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Sample records for catalytic converters suche

  1. Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

  2. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  3. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  4. Durability of ceramic catalytic converters for motorcycles

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.P.; Scott, P.L.; Hwang, H.S.; Mooney, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Motorcycle exhaust emission standards throughout the world are becoming more stringent. Emission control systems utilizing the catalytic converter are already in production in Taiwan for 2-stroke engine motorcycles. Catalysts designed for 2-stroke engines encounter a more severe exhaust environment than do those designed for 4-stroke engines. The two aspects of increased severity are the higher temperatures and higher stresses due to engine vibrations. Precious metal catalysts have been designed to operate in the thermal environment of 2-stroke engines and such catalysts have been successfully applied to both metal and ceramic substrates. However, until now, only the metal substrate catalysts have been utilized in motorcycle application. Ceramic based catalysts have not been considered because the mounting material that holds the catalyst substrate in place did not have enough durability to withstand the thermal/vibrational forces encountered in 2-stroke engine exhaust. Ceramic substrates have many advantages such as superior high temperature strength, which is especially important for the 2-stroke engine application, flexibility in cell shape and density, and lower cost. To realize these benefits, efforts were made in this study to develop better mounting systems. The results of this effort indicate that the durability requirements of 2-stroke engine can be met with the ceramic catalyst substrates if the improved mounting designs reported in the present study are employed.

  5. Caterpillar, Inc. — Converter GP-Catalytic Technology (CGP) system

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA memo approves Caterpillar Inc. request for Caterpillar Converter GP-Catalytic Technology (CGP) system for certain wheeled hydraulic excavators in reducing emissions and will be posted on the National Clean Diesel Verified Technologies List.

  6. Retrofit catalytic converter for wood-burning stoves

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The major purpose of this project was to design, fabricate, test, and evaluate a retrofit catalytic converter for woodburning stoves. In the interim between our date of application March 5, 1981 and the beginning of the grant period December 1, 1981, several such devices became commercially available. Therefore, we decided to modify the purpose and direction of our project. In summary, we designed and constructed a calorimeter room in a building located on the campus of Northern Kentucky University. We equipped this room with a woodburning stove and a metal chimney extending through the roof. We designed and constructed the appropriate instrumentation for monitoring the heat output of the stove. We observed and recorded the operating characteristics of this stove over a period of several days. We then equipped the stove with a barometric damper and repeated the experiment. We are now in the process of equipping the stove with a catalytic converter. Thus the major emphasis of the project currently is to test and evaluate several commercial retrofit devices which are purported to reduce creosote and/or increase the efficiency of a woodburning stove.

  7. I.C. Engine emission reduction by copper oxide catalytic converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, S. P.; Shubham Uday, Desai; Karan Hemant, Borana; Rajarshi Kushwanth Goud, Kagita; Lakshmana Kumar, G.; Pavan Kumar, K.

    2017-05-01

    The toxic gases emitted from diesel engines are more than petrol engines. Predicting the use of diesel engines, even more in future, this system is developed and can be used to minimize the harmful gases. Toxic gases include NOX, CO, HC and Smoke which are harmful to the atmosphere as well as to the human beings. The main aim of this work is to fabricate system, where the level of intensity of toxic gases is controlled through chemical reaction to more agreeable level. This system acts itself as an exhaust system; hence there is no needs to fit separate the silencer. The whole assembly is fitted in the exhaust pipe from engine. In this work, catalytic converter with copper oxide as a catalyst, by replacing noble catalysts such as platinum, palladium and rhodium is fabricated and fitted in the engine exhaust. With and without catalytic converter, the experimentations are carried out at different loads such as 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximum rated load. From the experimental results it is found that the maximum reduction is 32%, 61% and 21% for HC, NOx and CO respectively at 100% of maximum rated load when compared to that of without catalytic converter. This catalytic converter system is cash effective and more economical than the existing catalytic converter.

  8. Converting sugars to sugar alcohols by aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of converting sugars to their corresponding sugar alcohols by catalytic hydrogenation in the aqueous phase. It has been found that surprisingly superior results can be obtained by utilizing a relatively low temperature (less than 120.degree. C.), selected hydrogenation conditions, and a hydrothermally stable catalyst. These results include excellent sugar conversion to the desired sugar alcohol, in combination with long life under hydrothermal conditions.

  9. Applications and benefits of catalytic converter thermal management

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, S.D.; Keyser, M.A.; Colucci, C.P.; Potter, T.F.; Benson, D.K.; Biel, J.P.

    1996-07-01

    A catalytic converter thermal management system (TMS) using variable-conductance vacuum insulation and phase-change thermal storage can maintain the converter temperature above its operating temperature for many hours, allowing most trips to begin with minimal ``cold-start`` emissions. The latest converter TMS prototype was tested on a Ford Taurus (3.0 liter flex-fuel engine) at Southwest Research Institute. Following a 24-hour soak, the FTP-75 emissions were 0.031, 0.13, and 0.066 g/mile for NMHC, CO, and NOx, respectively. Tests were also run using 85% ethanol (E85), resulting in values of 0.005, 0.124, and 0.044 g/mile, and 0.005 g/mile NMOG. Compared to the baseline FTP levels, these values represent reductions of 84% to 96% for NMHC, NMOG, and CO.

  10. Thermal reliability and performance improvement of close-coupled catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Hijikata, Toshihiko; Kurachi, Hiroshi; Katsube, Fumio; Honacker, H. van

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a high temperature catalytic converter design using a ceramic substrate and intumescent matting. It also describes the improvement of converter performance using an advanced thin wall ceramic substrate. Due to future tightening of emission regulations and improvement of fuel economy, higher exhaust gas temperatures are suggested. Therefore, reduction of thermal reliability of an intumescent mat will be a concern because the catalytic converter will be exposed to high temperatures. For this reason, a new design converter has been developed using a dual cone structure for both the inlet and outlet cones. This minimizes heat conduction through the cone and decreases the temperature affecting the mat area. This design converter, without the use of a heat-shield, reduces the converter surface temperature to 441 C despite a catalyst bed temperature of 1,050 C. The long term durability of the converter is demonstrated by the hot vibration test. Since the new design converter does not need a heat-shield, the catalyst diameter can be enlarged by the width of the air gap used in the current design converter. By using an advanced thin wall ceramic substrate, such as 0.11 mm/620 kcpsm (4 mil/400 cpsi), it is possible to improve emission performance and pressure drop compared with the conventional 0.16 mm/620 kcpsm (6 mil/400 cpsi) ceramic substrate.

  11. Optimization of the packing design for manifold catalytic converter application

    SciTech Connect

    Kil, J.; Yeo, G.

    1996-09-01

    A preconverter is an essential component of the new vehicle exhaust system for the achievement of tightened emission standards. To meet those standards, the Manifold Catalytic Converter (MCC) system has been developed in the Hyundai Motor Company (HMC). Unfortunately, the conventional MCC is no longer a suitable design for the exhaust gas treatment of the newly developed high performance engine since it cannot withstand the engine`s exhaust temperature, vibration, pressure pulsation, and many other severe conditions. This paper is focused on a failure-mode analysis and new packing designs for the MCC application through a series of durability tests.

  12. Monolithic catalyst catalytic converter with catalyst holding expansible retainer ring

    SciTech Connect

    Isogai, K.; Koga, I.; Ohmori, N.; Okamoto, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Takita, N.; Tobi, N.

    1984-05-15

    A catalytic converter includes a tubular casing within which is held a monolithic catalyst body which is generally of a columnar shape. The ends of the monolithic catalyst body are each engaged with a cushion ring, and each cushion ring is engaged with a retainer ring therefor, which is substantially axially fixed within the casing near to an end thereof. The monolithic catalyst body is supported within the casing by axial compressive force present between the retainer rings on the outside, the cushion rings between the retainer rings, and the monolithic catalyst body between the cushion rings. At least one of the retainer rings is formed with a break in a part of its circumference, the two free ends of the retainer ring on the two sides of the break being movable with distortion of the retainer ring through a certain distance, according to changes of temperature of the retainer ring, with respect to one another in the mutual relative direction which causes the overall circumference of the retainer ring to be diminished, so that expansion of the retainer ring when it heats up is adsorbed, and the retainer ring is not subject to kinking or folding when the catalytic converter operates in the hot condition.

  13. Performance simulations of catalytic converters during the Federal Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.; Shamim, T.; Sengupta, S.; Son, S.; Adamczyk, A.A.

    1999-07-01

    A numerical study is carried out to predict the tailpipe emissions and emission conversion efficiencies of unburned hydrocarbon, nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide flowing through a catalytic converter during the Federal Test Procedure (FTP). The model considers the effect of heat transfer in the catalytic converter, coupled with catalyst chemical kinetics, including an oxygen storage mechanism. The resulting governing equations based on the conservation of mass and energy are solved by a tridiagonal matrix algorithm (TDMA) with a successive line under relaxation method. The numerical scheme for this non-linear problem is found to have good convergence efficiency. The simulation for the complete FTP cycle is accomplished in less than fifteen minutes on a desktop personal computer. A 13-step reaction mechanism plus a nine-step O{sub 2} storage mechanism is used to simulate the chemical kinetics. The energy equations include the heat loss due to conduction and convection plus the energy liberated by chemical reactions. The effect of radiation is assumed to be negligible and is not considered. The results of the numerical model for both the instantaneous and accumulated emissions are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. The conversion efficiencies of HC, CO and NO as predicted by the model are found to be within 5% of those dynamic measurements, and calculated results of accumulated HC, CO and NO{sub x} are in fair agreement with experimental measurements. The transient measurements are also used to check the robustness of the numerical model. The model is found to be robust and hence can simulate various operating conditions of engine output to the converter.

  14. TEC as electric generator in an automobile catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, R.; Holmlid, L.

    1996-12-31

    Modern cars use more and more electric power due to more on-board electric systems, e.g., ABS brakes, active suspension systems, electric windows, chair adjustment systems and electronic engine control systems. One possible energy source for electricity generation is to use the waste heat from the car`s engine, which generally is as much as 80% of the total energy from the combustion of the gasoline. Maybe the best location to tap the excess heat is the Catalytic Converter (Cat) in the exhaust system or perhaps at the exhaust pipes close to the engine. The Cat must be kept within a certain temperature interval. Large amounts of heat are dissipated through the wall of the Cat. A Thermionic Energy Converter (TEC) in coaxial form could conveniently be located around the ceramic cartridge of the Cat. Since the TEC is a rather good heat insulator before it reaches its working temperature the Cat will reach working temperature faster, and the final temperature of it can be controlled better when encapsulated in a concentric TEC arrangement. It is also possible to regulate the temperature of the Cat and the TEC by controlling the electrical load of the TEC. The possible working temperatures of present and future Cats appear very suitable for the new low work function collector TEC, which has been demonstrated to work down to 470 K.

  15. Potential for recovery of cerium contained in automotive catalytic converters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic converters (CATCONs) are required by Federal law to be installed in nearly all gasoline- and diesel-fueled onroad vehicles used in the United States. About 85 percent of the light-duty vehicles and trucks manufactured worldwide are equipped with CATCONs. Portions of the CATCONs (called monoliths) are recycled for their platinum-group metal (PGM) content and for the value of the stainless steel they contain. The cerium contained in the monoliths, however, is disposed of along with the slag produced from the recycling process. Although there is some smelter capacity in the United States to treat the monoliths in order to recover the PGMs, a great percentage of monoliths is exported to Europe and South Africa for recycling, and a lesser amount is exported to Japan. There is presently no commercial-scale capacity in place domestically to recover cerium from the monoliths. Recycling of cerium or cerium compounds from the monoliths could help ensure against possible global supply shortages by increasing the amount that is available in the supply chain as well as the number and geographic distribution of the suppliers. It could also reduce the amount of material that goes into landfills. Also, the additional supply could lower the price of the commodity. This report analyzes how much cerium oxide is contained in CATCONs and how much could be recovered from used CATCONs.

  16. Automated X-ray quality control of catalytic converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashishekhar, N.; Veselitza, D.

    2017-02-01

    Catalytic converters are devices attached to the exhaust system of automobile or other engines to eliminate or substantially reduce polluting emissions. They consist of coated substrates enclosed in a stainless steel housing. The substrate is typically made of ceramic honeycombs; however stainless steel foil honeycombs are also used. The coating is usually a slurry of alumina, silica, rare earth oxides and platinum group metals. The slurry also known as the wash coat is applied to the substrate in two doses, one on each end of the substrate; in some cases multiple layers of coating are applied. X-ray imaging is used to inspect the applied coating depth on a substrate to confirm compliance with quality requirements. Automated image analysis techniques are employed to measure the coating depth from the X-ray image. Coating depth is assessed by analysis of attenuation line profiles in the image. Edge detection algorithms with noise reduction and outlier rejection are used to calculate the coating depth at a specified point along an attenuation line profile. Quality control of the product is accomplished using several attenuation line profile regions for coating depth measurements, with individual pass or fail criteria specified for each region.

  17. Bioaccessibility of platinum group elements in automotive catalytic converter particulates.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Price, Simon

    2008-12-15

    The bioaccessibilities of the platinum group elements (PGE): Rh, Pd, and Pt; and the catalyzator poison, Pb, have been determined in particles derived from milled automotive catalytic converters using a physiologically based extraction test (PBET) that simulates, sequentially, the chemical conditions encountered in the human stomach and intestine. PGE accessibility, relative to total metal concentration, was generally less than a few percent, but increased in the stomach with decreasing pH (from 4 to 1) and/or increasing chloride concentration, and with decreasing particle concentration. In most cases, bioaccessibility increased from the acidic stomach to the neutral, carbonate-rich intestine. Bioaccessibility of Pb displayed similar pH and particle concentration dependencies to PGE in the stomach, but this metal exhibited significantly greater mobilization (up to 80%) overall and a reduction in accessibility from the stomach to intestine. Reaction kinetics of PGE dissolution in the stomach at pH 2.5 were modeled using a combined surface reaction-diffusion controlled mechanism with rate constants of 0.068, 0.031, and 0.015 (microg L(-1))(-1) h(-1) for Rh, Pd, and Pt, respectively. For Pb, however, mobilization proceeded via a different mechanism whose time-dependence was fitted with an empirical, logarithmic equation. Overall, PGE bioaccessibility appeared to be controlled by dissolution rates of metallic nanoparticles in the stomach, and solubility and kinetic constraints on inorganic species (chlorides, hydroxychlorides, and carbanatochlorides) and undefined organic complexes formed in the simulated gastrointestinal tract. Further studies are required to elucidate any effects engendered by the long-term oral exposure of small quantities of these species.

