalt oxides has been studied using TPS, simulating the sulfidation process of the cobalt sulfide catalysts. Two distinctly different kinds of sulfidation process are estimated by TPS measurements of the cobalt oxides. The calcination temperature of the precursor cobalt oxides strongly affects the sulfidation paths. They are differentiated in terms of the presence of a metallic Co intermediate. The relationship of the mechanism of sulfidation of the cobalt oxides to the generation of highly active sites is discussed.

  14. Surface properties of the Ni-silica gel catalyst precursors for the vegetable oil hydrogenation process: N2 sorption and XPS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, D.; Krstić, J.; Spasov, L.; Simeonov, D.; Lončarević, D.; Stefanov, Pl.; Jovanović, D.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the type of the silica gel pore structure on the surface properties of the Ni-silica gel catalyst precursors for the vegetable oil hydrogenation process has been examined applying N2 sorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The nickel catalyst precursors with identical composition (SiO2/Ni = 1.0) has been synthesized by precipitation of Ni(NO3)2 · 6H2O solution with Na2CO3 solution on the three types of silica gel with different pore structures. It is shown that the usage of the silica gel supports with different texture as source of SiO2 causes different location of Ni-species into the support pores and on the external surface area. The XPS data confirm the formation of surface species with different strength of interaction and different dispersion. These surface characteristics of the precursors will predetermine the formation of the active nickel metallic phase as well as the mass transfer of the reactants and products to and from the catalytic sites.

  15. Heterogeneous catalytic reduction of perchlorate in water with Re-Pd/C catalysts derived from an oxorhenium(V) molecular precursor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunxia; Hurley, Keith D; Shapley, John R

    2011-02-21

    The molecular Re(V) complex, chlorobis(2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-2-oxazoline)-oxorhenium(V), Re(O)(hoz)(2)Cl, has been investigated as a suitable precursor, when combined with activated carbon powder containing 5 wt % Pd, to provide a heterogeneous catalyst for the reduction of aqueous perchlorate by hydrogen. Two general methods for catalyst preparation have been adopted: first, by a standard "incipient wetness" impregnation of the carbon powder with handling under largely aerobic conditions for convenience and, second, by a completely anaerobic procedure maintaining a hydrogen atmosphere during adsorption of the complex in water onto the powder. Both types of catalyst were efficient for the complete reduction of perchlorate to chloride within a few hours at room temperature over a range of initial concentrations (2-200 ppm) under 1 atm of H(2) and acidic conditions (pH 2.7-3.7). The perchlorate reduction profiles displayed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the rates were insensitive to excess chloride. Complete reduction of perchlorate was observed even at pH 5.9 in a phosphate buffer over the course of two weeks. Under comparable conditions, chlorate reduction proceeded ca. 10 times more quickly than perchlorate reduction. The impregnated catalyst was examined by STEM/EDS, which revealed a wide distribution in Pd nanoparticle sizes and also suggested that the Re complex did not aggregate preferentially on or near the Pd particles. XPS of this material provided evidence for reduced Pd after the reaction, but only a +7 oxidation state was seen for the Re sites both pre- and postreduction. Elemental analyses of the catalyst materials taken pre- and postreduction showed variable amounts of Re loss (0-50%) but relatively unchanged amounts of nitrogen. These results show the need to maintain a reducing atmosphere during the preparation and operation of the catalyst in order to achieve optimum activity and stability. PMID:21226477

  16. [Catalyst research]. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ian P Rothwell; David R McMillin

    2005-03-14

    Research results are the areas of catalyst precursor synthesis, catalyst fluxionality, catalyst stability, polymerization of {alpha}-olefins as well as the chemistry of Group IV and Group V metal centers with aryloxide and arylsulfide ligands.

  17. A Pd/C-CeO2 Anode Catalyst for High-Performance Platinum-Free Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hamish A; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Vizza, Francesco; Marelli, Marcello; Di Benedetto, Francesco; D'Acapito, Francesco; Paska, Yair; Page, Miles; Dekel, Dario R

    2016-05-10

    One of the biggest obstacles to the dissemination of fuel cells is their cost, a large part of which is due to platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts. Complete removal of Pt is a difficult if not impossible task for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEM-FCs). The anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEM-FC) has long been proposed as a solution as non-Pt metals may be employed. Despite this, few examples of Pt-free AEM-FCs have been demonstrated with modest power output. The main obstacle preventing the realization of a high power density Pt-free AEM-FC is sluggish hydrogen oxidation (HOR) kinetics of the anode catalyst. Here we describe a Pt-free AEM-FC that employs a mixed carbon-CeO2 supported palladium (Pd) anode catalyst that exhibits enhanced kinetics for the HOR. AEM-FC tests run on dry H2 and pure air show peak power densities of more than 500 mW cm(-2) . PMID:27062251

  18. A Pd/C-CeO2 Anode Catalyst for High-Performance Platinum-Free Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hamish A; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Vizza, Francesco; Marelli, Marcello; Di Benedetto, Francesco; D'Acapito, Francesco; Paska, Yair; Page, Miles; Dekel, Dario R

    2016-05-10

    One of the biggest obstacles to the dissemination of fuel cells is their cost, a large part of which is due to platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts. Complete removal of Pt is a difficult if not impossible task for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEM-FCs). The anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEM-FC) has long been proposed as a solution as non-Pt metals may be employed. Despite this, few examples of Pt-free AEM-FCs have been demonstrated with modest power output. The main obstacle preventing the realization of a high power density Pt-free AEM-FC is sluggish hydrogen oxidation (HOR) kinetics of the anode catalyst. Here we describe a Pt-free AEM-FC that employs a mixed carbon-CeO2 supported palladium (Pd) anode catalyst that exhibits enhanced kinetics for the HOR. AEM-FC tests run on dry H2 and pure air show peak power densities of more than 500 mW cm(-2) .

  19. Iridium(I) complexes with anionic N-heterocyclic carbene ligands as catalysts for the hydrogenation of alkenes in nonpolar media.

    PubMed

    Kolychev, Eugene L; Kronig, Sabrina; Brandhorst, Kai; Freytag, Matthias; Jones, Peter G; Tamm, Matthias

    2013-08-21

    A series of lithium complexes of anionic N-heterocyclic carbenes that contain a weakly coordinating borate moiety (WCA-NHC) was prepared in one step from free N-heterocyclic carbenes by deprotonation with n-butyl lithium followed by borane addition. The reaction of the resulting lithium-carbene adducts with [M(COD)Cl]2 (M = Rh, Ir; COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) afforded zwitterionic rhodium(I) and iridium(I) complexes of the type [(WCA-NHC)M(COD)], in which the metal atoms exhibit an intramolecular interaction with the N-aryl groups of the carbene ligands. For M = Rh, the neutral complex [(WCA-NHC)Rh(CO)2] and the ate complex (NEt4)[(WCA-NHC)Rh(CO)2Cl] were prepared, with the latter allowing an assessment of the donor ability of the ligand by IR spectroscopy. The zwitterionic iridium-COD complexes were tested as catalysts for the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, which can be performed in the presence of nonpolar solvents or in the neat alkene substrate. Thereby, the most active complex showed excellent stability and activity in hydrogenation of alkenes at low catalyst loadings (down to 10 ppm).

  20. Anion-π Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we introduce artificial enzymes that operate with anion-π interactions, an interaction that is essentially new to nature. The possibility to stabilize anionic intermediates and transition states on an π-acidic surface has been recently demonstrated, using the addition of malonate half thioesters to enolate acceptors as a biologically relevant example. The best chiral anioncatalysts operate with an addition/decarboxylation ratio of 4:1, but without any stereoselectivity. To catalyze this important but intrinsically disfavored reaction stereoselectively, a series of anioncatalysts was equipped with biotin and screened against a collection of streptavidin mutants. With the best hit, the S112Y mutant, the reaction occurred with 95% ee and complete suppression of the intrinsically favored side product from decarboxylation. This performance of anion-π enzymes rivals, if not exceeds, that of the best conventional organocatalysts. Inhibition of the S112Y mutant by nitrate but not by bulky anions supports that contributions from anion-π interactions exist and matter, also within proteins. In agreement with docking results, K121 is shown to be essential, presumably to lower the pKa of the tertiary amine catalyst to operate at the optimum pH around 3, that is below the pKa of the substrate. Most importantly, increasing enantioselectivity with different mutants always coincides with increasing rates and conversion, i.e., selective transition-state stabilization. PMID:27413782

  1. Anion-π Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cotelle, Yoann; Lebrun, Vincent; Sakai, Naomi; Ward, Thomas R; Matile, Stefan

    2016-06-22

    In this report, we introduce artificial enzymes that operate with anion-π interactions, an interaction that is essentially new to nature. The possibility to stabilize anionic intermediates and transition states on an π-acidic surface has been recently demonstrated, using the addition of malonate half thioesters to enolate acceptors as a biologically relevant example. The best chiral anioncatalysts operate with an addition/decarboxylation ratio of 4:1, but without any stereoselectivity. To catalyze this important but intrinsically disfavored reaction stereoselectively, a series of anioncatalysts was equipped with biotin and screened against a collection of streptavidin mutants. With the best hit, the S112Y mutant, the reaction occurred with 95% ee and complete suppression of the intrinsically favored side product from decarboxylation. This performance of anion-π enzymes rivals, if not exceeds, that of the best conventional organocatalysts. Inhibition of the S112Y mutant by nitrate but not by bulky anions supports that contributions from anion-π interactions exist and matter, also within proteins. In agreement with docking results, K121 is shown to be essential, presumably to lower the pK a of the tertiary amine catalyst to operate at the optimum pH around 3, that is below the pK a of the substrate. Most importantly, increasing enantioselectivity with different mutants always coincides with increasing rates and conversion, i.e., selective transition-state stabilization. PMID:27413782

  2. Bismuth-palladium heterometallic carboxylate as a single-source precursor for the carbon-supported Pd-Bi/C catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Haitao; Huynh, Lan; Diverchy, Chantal; Hermans, Sophie; Devillers, Michel; Dikarev, Evgeny V

    2009-07-01

    The heterometallic complex [Bi(2)Pd(2)(O(2)CCF(3))(10)(HO(2)CCF(3))(2)] (1) was obtained by the solid state reaction of Bi(III) trifluoroacetate/trifluoroacetic acid adduct with unsolvated trinuclear Pd(II) trifluoroacetate. The crystal structure of 1 consists of discrete tetranuclear molecules, in which two paddlewheel [BiPd(O(2)CCF(3))(4)] units are connected by two chelating-bridging trifluoroacetate ligands through bismuth ends. There are no metal-metal bonds in the tetrameric structure of 1, since both Bi...Pd (3.0843(4) A) and Bi...Bi (4.5074(4) A) distances are too long to be considered as bonding interactions. A study of the solution behavior revealed that not only the coordinated trifluoroacetic acid in 1 can be effectively replaced by other donor solvent molecules but also the tetranuclear complex can be cleaved in solution into discrete dinuclear Bi-Pd species. Complex 1 was used as precursor for the preparation of a bimetallic Pd-Bi carbon-supported catalyst. The preparation procedure included the modification of the carbon support to increase the number of oxygenated functions at its surface followed by grafting complex 1 via ligand exchange for surface carboxylates and activating thermally. The resulting catalyst, consisting of small supported metallic particles, was found to be more active than the reference materials prepared from multisource homometallic Pd and Bi precursors. PMID:19499893

  3. In situ construction of three anion-dependent cu(i) coordination networks as promising heterogeneous catalysts for azide-alkyne "click" reactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenghu; Han, Lu Lu; Zhuang, Gui Lin; Bai, Jing; Sun, Di

    2015-05-18

    Three Cu(I) coordination networks, namely, {[Cu2(bpz)2(CN)X]·CH3CN}n, (X = Cl, 1; I, 3), {[Cu6(bpz)6(CH3CN)3(CN)3Br]·2OH·14CH3CN}n, (2, bpz = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole), were prepared by using solvothermal method. The cyanide ligands in these networks were generated in situ by cleavage of C-C bond of MeCN under solvothermal condition. The structures of these networks are dependent on halogen anions. Complex 1 is a ladderlike structure with μ2-CN(-) as rung and μ2-bpz as armrest. The Cl(-) in 1 is at terminal position but does not extend the one-dimensional (1D) ladder to higher dimensionalities. Complex 2 is a three-dimensional (3D) framework comprised of novel planar [Cu3Br] triangle and single Cu nodes, which are extended by μ2-bpz and μ2-CN(-) to form a novel (3,9)-connected gfy network. Density functional theory calculations showed that single-electron delocalization of Br atom induces the plane structure of [Cu3Br]. Complex 3 also possesses a similar ladderlike subunit as in 1, but the I(-) acts as bidentate bridge to extend the ladder to 3D framework with a four-connected sra topology. The three networks show notable catalytic activity on the click reaction. The compared catalytic results demonstrate that complex 2 possesses the best catalysis performance among three complexes, which is ascribed to the largest solvent-accessible void (porosity: 2 (29.4%) > 1 (25.7%) > 3 (17.6%)) and the more Cu(I) active sites in 2. The present combined structure-property studies provide not only a new synthetic route to obtain a new kind of catalyst for click reaction but also the new insights on catalyst structure-function relationships. PMID:25941881

  4. In situ construction of three anion-dependent cu(i) coordination networks as promising heterogeneous catalysts for azide-alkyne "click" reactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenghu; Han, Lu Lu; Zhuang, Gui Lin; Bai, Jing; Sun, Di

    2015-05-18

    Three Cu(I) coordination networks, namely, {[Cu2(bpz)2(CN)X]·CH3CN}n, (X = Cl, 1; I, 3), {[Cu6(bpz)6(CH3CN)3(CN)3Br]·2OH·14CH3CN}n, (2, bpz = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole), were prepared by using solvothermal method. The cyanide ligands in these networks were generated in situ by cleavage of C-C bond of MeCN under solvothermal condition. The structures of these networks are dependent on halogen anions. Complex 1 is a ladderlike structure with μ2-CN(-) as rung and μ2-bpz as armrest. The Cl(-) in 1 is at terminal position but does not extend the one-dimensional (1D) ladder to higher dimensionalities. Complex 2 is a three-dimensional (3D) framework comprised of novel planar [Cu3Br] triangle and single Cu nodes, which are extended by μ2-bpz and μ2-CN(-) to form a novel (3,9)-connected gfy network. Density functional theory calculations showed that single-electron delocalization of Br atom induces the plane structure of [Cu3Br]. Complex 3 also possesses a similar ladderlike subunit as in 1, but the I(-) acts as bidentate bridge to extend the ladder to 3D framework with a four-connected sra topology. The three networks show notable catalytic activity on the click reaction. The compared catalytic results demonstrate that complex 2 possesses the best catalysis performance among three complexes, which is ascribed to the largest solvent-accessible void (porosity: 2 (29.4%) > 1 (25.7%) > 3 (17.6%)) and the more Cu(I) active sites in 2. The present combined structure-property studies provide not only a new synthetic route to obtain a new kind of catalyst for click reaction but also the new insights on catalyst structure-function relationships.

  5. Development of a simple method for the preparation of novel egg-shell type Pt catalysts using hollow silica nanostructures as supporting precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiexin; Chen Jianfeng

    2008-04-01

    A simple method for the preparation of novel egg-shell type platinum catalysts was developed and achieved by utilizing unique hollow silica nanostructures, i.e., hollow silica nanospheres and nanotubes, as supports. The observation by transmission electron microscopy indicated that the well-dispersed hollow silica supported Pt catalysts with a Pt particle diameter of 8-14 nm can be successfully prepared by wet impregnation process and heat treatment. The Pt-loaded hollow silica nanostructures were also characterized by inductively coupled plasma, X-ray diffraction, specific surface area, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was thus demonstrated that a higher Pt loading amount (0.392%) could be obtained under the same conditions except the addition of ammonia, which was found to be more effective than that (0.061%) with the addition of HCl in the immobilization of Pt. In addition, the effect of soaking time, Pt precursor concentration and calcination temperature on the loading of Pt in hollow silica nanostructures were investigated as well.

  6. Surface Modified Coals for Enhanced Catalyst Dispersion and Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The aim of this study is to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on to the coal. During this reporting period, the effects of dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB) (a cationic surfactant), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (an anionic surfactant), Triton X-100 (a neutral surfactant), and ferrous sulfate (as a catalyst precursor) on the coal surface charge at various pH values were determined. The results of the zeta potential measurements suggest that ferrous sulfate as catalyst precursor creates a distinctly different condition on the coal surface compared to that of molybdenum as reported in the previous progress reports. The effects of the adsorption of the surfactants also varied distinctly with the type of surfactant. With the adsorption of DDAB, the cationic surfactant, the surface charge was more positive. The opposite effect was observed for the SDS, the anionic surfactant. The coals treated with Triton X-100, the neutral surfactant, also showed an overall negative surface charge density. The adsorption of the catalyst precursor (ferrous sulfate) resulted in a net negative charge on the coal surface.

  7. Exploring Pd adsorption, diffusion, permeation, and nucleation on bilayer SiO2/Ru as a function of hydroxylation and precursor environment: From UHV to catalyst preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomp, Sascha; Kaden, William E.; Sterrer, Martin; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The hydroxylation-dependent permeability of bilayer SiO2 supported on Ru(0001) was investigated by XPS and TDS studies in a temperature range of 100 K to 600 K. For this, the thermal behavior of Pd evaporated at 100 K, which results in surface and sub-surface (Ru-supported) binding arrangements, was examined relative to the extent of pre-hydroxylation. Samples containing only defect-mediated hydroxyls showed no effect on Pd diffusion through the film at low temperature. If, instead, the concentration of strongly bound hydroxyl groups and associated weakly bound water molecules was enriched by an electron-assisted hydroxylation procedure, the probability for Pd diffusion through the film is decreased via a pore-blocking mechanism. Above room temperature, all samples showed similar behavior, reflective of particle nucleation above the film and eventual agglomeration with any metal atoms initially binding beneath the film. When depositing Pd onto the same SiO2/Ru model support via adsorption of [Pd(NH3)4]Cl2 from alkaline (pH 12) precursor solution, we observe notably different adsorption and nucleation mechanisms. The resultant Pd adsorption complexes follow established decomposition pathways to produce model catalyst systems compatible with those created exclusively within UHV despite lacking the ability to penetrate the film due to the increased size of the initial Pd precursor groups.

  8. Effect of the support and the reduction temperature on the formation of metallic nickel phase in Ni/silica gel precursors of vegetable oil hydrogenation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrovska, M.; Krstić, J.; Tzvetkov, P.; Tenchev, K.; Shopska, M.; Vukelić, N.; Jovanović, D.

    2011-12-01

    Ni/SiO2 materials with identical composition (SiO2/Ni = 1.0) have been synthesized by precipitation of Ni(NO3)2 · 6H2O solution with Na2CO3 solution on the silica gel, obtained at three different pH values. The present investigation was undertaken in an endeavor to study the effects of the silica gel support type and the reduction temperature on the formation and dispersion of the metallic nickel phase in the reduced Ni/SiO2 precursors of the vegetable oil hydrogenation catalyst. The physicochemical characterization of the unreduced and reduced precursors has been accomplished appropriately by powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction and H2-chemisorption techniques. It can be stated that the texture peculiarities of the silica gels used as supports influence on the crystalline state and distribution of the deposited Ni-containing phases during the preparation of the precursors, on the reduction temperature of the investigated solids as well as on the bulk size and surface dispersion of the arising metallic nickel particles. It was shown that two types of Ni2+-species are formed during the synthesis procedure, namely basic nickel carbonate-like and Ni-phyllosilicate with different extent of presence, location and strength of interaction. The different location of these species is supposed to result in various strength of Ni-O and Ni-O-Si interaction, thus determining the overall reducibility of the precursors. It was specified that the Ni2+-species are strongly bonded to the surface of the silica gel obtained at neutral pH value and weakly bonded to the surface of those prepared in acidic and alkaline conditions. It was established that the precursor, derivates from the silica gel obtained at alkaline conditions, demonstrates both significant reduction of the Ni2+ ions at 430°C and finely dispersed metallic nickel particles on its surface. High dispersion of the metallic nickel might be the crucial reason for achieving of

  9. Kinetics of NiO and NiCl2 Hydrogen Reduction as Precursors and Properties of Produced Ni/Al2O3 and Ni-Pd/Al2O3 Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sokić, Miroslav; Kamberović, Željko; Nikolić, Vesna; Marković, Branislav; Korać, Marija; Anđić, Zoran; Gavrilovski, Milorad

    2015-01-01

    The objects of this investigation were the comparative kinetic analysis of the NiO and NiCl2 reduction by hydrogen during an induction period and elimination of the calcination during the synthesis of Ni/Al2O3 catalysts. The effect of temperature and time on NiO and NiCl2 reduction degrees was studied. Avrami I equation was selected as the most favorable kinetic model and used to determine activation energy of the NiO and NiCl2 reduction for the investigated temperature range (623–923 K) and time intervals (1–5 minutes). The investigation enabled reaching conclusions about the reaction ability and rate of the reduction processes. Afterward, Ni/Al2O3 catalysts were obtained by using oxide and chloride precursor for Ni. The catalysts were supported on alumina-based foam and prepared via aerosol route. Properties of the samples before and after low-temperature hydrogen reduction (633 K) were compared. Obtained results indicated that the synthesis of Ni/Al2O3 catalysts can be more efficient if chloride precursor for Ni is directly reduced by hydrogen during the synthesis process, without the calcination step. In addition, Ni-Pd/Al2O3 catalysts with different metal content were prepared by using chloride precursors. Lower reduction temperature was utilized and the chlorides were almost completely reduced at 533 K. PMID:25789335

  10. The fluxional amine gold(III) complex as an excellent catalyst and precursor of biologically active acyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Montanel-Pérez, Sara; Herrera, Raquel P; Laguna, Antonio; Villacampa, M Dolores; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2015-05-21

    A new amine gold(III) complex [Au(C6F5)2(DPA)]ClO4 with the di-(2-picolyl)amine (DPA) ligand has been synthesised. In the solid state the complex has a chiral amine nitrogen because the ligand coordinates to the gold centre through one nitrogen atom from a pyridine and through the NH moiety, whereas in solution it shows a fluxional behaviour with a rapid exchange between the pyridine sites. This complex can be used as an excellent synton to prepare new gold(III) carbene complexes by the reaction with isocyanide CNR. The resulting gold(III) derivatives have unprecedented bidentate C^N acyclic carbene ligands. All the complexes have been spectroscopically and structurally characterized. Taking advantage of the fluxional behaviour of the amine complex, its catalytic properties have been tested in several reactions with the formation of C-C and C-N bonds. The complex showed excellent activity with total conversion, without the presence of a co-catalyst, and with a catalyst loading as low as 0.1%. These complexes also present biological properties, and cytotoxicity studies have been performed in vitro against three tumour human cell lines, Jurkat (T-cell leukaemia), MiaPaca2 (pancreatic carcinoma) and A549 (lung carcinoma). Some of them showed excellent cytotoxic activity compared with the reference cisplatin.

  11. Synthesis and structural characterization of double metal cyanides of iron and zinc: catalyst precursors for the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Adams, M Jason; Yarbrough, Jason C; Phelps, Andrea L

    2003-12-01

    Several synthetic approaches for the preparation of double metal cyanide (DMC) derivatives of iron(II) and zinc(II) are described. These include (1) metathesis reactions of ZnCl(2) or ZnI(2) with KCpFe(CN)(2)CO in aqueous solution, (2) reactions of KCpFe(CN)(2)CO and its phosphine-substituted analogues with Zn(CH(3)CN)(4)(BF(4))(2) and subsequent displacement of acetonitrile at the zinc centers by the addition of a neutral (phosphine) or anionic (phenoxide) ligand, and (3) reactions of the protonated HCpFe(CN)(2)(phosphine) complexes with Zn(N(SiMe(3))(2))(2), followed by the addition of phenols. All structures are based on a diamond-shaped planar arrangement of the Fe(2)(CN)(4)Zn(2) core with various appended ligands at the metal sites. Although attempts to replace the iodide ligands in [CpFe(mu-CN)(2)PPh(3)ZnI(THF)](2) with acetate using silver acetate failed, two novel cationic mixed-metal cyanide salts based on the [CpFe(PPh(3))(mu-CN)(2)Zn(NC(5)H(5))](2)(2+) framework were isolated from pyridine solution and their structures were defined by X-ray crystallography. The anionic ligand bound to zinc in these derivatives, which serve as an anionic polymerization initiator, was shown to be central to the catalytic copolymerization reaction of CO(2)/epoxide to provide polycarbonates and cyclic carbonates. The structurally stabilized phosphine-strapped complexes [CpFe(mu-CN)(2)Zn(X)THF](2)(mu-dppp), where X = I or phenolate, were shown to be thermally stable under the conditions (80 degrees C) of the copolymerization reaction by in situ infrared spectroscopy. Both of these derivatives were proposed to serve as mimics for the heterogeneous DMC catalysts in the patent literature, with the derivative where the initiator is a phenolate being more active for the production of polycarbonates. PMID:14632496

  12. Colloidal nickel/gallium nanoalloys obtained from organometallic precursors in conventional organic solvents and in ionic liquids: noble-metal-free alkyne semihydrogenation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Kai; Doddi, Adinarayana; Kroll, Clarissa; Meyer, Hajo; Wiktor, Christian; Gemel, Christian; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Fischer, Roland A.; Janiak, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Efforts to replace noble-metal catalysts by low-cost alternatives are of constant interest. The organometallic, non-aqueous wet-chemical synthesis of various hitherto unknown nanocrystalline Ni/Ga intermetallic materials and the use of NiGa for the selective semihydrogenation of alkynes to alkenes are reported. Thermal co-hydrogenolysis of the all-hydrocarbon precursors [Ni(COD)2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) and GaCp* (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) in high-boiling organic solvents mesitylene and n-decane in molar ratios of 1 : 1, 2 : 3 and 3 : 1 yields the nano-crystalline powder materials of the over-all compositions NiGa, Ni2Ga3 and Ni3Ga, respectively. Microwave induced co-pyrolysis of the same precursors without additional hydrogen in the ionic liquid [BMIm][BF4] (BMIm = 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium) selectively yields the intermetallic phases NiGa and Ni3Ga from the respective 1 : 1 and 3 : 1 molar ratios of the precursors. The obtained materials are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), IR, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The single-source precursor [Ni(GaCp*)(PMe3)3] with a fixed Ni : Ga stoichiometry of 1 : 1 was employed as well. In comparison with the co-hydrogenolytic dual precursor source approach it turned out to be less practical due to inefficient nickel incorporation caused by the parasitic formation of stable [Ni(PMe3)4]. The use of ionic liquid [BMIm][BF4] as a non-conventional solvent to control the reaction and stabilize the nanoparticles proved to be particularly advantageous and stable colloids of the nanoalloys NiGa and Ni3Ga were obtained. A phase-selective Ni/Ga colloid synthesis in conventional solvents and in the presence of surfactants such as hexadecylamine (HDA) was not feasible due to the undesired reactivity of HDA with GaCp* leading to inefficient gallium incorporation. Recyclable NiGa nanoparticles selectively

  13. Anion-π catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  14. Anion-π catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  15. Combinatorial discovery of Ni-based binary and ternary catalysts for hydrazine electrooxidation for use in anion exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Tomokazu; Asazawa, Koichiro; Sanabria-Chinchilla, Jean; Martinez, Ulises; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen; Strasser, Peter; Tanaka, Hirohisa

    2014-02-01

    Ni-based catalysts, binary Ni-M (with M = Mn, Fe, Zn, La) and ternary Ni-Mn-Fe and Ni-Zn-La were investigated for hydrazine oxidation in direct hydrazine hydrate fuel cell anodes by a temperature controlled 16-channel electrochemical combinatorial array. The binary Ni0.8Zn0.2 and Ni0.9La0.1 catalysts are significantly more active than the Ni reference catalyst for hydrazine oxidation. While the best Ni0.8Zn0.1La0.1 ternary catalyst is close to the high active binary catalysts in composition. Additionally, Ni0.6Fe0.2Mn0.2 catalysts also showed high catalytic activity for hydrazine oxidation in alkaline media over standard Ni catalyst. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the alloying effect between Ni and added elements improves the catalytic activity for hydrazine oxidation. As a result of the screening tests and our previous research, unsupported binary Ni0.87Zn0.13 and Ni0.9La0.1 catalysts were synthesized by spray pyrolysis and tested in a direct hydrazine hydrate fuel cell MEA (DHFC) producing 486 mW cm-2 and 459 mW cm-2, respectively.

  16. High-valent chromium-oxo complex acting as an efficient catalyst precursor for selective two-electron reduction of dioxygen by a ferrocene derivative.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Mase, Kentaro; Bougher, Curt; Hicks, Scott D; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-07-21

    Efficient catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen (O2) by octamethylferrocene (Me8Fc) produced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using a high-valent chromium(V)-oxo corrole complex, [(tpfc)Cr(V)(O)] (tpfc = tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole) as a catalyst precursor in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in acetonitrile (MeCN). The facile two-electron reduction of [(tpfc)Cr(V)(O)] by 2 equiv of Me8Fc in the presence of excess TFA produced the corresponding chromium(III) corrole [(tpfc)Cr(III)(OH2)] via fast electron transfer from Me8Fc to [(tpfc)Cr(V)(O)] followed by double protonation of [(tpfc)Cr(IV)(O)](-) and facile second-electron transfer from Me8Fc. The rate-determining step in the catalytic two-electron reduction of O2 by Me8Fc in the presence of excess TFA is inner-sphere electron transfer from [(tpfc)Cr(III)(OH2)] to O2 to produce the chromium(IV) superoxo species [(tpfc)Cr(IV)(O2(•-))], followed by fast proton-coupled electron transfer reduction of [(tpfc)Cr(IV)(O2(•-))] by Me8Fc to yield H2O2, accompanied by regeneration of [(tpfc)Cr(III)(OH2)]. Thus, although the catalytic two-electron reduction of O2 by Me8Fc was started by [(tpfc)Cr(V)(O)], no regeneration of [(tpfc)Cr(V)(O)] was observed in the presence of excess TFA, regardless of the tetragonal chromium complex being to the left of the oxo wall. In the presence of a stoichiometric amount of TFA, however, disproportionation of [(tfpc)Cr(IV)(O)](-) occurred via the protonated species [(tpfc)Cr(IV)(OH)] to produce [(tpfc)Cr(III)(OH2)] and [(tpfc)Cr(V)(O)].

  17. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  18. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-02-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  19. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  20. Reactive layer-by-layer deposition of poly(ethylene imine) and a precursor of TiO2: influence of the sodium chloride concentration on the film growth, interaction with hexacyanoferrate anions, and particle distribution in the film.

    PubMed

    Ladhari, Nadia; Ringwald, Christian; Ersen, Ovidiu; Florea, Ileana; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Ball, Vincent

    2011-06-21

    Films prepared according to a layer-by-layer (LBL) manner find increasing importance in many applications such as coatings with dedicated optical or electronic properties, particularly when including nanomaterials. An alternative way to prepare such hybrid layer-by-layer coatings is to perform sol-gel chemistry in a layer-by-layer manner. In this article, we highlight the importance of the NaCl concentration as a parameter to control the growth as well as the properties of LBL films made from poly(ethylene imine) as the organic counterpart and titanium IV (bisammoniumlactato)dihydroxyde ([Ti(lac)(2)(OH)(2)](2-)) as the precursor of TiO(2). An increase in the sodium chloride concentration leads to the faster growth of the film and to a decrease in the number of hexacyanoferrate anions remaining in the film after a buffer rinse. This may be due to a progressive increase in the fraction of negatively charged TiO(2) as suggested by transmission electron microscopy. In the presence of 0.5 M NaCl, the fraction of TiO(2) is close to 60% in mass. As a surprising finding, the films produced from 0.15 M NaCl are not homogeneously filled with TiO(2) even if the film is produced in an LBL fashion. The increased concentration of TiO(2) at the film-solution interface could constitute a barrier for the incorporation of the negatively charged redox probe.

  1. Ni/Fe-supported over hydrotalcites precursors as catalysts for clean and selective oxidation of Basic Yellow 11: reaction intermediates determination.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; García, J

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Basic Yellow 11 (BY 11) was employed as model compound to study catalytic wet air oxidation as a pre-treatment step to the conventional biological oxidation. Ni and Fe catalysts supported over hydrotalcite (HT) were prepared by incipient wetness and excess impregnation to obtain catalysts with different metal loadings (from 1 to 10 wt.%). HTs were synthesized by co-precipitation and characterized with XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), BET, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM. Results showed that dye conversion increased with Ni and Fe content up to 7 wt.% and that the most effective catalyst were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The influence of metal loading in the catalyst, and the preparation method as well as the reaction conditions was investigated. A mechanism and reaction pathways for BY 11 during catalytic liquid phase oxidation have also been proposed.

  2. Ni/Fe-supported over hydrotalcites precursors as catalysts for clean and selective oxidation of Basic Yellow 11: reaction intermediates determination.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; García, J

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Basic Yellow 11 (BY 11) was employed as model compound to study catalytic wet air oxidation as a pre-treatment step to the conventional biological oxidation. Ni and Fe catalysts supported over hydrotalcite (HT) were prepared by incipient wetness and excess impregnation to obtain catalysts with different metal loadings (from 1 to 10 wt.%). HTs were synthesized by co-precipitation and characterized with XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), BET, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM. Results showed that dye conversion increased with Ni and Fe content up to 7 wt.% and that the most effective catalyst were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The influence of metal loading in the catalyst, and the preparation method as well as the reaction conditions was investigated. A mechanism and reaction pathways for BY 11 during catalytic liquid phase oxidation have also been proposed. PMID:22960061

  3. [Ru(η5-C5H5)(η6-C10H8)]PF6 as a catalyst precursor for the one-pot direct C-H alkenylation of nitrogen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Jason M; Milner, Lucy M; Mistry, Neetisha S; Slattery, John M; Warrington, Sally R; Whitwood, Adrian C

    2014-03-21

    The ruthenium naphthalene complex [Ru(η(5)-C5H5)(η(6)-C10H8)](+) is a catalyst precursor for the direct C-H alkenylation of pyridine and related nitrogen heterocycles by terminal alkynes. Stoichiometric studies have demonstrated that the naphthalene ligand may be displaced by either pyridine, 4-methylpyridine or dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) to give species [Ru(η(5)-C5H5)L3](+) (L = nitrogen-based ligand). Reaction of in situ-generated [Ru(η(5)-C5H5)(py)3](+) (py = pyridine) with PPh3 results in the formation of [Ru(η(5)-C5H5)(PPh3)(py)2](+), the active catalyst for direct alkenylation, some [Ru(η(5)-C5H5)(PPh3)2(py)](+) is also formed in this reaction. A one-pot procedure is reported which has allowed for the nature of the nitrogen heterocycle and phosphine ligand to be evaluated. The sterically demanding phosphine PCy3 inhibits catalysis, and only trace amounts of product are formed when precursors containing a pentamethylcyclopentadienyl group were used. The greatest conversion was observed with PMe3 when used as co-ligand with [Ru(η(5)-C5H5)(η(6)-C10H8)](+). PMID:24481140

  4. Relation between hydrodesulfurization activity and the state of promoters in precursor calcined Ni-Co-Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Caceres, C.; Fierro, J.L.G.; Agudo, A.L.; Severino, F.; Laine, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two series of NiCo-Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts prepared by different procedures were investigated. In each series the Mo loading and the total content of promoters (Co + Ni) were kept constant but the Co/(Co + Ni) atomic ratio was varied from 0 to 1. The two series of catalysts were prepared by a sequential wet impregnation technique. In series I, the impregnations of both Mo and promoters were carried out at the pH of the impregnating aqueous solutions, employing an intermediate calcination; in series II, Mo was impregnated at pH 10, while the promoters were added in aqueous ethanol solutions without intermediate calcination. Catalysts in their calcined state were characterized by reduction in H/sub 2/ at 500/sup 0/C, O/sub 2/ chemisorption, and infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed NO. The HDS activity and the optimum Co/(Co + Ni) atomic ratio were different for the two series, in agreement with the previous studies, HDS activity being generally higher for series II than for series I. Dispersion of Mo (as estimated from O/sub 2/ chemisorption) and NO adsorption on Mo in reduced catalysts (as judged from the intensity of the band at about 1705 cm/sup -1/) were not substantially different for the two series of catalysts and did not correlate with HDS activity. However, adsorbed NO on promoters in oxidized catalysts (bands at about 1880 and 1800 cm/sup -1/) followed roughly the same trend as HDS activity, suggesting that the active sites may be related to the Co and Ni atoms adsorbing NO. Possible reasons for the differences between HDS activity of the two series are considered.

  5. Electron-Withdrawing Trifluoromethyl Groups in Combination with Hydrogen Bonds in Polyols: Brønsted Acids, Hydrogen-Bond Catalysts, and Anion Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2013-06-26

    Electron withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups were characterized in combination with hydrogen bond interactions in three polyols (i.e., CF3CH(OH)CH2CH(OH)CF3, 1; (CF3)2C(OH)C(OH)(CF3)2, 2; ((CF3)2C(OH)CH2)2CHOH, 3) by pKa measurements in DMSO and H2O, negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and binding constant determinations with Cl–. Their catalytic behavior in several reactions were also examined and compared to a BrØnsted acid (HOAc) and a commonly employed thiourea ((3,5-(CF3)3C6H3NH)2CS). The combination of inductive stabilization and hydrogen bonds was found to afford potent acids which are effective catalysts. It also appears that hydrogen bonds can transmit the inductive effect over distance even in an aqueous environment, and this has far reaching implications.

  6. Chelating bis-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes of iron(ii) containing bipyridyl ligands as catalyst precursors for oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mara F; Cardoso, Bernardo de P; Barroso, Sónia; Martins, Ana M; Royo, Beatriz

    2016-09-14

    Chelating bis-N-heterocyclic carbene (bis-NHC) complexes of iron(ii) containing pyridyl ligands have been prepared by the reaction of [FeCl2L] [L = bipy (1), phen (2)] with [LiN(SiMe3)2] and a bis(imidazolium) salt. The [Fe(bis-NHC)L(I)2] complexes were active pre-catalysts in the oxidation of 1-phenylethanol with tert-butyl hydroperoxide in neat conditions, affording a quantitative yield of acetophenone in 4.5 h. The catalyst could be reused up to six cycles giving a turnover number (TON) of 1500. Various secondary alcohols, both aromatic and aliphatic were selectivity oxidised to the corresponding ketones in excellent yields. Compound 1 is stable in acetonitrile solution for ca. 4 h, although after 16 h, it evolves to a mixture of [Fe(bis-NHC)(bipy)2]I2 (3), [Fe(bipy)3](2+) and bis-imidazolium salt. The molecular structure of 3 has been determined by X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:27506414

  7. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis and fabrication of polymeric anion permselective membranes for redox systems are discussed. Variations of the prime candidate anion membrane formulation to achieve better resistance and/or lower permeability were explored. Processing parameters were evaluated to lower cost and fabricate larger sizes. The processing techniques to produce more membranes per batch were successfully integrated with the fabrication of larger membranes. Membranes of about 107 cm x 51 cm were made in excellent yield. Several measurements were made on the larger sample membranes. Among the data developed were water transport and transference numbers for these prime candidate membranes at 20 C. Other work done on this system included characterization of a number of specimens of candidate membranes which had been returned after service lives of up to sixteen months. Work with new polymer constituents, with new N.P.'s, catalysts and backing fabrics is discussed. Some work was also done to evaluate other proportions of the ingredients of the prime candidate system. The adoption of a flow selectivity test at elevated temperature was explored.

  8. Heteroatom-free arene-cobalt and arene-iron catalysts for hydrogenations.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Dominik; Welther, Alice; Rad, Babak Rezaei; Wolf, Robert; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2014-04-01

    75 years after the discovery of hydroformylation, cobalt catalysts are now undergoing a renaissance in hydrogenation reactions. We have evaluated arene metalates in which the low-valent metal species is--conceptually different from heteroatom-based ligands--stabilized by π coordination to hydrocarbons. Potassium bis(anthracene)cobaltate 1 and -ferrate 2 can be viewed as synthetic precursors of quasi-"naked" anionic metal species; their aggregation is effectively impeded by (labile) coordination to the various π acceptors present in the hydrogenation reactions of unsaturated molecules (alkenes, arenes, carbonyl compounds). Kinetic studies, NMR spectroscopy, and poisoning studies of alkene hydrogenations support the formation of a homogeneous catalyst derived from 1 which is stabilized by the coordination of alkenes. This catalyst concept complements the use of complexes with heteroatom donor ligands for reductive processes. PMID:24616276

  9. Vanadium(V) Complexes with Substituted 1,5-bis(2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)carbohydrazones and Their Use As Catalyst Precursors in Oxidation of Cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Dragancea, Diana; Talmaci, Natalia; Shova, Sergiu; Novitchi, Ghenadie; Darvasiová, Denisa; Rapta, Peter; Breza, Martin; Galanski, Markus; Kožı́šek, Jozef; Martins, Nuno M R; Martins, Luísa M D R S; Pombeiro, Armando J L; Arion, Vladimir B

    2016-09-19

    Six dinuclear vanadium(V) complexes have been synthesized: NH4[(VO2)2((H)LH)] (NH4[1]), NH4[(VO2)2((t-Bu)LH)] (NH4[2]), NH4[(VO2)2((Cl)LH)] (NH4[3]), [(VO2)(VO)((H)LH)(CH3O)] (4), [(VO2)(VO)((t-Bu)LH)(C2H5O)] (5), and [(VO2)(VO)((Cl)LH)(CH3O)(CH3OH/H2O)] (6) (where (H)LH4 = 1,5-bis(2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)carbohydrazone, (t-Bu)LH4 = 1,5-bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)carbohydrazone, and (Cl)LH4 = 1,5-bis(3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)carbohydrazone). The structures of NH4[1] and 4-6 have been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. In all complexes, the triply deprotonated ligand accommodates two V ions, using two different binding sites ONN and ONO separated by a diazine unit -N-N-. In two pockets of NH4[1], two identical VO2(+) entities are present, whereas, in those of 4-6, two different VO2(+) and VO(3+) are bound. The highest oxidation state of V ions was corroborated by X-ray data, indicating the presence of alkoxido ligand bound to VO(3+) in 4-6, charge density measurements on 4, magnetic susceptibility, NMR spectroscopy, spectroelectrochemistry, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All four complexes characterized by XRD form dimeric associates in the solid state, which, however, do not remain intact in solution. Compounds NH4[1], NH4[2], and 4-6 were applied as alternative selective homogeneous catalysts for the industrially significant oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. The peroxidative (with tert-butyl hydroperoxide, TBHP) oxidation of cyclohexane was performed under solvent-free and additive-free conditions and under low-power microwave (MW) irradiation. Cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone were the only products obtained (high selectivity), after 1.5 h of MW irradiation. Theoretical calculations suggest a key mechanistic role played by the carbohydrazone ligand, which can undergo reduction, instead of the metal itself, to form an active reduced form of the catalyst. PMID:27563933

  10. Effects of surface and structural properties of carbons on the behavior of carbon-supported molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Solar, J.M.; Debryshire, F.J.; De Beer, V.H.J.; Radovic, L.R. Eindhoven Univ. of Technology )

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on carbon-supported hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts has led to the general realization that the nature of the support has a very significant influence on catalytic activity. A commercial carbon black was subjected to oxidative and/or thermal treatment to modify its surface and structural properties. These were thoroughly examined using temperature-programmed desorption, X-ray diffraction, titrations, and electrophoresis. The various carbon-supported molybdenum catalysts were prepared by equilibrium adsorption and incipient wetness impregnation using four different catalyst precursors. The catalytic activity in thiophene HDS and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was determined in fixed-bed flow reactors connected on-line to gas chromatographs. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is concluded that two conflicting requirements complicate the preparation of highly active (i.e., highly dispersed) molybdenum species on carbon surfaces. On one hand, the introduction of oxygen functional groups provides anchoring sites for catalyst precursor adsorption and thus the potential for its high initial dispersion. On the other hand, this also renders the support surface negatively charged over a wide range of pH conditions. At very low pH conditions, below the isoelectric point of the support, when the attractive forces prevail between the Mo anions and the positively charged carbon surface. Mo polymerization is thought to contribute to catalyst agglomeration. No significant correlation between structural parameters of the support and catalytic activity was found.

  11. Catalyst Of A Metal Heteropoly Acid Salt That Is Insoluble In A Polar Solvent On A Non-Metallic Porous Support And Method Of Making

    DOEpatents

    Wang. Yong; Peden. Charles H. F.; Choi. Saemin

    2004-11-09

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  12. Catalyst of a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on a non-metallic porous support and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Peden, Charles H. F. [West Richland, WA; Choi, Saemin [Richland, WA

    2002-10-29

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  13. La-Sr-Ni-Co-O based perovskite-type solid solutions as catalyst precursors in the CO 2 reforming of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Gustavo; Kiennemann, Alain; Goldwasser, Mireya R.

    La 1- xSr xNi 0.4Co 0.6O 3 and La 0.8Sr 0.2Ni 1- yCo yO 3 solid solutions with perovskite-type structure were synthesized by the sol-gel resin method and used as catalytic precursors in the dry reforming of methane with CO 2 to syngas, between 873 and 1073 K at atmospheric pressure under continuous flow of reactant gases with CH 4/CO 2 = 1 ratio. These quaternary oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET specific surface area and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) techniques. XRD analyses of the more intense diffraction peaks and cell parameter measurements showed formation of La-Sr-Ni-Co-O solid solutions with La 0.9Sr 0.1CoO 3 and/or La 0.9Sr 0.1NiO 3 as the main crystallographic phases present on the solids depending on the degree of substitution. TPR analyses showed that Sr doping decreases the temperature of reduction via formation of intermediary species producing Ni 0, Co 0 with particle sizes in the range of nanometers over the SrO and La 2O 3 phases. These metallic nano particles highly dispersed in the solid matrix are responsible for the high activity shown during the reaction and avoid carbon formation. The presence of Sr in doping quantities also promotes the secondary reactions of carbon formation and water-gas shift in a very small extension during the dry reforming reaction.

  14. Solution Structures of Highly Active Molecular Ir Water-Oxidation Catalysts from Density Functional Theory Combined with High-Energy X-ray Scattering and EXAFS Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke R; Matula, Adam J; Kwon, Gihan; Hong, Jiyun; Sheehan, Stafford W; Thomsen, Julianne M; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H; Tiede, David M; Chen, Lin X; Batista, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    The solution structures of highly active Ir water-oxidation catalysts are elucidated by combining density functional theory, high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We find that the catalysts are Ir dimers with mono-μ-O cores and terminal anionic ligands, generated in situ through partial oxidation of a common catalyst precursor. The proposed structures are supported by (1)H and (17)O NMR, EPR, resonance Raman and UV-vis spectra, electrophoresis, etc. Our findings are particularly valuable to understand the mechanism of water oxidation by highly reactive Ir catalysts. Importantly, our DFT-EXAFS-HEXS methodology provides a new in situ technique for characterization of active species in catalytic systems. PMID:27087202

  15. Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides from Ce-containing layered double hydroxide precursors: Controllable preparation and catalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng; Zhao, Na; Liu, Junfeng; Li, Feng; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue; Forano, Claude; de Roy, Marie

    2011-12-01

    Cu/Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors have been synthesized using an anion exchange method with anionic Ce complexes containing the dipicolinate (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate) ligand. Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of the Ce-containing LDHs. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis, elemental analysis, and low temperature N 2 adsorption/desorption measurements. The results reveal that the inclusion of Ce has a significant effect on the specific surface area, pore structure, and chemical state of Cu in the resulting Cu-Ce-O mixed metal oxides. The resulting changes in composition and structure, particularly the interactions between Cu and Ce centers, significantly enhance the activity of the Ce-containing materials as catalysts for the oxidation of phenol by hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Anatomy of gold catalysts: facts and myths

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Beatrice; Escofet, Imma

    2015-01-01

    This review article covers the main types of gold(i) complexes used as precatalysts under homogeneous conditions in organic synthesis and discusses the different ways of catalyst activation as well as ligand, silver, and anion effects. PMID:26055272

  17. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe[sub 1-x]S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  18. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  19. Schiff base structured acid-base cooperative dual sites in an ionic solid catalyst lead to efficient heterogeneous knoevenagel condensations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjue; Zhao, Pingping; Leng, Yan; Chen, Guojian; Wang, Jun; Huang, Jun

    2012-10-01

    An acid-base bifunctional ionic solid catalyst [PySaIm](3)PW was synthesized by the anion exchange of the ionic-liquid (IL) precursor 1-(2-salicylaldimine)pyridinium bromide ([PySaIm]Br) with the Keggin-structured sodium phosphotungstate (Na(3) PW). The catalyst was characterized by FTIR, UV/Vis, XRD, SEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) theory, thermogravimetric analysis, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS, elemental analysis, and melting points. Together with various counterparts, [PySaIm](3)PW was evaluated in Knoevenagel condensation under solvent and solvent-free conditions. The Schiff base structure attached to the IL cation of [PySaIm](3)PW involves acidic salicyl hydroxyl and basic imine, and provides a controlled nearby position for the acid-base dual sites. The high melting and insoluble properties of [PySaIm](3)PW are relative to the large volume and high valence of PW anions, as well as the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding networks among inorganic anions and IL cations. The ionic solid catalyst [PySaIm](3)PW leads to heterogeneous Knoevenagel condensations. In solvent-free condensation of benzaldehyde with ethyl cyanoacetate, it exhibits a conversion of 95.8 % and a selectivity of 100 %; the conversion is even much higher than that (78.2 %) with ethanol as a solvent. The solid catalyst has a convenient recoverability with only a slight decrease in conversion following subsequent recyclings. Furthermore, the new catalyst is highly applicable to many substrates of aromatic aldehydes with activated methylene compounds. On the basis of the characterization and reaction results, a unique acid-base cooperative mechanism within a Schiff base structure is proposed and discussed, which thoroughly explains not only the highly efficient catalytic performance of [PySaIm](3)PW, but also the lower activities of various control catalysts.

  20. Pressure pyrolysed non-precious oxygen reduction catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallathambi, Vijayadurga

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide energy demand has driven long-term efforts towards developing a clean, hydrogen-based energy economy. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are low emissions and high efficiency devices that utilize the power of hydrogen and are a key enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. Carbon supported platinum-black is the state-of the art catalyst for oxygen reduction in a PEMFC because it can withstand the acidic environment. However, the high cost and low abundance of this precious metal has limited large-scale commercialization of PEMFCs. Current efforts focus on developing alternative inexpensive, non-noble metal-based catalysts for oxygen reduction with performance comparable to conventional platinum based electrocatalysts. In this work, inexpensive metal-nitrogen-carbon (MNC) catalysts have been synthesized by pyrolyzing transition metal and nitrogen precursors together with high surface area carbon materials in a closed, constant-volume quartz tube. High pressure generated due to nitrogen precursor evaporation lead to increased surface nitrogen content in the catalysts post-pyrolysis. Electrochemical oxygen reduction activity of MNC catalysts was analyzed using half-cell Rotating Ring Disc Electrode (RRDE) studies. The effect of nitrogen precursor morphology on the generation of active sites has been explored in detail. By increasing the Nitrogen/Carbon ratio of the nitrogen precursor, the accessible active site density increased by reducing carbon deposition in the pores of the carbon support during pyrolysis. The most active catalysts were obtained using melamine, having a N/C ratio of 2. Single PEMFC measurements employing MNC catalysts as cathodes indicated kinetic current density as high as 15 A cm-3 at 0.8 ViR-free and over 100 h of stable current at 0.5 V were observed. Effects of carbon free ammonia generating solid nitrogen precursors such as urea and ammonium carbamate were also studied. These precursors etched the carbon support

  1. A unifying mechanism for all high-temperature Heck reactions. The role of palladium colloids and anionic species.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Johannes G

    2006-01-21

    The Heck reaction has been the subject of intense investigation in the past decade. Many new types of catalysts have been developed in addition to the existing palladium/phosphine complexes. Prominent among these are palladacycles, pincers, several types of heterogeneous palladium catalysts, colloids and ligand-free palladium, usually in the form of Pd(OAc)2. Most of the newer types function only at higher temperatures, typically between 120 and 160 degrees C. It has been shown that irrespective of the catalyst precursor, none of these catalysts are stable at these high temperatures. They all have a tendency to form soluble palladium(0) colloids or nanoparticles, certainly with less reactive substrates such as aryl bromides or chlorides. The Heck reaction takes place by attack of the arylating agent on the palladium atoms in the outer rim of the nanoparticles. This leads to formation of monomeric or dimeric anionic palladium complexes that undergo the usual steps of the Heck mechanism as described by Amatore and Jutand.

  2. Palladium-Catalyzed Arylation of Alkyl Sulfenate Anions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tiezheng; Zhang, Mengnan; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Carol Y; Walsh, Patrick J

    2015-11-01

    A unique palladium-catalyzed arylation of alkyl sulfenate anions is introduced that affords aryl alkyl sulfoxides in high yields. Due to the base sensitivity of the starting sulfoxides, sulfenate anion intermediates, and alkyl aryl sulfoxide products, the use of a mild method to generate alkyl sulfenate anions was crucial to the success of this process. Thus, a fluoride triggered elimination strategy was employed with alkyl 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl sulfoxides to liberate the requisite alkyl sulfenate anion intermediates. In the presence of palladium catalysts with bulky monodentate phosphines (SPhos and Cy-CarPhos) and aryl bromides or chlorides, alkyl sulfenate anions were readily arylated. Moreover, the thermal fragmentation and the base promoted elimination of alkyl sulfoxides was overridden. The alkyl sulfenate anion arylation exhibited excellent chemoselectivity in the presence of functional groups, such as anilines and phenols, which are also known to undergo palladium catalyzed arylation reactions.

  3. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  4. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  5. Sodium citrate-assisted anion exchange strategy for construction of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/BiOI photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peng-Yuan; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Wei-De

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Heterostructured Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/BiOI microspheres were prepared via anion exchange. • Sodium citrate-assisted anion exchange for construction of composite photocatalysts. • Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/BiOI composites show high visible light photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/BiOI heterojuncted photocatalysts were constructed through a facile partial anion exchange strategy starting from BiOI microspheres and urea with the assistance of sodium citrate. The content of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in the catalysts was regulated by modulating the amount of urea as a precursor, which was decomposed to generate CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} in the hydrothermal process. Citrate anion plays a key role in controlling the morphology and composition of the products. The Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/BiOI catalysts display much higher photocatalytic activity than pure BiOI and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} towards the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) and bisphenol A (BPA). The enhancement of photocatalytic activity of the heterojuncted catalysts is attributed to the formation of p–n junction between p-BiOI and n-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, which is favorable for retarding the recombination of photoinduced electron-hole pairs. Moreover, the holes are demonstrated to be the main active species for the degradation of RhB and BPA.

  6. Cyclopentadienyl-containing low-valent early transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2003-12-30

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR".sub.3, NR".sub.2, OR", SR", GeR".sub.3, SnR".sub.3, and C.dbd.C containing groups (R".dbd.C.sub.1 -C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  7. Cyclopentadienyl-containing low-valent early transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2007-01-09

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising {Cp*MRR'.sub.n}.sup.+{A}.sup.- wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR''.sub.3, NR''.sub.2, OR'', SR'', GeR''.sub.3, SnR''.sub.3, and C.dbd.C-containing groups (R''=C.sub.1 C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  8. Cyclopentadienyl-containing low-valent early transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2003-04-08

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising {Cp*MRR'.sub.n }.sup.+ {A}.sup.- wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR".sub.3, NR".sub.2, OR", SR", GeR".sub.3, and SnR".sub.3 containing groups (R"=C.sub.1 -C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  9. Cyclopentadienyl-containing low-valent early transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2006-10-10

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising {Cp*MRR'.sub.n}.sup.+{A}.sup.- wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR''.sub.3, NR''.sub.2, OR'', SR'', GeR''.sub.3, SnR''.sub.3, and C.dbd.C-containing groups (R''=C.sub.1 C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  10. Cyclopentadienyl-Containing Low-Valent Early Transition Metal Olefin Polymerization Catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2004-06-08

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising {Cp*MRR'.sub.n }.sup.+ {A}.sup.- wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR".sub.3, NR".sub.2, OR", SR", GeR".sub.3, SnR".sub.3, and C.dbd.C-containing groups (R"=C.sub.1 -C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  11. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  12. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  13. Anion solvation in alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Jonah, C.D.; Xujia, Zhang; Lin, Yi

    1996-03-01

    Anion solvation is measured in alcohols using pump-probe pulse radiolysis and the activation energy of solvation is determined. Solvation of an anion appears to be different than excited state solvation. The continuum dielectric model does not appear to explain the results.

  14. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  15. Remarkable promotion effect of trace sulfation on OMS-2 nanorod catalysts for the catalytic combustion of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Changbin; He, Hong

    2015-09-01

    OMS-2 nanorod catalysts were synthesized by a hydrothermal redox reaction method using MnSO4 (OMS-2-SO4) and Mn(CH3COO)2 (OMS-2-AC) as precursors. SO4(2-)-doped OMS-2-AC catalysts with different SO4(2-) concentrations were prepared next by adding (NH4)2SO4 solution into OMS-2-AC samples to investigate the effect of the anion SO4(2-) on the OMS-2-AC catalyst. All catalysts were then tested for the catalytic oxidation of ethanol. The OMS-2-SO4 catalyst synthesized demonstrated much better activity than OMS-2-AC. The SO4(2-) doping greatly influenced the activity of the OMS-2-AC catalyst, with a dramatic promotion of activity for suitable concentration of SO4(2-) (SO4/catalyst=0.5% W/W). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), NH3-TPD and H2-TPR techniques. The results showed that the presence of a suitable amount of SO4(2-) species in the OMS-2-AC catalyst could decrease the Mn-O bond strength and also enhance the lattice oxygen and acid site concentrations, which then effectively promoted the catalytic activity of OMS-2-AC toward ethanol oxidation. Thus it was confirmed that the better catalytic performance of OMS-2-SO4 compared to OMS-2-AC is due to the presence of some residual SO4(2-) species in OMS-2-SO4 samples. PMID:26354694

  16. Anion gap acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Szerlip, H M

    1998-01-01

    Although an anion gap at less than 20 mEq/L rarely has a defined etiology, significant elevations in the anion gap almost always signify presence of an acidosis that can be easily identified. Anion gap acidoses can be divided into those caused by lactate accumulation, ketoacid production, toxin/drugs, and uremia. Lactic acidoses caused by decreased oxygen delivery or defective oxygen utilization are associated with high mortality. The treatment of lactic acidosis is controversial. The use of bicarbonate to increase pH is rarely successful and, by generating PCO2, may worsen outcome. Ketoacidosis is usually secondary to diabetes or alcohol. Treatment is aimed at turning off ketogenesis and repairing fluid and electrolyte abnormalities. Methanol, ethylene glycol, and salicylates are responsible for the majority of toxin-induced anion gap acidoses. Both methanol and ethylene glycol are associated with severe acidoses and elevated osmolar gaps. Treatment of both is alcohol infusion to decrease formation of toxic metabolites and dialyses to remove toxins. Salicylate toxicity usually is associated with a mild metabolic acidosis and a respiratory alkalosis. Uremia is associated with a mild acidosis secondary to decreased ammonia secretion and an anion gap caused by the retention of unmeasured anions. A decrease in anion gap is caused by numerous mechanisms and thus has little clinical utility.

  17. Role of the anions in the hydrothermally formed silver nanowires and their antibacterial property.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chengli; Sun, Wei; Lu, Jiaming; Yan, Wei

    2014-02-15

    Uniform silver nanowires were synthesized via a green and simple hydrothermal method through fine tailoring the anions in the precursors. The results indicate that the anions added to the reaction precursors played a key role in determining the morphology and composition of the final products. A new possible mechanism is proposed that in the hydrothermal process AgxAy act as another oxidant except for Ag(+) ions. The obtained silver nanowires showed excellent and long-lasting antibacterial property.

  18. SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force

  19. Intrinsic anion oxidation potentials.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patrik

    2006-11-01

    Anions of lithium battery salts have been investigated by electronic structure calculations with the objective to find a computational measure to correlate with the observed (in)stability of nonaqueous lithium battery electrolytes vs oxidation often encountered in practice. Accurate prediction of intrinsic anion oxidation potentials is here made possible by computing the vertical free energy difference between anion and neutral radical (Delta Gv) and further strengthened by an empirical correction using only the anion volume as a parameter. The 6-311+G(2df,p) basis set, the VSXC functional, and the C-PCM SCRF algorithm were used. The Delta Gv calculations can be performed using any standard computational chemistry software. PMID:17078600

  20. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2015-06-02

    Anion exchange polymer electrolytes that include guanidinium functionalized polymers may be used as membranes and binders for electrocatalysts in preparation of anodes for electrochemical cells such as solid alkaline fuel cells.

  1. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-03-03

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  2. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-02-20

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  3. Hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of long-chain alkanes and polyolefins over metal-promoted anion-modified transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, Koppampatti R.; Hu, Jianli; Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving

    1996-12-01

    A method is described for cracking a feedstock by contacting the feedstock with a metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst in the presence of hydrogen gas. The metal oxide of the catalyst is one or more of ZrO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2}, and the feedstock is principally chains of at least 20 carbon atoms. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of Pt, Ni, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, (Mn and Fe) or mixtures of them present between about 0.2% to about 15% by weight of the catalyst. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of SO{sub 4}, WO{sub 3}, or mixtures of them present between about 0.5% to about 20% by weight of the catalyst.

  4. Hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of long-chain alkanes and polyolefins over metal-promoted anion-modified transition metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Venkatesh, Koppampatti R.; Hu, Jianli; Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving

    2001-01-01

    A method of cracking a feedstock by contacting the feedstock with a metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst in the presence of hydrogen gas. The metal oxide of the catalyst is one or more of ZrO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, TiO.sub.2 and SnO.sub.2, and the feedstock is principally chains of at least 20 carbon atoms. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of Pt, Ni, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, (Mn & Fe) or mixtures of them present between about 0.2% to about 15% by weight of the catalyst. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of SO.sub.4, WO.sub.3, or mixtures of them present between about 0.5% to about 20% by weight of the catalyst.

  5. Sterically shielded diboron-containing metallocene olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Ja, Li; Yang, Xinmin

    1995-09-05

    A non-coordinating anion, preferably containing a sterically shielded diboron hydride, if combined with a cyclopenta-dienyl-substituted metallocene cation component, such as a zirconocene metallocene, is a useful olefin polymerization catalyst component. The anion preferably has the formula ##STR1## where R is branched lower alkyl, such as t-butyl.

  6. Bimetallic complexes and polymerization catalysts therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Jasson T.; Marks, Tobin J.; Li, Liting

    2000-11-28

    Group 3-6 or Lanthanide metal complexes possessing two metal centers, catalysts derived therefrom by combining the same with strong Lewis acids, Bronsted acid salts, salts containing a cationic oxidizing agent or subjected to bulk electrolysis in the presence of compatible, inert non-coordinating anions and the use of such catalysts for polymerizing olefins, diolefins and/or acetylenically unsaturated monomers are disclosed.

  7. Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Sansone, Michael J.; Slegeir, William A. R.

    1983-08-02

    A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint.

  8. Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Sansone, M.J.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    1983-08-02

    A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint. 9 figs.

  9. Unexpected anion effect in the alkoxylation of alkynes catalyzed by N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) cationic gold complexes.

    PubMed

    Biasiolo, Luca; Trinchillo, Marina; Belanzoni, Paola; Belpassi, Leonardo; Busico, Vincenzo; Ciancaleoni, Gianluca; D'Amora, Angela; Macchioni, Alceo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Zuccaccia, Daniele

    2014-11-01

    The intermolecular alkoxylation of alkynes is the oldest application of cationic gold(I) catalysts; however, no systematic experimental data about the role of the anion are available. In this contribution, the role of the anion in this catalytic reaction as promoted by a N-heterocyclic carbene-based gold catalyst, [(NHC)AuX] (X=BARF(-) , BF4 (-) , OTf(-) , OTs(-) , TFA(-) , or OAc(-) ) is analyzed, through a combined experimental (NMR spectroscopy) and theoretical (DFT calculation) approach. The most important factor seems to be the ability to abstract the proton from the methanol during the nucleophilic attack, and such ability is related to the anion basicity. On the other hand, too high coordination power or basicity of the anion worsens the catalytic performance by preventing alkyne coordination or by forming too much free methoxide in solution, which poisons the catalyst. The intermediate coordinating power and basicity of the OTs(-) anion provides the best compromise to achieve efficient catalysis. PMID:25263571

  10. Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Koji; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Abe, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ogumi, Zempachi

    Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an OH-form anion exchange membrane and polyhydric alcohols were studied. A high open circuit voltage of ca. 800 mV was obtained for a cell using Pt-Ru/C (anode) and Pt/C (cathode) at 323 K, which was about 100-200 mV higher than that for a DMFC using Nafion ®. The maximum power densities were in the order of ethylene glycol > glycerol > methanol > erythritol > xylitol. Silver catalysts were used as a cathode catalyst to fabricate alkaline fuel cells, since silver catalyst is almost inactive in the oxidation of polyhydric alcohols. Alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells using silver as a cathode catalyst gave excellent performance because higher concentrations of fuel could be supplied to the anode.

  11. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-02-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on the development of novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed liquefaction. The ultimate goal of the present research is to develop novel catalytic hydroliquefaction process using highly active dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research is to develop novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular that can be used in low precursors concentrations (< 1 %) but exhibit high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. The major technical approaches are, first, to prepare the desired heteronuclear organometallic molecules as catalyst precursors that contain covalently bound, two different metal atoms and sulfur in a single molecule. Such precursors will generate finely dispersed bimetallic catalysts such as Fe-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-Mo binary sulfides upon thermal decomposition. The second major technical approach is to perform the liquefaction of coals unpregnated with the organometallic precursors under temperature-programmed conditions, where the programmed heat-up serves as a step for both catalyst activation and coal pretreatment or preconversion. Two to three different complexes for each of the Fe-Mo, Co-Mo, and Ni-Mo combinations will be prepared. Initial catalyst screening tests will be conducted using a subbituminous coal and a bituminous coal. Effects of coal rank and solvents will be examined with the selected bimetallic catalysts which showed much higher activity than the dispersed catalysts from conventional precursors.

  12. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    DOEpatents

    Marks, T.J.; Ja, L.; Yang, X.

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetrafluoro-aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  13. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Ja, Li; Yang, Xinmin

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetra fluoro, aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  14. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-09-30

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  15. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  16. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  17. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  18. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.; Alexander, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    Two polymer ion exchange membranes were synthesized to fulfill the needs of both electrical resistivity and anolyte/catholyte separation for utility load leveling utilizing the DOE/NASA mixed electrolyte REDOX battery. Both membranes were shown to meet mixed electrolyte utility load leveling criteria. Several modifications of an anion exchange membrane failed to meet utility load leveling REDOX battery criteria using the unmixed electrolyte REDOX cell.

  19. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.; Alexander, S. S.

    1984-07-01

    Two polymer ion exchange membranes were synthesized to fulfill the needs of both electrical resistivity and anolyte/catholyte separation for utility load leveling utilizing the DOE/NASA mixed electrolyte REDOX battery. Both membranes were shown to meet mixed electrolyte utility load leveling criteria. Several modifications of an anion exchange membrane failed to meet utility load leveling REDOX battery criteria using the unmixed electrolyte REDOX cell.

  20. The copper-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of alkylboron reagents: disproportionation of anionic (alkyl)(alkoxy)borates to anionic dialkylborates prior to transmetalation.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Prakash; Thapa, Surendra; Dickie, Diane A; Giri, Ramesh

    2016-09-25

    We report the first example of Cu(I)-catalysed coupling of alkylboron reagents with aryl and heteroaryl iodides that affords products in good to excellent yields. Preliminary mechanistic studies with alkylborates indicate that the anionic (alkoxy)(alkyl)borates, generated from alkyllithium and alkoxyboron reagents, undergo disproportionation to anionic dialkylborates and that both anionic alkylborates are active for transmetalation to a Cu(I)-catalyst. Results from a radical clock experiment and the Hammett plot imply that the reaction likely proceeds via a non-radical pathway. PMID:27540605

  1. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  2. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  3. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  4. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The efforts on the synthesis of polymer anion redox membranes were mainly concentrated in two areas, membrane development and membrane fabrication. Membrane development covered the preparation and evaluation of experimental membranes systems with improved resistance stability and/or lower permeability. Membrane fabrication covered the laboratory scale production of prime candidate membranes in quantities of up to two hundred and sizes up to 18 inches x 18 inches (46 cm x 46 cm). These small (10 in x 11 in) and medium sized membranes were mainly for assembly into multicell units. Improvements in processing procedures and techniques for preparing such membrane sets lifted yields to over 90 percent.

  5. Heterogenization of Homogeneous Catalysts: the Effect of the Support

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, W.L.; Ott, K.C.; Hall, K.A.; de Rege, F.M.; Morita, D.K.; Tumas, W.; Brown, G.H.; Broene, R.D.

    1999-06-29

    We have studied the influence of placing a soluble, homogeneous catalyst onto a solid support. We determined that such a 'heterogenized' homogeneous catalyst can have improved activity and selectivity for the asymmetric hydrogenation of enamides to amino acid derivatives. The route of heterogenization of RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} cations occurs via electrostatic interactions with anions that are capable of strong hydrogen bonding to silica surfaces. This is a novel approach to supported catalysis. Supported RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} is a recyclable, non-leaching catalyst in non-polar media. This is one of the few heterogenized catalysts that exhibits improved catalytic performance as compared to its homogeneous analog.

  6. Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides from Ce-containing layered double hydroxide precursors: Controllable preparation and catalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Zheng; Zhao Na; Liu Junfeng; Li Feng; Evans, David G.; Duan Xue; Forano, Claude; Roy, Marie de

    2011-12-15

    Cu/Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors have been synthesized using an anion exchange method with anionic Ce complexes containing the dipicolinate (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate) ligand. Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of the Ce-containing LDHs. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis, elemental analysis, and low temperature N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption measurements. The results reveal that the inclusion of Ce has a significant effect on the specific surface area, pore structure, and chemical state of Cu in the resulting Cu-Ce-O mixed metal oxides. The resulting changes in composition and structure, particularly the interactions between Cu and Ce centers, significantly enhance the activity of the Ce-containing materials as catalysts for the oxidation of phenol by hydrogen peroxide. - Graphical Abstract: Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides calcined from [Ce(dipic){sub 3}]{sup 3-}- intercalated Cu/Zn/Al layered double hydroxides were synthesized and displayed good catalytic performances in phenol oxidation due to the Cu-Ce interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Ce(dipic){sub 3}]{sup 3-}-intercalated Cu/Zn/Al layered double hydroxides were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides derivated from the LDHs were characterized as catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of Ce influenced physicochemical property and catalytic performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu-Ce interaction was largely responsible for enhanced catalytic ability.

  7. Polyimide Precursor Solid Residuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A polyimide precursor solid residuum is an admixture of an aromatic dianhydride or derivative thereof and an aromatic diamine or derivative thereof plus a complexing agent, which is complexed with the admixture by hydrogen bonding. The polyimide precursor solid residuum is effectively employed in the preparation of polyimide foam and the fabrication of polyimide foam structures.

  8. Pseudorotation in fullerene anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Janette L.; Hands, Ian D.; Bates, Colin A.

    2007-07-01

    Jahn-Teller (JT) problems are often characterised by an adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) containing either a set of isoenergetic wells or a trough of equivalent-energy points, which may be warped by higher-order coupling terms or anisotropic effects. In all three cases, the JT effect will be dynamic. Either tunnelling between the wells or rotation (of a distortion) around the trough will restore the original symmetry of the system. This motion is referred to as pseudorotation. It should be possible to observe a JT system in a distorted geometry if measurements are made on a sufficiently short timescale. In various cubic systems, this timescale has been calculated to be the order of picoseconds. Such timescales are accessible using modern methods of ultrafast spectroscopy. Measurements of pseudorotation rates can lead to important information on the strength and nature of the JT coupling present. We will present analytical calculations that allow the rate of pseudorotation to be determined in terms of the vibronic coupling parameters. We will show how these results can be applied to E ⊗ e systems and then to the more complicated system applicable to C60- anions. This is of particular interest because of the high icosahedral symmetry of fullerene ions and also because of the many potential uses of materials containing these ions. We conclude by outlining experiments that should be capable of measuring pseudorotation in C 60 anions.

  9. Process for manufacturing a supported catalyst for the hydrotreatment of hydrocarbon oils

    SciTech Connect

    Toulhoat, H.; Jacquin, Y.; Mercier, M.; Plumail, J. C.

    1985-04-09

    Supported catalysts for use in hydrocarbons hydrotreatments are made by shaping catalyst carrier, with or without catalyst precursors, into balls, calcining the balls at 300/sup 0/-1000/sup 0/ C., and crushing the calcined balls to particles whose average size is 0.2-0.8 times the average diameter of the balls. When the precursors are not present during the manufacture, they are added thereafter.

  10. Attrition resistant bulk iron catalysts and processes for preparing and using same

    DOEpatents

    Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy; Goodwin, Jr., James G.; Gangwal, Santosh K.

    2007-08-21

    An attrition resistant precipitated bulk iron catalyst is prepared from iron oxide precursor and a binder by spray drying. The catalysts are preferably used in carbon monoxide hydrogenation processes such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These catalysts are suitable for use in fluidized-bed reactors, transport reactors and, especially, slurry bubble column reactors.

  11. Dynamic chemistry of anion recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu

    2012-01-01

    In the past 40 years, anion recognition by synthetic receptors has grown into a rich and vibrant research topic, developing into a distinct branch of Supramolecular Chemistry. Traditional anion receptors comprise organic scaffolds functionalized with complementary binding groups that are assembled by multistep organic synthesis. Recently, a new approach to anion receptors has emerged, in which the host is dynamically self-assembled in the presence of the anionic guest, via reversible bond formation between functional building units. While coordination bonds were initially employed for the self-assembly of the anion hosts, more recent studies demonstrated that reversible covalent bonds can serve the same purpose. In both cases, due to their labile connections, the molecular constituents have the ability to assemble, dissociate, and recombine continuously, thereby creating a dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) of receptors. The anionic guests, through specific molecular recognition, may then amplify (express) the formation of a particular structure among all possible combinations (real or virtual) by shifting the equilibria involved towards the most optimal receptor. This approach is not limited to solution self-assembly, but is equally applicable to crystallization, where the fittest anion-binding crystal may be selected. Finally, the pros and cons of employing dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) vs molecular design for developing anion receptors, and the implications of both approaches to selective anion separations, will be discussed.

  12. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  13. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S.; Hodgdon, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of NAS 3-20108 was the development and evaluation of improved anion selective membranes useful as efficient separators in a redox power storage cell system being constructed. The program was divided into three parts, (a) optimization of the selected candidate membrane systems, (b) investigation of alternative membrane/polymer systems, and (c) characterization of candidate membranes. The major synthesis effort was aimed at improving and optimizing as far as possible each candidate system with respect to three critical membrane properties essential for good redox cell performance. Substantial improvements were made in 5 candidate membrane systems. The critical synthesis variables of cross-link density, monomer ratio, and solvent composition were examined over a wide range. In addition, eight alternative polymer systems were investigated, two of which attained candidate status. Three other alternatives showed potential but required further research and development. Each candidate system was optimized for selectivity.