  18. Converting Light Energy to Chemical Energy: A New Catalytic Approach for Sustainable Environmental Remediation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michelle A; Zahran, Elsayed M; Wilbon, Azaan S; Besmer, Alexander V; Cendan, Vincent J; Ranson, William A; Lawrence, Randy L; Cohn, Joshua L; Bachas, Leonidas G; Knecht, Marc R

    2016-07-31

    We report a synthetic approach to form cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures and demonstrate their use as photocatalytic materials for tandem catalysis. Pd nanoparticles were deposited onto Cu2O cubes, and their tandem catalytic reactivity was studied via the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls. The Pd content of the materials was gradually increased to examine its influence on particle morphology and catalytic performance. Materials were prepared at different Pd amounts and demonstrated a range of tandem catalytic reactivity. H2 was generated via photocatalytic proton reduction initiated by Cu2O, followed by Pd-catalyzed dehalogenation using in situ generated H2. The results indicate that material morphology and composition and substrate steric effects play important roles in controlling the overall reaction rate. Additionally, analysis of the postreacted materials revealed that a small number of the cubes had become hollow during the photodechlorination reaction. Such findings offer important insights regarding photocatalytic active sites and mechanisms, providing a pathway toward converting light-based energy to chemical energy for sustainable catalytic reactions not typically driven via light.

  19. Converting Light Energy to Chemical Energy: A New Catalytic Approach for Sustainable Environmental Remediation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a synthetic approach to form cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures and demonstrate their use as photocatalytic materials for tandem catalysis. Pd nanoparticles were deposited onto Cu2O cubes, and their tandem catalytic reactivity was studied via the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls. The Pd content of the materials was gradually increased to examine its influence on particle morphology and catalytic performance. Materials were prepared at different Pd amounts and demonstrated a range of tandem catalytic reactivity. H2 was generated via photocatalytic proton reduction initiated by Cu2O, followed by Pd-catalyzed dehalogenation using in situ generated H2. The results indicate that material morphology and composition and substrate steric effects play important roles in controlling the overall reaction rate. Additionally, analysis of the postreacted materials revealed that a small number of the cubes had become hollow during the photodechlorination reaction. Such findings offer important insights regarding photocatalytic active sites and mechanisms, providing a pathway toward converting light-based energy to chemical energy for sustainable catalytic reactions not typically driven via light. PMID:27656687

  20. Biologic effects of auto emissions. I. Exhaust from engine with and without catalytic converter.

    PubMed

    Lee, S D; Malanchuk, M; Finelli, V N

    1976-05-01

    This paper relates to the efficacy of a catalytic converter in reducing the levels of certain pollutants emitted from an automobile engine and to the reduction and/or elimination of gross biologic damages in animals exposed to emissions from an exhaust system containing such catalysts. Groups of rats were exposed to diluted emissions from an automobile engine with and without catalyst. Concomitantly, a comparative experiment was conducted by exposing a group of rats to carbon monoxide alone (575 mg/m3). The parameters measured included hematocrit, serum LDH, GOT, and lysozyme. An elevation in hematocrit was observed in animals of the experiment run without catalyst and in those exposed to carbon monoxide; the use of the catalyst reduced the carbon monoxide levels in the exposure chambers by more than tenfold and prevented these bioeffects from occurring. Serum LDH activity was elevated in the groups of rats in the experiment conducted without catalyst, but no alternation was observed in the animals from the experiment utilizing the catalyst or in those exposed to carbon monoxide alone. The data obtained in this study showed that acute exposure to noncatalytic emissions caused significant alterations in certain biologic parameters. Conversely, the introduction of an oxidizing catalytic converter into the engine exhaust system reduced or prevented such biologic damage.

  1. Demonstration of a Catalytic Converter Using a Lawn Mower Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion is an important tool in environmental-remediation strategies and source removal of pollutants. Because a catalyst is regenerated, the chemistry can be extremely effective for conversion of undesirable pollutant species to less harmful products in situations where the pollutants have accumulated or are being continuously…

  2. Demonstration of a Catalytic Converter Using a Lawn Mower Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion is an important tool in environmental-remediation strategies and source removal of pollutants. Because a catalyst is regenerated, the chemistry can be extremely effective for conversion of undesirable pollutant species to less harmful products in situations where the pollutants have accumulated or are being continuously…

  3. Pre-converted nitric oxide gas in catalytic reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Mark C.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.

    1999-01-01

    A two-stage catalyst comprises an oxidative first stage and a reductive second stage. The first stage is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2. The second stage serves to convert NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N2, CO2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber. An oxidizing first catalyst converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and includes platinum/alumina, e.g., Pt/Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalyst. A flow of hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from a pipe into a second chamber. For example, propene can be used as a source of hydrocarbons. The NO.sub.2 from the first catalyst mixes with the hydrocarbons in the second chamber. The mixture proceeds to a second reduction catalyst that converts NO.sub.2 to N2, CO2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a gamma-alumina .gamma.-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the second catalyst.

  4. Pre-converted nitric oxide gas in catalytic reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1999-04-06

    A two-stage catalyst comprises an oxidative first stage and a reductive second stage. The first stage is intended to convert NO to NO{sub 2} in the presence of O{sub 2}. The second stage serves to convert NO{sub 2} to environmentally benign gases that include N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O. By preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} in the first stage, the efficiency of the second stage for NO{sub x} reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber. An oxidizing first catalyst converts NO to NO{sub 2} in the presence of O{sub 2} and includes platinum/alumina, e.g., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. A flow of hydrocarbons (C{sub x}H{sub y}) is input from a pipe into a second chamber. For example, propene can be used as a source of hydrocarbons. The NO{sub 2} from the first catalyst mixes with the hydrocarbons in the second chamber. The mixture proceeds to a second reduction catalyst that converts NO{sub 2} to N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O, and includes a {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} are simultaneously reduced while passing through the second catalyst. 9 figs.

  5. Study on the thermal deactivation of motorcycle catalytic converters by laboratory aging tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chi; Chen, Lu-Yen; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jeng, Fu-Tien

    2010-03-01

    Catalytic converters are used to curb exhaust pollution from motorcycles in Taiwan. A number of factors, including the length of time the converter is used for and driving conditions, affect the catalysts' properties during periods of use. The goal of this study is to resolve the thermal deactivation mechanism of motorcycle catalytic converters. Fresh catalysts were treated under different aging conditions by laboratory-scale aging tests to simulate the operation conditions of motorcycle catalytic converters. The aged catalysts were characterized by analytical techniques in order to provide information for investigating deactivation phenomena. The time-dependent data of specific surface areas were subsequently used to construct kinetics of sintering at the specific temperature. According to the analytical results of the catalysts' properties, the increase in aging temperature causes an increase in pore size of the catalysts and a decrease in the specific surface area. The aged catalysts all exhibited lower performances than the fresh ones. The reduction in catalytic activity is consistent with the reduction in the loss of specific surface area. The finding of catalytic properties' dependence on temperature is consistent with the thermally activated theory. In contrast, the effect of the aging time on the specific surface area was only significant during the initial few hours. The high correlation between specific surface areas measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and predicted by the constructed model verifies that the prediction models can predict the sintering rate reasonably under the aging conditions discussed in this study. As compared to automobile catalytic converters, the differences of structures and aging conditions are made less obvious by the deactivation phenomena of motorcycles.

  6. Correlations of asthma mortality with traffic-related factors: use of catalytic converters and radial tires.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, Thomas F; Lafleur, Arthur L; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Takada, Hideshige; Herrero-Jimenez, Pablo; Thilly, William G

    2006-12-01

    : The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that the post-1970 rise in asthma mortality in industrialized nations was related to introduction of catalytic converters and/or radial tires. : Annual asthma mortality data were plotted on linear coordinates for fraction of automobile fleet with converters or radial tires in Canada, Germany, Japan, and the United States. : Catalytic converter association could not account for asthma mortality that rose in Germany before general adoption of the technology there. Radial tire use was, however, linearly correlated with asthma mortality in all four countries. : Rising exposure to materials related to radial tire use may account for a substantial fraction of increased asthma mortality risk since approximately 1970.

  7. Platinum leaching from automotive catalytic converters with aqua regia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasani, M.; Khodadadi, A.; Koleini, S. M. J.; Saeedi, A. H.; Pérez-Pacheco, Y.; Meléndez, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Herein, kinetics extraction of platinum from spent auto catalysts, using nitric acid as an oxidant in hydrochloric acid solution, was investigated. The parameters such as temperature, hydrochloric and nitric acid concentrations, stirring speed, particle size and liquid/solid ratio, were analysed. The kinetic data were analysed using the shrinking core model. A variant of this model fits the kinetic data more appropriately. At a temperature of 90°C, the values of R2 in surface chemical reactions and diffusion were 0.819 and 0.937, respectively. With the alternative model, however, 0.991 was obtained. The activation energy for the dissolution was 35.75kJ/mol.

  8. Catalytic converter with fluid injector for catalyst-free enclosure of catalyst bed

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, S.P.S.

    1984-09-25

    A fluid injection lozenge comprises two tubes supporting a perforate member forming a cage enclosing the space between the tubes. Each tube has a series of perforations along its length so that a fluid can be injected, through the tube, into the enclosed space. The lozenges are of use in catalytic converters of either the axial or radial flow design. In the case of a radial flow converter, a plurality of tubes are provided, preferably connected in pairs by the perforate members, to form a squirrel cage structure, disposed in the catalyst bed.

  9. Emission reduction from a diesel engine fueled by pine oil biofuel using SCR and catalytic converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Yang, W. M.; Saravanan, C. G.; Lee, P. S.; Chua, K. J. E.; Chou, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we propose pine oil biofuel, a renewable fuel obtained from the resins of pine tree, as a potential substitute fuel for a diesel engine. Pine oil is endowed with enhanced physical and thermal properties such as lower viscosity and boiling point, which enhances the atomization and fuel/air mixing process. However, the lower cetane number of the pine oil hinders its direct use in diesel engine and hence, it is blended in suitable proportions with diesel so that the ignition assistance could be provided by higher cetane diesel. Since lower cetane fuels are prone to more NOX formation, SCR (selective catalyst reduction), using urea as reducing agent, along with a CC (catalytic converter) has been implemented in the exhaust pipe. From the experimental study, the BTE (brake thermal efficiency) was observed to be increased as the composition of pine oil increases in the blend, with B50 (50% pine oil and 50% diesel) showing 7.5% increase over diesel at full load condition. The major emissions such as smoke, CO, HC and NOX were reduced by 70.1%, 67.5%, 58.6% and 15.2%, respectively, than diesel. Further, the average emissions of B50 with SCR and CC assembly were observed to be reduced, signifying the positive impact of pine oil biofuel on atmospheric environment. In the combustion characteristics front, peak heat release rate and maximum in-cylinder pressure were observed to be higher with longer ignition delay.

  10. Impact of Hong Kong's Voluntary Catalytic Converter Replacement Programme on Roadside Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Guo, H.; Louie, P. K. K.; Luk, C.; Lyu, X.; Meinardi, S.; Yam, Y. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    As part of its ongoing policies to improve roadside air quality, in 2013 the Hong Kong government launched an incentive programme to replace catalytic converters and oxygen sensors in taxis and light buses mainly fueled by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The majority of replacements occurred from October 2013 to April 2014, with 75% of eligible vehicles participating in the programme, or 16,472 vehicles. Based on taxi exhaust measurements at a Hong Kong vehicle testing facility, the concentrations of n-butane, propane and i-butane (the primary components of LPG) decreased by 97% following the replacements. To determine the impact of the programme on roadside air quality, long-term measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed before, during and after the replacement programme, mainly at a busy roadside location in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. A clear decrease in the levels of major pollutants associated with LPG vehicle exhaust was observed at the roadside. For example, average (± 1 standard deviation) n-butane levels from October to April decreased from 13.0 ± 3.6 and 13.9 ± 2.6 ppbv in the two years preceding the programme, to 9.2 ± 2.9 ppbv during the programme, to 6.2 ± 1.7 ppbv the year after the programme. By contrast, compounds such as i-pentane that are not strongly associated with LPG or with LPG exhaust remained steady, averaging 0.90 ± 0.34, 1.01 ± 0.31, 0.93 ± 0.37, and 0.91 ± 0.42 ppbv from October to April of 2011/12, 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15, respectively. Impacts of the programme on roadside levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) will also be discussed. Because many taxis are high mileage vehicles that travel several hundred kilometers daily, their catalytic converters need to be replaced approximately every 18 months. Therefore ongoing vehicle maintenance will be required in order to preserve the gains made from this initial subsidy programme.

  11. Using heat pipe to make isotherm condition in catalytic converters of sulfuric acid plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, M.; Pahlavanzadeh, H.; Sadrameli, S. M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, for the first time, it is tried to construct a pilot reactor, for surveying the possibility of creating isothermal condition in the catalytic convertors where SO2 is converted to SO3 in the sulfuric acid plants by heat pipe. The thermodynamic and thermo-kinetic conditions were considered the same as the sulfuric acid plants converters. Also, influence of SO2 gas flow rate on isothermal condition, has been studied. A thermo-siphon type heat pipe contains the sulfur + 5% iodine as working fluid, was used for disposing the heat of reaction from catalytic bed. Our results show that due to very high energy-efficiency, isothermal and passive heat transfer mechanism of heat pipe, it is possible to reach more than 95% conversion in one isothermal catalytic bed. As the results, heat pipe can be used as a certain piece of equipment to create isothermal condition in catalytic convertors of sulphuric acid plants. With this work a major evaluation in design of sulphuric acid plants can be taken place.

  12. Using heat pipe to make isotherm condition in catalytic converters of sulfuric acid plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, M.; Pahlavanzadeh, H.; Sadrameli, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, for the first time, it is tried to construct a pilot reactor, for surveying the possibility of creating isothermal condition in the catalytic convertors where SO2 is converted to SO3 in the sulfuric acid plants by heat pipe. The thermodynamic and thermo-kinetic conditions were considered the same as the sulfuric acid plants converters. Also, influence of SO2 gas flow rate on isothermal condition, has been studied. A thermo-siphon type heat pipe contains the sulfur + 5% iodine as working fluid, was used for disposing the heat of reaction from catalytic bed. Our results show that due to very high energy-efficiency, isothermal and passive heat transfer mechanism of heat pipe, it is possible to reach more than 95% conversion in one isothermal catalytic bed. As the results, heat pipe can be used as a certain piece of equipment to create isothermal condition in catalytic convertors of sulphuric acid plants. With this work a major evaluation in design of sulphuric acid plants can be taken place.