  14. Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Bruno; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides or OATPs are central transporters in the disposition of drugs and other xenobiotics. In addition, they mediate transport of a wide variety of endogenous substrates. The critical role of OATPs in drug disposition has spurred research both in academia and in the pharmaceutical industry. Translational aspects with clinical questions are the focus in academia, while the pharmaceutical industry tries to define and understand the role these transporters play in pharmacotherapy. The present overview summarizes our knowledge on the interaction of food constituents with OATPs, and on the OATP transport mechanisms. Further, it gives an update on the available information on the structure-function relationship of the OATPs, and finally, covers the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of OATPs. PMID:24745984

  15. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chunshan, Song; Kirby, S.; Schmidt, E.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to explore bimetallic dispersed catalysts for more efficient coal liquefaction. Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting various aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. This paper describes recent results on (1) hydrodeoxygenation of O-containing polycyclic model compounds using novel organometallic catalyst precursors; and (2) activity and selectivity of dispersed Fe catalysts from organometallic and inorganic precursors for hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl) bibenzyl. The results showed that some iron containing catalysts have higher activity in the sulfur-free form, contrary to conventional wisdom. Adding sulfur to Fe precursors with Cp-ligands decreased the activity of the resulting catalyst. This is in distinct contrast to the cases with iron pentacarbonyl and superfine Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where S addition increased their catalytic activity substantially. A positive correlation between sulfur addition and increased activity can be seen, but a reversed trend between Fe cluster size and hydrocracking conversion could be observed, for carbonyl-type Fe precursors. It is apparent that the activity and selectivity of Fe catalysts for NMBB conversion depends strongly on both the type of ligand environment, the oxidation state and the number of intermetal bonds in the molecular precursor.

  16. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  17. Novel Fragmentation Pathways of Anionic Adducts of Steroids Formed by Electrospray Anion Attachment Involving Regioselective Attachment, Regiospecific Decompositions, Charge-Induced Pathways, and Ion-Dipole Complex Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannulu, Nalaka S.; Cole, Richard B.

    2012-09-01

    The analysis of several bifunctional neutral steroids, 5-α-pregnane diol (5-α-pregnane-3α-20βdiol), estradiol (3,17α-dihydroxy-1,3,5(10)-estratriene), progesterone (4-pregnene-3,20-dione), lupeol (3β-hydroxy-20(29)-lupene), pregnenolone (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one), and pregnenolone acetate (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one acetate) was accomplished by negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) employing adduct formation with various anions: fluoride, bicarbonate, acetate, and chloride. Fluoride yielded higher abundances of anionic adducts and more substantial abundances of deprotonated molecules compared with other investigated anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of precursor [M + anion]- adducts of these steroids revealed that fluoride adduct [M + F]- precursors first lose HF to produce [M - H]- and then undergo consecutive decompositions to yield higher abundances of structurally-informative product ions than the other tested anions. In addition to charge-remote fragmentations, the majority of CID pathways of estradiol are deduced to occur via charge-induced fragmentation. Most interestingly, certain anions exhibit preferential attachment to a specific site on these bifunctional steroid molecules, which we are calling "regioselective anion attachment." Regioselective anion attachment is evidenced by subsequent regiospecific decomposition. Regioselective attachment of fluoride (and acetate) anions to low (and moderate) acidity functional groups of pregnenolone, respectively, is demonstrated using deuterated compounds. Moreover, the formation of unique intermediate ion-dipole complexes leading to novel fragmentation pathways of fluoride adducts of pregnenolone acetate, and bicarbonate adducts of d4-pregnenolone, are also discussed.

  18. Earthquakes: hydrogeochemical precursors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

  19. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Utz, Bruce R.; Cugini, Anthony V.

    1992-01-01

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  20. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  1. Anion-exchange nanospheres as titration reagents for anionic analytes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-08-18

    We present here anion-exchange nanospheres as novel titration reagents for anions. The nanospheres contain a lipophilic cation for which the counterion is initially Cl(-). Ion exchange takes place between Cl(-) in the nanospheres and a more lipophilic anion in the sample, such as ClO4(-) and NO3(-). Consecutive titration in the same sample solution for ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were demonstrated. As an application, the concentration of NO3(-) in spinach was successfully determined using this method.

  2. Liquefaction Of Coal With Surfactant And Disposable Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1996-01-01

    Fuels derived from coal more competitive with petroleum products. Improved coal-liquefaction process exploits synergistic effects of disposable iron oxide catalyst and cheap anionic surfactant. Efficiency of conversion achieved in significantly higher than efficiencies obtained with addition of either surfactant or catalyst alone. No costly pretreatment necessary, and increase in conversion achieved under processing conditions milder than those used heretofore in liquefaction of coal. Quality of distillates obtained after liquefaction in process expected superior to distillates obtained after liquefaction by older techniques.

  3. Chelated Ruthenium Catalysts for Z-Selective Olefin Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of ruthenium-based metathesis catalysts with chelating N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands which catalyze highly Z-selective olefin metathesis. A very simple and convenient synthetic procedure of such a catalyst has been developed. An intramolecular C-H bond activation of the NHC ligand, which is promoted by anion ligand substitution, forms the appropriate chelate for stereo- controlled olefin metathesis. PMID:21563826

  4. Amino acids as chiral anionic ligands for ruthenium based asymmetric olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Ivry, Elisa; Ben-Asuly, Amos; Goldberg, Israel; Lemcoff, N Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Several amino acid ligands were introduced into the Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation complex by a facile anionic ligand exchange. The chiral pre-catalysts obtained displayed enantioselectivity in asymmetric ring-closing and ring-opening cross-metathesis reactions. Reduction of the lability of the carboxylate ligands was found to be cardinal for improving the observed enantiomeric product enrichment. PMID:25656548

  5. Amino acids as chiral anionic ligands for ruthenium based asymmetric olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Ivry, Elisa; Ben-Asuly, Amos; Goldberg, Israel; Lemcoff, N Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Several amino acid ligands were introduced into the Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd generation complex by a facile anionic ligand exchange. The chiral pre-catalysts obtained displayed enantioselectivity in asymmetric ring-closing and ring-opening cross-metathesis reactions. Reduction of the lability of the carboxylate ligands was found to be cardinal for improving the observed enantiomeric product enrichment.

  6. Anion transport with halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Andreas Vargas; Matile, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This review covers the application of halogen bonds to transport anions across lipid bilayer membranes. The introduction provides a brief description of biological and synthetic transport systems. Emphasis is on examples that explore interactions beyond the coordination with lone pairs or hydrogen bonds for the recognition of cations and anions, particularly cation-π and anion-π interactions, and on structural motifs that are relevant for transport studies with halogen bonds. Section 2 summarizes the use of macrocyclic scaffolds to achieve transport with halogen bonds, focusing on cyclic arrays of halogen-bond donors of different strengths on top of calixarene scaffolds. This section also introduces methods to study anion binding in solution and anion transport in fluorogenic vesicles. In Sect. 3, transport studies with monomeric halogen bond-donors are summarized. This includes the smallest possible organic anion transporter, trifluoroiodomethane, a gas that can be bubbled through a suspension of vesicles to turn on transport. Anion transport with a gas nicely illustrates the power of halogen bonds for anion transport. Like hydrogen bonds, they are directional and strong, but compared to hydrogen-bond donors, halogen-bond donors are more lipophilic. Section 3 also offers a concise introduction to the measurement of ion selectivity in fluorogenic vesicles and conductance experiments in planar bilayer membranes. Section 4 introduces the formal unrolling of cyclic scaffolds into linear scaffolds that can span lipid bilayers. As privileged transmembrane scaffolds, the importance of hydrophobically matching fluorescent p-oligophenyl rods is fully confirmed. The first formal synthetic ion channel that operates by cooperative multiion hopping along transmembrane halogen-bonding cascades is described. Compared to homologs for anion-π interactions, transport with halogen bonds is clearly more powerful.

  7. Identification of Desirable Precursor Properties for Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muoto, Chigozie K.; Jordan, Eric H.; Gell, Maurice; Aindow, Mark

    2011-06-01

    In solution precursor plasma spray chemical precursor solutions are injected into a standard plasma torch and the final material is formed and deposited in a single step. This process has several attractive features, including the ability to rapidly explore new compositions and to form amorphous and metastable phases from molecularly mixed precursors. Challenges include: (a) moderate deposition rates due to the need to evaporate the precursor solvent, (b) dealing on a case by case basis with precursor characteristics that influence the spray process (viscosity, endothermic and exothermic reactions, the sequence of physical states through which the precursor passes before attaining the final state, etc.). Desirable precursor properties were identified by comparing an effective precursor for yttria-stabilized zirconia with four less effective candidate precursors for MgO:Y2O3. The critical parameters identified were a lack of major endothermic events during precursor decomposition and highly dense resultant particles.

  8. Combinatorial Optimization of Heterogeneous Catalysts Used in the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Verma, Sunita; Delzeit, Lance; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2000-01-01

    Libraries of liquid-phase catalyst precursor solutions were printed onto iridium-coated silicon substrates and evaluated for their effectiveness in catalyzing the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The catalyst precursor solutions were composed of inorganic salts and a removable tri-block copolymer (EO)20(PO)70(EO)20 (EO = ethylene oxide, PO = propylene oxide) structure-directing agent (SDA), dissolved in ethanol/methanol mixtures. Sample libraries were quickly assayed using scanning electron microscopy after CVD growth to identify active catalysts and CVD conditions. Composition libraries and focus libraries were then constructed around the active spots identified in the discovery libraries to understand how catalyst precursor composition affects the yield, density, and quality of the nanotubes. Successful implementation of combinatorial optimization methods in the development of highly active, carbon nanotube catalysts is demonstrated, as well as the identification of catalyst formulations that lead to varying densities and shapes of aligned nanotube towers.

  9. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  10. Improving precursor removal

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, C.M.; Collins, M.R.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether dissolved organic carbon (DOC) could be feasibly removed by diatomaceous earth (DE) precoat filters amended with powdered activated carbon or anionic resin. In the first series of experiments, various precoat configurations of DE size, amendment type and concentration, and precoat weight were evaluated for their initial removals of dissolved organic matter and turbidity from a synthetic raw water source. In the second series of experiments, various body feed compositions were tested for their ability to maintain or improve the turbidity and organic carbon removal achieved by the optimum precoat while head loss through the filter was kept to a minimum. Amending the DE filter with a strong-base anionic resin in the precoat and body feed achieved significant removals of UV absorbance and DOC (> 50%) with excellent turbidity reduction and acceptable head loss development.

  11. Anion Transport with Chalcogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Benz, Sebastian; Macchione, Mariano; Verolet, Quentin; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    In this report, we introduce synthetic anion transporters that operate with chalcogen bonds. Electron-deficient dithieno[3,2-b;2',3'-d]thiophenes (DTTs) are identified as ideal to bind anions in the focal point of the σ holes on the cofacial endocyclic sulfur atoms. Anion binding in solution and anion transport across lipid bilayers are found to increase with the depth of the σ holes of the DTT anionophores. These results introduce DTTs and related architectures as a privileged motif to engineer chalcogen bonds into functional systems, complementary in scope to classics such as 2,2'-bipyrroles or 2,2'-bipyridines that operate with hydrogen bonds and lone pairs, respectively. PMID:27433964

  12. Composite catalysts supported on modified carbon substrates and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Popov, Branko N.; Subramanian, Nalini; Colon-Mercado, Hector R.

    2009-11-17

    A method of producing a composite carbon catalyst is generally disclosed. The method includes oxidizing a carbon precursor (e.g., carbon black). Optionally, nitrogen functional groups can be added to the oxidized carbon precursor. Then, the oxidized carbon precursor is refluxed with a non-platinum transitional metal precursor in a solution. Finally, the solution is pyrolyzed at a temperature of at least about 500.degree. C.

  13. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  14. Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Parent, Yves O.; Magrini, Kim; Landin, Steven M.; Ritland, Marcus A.

    2011-03-29

    A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

  15. Photocatalytic Anion Oxidation and Applications in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hering, Thea; Meyer, Andreas Uwe; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-19

    Ions and radicals of the same kind differ by one electron only. The oxidation of many stable inorganic anions yields their corresponding highly reactive radicals, and visible light excitable photocatalysts can provide the required oxidation potential for this transformation. Air oxygen serves as the terminal oxidant, or cheap sacrificial oxidants are used, providing a very practical approach for generating reactive inorganic radicals for organic synthesis. We discuss in this perspective several recently reported examples: Nitrate radicals are obtained by one-electron photooxidation of nitrate anions and are very reactive toward organic molecules. The photooxidation of sulfinate salts yields the much more stable sulfone radicals, which smoothly add to double bonds. A two-electron oxidation of chloride anions to electrophilic chlorine species reacting with arenes in aromatic substitutions extends the method beyond radical reactions. The chloride anion oxidation proceeds via photocatalytically generated peracidic acid as the oxidation reagent. Although the number of reported examples of photocatalytically generated inorganic radical intermediates for organic synthesis is still small, future extension of the concept to other inorganic ions as radical precursors is a clear perspective.

  16. Simple cerium-triethanolamine complex: Synthesis, characterization, thermal decomposition and its application to prepare ceria support for platinum catalysts used in methane steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wattanathana, Worawat; Nootsuwan, Nollapan; Veranitisagul, Chatchai; Koonsaeng, Nattamon; Laosiripojana, Navadol; Laobuthee, Apirat

    2015-06-01

    Cerium-triethanolamine complex was synthesized by simple complexation method in 1-propanol solvent using cerium(III) chloride as a metal source and triethanolamine as a ligand. The structures of the prepared complex were proposed based on FT-IR, FT-Raman and ESI-MS results as equimolar of triethanolamine and cerium chelated complex having monomeric tricyclic structure with and without chloride anion as another coordinating group known as ceratrane. The complex was used as a precursor for ceria material done by thermal decomposition. XRD result revealed that when calcined at 600 °C for 2 h, the cerium complex was totally turned into pure ceria with cubic fluorite structure. The obtained ceria was then employed to synthesize platinum doped ceria catalysts for methane steam reforming. Various amounts of platinum i.e. 1, 3, 5 and 10 mol percents were introduced on the ceria support by microwave-assisted wetness impregnation using ammonium tetrachloroplatinate(II). The platinum-impregnated ceria powders were subjected to calcination in 10% hydrogen/helium atmosphere at 500 °C for 3 h to reduce platinum(II) to platinum(0). XRD patterns of the catalysts confirmed that the platinum particles doped on the ceria support were in the form of platinum(0). Catalytic activity test showed that the catalytic activities got higher as the amounts of platinum doped increased. Besides, the portions of coke formation on the surface of catalysts were reduced as the amounts of platinum doped increased.

  17. Can Ni phosphides become viable hydroprocessing catalysts?

    SciTech Connect

    Soled, S.; Miseo, S.; Baumgartner, J.; Guzman, J.; Bolin, T.; Meyer, R.

    2015-05-15

    We prepared higher surface area nickel phosphides than are normally found by reducing nickel phosphate. To do this, we hydrothermally synthesized Ni hydroxy phosphite precursors with low levels of molybdenum substitution. The molybdenum substitution increases the surface area of these precursors. During pretreatment in a sulfiding atmosphere (such as H2S/H2) dispersed islands of MoS2 segregate from the precursor and provide a pathway for H2 dissociation that allows reduction of the phosphite precursor to nickel phosphide at substantially lower temperatures than in the absence of MoS2. The results reported here show that to create nickel phosphides with comparable activity to conventional supported sulfide catalysts, one would have to synthesize the phosphide with surface areas exceeding 400 m2/g (i.e. with nanoparticles less than 30 Å in lateral dimension).

  18. Fullerenols revisited as stable radical anions.

    PubMed

    Husebo, Lars O; Sitharaman, Balaji; Furukawa, Ko; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Wilson, Lon J

    2004-09-29

    The first exhaustive purification and characterization of the much-studied "fullerenols", prepared by reaction of C(60) in toluene with an oxygenated, aqueous NaOH solution using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide as a phase transfer catalyst, has been performed. The resulting fullerenol is not simply polyhydroxylated C(60) but rather is a structurally and electronically complex C(60) radical anion with a molecular formula of Na(+)(n)[C(60)O(x)(OH)(y)](n)(-) (where n = 2-3, x = 7-9, and y = 12-15) for three different, but identical, preparations. Surprisingly, Na(+)-fullerenol is paramagnetic, exhibiting mu(B) values in aqueous solution of 1.9-2.1 B.M. at 0.5 T and 300 K and R(1) proton relaxivities of 0.55-0.77 mM(-1)s(-1) at 20 MHz and 40 degrees C, values both slightly higher than those expected for a pure S = 1/2 spin system. ESR studies (ESE-FS and 2D nutation) of frozen aqueous solutions at 1.5 and 5.0 K establish that Na(+)-fullerenol is mainly S = 1/2 with a minor, but significant, component of S = 1. Thus, this is the first report to characterize these widely studied, water-soluble fullerenols as stable radical anions. The stability of the S = 1/2 Na(+)-fullerenol radical is likely due to a highly derivatized C(60) surface that protects a cyclopentadienyl radical center on the fullerene. PMID:15382940

  19. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2013-07-23

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

  20. Dipyrrolyl Precursors to Bisalkoxide Molybdenum Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Adam; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2008-01-01

    Addition of two equivalents of lithium pyrrolide to Mo(NR)(CHCMe2R')(OTf)2(DME) (OTf = OSO2CF3; R = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3, 1-adamantyl, or 2,6-Br2-4-MeC6H2; R' = Me or Ph) produces Mo(NR)(CHCMe2R')(NC4H4)2 complexes in good yield. All compounds can be recrystallized readily from toluene or mixtures of pentane and ether and are sensitive to air and moisture. An X-ray structure of a 2,6-diisopropylphenylimido species shows it to be an unsymmetric dimer, {Mo(NAr)(syn-CHCMe2Ph)(η5-NC4H4)(η1-NC4H4)}{Mo(NAr)(syn-CHCMe2Ph)(η1-NC4H4)2}, in which the nitrogen in the η5-pyrrolyl bound to one Mo behaves as a donor to the other Mo. All complexes are fluxional on the NMR time scale at room temperature, with one symmetric species being observed on the NMR time scale at 50 °C in toluene-d8. The dimers react with PMe3 (at Mo) or B(C6F5)3 (at a η5-NC4H4 nitrogen) to give monomeric products in high yield. They also react rapidly with two equivalents of monoalcohols (e.g., Me3COH or (CF3)2MeCOH) or one equivalent of a biphenol or binaphthol to give two equivalents of pyrrole and bisalkoxide or diolate complexes in ~100% yield. PMID:17165793

  1. Organic solvent soluble oxide supported hydrogenation catalyst precursors

    DOEpatents

    Edlund, David J.; Finke, Richard G.; Saxton, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention discloses two polyoxoanion supported metal complexes found to be useful in olefin hydrogenation. The complexes are novel compositions of matter which are soluble in organic solvents. In particular, the compositions of matter comprise A.sub.x [L.sub.n Ir.sup.(I) .multidot.X.sub.2 M.sub.15 M'.sub.3 O.sub.62 ].sup.x- and A.sub.y [L.sub.n Ir.sup.(I) .multidot.X.sub.2 M.sub.9 M'.sub.3 O.sub.40 ].sup.y- where L is a ligand preferably chosen from 1,5-cyclooctadiene (COD), ethylene, cyclooctene, norbornadiene and other olefinic ligands; n=1 or 2 depending upon the number of double bonds present in the ligand L; X is a "hetero" atom chosen from B, Si, Ge, P, As, Se, Te, I, Co, Mn and Cu; M is either W or Mo; M' is preferably Nb or V but Ti, Zr, Ta, Hf are also useful; and A is a countercation preferably selected from tetrabutyl ammonium and alkali metal ions.

  2. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  3. New hydroprocessing catalysts prepared from molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.

    1994-12-31

    Current commercial hydroprocessing catalysts are transition metal sulfides (TMS) based on Group 8 and 11 metals. They are prepared by dispersing MoO{sub 3} and a promoter metal oxide, either CoO or NiO, on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SiO{sub 2}-modified Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This is followed by sulfiding with a sulfur-bearing stream such as H{sub 2}S at high temperatures. The thus formed MoS{sub 2} crystallites are the backbone of the working catalysts. A potentially fruitful approach to new catalysts would be to molecularly incorporate promoter metals into the structure of MoS{sub 2} edge planes. As a first step, it would seem reasonable to exploit the use of heterometallic metal sulfur complexes as hydroprocessing catalyst precursors. The authors have developed several families of new catalysts along this line. In this paper the authors restrict themselves to the metal amine thiomolybdate-derived catalysts. Specifically, they give an overview of the performance of the bulk (unsupported) FeMo sulfide prepared from MAT. This low-surface-area catalyst shows a high HDN-to-HDS volumetric activity ratio and is also active for HDA. While most of the results are taken from their previous publications, some new results are reported here.

  4. Dendronized Anionic Gold Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Peña-González, Cornelia E; García-Broncano, Pilar; Ottaviani, M Francesca; Cangiotti, Michela; Fattori, Alberto; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, M Luisa; Pérez-Serrano, Jorge; Gómez, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Sánchez-Nieves, Javier; de la Mata, F Javier

    2016-02-24

    Anionic carbosilane dendrons decorated with sulfonate functions and one thiol moiety at the focal point have been used to synthesize water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through the direct reaction of dendrons, gold precursor, and reducing agent in water, and also through a place-exchange reaction. These nanoparticles have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, TEM, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV/Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and zeta-potential measurements. The interacting ability of the anionic sulfonate functions was investigated by EPR spectroscopy with copper(II) as a probe. Different structures and conformations of the AuNPs modulate the availability of sulfonate and thiol groups for complexation by copper(II). Toxicity assays of AuNPs showed that those produced through direct reaction were less toxic than those obtained by ligand exchange. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection was higher in the case of dendronized AuNPs than in dendrons. PMID:26875938

  5. Dendronized Anionic Gold Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Peña-González, Cornelia E; García-Broncano, Pilar; Ottaviani, M Francesca; Cangiotti, Michela; Fattori, Alberto; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, M Luisa; Pérez-Serrano, Jorge; Gómez, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Sánchez-Nieves, Javier; de la Mata, F Javier

    2016-02-24

    Anionic carbosilane dendrons decorated with sulfonate functions and one thiol moiety at the focal point have been used to synthesize water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through the direct reaction of dendrons, gold precursor, and reducing agent in water, and also through a place-exchange reaction. These nanoparticles have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, TEM, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV/Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and zeta-potential measurements. The interacting ability of the anionic sulfonate functions was investigated by EPR spectroscopy with copper(II) as a probe. Different structures and conformations of the AuNPs modulate the availability of sulfonate and thiol groups for complexation by copper(II). Toxicity assays of AuNPs showed that those produced through direct reaction were less toxic than those obtained by ligand exchange. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection was higher in the case of dendronized AuNPs than in dendrons.

  6. Indirect synthesis of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}via radiation- or photochemical formation of its hydrated precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Jan Pospisil, Milan; Cuba, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} precursors were produced by UV/e-beam irradiation of aqueous solutions. • Depending on the aluminium salt (Cl{sup −} or NO{sub 3}{sup −}), either γ-AlOOH or Al(OH){sub 3} is formed. • The mechanism involved strongly depends on the presence of formate anion. • Prepared mesoporous solid phase has high specific surface area (<190 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). • Calcination of the precursor leads to the formation of γ-/η-, θ- and α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: γ-, θ- and α-modifications of aluminium oxide (alumina) were successfully prepared by calcination of precursor solid phase obtained by irradiation of clear aqueous solutions by UV light or electron beam. For the precipitate to form, formate anion must be present in the solution in sufficient concentration. According to X-ray diffraction, the precipitate was found to consist of γ-AlOOH or a mixture of γ- and α-Al(OH){sub 3}, when aluminium chloride or aluminium nitrate was used, respectively. The addition of hydrogen peroxide as a ·OH radical source and sensitizer markedly improved the efficiency of the preparation. Some hints for the apparently very complex mechanism involved were listed and discussed. Calcination of the dried precipitate at 500–800 °C produced highly porous γ-alumina with high specific surface area (ca. 150 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). Mixture of γ- and θ-transition aluminas was obtained at 1000 °C and pure, stable corundum α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed at 1200 °C. Samples were further investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and specific surface area or porosity measurement. According to N{sub 2} adsorption isotherm, the precipitate contains mostly mesopores with average pore size 7 nm with specific surface area of ca. 100 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. Possible applications of the material as sorbent or catalyst as well as a pure matrix for thermoluminescence dosimetry were briefly contemplated. Strong light

  7. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Characterization Rb Promoted Iron Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar,A.; Jacobs, G.; Ji, Y.; Hamdeh, H.; Davis, B.

    2008-01-01

    Rubidium promoted iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts were prepared with two Rb/Fe atomic ratios (1.44/100 and 5/100) using rubidium nitrate and rubidium carbonate as rubidium precursors. Results of catalytic activity and deactivation studies in a CSTR revealed that rubidium promoted catalysts result in a steady conversion with a lower deactivation rate than that of the corresponding unpromoted catalyst although the initial activity of the promoted catalyst was almost half that of the unpromoted catalyst. Rubidium promotion results in lower methane production, and higher CO2, alkene and 1-alkene fraction in FTS products. M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopic measurements of CO activated and working catalyst samples indicated that the composition of the iron carbide phase formed after carbidization was -Fe5 C2 for both promoted and unpromoted catalysts. However, in the case of the rubidium promoted catalyst, '-Fe2.2C became the predominant carbidic phase as FTS continued and the overall catalyst composition remained carbidic in nature. In contrast, the carbide content of the unpromoted catalyst was found to decline very quickly as a function of synthesis time. Results of XANES and EXAFS measurements suggested that rubidium was present in the oxidized state and that the compound most prevalent in the active catalyst samples closely resembled that of rubidium carbonate.

  8. The first anionic defensin from amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin; Che, Helong; Han, Yi; Lv, Jing; Mu, Lixian; Lv, Lechun; Wu, Jing; Yang, Hailong

    2015-07-01

    A variety of antimicrobial peptides against infection have been identified from the skin of amphibians. However, knowledge on amphibian defensins is very limited. A novel anionic defensin designated PopuDef was purified from the skin of tree frog Polypedates puerensis, and the cDNA encoding PopuDef precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library. The amino acid sequence of PopuDef (net charge: -2, pI: 4.75) shared the highest identity of 57 % (25/44) with the salamander defensin CFBD-1 (net charge: 0, pI: 6.14) from urodela amphibians. PopuDef showed moderate antimicrobial activities against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus (MICs are 19.41 and 17.25 μM, respectively), and relatively weak activities against E. coli and B. subtilis (MICs are 38.82 and 43.14 μM, respectively). Tissue distribution analysis indicated that relatively high expression level of PopuDef mRNA was observed in immune-related tissues including skin, gut, lung and spleen. Furthermore, the expression level of PopuDef was significantly upregulated in these tissues after tree frogs were infected with different bacteria strains mentioned above. Interestingly, the induction of PopuDef challenged with E. coli or B. subtilis, which was less sensitive to PopuDef, was much higher than that did with P. aeruginosa or S. aureus. These findings highlight the key role of PopuDef in innate immunity against infection. To our knowledge, PopuDef is the first anionic defensin characterized from amphibians.

  9. Synthesis and Hydrodeoxygenation Properties of Ruthenium Phosphide Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, Richard H.; Smith, Mica C.; Pease, Melissa; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Kovarik, Libor; Bussell, Mark E.

    2011-07-01

    Ru2P/SiO2 and RuP/SiO2 catalysts were prepared by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of uncalcined precursors containing hypophosphite ion (H2PO2-) as the phosphorus source. The Ru2P/SiO2 and RuP/SiO2 catalysts had small average particle sizes (~4 nm) and high CO chemisorption capacities (90-110 umol/g). The Ru phosphide catalysts exhibited similar or higher furan (C4H4O) hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) activities than did a Ru/SiO2 catalyst, and the phosphide catalysts favored C4 hydrocarbon products while the Ru metal catalyst produced primarily C3 hydrocarbons.

  10. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  11. The EM Earthquake Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. B., II; Saxton, P. T.

    2013-12-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, American earthquake investigators predetermined magnetometer use and a minimum earthquake magnitude necessary for EM detection. This action was set in motion, due to the extensive damage incurred and public outrage concerning earthquake forecasting; however, the magnetometers employed, grounded or buried, are completely subject to static and electric fields and have yet to correlate to an identifiable precursor. Secondly, there is neither a networked array for finding any epicentral locations, nor have there been any attempts to find even one. This methodology needs dismissal, because it is overly complicated, subject to continuous change, and provides no response time. As for the minimum magnitude threshold, which was set at M5, this is simply higher than what modern technological advances have gained. Detection can now be achieved at approximately M1, which greatly improves forecasting chances. A propagating precursor has now been detected in both the field and laboratory. Field antenna testing conducted outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013, detected three strong EM sources along with numerous weaker signals. The antenna had mobility, and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. Next, two

  12. Photocatalytic Degradation of Anionic Surfactant in Titanium Dioxide Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó-Bárdos, Erzsébet; Zsilák, Zoltán; Horváth, Ottó

    In TiO2-based photocatalytic degradation of an anionic detergent (lauryl benzenesulfonate) initial pH of 5.0 proved to be most appropriate for high efficiency of surfactant conversion, although lower pHs were more favorable for the adsorption on the surface of the catalyst. A catalyst concentration of 1 g dm-3 was optimum for the mineralization of this pollutant. After decreasing the surfactant concentration below the limit of foaming in a closed photo-reactor utilizing H2O2 as electron acceptor, total mineralization of the pollutant could be achieved by a longer-time irradiation in a second, air-bubbled reactor. The activity of the photocatalyst proved to be constant even after several reusages. The temperature increase promoted the photoassisted degradation of the anionic detergent in the range of 20-50 °C measured in a home-built pilot equipment. The progress of mineralization became faster only after the conversion of surfactant reached 80-85%. There was found an optimum concentration of the oxidizer, H2O2, above which the efficiency of degradation could not be significantly enhanced.

  13. Supported catalysts using nanoparticles as the support material

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Michael S.; Wachs, Israel E.; Knowles, William V.

    2010-11-02

    A process for making a porous catalyst, comprises a) providing an aqueous solution containing a nanoparticle precursor, b) forming a composition containing nanoparticles, c) adding a first catalytic component or precursor thereof and a pore-forming agent to the composition containing nanoparticles and allowing the first catalytic component, the pore-forming agent, and the nanoparticles form an organic-inorganic structure, d) removing water from the organic-inorganic structure; and e) removing the pore-forming agent from the organic-inorganic structure so as to yield a porous catalyst.

  14. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    Providing energy for a population projected to reach 9 billion people within the middle of this century is one of the most pressing societal issues. Burning fossil fuels at a rate and scale that satisfy our near-term demand will irreversibly damage the living environment. Among the various sources of alternative and CO2-emission-free energies, the sun is the only source that is capable of providing enough energy for the whole world. Sunlight energy, however, is intermittent and requires an efficient storage mechanism. Sunlight-driven water splitting to make hydrogen is widely considered as one of the most attractive methods for solar energy storage. Water splitting needs a hydrogen evolution catalyst to accelerate the rate of hydrogen production and to lower the energy loss in this process. Precious metals such as Pt are superior catalysts, but they are too expensive and scarce for large-scale applications. In this Account, we summarize our recent research on the preparation, characterization, and application of amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The catalysts can be synthesized by electrochemical deposition under ambient conditions from readily available and inexpensive precursors. The catalytic activity is among the highest for nonprecious catalysts. For example, at a loading of 0.2 mg/cm(2), the optimal catalyst delivers a current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 160 mV. The growth mechanism of the electrochemically deposited film catalysts was revealed by an electrochemical quartz microcrystal balance study. While different electrochemical deposition methods produce films with different initial compositions, the active catalysts are the same and are identified as a "MoS(2+x)" species. The activity of the film catalysts can be further promoted by divalent Fe, Co, and Ni ions, and the origins of the promotional effects have been probed. Highly active amorphous molybdenum sulfide particles can also be prepared

  15. Support chemistry, surface area, and preparation effects on sulfided NiMo catalyst activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Sandoval, R.S.

    1996-06-01

    Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials which contain a homogeneous distribution of ion exchangeable alkali cations that provide charge compensation to the metal-oxygen framework. In terms of the major types of inorganic ion exchangers defined by Clearfield, these amorphous HMO materials are similar to both hydrous oxides and layered oxide ion exchangers (e.g., alkali metal titanates). For catalyst applications, the HMO material serves as an ion exchangeable support which facilitates the uniform incorporation of catalyst precursor species. Following catalyst precursor incorporation, an activation step is required to convert the catalyst precursor to the desired active phase. Considerable process development activities at Sandia National Laboratories related to HMO materials have resulted in bulk hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)- and silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-supported NiMo catalysts that are more active in model reactions which simulate direct coal liquefaction (e.g., pyrene hydrogenation) than commercial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported NiMo catalysts. However, a fundamental explanation does not exist for the enhanced activity of these novel catalyst materials; possible reasons include fundamental differences in support chemistry relative to commercial oxides, high surface area, or catalyst preparation effects (ion exchange vs. incipient wetness impregnation techniques). The goals of this paper are to identify the key factors which control sulfided NiMo catalyst activity, including those characteristics of HTO- and HTO:Si-supported NiMo catalysts which uniquely set them apart from conventional oxide supports.

  16. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-10-28

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is NiC (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  17. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.; Mahajan, Devinder

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160.degree. C.) and preferably in the range 80.degree.-120.degree. C. used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa--M(OAc).sub.2 where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M=Ni and R=tertiary amyl). Mo(CO).sub.6 is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  18. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1985-03-12

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-RONa-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  19. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  20. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  1. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  2. Long-Life Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STC Catalysts, Inc. (SCi) manufactures a noble metal reducible oxide catalyst consisting primarily of platinum and tin dioxide deposited on a ceramic substrate. It is an ambient temperature oxidation catalyst that was developed primarily for Carbon Dioxide Lasers.The catalyst was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder Program (LAWS) which was intended to measure wind velocity on a global basis. There are a number of NASA owned patents covering various aspects of the catalyst.

  3. Evaluation of Ir/Al2O3, Ir-Ru/Al2O3 and Ru/Al2O3 catalyst performance in a 5 N satellite thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre, J. B. F.; Soares Neto, T. G.; Dias, F. F.; Cruz, G. M.

    2013-04-01

    Ir/Al2O3, Ir-Ru/Al2O3 and Ru/Al2O3 catalysts with approximately 33% metallic content in mass were prepared in 20 impregnation steps. For the Ru catalyst, two impregnation methods were employed: incipient wetness (chlorinated precursor) and by excess volume (non-chlorinated precursor). For the remaining catalysts, only incipient wetness impregnation was used with chlorinated precursors. Catalyst textural properties were evaluated before and after catalytic tests: metallic grade, specific area, mesopore volume distribution, metallic dispersion, and metallic particle average diameter. Catalysts were tested for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition reaction in a 5 N satellite thruster and their performances were compared to Shell 405 commercial catalyst. Results showed that catalysts containing Ir were similar in performance to Shell 405 commercial catalyst and that the catalyst containing only Ru should not be used in cold starts.

  4. Precursors of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, David G; Cheng, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is the only accepted precursor of prostatic adenocarcinoma, according to numerous studies of animal models and man; other proposed precursors include atrophy and malignancy-associated changes (with no morphologic changes). PIN is characterized by progressive abnormalities of phenotype and genotype that are intermediate between benign prostatic epithelium and cancer, indicating impairment of cell differentiation and regulatory control with advancing stages of prostatic carcinogenesis. The only method of detection of PIN is biopsy because it does not significantly elevate serum prostate-specific antigen concentration and cannot be detected by ultrasonography. The mean incidence of PIN in biopsies is 9% (range, 4%-16%), representing about 115,000 new cases of isolated PIN diagnosed each year in the United States. The clinical importance of PIN is its high predictive value as a marker for adenocarcinoma, and its identification warrants repeat biopsy for concurrent or subsequent carcinoma, especially when multifocal or observed in association with atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Carcinoma develops in most patients with PIN within 10 years. Androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy decrease the prevalence and extent of PIN, suggesting that these forms of treatment may play a role in prevention of subsequent cancer. Multiple clinical trials to date of men with PIN have had modest success in delaying or preventing subsequent cancer. PMID:22212075

  5. A highly reactive chalcogenide precursor for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhu, Dong-Liang; Zhu, Chun-Nan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S2-) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4- ions and AuCl4- ions can also be transferred to the organic phase for synthesizing noble metal NCs (such as Ag and Au NCs).Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S2-) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4- ions and AuCl4- ions can also be transferred to

  6. Precursor nuclearity effects in supported vanadium oxides prepared by organometallic grafting.

    SciTech Connect

    Wegener, S. L.; Kim, H.; Marks, T. J.; Stair, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread importance in catalysis, the active and selective sites of supported vanadium oxide (VO{sub x}) catalysts are not well understood. Such catalysts are of great current interest because of their industrial significance and potential for selective oxidation processes. However, the fact that the nature of the active and selective sites is ambiguous hinders molecular level understanding of catalytic reactions and the development of new catalysts. Furthermore, complete structural elucidation requires isolation and characterization of specific vanadium oxide surface species, the preparation of which presents a significant synthetic challenge. In this study, we utilize the structural uniformity inherent in organometallic precursors for the preparation of supported vanadium oxide catalysts. The resulting catalysts are characterized by UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), UV-Raman spectroscopy, and H{sub 2}-temperature programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR). Significant structural and reactivity differences are observed in catalysts prepared from different organometallic precursors, indicating that the chemical nature of surface vanadia can be influenced by the nuclearity of the precursor used for grafting.

  7. A delafossite-based copper catalyst for sustainable Cl2 production by HCl oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Cecilia; Amrute, Amol P; Schmidt, Timm; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2011-07-01

    A copper catalyst based on a delafossite precursor (CuAlO(2)) displays high activity and extraordinary lifetime in the gas-phase oxidation of HCl to Cl(2), representing a cost-effective alternative to RuO(2)-based catalysts for chlorine recycling. PMID:21607240

  8. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOEpatents

    King, Jr., Allen D.; King, Robert B.; Sailers, III, Earl L.

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  9. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P.