  13. Calculating the rate of exothermic energy release for catalytic converter efficiency monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hepburn, J.S.; Meitzler, A.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on the development of a new methodology for OBD-II catalyst efficiency monitoring. Temperature measurements taken from the center of the catalyst substrate or near the exterior surface of the catalyst brick were used in conjunction with macroscopic energy balances to calculate the instantaneous rate of exothermic energy generation within the catalyst. The total calculated rate of exothermic energy release over the FTP test cycle was within 10% of the actual or theoretical value and provided a good indicator of catalyst light-off for a variety of aged catalytic converters. Normalization of the rate of exothermic energy release in the front section of the converter by the mass flow rate of air inducted through the engine was found to provide a simple yet practical means of monitoring the converter under both FTP and varying types of road driving.

  14. Effects of a catalytic converter on PCDD/F, chlorophenol and PAH emissions in residential wood combustion.

    PubMed

    Kaivosoja, T; Virén, A; Tissari, J; Ruuskanen, J; Tarhanen, J; Sippula, O; Jokiniemi, J

    2012-07-01

    Catalytic converters can be used to decrease carbon monoxide, organic compounds and soot from small-scale wood-fired appliances. The reduction is based on the oxidation of gaseous and particulate pollutants promoted by catalytic transition metal surfaces. However, many transition metals have also strong catalytic effect on PCDD/F formation. In this study birch logs were burned in a wood-fired stove (18 kW) with and without a catalytic converter with palladium and platinum as catalysts. PCDD/F, chlorophenol and PAH concentrations were analyzed from three phases of combustion (ignition, pyrolysis and burnout) and from the whole combustion cycle. PCDD/F emissions without the catalytic converter were at a level previously measured for wood combustion (0.15-0.74 ng N m(-3)). PAH emissions without the catalytic converter were high (47-85 mg N m(-3)) which is typical for batch combustion of wood logs. Total PAH concentrations were lower (on average 0.8-fold), and chlorophenol and PCDD/F levels were substantially higher (4.3-fold and 8.7-fold, respectively) when the catalytic converter was used. Increase in the chlorophenol and PCDD/F concentrations was most likely due to the catalytic effect of the platinum and palladium. Platinum and palladium may catalyze chlorination of PCDD/Fs via the Deacon reaction or an oxidation process. The influence of emissions from wood combustion to human health and the environment is a sum of effects caused by different compounds formed in the combustion. Therefore, the usage of platinum and palladium based catalytic converters to reduce emissions from residential wood combustion should be critically evaluated before wide-range utilization of the technology.

  15. Targeted catalytic inactivation of angiotensin converting enzyme by lisinopril-coupled transition-metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Hocharoen, Lalintip; Cowan, J A

    2012-02-22

    A series of compounds that target reactive transition-metal chelates to somatic angiotensin converting enzyme (sACE-1) have been synthesized. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) and rate constants for both inactivation and cleavage of full-length sACE-1 have been determined and evaluated in terms of metal chelate size, charge, reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and coreactant selectivity. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and tripeptide GGH were linked to the lysine side chain of lisinopril by 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling. The resulting amide-linked chelate-lisinopril (EDTA-lisinopril, NTA-lisinopril, DOTA-lisinopril, and GGH-lisinopril) conjugates were used to form coordination complexes with iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper, such that lisinopril could mediate localization of the reactive metal chelates to sACE-1. ACE activity was assayed by monitoring cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate Mca-RPPGFSAFK(Dnp)-OH, a derivative of bradykinin, following preincubation with metal chelate-lisinopril compounds. Concentration-dependent inhibition of sACE-1 by metal chelate-lisinopril complexes revealed IC(50) values ranging from 44 to 4500 nM for Ni-NTA-lisinopril and Ni-DOTA-lisinopril, respectively, versus 1.9 nM for lisinopril. Stronger inhibition was correlated with smaller size and lower negative charge of the attached metal chelates. Time-dependent inactivation of sACE-1 by metal chelate-lisinopril complexes revealed a remarkable range of catalytic activities, with second-order rate constants as high as 150,000 M(-1) min(-1) (Cu-GGH-lisinopril), while catalyst-mediated cleavage of sACE-1 typically occurred at much lower rates, indicating that inactivation arose primarily from side chain modification. Optimal inactivation of sACE-1 was observed when the reduction potential for the

  16. Targeted Catalytic Inactivation of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Jeff C.; Hocharoen, Lalintip; Cowan, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    A series of compounds that target reactive transition metal chelates to somatic Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) have been synthesized. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) and rate constants for both inactivation and cleavage of full length sACE-1 have been determined and evaluated in terms of metal-chelate size, charge, reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and coreactant selectivity. Ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and tripeptide GGH were linked to the lysine sidechain of lisinopril by EDC/NHS coupling. The resulting amide-linked chelate-lisinopril (EDTA-lisinopril, NTA-lisinopril, DOTA-lisinopril, and GGH-lisinopril) conjugates were used to form coordination complexes with iron, cobalt, nickel and copper, such that lisinopril could mediate localization of the reactive metal chelates to sACE-1. ACE activity was assayed by monitoring cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate Mca-RPPGFSAFK(Dnp)-OH, a derivative of bradykinin, following pre-incubation with metal-chelate-lisinopril compounds. Concentration-dependent inhibition of sACE-1 by metal-chelate-lisinopril complexes revealed IC50 values ranging from 44 nM to 4,500 nM for Ni-NTA-lisinopril and Ni-DOTA-lisinopril, respectively, versus 1.9 nM for lisinopril. Stronger inhibition was correlated with smaller size and lower negative charge of the attached metal chelates. Time-dependent inactivation of sACE-1 by metal-chelate-lisinopril complexes revealed a remarkable range of catalytic activities, with second order rate constants as high as 150,000 M−1min−1 (Cu-GGH-lisinopril), while catalyst-mediated cleavage of sACE-1 typically occurred at much lower rates, indicating that inactivation arose primary from sidechain modification. Optimal inactivation of sACE-1 was observed when the reduction potential for the metal center was poised near 1000 mV, reflecting the difficulty of protein

  17. Catalytic converters for exhaust emission control of commercial equipment powered by internal combustion engines.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, J G

    1975-01-01

    The development of PTX, monolithic catalytic exhaust purifiers, is outlined, and their first use for exhaust emissions control of commercial equipment is described. The main use of PTX converters is on forklift trucks. The purification achievable with PTX-equipped fork-lift trucks under various operational conditions is discussed, and examples from the field are given. During more than ten years of operation, no adverse health effects have been reported, and PTX-equipped internal combustion engines appear safe for use in confined areas. PMID:50933

  18. Catalytic hydrosolvation process converts coal to low-sulfur liquid fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the catalytic hydrosolvation process for converting coal to low-sulfur fuel oil is described in this paper. Coal impregnated with catalyst was slurried with oil, and the mixture was hydrogenated at a temperature of 475 C, and 30 min residence time under 3600 psi pressure. A ton of coal yielded 3.5 bbl of fuel oil containing 0.2% sulfur, with naphtha and C1-C4 hydrocarbon gases as byproducts. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process indicated potential for further development.

  19. Catalytic hydrosolvation process converts coal to low-sulfur liquid fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the catalytic hydrosolvation process for converting coal to low-sulfur fuel oil is described in this paper. Coal impregnated with catalyst was slurried with oil, and the mixture was hydrogenated at a temperature of 475 C, and 30 min residence time under 3600 psi pressure. A ton of coal yielded 3.5 bbl of fuel oil containing 0.2% sulfur, with naphtha and C1-C4 hydrocarbon gases as byproducts. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process indicated potential for further development.

  20. Evaluation of on-board diagnosis methods for three-way catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Tsinoglou, Dimitrios N; Koltsakis, Grigorios C; Samaras, Zissis C

    2002-12-01

    On-board diagnosis (OBD) aims at detecting malfunctions of emission-related components of road vehicles. It is required by legislation in United States and the European Union, as it is considered to be beneficial for the reduction of vehicle-related air pollution. On-board diagnosis of the catalytic converter is a challenging task, as it relies on indirect assessments of catalyst activity. Several methods have been proposed for catalyst diagnosis, presenting a varying degree of correlation between the quantities used as OBD indexes and the actual tailpipe emissions. This paper evaluates two methods, with the support of mathematical modeling; in the first one, which is commonly used by vehicle manufacturers, malfunction detection relies on the oxygen storage properties of the catalyst, while in the second, detection relies on the heat released by the chemical reactions in the catalyst. Both are found to be sufficient for the diagnosis of catalytic converters for current legislation requirements. However, the thermal method presents higher sensitivity to low levels of catalyst deactivation and could therefore be more suitable for diagnosis of future, ultra-low-emitting vehicles.

  1. Acoustical inspection method for inspecting the ceramic coating of catalytic converter monolith substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Varterasian, J.H.; Blaser, D.A.

    1987-03-31

    An acoustic inspection method is described for determining in a catalytic converter monolith substrate whether a ceramic coating was applied in a predetermined amount to the surface of exhaust gas passages extending therethrough and whether the ceramic coating is blocking any of the passages. The method comprises: (a) mounting a catalytic converter monolith substrate with ceramic coated exhaust gas passages extending therethrough in an acoustically sealed structure so as to form a throat communicating a speaker at an entrance end of the coated passages with an empty resonator cavity at an exit end of the coated passages and thereby form a Helmholtz resonator, (b) driving the speaker to produce a continuous sound wave through the coated passages into the resonator cavity at a predetermined frequency and thereby produce oscillatory sound waves through the coated passages at the same frequency, (c) comparing the phase angles of the sound waves at the entrance and exit ends of the coated substrate passages and with respect to those of a reference sound wave of the same frequency passed in like manner through a reference substrate known to have the desired quantity of coating on the passages and no blockage, and (d) detecting whether or not the passages of the substrate being inspected have the prescribed quantity and any blockage on the basis that the occurrence of a prescribed difference in the phase angles infers a deviation in the total flow area of the passages and thereby a deviation from the desired coating as to amount and lack of blockage.

  2. Occurrence of acid rain in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Summer 1981. The role of the catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.W.; Ghane, H.

    1982-01-01

    Between June and October 1981, acid rain falling in Baton Rouge, LA was studied. The acidity of the rain ranged for pH 3.9 to pH 5.8. Preliminary data showed that rain associated with thermal cumulo nimbus tended to be more acidic, but rain associated with active cold fronts were less acid. This may relate to dispersion and dilution of the acid aerosols by the cold front. It is proposed that exhaust from automobiles fitted with catalytic converters is a substantial contributor to the acid rain problem, and that their net value to the abatement of pollution must be questioned, particularly in regions of the country where smog is not a problem. (JMT)

  3. A theoretical study for one-dimensional modeling for VOC in a catalytic converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, S.; Sharma, L.; Srivastava, V. K.

    2010-07-01

    Modeling for catalytic oxidation of a volatile organic compound, acetaldehyde for the purpose of controlling tail-pipe emissions from vehicular exhaust was carried out. The model developed was one-dimensional unsteady state model, using mass and energy balance equations to predict results for acetaldehyde conversion in an adiabatic monolith operating under warm-up conditions. The equations consisted of a set of partial differential equations that are coupled and solved using Backward Implicit Scheme. Analysis of the behavior of the converter during warm up period was carried out and it was observed that the warm up was faster for a fresh catalyst and this warm up period could be reduced by introducing hot incoming exhaust gas at higher temperature.

  4. Kinetic studies of competitive adsorption processes related to automobile catalytic converters

    SciTech Connect

    Zaera, F.; Paffett, M.T.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to study the microscopic details for the adsorption of CO, NO, and O{sub 2} on transition metal surfaces under conditions resembling those present in automobile catalytic converters. Initial sticking coefficients were measured as a function of temperature on transition metal single crystals by using a method originally developed by King and Wells. These measurements were performed under conditions emulating those typical of competitive adsorption, namely, where the substrate is exposed to a mixture of two or more gases simultaneously, or where one molecule is adsorbed on the surface prior to exposure to the second gas. The experimental results were then analyzed by using Monte Carlo computer simulation algorithm in an attempt to better understand the relevant aspects of the adsorption process.

  5. The application of PIXE to the mapping of contaminants deposited on a monolithic automotive catalytic converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angove, Dennys E.; Cant, Noel W.; Bailey, Grahame M.; Cohen, David D.

    1996-04-01

    Automotive catalytic converters lose activity whilst in service. The degree of deactivation depends upon a number of factors including contamination by residues of additives or trace elements in fuel and/or engine oil, which generally reduces the surface area of the catalyst. In this initial investigation, PIXE was used to map contaminant deposition at three points along each of the central longitudinal axis and a parallel axis located closer to the side of a single monolith. This monolith was selected because it was physically undamaged and exhibited low surface area (<2 m 2 g -1) at the front and reasonable surface area (>10 m 2 g -1) towards the rear. A total of 20 elements were identified. The contaminants P, K, Ca, Zn and Pb were deposited in greater concentration towards the front of the monolith on both axes. Si may also be a contaminant; it is unexpectedly deposited more uniformly along the central axis than along the parallel side axis where it appears to decrease linearly from front to rear. Degraded precision was obtained for Al and Si in samples that were heavily contaminated.

  6. Oxidative destruction of biomolecules by gasoline engine exhaust products and detoxifying effects of the three-way catalytic converter.

    PubMed

    Blaurock, B; Hippeli, S; Metz, N; Elstner, E F

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of engine exhaust condensation products were derived from cars powered by diesel or four-stroke gasoline engines (with and without three-way catalytic converter). The cars were operated on a static test platform. Samples of the different exhaust solutions accumulated in a Grimmer-type distillation trap (VDI 3872) during standard test programs (Federal Test Procedure) were incubated with important biomolecules. As indicators of reactive oxygen species or oxidative destruction, ascorbic acid, cysteine, glutathione, serum albumin, the enzymes glycerinaldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase, and the oxygen free-radical indicator keto-methylthiobutyrate were used. During and after the incubations, oxygen activation (consumption) and oxidative destruction were determined. Comparison of the oxidative activities of the different types of exhaust condensates clearly showed that the exhaust condensate derived from the four-stroke car equipped with a three-way catalytic converter exhibited by far the lowest oxidative and destructive power.

  7. A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Recycling the Platinum Group Metals from Automobile Catalytic Converter: An Australian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodrat, Maryam; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Sharafi, Pezhman; Samali, Bijan

    2017-12-01

    This study provides a comparison between environmental impacts of the recovery of platinum group metals (PGMs) from the end-of-life catalytic converters by hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical methods. A gate to grave life cycle assessment of a typical three-way catalytic converter manufactured for an Australian passenger car was carried out using GaBi professional environmental package. Recovery rates, as well as qualities, quantities, losses, and fugitive emissions for all materials and elements used in both methods were calculated based on the developed flowsheets. A life cycle impact assessment was then made by carrying out a mass balance calculation. Inventory data show that the hydrometallurgical route for recycling of the platinum group metals out of catalytic converter scrap has lower impacts on the environment compared with the pyrometallurgical method. In terms of emission effects, the hydrometallurgical process was found to be highly advantageous since it causes insignificant emissions to air, sea water, and fresh water. It is also found that the hydrometallurgical route performs comparatively superior in terms of acidification, eutrophication, fossil depletion, and human toxicity. The obtained results are applicable only to the Australian setting.

  8. Monocyte Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–Converting Enzyme Catalytic Activity and Substrate Shedding in Sepsis and Noninfectious Systemic Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, David J. P.; O’Dea, Kieran P.; Scott, Alasdair J.; Takata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of severe sepsis on monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme baseline and inducible activity profiles. Design: Observational clinical study. Setting: Mixed surgical/medical teaching hospital ICU. Patients: Sixteen patients with severe sepsis, 15 healthy volunteers, and eight critically ill patients with noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Monocyte expression of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide, sol-tumor necrosis factor production, tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme expression and catalytic activity, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 expression, and shedding at 48-hour intervals from day 0 to day 4, as well as p38-mitogen activated protein kinase expression. Compared with healthy volunteers, both sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients’ monocytes expressed reduced levels of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide and released less sol-tumor necrosis factor on in vitro lipopolysaccharide stimulation, consistent with the term monocyte deactivation. However, patients with sepsis had substantially elevated levels of basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity that were refractory to lipopolysaccharide stimulation and this was accompanied by similar changes in p38-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. In patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, monocyte basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme, and its induction by lipopolysaccharide, appeared similar to healthy controls. Changes in basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity at day 0 for sepsis patients correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and the attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme response to lipopolysaccharide was associated with increased mortality. Similar changes in monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity could

  9. Research on Integration of an Automotive Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Generator and a Three-Way Catalytic Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y. D.; Chen, Y. L.; Chen, S.; Xianyu, W. D.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-06-01

    A key research topic related to thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive applications is to improve their compatibility with the original vehicle exhaust system, which determines the quality of the exhaust gas treatment and the realization of energy conservation and emission reduction. A new TEG integrated with a three-way catalytic converter (CTEG) by reshaping the converter as the heat exchanger is proposed. A heat-flux coupling simulation model of the integrated TEG is established at the light-off stage of the original three-way catalytic converter (TWC). Temperature distribution maps of the integrated heat exchanger, thermoelectric modules, and cooling-water tank are obtained to present the process of energy flow among the parts of the CTEG. Based on the simulation results, the output power of the CTEG is calculated by a mathematical model. A minimum output power of 31.93 W can be obtained by conversion when the TWC starts working at steady conditions. Theoretically, this case study demonstrates the great potential for use of CTEGs in vehicles.

  10. Microchannel Catalytic Processes for Converting Biomass-Derived Syngas to Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong; Jones, Susanne B.; Hu, Jianli; Li, Xiaohong S.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Stevens, Don J.

    2005-08-15

    Biomass gasification process provides feedstock for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to produce liquid transportation fuels. Biomass-derived feedstock has the nature of small scale, at which conventional fossil fuel base gas-to-liquid (GTL) technologies are not cost-competitive. The use of microchannel reactor technology is potentially an enabling technology for biomass conversions to hydrocarbon fuels. In this paper, a catalytic microchannel reactor integrated with highly effecient heat exchangers was used to demonstrate the significatnly improved FT productivity by minimizing heat and mass transfer limitations in this three phase reaction system. In order to achieve high yields of naphtha and diesel range of hydrocarbons (C5-C19), we have developed a unique structured catalyst system suitable for the deployment in microchannel reactor applications. This engineered catalyst structure is based on metallic monolith supports, uniformly coated with an improved catalyst formula. Such an ordered catalyst structure also has the advantages of the high thermal conductivity and reduced mass transfer resistance. By tailoring the mass transfer limitations, we have demonstrated that this engineered catalyst produces hydrocarbons with narrower carbon distributions (mainly less than C25) than a conventional particulate catalyst at similar conversion and methane selectivity. In particular, majority of the synthesis products fall into the gasoline and diesel range. This uniquie product distribution, in turn, has positive impace on process economics since a milder or no hydrocracker will be required in downstream product processing.

  11. Platinum levels in natural and urban soils from Rome and Latium (Italy): significance for pollution by automobile catalytic converter.

    PubMed

    Cinti, D; Angelone, M; Masi, U; Cremisini, C

    2002-07-03

    Platinum concentrations in topsoil samples collected in 1992 (48) and in 2001 (16) from the urban area of Rome have been determined by ICP-MS. Concentrations in 47 soil samples collected in 1992 from natural sites of Latium (an area around Rome) have been determined for a first assessment of natural background levels. The Pt concentrations in Rome urban soils collected in 1992 range from 0.8 to 6.3 ng/g (mean = 3.8 +/- 1.0) overlapping the concentration range of natural soils from Latium (mean = 3.1 +/- 2.1 ng/g). No significant correlation has generally been found between Pt contents in the 'natural' soils and related bedrock or major pedogenetic parameters. These results suggest that there is no evidence of Pt pollution in Rome urban soils at that time, because the massive use of the automobile catalytic converter has only just started. Higher (up to six times more) Pt concentrations, than those measured in the 1992 samples, have been measured, in some cases, in Rome urban soils collected in 2001, suggesting a possible start of Pt accumulation because of the large-scale use in the last decade of automobile catalytic converters. At the same time, a clear decrease of lead levels in Rome urban soils with respect to the levels measured in 1992 has been observed, paralleling the decreasing number of lead gasoline-fuelled cars. Here we present one of the first systematic studies for defining background levels of Pt in Italian natural soils, thus allowing for monitoring, in the future, should any possible Pt pollution caused by the use of automobile catalytic converter, especially in urban soils, occur.

  12. Traffic and catalytic converter - related atmospheric contamination in the metropolitan region of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Lílian Irene Dias; de Souza Sarkis, Jorge Eduardo; Zotin, Fátima Maria Zanon; Carneiro, Manuel Castro; Neto, Arnaldo Alcover; da Silva, Alzira dos Santos Amaral Gomes; Cardoso, Mauri José Baldini; Monteiro, Maria Inês Couto

    2008-03-01

    In this work, 24-h PM10 samples were collected in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and analysed for trace elements (Cd, Ce, Cu, La, Mo, Ni, Pb, Pd, Rh, Sb and Sn). The sampling was carried out at five locations (Bonsucesso; Centro, downtown city; Copacabana; Nova Iguaçu and Sumaré) with different traffic densities and anthropogenic activities. An analytical method based on the EPA method for the determination of trace elements in airborne particulate matter (PM), using ultrasonic-assisted extraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied. Our results suggest that vehicular traffic is the most important source of environmental pollution at the studied sites. The presence of Mo, Pd and Rh in the analysed filters reflects an additional source of pollution caused by the erosion and deterioration of automotive catalytic converters.

  13. Apparatus for controlling the flow of exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger and a catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, K.; Omata, K.

    1984-03-20

    An apparatus for controlling the flow of the exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine including a turbocharger, a catalytic converter in an exhaust duct, and a throttle valve in an intake duct, wherein the apparatus comprises a bypass passage bypassing a turbine of the turbocharger, a waste gate valve which controls the amount of the exhaust gas passing therethrough, an actuator for actuating the waste gate valve which has first and second pressure chambers separated from one another, and a switching valve which selectively connects the second pressure chamber to the atmosphere or to the intake vacuum area, the first pressure chamber being connected to the delivery pressure area of the turbocharger by means of a conduit which is connected to an atmospheric pressure area via a restriction.

  14. Soluble and Catalytically Active Endothelin Converting Enzyme-1 is Present in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Chou, Sherry H.-Y.; Feske, Steven K.; Suh, Sarah; Hanchapola, Iresha; Lo, Eng H.; Ning, MingMing; Smith, A. Ian

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin converting Enzyme-1 (ECE-1) is essential for the production of Endothelin-1 (ET-1), which is associated with vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We have previously demonstrated the presence of a catalytically active soluble form of ECE-1 in the media of endothelial cells. We aimed to determine if this form of ECE-1 exists in vivo, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of SAH patients. We examined CSF taken from SAH subjects for the presence of soluble ECE-1 using a bradykinin based quenched fluorescent substrate assay. We obtained further confirmation by characterizing the CSF mediated cleavage products of BigET-1 and BigET18–34 (6 μg/ml) using mass spectrometry. The specificity of cleavage was confirmed using the ECE-1 inhibitor CGS35066 5nmol/L. SAH CSF samples had mean ECE-1 activity of 0.127 ± 0.037 μmols of substrate cleaved/μl of CSF/24 h. The C-terminal peptides generated upon the cleavage of BigET-1 and BigET18–34 were detected 48 h after incubation of these substrates with CSF. Cleavage of these substrates was inhibited by CGS35066. Results of Western blots also produced strong evidence for the presence of truncated soluble ECE-1 in CSF. These results strongly suggest the presence of a truncated but catalytically active form of ECE-1 in the CSF of SAH subjects. Further studies are necessary to determine the biological significance of soluble ECE-1 in CSF of SAH subjects, including an association with vasospasm after SAH. PMID:23816989

  15. The effects of the catalytic converter and fuel sulfur level on motor vehicle particulate matter emissions: gasoline vehicles.

    PubMed

    Maricq, M Matti; Chase, Richard E; Xu, Ning; Podsiadlik, Diane H

    2002-01-15

    Scanning mobility and electrical low-pressure impactor particle size measurements conducted during chassis dynamometer testing reveal that neither the catalytic converter nor the fuel sulfur content has a significant effect on gasoline vehicle tailpipe particulate matter (PM) emissions. For current technology, port fuel injection, gasoline engines, particle number emissions are < or = 2 times higher from vehicles equipped with blank monoliths as compared to active catalysts, insignificant in contrast to the 90+% removal of hydrocarbons. PM mass emission rates derived from the size distributions are equal within the experimental uncertainty of 50-100%. Gravimetric measurements exhibit a 3-10-fold PM mass increase when the active catalyst is omitted, which is attributed to gaseous hydrocarbons adsorbing onto the filter medium. Both particle number and gravimetric measurements show that gasoline vehicle tailpipe PM emissions are independent (within 2 mg/mi) of fuel sulfur content over the 30-990 ppm concentration range. Nuclei mode sulfate aerosol is not observed in either test cell measurements or during wind tunnel testing. For three-way catalyst equipped vehicles, the principal sulfur emission is SO2; however a sulfur balance is not obtained over the drive cycle. Instead, sulfur is stored on the catalyst during moderate driving and then partially removed during high speed/load operation.

  16. Accumulation of the precious metals platinum, palladium and rhodium from automobile catalytic converters in Paratenuisentis ambiguus as compared with its fish host, Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, S; von Bohlen, A; Messerschmidt, J; Sures, B

    2005-03-01

    The platinum group metals (PGM) Pt, Pd and Rh are emitted into the environment mainly by catalytic exhaust gas converters of cars. As PGM accumulate in sediments of aquatic ecosystems, the study was focused on the uptake of the noble metals by European eels, Anguilla anguilla infected with the acanthocephalan Paratenuisentis ambiguus. Eels were exposed to ground catalytic converter material for six weeks. After exposure Pt and Pd were detected in the liver and kidney of the eels and in the parasites. Palladium was also found in fish muscle and intestine. No Rh uptake by the eel tissues and the parasites occurred. Paratenuisentis ambiguus contained the highest levels of both metals with 40 times higher Pt concentrations and four times higher Pd concentrations than the liver of its host. Due to its accumulation capacity for PGM, P. ambiguus can be applied as a sensitive accumulation indicator in field studies to assess the degree of environmental PGM contamination in aquatic ecosystems.

  17. Effect of support on a catalytic converter for removing CO and HC emissions from a two-stroke motorcycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chen, Y.W.

    1997-12-01

    The effect of support on the noble metal catalysts for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation was investigated. The reactions were performed under the stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient conditions. Under the stoichiometric point, the activities of the powder catalysts for CO and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} oxidation are in the order Pt/K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}, that is, the same as the order of basicity of these catalysts. Under an oxygen-deficient condition, Pt supported on an acidic support, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}, exhibits the higher C{sub 3}H{sub 6} conversion and the higher activity for the steam re-forming reaction. In contrast, Pt supported on a basic support, K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, exhibits the higher CO conversion and the higher activity for the water-gas shift reaction. The order of activity of the powder catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction is the same as the order of basicity of these catalysts. On the other hand, the testing results of the monolithic PtRh-containing catalysts by the simulative gases and the ECE-40 mode driving cycle also reveal the same trend as that of the Pt powder catalysts. Furthermore, the addition of K{sub 2}O on PtRh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} not only increases the basicity of the catalyst but also significantly reduces the CO emission under the ECE-40 mode driving cycle test. Therefore, K{sub 2}O could be a promising additive to a catalytic converter of a two-stroke motorcycle since it can significantly enhance CO conversion.