    1997-11-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

  10. Reactivation of a Ruthenium-Based Olefin Metathesis Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Tabari, Daniel S.; Tolentino, Daniel R.; Schrodi, Yann

    2013-01-01

    1st Generation Hoveyda-Grubbs olefin metathesis catalyst was purposely decomposed in the presence of ethylene yielding inorganic species that are inactive in the ring-closing metathesis (RCM) of benchmark substrate diethyldiallyl malonate (DEDAM). The decomposed catalyst was treated with 1-(3,5-diisopropoxyphenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-yn-1-ol (3) to generate an olefin metathesis active ruthenium indenylidene-ether complex in 43 % yield. This complex was also prepared independently by reacting RuCl2(p-cymene)(PCy3) with organic precursor 3. The activity of the isolated reactivated catalyst in the RCM of DEDAM is similar to that of the independently prepared complex. PMID:23355756

  11. Reactivation of a Ruthenium-Based Olefin Metathesis Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Daniel S; Tolentino, Daniel R; Schrodi, Yann

    2013-01-14

    1(st) Generation Hoveyda-Grubbs olefin metathesis catalyst was purposely decomposed in the presence of ethylene yielding inorganic species that are inactive in the ring-closing metathesis (RCM) of benchmark substrate diethyldiallyl malonate (DEDAM). The decomposed catalyst was treated with 1-(3,5-diisopropoxyphenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-yn-1-ol (3) to generate an olefin metathesis active ruthenium indenylidene-ether complex in 43 % yield. This complex was also prepared independently by reacting RuCl(2)(p-cymene)(PCy(3)) with organic precursor 3. The activity of the isolated reactivated catalyst in the RCM of DEDAM is similar to that of the independently prepared complex.

  12. Twisted and tubular silica structures by anionic surfactant fibers encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Chekini, Mahshid; Guénée, Laure; Marchionni, Valentina; Sharma, Manish; Bürgi, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Organic molecules imprinting can be used for introducing specific properties and functionalities such as chirality to mesoporous materials. Particularly organic self-assemblies can work as a scaffold for templating inorganic materials such as silica. During recent years chiral imprinting of anionic surfactant for fabrication of twisted rod-like silica structures assisted by co-structuring directing agent were thoroughly investigated. The organic self-assemblies of anionic surfactants can also be used for introducing other shapes in rod-like silica structures. Here we report the formation of amphiphilic N-miristoyl-l-alanine self-assemblies in aqueous solution upon stirring and at presence of l-arginine. These anionic surfactant self-assemblies form fibers that grow by increasing the stirring duration. The fibers were studied using transmission electron microscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and vibrational circular dichroism. Addition of silica precursor 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethylene and co-structuring directing agent N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride at different stages of fibers' growth leads to formation of different silica structures. By controlling stirring duration, we obtained twisted tubular silica structures as a result of fibers encapsulation. We decorated these structures with gold nanoparticles by different methods and measured their optical activity.

  13. Simple and highly Z-selective ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Giovanni; Hansen, Fredrik R; Törnroos, Karl W; Jensen, Vidar R

    2013-03-01

    A one-step substitution of a single chloride anion of the Grubbs-Hoveyda second-generation catalyst with a 2,4,6-triphenylbenzenethiolate ligand resulted in an active olefin metathesis catalyst with remarkable Z selectivity, reaching 96% in metathesis homocoupling of terminal olefins. High turnover numbers (up to 2000 for homocoupling of 1-octene) were obtained along with sustained appreciable Z selectivity (>85%). Apart from the Z selectivity, many properties of the new catalyst, such as robustness toward oxygen and water as well as a tendency to isomerize substrates and react with internal olefin products, resemble those of the parent catalyst.

  14. New magnetic organic inorganic composites based on hydrotalcite-like anionic clays for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carja, Gabriela; Chiriac, Horia; Lupu, Nicoleta

    2007-04-01

    The structural "memory effect" of anionic clays was used to obtain layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with tailored magnetic properties, by loading iron oxides and/or spinel structures on iron partially substituted hydrotalcite-like materials. The obtained magnetic layered structures were further used as precursors for new hybrid nanostructures, such as aspirin-hydrotalcite-like anionic clays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis shows that small iron oxide or spinel nanoparticles coexist with the fibrous drug particles on the surface of partially aggregated typical clay-like particles. The specific saturation magnetization of the loaded LDHs can be increased up to 70 emu/g by using specific post-synthesis treatments.

  15. In-Situ XAFS Characterization for Nitriding Process of Silica Supported Nb Catalysts Under N2-H2 Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hiroari; Haneishi, Hidenori; Shimazu, Shogo; Bando, Kyoko K.

    2007-02-02

    Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst was prepared from NbCl5 or peroxoniobic acid as Nb precursors. These precursor catalysts were nitrided by the TPR method under N2-H2 passage (without using NH3). Nb K-edge in-situ XAFS measurements were carried out during the nitriding process and revealed that the Nb species was more nitrided in the Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst prepared from peroxoniobic acid than in that prepared from NbCl5 as Nb precursor.

  16. In-Situ XAFS Characterization for Nitriding Process of Silica Supported Nb Catalysts Under N2-H2 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hiroari; Haneishi, Hidenori; Bando, Kyoko K.; Shimazu, Shogo

    2007-02-01

    Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst was prepared from NbCl5 or peroxoniobic acid as Nb precursors. These precursor catalysts were nitrided by the TPR method under N2-H2 passage (without using NH3). Nb K-edge in-situ XAFS measurements were carried out during the nitriding process and revealed that the Nb species was more nitrided in the Fe-Nb/SiO2 catalyst prepared from peroxoniobic acid than in that prepared from NbCl5 as Nb precursor.

  17. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1997-09-23

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a well-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  18. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Marsh, S. Fredric; Bartsch, Richard A.

    1997-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a ell-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  19. Effect of KCl addition method on the Pt/KL catalyst for the aromatization of hexane

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lian-Xin; Sakashita, Haru; Tatsumi, Takashi )

    1994-05-01

    The influence of the method for loading platinum precursor and adding KCl, KCl loading content, calcination temperature, KCl addition procedure, various additives, and water washing on the activity and selectivity of Pt/KL catalysts for hexane reforming reaction has been investigated. The catalyst preparation methods involve ion exchange (IE), incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), and coimpregnation with KCl (IWI-KCl). The Pt/KL catalysts prepared by ion exchange with [Pt(NH[sub 3])[sub 4

  20. Gallium based low-interaction anions

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne A.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

  1. Collaboration between primitive cell membranes and soluble catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Adamala, Katarzyna P.; Engelhart, Aaron E.; Szostak, Jack W.

    2016-01-01

    One widely held model of early life suggests primitive cells consisted of simple RNA-based catalysts within lipid compartments. One possible selective advantage conferred by an encapsulated catalyst is stabilization of the compartment, resulting from catalyst-promoted synthesis of key membrane components. Here we show model protocell vesicles containing an encapsulated enzyme that promotes the synthesis of simple fatty acid derivatives become stabilized to Mg2+, which is required for ribozyme activity and RNA synthesis. Thus, protocells capable of such catalytic transformations would have enjoyed a selective advantage over other protocells in high Mg2+ environments. The synthetic transformation requires both the catalyst and vesicles that solubilize the water-insoluble precursor lipid. We suggest that similar modified lipids could have played a key role in early life, and that primitive lipid membranes and encapsulated catalysts, such as ribozymes, may have acted in conjunction with each other, enabling otherwise-impossible chemical transformations within primordial cells. PMID:26996603

  2. Collaboration between primitive cell membranes and soluble catalysts.

    PubMed

    Adamala, Katarzyna P; Engelhart, Aaron E; Szostak, Jack W

    2016-01-01

    One widely held model of early life suggests primitive cells consisted of simple RNA-based catalysts within lipid compartments. One possible selective advantage conferred by an encapsulated catalyst is stabilization of the compartment, resulting from catalyst-promoted synthesis of key membrane components. Here we show model protocell vesicles containing an encapsulated enzyme that promotes the synthesis of simple fatty acid derivatives become stabilized to Mg(2+), which is required for ribozyme activity and RNA synthesis. Thus, protocells capable of such catalytic transformations would have enjoyed a selective advantage over other protocells in high Mg(2+) environments. The synthetic transformation requires both the catalyst and vesicles that solubilize the water-insoluble precursor lipid. We suggest that similar modified lipids could have played a key role in early life, and that primitive lipid membranes and encapsulated catalysts, such as ribozymes, may have acted in conjunction with each other, enabling otherwise-impossible chemical transformations within primordial cells. PMID:26996603

  3. Improved coal liquefaction using carbon-supported hydrogenation catalysts: Quarterly reports for the period 1 April-30 September 1986. [Mo/C catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Scaroni, A.W.; Derbyshire, F.J.; Solar, J.M.; Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1986-09-01

    Characterization studies of sulfided Mo/C catalysts have been continued. The stoichiometry of unsupported molybdenum sulfide, prepared by laboratory procedures, was confirmed to have an S/Mo atomic ratio of 2.0 after reduction in hydrogen at 400/sup 0/C. Toluene chemisorption has been used as a technique to obtain some indication of the catalyst dispersion and the active surface areas of Mo/C catalysts. The measured toluene surface areas were found to correlate with the catalyst activities for coal asphaltene conversion. Investigations of the effect of hydrogen pressure (500 to 1500 psig) have been made of the activities of an Mo/Ambersorb XE-348 catalyst and an Mo/NH/sub 3/ pretreated Ambersorb XE-348 catalyst (pretreated for 1.5 h at 873 K) for coal liquids conversion. The catalyst prepared on the pretreated support showed higher activity for asphaltene conversion. For both catalysts, asphaltene conversion increased and coking propensity decreased with increasing H/sub 2/ pressure. Mo/C catalysts have been prepared on five different supports using a molybdenum acetylacetonate precursor. The supports were loaded by adsorption from aqueous solution rather than impregnation by the incipient wetness technique. Preliminary results indicate that some of the catalysts prepared by this procedure possess higher activities for thiophene HDS than those earlier reported using molybdenumtricarbonyltriacetonitrile as a precursor. 30 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. The anion-binding polyanion: a molecular cobalt vanadium oxide with anion-sensitive visual response.

    PubMed

    Seliverstov, Andrey; Forster, Johannes; Heiland, Magdalena; Unfried, Johannes; Streb, Carsten

    2014-07-25

    An anionic molecular cobalt vanadium oxide cluster, (n-Bu4N)3[Co(AcO)V4O12] and its use as anion binding site is reported. Cluster formation is controlled by an anion-dependent dynamic solution equilibrium. Reversible anion binding in solution leads to significant spectral changes, allowing the ratiometric optical detection of the anion concentration in situ, even under harsh thermal conditions (T = 90 °C). Comparative studies showed that the spectral response is dependent on the type of anion so that carboxylates, weakly coordinating anions and halides can be distinguished.

  5. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R. G.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L.; Weissman, P.

    1977-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, with launch about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. Candidate science instruments are suggested. Individual spacecraft systems for the mission were considered, technology requirements and problem areas noted, and a number of recommendations made for technology study and advanced development. The most critical technology needs include attainment of 50-yr spacecraft lifetime and development of a long-life NEP system.

  6. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for

  7. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br- afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity.

  8. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br(-) afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity.

  9. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles.

  10. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles. PMID:16430253

  11. Anion-induced urea deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Boiocchi, Massimo; Del Boca, Laura; Esteban-Gómez, David; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Monzani, Enrico

    2005-05-01

    The urea-based receptor 1 (1-(7-nitrobenzo[1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)urea, L--H), interacts with X- ions in MeCN, according to two consecutive steps: 1) formation of a hydrogen-bond complex [L--H...X]-; 2) deprotonation of L--H to give L- and [HX2]-, as shown by spectrophotometric and 1H NMR titration experiments. Step 2) takes place with more basic anions (fluoride, carboxylates, dihydrogenphosphate), while less basic anions (Cl-, NO2-, NO3-) do not induce proton transfer. On crystallisation from a solution containing L--H and excess Bu4NF, the tetrabutylammonium salt of the deprotonated urea derivative (Bu4N[L]) was isolated and its crystal and molecular structure determined. PMID:15770711

  12. Anion Solvation in Carbonate Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2015-11-16

    With the correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. As of now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. As a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate, PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.

  13. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-02-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on the development of novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed liquefaction. The ultimate goal of the present research is to develop novel catalytic hydroliquefaction process using highly active dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research is to develop novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular that can be used in low precursors concentrations (< 1 %) but exhibit high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. The major technical approaches are, first, to prepare the desired heteronuclear organometallic molecules as catalyst precursors that contain covalently bound, two different metal atoms and sulfur in a single molecule. Such precursors will generate finely dispersed bimetallic catalysts such as Fe-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-Mo binary sulfides upon thermal decomposition. The second major technical approach is to perform the liquefaction of coals unpregnated with the organometallic precursors under temperature-programmed conditions, where the programmed heat-up serves as a step for both catalyst activation and coal pretreatment or preconversion. Two to three different complexes for each of the Fe-Mo, Co-Mo, and Ni-Mo combinations will be prepared. Initial catalyst screening tests will be conducted using a subbituminous coal and a bituminous coal. Effects of coal rank and solvents will be examined with the selected bimetallic catalysts which showed much higher activity than the dispersed catalysts from conventional precursors.

  14. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Qing; McBreen, James

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  15. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  16. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required.

  17. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required. PMID:27447507

  18. Separation of inorganic anions using a series of sulfobetaine exchangers.

    PubMed

    Sonnenschein, Lukas; Seubert, Andreas

    2011-02-25

    A set of five new sulfobetaine exchangers with inner quaternary amines and outer sulfonic acids have been prepared. A series of zwitterionic precursors was attached to highly porous divinylbenzene polymer using a grafting reaction, which allows a flexible adjustment of the degree of functionalisation. The resulting materials have identical spacers to the polymeric backbone and differ only in chain length between the charged functional groups. Capacities of the stationary phases were analysed by two different methods based on elemental analysis and the results obtained were found to correlate. The application of combustion elemental analysis proved an identical molar content of sulfur and nitrogen. The distance between the charged functional groups is varied from one to five methylene groups for a better understanding of the retention behaviour of inorganic anions on zwitterionic stationary phases. Inorganic anions were separated using sodium acetate eluents with varying ionic strength and pH and the behaviour of all columns has been compared to each other and to ZIC-HILIC and ZIC-pHILIC columns from Merck SeQuant. The exchangers with two and five methylene groups between the charges showed the highest retention factors. Polarity and accessibility of the anion exchange sites are dependent on the distance between the charged groups and the flexibility of the chains. These properties have a strong influence on anion separations. The exchanger with two methylene groups between the charged functional groups showed the biggest difference as compared to the commercially available ZIC-HILIC and ZIC-pHILIC exchangers. PMID:21251664

  19. Probing neutral atmospheric collision complexes with anion photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrold, Caroline

    Photodetachment of anionic precursors of neutral collision complexes offers a way to probe the effects of symmetry-breaking collision events on the electronic structure of normally transparent molecules. We have measured the anion photoelectron imaging (PEI) spectra of a series of O2- X complexes, where X is a volatile organic molecule with atmospheric relevance, to determine how the electronic properties of various X molecules affect the low-lying electronic structure of neutral O2 undergoing O2 - X collisons. The study was motivated by the catalog of vibrational and electronic absorption lines induced by O2 - O2, O2 - N2, and other collisions. The energies of electronic features observed in the anion PEI spectra of O2- X (X = hexane, hexene, isoprene and benzene) relative to O2- PEI spectroscopic features indicate that photodetachment of the anion does indeed access a repulsive part of the O2 - X potential. In addition, the spectra of the various complexes show an interesting variation in the intensities of transitions to the excited O2(1Δg) . X and O2(1Σg+) . X states relative to the ground O2(3Σg-) . X state. With X = non-polar species such as hexane, the relative intensities of transitions to the triplet and singlet states of O2 . X are very similar to those of isolated O2, while the relative intensity of the singlet band decreases and becomes lower in energy relative to the triplet band for X = polar molecules. A significant enhancement in the intensities of the singlet bands is observed for complexes with X = isoprene and benzene, both of which have low-lying triplet states. The role of the triplet states in isoprene and benzene, and the implications for induced electronic absorption in O2 undergoing collisions with these molecules, are explored. National Science Foundation NSF CHE 1265991.

  20. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, S.; Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-09-01

    Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting polycyclic aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. Here in this quarterly, we report on our continued effort on hydrodeoxygenation of O-containing polycyclic model compounds using novel organometallic catalyst precursors. Compounds containing oxygen functional groups, especially phenols, are undesirable components of coal-derived liquids. Removal of these compounds from the products of coal liquefaction is required. A beneficial alternative would be the removal of these compounds, or the prevention of their formation, during the liquefaction reaction itself, rather than as a separate processing step. A novel organometallic catalyst precursor containing Co and Mo has been studied as a potential hydrogenation catalyst for coal liquefaction. To ascertain the hydrodeoxygenation activity of this catalyst under liquefaction conditions, model compounds were investigated. Anthrone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methyl-phenol, dinaphthyl ether, and xanthene were reacted in the presence of the Co-Mo catalyst precursor and a precursor containing only Mo over a range of temperatures, providing a comparison of conversions to deoxygenated products. These conversions give an indication of the hydrodeoxygenating abilities of organometallic catalyst precursors within a coal liquefaction system. For example, at 400{degrees}C dinaphthylether was converted 100% (4.5% O-containing products) in the presence of the Co-Mo organometallic precursor, compared to 76.5% conversion (7.4% O-products) in the presence of the Mo catalyst.

  1. Conformational NMR Study of Bistriazolyl Anion Receptors.

    PubMed

    Makuc, Damjan; Merckx, Tamara; Dehaen, Wim; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Conformational features of pyridine- and pyrimidine-based bistriazolyl anion receptors dissolved in acetonitrile-d3 were assessed by multidimensional, heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. NOESY correlation signals suggested preorganization of both host molecules in solution in the absence of anions. In addition, only a single set of signals was observed in the 1H NMR spectra, which suggested a symmetrical conformation of anion receptors or their conformational exchange that is fast on the NMR time-scale. Furthermore, the predominant conformations of the pyridine- and pyrimidine-based anion receptors are preserved upon addition of chloride, bromide, and acetate anions. Chemical shift changes observed upon addition of anions showed that the NH (thio)urea and triazole protons are involved in anion-receptor interactions through hydrogen bonding. PMID:27640375

  2. Au/TiO2 supported on ferritic stainless steel monoliths as CO oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milt, V. G.; Ivanova, S.; Sanz, O.; Domínguez, M. I.; Corrales, A.; Odriozola, J. A.; Centeno, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    Metallic supported structured catalysts were obtained by washcoating AluchromYHf monoliths with an Au/TiO2 catalyst. The powder catalyst was synthesized by DAE (direct anionic exchange) method. Using this catalyst, a stable slurry was prepared and used to washcoat the monoliths. TEM and SEM studies revealed that gold nanoparticles in the Au/TiO2 powder catalyst had an average diameter of 3-4 nm, but during the preparation of the structured catalyst, aggregate Au particles of the slurry reached diameters of 9 nm. Before coating, Aluchrom YHf monoliths were thermally treated to generate a homogeneous and well-adhered oxide rough surface layer, mainly composed of α-Al2O3 whiskers, which favored the anchoring of the catalyst. The catalytic layer deposited was well attached and contained not only the Au/TiO2 catalyst but also metallic oxides formed from stainless steel components that diffused through the oxide scale. The structural characterization was performed by XRD, XRF, TEM, SEM, GD-OES and SBET. The catalytic activity of the powder and structured catalysts was tested in the oxidation of the CO reaction. Catalysts demonstrated to be active at room temperature. After a first activation run, and in spite of their larger gold particle size, the catalytic activities of the structured catalysts overcame those of the powder catalyst. This improvement is probably due to the segregation of the transition metal oxides toward the surface oxide scale.

  3. Quaternized poly (styrene-co-vinylbenzyl chloride) anion exchange membranes for alkaline water electrolysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengatesan, S.; Santhi, S.; Jeevanantham, S.; Sozhan, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, poly (ST-co-VBC) based anion exchange membranes with different styrene to VBC ratios (1: 0.16, 1: 0.33 and 1: 1) have been prepared via chloromethylation-free synthetic route using aromatic vinyl monomers. The synthesized co-polymers are identified by FTIR and 1H-NMR analysis. Hydroxide (OH-) ion conductivity of the anion exchange membrane with styrene to VBC ratio of 1: 0.33 is as high as 6.8 × 10-3 S cm-1 in de-ionised water at 25 °C. The membrane also acquires the ion-exchange capacity of 2.14 meq. g-1, and the water uptake of 127%. Membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) using the anion exchange membrane and Ni - foam catalyst demonstrate the current density of 40 mA cm-2 at 2.3 V in a water electrolyser cell.

  4. Asymmetric Anion-π Catalysis: Enamine Addition to Nitroolefins on π-Acidic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Cotelle, Yoann; Avestro, Alyssa-Jennifer; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2015-09-16

    Here we provide experimental evidence for anion-π catalysis of enamine chemistry and for asymmetric anion-π catalysis. A proline for enamine formation on one side and a glutamic acid for nitronate protonation on the other side are placed to make the enamine addition to nitroolefins occur on the aromatic surface of π-acidic naphthalenediimides. With increasing π acidity of the formally trifunctional catalysts, rate and enantioselectivity of the reaction increase. Mismatched and more flexible controls reveal that the importance of rigidified, precisely sculpted architectures increases with increasing π acidity as well. The absolute configuration of stereogenic sulfoxide acceptors at the edge of the π-acidic surface has a profound influence on asymmetric anion-π catalysis and, if perfectly matched, affords the highest enantio- and diastereoselectivity.

  5. Crystal structures of Ziegler-Natta catalyst supports.

    PubMed

    Malizia, Federica; Fait, Anna; Cruciani, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    The crystal structures of three MgCl(2)·nEtOH complexes with n=1.5, 2.8, and 3.3 have been fully determined. Such complexes are the fundamental precursors for Ziegler-Natta polymerization catalysts used to produce polyolefins on a multimillion-ton scale worldwide. The ab initio structure solution showed that the structure of MgCl(2)·nEtOH complexes with n=1.5 and 2.8 are based on ribbons of metal-centered octahedra, whereas for n=3.3 this chainlike arrangement breaks into a threadlike structure of isolated octahedra linked by hydrogen bonds. A clear correlation between catalyst performance and the crystal structure of precursors has been found, and reveals the fundamental role of the latter in determining catalyst properties. The direct knowledge of building blocks in the precursor structures will help to develop more accurate models for activated catalysts. These models will not require the arbitrary and oversimplified assumption of locating the catalyst active sites on selected cut surfaces of the α-MgCl(2) crystal lattice. PMID:22052708

  6. Catalysts based on PdO_ZrO2 in the hydrodechlorination reaction of chlorobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otroshchenko, T. P.; Turakulova, A. O.; Lokteva, E. S.; Golubina, E. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility of using mixed oxides of palladium and zirconium obtained with biotemplates (cellulose and wood pulp) as the precursor of catalysts for the hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene is analyzed. The properties of the samples are studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) method, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR). They are then compared to the properties of a supported analogue. The biomorphic precursors are characterized by high porosity and include micropores, mesopores, and macropores; the results from TPR reveal the presence in the precursors of several forms of PdO that differ by reduction temperature. It is shown that the distribution of palladium in the catalysts obtained by reducing the precursors with hydrogen depends on the method used in synthesizing the precursor. It is shown that the studied catalysts ensure 100% conversion of chlorobenzene at temperatures of 100 to 250°C. It is established that cyclohexane is the principal product in the presence of the supported catalyst across the range of temperatures, while cyclohexane and benzene are detected among the products in the presence of biomorphous samples at temperatures above 130°C. The effect the presence of an admixture of alkaline and alkaline-earth metals in the catalyst has on the selectivity of the process is noted. It is established that the catalysts operate in a stable manner for at least 27 h of use under experimental conditions.

  7. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L. D.; Weissman, P.

    1980-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, launched about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low-energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and the mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. The mission should extend to 400-1000 AU from the sun. A heliocentric hyperbolic escape velocity of 50-100 km/sec or more is needed to attain this distance within a reasonable mission duration (20-50 years). The trajectory should be toward the incoming interstellar gas. For a year 2000 launch, a Pluto encounter and orbiter can be included. A second mission targeted parallel to the solar axis would also be worthwhile. The mission duration is 20 years, with an extended mission to a total of 50 years. A system using one or two stages of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) was selected as a possible baseline. The most promising alternatives are ultralight solar sails or laser sailing, with the lasers in earth orbit, for example. The NEP baseline design allows the option of carrying a Pluto orbiter as a daughter spacecraft.

  8. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material and product thereof

    DOEpatents

    Utz, Bruce R.; Cugini, Anthony V.

    1992-01-01

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  9. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  10. Perlite as a potential support for nickel catalyst in the process of sunflower oil hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjić, V.; Krstić, J.; Lončarević, D.; Jovanović, D.; Vukelić, N.; Stanković, M.; Nikolova, D.; Gabrovska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Investigation was conducted in order to elucidate the possibility of using perlite as support for preparation of nickel based precursor catalyst, potentially applicable in vegetable oil hydrogenation process. On three differently prepared expanded perlite, nickel catalyst precursors with identical Ni/SiO2 = 1.1 and Ni/Mg = 10/1 ratios were synthesized by precipitation-deposition method. Different techniques, SEM micrography, He-pycnometry, calcimetry, Hg-porosimetry, N2-physisorption, H2-chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction, were used for characterization of obtained samples. Determining the precursor texture, morphology and reducibility shows a successfully deposited nickel phase on perlite support with promising properties for vegetable oil hydrogenation. Chosen precursor was reduced and passivated in paraffin oil and the obtained catalyst showed significant catalytic activity in the test of sunflower oil hydrogenation.

  11. Highly Conductive Anion-Exchange Membranes from Microporous Tröger's Base Polymers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengjin; Guo, Rui; Malpass-Evans, Richard; Carta, Mariolino; McKeown, Neil B; Guiver, Michael D; Wu, Liang; Xu, Tongwen

    2016-09-12

    The development of polymeric anion-exchange membranes (AEMs) combining high ion conductivity and long-term stability is a major challenge for materials chemistry. AEMs with regularly distributed fixed cationic groups, based on the formation of microporous polymers containing the V-shape rigid Tröger's base units, are reported for the first time. Despite their simple preparation, which involves only two synthetic steps using commercially available precursors, the polymers provide AEMs with exceptional hydroxide conductivity at relatively low ion-exchange capacity, as well as a high swelling resistance and chemical stability. An unprecedented hydroxide conductivity of 164.4 mS cm(-1) is obtained at a relatively a low ion-exchange capacity of 0.82 mmol g(-1) under optimal operating conditions. The exceptional anion conductivity appears related to the intrinsic microporosity of the charged polymer matrix, which facilitates rapid anion transport. PMID:27505421

  12. Synthetic ion transporters that work with anion-π interactions, halogen bonds, and anion-macrodipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Vargas Jentzsch, Andreas; Hennig, Andreas; Mareda, Jiri; Matile, Stefan

    2013-12-17

    these elusive interactions in action, we synthesized naphthalenediimide transporters of increasing π-acidity up to an unprecedented quadrupole moment of +39 Buckinghams and characterized these systems in comparison with tandem mass spectrometry and computational simulations. With π-acidic calixarenes and calixpyrroles, we have validated our results on anion-π interactions and initiated our studies of halogen bonds. Halogen bonds originate from the σ-hole that appears on top of electron-deficient iodines, bromines, and chlorines. Halogen-bond donors are ideal for anion transport because they are as strong and at least as directional as hydrogen-bond donors, but also hydrophobic. The discovery of the smallest possible organic anion transporter, trifluoroiodomethane, illustrates the power of halogen-bond donors. This molecule contains a single carbon atom and is a gas with a boiling point of -22 °C. Anion-macrodipole interactions, finally, differ significantly from anion-π interactions and halogen bonds because they are important in nature and cannot be studied with small molecules. We have used anion-transporting peptide/urea nanotubes to examine these interactions in synthetic transport systems. To facilitate the understanding of the described results, we also include an in-depth discussion of the meaning of Hill coefficients. The use of synthetic transport systems to catch less common noncovalent interactions at work is important because it helps to expand the collection of interactions available to create functional systems. Progress in this direction furthers fundamental knowledge and invites many different applications. For illustration, we briefly discuss how this knowledge could apply to the development of new catalysts. PMID:23547885

  13. PGM-free Fe-N-C catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction: Catalyst layer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stariha, Sarah; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Workman, Michael J.; Serov, Alexey; Mckinney, Sam; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the morphology of platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) catalyst layers for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and compares catalytic performance via polarization curves. Three different nitrogen-rich organic precursors are used to prepare the catalysts. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, the porosity, Euler number (pore connectivity), overall roughness, solid phase size and pore size are calculated for catalyst surfaces and volumes. Catalytic activity is determined using membrane electrode assembly (MEA) testing. It is found that the dominant factor in MEA performance is transport limitations. Through the 2D and 3D metrics it is concluded that pore connectivity has the biggest effect on transport performance.

  14. Iridium-catalyst-based autonomous bubble-propelled graphene micromotors with ultralow catalyst loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Sofer, Zdeněk; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Pumera, Martin

    2014-11-10

    A novel concept of an iridium-based bubble-propelled Janus-particle-type graphene micromotor with very high surface area and with very low catalyst loading is described. The low loading of Ir catalyst (0.54 at %) allows for fast motion of graphene microparticles with high surface area of 316.2 m(2)  g(-1). The micromotor was prepared with a simple and scalable method by thermal exfoliation of iridium-doped graphite oxide precursor composite in hydrogen atmosphere. Oxygen bubbles generated from the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at the iridium catalytic sites provide robust propulsion thrust for the graphene micromotor. The high surface area and low iridium catalyst loading of the bubble-propelled graphene motors offer great possibilities for dramatically enhanced cargo delivery. PMID:25293511

  15. Optimization of Single and Bimetallic Noble Metal Catalysts by Strong Electrostatic Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Sean E.

    Heterogeneous catalysts are used in over 90% of chemical processes today. These small metal particles maximize the number of active sites present, which leads to cheaper, more effective catalysts. However, the preparation of heterogeneous catalysts is still a "dark art". An alternate to dry impregnation is the method of Strong Electrostatic Adsorption (SEA). In this method the surface hydroxyl groups of the support can either protonate or deprotonate depending on the pH of the contacting solution. These surface groups then can then attract oppositely charged metal precursors. Preparation of catalysts by SEA leads to the anchoring of small, well dispersed, highly active metal particles. The aim of this work is to optimize the preparation via SEA of various supported catalysts systems, particularly Pt/carbon, Au supported on a variety of materials, and Au-Pd/carbon. Carbon supported metal catalysts are becoming increasingly important not just as electro catalyst in fuel cells, but for many aqueous phase biomass conversion reactions.

  16. Collision-induced dissociation of intact duplex and single-stranded siRNA anions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Teng-Yi; Liu, Jian; Liang, Xiaorong; Hodges, Brittany D M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2008-11-15

    A tandem mass spectrometry approach is demonstrated for complete sequencing of a model small interfering RNA (siRNA) based on ion trap collisional activation of intact single-stranded anions. Various charge states of the siRNA duplex and the individual strands were generated by nanoelectrospray (nano-ESI). The siRNA duplex anions were predominantly dissociated into the sense and antisense strands by collisional activation. The characteristic fragment ions (c/y- and a-B/w-ion series) from both strands were observed when higher activation amplitude was applied and when beam-type collisional activation was examined; however, the coexistence of fragment ions from both strands complicated spectral interpretation. The effect of precursor ion charge state on the dissociation of the individual sense and antisense strand siRNA anions was studied using ion trap collision-induced dissociation under various activation amplitudes. Through the activation of relatively low charge state precursor ions at relatively low excitation energy, selective backbone dissociation predominantly via the c/y channels was achieved. By applying relatively high excitation energy, the a-B/w channels also became prominent; however, the increase in spectral complexity made complete peak assignment difficult. In order to simplify the product ion spectra, proton-transfer reactions were applied, and complete sequencing of each strand was achieved. The application of tandem mass spectrometry to intact single-stranded anions demonstrated in this study can be adapted for the rapid identification of other noncoding RNAs in RNomics studies.

  17. Catalyst by Design

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; DeBusk, Melanie Moses

    2014-01-01

    The development of new catalytic materials is still dominated by trial and error methods. Although it has been successful, the empirical development of catalytic materials is time consuming and expensive with no guarantee of success. In our laboratories, we are developing a comprehensive catalysts by design that involves state-of-the-art first principle density functional theory calculations, experimental design of catalyst sites, and sub- ngstr m resolution imaging with an aberration-corrected electron microscope to characterize the microstructure. In this chapter, we focus on supported platinum cluster catalyst systems which are one of the most important industrial catalysts and attempt to demonstrate the feasibility of the catalyst by design concept.

  18. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  19. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  20. Supported catalyst of increased resistance to poisons useful for hydrotreating metal containing oil fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Toulhoat, H.; Dupin, T.; Jacquin, Y.

    1985-02-12

    A catalyst for use in the hydrotreatment of hydrocarbons comprises a carrier and at least one catalytic metal selected from vanadium, molybdenum, tungsten, nickel, cobalt and/or iron; this catalyst is in the form of a plurality of juxtaposed agglomerates of acicular platelets, oriented radially to each other. It is prepared from agglomerates of activated alumina subjected to reaction with an acid and a compound providing an anion able to combine with aluminum ions in solution.

  1. System for reactivating catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  2. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum

  3. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  4. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  5. A Novel Methodology to Synthesize Highly Conductive Anion Exchange Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yubin; Pan, Jiefeng; Wu, Liang; Zhu, Yuan; Ge, Xiaolin; Ran, Jin; Yang, Zhengjin; Xu, Tongwen

    2015-08-01

    Alkaline polyelectrolyte fuel cell now receives growing attention as a promising candidate to serve as the next generation energy-generating device by enabling the use of non-precious metal catalysts (silver, cobalt, nickel et al.). However, the development and application of alkaline polyelectrolyte fuel cell is still blocked by the poor hydroxide conductivity of anion exchange membranes. In order to solve this problem, we demonstrate a methodology for the preparation of highly OH- conductive anion exchange polyelectrolytes with good alkaline tolerance and excellent dimensional stability. Polymer backbones were grafted with flexible aliphatic chains containing two or three quaternized ammonium groups. The highly flexible and hydrophilic multi-functionalized side chains prefer to aggregate together to facilitate the formation of well-defined hydrophilic-hydrophobic microphase separation, which is crucial for the superior OH- conductivity of 69 mS/cm at room temperature. Besides, the as-prepared AEMs also exhibit excellent alkaline tolerance as well as improved dimensional stability due to their carefully designed polymer architecture, which provide new directions to pursue high performance AEMs and are promising to serve as a candidate for fuel cell technology.

  6. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  7. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  8. Cd(II)-coordination framework: synthesis, anion-induced structural transformation, anion-responsive luminescence, and anion separation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shan; Liu, Qi-Kui; Ma, Jian-Ping; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2013-03-18

    A series of Cd(II) coordination frameworks that are constructed from a new oxadiazole-bridged ligand 3,5-bis(3-pyridyl-3-(3'-methylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (L) and CdX2 (X = NO3(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), N3(-), and SCN(-)) were synthesized. The NO3(-) anion of the solid CdL2(NO3)2·2THF (1) is able to be quantitatively exchanged with Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), SCN(-), and N3(-) in the solid state. For Cl(-) and Br(-), the anion exchange resulted in a anion-induced structural transformation to form the structures of 2 and 3, respectively. In addition, the Cd(II) structure herein exhibits the anion-responsive photoluminescence, which could be a useful method to monitor the anion-exchange process. Notably, compound 1 can recognize and completely separate SCN(-)/N3(-) with similar geometry.

  9. Tandem isomerization-decarboxylation of unsaturated fatty acids to olefins via ruthenium metal-as-ligand catalysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new facile Ru-catalyzed route to bio-olefins3 from unsaturated fatty acids via readily accessible metal-as-ligand type catalyst precursors, [Ru(CO)2RCO2]n and Ru3(CO)12, will be described. The catalyst apparently functions in a tandem mode by dynamically isomerizing the positions of double bonds i...

  10. Aprotic Heterocyclic Anion Triazolide Ionic Liquids - A New Class of Ionic Liquid Anion Accessed by the Huisgen Cycloaddition Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Robert L; Damodaran, Krishnan; Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid

    2013-06-01

    The triazole core is a highly versatile heterocyclic ring which can be accessed easily with the Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition reaction. Herein we present the preparation of ionic liquids that incorporate a 1,2,3-triazolide anion. These ionic liquids were prepared by a facile procedure utilizing a base-labile pivaloylmethyl group at the 1-position, which can act as precursors to 1H- 4-substituted 1,2,3-triazole. These triazoles were then subsequently converted into ionic liquids after deprotonation using an appropriate ionic liquid cation hydroxide. The densities and thermal decompositions of these ionic liquids were measured. These novel ionic liquids have potential applications in gas separations and in metal-free catalysis.

  11. Chemistry of nitrile anions in the interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, S.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Biennier, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2015-12-31

    Despite the extreme conditions of temperature (down to 10K) and density (down to 100 molecules/cm{sup 3}), the giant molecular clouds and the circumstellar envelopes present a rich and complex chemistry. To date, more than 180 molecules have been detected in the InterStellar Medium (ISM) with a large abundance of nitriles (RC≡N). In addition, several anions have been recently observed in this medium: C{sub 4}H{sup ¯}, C{sub 6}H{sup ¯}, C{sub 8}H{sup ¯}, CN{sup ¯}, C{sub 3}N{sup ¯} and C{sub 5}N{sup ¯}. These last species should play a key role in the molecular growth towards complexity. To explore this hypothesis, their reactivity must be studied in the laboratory. The FALP-MS and the CRESU experimental apparatuses of the Rennes University are able to measure absolute rate coefficient of various chemical reactions, including the ion – molecule reactions, in gas phase at low temperature (from 300K for the FALP-MS down to 15K for the CRESU). Therefore, these experimental tools are particularly adapted to the kinetic studies of reactions potentially involved in the Interstellar Medium. One of the difficulties encountered in experiments with anions is their generation. We describe here the formation of the CN{sup ¯} and C{sub 3}N{sup ¯} anions by dissociative electron attachment on the molecular precursors BrCN and BrC{sub 3}N.