  18. Environmental risk of particulate and soluble platinum group elements released from gasoline and diesel engine catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, M; Palacios, M A; Gómez, M M; Morrison, G; Rauch, S; McLeod, C; Ma, R; Caroli, S; Alimonti, A; Petrucci, F; Bocca, B; Schramel, P; Zischka, M; Pettersson, C; Wass, U; Luna, M; Saenz, J C; Santamaría, J

    2002-09-16

    A comparison of platinum-group element (PGE) emission between gasoline and diesel engine catalytic converters is reported within this work. Whole raw exhaust fumes from four catalysts of three different types were examined during their useful lifetime, from fresh to 80,000 km. Two were gasoline engine catalysts (Pt-Pd-Rh and Pd-Rh), while the other two were diesel engine catalysts (Pt). Samples were collected following the 91441 EUDC driving cycle for light-duty vehicle testing, and the sample collection device used allowed differentiation between the particulate and soluble fractions, the latter being the most relevant from an environmental point of view. Analyses were performed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (quadrupole and high resolution), and special attention was paid to the control of spectral interference, especially in the case of Pd and Rh. The results obtained show that, for fresh catalysts, the release of particulate PGE through car exhaust fumes does not follow any particular trend, with a wide range (one-two orders of magnitude) for the content of noble metals emitted. The samples collected from 30,000-80,000 km present a more homogeneous PGE release for all catalysts studied. A decrease of approximately one order of magnitude is observed with respect to the release from fresh catalysts, except in the case of the diesel engine catalyst, for which PGE emission continued to be higher than in the case of gasoline engines. The fraction of soluble PGE was found to represent less than 10% of the total amount released from fresh catalysts. For aged catalysts, the figures are significantly higher, especially for Pd and Rh. Particulate PGE can be considered as virtually biologically inert, while soluble PGE forms can represent an environmental risk due to their bioavailability, which leads them to accumulate in the environment.

  19. N- versus C-domain selectivity of catalytic inactivation of human angiotensin converting enzyme by lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C; Cowan, J A

    2013-12-27

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic angiotensin I converting enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates was tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of each domain of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and catalytic factors (double-filter effect).

  20. N- vs. C-Domain Selectivity of Catalytic Inactivation of Human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates were tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of the M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and orientation factors (double-filter effect). PMID:24228790

  1. Oxidative leaching process with cupric ion in hydrochloric acid media for recovery of Pd and Rh from spent catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C A; Paiva, A P; Oliveira, P C; Costa, M C; da Costa, A M Rosa

    2014-08-15

    The recycling of platinum-group metals from wastes such as autocatalytic converters is getting growing attention due to the scarcity of these precious metals and the market pressure originated by increase of demand in current and emerging applications. Hydrometallurgical treatment of such wastes is an alternative way to the most usual pyrometallurgical processes based on smelter operations. This paper focuses on the development of a leaching process using cupric chloride as oxidising agent, in HCl media, for recovery of palladium and rhodium from a spent catalyst. The chloride media allows the adequate conditions for oxidising and solubilising the metals, as demonstrated by equilibrium calculations based on thermodynamic data. The experimental study of the leaching process revealed that Pd solubilisation is clearly easier than that of Rh. The factors temperature, time, and HCl and Cu(2+) concentrations were significant regarding Pd and Rh leaching, the latter requiring higher factor values to achieve the same results. Leaching yields of 95% Pd and 86% Rh were achieved under optimised conditions (T = 80 °C, t = 4h, [HCl] = 6M, [Cu(2+)] = 0.3M).

  2. Evaluation of an EMITEC resistively heated metal monolith catalytic converter on two M100 neat methanol-fueled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Gregory K.; Schaefer, Ronald M.

    1992-12-01

    The report describes the evaluation of a resistively heated catalyst system on two different methanol fueled vehicles. The EMITEC catalyst consisted of a compact resistively heated metal monolith in front of a larger conventional main converter. The EMITEC catalyst was evaluated on two neat methanol-fueled vehicles, a 1981 Volkswagen Rabbit and a 1988 Toyota Corolla. Emission testing was conducted over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) CVS-75 test cycle. The emissions of primary interest were cold start methanol (unburned fuel), carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde.

  3. Effect of K{sub 2}O on a Pd-containing catalytic converter for removing CO and HC emissions from a two-stroke motorcycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chen, Y.W.

    1998-04-01

    Noble metals (Pt, Pd, and Rh) supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}O/CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared and characterized with respect to surface area, pore volume, and temperature-programmed desorption of CO{sub 2}. The effects of K{sub 2}O on the noble-metal catalysts for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation were investigated. The reactions were carried out under the stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient conditions. Under the stoichiometric point, the Pd-containing catalysts exhibit higher activity than the Pt-containing catalysts for both CO and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} oxidation. Moreover, Pd/K{sub 2}O/CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most active catalyst among the powder catalysts in this study. Under the oxygen-deficient conditions and in the presence of water, the CO conversions on Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pd/CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are significantly lower than those on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt/CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, respectively. In contrast, the Pd-containing catalysts exhibit higher C{sub 3}H{sub 6} conversion than the Pt-containing catalysts. However, the CO conversions on the Pd-containing catalysts can be promoted by the addition of K{sub 2}O. On the other hand, the test results of the monolithic catalysts revealed that the CO conversion on PdRh/K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--CeO{sub 2} is quite close to that on PtRh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} under the simulative gases and the ECE-40 mode driving cycle test. PtRh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} is the typical composition of catalytic converters for two-stroke motorcycles. It infers that PdRh/K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} is a promising catalytic converter for a two-stroke motorcycle.

  4. Catalytic oxidation of waste materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Aqueous stream of human waste is mixed with soluble ruthenium salts and is introduced into reactor at temperature where ruthenium black catalyst forms on internal surfaces of reactor. This provides catalytically active surface to convert oxidizable wastes into breakdown products such as water and carbon dioxide.

  5. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  6. Peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) inhibit the angiotensin-I converting enzyme by interacting with its catalytic cavity independent of their antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; González de Mejía, Elvira; Mendoza, Sandra; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory potential and the antioxidant capacity of pure synthesized peptides (GLTSK, LSGNK, GEGSGA, MPACGSS and MTEEY) originally identified in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans (P. vulgaris L.) that had previously demonstrated antiproliferative activity against human colorectal cancer cells. The five peptides were able to inhibit ACE with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 65.4 (GLTSK) to 191.5 μM (MPACGSS). The combination of GLTSK and MTEEY increased the ACE inhibition by 30% compared to equieffective doses of the single peptides. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides had lower estimated free energy values (-6.47 to -9.34 kcal mol(-1)) when they interacted with the catalytic site of ACE than that of the substrate hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (-5.41 kcal mol(-1)), thus inhibiting the enzymatic activity. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides interacted with four (His353, Ala354, Glu411 and Tyr523) out of 6 catalytic residues. Moreover, MPACGSS had the highest antioxidant activity according to Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) (421.58 μmol FeSO4 mg(-1)), Fe(2+) chelation (2.01 μmol Na2EDTA mg(-1)) assays, and also in DPPH (748.39 μmol Trolox per mg of dry peptide) and ABTS (561.42 μmol Trolox mg(-1)) radical scavenging assays. The results support the hypothesis that peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) may exert their physiological benefits independent of their antioxidant capacity, by ACE inhibition through interaction with its catalytic cavity.

  7. Catalytic booster device for vehicular exhaust systems and method of installing

    SciTech Connect

    Feaster, D.L.

    1984-04-24

    A catalytic booster-converter for insertion into the exhaust pipe of a vehicular exhaust system comprising an elongated conduit device adapted to be rigidly connected in series with an exhaust pipe intermediate the ends thereof. The elongated conduit device is in separate length portions which are spaced apart a predetermined distance. A catalytic converter element is interposed between and removably secured to the facing ends of said length portions. A converter element is secured between such length portions in such a manner that it can be removed and replaced by movement transversely of the conduit device.

  8. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  9. Technologies for converter topologies

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Haiyu

    2017-02-28

    In some embodiments of the disclosed inverter topologies, an inverter may include a full bridge LLC resonant converter, a first boost converter, and a second boost converter. In such embodiments, the first and second boost converters operate in an interleaved manner. In other disclosed embodiments, the inverter may include a half-bridge inverter circuit, a resonant circuit, a capacitor divider circuit, and a transformer.

  10. Design of Catalytically Amplified Sensors for Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Makhlynets, Olga V.; Korendovych, Ivan V.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytically amplified sensors link an allosteric analyte binding site with a reactive site to catalytically convert substrate into colored or fluorescent product that can be easily measured. Such an arrangement greatly improves a sensor’s detection limit as illustrated by successful application of ELISA-based approaches. The ability to engineer synthetic catalytic sites into non-enzymatic proteins expands the repertoire of analytes as well as readout reactions. Here we review recent examples of small molecule sensors based on allosterically controlled enzymes and organometallic catalysts. The focus of this paper is on biocompatible, switchable enzymes regulated by small molecules to track analytes both in vivo and in the environment. PMID:24970222

  11. Nano sponge Mn₂O ₃ as a new adsorbent for the preconcentration of Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions in sea water, wastewater, rock, street sediment and catalytic converter samples prior to FAAS determinations.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Emre; Tokalıoğlu, Serife; Sahan, Halil; Patat, Saban

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a nano sponge Mn2O3 adsorbent was synthesized and was used for the first time. Various parameters affecting the recovery values of Pd(II) and Rh(III) were examined. The tolerance limits (≥ 90 %) for both Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions were found to be 75,000 mg L(-1) Na(I), 75,000 mg L(-1) K(I), 50,000 mg L(-1) Mg(II) and 50,000 mg L(-1) Ca(II). A 30s contact time was enough for both adsorption and elution. A preconcentration factor of 100 was obtained by using 100mg of the nano sponge Mn2O3. The reusability of the adsorbent was 120 times. Adsorption capacities for Pd(II) and Rh(III) were found to be 42 and 6.2 mg g(-1), respectively. The detection limits were 1.0 µg L(-1) for Pd(II) and 0.37 µg L(-1) for Rh(III) and the relative standard deviations (RSD, %) were found to be ≤ 2.5%. The method was validated by analyzing the standard reference material, SRM 2556 (Used Auto Catalyst Pellets) and spiked real samples. The optimized method was applied for the preconcentration of Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions in water (sea water and wastewater), rock, street sediment and catalytic converter samples.

  12. Interleaved power converter

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Lizhi

    2007-11-13

    A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

  13. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  14. Harmonic elimination in high power GTO converter using an auxiliary converter with zero fundamental power

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, G.K.; Chatterjee, K.; Oruganti, R.; Chang, C.S.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes a method of harmonic elimination using a low power auxiliary converter. The auxiliary converter handles only harmonic currents with zero fundamental. Such a converter combination has a lower cost compared to multipulse converters currently in use.

  15. XTL Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Spurgeon, Steven R

    2015-10-07

    "XTL Converter" is a short Python script for electron microscopy simulation. The program takes an input crystal file in the VESTA *.XTL format and converts it to a text format readable by the multislice simulation program ìSTEM. The process of converting a crystal *.XTL file to the format used by the ìSTEM simulation program is quite tedious; it generally requires the user to select dozens or hundreds of atoms, rearranging and reformatting their position. Header information must also be reformatted to a specific style to be read by ìSTEM. "XTL Converter" simplifies this process, saving the user time and allowing for easy batch processing of crystals.

  16. XTL Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Spurgeon, Steven R

    2015-10-07

    "XTL Converter" is a short Python script for electron microscopy simulation. The program takes an input crystal file in the VESTA *.XTL format and converts it to a text format readable by the multislice simulation program ìSTEM. The process of converting a crystal *.XTL file to the format used by the ìSTEM simulation program is quite tedious; it generally requires the user to select dozens or hundreds of atoms, rearranging and reformatting their position. Header information must also be reformatted to a specific style to be read by ìSTEM. "XTL Converter" simplifies this process, saving the user time and allowing for easy batch processing of crystals.

  17. Thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Fitzpatrick, G.O.

    1987-05-19

    A thermionic converter is set forth which includes an envelope having an electron collector structure attached adjacent to a wall. An electron emitter structure is positioned adjacent the collector structure and spaced apart from opposite wall. The emitter and collector structures are in a common chamber. The emitter structure is heated substantially only by thermal radiation. Very small interelectrode gaps can be maintained utilizing the thermionic converter whereby increased efficiency results. 10 figs.

  18. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  19. Thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Fitzpatrick, Gary O.

    1987-05-19

    A thermionic converter (10) is set forth which includes an envelope (12) having an electron collector structure (22) attached adjacent to a wall (16). An electron emitter structure (24) is positioned adjacent the collector structure (22) and spaced apart from opposite wall (14). The emitter (24) and collector (22) structures are in a common chamber (20). The emitter structure (24) is heated substantially only by thermal radiation. Very small interelectrode gaps (28) can be maintained utilizing the thermionic converter (10) whereby increased efficiency results.

  20. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  1. Catalytic Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

  2. Process for Coating Substrates with Catalytic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klelin, Ric J. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for forming catalysts by coating substrates with two or more catalytic components, which comprises the following sequence of steps. First, the substrate is infused with an adequate amount of solution having a starting material comprising a catalytic component precursor, wherein the thermal decomposition product of the catalytic component precursor is a catalytic component. Second, the excess of the solution is removed from the substrate. thereby leaving a coating of the catalytic component precursor on the surface of the substrate. Third, the coating of the catalytic component precursor is converted to the catalytic component by thermal decomposition. Finally, the coated substance is etched to increase the surface area. The list three steps are then repeated for at least a second catalytic component. This process is ideally suited for application in producing efficient low temperature oxidation catalysts.

  3. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel-bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating value, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  4. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  5. Power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A dc-to-dc converter employs four transistor switches in a bridge to chop dc power from a source, and a voltage multiplying diode rectifying ladder network to rectify and filter the chopped dc power for delivery to a load. The bridge switches are cross coupled in order for diagonally opposite pairs to turn on and off together using RC networks for the cross coupling to achieve the mode of operation of a free running multivibrator, and the diode rectifying ladder is configured to operate in a push-pull mode driven from opposite sides of the multivibrator outputs of the ridge switches. The four transistor switches provide a square-wave output voltage which as a peak-to-peak amplitude that is twice the input dc voltage, and is thus useful as a dc-to-ac inverter.

  6. AC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Praveen K.

    1992-08-01

    In a system such as a 20 kHz space station primary electrical power distribution system, power conversion from AC to DC is required. Some of the basic requirements for this conversion are high efficiency, light weight and small volume, regulated output voltage, close to unity input power factor, distortionless input current, soft-starting, low electromagnetic interference, and high reliability. An AC-to-DC converter is disclosed which satisfies the main design objectives of such converters for use in space. The converter of the invention comprises an input transformer, a resonant network, a current controller, a diode rectifier, and an output filter. The input transformer is for connection to a single phase, high frequency, sinusoidal waveform AC voltage source and provides a matching voltage isolating from the AC source. The resonant network converts this voltage to a sinusoidal, high frequency bidirectional current output, which is received by the current controller to provide the desired output current. The diode rectifier is connected in parallel with the current controller to convert the bidirectional current into a unidirectional current output. The output filter is connected to the rectifier to provide an essentially ripple-free, substantially constant voltage DC output.