  12. Effect of cationic/anionic organic surfactants on evaporation induced self assembled tin oxide nanostructured films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khun Khun, Kamalpreet; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    Tin oxide nanostructures with well defined morphologies have been obtained through an evaporation induced self assembly process. The technique has been employed using an ultrasonic nebulizer for production of aersol and its subsequent deposition onto a heated glass substrate. The precursor used for aersol production was modified by introducing cationic and anionic surfactants namely cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate respectively. The effect of surfactants on the structural, electrical and optical properties of self assembled tin oxide nanostructures were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electroscope microscopy, two probe technique and photoluminiscence studies. The results reveal that high concentration of surfactants in the precursor solution leads to reduction in crystallite size with significant changes in the morphology of tin oxide nanostructures. Photoluminiscence studies of the nanostructures show emissions in the visible region which exhibit marked changes in the intensities upon variation of surfactants in the precursor solutions.

  13. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  14. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  15. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selective recognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure and selectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometric ion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  16. Catalyst enhances Claus operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, T.; Voizin, R.

    1982-11-01

    An improved Claus catalyst offers superior activity that emphasizes hydrolysis of CS/sub 2/ in the first converter. The catalyst is insensitive to oxygen action at concentrations generally found in Claus gas feeds. It also has an excellent resistance to hydrothermal shocks that may occur during shutdown of the sulfur line. Collectively, these properties make this catalyst the most active formula now available for optimum Claus yields and COS/CS/sub 2/ hydrolysis conversion.

  17. Gels based on anion recognition between triurea receptor and phosphate anion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiling; Wu, Biao; Chen, Yongming; Zhang, Ke

    2015-04-01

    Anion recognition between the triurea receptor and phosphate anion is demonstrated as the cross-linkage to build supramolecular polymer gels for the first time. A novel multi-block copolymer (3) is designed to have functional triurea groups as cross-linking units along the polymer main chain. By virtue of anion coordination between the triurea receptor and phosphate anion with a binding mode of 2:1, supramolecular polymer gels are then prepared based on anion recognition using 3 as the building block. PMID:25694389

  18. Covalent Polymers Containing Discrete Heterocyclic Anion Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, Brett M.; Silver, Eric S.; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter covers recent advances in the development of polymeric materials containing discrete heterocyclic anion receptors, and focuses on advances in anion binding and chemosensor chemistry. The development of polymers specific for anionic species is a relatively new and flourishing area of materials chemistry. The incorporation of heterocyclic receptors capable of complexing anions through non-covalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions) provides a route to not only sensitive but also selective polymer materials. Furthermore, these systems have been utilized in the development of polymers capable of extracting anionic species from aqueous environments. These latter materials may lead to advances in water purification and treatment of diseases resulting from surplus ions. PMID:20871791

  19. Picosecond dynamics of benzophenone anion solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Jonah, C.D. )

    1993-01-14

    The dynamics of benzophenone anion solvation in alcohols are studied by pulse-radiolysis techniques. The solvation process is characterized by the blue shift of the transient absorption spectrum of the anion and is faster for the smaller alcohols. The anion is solvated more slowly than the electron in the same solvent, but the solvation times of both are similar to [tau][sub 2], the solvent dielectric relaxation time. The familiar phenomenological two-state model of solvation was found to be inappropriate for describing the anion solvation process. A multistate process appears to be a more appropriate description. The authors modeled the kinetics of the spectral relaxation. In most cases, nearly quantitative agreement between the calculated and observed spectra is achieved. The characteristic relaxation times for the alcohol solvents around the anions were also reproduced. 50 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Creating molecular macrocycles for anion recognition

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary The creation and functionality of new classes of macrocycles that are shape persistent and can bind anions is described. The genesis of triazolophane macrocycles emerges out of activity surrounding 1,2,3-triazoles made using click chemistry; and the same triazoles are responsible for anion capture. Mistakes made and lessons learnt in anion recognition provide deeper understanding that, together with theory, now provides for computer-aided receptor design. The lessons are acted upon in the creation of two new macrocycles. First, cyanostars are larger and like to capture large anions. Second is tricarb, which also favors large anions but shows a propensity to self-assemble in an orderly and stable manner, laying a foundation for future designs of hierarchical nanostructures. PMID:27340452

  1. Polyolefin catalyst manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inkrott, K.E.; Scinta, J.; Smith, P.D. )

    1989-10-16

    Statistical process control (SPC) procedures are absolutely essential for making new-generation polyolefin catalysts with the consistent high quality required by modern polyolefin processes. Stringent quality assurance is critical to the production of today's high-performance catalysts. Research and development efforts during the last 20 years have led to major technological improvements in the polyolefin industry. New generation catalysts, which once were laboratory curiosities, must now be produced commercially on a regular and consistent basis to meet the increasing requirements of the plastics manufacturing industry. To illustrate the more stringent requirements for producing the new generation polyolefin catalysts, the authors compare the relatively simple, first-generation polypropylene catalyst production requirements with some of the basic requirements of manufacturing a more complex new-generation catalyst, such as Catalyst Resources Inc.'s LYNX 900. The principles which hold true for the new-generation catalysts such as LYNX 900 are shown to apply equally to the scale-up of other advanced technology polyolefin catalysts.

  2. METHOD OF PURIFYING CATALYSTS

    DOEpatents

    Joris, G.G.

    1958-09-01

    It has been fuund that the presence of chlorine as an impurity adversely affects the performance of finely divided platinum catalysts such as are used in the isotopic exchange process for the production of beavy water. This chlorine impurity may be removed from these catalysts by treating the catalyst at an elevated temperature with dry hydrogen and then with wet hydrogen, having a hydrogen-water vapor volume of about 8: 1. This alternate treatment by dry hydrogen and wet hydrogen is continued until the chlorine is largely removed from the catalyst.

  3. Liquefaction with microencapsulated catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Sol W.

    1985-01-01

    A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material.

  4. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of ethylidene diacetate from acetic anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, D.; Waller, F.J.

    1998-06-16

    This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled without loss in activity.

  5. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of ethylidene diacetate from acetic anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, Dorai; Waller, Francis Joseph

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled without loss in activity.

  6. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Srinivas, Girish; Bai, Chuansheng

    2000-08-08

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  7. Anion Effects in Oxidative Aliphatic Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage Reactions of Cu(II) Chlorodiketonate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Sushma L; Miłaczewska, Anna; Borowski, Tomasz; James, Christopher D; Tierney, David L; Popova, Marina; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2016-07-18

    Aliphatic oxidative carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions involving Cu(II) catalysts and O2 as the terminal oxidant are of significant current interest. However, little is currently known regarding how the nature of the Cu(II) catalyst, including the anions present, influence the reaction with O2. In previous work, we found that exposure of the Cu(II) chlorodiketonate complex [(6-Ph2TPA)Cu(PhC(O)CClC(O)Ph)]ClO4 (1) to O2 results in oxidative aliphatic carbon-carbon bond cleavage within the diketonate unit, leading to the formation of benzoic acid, benzoic anhydride, benzil, and 1,3-diphenylpropanedione as organic products. Kinetic studies of this reaction revealed a slow induction phase followed by a rapid decay of the absorption features of 1. Notably, the induction phase is not present when the reaction is performed in the presence of a catalytic amount of chloride anion. In the studies presented herein, a combination of spectroscopic (UV-vis, EPR) and density functional theory (DFT) methods have been used to examine the chloride and benzoate ion binding properties of 1 under anaerobic conditions. These studies provide evidence that each anion coordinates in an axial position of the Cu(II) center. DFT studies reveal that the presence of the anion in the Cu(II) coordination sphere decreases the barrier for O2 activation and the formation of a Cu(II)-peroxo species. Notably, the chloride anion more effectively lowers the barrier associated with O-O bond cleavage. Thus, the nature of the anion plays an important role in determining the rate of reaction of the diketonate complex with O2. The same type of anion effects were observed in the O2 reactivity of the simple Cu(II)-bipyridine complex [(bpy)Cu(PhC(O)C(Cl)C(O)Ph)ClO4] (3). PMID:27377103

  8. Hydrogenation of coal liquid utilizing a metal carbonyl catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Feder, Harold M.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1979-01-01

    Coal liquid having a dissolved transition metal, catalyst as a carbonyl complex such as Co.sub.2 (CO.sub.8) is hydrogenated with hydrogen gas or a hydrogen donor. A dissociating solvent contacts the coal liquid during hydrogenation to form an immiscible liquid mixture at a high carbon monoxide pressure. The dissociating solvent, e.g. ethylene glycol, is of moderate coordinating ability, while sufficiently polar to solvate the transition metal as a complex cation along with a transition metal, carbonyl anion in solution at a decreased carbon monoxide pressure. The carbon monoxide pressure is reduced and the liquids are separated to recover the hydrogenated coal liquid as product. The dissociating solvent with the catalyst in ionized form is recycled to the hydrogenation step at the elevated carbon monoxide pressure for reforming the catalyst complex within fresh coal liquid.

  9. Brillouin precursors in Debye media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, Bruno; Ségard, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically study the formation of Brillouin precursors in Debye media. We point out that the precursors are visible only at propagation distances such that the impulse response of the medium is essentially determined by the frequency dependence of its absorption and is practically Gaussian. By simple convolution, we then obtain explicit analytical expressions of the transmitted waves generated by reference incident waves, distinguishing precursor and main signal by a simple examination of the long-time behavior of the overall signal. These expressions are in good agreement with the signals obtained in numerical or real experiments performed on water in the radio-frequency domain and explain in particular some observed shapes of the precursor. Results are obtained for other remarkable incident waves. In addition, we show quite generally that the shape of the Brillouin precursor appearing alone at sufficiently large propagation distance and the law giving its amplitude as a function of this distance do not depend on the precise form of the incident wave but only on its integral properties. The incidence of a static conductivity of the medium is also examined and explicit analytical results are again given in the limit of weak and strong conductivities.

  10. Catalytic water oxidation by mononuclear Ru complexes with an anionic ancillary ligand.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lianpeng; Inge, A Ken; Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Zou, Xiaodong; Sun, Licheng

    2013-03-01

    Mononuclear Ru-based water oxidation catalysts containing anionic ancillary ligands have shown promising catalytic efficiency and intriguing properties. However, their insolubility in water restricts a detailed mechanism investigation. In order to overcome this disadvantage, complexes [Ru(II)(bpc)(bpy)OH2](+) (1(+), bpc = 2,2'-bipyridine-6-carboxylate, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(II)(bpc)(pic)3](+) (2(+), pic = 4-picoline) were prepared and fully characterized, which features an anionic tridentate ligand and has enough solubility for spectroscopic study in water. Using Ce(IV) as an electron acceptor, both complexes are able to catalyze O2-evolving reaction with an impressive rate constant. On the basis of the electrochemical and kinetic studies, a water nucleophilic attack pathway was proposed as the dominant catalytic cycle of the catalytic water oxidation by 1(+), within which several intermediates were detected by MS. Meanwhile, an auxiliary pathway that is related to the concentration of Ce(IV) was also revealed. The effect of anionic ligand regarding catalytic water oxidation was discussed explicitly in comparison with previously reported mononuclear Ru catalysts carrying neutral tridentate ligands, for example, 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (tpy). When 2(+) was oxidized to the trivalent state, one of its picoline ligands dissociated from the Ru center. The rate constant of picoline dissociation was evaluated from time-resolved UV-vis spectra.

  11. Improved removals of trihalomethane precursors by small water supply systems

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.R.; Eighmy, T.T.; Fenstermacher, J.M.; Spanos, S.K.; Spencer, C.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Selected slow sand filter modifications that could enhance the principal removal mechanisms of biodegradation and adsorption and would not compromise the simplicity of the treatment process were explored in research conducted at the University of New Hampshire. The modifications were evaluated for their potential to improve removal of trihalomethanes (THM) precursor material and particulate matter over conventionally operated slow sand filters. The results suggest that those water utilities that are considering slow sand filtration and want to improve THM precursor removals construct filter units that provide the following capabilities: increase biodegradation potential by increasing bacterial populations with filter depth through incorporating a cleaning procedure that harrows the filter media; or increase adsorption removals by adding granular activated carbon or anionic resin as a filter media amendment. THM precursor removals by slow sand filters may be independent of organic loading rate suggesting that smaller filter units operating at high filtration rates may be used to offset construction costs. However, the savings in construction costs may be lost if an efficient filter cleaning procedure is not correspondingly implemented since increased removal rates will increase headloss development. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A broadly applicable and practical oligomeric (salen) Co catalyst for enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions

    PubMed Central

    White, David E.; Tadross, Pamela M.; Lu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The (salen) Co catalyst (4a) can be prepared as a mixture of cyclic oligomers in a short, chromatography-free synthesis from inexpensive, commercially available precursors. This catalyst displays remarkable enhancements in reactivity and enantioselectivity relative to monomeric and other multimeric (salen) Co catalysts in a wide variety of enantioselective epoxide ring-opening reactions. The application of catalyst 4a is illustrated in the kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides by nucleophilic ring-opening with water, phenols, and primary alcohols; the desymmetrization of meso epoxides by addition of water and carbamates; and the desymmetrization of oxetanes by intramolecular ring opening with alcohols and phenols. The favorable solubility properties of complex 4a under the catalytic conditions facilitated mechanistic studies, allowing elucidation of the basis for the beneficial effect of oligomerization. Finally, a catalyst selection guide is provided to delineate the specific advantages of oligomeric catalyst 4a relative to (salen) Co monomer 1 for each reaction class. PMID:25045188

  13. A nickel iron diselenide-derived efficient oxygen-evolution catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Song, Fang; Hu, Xile

    2016-08-01

    Efficient oxygen-evolution reaction catalysts are required for the cost-effective generation of solar fuels. Metal selenides have been reported as promising oxygen-evolution catalysts; however, their active forms are yet to be elucidated. Here we show that a representative selenide catalyst, nickel selenide, is entirely converted into nickel hydroxide under oxygen-evolution conditions. This result indicates that metal selenides are unstable during oxygen evolution, and the in situ generated metal oxides are responsible for their activity. This knowledge inspired us to synthesize nanostructured nickel iron diselenide, a hitherto unknown metal selenide, and to use it as a templating precursor to a highly active nickel iron oxide catalyst. This selenide-derived oxide catalyses oxygen evolution with an overpotential of only 195 mV for 10 mA cm-2. Our work underscores the importance of identifying the active species of oxygen-evolution catalysts, and demonstrates how such knowledge can be applied to develop better catalysts.

  14. An anion exchange approach to Bi2WO6 hollow microspheres with efficient visible light photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to methanol.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefeng; Huang, Baibiao; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zeyan; Qin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Dai, Ying

    2012-10-01

    An anion exchange strategy is explored to synthesize Bi(2)WO(6) hollow microspheres based on the microscale Kirkendall effect. The as-prepared Bi(2)WO(6) hollow microspheres display high CO(2) adsorption capacity and visible light photocatalytic conversion efficiency of CO(2) into methanol without the aid of any co-catalyst. PMID:22914674

  15. Characterization of bimetallic Pt-Sn/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts: Relationship between particle size and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Merlen, E.; Zanier, N.

    1996-03-01

    Pt-Sn/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bimetallic catalysts have been prepared using organometallic precursors and characterized. Two models depending on average platinum particle size are proposed in order to describe these solids. The catalyst obtained from a highly dispersed monometallic precursor may be described as Pt/SnO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with platinum probably in interaction with tin oxide. When the monometallic precursor has low dispersion, the bimetallic system may be described as PtSn{sup 0} + SnO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. 35 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Taylor, Jesse W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst compositions and methods for F-T synthesis which exhibit high CO conversion with minor levels (preferably less than 35% and more preferably less than 5%) or no measurable carbon dioxide generation. F-T active catalysts are prepared by reduction of certain oxygen deficient mixed metal oxides.

  17. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  18. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  19. Improved zeolitic isocracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, A.J.; Habib, M.M.; Moore, R.O.; Law, D.V.; Convery, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    Chevron Research Company introduced the first low pressure, low temperature catalytic hydrocracking process--ISOCRACKING--in 1959. Within the last four years, Chevron has developed and commercialized three new zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalysts. ICR 209 is Chevron`s latest noble metal ISOCRACKING catalyst. It offers improved liquid yield stability, longer life, and superior polynuclear aromatics control compared to its predecessor. ICR 209`s high hydrogenation activity generates the highest yields of superior quality jet fuel of any zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalyst. The second new ISOCRACKING catalyst, ICR 208, is a base metal catalyst which combines high liquid selectivity and high light naphtha octane in hydrocrackers operating for maximum naphtha production. ICR 210 is another new base metal catalyst which offers higher liquid yields and longer life than ICR 208 by virtue of a higher hydrogenation-to-acidity ratio. Both ICR 208 and ICR 210 have been formulated to provide higher liquid yield throughout the cycle and longer cycle length than conventional base metal/zeolite catalysts. This paper will discuss the pilot plant and commercial performances of these new ISOCRACKING catalysts.

  20. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  1. Metal-catalyst-free carbohydrazide fuel cells with three-dimensional graphene anodes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ji; Benipal, Neeva; Wang, Hui; Chadderdon, David J; Jiang, Yibo; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yun Hang; Li, Wenzhen

    2015-04-13

    As a potential solution to concerns on sustainable energy, the wide spread commercialization of fuel cell has long been hindered by limited reserves and relatively high costs of metal catalysts. 3D graphene, a carbon-only catalyst prepared by reduction of carbon monoxide with lithium oxide, is found to electrochemically catalyze carbohydrazide oxidation reaction efficiently. A prototype of a completely metal-catalyst-free anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) with a 3D graphene anode catalyst and an N-doped CNT (N-CNT) cathode catalyst generate a peak power density of 24.9 mW cm(-2) . The average number of electrons electrochemically extracted from one carbohydrazide molecule is 4.9, indicating the existence of CN bond activation, which is a key factor contributing to high fuel utilization efficiency.

  2. Metal-catalyst-free carbohydrazide fuel cells with three-dimensional graphene anodes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ji; Benipal, Neeva; Wang, Hui; Chadderdon, David J; Jiang, Yibo; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yun Hang; Li, Wenzhen

    2015-04-13

    As a potential solution to concerns on sustainable energy, the wide spread commercialization of fuel cell has long been hindered by limited reserves and relatively high costs of metal catalysts. 3D graphene, a carbon-only catalyst prepared by reduction of carbon monoxide with lithium oxide, is found to electrochemically catalyze carbohydrazide oxidation reaction efficiently. A prototype of a completely metal-catalyst-free anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) with a 3D graphene anode catalyst and an N-doped CNT (N-CNT) cathode catalyst generate a peak power density of 24.9 mW cm(-2) . The average number of electrons electrochemically extracted from one carbohydrazide molecule is 4.9, indicating the existence of CN bond activation, which is a key factor contributing to high fuel utilization efficiency. PMID:25469500

  3. Anion photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Tian; Dixon, Andrew R.; Sanov, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    We report a photoelectron imaging study of the radical-anion of glyoxal. The 532 nm photoelectron spectrum provides the first direct spectroscopic determination of the adiabatic electron affinity of glyoxal, EA = 1.10 ± 0.02 eV. This assignment is supported by a Franck-Condon simulation of the experimental spectrum that successfully reproduces the observed spectral features. The vertical detachment energy of the radical-anion is determined as VDE = 1.30 ± 0.04 eV. The reported EA and VDE values are attributed to the most stable (C2h symmetry) isomers of the neutral and the anion.

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy of nitromethane anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Carrie Jo M.; Albury, Rachael M.; Goebbert, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    Nitromethane anion and nitromethane dimer, trimer, and hydrated cluster anions were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. Vertical detachment energies, estimated electron affinities, and solvation energies were obtained from the photoelectron spectra. Cluster structures were investigated using theoretical calculations. Predicted detachment energies agreed with experiment. Calculations show water binds to nitromethane anion through two hydrogen bonds. The dimer has a non-linear structure with a single ionic Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. The trimer has two different solvent interactions, but both involve the weak Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond.

  5. Ketoprofen as a photoinitiator for anionic polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsuan; Wan, Peter

    2015-06-01

    A new photoinitiating system for anionic polymerization of acrylates based on the efficient photodecarboxylation of Ketoprofen (1) and the related derivatives 3 and 4 that generate the corresponding carbanion intermediates is presented. Carbanion intermediates are confirmed by deuterium incorporation in the trapped Michael adducts and by spectroscopic detection using laser flash photolysis (LFP). This novel anionic initiating system features excitation in the near UV and visible regions, potential characteristics of photocontrolled living polymerization, and metal-free photoinitiators generated from photoexcitation, different from typical anionic polymerization where the polymerizations are initiated by heat and strong base containing alkali metals.

  6. Improved catalysts and method

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.

    1990-12-31

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Bismuth - modified supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Nadirov, N.K.; Lykova, L.F.; Petrosyan, L.S.

    1985-09-01

    Bismuth was used as an additive to three-component catalysts prepared through modification of an aluminoplatinorhenium catalyst by III and IV nontransition and iron subgroup elements. Since there is conflicting information on bismuth additions, the role of bismuth in polycomponent catalysts and whether it promotes aromatization catalysts was considered. The effect of temperature on the yield of n-hexane conversion products in the presence of Pt-Re-Co-Bi/gamma-A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is shown. Conclusive results establish that the addition of 0.5% nickel to a 0.3 Pt-0.3 Re/gamma-A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst (in wt.%) increased the yield of benzene from n-hexane by 5.7%. It was also shown that 0.1 to 0.25 wt.% bismuth poisons two- and three-component samples containing 0.25 to 0.3 wt.% platinum.

  8. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Parfitt, D.P.; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-08-01

    The ultimate goal of the present research is to develop novel catalytic hydroliquefaction process using highly active dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research is to develop novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that can be used in low concentrations (precursors of bimetallic dispersed catalysts for liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous coal (DECS-9) at the loading level of 0.5 wt% Mo on dmmf coal. It was found that the structure of the precursors, in particular the ligands to the metal species, affect the activity of the resulting catalyst significantly. Among the M-M` type precursors tested, Mo-Co thiocubane, Mo{sub 2}Co{sub 2}S{sub 4}(Cp){sub 2}(CO){sub 2} [Cp = cyclopentadiene], designated as MoCo-TC2, produced in-situ the best catalyst The performance of the Mo-Co bimetallic catalyst was further enhanced by using temperature programmed (TPL) conditions consisting of a low temperature soaking at 200{degrees}C, programmed heat-up to 400 or 425{degrees}C followed by a 30 minutes hold. The pro ed heat-up serves as an in-situ activation of catalyst and coal pretreatment, which contributes to more effective hydrogenation of reactive fragments at high temperature.

  9. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  10. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of exogenous anion exchange in FeFbpA-NTA: significance of periplasmic anion lability and anion binding activity of ferric binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Jared J; Gabricević, Mario; Mietzner, Timothy A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2010-02-01

    The bacterial transferrin ferric binding protein A (FbpA) requires an exogenous anion to facilitate iron sequestration, and subsequently to shuttle the metal across the periplasm to the cytoplasmic membrane. In the diverse conditions of the periplasm, numerous anions are known to be present. Prior in vitro experiments have demonstrated the ability of multiple anions to fulfill the synergistic iron-binding requirement, and the identity of the bound anion has been shown to modulate important physicochemical properties of iron-bound FbpA (FeFbpA). Here we address the kinetics and mechanism of anion exchange for the FeFbpA-nitrilotriacetate (NTA) assembly with several biologically relevant anions (citrate, oxalate, phosphate, and pyrophosphate), with nonphysiologic NTA serving as a representative synergistic anion/chelator. The kinetic data are consistent with an anion-exchange process that occurs in multiple steps, dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion. The exchange mechanism may proceed either as a direct substitution or through an intermediate FeFbpA-X* assembly based on anion (X) identity. Our kinetic results further develop an understanding of exogenous anion lability in the periplasm, as well as address the final step of the iron-free FbpA (apo-FbpA)/Fe(3+) sequestration mechanism. Our results highlight the kinetic significance of the FbpA anion binding site, demonstrating a correlation between apo-FbpA/anion affinity and the FeFbpA rate of anion exchange, further supporting the requirement of an exogenous anion to complete tight sequestration of iron by FbpA, and developing a mechanism for anion exchange within FeFbpA that is dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion. PMID:19813031

  12. Alkali Metal Salts with Designable Aryltrifluoroborate Anions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kazuki; Yoshii, Kazuki; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Matsumoto, Hajime; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    Aryltrifluoroborate ([ArBF3](-)) has a designable basic anion structure. Various [ArBF3](-)-based anions were synthesized to create novel alkali metal salts using a simple and safe process. Nearly 40 novel alkali metal salts were successfully obtained, and their physicochemical characteristics, particularly their thermal properties, were elucidated. These salts have lower melting points than those of simple inorganic alkali halide salts, such as KCl and LiCl, because of the weaker interactions between the alkali metal cations and the [ArBF3](-) anions and the anions' larger entropy. Moreover, interestingly, potassium cations were electrochemically reduced in the potassium (meta-ethoxyphenyl)trifluoroborate (K[m-OEtC6H4BF3]) molten salt at 433 K. These findings contribute substantially to furthering molten salt chemistry, ionic liquid chemistry, and electrochemistry. PMID:27510799

  13. Heterocyclic anions of astrobiological interest

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Callie A.; Demarais, Nicholas J.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Yang, Zhibo; Snow, Theodore P. E-mail: Nicholas.Demarais@colorado.edu E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@ou.edu

    2013-12-20

    As more complex organic molecules are detected in the interstellar medium, the importance of heterocyclic molecules to astrobiology and the origin of life has become evident. 2-Aminothiazole and 2-aminooxazole have recently been suggested as important nucleotide precursors, highlighting azoles as potential prebiotic molecules. This study explores the gas-phase chemistry of three deprotonated azoles: oxazole, thiazole, and isothiazole. For the first time, their gas-phase acidities are experimentally determined with bracketing and H/D exchange techniques, and their reactivity is characterized with several detected interstellar neutral molecules (N{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, CO, OCS, CO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2}) and other reactive species (CS{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}Cl, (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CCl, and (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CBr). Rate constants and branching fractions for these reactions are experimentally measured using a modified commercial ion trap mass spectrometer whose kinetic data are in good accord with those of a flowing afterglow apparatus reported here. Last, we have examined the fragmentation patterns of these deprotonated azoles to elucidate their destruction mechanisms in high-energy environments. All experimental data are supported and complemented by electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory.

  14. Heterocyclic Anions of Astrobiological Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2013-12-01

    As more complex organic molecules are detected in the interstellar medium, the importance of heterocyclic molecules to astrobiology and the origin of life has become evident. 2-Aminothiazole and 2-aminooxazole have recently been suggested as important nucleotide precursors, highlighting azoles as potential prebiotic molecules. This study explores the gas-phase chemistry of three deprotonated azoles: oxazole, thiazole, and isothiazole. For the first time, their gas-phase acidities are experimentally determined with bracketing and H/D exchange techniques, and their reactivity is characterized with several detected interstellar neutral molecules (N2O, O2, CO, OCS, CO2, and SO2) and other reactive species (CS2, CH3Cl, (CH3)3CCl, and (CH3)3CBr). Rate constants and branching fractions for these reactions are experimentally measured using a modified commercial ion trap mass spectrometer whose kinetic data are in good accord with those of a flowing afterglow apparatus reported here. Last, we have examined the fragmentation patterns of these deprotonated azoles to elucidate their destruction mechanisms in high-energy environments. All experimental data are supported and complemented by electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory.

  15. Preparation and evaluation of novel hydrous metal oxide (HMO)-supported noble metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Evans, L.R.; Datye, A.K.

    1998-04-01

    Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials that, because of their high cation exchange capacity, possess a unique ability to allow the preparation of highly dispersed supported-metal catalyst precursors with high metal loadings. This study evaluates high weight loading Rh/HMO catalysts with a wide range of HMO support compositions, including hydrous titanium oxide (HTO), silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si), hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO), and silica-doped hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO:Si), against conventional oxide-supported Rh catalysts with similar weight loadings and support chemistries. Catalyst activity measurements for a structure-sensitive model reaction (n-butane hydrogenolysis) as a function of catalyst activation conditions show superior activity and stability for the ZrO{sub 2}, HZO, and HZO:Si supports, although all of the Rh/HMO catalysts have high ethane selectivity indicative of high Rh dispersion. For the TiO{sub 2}-, HTO-, and HTO:Si supported Rh catalysts, a significant loss of both catalyst activity and Rh dispersion is observed at more aggressive activation conditions, consistent with TiO{sub x} migration associated with SMSI phenomena. Of all the Rh/HMO catalysts, the Rh/HZO:Si catalysts appear to offer the best tradeoff in terms of high Rh dispersion, high activity, and high selectivity.

  16. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  17. Intercalated clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnavaia, T.J.

    1983-04-22

    Recent advances in the intercalation of metal complex cations in smectite clay minerals are leading to the development of new classes of selective heterogeneous catalysts. The selectivity of both metal-catalyzed and proton-catalyzed chemical conversions in clay intercalates can often be regulated by controlling surface chemical equilibria, interlamellar swelling, or reactant pair proximity in the interlayer regions. Also, the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxy metal cations and metal cluster cations in smectites affords new pillared clay catalysts with pore sizes that can be made larger than those of conventional zeolite catalysts.

  18. Intercalated Clay Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    1983-04-01

    Recent advances in the intercalation of metal complex cations in smectite clay minerals are leading to the development of new classes of selective heterogeneous catalysts. The selectivity of both metal-catalyzed and proton-catalyzed chemical conversions in clay intercalates can often be regulated by controlling surface chemical equilibria, interlamellar swelling, or reactant pair proximity in the interlayer regions. Also, the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxy metal cations and metal cluster cations in smectites affords new pillared clay catalysts with pore sizes that can be made larger than those of conventional zeolite catalysts.

  19. Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1994-08-01

    The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

  20. Popping of graphite oxide: application in preparing metal nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongjun; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Jiaguang; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Tsunehiro; Teramura, Kentaro; Ma, Ding; Yan, Ning

    2015-08-26

    A popcorn-like transformation of graphite oxide (GO) is reported and used to synthesize metal nanoparticle catalysts. The popping step is unique and essential, not only generating a high-surface-area support but also partially decomposing the metal precursors to form well-separated metal oxide nuclei, which would further evolve into highly dispersed and uniform-sized nanoparticles in the subsequent reduction. PMID:26179983

  1. A chameleon catalyst for nonheme iron-promoted olefin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shyam R; Javadi, Maedeh Moshref; Feng, Yan; Hyun, Min Young; Oloo, Williamson N; Kim, Cheal; Que, Lawrence

    2014-11-18

    We report the chameleonic reactivity of two nonheme iron catalysts for olefin oxidation with H2O2 that switch from nearly exclusive cis-dihydroxylation of electron-poor olefins to the exclusive epoxidation of electron-rich olefins upon addition of acetic acid. This switching suggests a common precursor to the nucleophilic oxidant proposed to Fe(III)-η(2)-OOH and electrophilic oxidant proposed to Fe(V)(O)(OAc), and reversible coordination of acetic acid as a switching pathway.

  2. Synthesis And Characterization of Dendrimer-Derived Supported Iridium Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Jesus, Y.Lopez-De; Vicente, A.; Lafaye, G.; Marecot, P.; Williams, C.T.

    2009-05-19

    The synthesis of Ir/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using the dendrimer metal nanocomposites (DMN) approach is reported. Fourth generation hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine dendrimer was complexed with Ir{sup 3+} in aqueous solution and the process monitored using ultraviolet-visible and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. No discernible reduction of Ir{sup 3+} to form zerovalent nanoparticles was observed after bubbling hydrogen or adding NaBH{sub 4} into the complex solution. Standard wet impregnation of the DMN precursors were used to prepare Ir/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which were compared with conventionally prepared samples. In situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy during dendrimer thermal decomposition in different atmospheres and CO adsorption allowed for identification of catalyst activation treatments that expose the maximum metal surface area. The particle size distributions of these catalysts were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, revealing that all of the catalysts have small particle sizes (0.4-3 nm) with narrow distributions. An optimized oxidation/reduction treatment produced a DMN-derived supported catalyst with higher metallic dispersion. DMN-derived catalysts were tested for liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzonitrile, and show an increase in TOF with increasing dispersion. The selectivity toward dibenzylamine is affected by the catalyst preparation method, with the oxidation/reduction treatment resulting in lower selectivity.

  3. ELECTRON-DRIVEN REACTIONS IN PROTO-PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES: METASTABLE ANIONS OF GASEOUS o-BENZYNE

    SciTech Connect

    Carelli, F.; Sebastianelli, F.; Baccarelli, I.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2010-03-20

    In this paper, we present an investigation into low-energy electron scattering (E < 15 eV) processes from a specific benzene-like polyatomic target such as ortho-benzyne, o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}({sup 1}SIGMA), in order to gain a better understanding of the effects that possible low-lying metastable electron-attachment states could have on its nuclear fragmentation dynamics. The current importance of the dynamical evolution of this molecule lies in the fact that o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} is considered to be relevant for the circumstellar synthesis of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as a precursor for C{sub 6}H{sub 6} production via ion-based ring closure reaction from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Our parameter-free scattering calculations are performed within the molecular reference frame, where we obtain the metastable anionic states for the nuclear equilibrium configuration and further characterize the properties of such transient anions with respect to those found earlier for the benzene molecule. Our quantum studies indicate that o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} is a more efficient producer of compact, fairly long-lived anionic intermediates than benzene itself; hence, this should more rapidly enter the chemical reaction cycles of PAHs formation, thereby disappearing from possible direct observation as a stable anion.

  4. Electron-Driven Reactions in Proto-Planetary Atmospheres: Metastable Anions of Gaseous o-Benzyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carelli, F.; Sebastianelli, F.; Baccarelli, I.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation into low-energy electron scattering (E < 15 eV) processes from a specific benzene-like polyatomic target such as ortho-benzyne, o-C6H4(1Σ), in order to gain a better understanding of the effects that possible low-lying metastable electron-attachment states could have on its nuclear fragmentation dynamics. The current importance of the dynamical evolution of this molecule lies in the fact that o-C6H4 is considered to be relevant for the circumstellar synthesis of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as a precursor for C6H6 production via ion-based ring closure reaction from C2H2. Our parameter-free scattering calculations are performed within the molecular reference frame, where we obtain the metastable anionic states for the nuclear equilibrium configuration and further characterize the properties of such transient anions with respect to those found earlier for the benzene molecule. Our quantum studies indicate that o-C6H4 is a more efficient producer of compact, fairly long-lived anionic intermediates than benzene itself; hence, this should more rapidly enter the chemical reaction cycles of PAHs formation, thereby disappearing from possible direct observation as a stable anion.

  5. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of europium doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxides intercalated with MoO anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Pan, Qingrui; Liu, Qi; He, Yang; Mann, Tom; Li, Rumin; Zhang, Milin; Liu, Lianhe

    2012-05-01

    Novel fluorescent Eu-containing layered double hydroxides (Eu-LDHs) were prepared by direct ion-exchange of EuMgAl-NO3 LDHs precursors with MoO anions. The samples were characterized by elemental analyses, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectra, photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results indicated that Eu3+ ions were likely incorporated into the hydrotalcite lattice and MoO anions were successfully intercalated into interlayer region of the LDHs with the Mo/Al molar ratio close to 0.40. The luminescence properties were largely enhanced compared with the EuMgAl-NO3 LDHs precursors, which were attributed to the energy transfer between Eu3+ and MoO.

  6. Method for improving product yields in an anionic metalloporphyrin-based artificial photosynthesis system

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.

    1986-01-01

    A method for improving product yields in an anionic metalloporphyrin-based artificial photosynthesis system for hydrogen generation which comprises forming an aqueous solution comprising an electron donor, methylviologen, and certain metalloporphyrins and metallochlorins, and irradiating said aqueous solution with light in the presence of a catalyst. In the photosynthesis process, solar energy is collected and stored in the form of a gas hydrogen. Ligands attached above and below the metalloporphyrin and metallochlorin plane are capable of sterically blocking photochemically inactive electrostatically bound .pi.--.pi. complexes which can develop.

  7. Method for improving product yields in an anionic metalloporphyrin-based artificial photosynthesis system

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1984-11-29

    A method is disclosed improving product yields in an anionic metalloporphyrin-based artificial photosynthesis system for hydrogen generation. The method comprises forming an aqueous solution comprising an electron donor, methylviologen, and certain metalloporphyrins and metallochlorins, and irradiating said aqueous solution with light in the presence of a catalyst. In the photosynthesis process, solar energy is collected and stored in the form of a hydrogen. Ligands attached above and below the metalloporphyrin and metallochlorin plane are capable of sterically blocking photochemically inactive electrostatically bound ..pi..-..pi.. complexes which can develop.

  8. The direct formate fuel cell with an alkaline anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartrom, Amy M.; Haan, John L.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an operating Direct Formate Fuel Cell employing formate salts as the anode fuel, air or oxygen as the oxidant, a polymer anion exchange membrane, and metal catalysts at the anode and cathode. Operation of the DFFC at 60 °C using 1 M KOOCH and 2 M KOH as the anode fuel and electrolyte and oxygen gas at the cathode produces 144 mW cm-2 of peak power density, 181 mA cm-2 current density at 0.6 V, and an open circuit voltage of 0.931 V. This performance is competitive with alkaline Direct Liquid Fuel Cells (DLFCs) previously reported in the literature and demonstrates that formate fuel is a legitimate contender with alcohol fuels for alkaline DLFCs. A survey of the literature shows that a formate-oxygen fuel cell has a high theoretical potential, and the safe, renewable formate fuel does not poison the anode catalyst.

  9. Tuning the Optical Properties of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals by Anion Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that, via controlled anion exchange reactions using a range of different halide precursors, we can finely tune the chemical composition and the optical properties of presynthesized colloidal cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs), from green emitting CsPbBr3 to bright emitters in any other region of the visible spectrum, and back, by displacement of Cl– or I– ions and reinsertion of Br– ions. This approach gives access to perovskite semiconductor NCs with both structural and optical qualities comparable to those of directly synthesized NCs. We also show that anion exchange is a dynamic process that takes place in solution between NCs. Therefore, by mixing solutions containing perovskite NCs emitting in different spectral ranges (due to different halide compositions) their mutual fast exchange dynamics leads to homogenization in their composition, resulting in NCs emitting in a narrow spectral region that is intermediate between those of the parent nanoparticles. PMID:26214734

  10. TGR5 potentiates GLP-1 secretion in response to anionic exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Harach, Taoufiq; Pols, Thijs W H; Nomura, Mitsunori; Maida, Adriano; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Anionic exchange resins are bona fide cholesterol-lowering agents with glycemia lowering actions in diabetic patients. Potentiation of intestinal GLP-1 secretion has been proposed to contribute to the glycemia lowering effect of these non-systemic drugs. Here, we show that resin exposure enhances GLP-1 secretion and improves glycemic control in diet-induced animal models of "diabesity", effects which are critically dependent on TGR5, a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by bile acids. We identified the colon as a major source of GLP-1 secretion after resin treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the boost in GLP-1 release by resins is due to both enhanced TGR5-dependent production of the precursor transcript of GLP-1 as well as to the local enrichment of TGR5 agonists in the colon. Thus, TGR5 represents an essential component in the pathway mediating the enhanced GLP-1 release in response to anionic exchange resins. PMID:22666533

  11. Role of Surface Cobalt Silicate in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis from Silica-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Wang, X; Derrouiche, S; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO{sub 2}-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable.

  12. Role of surface cobalt silicate in single-walled carbon nanotube synthesis from silica-supported cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Wang, Xiaoming; Derrouiche, Salim; Haller, Gary L; Pfefferle, Lisa D

    2010-03-23

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO2-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable. PMID:20201563

  13. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2011-11-15

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  14. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  15. Novel pseudo-delocalized anions for lithium battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Jónsson, Erlendur; Armand, Michel; Johansson, Patrik

    2012-05-01

    A novel anion concept of pseudo-delocalized anions, anions with distinct positive and negative charge regions, has been studied by a computer aided synthesis using DFT calculations. With the aim to find safer and better performing lithium salts for lithium battery electrolytes two factors have been evaluated: the cation-anion interaction strength via the dissociation reaction LiAn ⇌ Li(+) + An(-) and the anion oxidative stability via a vertical ionisation from anion to radical. Based on our computational results some of these anions have shown promise to perform well as lithium salts for modern lithium batteries and should be interesting synthetic targets for future research. PMID:22441354

  16. Synthesis of 1D Silica Nanostructures with Controllable Sizes Based on Short Anionic Peptide Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengjie; Cai, Qingwei; Du, Mingxuan; Xue, Junyi; Xu, Hai

    2015-09-10

    Artificial synthesis of silica under benign conditions is usually achieved by using cationic organic matrices as templates while the anionic analogues have not received enough consideration, albeit they are also functioning in biosilica formation. In this work, we report the design and self-assembly of an anionic peptide amphiphile (I3E) and the use of its self-assemblies as templates to synthesize 1D silica nanostructures with tunable sizes. We show that short I3E readily formed long nanofibrils in aqueous solution via a hierarchical self-assembly process. By using APTES and TEOS as silica precursors, we found that the I3E nanofibrils templated the production of silica nanotubes with a wide size distribution, in which the silica size regulation was achieved by tuning the interactions among the peptide template and silicon species. These results clearly illustrate a facile method for generating silica nanomaterials based on anionic matrices.

  17. Analysis of oxyhalide disinfection by-products and other anions of interest in drinking water by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hautman, D P; Bolyard, M

    1992-06-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is developing regulations for various drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). This effort involves developing analytical methods for the DBPs formed as a result of different disinfection treatments and collecting occurrence data for these species. Ion chromatography is one method being used to analyze drinking water samples for the following inorganic DBPs: chlorite, chlorate and bromate. These anions, however, are difficult to separate from common interfering anions of chloride, carbonate and nitrate. A method is therefore presented by which tetraborate/boric acid is used to separate these anions. Method detection limits of the order of 10 micrograms/l, using conductivity and UV detection were obtained. Stability studies of chlorite showing the effectiveness of ethylenediamine as a preservative and summary data for an occurrence of nitrite, nitrate and the DBP precursor bromide are presented.

  18. Rearrangements Leading to Fragmentations of Hydrocinnamate and Analogous Nitrogen-Containing Anions Upon Collision-Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Elizabeth A. L.; Grossert, J. Stuart; White, Robert L.

    2014-03-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) confirmed decarboxylation as the major collision-induced dissociation (CID) pathway of deprotonated hydrocinnamic acid (C6H5CH2CH2CO2H), N-phenylglycine (C6H5NHCH2CO2H) and 3-pyridin-2-ylpropanoic acid (C5H4NCH2CH2CO2H). The structure and stability of isomeric precursor and product anions were examined using density functional theory and ab initio methods. Geometry optimizations and frequency calculations were performed using the B3LYP/6-31++G(2d,p) level of theory and basis set with additional single point energies calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,p) level. The formation of a delocalized product anion by carboxyl group-mediated migration of a benzylic proton to the ortho position of the ring and subsequent Cα-CO2 - bond cleavage was energetically more favorable than direct decarboxylation and rearrangements of anions within ion-neutral complexes with carbon dioxide. The energy barrier for rearrangement of the delocalized product anion to the more stable benzylic anion was lowest in the fragmentation pathway of 3-pyridin-2-ylpropanoate. More energetically demanding fragmentation processes were indicated by the formation of other product anions at higher collision energy. Computations supported the feasibility of the formation of hydroxycarbonyl, styrene, and phenide ions from the benzylic anion of hydrocinnamate and the corresponding product anions from the nitrogen-containing analogues. The loss of dihydrogen from decarboxylated 3-pyridin-2-ylpropanoate was characterized computationally as hydride abstraction of an aryl proton. Overall, the results highlight the importance of exploring rearrangements in the fragmentation pathways of ions formed by electrospray ionization (ESI).

  19. Catalysts and method

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    An improved catlayst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HC1 and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  20. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    DOEpatents

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  1. Precursor polymer compositions comprising polybenzimidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.

    2015-07-14

    Stable, high performance polymer compositions including polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a melamine-formaldehyde polymer, such as methylated, poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde), for forming structures such as films, fibers and bulky structures. The polymer compositions may be formed by combining polybenzimidazole with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form a precursor. The polybenzimidazole may be reacted and/or intertwined with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form the polymer composition. For example, a stable, free-standing film having a thickness of, for example, between about 5 .mu.m and about 30 .mu.m may be formed from the polymer composition. Such films may be used as gas separation membranes and may be submerged into water for extended periods without crazing and cracking. The polymer composition may also be used as a coating on substrates, such as metal and ceramics, or may be used for spinning fibers. Precursors for forming such polymer compositions are also disclosed.

  2. The Innate Lymphoid Cell Precursor.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Constantinides, Michael G; Gudjonson, Herman; Bendelac, Albert

    2016-05-20

    The discovery of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cell populations effecting different forms of type 1, 2, and 3 immunity; tissue repair; and immune regulation has transformed our understanding of mucosal immunity and allergy. The emerging complexity of these populations along with compounding issues of redundancy and plasticity raise intriguing questions about their precise lineage relationship. Here we review advances in mapping the emergence of these lineages from early lymphoid precursors. We discuss the identification of a common innate lymphoid cell precursor characterized by transient expression of the transcription factor PLZF, and the lineage relationships of innate lymphoid cells with conventional natural killer cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. We also review the rapidly growing understanding of the network of transcription factors that direct the development of these lineages.

  3. Neurotransmitter precursors and brain function.

    PubMed

    Conlay, L A; Zeisel, S H

    1982-04-01

    Brain function can be affected by the availability of dietary precursors of neurotransmitters. This occurs because the rate-limiting synthetic enzymes are not "saturated" with substrate under normal circumstances. Tyrosine affects catecholaminergic neurons that fire rapidly, whether in the brain stem to decrease blood pressure in hypertension or in the adrenal gland to increase blood pressure in hypotension, and has been used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and depression. Choline forms acetylcholine and has been used successfully in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia and memory disorders. Tryptophan, which forms serotonin, has been used for chronic pain therapy, sleep disorders, depression, and appetite control. Although these substances may lack the potency of traditionally used agonists, they offer an increase in specificity because the enzymes necessary to convert them to neurotransmitters are found only in neurons. Precursors are also "physiological"; they are consumed as foods and, therefore, should be relatively safe therapeutic agents. PMID:6124895

  4. Studies of anions sorption on natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Barczyk, K; Mozgawa, W; Król, M

    2014-12-10

    This work presents results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of anions-chromate, phosphate and arsenate - sorbed from aqueous solutions (different concentrations of anions) on zeolites. The sorption has been conducted on natural zeolites from different structural groups, i.e. chabazite, mordenite, ferrierite and clinoptilolite. The Na-forms of sorbents were exchanged with hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations (HDTMA(+)) and organo-zeolites were obtained. External cation exchange capacities (ECEC) of organo-zeolites were measured. Their values are 17mmol/100g for chabazite, 4mmol/100g for mordenite and ferrierite and 10mmol/100g for clinoptilolite. The used initial inputs of HDTMA correspond to 100% and 200% ECEC of the minerals. Organo-modificated sorbents were subsequently used for immobilization of mentioned anions. It was proven that aforementioned anions' sorption causes changes in IR spectra of the HDTMA-zeolites. These alterations are dependent on the kind of anions that were sorbed. In all cases, variations are due to bands corresponding to the characteristic Si-O(Si,Al) vibrations (occurring in alumino- and silicooxygen tetrahedra building spatial framework of zeolites). Alkylammonium surfactant vibrations have also been observed. Systematic changes in the spectra connected with the anion concentration in the initial solution have been revealed. The amounts of sorbed CrO4(2-), AsO4(3-) and PO4(3-) ions were calculated from the difference between their concentrations in solutions before (initial concentration) and after (equilibrium concentration) sorption experiments. Concentrations of anions were determined by spectrophotometric method.

  5. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2004-09-21

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  6. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2007-10-09

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  7. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  8. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  9. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  10. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  11. Understanding the forces that govern packing: a density functional theory and structural investigation of anion-π-anion and nonclassical C-H···anion interactions.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Sally; White, Nicholas G; Bauzá, Antonio; Deyà, Pere M; Frontera, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    The ability of Ni(II) coordinated 4-pyrrolyl-3,5-di(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazole (pldpt) to establish multiple anion-π interactions is analyzed. Experimentally, such complexes were previously shown to form strong anion-π interactions, including "π-pocket" and "π-sandwiched" motifs, in the crystal lattice. In the latter, the triazole ring is "sandwiched" by two anions forming a ternary anion-π-anion assembly (π-sandwich) which, surprisingly, gave about 0.2 Å shorter anion-π distances than in binary assemblies (where only one side of the triazole participates in the anion binding), indicating the possibility of cooperativity. In depth analysis, using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT, BP86-D/def2-TZVP level of theory), shows that this ternary anion-π-anion interaction is slightly less energetically favorable than the binary anion-π interactions in isolation. Hence, the sandwich interaction is not cooperative (E(coop) is positive), but, as E(coop) contributes less than 1.5% of the total interaction energy (which is dominated by the strong electrostatic attraction of the anions to the highly π-acidic Ni(II)-coordinated triazole ring), the presence of nonclassical C-H···anion hydrogen bonds can offset this, making the short anion-π sandwich interactions the most favorable solid state conformation. PMID:22974250

  12. Comprehensive catalyst management

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, S.

    2007-05-15

    From January 2009, as SCR season expands from five months to year-round to meet new US Clean Air Interstate Rule standards, new catalyst strategies are increasingly important. Power plants will need a comprehensive management strategy that accounts for a wide range of old and new issues to achieve peak performance. An optimum plan is necessary for catalyst replacement or addition. SCR systems should be inspected and evaluated at least once a year. Levels of deactivation agents, most often arsenic and calcium oxide, need to match the particular coals used. Tools such as Cormetech's FIELD Guide are available to quantify the effect on catalyst life under various fuel-firing scenarios. Tests should be conducted to evaluate the NH{sub 3}/NOx distribution over time to maximise catalyst performance. The article gives a case study of catalyst management at the Tennessee Valley Authority Allen plant. Recent changes have created new variables to be considered in a catalyst management process, notably the expansion of the operating temperature range, mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} emission limits. Cormetech has researched these areas. 5 figs., 2 photos.

  13. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman-James, Kristen

    2004-12-01

    This project have focuses on the basic chemical aspects of anion receptor design of functional pH independent systems, with the ultimate goal of targeting the selective binding of sulfate, as well as design of separations strategies for selective and efficient removal of targeted anions. Key findings include: (1) the first synthetic sulfate-selective anion-binding agents; (2) simple, structure-based methods for modifying the intrinsic anion selectivity of a given class of anion receptors; and (3) the first system capable of extracting sulfate anion from acidic, nitrate-containing aqueous media. Areas probed during the last funding period include: the design, synthesis, and physical and structural characterization of receptors and investigation of anion and dual ion pair extraction using lipophilic amide receptors for anion binding. A new collaboration has been added to the project in addition to the one with Dr. Bruce Moyer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with Professor Jonathan Sessler at the University of Texas at Austin.

  14. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman-James, K.; Wilson, G.; Moyer, B. A.

    2004-12-11

    This project involves the design and synthesis of receptors for oxoanions of environmental importance, including emphasis on high level and low activity waste. Target anions have included primarily oxoanions and a study of the basic concepts behind selective binding of target anions. A primary target has been sulfate because of its deleterious influence on the vitrification of tank wastes

  15. Optimization of Fe/Ni/Mg Trimetallic Catalyst for Carbon Nanotubes Growth by Using Fluidized Floating Catalyst Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    Fluidized floating catalyst method has been used for preparing carbon nanotubes with average size ˜11 nm which yielded high yield even at low temperature; 650° C. Optimum concentration of the Fe/Ni/Mg metal alloy catalyst has been found to be at 2.133% for producing carbon nanotubes with high yield. Carbon nanotubes are formed by the evaporation of the camphor oil (precursor), which decomposes `in situ' and aggregates on the metal alloy catalyst particles present in the ceramic boat. From the PXRD analyses, graphite layers detected which provide an indication of the degree of graphitic character. However, by using the Scherrer equation is not suitable for carbon nanotubes as the value is slightly different from the average diameter determine from FESEM micrographs. Since the metallic alloy was obtained by calcining the respective nitrates, it is expected to have residual entrapped nitrogen, which may bond with the depositing CNTs as observed from FTIR spectroscopy.

  16. The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over bimetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeb, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde has been investigated over a monometallic Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalyst and platinum bimetallic catalysts where the second metal was either silver, copper, or tin. The effects of addition of a second metal to the Pt/SiO{sub 2} system on the selectivity to crotyl alcohol were investigated. The Pt-Sn bimetallic catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption, {sup 1}H NMR and microcalorimetry. The Pt-Ag/SiO{sub 2} and Pt-Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption. Pt-Sn/SiO{sub 2} catalysts selectively hydrogenated crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol and the method of preparation of these catalysts affected the selectivity. The most selective Pt-Sn/SiO{sub 2} catalysts for the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol were those in which the Sn precursor was dissolved in a HCl solution. Sn increased both the rate of formation of butyraldehyde and the rate of formation of crotyl alcohol. The Pt/SiO{sub 2}, Pt-Ag/SiO{sub 2} and Pt-Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts produced only butyraldehyde. Initial heats of adsorption ({approximately}90 kJ/mol) measured using microcalorimetry were not affected by the presence of Sn on Pt. We can conclude that there is no through metal electronic interaction between Pt and Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn had similar initial heats of adsorption coupled with the invariance of the {sup 1}H NMR Knight shift.

  17. Electron impact induced anion production in acetylene.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Ewelina; Čadež, Iztok; Krishnakumar, E; Mason, Nigel J

    2014-02-28

    A detailed experimental investigation of electron induced anion production in acetylene, C2H2, in the energy range between 1 and 90 eV is presented. The anions are formed by two processes in this energy range: dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and dipolar dissociation (DD). DEA in C2H2 is found to lead to the formation of H(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) through excitation of resonances in the electron energy range 1-15 eV. These anionic fragments are formed with super thermal kinetic energy and reveal no anisotropy in the angular distributions. DD in C2H2 leads to the formation of H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) with threshold energies of 15.7, 20.0 and 16.5 eV respectively. The measured anion yields have been used to calculate anion production rates for H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) in Titan's ionosphere. PMID:24343432

  18. Electroosmotic Flow Hysteresis for Dissimilar Anionic Solutions.

    PubMed

    Lim, An Eng; Lim, Chun Yee; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-08-16

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) with two or more fluids is often encountered in various microfluidic applications. However, no investigation has hitherto been conducted to investigate the hysteretic or flow direction-dependent behavior during displacement flow of solutions with dissimilar anion species. In this investigation, EOF of dissimilar anionic solutions was studied experimentally through the current monitoring method and numerically through finite element simulations. As opposed to other conventional displacement flows, EOF involving dissimilar anionic solutions exhibits counterintuitive behavior, whereby the current-time curve does not reach the steady-state value of the displacing electrolyte. Two distinct mechanics have been identified as the causes for this observation: (a) ion concentration adjustment when the displacing anions migrate upstream against EOF due to competition between the gradients of electromigrative and convective fluxes and (b) ion concentration readjustment induced by the static diffusive interfacial region between the dissimilar fluids which can only be propagated throughout the entire microchannel with the presence of EOF. The resultant ion distributions lead to the flow rate to be directional-dependent, indicating that the flow conditions are asymmetric between these two different flow directions. The outcomes of this investigation contribute to the in-depth understanding of flow behavior in microfluidic systems involving inhomogeneous fluids, particularly dissimilar anionic solutions. The understanding of EOF hysteresis is fundamentally important for the accurate prediction of analytes transport in microfluidic devices under EOF. PMID:27426052

  19. Improved coal liquefaction using carbon-supported hydrogenation catalysts: Quarterly report for the period 1 January-31 March 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Scaroni, A.W.; Derbyshire, F.J.; Solar, J.M.; Abotsi, G.M.K.; Spears, R.

    1986-03-01

    Catalysts have been prepared by the impregnation of different porous carbons with molybdenum-containing precursor compounds using the incipient wetness technique. Two precursors were investigated; a solution of ammonium heptamolybdate (or, in some cases, ammoniumtetrathiomolybdate) in 90% H/sub 2/O/10% EtOH; a solution of molybdenumtricarbonyltriacetonitrile in acetonitrile. The fresh catalysts were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The activities of the sulfided catalysts were measured for thiophene hydrodesulfurization in a continuous flow, atmospheric pressure reactor. The principal findings are that: (1) for a given support and at similar loading, the organometallic precursor confers a much higher activity than the ammonium salt precursors. The increase in lined-out activity can be higher by as much as a factor of 1.6 and (2) with catalysts prepared from molybdenumtricarbonyltriacetonitrile, the highest thiophene conversions were obtained with a high surface area active carbon. However, when (based upon a number of assumptions) the catalysts are compared at similar dispersions and corrected for surface area differences, the most active catalyst was found to be that prepared upon a graphitic support. 3 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Characterization of Al2O3 Supported Nickel Catalysts Derived from RFNon-thermal Plasma Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Ben W; Helleson, Michael J; Shi, Chunkai; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Schwartz, Viviane; Liang, Chengdu; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts derived from non-thermal plasma techniques have previously shown unusual and highly advantageous catalytic properties including room temperature reduction, unusual metal particle structure and metal-support interactions, and enhanced selectivity and stability. This study focuses on the characterization of Al2O3 supported Ni catalysts derived from the RF non-thermal plasma technique with in-situ XRD, TPR-MS and STEM and on relating the results to the enhanced activity and stability of benzene hydrogenation. The results suggest that catalysts with plasma treatments before impregnation are relatively easier to be reduced and result in better activities under mild reduction conditions. These plasma treatments stabilize the nickel particle sizes of air(B) and H2(B) catalysts at 600 C by slowing down the sintering process. Plasma treatments after the impregnation of precursors, on the other hand, tend to delay the growth of nickel particles below 600 C, forming smaller Ni particles, but with a sudden increase in particle size near 600 C. It suggests that the structure of Ni nitrate and the metal-support interaction have been altered by the plasma treatments. The reduction patterns of plasma 1 treated catalysts are, therefore, changed. The catalyst with a combination plasma treatment demonstrates that the effect of a combination plasma treatment is larger than either the plasma treatment before or after the impregnation alone. Both plasma treatments before and after the impregnation of metal precursor play important roles in modifying supported metal catalysts.

  1. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2006-09-30

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, Al-SBA-15, containing strong Broensted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt% Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst will be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks to naphtha and middle distillates.

  2. An efficient, overall [4+1] cycloaddition of 1,3-dienes and nitrene precursors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Hu, Jian; Ren, Xinfeng; Zhou, Jianrong

    2011-10-01

    Intermolecular cycloadditions of conjugated dienes and nitrene precursors usually produce aziridines. A generally useful method was lacking to directly provide the [4+1] cycloadducts, 3-pyrrolines. We have realized this transformation by using an uniquely active catalyst, copper(II) 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate ([Cu(hfacac)(2)]). The method is applicable to a wide array of dienes with good yields. When 1,4-disubstituted dienes are used as substrates, good-to-excellent cis or trans selectivity can be obtained. Interestingly, the cis or trans preference depends on the nature of the substituents, rather than diene geometry. Mechanistic studies reveal that the [4+1] cycloaddition proceeds through diene aziridination and subsequent ring expansion. Among common copper catalysts, only [Cu(hfacac)(2)] can efficiently catalyze both steps, which explains the unique efficiency of the catalyst. PMID:21887836

  3. Ru-Containing Magnetically Recoverable Catalysts: A Sustainable Pathway from Cellulose to Ethylene and Propylene Glycols.

    PubMed

    Manaenkov, Oleg V; Mann, Joshua J; Kislitza, Olga V; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Stein, Barry D; Morgan, David Gene; Pink, Maren; Lependina, Olga L; Shifrina, Zinaida B; Matveeva, Valentina G; Sulman, Esther M; Bronstein, Lyudmila M

    2016-08-24

    Biomass processing to value-added chemicals and biofuels received considerable attention due to the renewable nature of the precursors. Here, we report the development of Ru-containing magnetically recoverable catalysts for cellulose hydrogenolysis to low alcohols, ethylene glycol (EG) and propylene glycol (PG). The catalysts are synthesized by incorporation of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) in mesoporous silica pores followed by formation of 2 nm Ru NPs. The latter are obtained by thermal decomposition of ruthenium acetylacetonate in the pores. The catalysts showed excellent activities and selectivities at 100% cellulose conversion, exceeding those for the commercial Ru/C. High selectivities as well as activities are attributed to the influence of Fe3O4 on the Ru(0)/Ru(4+) NPs. A facile synthetic protocol, easy magnetic separation, and stability of the catalyst performance after magnetic recovery make these catalysts promising for industrial applications.

  4. Effect of preparation parameters on the microporous structure of Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Castillon, F.F.; Bodganchikova, N.; Fuentes, S.; Avalos, M.

    1996-12-31

    In this work the authors report the synthesis of Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts promoted by group 2 (IIA) cations (calcium and barium) which are currently used as hydrogenation catalysts. The effect of the preparation parameters-aging, base agent, and type of cation, on the surface area of catalysts--is evaluated. Catalysts were prepared by precipitation of the precursor silicic acid, along with nickel nitrate and calcium and barium carbonates, with NaOH, NH{sub 4}OH and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as precipitating agents. Catalysts were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and by BET-surface area measurements. Results are discussed in terms of sol-gel chemistry.

  5. Growth Mechanism Of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared By Fluidized Floating Catalyst Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, carbon nanotubes were synthesized by fluidized floating catalyst method which yielded high yield even at low temperature; 650° C using camphor oil as carbon source and Argon as carrier gas. Optimum concentration for trimetal alloy catalyst; Fe/Ni/Mg has been found to be the suitable catalyst for producing carbon nanotubes at high yield. Carbon nanotubes are formed by the evaporation of the camphor oil (precursor), which decomposes `in situ' and aggregates on the metal alloy catalyst particles present in the ceramic boat. The morphology of carbon nanotubes were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). This result demonstrates that fluidized floating catalyst method is suitable for effective formation of CNTs with average size ˜11.5 nm. The morphological studies support `tip growth mechanism' for the growth of the CNT's in our case.

  6. Ru-Containing Magnetically Recoverable Catalysts: A Sustainable Pathway from Cellulose to Ethylene and Propylene Glycols.

    PubMed

    Manaenkov, Oleg V; Mann, Joshua J; Kislitza, Olga V; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Stein, Barry D; Morgan, David Gene; Pink, Maren; Lependina, Olga L; Shifrina, Zinaida B; Matveeva, Valentina G; Sulman, Esther M; Bronstein, Lyudmila M

    2016-08-24

    Biomass processing to value-added chemicals and biofuels received considerable attention due to the renewable nature of the precursors. Here, we report the development of Ru-containing magnetically recoverable catalysts for cellulose hydrogenolysis to low alcohols, ethylene glycol (EG) and propylene glycol (PG). The catalysts are synthesized by incorporation of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) in mesoporous silica pores followed by formation of 2 nm Ru NPs. The latter are obtained by thermal decomposition of ruthenium acetylacetonate in the pores. The catalysts showed excellent activities and selectivities at 100% cellulose conversion, exceeding those for the commercial Ru/C. High selectivities as well as activities are attributed to the influence of Fe3O4 on the Ru(0)/Ru(4+) NPs. A facile synthetic protocol, easy magnetic separation, and stability of the catalyst performance after magnetic recovery make these catalysts promising for industrial applications. PMID:27484222

  7. Magnetic and dendritic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Deraedt, Christophe; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2015-07-21

    The recovery and reuse of catalysts is a major challenge in the development of sustainable chemical processes. Two methods at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis have recently emerged for addressing this problem: loading the catalyst onto a dendrimer or onto a magnetic nanoparticle. In this Account, we describe representative examples of these two methods, primarily from our research group, and compare them. We then describe new chemistry that combines the benefits of these two methods of catalysis. Classic dendritic catalysis has involved either attaching the catalyst covalently at the branch termini or within the dendrimer core. We have used chelating pyridyltriazole ligands to insolubilize catalysts at the termini of dendrimers, providing an efficient, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. With the addition of dendritic unimolecular micelles olefin metathesis reactions catalyzed by commercial Grubbs-type ruthenium-benzylidene complexes in water required unusually low amounts of catalyst. When such dendritic micelles include intradendritic ligands, both the micellar effect and ligand acceleration promote faster catalysis in water. With these types of catalysts, we could carry out azide alkyne cycloaddition ("click") chemistry with only ppm amounts of CuSO4·5H2O and sodium ascorbate under ambient conditions. Alternatively we can attach catalysts to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), essentially magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), offering the opportunity to recover the catalysts using magnets. Taking advantage of the merits of both of these strategies, we and others have developed a new generation of recyclable catalysts: dendritic magnetically recoverable catalysts. In particular, some of our catalysts with a γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core and 1,2,3-triazole tethers and loaded with Pd nanoparticles generate strong positive dendritic effects with respect to ligand loading, catalyst loading, catalytic activity and

  8. An Innovative Anion Regulation Strategy for Energy Bands of Semiconductors: A Case from Bi2O3 to Bi2O(OH)2SO4

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hao; Teng, Fei; Xu, Juan; Lou, Sunqi; Li, Na; Zhao, Yunxuan; Chen, Mindong

    2015-01-01

    How to develop a new, efficient photo catalyst is still a big challenge to us. A suitable band gap is the key for light absorption of semiconductor. Herein, an innovative anion intercalation strategy is, for the first time, developed to regulate the energy band of semiconductor. Typically, we introduce a layered sulfate compound (Bi2O(OH)2SO4) as a new photo catalyst, which has not been known before. Both partial density of states (PDOS) and total density of states (TDOS) have demonstrated that compared with Bi2O3 (2.85 eV), the band gap of Bi2O(OH)2SO4 has been widened to 4.18 eV by the intercalation of sulfate anion. Moreover, the band gap width of oxyacid salt compound is mainly predominated by the number of the outmost electrons (NOE) of central atom of anion. This study suggests that new photo catalysts can be developed by grouping anions with the existing oxides or sulfides. PMID:25597769

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrated Nitromethane Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2009-06-01

    The hydration of molecular anions is still not as thoroughly explored as for atomic anions. We present IR spectra and quantum chemical calculations of hydrated nitromethane anions. In the monohydrate, the nitro group of the ion interacts with the water molecule via two hydrogen bonds, one from each O atom. This motif is partially conserved in the dihydrate. Adding the third water molecule results in a ring-like structure of the water ligands, each of which forms one H bond to one of the O atoms of the nitro group and another to a neighboring water ligand, reminiscent of the hydration motif of the heavier halides. Interestingly, while the methyl group is not directly involved in the interaction with the water ligands, its infrared signature is strongly affected by the changes in the intramolecular charge distribution through hydration.

  10. Differentiating homogeneous and heterogeneous water oxidation catalysis: confirmation that [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- is a molecular water oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Vickers, James W; Lv, Hongjin; Sumliner, Jordan M; Zhu, Guibo; Luo, Zhen; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Geletii, Yurii V; Hill, Craig L

    2013-09-25

    Distinguishing between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is not straightforward. In the case of the water oxidation catalyst (WOC) [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2](10-) (Co4POM), initial reports of an efficient, molecular catalyst have been challenged by studies suggesting that formation of cobalt oxide (CoOx) or other byproducts are responsible for the catalytic activity. Thus, we describe a series of experiments for thorough examination of active species under catalytic conditions and apply them to Co4POM. These provide strong evidence that under the conditions initially reported for water oxidation using Co4POM (Yin et al. Science, 2010, 328, 342), this POM anion functions as a molecular catalyst, not a precursor for CoOx. Specifically, we quantify the amount of Co(2+)(aq) released from Co4POM by two methods (cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and show that this amount of cobalt, whatever speciation state it may exist in, cannot account for the observed water oxidation. We document that catalytic O2 evolution by Co4POM, Co(2+)(aq), and CoOx have different dependences on buffers, pH, and WOC concentration. Extraction of Co4POM, but not Co(2+)(aq) or CoOx into toluene from water, and other experiments further confirm that Co4POM is the dominant WOC. Recent studies showing that Co4POM decomposes to a CoOx WOC under electrochemical bias (Stracke and Finke, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 14872), or displays an increased ability to reduce [Ru(bpy)3](3+) upon aging (Scandola, et al., Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 8808) help complete the picture of Co4POM behavior under various conditions but do not affect our central conclusions.

  11. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Pathways of Mixed-Addenda Keggin Anions: PMo12-nWnO403- (n = 0-12)

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-06-01

    We report a collision-induced dissociation (CID) investigation of the mixed addenda polyoxometalate (POM) anions, PMo12-nWnO403- (n = 0-12). The anions were generated in solution using a straightforward single-step synthesis approach and introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization (ESI). Distinct differences in fragmentation patterns were observed for the range of mixed POMs examined in this study. CID of molybdenum-rich anions, PMo12- nWnO403- (n = 0-2), generates an abundant doubly charged fragment containing seven metal atoms (M) and twenty-two oxygen atoms (M7O222-) and its complementary singly charged PM5O18- ion, while the Lindqvist anion, (M6O192-) and its complementary PM6O21- ion are the dominant fragments of Keggin POMs containing more than two tungsten atoms, PMo12-nWnO403- (n = 3-12). The observed transition in the dissociation pathways with an increase in the number of W atoms may be attributed to the higher stability of tungsten-rich anions towards isomerization. We find that the observed distribution of Mo and W atoms in the major M6O192- and M7O222- fragment ions is different from that predicted by a random distribution indicating substantial segregation of the addenda metal atoms in the POMs. Electron detachment from the triply charged precursor anion resulting in formation of doubly charged anions is observed. This is a dominant dissociation pathway for mixed POMs having a majority (8-11) of W atoms and a minor channel for other precursors indicating a close competition between fragmentation and electron detachment pathways of POM anions.

  12. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  13. Precursors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troja, E.; Rosswog, S.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out a systematic search of precursors on the sample of short GRBs observed by Swift. We found that approx. 8-10% of short GRBs display such early episode of emission. One burst (GRB 090510) shows two precursor events, the former approx.13 s and the latter approx. 0.5 s before the GRB. We did not find any substantial difference between the precursor and the main GRB emission, and between short GRBs with and without precursors. We discuss possible mechanisms to reproduce the observed precursor emission within the scenario of compact object mergers. The implications of our results on quantum gravity constraints are also discussed.

  14. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectra of Halomethyl Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Wren, Scott W.; McCoy, Anne B.; Ervin, Kent M.; Lineberger, W. Carl

    2009-06-01

    Halomethyl anions undergo a significant geometry change upon electron photodetachment, resulting in multiple extended vibrational progressions in the photoelectron spectra. The normal mode analysis that successfully models photoelectron spectra when geometry changes are modest is unable to reproduce the experimental data using physically reasonable parameters. A three-dimensional anharmonic coupled-mode analysis was employed to accurately reproduce the observed vibrational structure. We present the 364 nm negative ion photoelectron spectra of the halomethyl anions CHX_2^- and CDX_2^- (X = Cl, Br, I) and report electron affinities, vibrational frequencies, and geometries.

  15. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Sushko, Peter V; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32](2+) ⋅ (e(-))2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. The concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: It invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a unique avenue in rational materials design. PMID:27559083

  16. Krebs cycle anions in metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Francis G; Morgan, Thomas J

    2005-10-05

    For many years it has been apparent from estimates of the anion gap and the strong ion gap that anions of unknown identity can be generated in sepsis and shock states. Evidence is emerging that at least some of these are intermediates of the citric acid cycle. The exact source of this disturbance remains unclear, because a great many metabolic blocks and bottlenecks can disturb the anaplerotic and cataplerotic pathways that enter and leave the cycle. These mechanisms require clarification with the use of tools such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  17. Precursor Lesions of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Michiyo; Yamada, Norishige; Goto, Masamichi

    2008-01-01

    This review article describes morphological aspects, gene abnormalities, and mucin expression profiles in precursor lesions such as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas, as well as their relation to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The gene abnormalities in precursors of PDAC are summarized as follows: (1) KRAS mutation and p16/CDKN2A inactivation are early events whose frequencies increase with the dysplasia grade in both PanIN and IPMN; (2) TP53 mutation and SMAD4/DPC4 inactivation are late events observed in PanIN3 or carcinomatous change of IPMN in both PanIN and IPMN, although the frequency of the TP53 mutation is lower in IPMN than in PDAC; and (3) also in MCN, KRAS mutation is an early event whose frequency increases with the dysplasia grade, whereas TP53 mutation and SMAD4/DPC4 inactivation are evident only in the carcinoma. The mucin expression profiles in precursors of PDAC are summarized as follows: (1) MUC1 expression increases with the PanIN grade, and is high in PDAC; (2) the expression pattern of MUC2 differs markedly between the major subtypes of IPMN with different malignancy potentials (i.e., IPMN-intestinal type with MUC2+ expression and IPMN-gastric type with MUC2- expression); (3) MUC2 is not expressed in any grade of PanINs, which is useful for differentiating PanIN from intestinal-type IPMN; (4) de novo expression of MUC4, which appears to increase with the dysplasia grade; and (5) high de novo expression of MUC5AC in all grades of PanINs, all types of IPMN, MCN, and PDAC. PMID:20485640

  18. Low Temperature Oxidation Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    One day soon homeowners everywhere may be protected from deadly carbon monoxide fumes, thanks to a device invented at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. It uses a new class of low-temperature oxidation catalysts to convert carbon monoxide to non-toxic carbon dioxide at room temperature. It can also remove formaldehyde from the air. The catalysts initially were developed for research involving carbon dioxide lasers. Industry already has shown an interest. Rochester Gas and Electric Co., of Rochester, N.Y., has an agreement with NASA Langley to develop a product for habitable spaces such as homes, cars and aircraft. The Mantic Corp., of Salt Lake City, Utah, plans to use them in breathing apparatus, such as firefighter masks. The catalysts also have applications as trace-gas detectors, and in cold-engine emission control. To work, the catalysts - tin oxide and platinum - are applied to a surface. Air passing over the surface reacts with the catalysts, transforming carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The device requires no energy for operation, doesn't need to be plugged in, has no moving parts and lasts a long time.

  19. Reforming using erionite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Liers, J.; Meusinger, J.; Moesch, A. ); Reschetilowski, W. )

    1993-08-01

    The advantage of reforming on erionite catalysts is a product with high octane numbers and low amounts of aromatics. This advantage seems to be slight at reaction pressures lower than 25 bar. But it is possible to compensate for the influence of pressure by varying the erionite content within the catalyst and the reaction temperature. When reforming on Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts, the following reactions take place: dehydrocyclization of paraffins to naphthenes, dehydrogenation of naphthenes to aromatics, isomerication of normal paraffins remains in the product, lowering its octane number. By using a Ni/H-erionite catalyst, the octane rating can be increased by 3 to 7 numbers through selective hydrocracking of n-alkanes in the reformate. Erionite catalysts favor shape-selective hydrocracking of normal paraffins and the formation of cyclopentane derivatives lowering the content of aromatics during reforming reactions. Reducing the reaction pressure decreases hydrocracking activity and cyclopentane formation. These results can be interpreted in terms of thermodynamic restrictions and deactivation.