  7. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  8. Studies on exhaust emissions of catalytic coated spark ignition engine with adulterated gasoline.

    PubMed

    Muralikrishna, M V S; Kishor, K; Venkata Ramana Reddy, Ch

    2006-04-01

    Adulteration of automotive fuels, especially, gasoline with cheaper fuels is widespread throughout south Asia. Some adulterants decrease the performance and life of the engine and increase the emission of harmful pollutants causing environmental and health problems. The present investigation is carried out to study the exhaust emissions from a single cylinder spark ignition (SI) engine with kerosene blended gasoline with different versions of the engine, such as conventional engine and catalytic coated engine with different proportions of the kerosene ranging from 0% to 40% by volume in steps of 10% in the kerosene-gasoline blend. The catalytic coated engine used in the study has copper coating of thickness 400 microns on piston and inner surface of the cylinder head. The pollutants in the exhaust, carbon monoxide (CO) and unburnt hydrocarbons (UBHC) are measured with Netel Chromatograph CO and HC analyzer at peak load operation of the engine. The engine is provided with catalytic converter with sponge iron as a catalyst to control the pollutants from the exhaust of the engine. An air injection is also provided to the catalytic converter to further reduce the pollutants. The pollutants found to increase drastically with adulterated gasoline. Copper-coated engine with catalytic converter significantly reduced pollutants, when compared to conventional engine.

  9. Thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Rasor, Ned S.; Britt, Edward J.

    1976-01-01

    A gas-filled thermionic converter is provided with a collector and an emitter having a main emitter region and an auxiliary emitter region in electrical contact with the main emitter region. The main emitter region is so positioned with respect to the collector that a main gap is formed therebetween and the auxiliary emitter region is so positioned with respect to the collector that an auxiliary gap is formed therebetween partially separated from the main gap with access allowed between the gaps to allow ionizable gas in each gap to migrate therebetween. With heat applied to the emitter the work function of the auxiliary emitter region is sufficiently greater than the work function of the collector so that an ignited discharge occurs in the auxiliary gap and the work function of the main emitter region is so related to the work function of the collector that an unignited discharge occurs in the main gap sustained by the ions generated in the auxiliary gap. A current flows through a load coupled across the emitter and collector due to the unignited discharge in the main gap.

  10. Convertible Stadium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Air flotation technology used in NASA's Apollo program has found an interesting application in Hawaii's Aloha Stadium near Honolulu. The stadium's configuration can be changed, by moving entire 7,000-seat sections on a cushion of air, for best accommodation of spectators and participants at different types of events. In most stadiums, only a few hundred seats can be moved, by rolling sections on wheels or rails. At Aloha Stadium, 28,000 of the 50,000 seats can be repositioned for better spectator viewing and, additionally, for improved playing conditions. For example, a stadium designed primarily for football may compromise the baseball diamond by providing only a shallow outfield. Aloha's convertibility allows a full-size baseball field as well as optimum configurations for many other types of sports and special events. The photos show examples. The stadium owes its versatility to air flotation technology developed by General Motors. Its first large-scale application was movement of huge segments of the mammoth Saturn V moonbooster during assembly operations at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to light olefins

    DOEpatents

    Rao, V. Udaya S.; Gormley, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalyst and process for making same useful in the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide in which a silicalite support substantially free of aluminum is soaked in an aqueous solution of iron and potassium salts wherein the iron and potassium are present in concentrations such that the dried silicalite has iron present in the range of from about 5 to about 25 percent by weight and has potassium present in an amount not less than about 0.2 percent by weight, and thereafter the silicalite is dried and combined with amorphous silica as a binder for pellets, the catalytic pellets are used to convert synthesis gas to C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 olefins.

  12. Self-powered microthermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; King, Donald B.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-08-10

    A self-powered microthermionic converter having an internal thermal power source integrated into the microthermionic converter. These converters can have high energy-conversion efficiencies over a range of operating temperatures. Microengineering techniques are used to manufacture the converter. The utilization of an internal thermal power source increases potential for mobility and incorporation into small devices. High energy efficiency is obtained by utilization of micron-scale interelectrode gap spacing. Alpha-particle emitting radioisotopes can be used for the internal thermal power source, such as curium and polonium isotopes.

  13. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2002-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  14. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  15. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  16. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  17. Formaldehyde: catalytic oxidation as a promising soft way of elimination.

    PubMed

    Quiroz Torres, Jhon; Royer, Sébastien; Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Giraudon, Jean-Marc; Lamonier, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    Compared to other molecules such as benzene, toluene, xylene, and chlorinated compounds, the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde has been studied rarely. However, standards for the emission level of this pollutant will become more restrictive because of its extreme toxicity even at very low concentrations in air. As a consequence, the development of a highly efficient process for its selective elimination is needed. Complete catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde into CO2 and H2 O using noble-metal-based catalysts is a promising method to convert this pollutant at room temperature, making this process energetically attractive from an industrial point of view. However, the development of a less expensive active phase is required for a large-scale industrial development. Nanomaterials based on oxides of manganese are described as the most promising catalysts. The objective of this Minireview is to present promising recent studies on the removal of formaldehyde through heterogeneous catalysis to stimulate future research in this topic.

  18. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  19. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  20. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  1. Catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Aldag, A.W. Jr.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound. The process consists of contacting the feedstock under suitable reforming conditions with a catalyst composition selected from the group consisting of a catalyst. The catalyst essentially consists of zinc oxide and a spinel structure alumina. Another catalyst consists essentially of a physical mixture of zinc titanate and a spinel structure alumina in the presence of sufficient added hydrogen to substantially prevent the formation of coke. Insufficient zinc is present in the catalyst composition for the formation of a bulk zinc aluminate.

  2. Feasibility study for convertible engine torque converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility study has shown that a dump/fill type torque converter has excellent potential for the convertible fan/shaft engine. The torque converter space requirement permits internal housing within the normal flow path of a turbofan engine at acceptable engine weight. The unit permits operating the engine in the turboshaft mode by decoupling the fan. To convert to turbofan mode, the torque converter overdrive capability bring the fan speed up to the power turbine speed to permit engagement of a mechanical lockup device when the shaft speed are synchronized. The conversion to turbofan mode can be made without drop of power turbine speed in less than 10 sec. Total thrust delivered to the aircraft by the proprotor, fan, and engine during tansient can be controlled to prevent loss of air speed or altitude. Heat rejection to the oil is low, and additional oil cooling capacity is not required. The turbofan engine aerodynamic design is basically uncompromised by convertibility and allows proper fan design for quiet and efficient cruise operation. Although the results of the feasibility study are exceedingly encouraging, it must be noted that they are based on extrapolation of limited existing data on torque converters. A component test program with three trial torque converter designs and concurrent computer modeling for fluid flow, stress, and dynamics, updated with test results from each unit, is recommended.

  3. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  4. Study of catalytic upgrading of biomass tars using Indonesian iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat; Sutijan, Rochmadi, Budiman, Arief

    2017-03-01

    Catalytic decomposition is a promising way for chemical upgrading process of low quality oil such as biomass tars. In this experiment, catalytic decomposition of biomass tars was performed over Indonesian low grade iron ore catalyst. This process is carried out in a fixed bedreactor which is equipped with preheater to convert the tars into vapor form. The reaction was studied at the temperature range of 500 - 700°C. The kinetic study of catalytic decomposition of biomass tars is represented using first order reaction. The results show that value of constant of chemical reaction is in range 0.2514 - 0.9642 cm3.gr-1.min-1 with value of the frequency factor (A) and the activation energy (E) are 48.98 min-1 and 5724.94 cal.mol-1, respectively.

  5. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  6. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  7. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP`s off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described.

  8. Rotorcraft convertible engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, J. C.; Earle, R. V.; Mar, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Rotorcraft Convertible Engine Study was to define future research and technology effort required for commercial development by 1988 of convertible fan/shaft gas turbine engines for unconventional rotorcraft transports. Two rotorcraft and their respective missions were defined: a Fold Tilt Rotor aircraft and an Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) rotorcraft. Sensitivity studies were conducted with these rotorcraft to determine parametrically the influence of propulsion characteristics on aircraft size, mission fuel requirements, and direct operating costs (DOC). The two rotorcraft were flown with conventional propulsion systems (separate lift/cruise engines) and with convertible propulsion systems to determine the benefits to be derived from convertible engines. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine the optimum engine cycle and staging arrangement for a convertible engine. Advanced technology options applicable to convertible engines were studied. Research and technology programs were identified which would ensure technology readiness for commercial development of convertible engines by 1988.

  9. JP-8 catalytic cracking for compact fuel processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Timothy J.; Shaaban, Aly H.; Holcomb, Franklin H.; Salavani, Reza; Binder, Michael J.

    In processing heavier hydrocarbons such as military logistic fuels (JP-4, JP-5, JP-8, and JP-100), kerosene, gasoline, and diesel to produce hydrogen for fuel cell use, several issues arise. First, these fuels have high sulfur content, which can poison and deactivate components of the reforming process and the fuel cell stack; second, these fuels may contain non-volatile residue (NVR), up to 1.5 vol.%, which could potentially accumulate in a fuel processor; and third is the high coking potential of heavy hydrocarbons. Catalytic cracking of a distillate fuel prior to reforming can resolve these issues. Cracking using an appropriate catalyst can convert the various heavy organosulfur species in the fuel to lighter sulfur species such as hydrogen sulfide (H 2S), facilitating subsequent sulfur adsorption on zinc oxide (ZnO). Cracking followed by separation of light cracked gas from heavies effectively eliminates non-volatile aromatic species. Catalytic cracking can also convert heavier hydrocarbons to lights (C 1-C 3) at high conversion, which reduces the potential for coke formation in the reforming process. In this study, two types of catalysts were compared for JP-8 cracking performance: commercially-available zeolite materials similar to catalysts formulated for fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) processes, and a novel manganese/alumina catalyst, which was previously reported to provide high selectivity to lights and low coke yield. Experiments were designed to test each catalyst's effectiveness under the high space velocity conditions necessary for use in compact, lightweight fuel processor systems. Cracking conversion results, as well as sulfur and hydrocarbon distributions in the light cracked gas, are presented for the two catalysts to provide a performance comparison.

  10. The photoelectric displacement converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoner, Valeriu V.

    2005-02-01

    In the article are examined questions of constructing photoelectric displacement converter satisfying demands that are stated above. Converter has channels of approximate and precise readings. The approximate reading may be accomplished either by the method of reading from a code mask or by the method of the consecutive calculation of optical scale gaps number. Phase interpolator of mouar strips" gaps is determined as a precise measuring. It is shown mathematical model of converter that allow evaluating errors and operating speed of conversion.

  11. PWM Converter Power Density Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolar, Johann W.; Drofenik, Uwe; Biela, Juergen; Heldwein, Marcelo; Ertl, Hans; Friedli, Thomas; Round, Simon

    Power density of power electronic converters has roughly doubled every 10 years since 1970. Behind this trajectory is the continuous advancement of power semiconductor devices, which has increased the converter switching frequencies by a factor of 10 every decade. However, today's cooling concepts and passive components are major barriers for a continuation of this trend. To identify such technological barriers, this paper investigates the volume of the cooling system and passive components as a function of the switching frequency for power electronic converters and determines the switching frequency that minimizes the total volume. A power density limit of 28kW/dm3 at 300kHz is calculated for an isolated DC-DC converter, 44kW/dm3 at 820kHz for a three-phase unity power factor PWM rectifier, and 26kW/dm3 at 21kHz for a sparse matrix converter. For single-phase AC-DC conversion a general limit of 35kW/dm3 results from the DC link capacitor. These power density limits highlight the need to broaden the scope of power electronics research to include cooling systems, high frequency electromagnetics, interconnection and packaging technology, and multi-domain modelling and simulation to ensure further advancement along the power density trajectory.

  12. PWM converter topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerman, E. R. W.; Spruyt, H. J. N.

    1989-08-01

    Dc to dc converters using an electrical switch to control power flow between a dc source and a dc load are discussed. Only Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) type converter topologies are considered. A basic three element, three terminal converter topology is defined followed by two universal rules allowing for derivation of a wide variety of different topologies. A summary of different topology types is provided with steady state and small signal relations given for each. The survey shows 46 converter topologies of which 18 are known and 28 are new (under, patent application). The number of topologies could be increased to 68 if negative input voltages are considered.

  13. THERMIONIC CONVERTER SURFACE CONDITIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THERMIONIC CONVERTERS , *THERMIONIC EMISSION, SURFACE PROPERTIES, MATERIALS, CESIUM, VAPORS, NIOBIUM COMPOUNDS, CARBIDES, MOLYBDENUM, TANTALUM, TUNGSTEN, NICKEL, RHENIUM, ELECTRODES, VOLTAGE, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING).

  14. HEAT DIODE CONVERTER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    DIODES, * ELECTRIC POWER PRODUCTION, *REFRACTORY MATERIALS, *THERMIONIC EMISSION, CESIUM, COPPER, DISCHARGE TUBES, ELECTRONS, EVAPORATION, MOLYBDENUM...PLASMAS(PHYSICS), POWER SUPPLIES, REFLECTION, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY, THERMIONIC CONVERTERS , VAPORS.

  15. FISSION HEAT DIODE CONVERTER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CESIUM, *DIODES, * ELECTRIC POWER PRODUCTION, ADSORPTION, AUXILIARY POWER PLANTS, ELECTRONS, OSCILLATION, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), POWER SUPPLIES...SCATTERING, SOURCES, SPACECRAFT, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY, THERMIONIC CONVERTERS , THERMIONIC EMISSION, TUNGSTEN, VAPORS

  16. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  17. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  18. Hardware Index to Permutation Converter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    Hardware Index to Permutation Converter J. T. Butler T. Sasao Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Computer Science...generates a permutation in response to an index. Since there are n! n-element permutations , the index ranges from 0 to n! − 1. Such a circuit is needed...in the hardware implementation of unique- permutation hash functions to specify how parallel machines interact through a shared memory. Such a circuit

  19. Performance of Power Converters at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    Power converters capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated to play an important role in the power system architecture of future NASA deep space missions. Design of such converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance and reduce development and launch costs. Aerospace power systems are mainly a DC distribution network. Therefore, DC/DC and DC/AC converters provide the outputs needed to different loads at various power levels. Recently, research efforts have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to design and evaluate DC/DC converters that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures. This paper presents a summary of the research performed to evaluate the low temperature performance of five DC/DC converters. Various parameters were investigated as a function of temperature in the range of 20 to -196 C. Data pertaining to the output voltage regulation and efficiency of the converters is presented and discussed.