  20. Synthesis of 5'-O-DMT-2'-O-TBS Mononucleosides Using an Organic Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunggi; Blaisdell, Thomas P; Kasaplar, Pinar; Sun, Xixi; Tan, Kian L

    2014-06-24

    This unit describes a highly effective method to produce 5'-O-DMT-2'-O-TBS mononucleosides selectively using a small organic catalyst. This methodology avoids the tedious protection/deprotection strategy necessary to differentiate the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups in a ribonucleoside. The catalyst was synthesized in two steps, starting from the condensation of valinol and cyclopentyl aldehyde, followed by anionic addition of N-methylimidazole. Ring closure of the amino alcohol with N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal in methanol furnishes the catalyst. All four 2'-O-TBS protected mono-nucleosides, U, A(Bz), G(Ib), and C(Ac), were produced in a single step using 10 to 20 mol% of the catalyst at room temperature with excellent yields and selectivity. Further transformation to phosphoramidite demonstrates the utility of this protocol in the preparation of monomers useful for automated synthesis of RNA.

  1. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of acetic anhydride from methyl acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasad, Dorai; Waller, Francis Joseph

    1999-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for producing acetic anhydride by the reaction of methyl acetate, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that contains an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized phosphine groups, some of which phosphine groups are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the phosphine groups being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for consecutive runs without loss in activity. Bifunctional catalysts for use in carbonylating dimethyl ether are also provided.

  2. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of acetic anhydride from methyl acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasad, D.; Waller, F.J.

    1999-04-06

    This invention relates to a process for producing acetic anhydride by the reaction of methyl acetate, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that contains an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized phosphine groups, some of which phosphine groups are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the phosphine groups being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for consecutive runs without loss in activity. Bifunctional catalysts for use in carbonylating dimethyl ether are also provided.

  3. Z-Selective ethenolysis with a ruthenium metathesis catalyst: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Herbert, Myles B; Liu, Peng; Dong, Xiaofei; Xu, Xiufang; Keitz, Benjamin K; Ung, Thay; Mkrtumyan, Garik; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2013-04-17

    The Z-selective ethenolysis activity of chelated ruthenium metathesis catalysts was investigated with experiment and theory. A five-membered chelated catalyst that was successfully employed in Z-selective cross metathesis reactions has now been found to be highly active for Z-selective ethenolysis at low ethylene pressures, while tolerating a wide variety of functional groups. This phenomenon also affects its activity in cross metathesis reactions and prohibits crossover reactions of internal olefins via trisubstituted ruthenacyclobutane intermediates. In contrast, a related catalyst containing a six-membered chelated architecture is not active for ethenolysis and seems to react through different pathways more reminiscent of previous generations of ruthenium catalysts. Computational investigations of the effects of substitution on relevant transition states and ruthenacyclobutane intermediates revealed that the differences of activities are attributed to the steric repulsions of the anionic ligand with the chelating groups.

  4. pH-dependent release of trace elements including platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucha, Veronika; Mihaljevic, Martin; Ettler, Vojtech; Strnad, Ladislav

    2014-05-01

    The release of trace metals and platinum group elements (PGEs) from automobile exhaust catalysts represents a remarkable source of higly dispersed environmental contamination. Especially, PGEs have shown increasing research interest due to their possible bioaccessibility. In our research, we focused on leaching behaviour of trace metals from gasoline and diesel automobile catalysts. While catalysts for gasoline engines contain a mixture of Pt-Pd-Rh or Pd-Rh, catalysts for diesel engines are composed only of Pt. We used dust from two crushed gasoline and two crushed diesel catalysts (new and aged). The dust of gasoline catalysts contains significant concentrations of Pt (700 mg.kg-1), Pd (11 000 mg.kg-1) and Rh (700 mg.kg-1). And the dust of diesel catalysts are composed of Pt (3 900 mg.kg-1) and they contains negligible amounts of Pd dan Rh (< 0.5 mg.kg-1, < 0.1 mg.kg-1, respectively). To evaluate leaching of trace metals from dust we used pH-stat leaching test according to the European standard CEN/TS 14997. The concentrations of cations: PGEs (Pt, Pd a Rh), K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, La and Ce were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), and anions: F-, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- by high-performance liquid chromatography. Although the dusts from catalysts were relatively stable to acid/base influence, the leaching of trace metals from catalysts showed a dependence on pH. Generally, the highest concentrations were released under acidic conditions. The leaching of PGEs was higher for Pt in diesel catalysts and for Pd and Rh in gasoline catalysts. The highest concentrations of Zn and Pb were observed in old catalysts. The rare earth metals were released more from gasoline catalysts. Catalysts particles represent health risk especially with respect to their PGEs contents.

  5. Quality assurance for purchased catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Puls, F.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Petrochemical industries require many different types of catalysts in process operations. A significantly portion of these requirements is being met through purchases from merchant catalyst suppliers. The importance of catalysts and of catalyst quality to these industries cannot be overstated. It is not surprising that in the quest for quality which has affected much of US industry in the last few years, catalysts were among the first products which were singled out for development of quality assurance. Currently, catalyst supplier auditing and certification procedures are being implemented. Primary emphasis is on the implementation of statistical process control procedures in the manufacture of commercially available catalyst. Thus, a trend exists to move from quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) for purchased catalysts to statistical process control (SPC). This development is being supported by audits of the suppliers' manufacturing quality control systems. The keystone of quality management is the concept of customer and supplier working together for their mutual advantage. The focus in this presentation will be on two topics. (1) Fixed bed catalysts: The recognition of lot-to-lot variations led to purchase specifications which then led to quality control procedures for purchased catalysts. (2) Catalyst suppliers: the limitations of quality control for catalysts will be discussed, and the efforts of catalyst suppliers to apply SPC will be mentioned.

  6. Immobilization of anionic iron(III) porphyrins onto in situ obtained zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Machado, Guilherme S; Wypych, Fernando; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2012-07-01

    A family of anionic iron(III) porphyrins (FePor) was immobilized onto zinc oxide (ZnO) obtained by the in situ hydrothermal decomposition of zinc hydroxide nitrate, a layered hydroxide salt. The immobilization probably occurred via the interaction between the anionic charges on the porphyrins and the positively charged surface of the ZnO, in slightly acidic to neutral pH. The resulting solids were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRDP), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) (solid samples), which confirmed the formation of ZnO and the immobilization of the FePor. The prepared materials were employed as catalysts for the heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of cyclooctene, cyclohexane, and n-heptane, using iodosylbenzene as the oxygen donor. Good catalytic results were achieved for all the substrates, and selectivity for the alcohol was verified during the oxidation of alkanes. The reuse capacity of the solid catalyst was also investigated.

  7. Anion and Cation Modulation in Metal Compounds for Bifunctional Overall Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Chen, Sheng; Vasileff, Anthony; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-09-27

    As substitutes for precious cathodic Pt/C and anodic IrO2 in electrolytic water splitting cells, a bifunctional catalyst electrode (Fe- and O-doped Co2P grown on nickel foam) has been fabricated by manipulating the cations and anions of metal compounds. The modified catalyst electrode exhibits both superior HER and OER performances with high activity, favorable kinetics, and outstanding durability. The overall ability toward water splitting is especially extraordinary, requiring a small overpotential of 333.5 mV to gain a 10 mA cm(-2) current density. A study on the electrocatalytic mechanism reveals that the atomic modulation between cation and anion plays an important role in optimizing the electrocatalytic activity, which greatly expands the active sites in the electrocatalyst. Further, the three-dimensional conductive porous network is highly advantageous for the exposure of active species, the transport of bubble products, and the transfer of electrons and charges, which substantially boosts reaction kinetics and structure stability. PMID:27622580

  8. Anion and Cation Modulation in Metal Compounds for Bifunctional Overall Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Chen, Sheng; Vasileff, Anthony; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-09-27

    As substitutes for precious cathodic Pt/C and anodic IrO2 in electrolytic water splitting cells, a bifunctional catalyst electrode (Fe- and O-doped Co2P grown on nickel foam) has been fabricated by manipulating the cations and anions of metal compounds. The modified catalyst electrode exhibits both superior HER and OER performances with high activity, favorable kinetics, and outstanding durability. The overall ability toward water splitting is especially extraordinary, requiring a small overpotential of 333.5 mV to gain a 10 mA cm(-2) current density. A study on the electrocatalytic mechanism reveals that the atomic modulation between cation and anion plays an important role in optimizing the electrocatalytic activity, which greatly expands the active sites in the electrocatalyst. Further, the three-dimensional conductive porous network is highly advantageous for the exposure of active species, the transport of bubble products, and the transfer of electrons and charges, which substantially boosts reaction kinetics and structure stability.

  9. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  10. Conversion of C2-C4 alcohols over copper-containing catalysts on carbon and fluorocarbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveritinova, E. A.; Zhitnev, Yu. N.; Roshchina, T. M.; Lunin, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon and fluorocarbon fibers were used as carriers for the preparation of copper catalysts from copper oxalate as precursor. The catalytic properties of catalyst were studied in the reaction of the dehydrogenation of C2-C4 alcohols by the pulsed microcatalytic method. The effect of the copper content in the catalyst, the reaction temperature on the degree of conversion, and the relation of the reaction channels were studied. The electron microphotographs were obtained, specific surfaces were measured, and X-ray pictures and infrared spectra of catalysts were taken. The activity of the catalysts on the carbon and fluorocarbon fibers in the dehydration-dehydrogenation reactions of C2-C4 alcohols was comparatively estimated. It was shown that the selectivity of the products from the dehydrogenation reaction is higher for the Cu-fluorocarbon fiber catalyst.

  11. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of small, essentially molecular metal complexes and metal clusters on support surfaces have brought new insights to catalysis and point the way to systematic catalyst design. We summarize recent work unraveling effects of key design variables of site-isolated catalysts: the metal, metal nuclearity, support, and other ligands on the metals, also considering catalysts with separate, complementary functions on supports. The catalysts were synthesized with the goal of structural simplicity and uniformity to facilitate incisive characterization. Thus, they are essentially molecular species bonded to porous supports chosen for their high degree of uniformity; the supports are crystalline aluminosilicates (zeolites) and MgO. The catalytic species are synthesized in reactions of organometallic precursors with the support surfaces; the precursors include M(L)2(acetylacetonate)1-2, with M = Ru, Rh, Ir, or Au and the ligands L = C2H4, CO, or CH3. Os3(CO)12 and Ir4(CO)12 are used as precursors of supported metal clusters, and some such catalysts are made by ship-in-a-bottle syntheses to trap the clusters in zeolite cages. The simplicity and uniformity of the supported catalysts facilitate precise structure determinations, even in reactive atmospheres and during catalysis. The methods of characterizing catalysts in reactive atmospheres include infrared (IR), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and complementary methods include density functional theory and atomic-resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging of individual metal atoms. IR, NMR, XANES, and microscopy data demonstrate the high degrees of uniformity of well-prepared supported species. The characterizations determine the compositions of surface metal complexes and clusters, including the ligands and the metal

  12. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of small, essentially molecular metal complexes and metal clusters on support surfaces have brought new insights to catalysis and point the way to systematic catalyst design. We summarize recent work unraveling effects of key design variables of site-isolated catalysts: the metal, metal nuclearity, support, and other ligands on the metals, also considering catalysts with separate, complementary functions on supports. The catalysts were synthesized with the goal of structural simplicity and uniformity to facilitate incisive characterization. Thus, they are essentially molecular species bonded to porous supports chosen for their high degree of uniformity; the supports are crystalline aluminosilicates (zeolites) and MgO. The catalytic species are synthesized in reactions of organometallic precursors with the support surfaces; the precursors include M(L)2(acetylacetonate)1-2, with M = Ru, Rh, Ir, or Au and the ligands L = C2H4, CO, or CH3. Os3(CO)12 and Ir4(CO)12 are used as precursors of supported metal clusters, and some such catalysts are made by ship-in-a-bottle syntheses to trap the clusters in zeolite cages. The simplicity and uniformity of the supported catalysts facilitate precise structure determinations, even in reactive atmospheres and during catalysis. The methods of characterizing catalysts in reactive atmospheres include infrared (IR), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and complementary methods include density functional theory and atomic-resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging of individual metal atoms. IR, NMR, XANES, and microscopy data demonstrate the high degrees of uniformity of well-prepared supported species. The characterizations determine the compositions of surface metal complexes and clusters, including the ligands and the metal

  13. Polyethylene-bound rhodium(I) hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergbreiter, D.E.; Chandran, R.

    1987-01-07

    Homogeneous, recoverable hydrogenation catalysts were prepared with use of functionalized ethylene oligomers as ligands. Phosphine groups were introduced onto ethylene oligomers following anionic oligomerization of ethylene. The product polyethylenediphenylphosphine ligands were then exchanged with triphenylphosphine or ethylene ligands to prepare ethylene oligomer ligated rhodium(I) complexes. These Rh(I) complexes had the solubility of polyethylene and dissolved at 90-110/sup 0/C in hydrocarbon solvents but quantitatively precipitated at 25/sup 0/C. Less than 0.1% of the charged rhodium was lost in each dissolution precipitation cycle. The rhodium(I) complexes so prepared were shown to have about 80% of the activity of tris(triphenylphosphine)rhodium chloride in hydrogenation of various alkenes including 1-octene, ..delta../sup 2/-cholestene, cyclooctene, cyclododecene, styrene, and ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene. /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy and reactivity studies were used to characterize these catalysts.

  14. Microemulsion flame pyrolysis for hopcalite nanoparticle synthesis: a new concept for catalyst preparation.

    PubMed

    Biemelt, T; Wegner, K; Teichert, J; Kaskel, S

    2015-04-01

    A new route to highly active hopcalite catalysts via flame spray pyrolysis of an inverse microemulsion precursor is reported. The nitrate derived nanoparticles are around 15 nm in diameter and show excellent conversion of CO under ambient conditions, outperforming commercial reference hopcalite materials produced by co-precipitation. PMID:25726946

  15. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    Model catalysts with uniform and well-defined surface structures have been extensively employed to explore structure-property relationships of powder catalysts. Traditional oxide model catalysts are based on oxide single crystals and single crystal thin films, and the surface chemistry and catalysis are studied under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. However, the acquired fundamental understandings often suffer from the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" when they are extended to the real world of powder catalysts working at atmospheric or higher pressures. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis have realized controlled synthesis of catalytic oxide nanocrystals with uniform and well-defined morphologies. These oxide nanocrystals consist of a novel type of oxide model catalyst whose surface chemistry and catalysis can be studied under the same conditions as working oxide catalysts. In this Account, the emerging concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts is demonstrated using our investigations of surface chemistry and catalysis of uniform and well-defined cuprous oxide nanocrystals and ceria nanocrystals. Cu2O cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, Cu2O octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes, and Cu2O rhombic dodecahedra enclosed with the {110} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent surface reactivities and catalytic properties that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Among these types of Cu2O nanocrystals, the octahedra are most reactive and catalytically active due to the presence of coordination-unsaturated (1-fold-coordinated) Cu on the exposed {111} crystal planes. The crystal-plane-controlled surface restructuring and catalytic activity of Cu2O nanocrystals were observed in CO oxidation with excess oxygen. In the propylene oxidation reaction with O2, 1-fold-coordinated Cu on Cu2O(111), 3-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(110), and 2-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(100) were identified

  16. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  17. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-27

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  18. Catalyst, Method Of Making, And Reactions Using The Catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Gao, Yufei

    2004-07-13

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  19. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2009-03-03

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  20. In Situ Observation of Active Oxygen Species in Fe-Containing Ni-Based Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: The Effect of pH on Electrochemical Activity.

    PubMed

    Trześniewski, Bartek J; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Vermaas, David A; Longo, Alessandro; Bras, Wim; Koper, Marc T M; Smith, Wilson A

    2015-12-01

    Ni-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OECs) are cost-effective and very active materials that can be potentially used for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion process toward sustainable energy generation. We present a systematic spectroelectrochemical characterization of two Fe-containing Ni-based OECs, namely nickel borate (Ni(Fe)-B(i)) and nickel oxyhydroxide (Ni(Fe)OOH). Our Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results show that both OECs are chemically similar, and that the borate anions do not play an apparent role in the catalytic process at pH 13. Furthermore, we show spectroscopic evidence for the generation of negatively charged sites in both OECs (NiOO(-)), which can be described as adsorbed "active oxygen". Our data conclusively links the OER activity of the Ni-based OECs with the generation of those sites on the surface of the OECs. The OER activity of both OECs is strongly pH dependent, which can be attributed to a deprotonation process of the Ni-based OECs, leading to the formation of the negatively charged surface sites that act as OER precursors. This work emphasizes the relevance of the electrolyte effect to obtain catalytically active phases in Ni-based OECs, in addition to the key role of the Fe impurities. This effect should be carefully considered in the development of Ni-based compounds meant to catalyze the OER at moderate pHs. Complementarily, UV-vis spectroscopy measurements show strong darkening of those catalysts in the catalytically active state. This coloration effect is directly related to the oxidation of nickel and can be an important factor limiting the efficiency of solar-driven devices utilizing Ni-based OECs.

  1. The synergy of earthquake precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, Sergey

    2011-12-01

    The system of geophysical shells (lithosphere, atmosphere, ionosphere) is considered as an open complex nonlinear system with dissipation where earthquake preparation could be regarded as a self-organizing process leading to the critical state of the system. The processes in atmosphere and ionosphere are considered from the point of view of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The intensive ionization of boundary layer of atmosphere (probably provided by radon in occasion of earthquake preparation) gives start to the synergetic sequence of coupling processes where the ionosphere and even magnetosphere are the last links in the chain of interactions. Every anomaly observed in different geophysical fields (surface temperature, latent heat flux, electromagnetic emissions, variations in ionosphere, particle precipitation, etc.) is not considered as an individual process but the part of the self-organizing process, the final goal of which is the reaching of the point of the maximum entropy. Radon anomaly before the Kobe earthquake is considered as a perfect example to satisfy the formal seismological determination of the earthquake precursor. What is genetically connected with radon through the ionization process can also be regarded as a precursor. The problem of co-seismic variations of the discussed parameters of atmosphere and ionosphere is considered as well.

  2. Annealing of aromatic polyimide precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakelyn, N. T.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of the thermal behavior of polyimide precursors: an isomeric pair of crystals of the complex formed by p-phenylenediamine with the separated isomers of the di-isopropyl ester of pyromellitic acid. Specimens of this material were isothermally annealed in the temperature range 120 C to 170 C for periods of time up to 1 week. Although this temperature range is well below that customarily used for imidizations, the working hypothesis was that it would be more likely that a polymer embodying at least part of the precursor structure could be formed if the molecular motion was minimized to that actually required for the formation of the imide linkage. The progress of the annealing was followed by: infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and thermal gravimetric analysis. Single crystal X-ray analysis of the meta monomer yields a structure of chains of alternating acid and base and suggests that this monomer is amenable to polymerization with a minimum of geometrical disruption.

  3. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/10/21/catalysts/

  4. Engelhard expands oxidation catalysts portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1997-02-26

    Engelhard says its agreement earlier this month to market Amoco Chemical`s proprietary maleic anhydride catalyst reflects an effort to expand its speciality catalysts business (CW, Feb. 19, p.5). In particular, the company says it is looking for additional alliances to bolster its oxidation catalysts portfolio. {open_quotes}There are some areas of oxidation catalysis that are reasonably attractive,{close_quotes} says Paul Lamb, marketing director/chemical catalysts. He says that while Engelhard is not interested in commodity oxidation catalysts, such as those used to make sulfuric acid, it does want to boost offerings for higher-value oxidation catalysts. Engelhard is collaborating with Geon to offer oxychlorination catalysts for making ethylene dichloride. It also markets oxidation catalysts for vinyl acetate production.

  5. Passivating metals on cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, D.L.

    1980-01-15

    Metals such as nickel, vanadium and iron contaminating a cracking catalyst are passivated by contacting the cracking catalyst under elevated temperature conditions with antimony selenide, antimony sulfide, antimony sulfate, bismuth selenide, bismuth sulfide, or bismuth phosphate.

  6. Aerogel derived catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

    1996-12-11

    Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

  7. Metabolic acidosis with an elevated anion gap.

    PubMed

    Hertford, J A; McKenna, J P; Chamovitz, B N

    1989-04-01

    Determining the cause of metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap may present a diagnostic challenge. Possible causes include ketoacidosis, certain toxic ingestions, renal failure and lactic acidosis. Many of these entities present with nausea, vomiting and changes in mental status; however, there are specific hallmarks in the signs, symptoms and laboratory findings that help to differentiate among them.

  8. Anionic/cationic complexes in hair care.

    PubMed

    O'Lenick, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of cosmetic products is always more complicated than studying the individual components in aqueous solution. This is because there are numerous interactions between the components, which make the formulation truly more than the sum of the parts. This article will look at interactions between anionic and cationic surfactants and offer insights into how to use these interactions advantageously in making formulations.

  9. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2011-11-22

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  10. Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, and Membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2008-10-21

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  11. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2010-12-07

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  12. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2009-09-01

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  13. Wigner photoemission time delay from endohedral anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashish; Varma, Hari R.; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Manson, Steven T.; Dolmatov, Valeriy K.; Kheifets, Anatoli

    2016-10-01

    Characteristic features of Wigner photoemission time delay from endohedral anions A@C60q along with their dependence on the anion charge q are unraveled. Specifically, significant enhancement of the time delay in the innermost dipole photoionization channels near threshold is found, owing to the presence of the Coulomb confined resonances (CRs). Moreover, it is shown that interchannel coupling of the inner-shell Coulomb CRs with outer-shell photoionization channels results in resonantly enhanced time delay in the release of the outer-shell photoelectron well above, several hundreds eV, the outer-shell thresholds. It is also demonstrated that, and explained why, photoionization cross sections of the innermost subshells as well as outer subshells (near the inner-subshell threshold) depends only very weakly on the anion charge q , but the dependence of the corresponding time delays on q can be significant. Furthermore, Coulomb CRs are found to emerge in the innermost quadrupole photoionization channels as well, thereby causing considerable time delay in the quadrupole photoemission. These findings are illustrated in calculations of the photoionization of inner and outer subshells of the endohedral anions Ne@C60-1 and Ne@C60-5 that were chosen as case studies.

  14. Process of making supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Subramanian, Somasundaram

    1992-01-01

    Oxide supported metal catalysts have an additional metal present in intimate association with the metal catalyst to enhance catalytic activity. In a preferred mode, iridium or another Group VIII metal catalyst is supported on a titania, alumina, tungsten oxide, silica, or composite oxide support. Aluminum ions are readsorbed onto the support and catalyst, and reduced during calcination. The aluminum can be added as aluminum nitrate to the iridium impregnate solution, e.g. chloroiridic acid.

  15. Preparation of supported heterogeneous catalysts by pulse impregnation: Application to Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12]/2,2[prime]-bipyridine/SiO[sub 2] catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Haukka, M.; Pakkanen, T.A. )

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce pulse impregnation, a method for preparing supported heterogeneous catalysts by successive impregnation cycles. Pulse impregnation is a method for preparing supported heterogeneous catalysts from the liquid phase. In the pulse-impregnation technique the catalyst surface is grown gradually in consecutive cycles, with each cycle consisting of separate deposition and activation steps. During the deposition step, the catalyst precursor or precursors are deposited onto the support from a suitable solvent. The actual chemically bonded catalyst phase is formed during the activation step (e.g., thermal activation). Pulse impregnation was tested in the separate deposition of 2,2[prime]-bipyridine and Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12] onto a silica support, and in the preparation of Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12]/2,2[prime]-bipyridine/SiO[sub 2] catalyst, in a column-type reactor system. Macroscopically uniform deposition was achieved with both 2,2[prime]-bipyridine and Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12]. Various solvent systems were used to control the amount of solute adsorbed during deposition. In the preparation of the Ru[sub 3](CO)[sub 12]/2,2[prime]-bipyridine/SiO[sub 2] catalyst, the ruthenium content increased nearly linearly with the number of preparation cycles. The effects of the preparation method on the catalyst activity was also tested in 1-hexane hydroformylation. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Electron donor properties of claus catalysts--1. Influence of NaOH on the catalytic activity of silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, Z.; George, Z.M.

    1980-05-01

    ESR spectroscopy showed that SO/sub 2/ adsorbed on silica gel impregnated with NaOH formed the SO/sub 2//sup -/ anion radical. With increasing NaOH concentration, the SO/sub 2/ adsorption and the activity for the reaction of H/sub 2/S with SO/sub 2/ (Claus reaction) went through a maximum at 1.0-1.4% NaOH. The SO/sub 2/ anion radical apparently formed by electron transfer from the catalyst surface and was a reaction intermediate which reacted rapidly with H/sub 2/S. The NaOH catalyst had similar stability and activity as commercial alumina catalyst in five-day tests under Claus conditions.

  17. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol over Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Iron Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Jun; Fu, Yao

    2016-06-01

    Iron-based heterogeneous catalysts, which were generally prepared by pyrolysis of iron complexes on supports at elevated temperature, were found to be capable of catalyzing the transfer hydrogenation of furfural (FF) to furfuryl alcohol (FFA). The effects of metal precursor, nitrogen precursor, pyrolysis temperature, and support on catalytic performance were examined thoroughly, and a comprehensive study of the reaction parameters was also performed. The highest selectivity of FFA reached 83.0 % with a FF conversion of 91.6 % under the optimal reaction condition. Catalyst characterization suggested that iron cations coordinated by pyridinic nitrogen functionalities were responsible for the enhanced catalytic activity. The iron catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of catalytic activity for five runs, and the destruction of the nitrogen-iron species, the presence of crystallized Fe2 O3 phase, and the pore structure change were the main reasons for catalyst deactivation. PMID:27144965

  18. Formation process of MCM-41 precursor and porous texture of MCM-41

    SciTech Connect

    Naono, Hiromitu; Hakuman, Masako; Tsunehisa, Takashi; Tamura, Nobuki; Nakai, Kazuyuki

    2000-04-15

    The formation process of the MCM-41 precursors (silicate/surfactant complex) was investigated on the basis of the pH titration curves of Na{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} in the presence of [C{sub 16}H{sub 33}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]Cl. Measurements of the pH titration curves were carried out using the computer-controlled gravimetric titrator constructed in their laboratory. The white precipitate (MCM-41 precursor) was abruptly formed at pH 11.1 (298 K) and at pH 9.9 (343 K). Formation of the MCM-41 precursor can be explained by coagulation of the rod-like micelle colloids whose surface is covered by the condensed silicate anions of (HSiO{sub 3}){sub n}{sup n{minus}}. The porous texture of the MCM-41 samples whose precursors were synthesized under different conditions was analyzed on the basis of the adsorption isotherms of nitrogen at 77 K. It has been shown that the MCM-41 sample whose precursor was prepared at pH 9.9 and 343 K shows one sharp peak (r{sub p} = 1.65 nm) in the pore size distribution curve, but the MCM-41 samples whose precursors were prepared at pH 6.5--5.0 and 343 K give two peaks (r{sub p} = 1.66 nm and r{sub p} = 2.12--2.36 nm). The appearance of the second peak (r{sub p} = 2.12--2.36 nm) has been considered to be in connection with the destruction of the MCM-41 precursor into small fragments in acidic medium.

  19. Catalyst increases COS conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.

    1985-02-18

    Increasingly stringent air quality legislation is placing greater emphasis on conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/ in Claus plants for the maximum sulfur recovery. Overall sulfur recovery goals are dependent upon outstanding service from the Claus catalyst in each reactor because catalyst activity is a major factor influencing plant performance. Today's catalyst are much improved over those used 10 years ago for the Claus (H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/) reaction. Recent technical efforts have focused on the conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/. These carbon-sulfur compounds can account for as much as 50% of the sulfur going to the incinerator, which essentially converts all remaining sulfur species to SO/sub 2/ for atmospheric dispersion. Previously, the mechanism of Claus COS conversion, i.e., hydrolysis or oxidation by SO/sub 2/, was studied and the conclusion was that oxidation by SO/sub 2/ appears to be the predominate mode of COS conversion on sulfated alumina catalysts.

  20. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  1. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  2. Catalyst, 2000-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication designed to assist higher education in developing alcohol and other drug prevention polices and programs that will foster students' academic and social development and promote campus and community safety. Issue 1 of volume 6 introduces a series of "Presidential Profiles" in which university presidents describe their…

  3. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  4. Octane boosting catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.G.; Pellet, R.J.; Shamshoun, E.S.; Rabo, J.A

    1989-02-07

    The invention provides petroleum cracking and octane boosting catalysts containing a composite of an intermediate pore NZMS in combination with another non-zeolitic molecular sieve having the same framework structure, and processes for cracking of petroleum for the purpose of enhancing the octane rating of the gasoline produced.

  5. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  6. Precursors for Carbon Nitride Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Prashantha, M.; Gopal, E. S. R.; Ramesh, K.

    2011-07-15

    Nano structured carbon nitride films were prepared by pyrolysis assisted chemical vapour deposition. Pyrrole (C{sub 4}H{sub 5}N), Pyrrolidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}N), Azabenzimidazole (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}N{sub 3}) and Triazine (C{sub 6}H{sub 15}N{sub 3}) were used as precursors. The vibrational modes observed for C-N and C = N from FTIR spectra confirms the bonding of nitrogen with carbon. XPS core level spectra of C 1s and N 1s also show the formation of bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms. The nitrogen content in the prepared samples was found to be around 25 atomic %.

  7. Anomalous reactivity of supported V2O5 nanoparticles for propane oxidative dehydrogenation: influence of the vanadium oxide precursor.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Carlos A; Keturakis, Christopher J; Orrego, Andres; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Wachs, Israel E

    2013-09-21

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane to propylene by supported vanadia catalysts has received much attention in recent years, but different reactivity trends have been reported for this catalytic reaction system. In the present investigation, the origin of these differing trends are investigated with synthesis of supported V/SiO2, V/TiO2, and V/Al2O3 catalysts prepared with three different vanadium oxide precursors (2-propanol/vanadyl triisopropoxide [VO(O-Pri)3] (VTI), oxalic acid/ammonium metavanadate [NH4VO3] (AMV), and toluene/vanadyl acetylacetonate [VO(C5H7O2)2] (VAA)) in order to elucidate the influence of the precursor on supported vanadia phase and propane ODH activity. In situ Raman spectroscopy revealed that the choice of vanadium precursor does not affect the dispersion of the supported vanadium oxide phase below 4 V nm(-2) (0.5 monolayer coverage), where only isolated and oligomeric surface VO4 species are present, and only the AMV precursor favors crystalline V2O5 nanoparticle (NP) formation below monolayer coverage (8 V nm(-2)). The propane ODH specific reactivity trend demonstrated that there is no significant difference in TOF for the isolated and oligomeric surface VO4 sites. Surprisingly, V2O5 NPs in the ∼1-2 nm range exhibit anomalously high propane ODH TOF values for the supported vanadia catalysts. This was found for all supported vanadium oxide catalysts examined. This comparative study with different V-precursors and synthesis methods and oxide supports finally resolves the debate in the catalysis literature about the dependence of TOF on the surface vanadium density that is related to the unusually high reactivity of small V2O5 NPs.

  8. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-03-31

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of a mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, AlSBA-15. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst contains strong Br{umlt o}nsted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt % Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at a temperature of 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into a psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst is being evaluated for the conversion of a heavy petroleum feedstock to naphtha and middle distillates. This phase was significantly delayed during the past six months due to a serious malfunction of the fume hoods in the Clark Atlanta University's Research Center for Science and Technology, where the project is being conducted. The fume hood system was repaired and the catalyst evaluation is now underway.

  9. Noble metal ionic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hegde, M S; Madras, Giridhar; Patil, K C

    2009-06-16

    Because of growing environmental concerns and increasingly stringent regulations governing auto emissions, new more efficient exhaust catalysts are needed to reduce the amount of pollutants released from internal combustion engines. To accomplish this goal, the major pollutants in exhaust-CO, NO(x), and unburned hydrocarbons-need to be fully converted to CO(2), N(2), and H(2)O. Most exhaust catalysts contain nanocrystalline noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) dispersed on oxide supports such as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) promoted by CeO(2). However, in conventional catalysts, only the surface atoms of the noble metal particles serve as adsorption sites, and even in 4-6 nm metal particles, only 1/4 to 1/5 of the total noble metal atoms are utilized for catalytic conversion. The complete dispersion of noble metals can be achieved only as ions within an oxide support. In this Account, we describe a novel solution to this dispersion problem: a new solution combustion method for synthesizing dispersed noble metal ionic catalysts. We have synthesized nanocrystalline, single-phase Ce(1-x)M(x)O(2-delta) and Ce(1-x-y)Ti(y)M(x)O(2-delta) (M = Pt, Pd, Rh; x = 0.01-0.02, delta approximately x, y = 0.15-0.25) oxides in fluorite structure. In these oxide catalysts, Pt(2+), Pd(2+), or Rh(3+) ions are substituted only to the extent of 1-2% of Ce(4+) ion. Lower-valent noble metal ion substitution in CeO(2) creates oxygen vacancies. Reducing molecules (CO, H(2), NH(3)) are adsorbed onto electron-deficient noble metal ions, while oxidizing (O(2), NO) molecules are absorbed onto electron-rich oxide ion vacancy sites. The rates of CO and hydrocarbon oxidation and NO(x) reduction (with >80% N(2) selectivity) are 15-30 times higher in the presence of these ionic catalysts than when the same amount of noble metal loaded on an oxide support is used. Catalysts with palladium ion dispersed in CeO(2) or Ce(1-x)Ti(x)O(2) were far superior to Pt or Rh ionic catalysts. Therefore, we have demonstrated that the

  10. Improved Steroids Detection and Evidence for Their Regiospecific Decompositions Using Anion Attachment Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Quentin; Bárcenas, Mariana; Dossmann, Héloïse; Bailloux, Isabelle; Buisson, Corinne; Mechin, Nathalie; Molina, Adeline; Lasne, Françoise; Rannulu, Nalaka S; Cole, Richard B

    2016-04-01

    Nonpolar anabolic steroids are doping agents that typically do not provide strong signals by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) owing especially to the low polarity of the functional groups present. We have investigated the addition of anions, in ammonium salt form, to anabolic steroid samples as ionization enhancers and have confirmed that lower instrumental limits of detection (as low as 10 ng/mL for fluoxymesterone-M) are obtained by fluoride anion attachment mass spectrometry, as compared to ESI(+)/(-) or atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI)(+). Moreover, collision-induced decomposition (CID) spectra of precursor fluoride adducts of the bifunctional steroid "reduced pregnenolone" (containing two hydroxyl groups) and its d4-analogue provide evidence of regiospecific decompositions after attachment of fluoride anion to a specific hydroxyl group of the steroid. This type of charting of specific CID reaction pathways can offer value to selected reaction monitoring experiments (SRM) as it may result in a gain in selectivity in detection as well as in improvements in quantification. PMID:26926765

  11. Preparation, structural characterization and catalytic properties of Co/CeO2 catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol and hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovón, Adriana S. P.; Lovón-Quintana, Juan J.; Almerindo, Gizelle I.; Valença, Gustavo P.; Bernardi, Maria I. B.; Araújo, Vinícius D.; Rodrigues, Thenner S.; Robles-Dutenhefner, Patrícia A.; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, Co/CeO2 catalysts, with different cobalt contents were prepared by the polymeric precursor method and were evaluated for the steam reforming of ethanol. The catalysts were characterized by N2 physisorption (BET method), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible diffuse reflectance, temperature programmed reduction analysis (TPR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM). It was observed that the catalytic behavior could be influenced by the experimental conditions and the nature of the catalyst employed. Physical-chemical characterizations revealed that the cobalt content of the catalyst influences the metal-support interaction which results in distinct catalyst performances. The catalyst with the highest cobalt content showed the best performance among the catalysts tested, exhibiting complete ethanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity close to 66% and good stability at a reaction temperature of 600 °C.

  12. Nanostructured nonprecious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-20

    Platinum-based catalysts represent a state of the art in the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) from the point of view of their activity and durability in harnessing the chemical energy via direct electrochemical conversion. However, because platinum is both expensive and scarce, its widespread implementation in such clean energy applications is limited. Recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of high-performance nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) make replacement of Pt in ORR electrocatalysts with earth-abundant elements, such as Fe, Co, N, and C, a realistic possibility. In this Account, we discuss how we can obtain highly promising M-N-C (M: Fe and/or Co) catalysts by simultaneously heat-treating precursors of nitrogen, carbon, and transition metals at 800-1000 °C. The activity and durability of resulting catalysts depend greatly on the selection of precursors and synthesis chemistry. In addition, they correlate quite well with the catalyst nanostructure. While chemists have presented no conclusive description of the active catalytic site for this class of NPMCs, they have developed a designed approach to making active and durable materials, focusing on the catalyst nanostructure. The approach consists of nitrogen doping, in situ carbon graphitization, and the usage of graphitic structures (possibly graphene and graphene oxides) as carbon precursors. Various forms of nitrogen, particularly pyridinic and quaternary, can act as n-type carbon dopants in the M-N-C catalysts, assisting in the formation of disordered carbon nanostructures and donating electrons to the carbon. The CNx structures are likely a crucial part of the ORR active site(s). Noteworthy, the ORR activity is not necessarily governed by the amount of nitrogen, but by how the nitrogen is incorporated into the nanostructures. Apart from the possibility of a direct participation in the active site, the transition metal often plays an important role in the in situ formation of various

  13. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  14. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  15. Thermolytic Molecular Precursor Route to Site-IsolatedVanadia-Silica Materials and Their Catalytic Performance in MethaneSelective Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Daniel A.; Ohler, Nicholas L.; Bell, Alexis T.; Tilley, T.Don

    2005-11-23

    The thermolytic molecular precursor (TMP) method was used to prepare site-isolated, high-surface area vanadia-silica (V/SBA15) materials of various V loadings via the grafting of two precursors, OV[OSi(O{sup t}Bu){sub 3}]{sub 3} (1) and Ov(O{sup t}Bu){sub 3} (2). Spectroscopic analysis indicates that excellent synthetic control was established for the exclusive formation of a pseudotetrahedral monovanadate (VO4) structure on all catalyst surfaces. Another V/SBA15 catalyst was prepared via conventional incipient wetness impregnation (WI) with aqueous NH4VO3. A spectroscopic investigation of this catalyst revealed the presence of monovanadate and polyvanadate species along with small domains of V2O5. The TMP materials behave as single-site catalysts in the selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde up to a V coverage of 0.47 Vnm-2 and demonstrate superior activity compared with the WI catalyst. A space-time yield of 5.84 kgCH2Okg-1cat h-1 was observed, more than twice the highest value previously reported.