  20. Photocapacitive image converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. E.; Sher, A.; Tsuo, Y. H.

    1982-05-01

    An apparatus for converting a radiant energy image into corresponding electrical signals including an image converter is described. The image converter includes a substrate of semiconductor material, an insulating layer on the front surface of the substrate, and an electrical contact on the back surface of the substrate. A first series of parallel transparent conductive stripes is on the insulating layer with a processing circuit connected to each of the conductive stripes for detecting the modulated voltages generated thereon. In a first embodiment of the invention, a modulated light stripe perpendicular to the conductive stripes scans the image converter. In a second embodiment a second insulating layer is deposited over the conductive stripes and a second series of parallel transparent conductive stripes perpendicular to the first series is on the second insulating layer. A different frequency current signal is applied to each of the second series of conductive stripes and a modulated image is applied to the image converter.

  1. Cascaded resonant bridge converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A converter for converting a low voltage direct current power source to a higher voltage, high frequency alternating current output for use in an electrical system where it is desired to use low weight cables and other circuit elements. The converter has a first stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which converts the direct current power source to an alternating current by means of switching elements that are operated by a variable frequency voltage regulator, a transformer to step up the voltage of the alternating current, and a rectifier bridge to convert the alternating current to a direct current first stage output. The converter further has a second stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which is connected in series to the first stage converter to receive its direct current output and convert it to a second stage high frequency alternating current output by means of switching elements that are operated by a fixed frequency oscillator. The voltage of the second stage output is controlled at a relatively constant value by controlling the first stage output voltage, which is accomplished by controlling the frequency of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller in response to second stage voltage. Fault tolerance in the event of a load short circuit is provided by making the operation of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller responsive to first and second stage current limiting devices. The second stage output is connected to a rectifier bridge whose output is connected to the input of the second stage to provide good regulation of output voltage wave form at low system loads.

  2. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  3. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  4. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  5. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  6. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  7. Catalytic oxidizers and Title V requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, M.; Rach, S.E.

    1999-07-01

    Catalytic oxidizers have been used to reduce VOC emissions from various industries including printing, chemical, paint, coatings, etc. A catalytic oxidizer uses a catalyst to reduce the operating temperature for combustion to approximately 600 F, which is substantially lower than thermal oxidation unit. Title V requirements have renewed the debate on the best methods to assure compliance of catalytic oxidizers, with some suggesting the need for continuous emission monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the various aspects of catalytic oxidation and consider options such as monitoring inlet/outlet temperatures, delta T across the catalyst, periodic laboratory testing of catalyst samples, and preventive maintenance procedures as means of assuring continuous compliance.

  8. Advanced thermionic converter development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Lieb, D.; Briere, T. R.; Sommer, A. H.; Rufeh, F.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress at Thermo Electron in developing advanced thermionic converters is summarized with particular attention paid to the development of electrodes, diodes, and triodes. It is found that one class of materials (ZnO, BaO and SrO) provides interesting cesiated work functions (1.3-1.4 eV) without additional oxygen. The second class of materials studied (rare earth oxides and hexaborides) gives cesiated/oxygenated work functions of less than 1.2 eV. Five techniques of oxygen addition to thermionic converters are discussed. Vapor deposited tungsten oxide collector diodes and the reflux converter are considered.

  9. Microminiature thermionic converters

    DOEpatents

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2001-09-25

    Microminiature thermionic converts (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures. Methods of manufacturing those converters using semiconductor integrated circuit fabrication and micromachine manufacturing techniques are also disclosed. The MTCs of the invention incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. Existing prior art thermionic converter technology has energy conversion efficiencies ranging from 5-15%. The MTCs of the present invention have maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices can be fabricated at modest costs.

  10. Advanced thermionic converter development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Lieb, D.; Briere, T. R.; Sommer, A. H.; Rufeh, F.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress at Thermo Electron in developing advanced thermionic converters is summarized with particular attention paid to the development of electrodes, diodes, and triodes. It is found that one class of materials (ZnO, BaO and SrO) provides interesting cesiated work functions (1.3-1.4 eV) without additional oxygen. The second class of materials studied (rare earth oxides and hexaborides) gives cesiated/oxygenated work functions of less than 1.2 eV. Five techniques of oxygen addition to thermionic converters are discussed. Vapor deposited tungsten oxide collector diodes and the reflux converter are considered.

  11. [Bioethics in catastrophe situations such as earthquakes].

    PubMed

    León, C Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    A catastrophe of the magnitude of the earthquake and tsunami that hit Chile not long ago, forces us to raise some questions that we will try to answer from a philosophical, ethical and responsibility viewpoints. An analysis of the basic principles of bioethics is also justified. A natural catastrophe is not, by itself, moral or immoral, fair or unfair. However, its consequences could certainly be regarded as such, depending on whether they could have been prevented or mitigated. We will identify those individuals, who have the ethical responsibility to attend the victims and the ethical principles that must guide the tasks of healthcare and psychological support teams. The minimal indispensable actions to obtain an adequate social and legal protection of vulnerable people, must be defined according to international guidelines. These reflections are intended to improve the responsibility of the State and all the community, to efficiently prevent and repair the material and psychological consequences of such a catastrophe.

  12. Auf der Suche nach dem Unendlichen.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, G.; Lillestøl, E.; Sellevåg, I.

    This book is a German translation by C. Ascheron and J. Urbahn, of "The search for infinity: solving the mysteries of the universe", published in 1994. Diese Buch beschreibt anschaulich die Meilensteine, die der Mensch seit der Antike auf der Suche nach dem Unendlichen erreicht und hinter sich gelassen hat. Es enthält Kurzbiographien der wichtigsten Forscher, verständlich geschriebene Texte sowie Erläuterungen der entscheidenen Fachtermini.

  13. At-one-ment, intuition and 'suchness'.

    PubMed

    Stitzman, Leandro

    2004-10-01

    Many senses exist for perceiving sensory experience; there are in turn others which make it possible to perceive emotional experience: intuition is one of these. The author, using W. R. Bion's work, studies intuition psychoanalytically, considering it to be a powerful 'sense' in clinical work. He describes the metapsychology of intuition, and proposes models that make it possible to think--from different perspectives--about how to make use of it in an analysis. To this end, he examines a series of useful processes and concepts: growth, tolerance, 'suchness', suffering and courage. The author defi nes the intuitive mechanism as a derivation of the renunciation of memory, desire and understanding; such a renunciation, learning from the experience of suffering the pain of facing the Truth in at-one-ment, makes it possible to tolerate the frustrations associated with observing the analysand 'such-as-he-is'. Finally, once immersed in the intelligence of intuition, the author considers ways in which intuition might be linked with concepts, with a view to interpreting the facts that must be transformed in the analysis.

  14. Hypothesis-free? No such thing

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2008-06-01

    Finding meaningful relationships in complex datasets requires starting with the appropriate data. A hypothesis usually takes the form of a mechanistic relationship between a specific cause and a consequent effect, and this will almost always depend on experimental context. There are some circumstances when data must be gathered in the absence of context or hypothesis to characterize a system, but it is unrealistic to expect such preliminary studies to lead to significant biological insights. For this, you need a hypothesis. Systems biology might be the future of biology, but we still need hypotheses to take us where we want to go.

  15. Digital scale converter

    DOEpatents

    Upton, Richard G.

    1978-01-01

    A digital scale converter is provided for binary coded decimal (BCD) conversion. The converter may be programmed to convert a BCD value of a first scale to the equivalent value of a second scale according to a known ratio. The value to be converted is loaded into a first BCD counter and counted down to zero while a second BCD counter registers counts from zero or an offset value depending upon the conversion. Programmable rate multipliers are used to generate pulses at selected rates to the counters for the proper conversion ratio. The value present in the second counter at the time the first counter is counted to the zero count is the equivalent value of the second scale. This value may be read out and displayed on a conventional seven-segment digital display.

  16. There is no Such Thing as Attention

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Britt

    2011-01-01

    Given that the core issues of attention research have been recognized for millenia, we do not know as much about attention as we should. I argue that the reasons for this failure are (1) we create spurious dichotomies, (2) we reify attention, treating it as a cause, when it is an effect, and (3) we equate a collection of facts with a theory. In order to correct these errors, we need a new technical vocabulary that allows for attentional effects to be continuously distributed, rather than merely present or absent, and that provides a basis for quantitative behavioral predictions that map onto neural substrates. The terminology of the Bayesian decision process has already proved useful for structuring conceptual discussions in other psychological domains, such as perception and decision making under uncertainty, and it had demonstrated early success in the domain of attention. By rejecting a reified, causal conception of attention, in favor of theories that produce attentional effects as consequences, psychologists will be able to conduct more definitive experiments. Such conceptual advances will then enhance the productivity of neuroscientists by allowing them to concentrate their data collection efforts on the richest soil. PMID:21977019

  17. Thermionic photovoltaic energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermionic photovoltaic energy conversion device comprises a thermionic diode mounted within a hollow tubular photovoltaic converter. The thermionic diode maintains a cesium discharge for producing excited atoms that emit line radiation in the wavelength region of 850 nm to 890 nm. The photovoltaic converter is a silicon or gallium arsenide photovoltaic cell having bandgap energies in this same wavelength region for optimum cell efficiency.

  18. Workshop 4 Converter cooling & recuperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iles, Peter; Hindman, Don

    1995-01-01

    Cooling the PV converter increases the overall TPV system efficiency, and more than offsets the losses incurred in providing cooling systems. Convective air flow methods may be sufficient, and several standard water cooling systems, including thermo-syphon radiators, capillary pumps or microchannel plates, are available. Recuperation is used to increase system efficiency, rather than to increase the emitter temperature. Recuperators operating at comparable high temperatures, such as in high temperature turbines have worked effectively.

  19. Carbon Cloth Supports Catalytic Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, W. T. P.; Ammon, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon cloth is starting material for promising new catalytic electrodes. Carbon-cloth electrodes are more efficient than sintered-carbon configuration previously used. Are also chemically stable and require less catalyst--an important economic advantage when catalyst is metal such as platinum.

  20. Molecular chaperones are nanomachines that catalytically unfold misfolded and alternatively folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Mattoo, Rayees U H; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    By virtue of their general ability to bind (hold) translocating or unfolding polypeptides otherwise doomed to aggregate, molecular chaperones are commonly dubbed "holdases". Yet, chaperones also carry physiological functions that do not necessitate prevention of aggregation, such as altering the native states of proteins, as in the disassembly of SNARE complexes and clathrin coats. To carry such physiological functions, major members of the Hsp70, Hsp110, Hsp100, and Hsp60/CCT chaperone families act as catalytic unfolding enzymes or unfoldases that drive iterative cycles of protein binding, unfolding/pulling, and release. One unfoldase chaperone may thus successively convert many misfolded or alternatively folded polypeptide substrates into transiently unfolded intermediates, which, once released, can spontaneously refold into low-affinity native products. Whereas during stress, a large excess of non-catalytic chaperones in holding mode may optimally prevent protein aggregation, after the stress, catalytic disaggregases and unfoldases may act as nanomachines that use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to repair proteins with compromised conformations. Thus, holding and catalytic unfolding chaperones can act as primary cellular defenses against the formation of early misfolded and aggregated proteotoxic conformers in order to avert or retard the onset of degenerative protein conformational diseases.

  1. Fundamentals and Catalytic Applications of CeO2-Based Materials.

    PubMed

    Montini, Tiziano; Melchionna, Michele; Monai, Matteo; Fornasiero, Paolo

    2016-05-25

    Cerium dioxide (CeO2, ceria) is becoming an ubiquitous constituent in catalytic systems for a variety of applications. 2016 sees the 40(th) anniversary since ceria was first employed by Ford Motor Company as an oxygen storage component in car converters, to become in the years since its inception an irreplaceable component in three-way catalysts (TWCs). Apart from this well-established use, ceria is looming as a catalyst component for a wide range of catalytic applications. For some of these, such as fuel cells, CeO2-based materials have almost reached the market stage, while for some other catalytic reactions, such as reforming processes, photocatalysis, water-gas shift reaction, thermochemical water splitting, and organic reactions, ceria is emerging as a unique material, holding great promise for future market breakthroughs. While much knowledge about the fundamental characteristics of CeO2-based materials has already been acquired, new characterization techniques and powerful theoretical methods are deepening our understanding of these materials, helping us to predict their behavior and application potential. This review has a wide view on all those aspects related to ceria which promise to produce an important impact on our life, encompassing fundamental knowledge of CeO2 and its properties, characterization toolbox, emerging features, theoretical studies, and all the catalytic applications, organized by their degree of establishment on the market.

  2. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes.

  3. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  4. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.378 - NO2-to-NO converter conversion verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Measurements § 1065.378 NO2-to-NO converter conversion verification. (a) Scope and frequency. If you use an... catalytic activity of the NO2-to-NO converter has not deteriorated. (b) Measurement principles. An NO2-to-NO.... Allow for stabilization, accounting only for transport delays and instrument response. (ii) Use an...

  6. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  7. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  8. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  9. Catalytic oxidation for treatment of ECLSS and PMMS waste streams. [Process Material Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Thompson, John; Scott, Bryan; Jolly, Clifford; Carter, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation was added to the baseline multifiltration technology for use on the Space Station Freedom in order to convert low-molecular weight organic waste components such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, and thiocarbamides to CO2 at low temperature (121 C), thereby reducing the total organic carbon (TOC) to below 500 ppb. The rate of reaction for the catalytic oxidation of aqueous organics to CO2 and water depends primarily upon the catalyst, temperature, and concentration of reactants. This paper describes a kinetic study conducted to determine the impact of each of these parameters upon the reaction rate. The results indicate that a classic kinetic model, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation for heterogeneous catalysis, can accurately represent the functional dependencies of this rate.

  10. Catalytic oxidation for treatment of ECLSS and PMMS waste streams. [Process Material Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Thompson, John; Scott, Bryan; Jolly, Clifford; Carter, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation was added to the baseline multifiltration technology for use on the Space Station Freedom in order to convert low-molecular weight organic waste components such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, and thiocarbamides to CO2 at low temperature (121 C), thereby reducing the total organic carbon (TOC) to below 500 ppb. The rate of reaction for the catalytic oxidation of aqueous organics to CO2 and water depends primarily upon the catalyst, temperature, and concentration of reactants. This paper describes a kinetic study conducted to determine the impact of each of these parameters upon the reaction rate. The results indicate that a classic kinetic model, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation for heterogeneous catalysis, can accurately represent the functional dependencies of this rate.