  16. Adsorption of DNA onto anionic lipid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Luque-Caballero, Germán; Faraudo, Jordi; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-01

    Currently self-assembled DNA delivery systems composed of DNA multivalent cations and anionic lipids are considered to be promising tools for gene therapy. These systems become an alternative to traditional cationic lipid-DNA complexes because of their low cytotoxicity lipids. However, currently these nonviral gene delivery methods exhibit low transfection efficiencies. This feature is in large part due to the poorly understood DNA complexation mechanisms at the molecular level. It is well-known that the adsorption of DNA onto like charged lipid surfaces requires the presence of multivalent cations that act as bridges between DNA and anionic lipids. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms behind such adsorption phenomenon still remain unclear. Accordingly a historical background of experimental evidence related to adsorption and complexation of DNA onto anionic lipid surfaces mediated by different multivalent cations is firstly reviewed. Next, recent experiments aimed to characterise the interfacial adsorption of DNA onto a model anionic phospholipid monolayer mediated by Ca(2+) (including AFM images) are discussed. Afterwards, modelling studies of DNA adsorption onto charged surfaces are summarised before presenting preliminary results obtained from both CG and all-atomic MD computer simulations. Our results allow us to establish the optimal conditions for cation-mediated adsorption of DNA onto negatively charged surfaces. Moreover, atomistic simulations provide an excellent framework to understand the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids in the presence of divalent cations. Accordingly,our simulation results in conjunction go beyond the macroscopic picture in which DNA is stuck to anionic membranes by using multivalent cations that form glue layers between them. Structural aspects of the DNA adsorption and molecular binding between the different charged groups from DNA and lipids in the presence of divalent cations are reported in the last part of the study

  17. Functional analyses and treatment of precursor behavior.

    PubMed

    Najdowski, Adel C; Wallace, Michele D; Ellsworth, Carrie L; MacAleese, Alicia N; Cleveland, Jackie M

    2008-01-01

    Functional analysis has been demonstrated to be an effective method to identify environmental variables that maintain problem behavior. However, there are cases when conducting functional analyses of severe problem behavior may be contraindicated. The current study applied functional analysis procedures to a class of behavior that preceded severe problem behavior (precursor behavior) and evaluated treatments based on the outcomes of the functional analyses of precursor behavior. Responding for all participants was differentiated during the functional analyses, and individualized treatments eliminated precursor behavior. These results suggest that functional analysis of precursor behavior may offer an alternative, indirect method to assess the operant function of severe problem behavior. PMID:18468282

  18. Functional Analyses and Treatment of Precursor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Najdowski, Adel C; Wallace, Michele D; Ellsworth, Carrie L; MacAleese, Alicia N; Cleveland, Jackie M

    2008-01-01

    Functional analysis has been demonstrated to be an effective method to identify environmental variables that maintain problem behavior. However, there are cases when conducting functional analyses of severe problem behavior may be contraindicated. The current study applied functional analysis procedures to a class of behavior that preceded severe problem behavior (precursor behavior) and evaluated treatments based on the outcomes of the functional analyses of precursor behavior. Responding for all participants was differentiated during the functional analyses, and individualized treatments eliminated precursor behavior. These results suggest that functional analysis of precursor behavior may offer an alternative, indirect method to assess the operant function of severe problem behavior. PMID:18468282

  19. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of CO-oxidation catalysts for high repetition rate CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, Thomas P.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely active class of noble metal catalysts supported on titania was developed and fabricated at Hughes for the recombination of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) in closed-cycle CO2 TEA lasers. The incipient wetness technique was used to impregnate titania and alumina pellets with precious metals including platinum and palladium. In particular, the addition of cerium (used as an oxygen storage promoter) produced an extremely active Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst. By comparison, the complementary Pt/Ce/ gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was considerably less active. In general, chloride-free catalyst precursors proved critical in obtaining an active catalyst while also providing uniform metal distributions throughout the support structure. Detailed characterization of the Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst demonstrated uniform dendritic crystal growth of the metals throughout the support. Electron spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis was used to characterize the oxidation states of Pt, Ce and Ti. The performance of the catalysts was evaluated with an integral flow reactor system incorporating real time analysis of O2 and CO. With this system, the transient and steady-state behavior of the catalysts were evaluated. The kinetic evaluation was complemented by tests in a compact, closed-cycle Hughes CO2 TEA laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz with a catalyst temperature of 75 to 95 C. The Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst was compatible with a C(13)O(16)2 gas fill.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of CO-oxidation catalysts for high repetition rate CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Thomas P.

    1990-06-01

    An extremely active class of noble metal catalysts supported on titania was developed and fabricated at Hughes for the recombination of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) in closed-cycle CO2 TEA lasers. The incipient wetness technique was used to impregnate titania and alumina pellets with precious metals including platinum and palladium. In particular, the addition of cerium (used as an oxygen storage promoter) produced an extremely active Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst. By comparison, the complementary Pt/Ce/ gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was considerably less active. In general, chloride-free catalyst precursors proved critical in obtaining an active catalyst while also providing uniform metal distributions throughout the support structure. Detailed characterization of the Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst demonstrated uniform dendritic crystal growth of the metals throughout the support. Electron spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis was used to characterize the oxidation states of Pt, Ce and Ti. The performance of the catalysts was evaluated with an integral flow reactor system incorporating real time analysis of O2 and CO. With this system, the transient and steady-state behavior of the catalysts were evaluated. The kinetic evaluation was complemented by tests in a compact, closed-cycle Hughes CO2 TEA laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz with a catalyst temperature of 75 to 95 C. The Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst was compatible with a C(13)O(16)2 gas fill.

  1. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Chander, S.; Gutterman, C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases. This effect is also demonstrated by improved catalyst precursor impregnation with increased contact temperature. Laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent.

  2. Anion photoelectron spectroscopy of radicals and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Taylor R.

    1999-12-16

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study free radicals and clusters. The low-lying {sup 2}{Sigma} and {sup 2}{Pi} states of C{sub 2n}H (n = 1--4) have been studied. The anion photoelectron spectra yielded electron affinities, term values, and vibrational frequencies for these combustion and astrophysically relevant species. Photoelectron angular distributions allowed the author to correctly assign the electronic symmetry of the ground and first excited states and to assess the degree of vibronic coupling in C{sub 2}H and C{sub 4}H. Other radicals studied include NCN and I{sub 3}. The author was able to observe the low-lying singlet and triplet states of NCN for the first time. Measurement of the electron affinity of I{sub 3} revealed that it has a bound ground state and attachment of an argon atom to this moiety enabled him to resolve the symmetric stretching progression.

  3. The superfamily of organic anion transporting polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Hagenbuch, B; Meier, P J

    2003-01-10

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps/OATPs) form a growing gene superfamily and mediate transport of a wide spectrum of amphipathic organic solutes. Different Oatps/OATPs have partially overlapping and partially distinct substrate preferences for organic solutes such as bile salts, steroid conjugates, thyroid hormones, anionic oligopeptides, drugs, toxins and other xenobiotics. While some Oatps/OATPs are preferentially or even selectively expressed in one tissue such as the liver, others are expressed in multiple organs including the blood-brain barrier (BBB), choroid plexus, lung, heart, intestine, kidney, placenta and testis. This review summarizes the actual state of the rapidly expanding OATP superfamily and covers the structural properties, the genomic classification, the phylogenetic relationships and the functional transport characteristics. In addition, we propose a new species independent and open ended nomenclature and classification system, which is based on divergent evolution and agrees with the guidelines of the Human Genome Nomenclature Committee.

  4. Specific anion effects in Artemia salina.

    PubMed

    Lo Nostro, Pierandrea; Ninham, Barry W; Carretti, Emiliano; Dei, Luigi; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-09-01

    The specific anion effect on the vitality of Artemia salina was investigated by measuring the Lethal Time LT50 of the crustaceans in the presence of different sodium salts solutions at room temperature and at the same ionic strength as natural seawater. Fluoride, thiocyanate and perchlorate are the most toxic agents, while chloride, bromide and sulfate are well tolerated. The rates of oxygen consumption of brine shrimps were recorded in mixed NaCl+NaF or NaCl+NaSCN solutions as a function of time. The results are discussed in terms of the Hofmeister series, and suggest that, besides the biochemical processes that involve F(-), SCN(-) and ClO4(-), the different physico-chemical properties of the strong kosmotropic and chaotropic anions may contribute in determining their strong toxicity for A. salina. PMID:25978674

  5. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  6. Stability and Characteristics of the Halogen Bonding Interaction in an Anion-Anion Complex: A Computational Chemistry Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guimin; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Xu, Zhijian; Wang, Jinan; Yang, Yang; Cai, Tingting; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2016-02-01

    Halogen bonding is the noncovalent interaction between the positively charged σ-hole of organohalogens and nucleophiles. In reality, both the organohalogen and nucleophile could be deprotonated to form anions, which may lead to the vanishing of the σ-hole and possible repulsion between the two anions. However, our database survey in this study revealed that there are halogen bonding-like interactions between two anions. Quantum mechanics calculations with small model complexes composed of halobenzoates and propiolate indicated that the anion-anion halogen bonding is unstable in vacuum but attractive in solvents. Impressively, the QM optimized halogen bonding distance between the two anions is shorter than that in a neutral system, indicating a possibly stronger halogen bonding interaction, which is verified by the calculated binding energies. Furthermore, natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecule analyses also suggested stronger anion-anion halogen bonding than that of the neutral one. Energy decomposition by symmetry adapted perturbation theory revealed that the strong binding might be attributed to large induction energy. The calculations on 4 protein-ligand complexes from PDB by the QM/MM method demonstrated that the anion-anion halogen bonding could contribute to the ligands' binding affinity up to ∼3 kcal/mol. Therefore, anion-anion halogen bonding is stable and applicable in reality. PMID:26735575

  7. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  8. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Oing; McBreen, James

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  9. Collision-induced dissociation of fluoropyridinide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shuji; Lineberger, W. Carl; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2007-10-01

    Collision-induced dissociation of ortho-fluoro, meta-fluoro, and 2,6-difluoropyridinide anions are studied using the selected ion flow tube technique. Structures and energetics of the reactants, transition states, and products are calculated at the MP4(SDQ)/6-31 + G(d) level of theory based on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and/or MP2/6-31 + G(d) optimized geometries. The monofluoropyridinide anions (C5NH3F-) dissociate almost exclusively via loss of an HF molecule, i.e., C5NH2- + HF at low collision energies, in addition to loss of F- at higher energies. 2,6-Difluoropyridinide anions (C5NH2F2-) dissociate via successive loss of HF molecules to form C5NHF- then C5N- depending on the collision energy. The CID results strongly suggest formation of ring-intact pyridynide structures (C5NH2-, C5NHF-) with a bent triple bond embedded in the azine ring systems. Calculated reaction energy diagrams are totally consistent with the experimental observations. Didehydropyridynides C5NH2- and C5NHF- have substantial barriers to decomposition. Tetradehydropyridynide C5N- is a highly strained ring system and metastable with a predicted barrier of about 5 kcal mol-1 (20 kJ mol-1) toward ring-opening to a linear NCCCCC- structure. The observed C5N- species is most likely the linear anion under experimental conditions; however, the ring-intact C5N- pyridynide is a highly energetic species releasing about 80 kcal mol-1 (340 kJ mol-1) of energy upon the ring-opening.

  10. Lowest autodetachment state of the water anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houfek, Karel; Čížek, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The potential energy surface of the ground state of the water anion H2O- is carefully mapped using multireference CI calculations for a large range of molecular geometries. Particular attention is paid to a consistent description of both the O-+H2 and OH-+H asymptotes and to a relative position of the anion energy to the ground state energy of the neutral molecule. The autodetachment region, where the anion state crosses to the electronic continuum is identified. The local minimum in the direction of the O- + H2 channel previously reported by Werner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 2913 (1987)] is found to be slighly off the linear geometry and is separated by a saddle from the autodetachment region. The autodetachment region is directly accessible from the OH-+H asymptote. For the molecular geometries in the autodetachment region and in its vicinity we also performed fixed-nuclei electron-molecule scattering calculations using the R-matrix method. Tuning of consistency of a description of the correlation energy in both the multireference CI and R-matrix calculations is discussed. Two models of the correlation energy within the R-matrix method that are consistent with the quantum chemistry calculations are found. Both models yield scattering quantities in a close agreement. The results of this work will allow a consistent formulation of the nonlocal resonance model of the water anion in a future publication. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  11. Leading time domain seismic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucouvalas, A. C.; Gkasios, M.; Keskebes, A.; Tselikas, N. T.

    2014-08-01

    The problem of predicting the occurrence of earthquakes is threefold. On one hand it is necessary to predict the date and magnitude of an earthquake, and on the other hand the location of the epicenter. In this work after a brief review of the state of earthquake prediction research, we report on a new leading time precursor for determining time onset of earthquake occurrence. We report the linking between earthquakes of the past with those which happen in the future via Fibonacci, Dual and Lucas numbers (FDL) numbers. We demonstrate it here with two example seed earthquakes at least 100 years old. Using this leading indicator method we can predict significant earthquake events >6.5R, with good accuracy approximately +- 1 day somewhere in the world. From a single seed we produce at least 100 trials simultaneously of which 50% are correct to +- 1day. The indicator is based on Fibonacci, Dual and Lucas numbers (FDL). This result hints that the log periodic FDL numbers are at the root of the understanding of the earthquake mechanism. The theory is based on the assumption that each occurred earthquake discontinuity can be thought of as a generating source of FDL time series. (The mechanism could well be linked to planetary orbits). When future dates are derived from clustering and convergence from previous strong earthquake dates at an FDL time distance, then we have a high probability for an earthquake to occur on that date. We set up a real time system which generates FDL time series from each previous significant earthquake (>7R) and we produce a year to year calendar of high probability earthquake dates. We have tested this over a number of years with considerable success. We have applied this technique for strong (>7R) earthquakes across the globe as well as on a restricted region such as the Greek geographic region where the magnitude is small (>4R-6.5R). In both cases the success of the method is impressive. It is our belief that supplementing this method with

  12. Donnan membrane technique (DMT) for anion measurement.

    PubMed

    Vega, Flora Alonso; Weng, Liping; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2010-04-01

    Donnan membrane technique (DMT) is developed and tested for determination of free anion concentrations. Time needed to reach the Donnan membrane equilibrium depends on type of ions and the background. The Donnan membrane equilibrium is reached in 1 day for Cl(-), 1-2 days for NO(3)(-), 1-4 days for SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and 1-14 days for H(2)PO(4)(-) in a background of 2-200 mM KCl or K(2)SO(4). The strongest effect of ionic strength on equilibrium time is found for H(2)PO(4)(-), followed by SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and then by Cl(-) and NO(3)(-). The negatively charged organic particles of fulvic and humic acids do not pass the membrane. Two approaches for the measurement of different anion species of the same element, such as SeO(4)(2-) and HSeO(3)(-), using DMT are proposed and tested. These two approaches are based on transport kinetics or response to ionic strength difference. A transport model that was developed previously for cation DMT is applied in this work to analyze the rate-limiting step in the anion DMT. In the absence of mobile/labile complexes, transport tends to be controlled by diffusion in solution at a low ionic strength, whereas at a higher ionic strength, diffusion in the membrane starts to control the transport.

  13. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Multiply Charged Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Lai S.

    2009-07-01

    Multiply charged anions (MCA’s) are common in the condensed phases, but are challenging to study in the gas phase. An experimental technique coupling photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) with electrospray ionization (ESI) has been developed to investigate properties of free MCA’s in the gas phase. In this article, the principles of this technique, and some initial findings about the intrinsic properties of MCA’s are reviewed. Examples chosen include the observation of the repulsive Coulomb barrier that exists universally in MCA’s and its effects on the dynamic stability and photoelectron spectroscopy of MCA’s. Solvation and solvent stabilization of MCA’s has been studied in the gas phase and will also be discussed. A second generation low-temperature ESI-PES apparatus has been developed, which allows ion temperatures to be controlled between 10 to 350 K. New results from the low-temperature ESI-PES instrument will also be reviewed, including doubly charged fullerene anions, inorganic metal complexes, and temperature-induced conformation changes of complex anions.

  14. The 2-Arsaethynolate Anion: Synthesis and Reactivity Towards Heteroallenes.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Alexander; Goicoechea, Jose M

    2016-07-18

    The synthesis and isolation of the 2-arsaethynolate anion, AsCO(-) , and its subsequent reactivity towards heteroallenes is reported. Reactions with ketenes and carbodiimides afford four-membered anionic heterocycles in formal [2+2] cycloaddition reactions. By contrast, reaction with an isocyanate yielded a 1,4,2-diazaarsolidine-3,5-dionide anion and the unprecedented cluster anions As10 (2-) and As12 (4-) . These preliminary reactivity studies hint at the enormous potential synthetic utility of this novel anion, which may be employed as an arsenide (As(-) ) source. PMID:27093942

  15. Several hemicyanine dyes as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Muhan; Wang, Kangnan; Guan, Ruifang; Liu, Zhiqiang; Cao, Duxia; Wu, Qianqian; Shan, Yanyan; Xu, Yongxiao

    2016-05-01

    Four hemicyanine dyes as chemosensors for cyanide anions were synthesized easily. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions were investigated. The results indicate that all the dyes can recognize cyanide anions with obvious color, absorption and fluorescence change. The recognition mechanism analysis basing on in situ 1H NMR and Job plot data indicates that to the compounds with hydroxyl group, the recognition mechanism is intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction. However, to the compounds without hydroxyl group, cyanide anion is bonded to carbon-carbon double bond in conjugated bridge and induces N+ CH3 to neutral NCH3. Fluorescence of the compounds is almost quenched upon the addition of cyanide anions.

  16. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  17. Have organic interstellar grains redox-catalyzed RNA and other synthesis from cometary precursors ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, F. R.; Kissel, J.; Werther, W.; Schmid, E. R.

    The recent in-situ investigations of cosmic dust clearly show, that the only building blocks of life therein are nucleobases. All the other building blocks are just found as precursors in cometary dust. They themselves must be formed from precursors by hydrolysis in liquid water, like phosphates from phosphides, sugars (stabilized at mineralic surfaces) may be from polyines, and amino and lipidic acids from nitriles. Nevertheless, the self-organized synthesis of polymers like RNA's and peptides needs, i.a., additional redox-catalysis. These catalysts act in stabilizing and transmitting single electrons and/or holes in chemical reactions. At mineralic surfaces transition metals like FeII/III may take the task. However, once life has emancipated itself from minerals redox catalysts should be furtheron present yet organically without prior encoding for synthesis - as the code itself must have been evolved already before the encoded enzymes can act. However, there may be another solution for this enigma: Except archeae, all stems of life make use of quinone-type co-enzymes of the PQQ (pyrrolo-quinoline-quinone) type of redox catalysts. Interstellar dust reaching the interior of the solar system consists at least of homologuous polymers which may convert to PQQ types in liquid water, after being decelerated in the upper atmosphere. Due to their enormous radiation stability, these types are the natural end-products after long interstellar trips. They can withstand the collision processes with atmospheric molecules, then being washed out.

  18. Anion effects to deliver enhanced iridium catalysts for hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan R; Kerr, William J; Moir, Rory; Reid, Marc

    2014-10-28

    Synthesis of a series of iridium(I) complexes of the type [(COD)Ir(IMes)(PPh3)]X (X = BF4, OTf, and BArF) has been established. Application of these species in mild hydrogen isotope exchange processes revealed more efficient catalysis and, further, a wider solvent scope when employing larger, more weakly coordinating counterions. PMID:25208265

  19. Fluorination process using catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  20. Fluorination process using catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

    1983-08-25

    A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  1. New microbead cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Nefedov, S.K.; Guseinov, A.M.; Il'ina, L.M.; Melik-Akhnazarov, T.K.; Stankevich, V.A.

    1984-05-01

    This article reports on the preparation and testing of an experimental batch of KMTsU catalysts using a cocurrent-flow fluid-bed reactor. The proposed manufacturing process is based on the regulation of the density and pore structure of an aluminosilicate matrix by varying the conditions of syneresis and wet treatment in the activation stage. It is recommended that the medium should be at a lower pH in obtaining the gel, that the temperature and pH of the medium should be lower in the activation stage, and that additional dispersion of the gel should be accomplished before spray-drying. The results of the tests on the KMTsU catalyst demonstrate its sufficiently high stable activity, high density (900-920 kg/m/sup 3/), and attrition resistance (92-94%).

  2. Anion order in perovskites: a group-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Talanov, M V; Shirokov, V B; Talanov, V M

    2016-03-01

    Anion ordering in the structure of cubic perovskite has been investigated by the group-theoretical method. The possibility of the existence of 261 ordered low-symmetry structures, each with a unique space-group symmetry, is established. These results include five binary and 14 ternary anion superstructures. The 261 idealized anion-ordered perovskite structures are considered as aristotypes, giving rise to different derivatives. The structures of these derivatives are formed by tilting of BO6 octahedra, distortions caused by the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect and other physical effects. Some derivatives of aristotypes exist as real substances, and some as virtual ones. A classification of aristotypes of anion superstructures in perovskite is proposed: the AX class (the simultaneous ordering of A cations and anions in cubic perovskite structure), the BX class (the simultaneous ordering of B cations and anions) and the X class (the ordering of anions only in cubic perovskite structure). In most perovskites anion ordering is accompanied by cation ordering. Therefore, the main classes of anion order in perovskites are the AX and BX classes. The calculated structures of some anion superstructures are reported. Comparison of predictions and experimentally investigated anion superstructures shows coherency of theoretical and experimental results. PMID:26919374

  3. Effect of detergents on streptolysin S precursor.

    PubMed

    Calandra, G B

    1980-08-01

    Group A streptococci which produce streptolysin S contain a cellular precursor to streptolysin S in the membranes and cytoplasm which is activatable by blending in a Vortex mixer with glass beads and ribonucleic acid (RNA)-core (RNA preparation from yeast). Although no activation of precursor occurred when it was mixed with detergents, it was activated when blended with glass beads and detergents such as Tergitol NP-40 and Brij 35. Maximum activation of precursor was achieved in 1 to 2% detergent, in pH 6.5 buffer, and after 8 min of blending. Detergents Tween 20, 40, 60, and 80, Brij 56, and Lubrol WX also activated precursor, but, of all the hemolysin preparations, those with Tween 40 or 60 or Lubrol WX were the most stable. The addition of RNA-core during or after blending of precursor with detergents enhanced the titer and stability of the hemolysin. This was due in part to the association of the hemolytic moiety with RNA-core. Activation of precursor in the membrane was better with a detergent, whereas that in the cytoplasm was better with RNA-core. Therefore, precursor from two different cellular locations can be differentiated by the effects of RNA-core and detergents on precursor titer.

  4. Precursors in gas-liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasenko, V. G.; Gorelik, R. S.; Nakoryakov, V. E.; Timkin, L. S.

    2013-10-01

    Two types of precursors propagating at the speed of sound in a pure liquid have been revealed in the experiments on the evolution of pressure pulses in a gas-liquid mixture; at the same time, the main pressure pulse propagates at a low equilibrium speed of sound and its evolution is described by the Burgers-Korteweg-de Vries equation. The first high-frequency precursor is a complete analog of a classical Sommerfeld precursor, because the resonance dispersion equation for a bubble mixture coincides with that for insulators in the Lorentz model, and oscillates at a frequency close to the "plasma frequency." The second low-frequency precursor has been revealed in this work. The frequency of the low-frequency precursor is close to the resonance frequency of pulsations of bubbles, which is almost an order of magnitude lower than the frequency of the high-frequency precursor. The low-frequency precursor has a much larger amplitude of pulsations and smaller damping and is not described within the homogeneous model of the gas-liquid mixture. The observed phenomenon of low-frequency precursors has been explained within a simple heterogeneous model of a bubble liquid.

  5. The Interrelationships of Mathematical Precursors in Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirino, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the interrelations among cognitive precursors across quantitative, linguistic, and spatial attention domains that have been implicated for math achievement in young children. The dimensionality of the quantity precursors was evaluated in 286 kindergarteners via latent variable techniques, and the contribution of precursors…

  6. Effect of the metal support interactions on the physicochemical and magnetic properties of Ni catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Polo, C.; Gil, A.; Korili, S. A.; Pérez-Landázabal, J. I.; Recarte, V.; Trujillano, R.; Vicente, M. A.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, the effect of the preparation method on the physicochemical and magnetic properties of nickel-containing catalysts is analysed. The catalysts were prepared by two methods, incipient wetness impregnation and precipitation-deposition using two commercial oxides, γ-Al 2O 3 (Rhône-Poulenc) and SiO 2 (AF125, Kali Chemie) as supports. The precursors were dried at 393 K for 16 h and then calcined at 823 K for 4 h. The physicochemical characterization of the catalysts included nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and chemical analysis. A SQUID magnetometer was employed in the magnetic characterization. The basic compositional and structural characteristics of these Ni-based nanoporous catalysts are analysed in relation to their magnetic response.

  7. Catalytic properties and structure of copper-chromium catalysts for the dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, V.Z.; Bedina, L.N.; Petrov, I.Ya.

    1988-11-01

    The properties of oxidized and reduced copper-chromium catalysts for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation have been investigated. It has been shown that during synthesis of the catalysts, phases of the compound CuCrO/sub 4/ form. A correlation has been established between the amount of the compound and the activity of the catalyst in the dehydrogenation reaction, and it is postulated that the CuCrO/sub 4/ is a precursor of the most active catalytic sites in this reaction. It is shown that side reactions of the dehydration of C/sub 6/H/sub 12/O and the condensation of C/sub 6/H/sub 10/O occur in the Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ formed on the surface of the reduced catalysts.

  8. Resolving Interparticle Heterogeneities in Composition and Hydrogenation Performance between Individual Supported Silver on Silica Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Supported metal nanoparticle catalysts are commonly obtained through deposition of metal precursors onto the support using incipient wetness impregnation. Typically, empirical relations between metal nanoparticle structure and catalytic performance are inferred from ensemble averaged data in combination with high-resolution electron microscopy. This approach clearly underestimates the importance of heterogeneities present in a supported metal catalyst batch. Here we show for the first time how incipient wetness impregnation leads to 10-fold variations in silver loading between individual submillimeter-sized silica support granules. This heterogeneity has a profound impact on the catalytic performance, with 100-fold variations in hydrogenation performance at the same level. In a straightforward fashion, optical microscopy interlinks single support particle level catalytic measurements to structural and compositional information. These detailed correlations reveal the optimal silver loading. A thorough consideration of catalyst heterogeneity and the impact thereof on the catalytic performance is indispensable in the development of catalysts. PMID:26618052

  9. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  10. Membrane process for separating contaminant anions from aqueous solutions of valuable metal anions

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.; Laferty, J.M.

    1980-11-18

    An aqueous solution of at least one valuable oxyanion containing molybdenum, tungsten, vanadium, or uranium is refined to lower the content of contaminant anions such as PO/sub 4//sup -3/, SO/sub 4//sup -2/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, Cl/sup -/, ClO/sub 3//sup -/, and ClO/sub 4//sup -/, by subjecting the solution to electrolysis at a ph of from 0.5 to 4.0 between a cation-permselective membrane and an anion-permselective membrane having tertiary amine or quaternary ammonium anion exchange groups, to cause contaminant anions to pass from the solution into the anolyte. Ammonium molybdates, tungstates, vanadates, and uranates are formed from the thus-refined solution by subjecting it to a second stage of electrolysis at a ph of at least 7 between a cation-permselective membrane and an anion-permselective membrane to cause valuable oxyanions to pass from the solution into an anolyte which comprises an aqueous solution of ammonia and to form the desired ammonium compound.

  11. The benzene radical anion: A computationally demanding prototype for aromatic anions

    SciTech Connect

    Bazante, Alexandre P. Bartlett, Rodney J.; Davidson, E. R.

    2015-05-28

    The benzene radical anion is studied with ab initio coupled-cluster theory in large basis sets. Unlike the usual assumption, we find that, at the level of theory investigated, the minimum energy geometry is non-planar with tetrahedral distortion at two opposite carbon atoms. The anion is well known for its instability to auto-ionization which poses computational challenges to determine its properties. Despite the importance of the benzene radical anion, the considerable attention it has received in the literature so far has failed to address the details of its structure and shape-resonance character at a high level of theory. Here, we examine the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect and its impact on the anion potential energy surface. We find that a minimum energy geometry of C{sub 2} symmetry is located below one D{sub 2h} stationary point on a C{sub 2h} pseudo-rotation surface. The applicability of standard wave function methods to an unbound anion is assessed with the stabilization method. The isotropic hyperfine splitting constants (A{sub iso}) are computed and compared to data obtained from experimental electron spin resonance experiments. Satisfactory agreement with experiment is obtained with coupled-cluster theory and large basis sets such as cc-pCVQZ.

  12. FCC catalyst selection

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, G.D.L. ); McElhiney, G. )

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses a commonly used technique for comparing FCC catalytic selectivities based on the ASTM microactivity test (MAT) procedure, ASTM D-3907-80. In its original form the ASTM test provides only very limited information on selectivity. However, extension of the ASTM MAT procedure by using additional product analyses gives a microselectivity test capable of providing detailed yield structure information. This modified MAT procedure thus provides a cost-effective and rapid means of comparing many catalysts.

  13. Method of texturing a superconductive oxide precursor

    DOEpatents

    DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Li, Qi; Antaya, Peter D.; Christopherson, Craig J.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Seuntjens, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a textured superconductor wire includes constraining an elongated superconductor precursor between two constraining elongated members placed in contact therewith on opposite sides of the superconductor precursor, and passing the superconductor precursor with the two constraining members through flat rolls to form the textured superconductor wire. The method includes selecting desired cross-sectional shape and size constraining members to control the width of the formed superconductor wire. A textured superconductor wire formed by the method of the invention has regular-shaped, curved sides and is free of flashing. A rolling assembly for single-pass rolling of the elongated precursor superconductor includes two rolls, two constraining members, and a fixture for feeding the precursor superconductor and the constraining members between the rolls. In alternate embodiments of the invention, the rolls can have machined regions which will contact only the elongated constraining members and affect the lateral deformation and movement of those members during the rolling process.

  14. Steam reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kramarz, Kurt W.; Bloom, Ira D.; Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Wilkenhoener, Rolf; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel. A vapor of the hydrocarbon fuel and steam is brought in contact with a two-part catalyst having a dehydrogenation powder portion and an oxide-ion conducting powder portion at a temperature not less than about 770.degree.C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich. The H.sub.2 content of the hydrogen gas is greater than about 70 percent by volume. The dehydrogenation portion of the catalyst includes a group VIII metal, and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide from the group crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure and mixtures thereof. The oxide-ion conducting portion of the catalyst is a ceramic powder of one or more of ZrO.sub.2, CeO.sub.2, Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3, (BiVO).sub.4, and LaGaO.sub.3.

  15. Formation, precursors, control, and occurrence of nitrosamines in drinking water: a review.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W; Mitch, William A; McCurry, Daniel L; Hanigan, David; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-09-01

    This review summarizes major findings over the last decade related to nitrosamines in drinking water, with a particular focus on N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), because it is among the most widely detected nitrosamines in drinking waters. The reaction of inorganic dichloramine with amine precursors is likely the dominant mechanism responsible for NDMA formation in drinking waters. Even when occurrence surveys found NDMA formation in chlorinated drinking waters, it is unclear whether chloramination resulted from ammonia in the source waters. NDMA formation has been associated with the use of quaternary amine-based coagulants and anion exchange resins, and wastewater-impaired source waters. Specific NDMA precursors in wastewater-impacted source waters may include tertiary amine-containing pharmaceuticals or other quaternary amine-containing constituents of personal care products. Options for nitrosamine control include physical removal of precursors by activated carbon or precursor deactivation by application of oxidants, particularly ozone or chlorine, upstream of chloramination. Although NDMA has been the most prevalent nitrosamine detected in worldwide occurrence surveys, it may account for only ≈ 5% of all nitrosamines in chloraminated drinking waters. Other significant contributors to total nitrosamines are poorly characterized. However, high levels of certain low molecular weight nitrosamines have been detected in certain Chinese waters suspected to be impaired by industrial effluents. The review concludes by identifying research needs that should be addressed over the next decade.

  16. Catalyst composition and impurity-dependent kinetics of nanowire heteroepitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gamalski, Andrew D; Perea, Daniel E; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Li, Nan; Olszta, Matthew J; Colby, Robert; Schreiber, Daniel K; Ducati, Caterina; Picraux, S Tom; Hofmann, Stephan

    2013-09-24

    The mechanisms and kinetics of axial Ge-Si nanowire heteroepitaxial growth based on the tailoring of the Au catalyst composition via Ga alloying are studied by environmental transmission electron microscopy combined with systematic ex situ CVD calibrations. The morphology of the Ge-Si heterojunction, in particular, the extent of a local, asymmetric increase in nanowire diameter, is found to depend on the Ga composition of the catalyst, on the TMGa precursor exposure temperature, and on the presence of dopants. To rationalize the findings, a general nucleation-based model for nanowire heteroepitaxy is established which is anticipated to be relevant to a wide range of material systems and device-enabling heterostructures.

  17. In Situ Graphene Growth Dynamics on Polycrystalline Catalyst Foils

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of graphene growth on polycrystalline Pt foils during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy and complementary structural characterization of the catalyst with electron backscatter diffraction. A general growth model is outlined that considers precursor dissociation, mass transport, and attachment to the edge of a growing domain. We thereby analyze graphene growth dynamics at different length scales and reveal that the rate-limiting step varies throughout the process and across different regions of the catalyst surface, including different facets of an individual graphene domain. The facets that define the domain shapes lie normal to slow growth directions, which are determined by the interfacial mobility when attachment to domain edges is rate-limiting, as well as anisotropy in surface diffusion as diffusion becomes rate-limiting. Our observations and analysis thus reveal that the structure of CVD graphene films is intimately linked to that of the underlying polycrystalline catalyst, with both interfacial mobility and diffusional anisotropy depending on the presence of step edges and grain boundaries. The growth model developed serves as a general framework for understanding and optimizing the growth of 2D materials on polycrystalline catalysts. PMID:27576749

  18. New catalysts for hydroprocessing: Transition metal carbides and nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, S.; Oyama, S.T. |

    1995-11-02

    A series of moderate surface area transition metal carbides and nitrides of molybdenum, tungsten, vanadium, niobium, and titanium were prepared by temperature-programmed reaction of the oxide precursor with a reactant gas (20% CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} for the carbides and 100% NH{sub 3} for the nitrides). The phase purity and composition of the samples were established by X-ray diffraction photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while surface properties were determined by N{sub 2} BET and CO chemisorption measurements. The catalysts were tested in three-phase trickle-bed reactor for their activity in hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), hydrodesulfurization, and hydrodeoxygenation, with particular emphasis on HDN. The catalytic tests were carried out using a model liquid feed mixture containing 3000 ppm sulfur (dibenzothiophene), 2000 ppm nitrogen (quinoline), 500 ppm oxygen (benzofuran), 20 wt% aromatics (tetralin), and balance aliphatics (tetradecane). The carbides and nitrides were found to be active for HDN of quinoline with activity following the order group 6 > group 5 > group 4. Notably, Mo{sub 2}C showed superior areal HDN activity than a commercial sulfided Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2} O{sub 3} catalyst (shell 324). The XRD analysis of the spent catalysts indicated no change in the bulk structure, while XPS results showed little incorporation of sulfur in the surface region of the catalysts, suggesting that these materials are tolerant of sulfur. 42 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Run 263 with Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal and dispersed molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This report presents the results of Run 263 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on October 31, 1991 and continued until February 23, 1992. Tests were conducted by operating the reactors in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode and by processing Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal from Wyodak-Anderson seam in Wyoming Powder River Basin. Half volume reactors were used for the entire run. In the first part of Run 263, a dispersed molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for its performance without a supported catalyst in the second stage. Molyvan L and Molyvan 822 (commercially available as friction reducing lubricants) were used as precursors for the dispersed molybdenum catalyst. The effect of the dispersed catalyst on eliminating the solids buildup was also evaluated. For the second part of the run, the hybrid catalyst system was tested with supported Criterion 324 1/1611 catalyst in the second stage at catalyst replacement rates of 2 and 3 lb/ton of MF coal. The molybdenum concentration was 100--200 ppm based on MF coal. Iron oxide was used as a slurry catalyst precursor at a rate of 1--2 wt % MF coal throughout the run with dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) as the sulfiding agent. The close-coupled reactor unit was on-stream for 2482 hours for an on-stream factor of 91.2% and the ROSE-SR[sup sm] unit was on-feed for 2126 hours for an on-stream factor of 96.4% for the entire run.

  20. Run 263 with Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal and dispersed molybdenum catalysts. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This report presents the results of Run 263 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on October 31, 1991 and continued until February 23, 1992. Tests were conducted by operating the reactors in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode and by processing Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal from Wyodak-Anderson seam in Wyoming Powder River Basin. Half volume reactors were used for the entire run. In the first part of Run 263, a dispersed molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for its performance without a supported catalyst in the second stage. Molyvan L and Molyvan 822 (commercially available as friction reducing lubricants) were used as precursors for the dispersed molybdenum catalyst. The effect of the dispersed catalyst on eliminating the solids buildup was also evaluated. For the second part of the run, the hybrid catalyst system was tested with supported Criterion 324 1/1611 catalyst in the second stage at catalyst replacement rates of 2 and 3 lb/ton of MF coal. The molybdenum concentration was 100--200 ppm based on MF coal. Iron oxide was used as a slurry catalyst precursor at a rate of 1--2 wt % MF coal throughout the run with dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) as the sulfiding agent. The close-coupled reactor unit was on-stream for 2482 hours for an on-stream factor of 91.2% and the ROSE-SR{sup sm} unit was on-feed for 2126 hours for an on-stream factor of 96.4% for the entire run.