  11. Producing Clean Syngas via Catalytic Reforming for Fuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini, K. A.; Parent, Y.; Jablonski, W.; Yung, M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermochemical biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals can be achieved through gasification to syngas. The biomass derived raw syngas contains the building blocks of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as well as impurities such as tars, light hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide. These impurities must be removed prior to fuel synthesis. We used catalytic reforming to convert tars and hydrocarbons to additional syngas, which increases biomass carbon utilization. In this work, nickel based, fluidizable tar reforming catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for tar and methane reforming performance with oak and model syngas in two types of pilot scale fluidized reactors (recirculating and recirculating regenerating). Because hydrogen sulfide (present in raw syngas and added to model syngas) reacts with the active nickel surface, regeneration with steam and hydrogen was required. Pre and post catalyst characterization showed changes specific to the syngas type used. Results of this work will be discussed in the context of selecting the best process for pilot scale demonstration.

  12. Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ; Matlin, Ramail [Berkeley Heights, NJ; Heinz, Robert [Ludwigshafen, DE

    2012-06-26

    A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

  13. Operation of high power converters in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1993-01-01

    High power converters that are used in space power subsystems are limited in power handling capability due to component and thermal limitations. For applications, such as Space Station Freedom, where multi-kilowatts of power must be delivered to user loads, parallel operation of converters becomes an attractive option when considering overall power subsystem topologies. TRW developed three different unequal power sharing approaches for parallel operation of converters. These approaches, known as droop, master-slave, and proportional adjustment, are discussed and test results are presented.

  14. Pseudolog Digital-to-Analog Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivity decreases by 10 at beginning of each input decade. Method conceived to convert binary-coded data to suitable linear form for stripchart recording. Strip-chart recordings obtained from typical pressure readings in a vacuum system during pumpdown. In reading curve, BCD digital vacuum-gage output processed by analog-to-digital converter in such way that only reading digits (but not range) appear in output. In range and reading, range also converted to analog and placed as most significant digit.

  15. Thermionic energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, Jr., James E.

    1977-08-09

    A thermionic device for converting nuclear energy into electrical energy comprising a tubular anode spaced from and surrounding a cylindrical cathode, the cathode having an outer emitting surface of ruthenium, and nuclear fuel on the inner cylindrical surface. The nuclear fuel is a ceramic composition of fissionable material in a metal matrix. An axial void is provided to collect and contain fission product gases.

  16. Fractional Watt AMTEC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, T. K.; Rasmussen, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    We report here the long term performance of a small, multi-tube AMTEC converter. This converter was designed to operate and produce approximately 12 watt of electrical output from a small, 4 to 6 watt radioisotope heat source for remote power applications. It was built and put on test in 1999 using electrical heaters as stand-ins for the radioisotope capsule. Since that time it has accumulated more than 5 years of run time at an input heater temperature of 700 °C, with numerous thermal cycles to ambient that were generally related to grid power failures or physical moves of the test apparatus. The power output has remained, with variations due to orientation changes and minor variations due to small temperature changes, essentially constant at 0.40 W to 0.60 W over the test period and operation is ongoing. The converter casing and mechanical structure was fabricated from 316 SS and the electrodes are sputtered titanium nitride films. Separate static tests of a multilayer insulation package suitable for use with the converter showed the capability to reach 700 °C with a thermal input of < 4 watts.

  17. Rich catalytic injection

    SciTech Connect

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  18. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  19. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  20. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  1. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  2. Digital control of HVDC converters

    SciTech Connect

    Pilotto, L.A.S.; Roitman, M.; Alves, J.E.R.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the project of a completely digital HVDC converter controller based on a 16-bit microcomputer. It was decided to achieve as much as possible by software in order to minimize functions performed by external hardware. The presented design comprises software programmed functions such as a PID current control amplifier, voltage dependent current order limiters and an alpha-minimum symmetrization unit, among others. HVDC control principles are briefly reviewed and a detailed description of both the hardware and software structure of the controller is presented. The digital controller was implemented in an HVDC simulator and several dynamic performance tests demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed methodology.

  3. Workshop 4 Converter cooling & recuperation

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, P.; Hindman, D.

    1995-01-05

    Cooling the PV converter increases the overall TPV system efficiency, and more than offsets the losses incurred in providing cooling systems. Convective air flow methods may be sufficient, and several standard water cooling systems, including thermo-syphon radiators, capillary pumps or microchannel plates, are available. Recuperation is used to increase system efficiency, rather than to increase the emitter temperature. Recuperators operating at comparable high temperatures, such as in high temperature turbines have worked effectively. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fine chemicals and fuels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hui; Xia, Xi; Lin, Chun-Xiang; Tong, Dong-Shen; Beltramini, Jorge

    2011-11-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant and bio-renewable resource with great potential for sustainable production of chemicals and fuels. This critical review provides insights into the state-of the-art accomplishments in the chemocatalytic technologies to generate fuels and value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, with an emphasis on its major component, cellulose. Catalytic hydrolysis, solvolysis, liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation are the major processes presently studied. Regarding catalytic hydrolysis, the acid catalysts cover inorganic or organic acids and various solid acids such as sulfonated carbon, zeolites, heteropolyacids and oxides. Liquefaction and fast pyrolysis of cellulose are primarily conducted over catalysts with proper acidity/basicity. Gasification is typically conducted over supported noble metal catalysts. Reaction conditions, solvents and catalysts are the prime factors that affect the yield and composition of the target products. Most of processes yield a complex mixture, leading to problematic upgrading and separation. An emerging technique is to integrate hydrolysis, liquefaction or pyrolysis with hydrogenation over multifunctional solid catalysts to convert lignocellulosic biomass to value-added fine chemicals and bio-hydrocarbon fuels. And the promising catalysts might be supported transition metal catalysts and zeolite-related materials. There still exist technological barriers that need to be overcome (229 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  5. Digital to synchro converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predina, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A digital-to-synchro converter is provided where a binary input code specifies a desired shaft angle and where an resolver type position transducer is employed with additional circuitry to generate a shaft position error signal indicative of the angular difference between the desired shaft angle and the actual shaft angle. The additional circuitry corrects for known and calculated errors in the shaft position detection process and equipment.

  6. Catalytic systems used for polymerization, biomass conversion, and enhancing diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pong, Frances

    revealed that these angstrom sized catalysts nearly double the speed of diffusion of passive molecular tracers in their immediate surroundings. This result is particularly intriguing because in this size regime, the viscosity of the surroundings is expected to completely overcome the inertial forces of these catalysts. This study has prompted further diffusion-NMR studies of molecular catalysts and enzymes as molecular motors. Catalytic systems play a crucial role in the conversion of renewable biomasses into energy and useful materials. This field of research has become increasingly important and lucrative as fossil fuel sources continue to decline/destabilize in the face of increased worldwide demand for more resources. In this work (iii), the efficacy of a hydrogen-pressurized, biphasic catalytic system to convert linear sugar polyols to iodoalkanes was examined. These iodoalkanes can easily be converted to 1-alkenes which can then be used for the synthesis of low density polyethylene. The results indicated that the system products were relatively pure and that the catalytic layer had a degree of recyclability, hinting that such a system may be viable for industrial use.

  7. RAW to UIMF Converter

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-09

    The RAW to Unified Ion Mobility File (UIMF) converter is a software application that takes LC MS scans from a Thermo RAW file and translates them into ion mobility scans compatible with the UIMF file format. The converter calculates the number of points to generate for the UIMF format by estimating the coefficients of a power function, which models the way in which FTMS data is collected. Once the coefficients are estimated (using a standard Gauss-Newton solver), an m/z mesh is created using standard m/z ppm calculations. This mesh is then used as a basis for translating the m/z intensity pairs from the Thermo RAW file to the UIMF format. Due to non-uniform spacing of m/z values in RAW spectra, a simple linear interpolation is applied to the UIMF format after assigning all m/z values in the mesh in order to fill in gaps. Finally, the converter can perform singly or doubly demultiplexing of encoded ion mobility chromtograms, depending on user selected options during the conversion process. This operation is performed after the UIMF file has been generated.

  8. Carbohydrates regulate the dimerization of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kost, O A; Orth, T A; Nikolskaya, I I; Nametkin, S N; Levashov, A V

    1998-03-01

    Regulation of the catalytic activity and supramolecular structure of angiotensin-converting enzyme was studied in reverse micelles of Aerosol OT in octane as biomembrane model. The kinetic experiments and the sedimentation analysis demonstrated that the enzyme can function both in monomeric and dimeric form. The degree of dimerization was strongly dependent on the concentration and structure of mono- and disaccharides added to the media, indicating the specific role of carbohydrates in forming the supramolecular structure of angiotensin-converting enzyme. The existence of carbohydrate-binding center on the enzyme molecule is proposed.

  9. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  10. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  11. Multilevel converters -- A new breed of power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z. |

    1995-09-01

    Multilevel voltage source converters are emerging as a new breed of power converter options for high-power applications. The multilevel voltage source converters typically synthesize the staircase voltage wave from several levels of dc capacitor voltages. One of the major limitations of the multilevel converters is the voltage unbalance between different levels. The techniques to balance the voltage between different levels normally involve voltage clamping or capacitor charge control. There are several ways of implementing voltage balance in multilevel converters. Without considering the traditional magnetic coupled converters, this paper presents three recently developed multilevel voltage source converters: (1) diode-clamp, (2) flying-capacitors, and (3) cascaded-inverters with separate dc sources. The operating principle, features, constraints, and potential applications of these converters will be discussed.

  12. Analysis of self-oscillating dc-to-dc converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, P.

    1974-01-01

    The basic operational characteristics of dc-to-dc converters are analyzed along with the basic physical characteristics of power converters. A simple class of dc-to-dc power converters are chosen which could satisfy any set of operating requirements, and three different controlling methods in this class are described in detail. Necessary conditions for the stability of these converters are measured through analog computer simulation whose curves are related to other operational characteristics, such as ripple and regulation. Further research is suggested for the solution of absolute stability and efficient physical design of this class of power converters.

  13. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  14. Method for remotely powering a device such as a lunar rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, Russell J. (Inventor); Williams, Michael D. (Inventor); Walker, Gilbert H. (Inventor); Schuster, Gregory L. (Inventor); Lee, Ja H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method of supplying power to a device such as a lunar rover located on a planetary surface is provided. At least one, and preferably three, laser satellites are set in orbit around the planet. Each satellite contains a nuclear reactor for generating electrical power. This electrical power is converted into a laser beam which is passed through an amplifying array and directed toward the device such as a lunar rover. The received laser beam is then converted into electrical power for use by the device.

  15. Method for remotely powering a device such as a lunar rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, Russell J.; Williams, Michael D.; Walker, Gilbert H.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Lee, Ja H.

    1992-01-01

    A method of supplying power to a device such as a lunar rover located on a planetary surface is provided. At least one, and preferably three, laser satellites are set in orbit around the planet. Each satellite contains a nuclear reactor for generating electrical power. This electrical power is converted into a laser beam which is passed through an amplifying array and directed toward the device such as a lunar rover. The received laser beam is then converted into electrical power for use by the device.

  16. Method for remotely powering a device such as a lunar rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, Russell J.; Williams, Michael D.; Walker, Gilbert H.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Lee, Ja H.

    1993-11-01

    A method of supplying power to a device such as a lunar rover located on a planetary surface is provided. At least one, and preferably three, laser satellites are set in orbit around the planet. Each satellite contains a nuclear reactor for generating electrical power. This electrical power is converted into a laser beam which is passed through an amplifying array and directed toward the device such as a lunar rover. The received laser beam is then converted into electrical power for use by the device.

  17. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; Dinetta, L. C.; Goetz, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) energy converters may be successfully deployed to provide new mission capabilities for spacecraft. Betavoltaic power supplies based on the conversion of tritium beta decay to electricity using GaP energy converters can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. High temperature solar cells, also based on GaP, can be used in inward-bound missions greatly reducing the need for thermal dissipation. Results are presented for GaP direct conversion devices powered by Ni-63 and compared to the conversion of light emitted by tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/sq cm have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. Temperature dependent IV, QE, R(sub sh), and V(sub oc) results are also presented. These data are used to predict the high-temperature solar cell and betacell performance of GaP devices and suggest appropriate applications for the deployment of this technology.

  18. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, Albert Andreas Maria

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero.

  19. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, A.A.M.

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero. 20 figs.

  20. Potential converter for laser-power beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Williams, Michael D.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Iles, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    Future space missions, such as those associated with the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), will require large amounts of power for operation of bases, rovers, and orbit transfer vehicles. One method for supplying this power is to beam power from a spaced based or Earth based laser power station to a receiver where laser photons can be converted to electricity. Previous research has described such laser power stations orbiting the Moon and beaming power to a receiver on the surface of the Moon by using arrays of diode lasers. Photovoltaic converters that can be efficiently used with these diode lasers are described.

  1. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  2. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  3. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  4. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  5. Combined hydrothermal liquefaction and catalytic hydrothermal gasification system and process for conversion of biomass feedstocks

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.

    2017-09-12

    A combined hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) system and process are described that convert various biomass-containing sources into separable bio-oils and aqueous effluents that contain residual organics. Bio-oils may be converted to useful bio-based fuels and other chemical feedstocks. Residual organics in HTL aqueous effluents may be gasified and converted into medium-BTU product gases and directly used for process heating or to provide energy.

  6. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2: The First Decade

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Nicola E.; Turner, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of hypertension, primarily through the actions of the vasoactive peptide Ang II, which is generated by the action of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) mediating an increase in blood pressure. The discovery of ACE2, which primarily metabolises Ang II into the vasodilatory Ang-(1-7), has added a new dimension to the traditional RAS. As a result there has been huge interest in ACE2 over the past decade as a potential therapeutic for lowering blood pressure, especially elevation resulting from excess Ang II. Studies focusing on ACE2 have helped to reveal other actions of Ang-(1-7), outside vasodilation, such as antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects. Moreover, investigations focusing on ACE2 have revealed a variety of roles not just catalytic but also as a viral receptor and amino acid transporter. This paper focuses on what is known about ACE2 and its biological roles, paying particular attention to the regulation of ACE2 expression. In light of the entrance of human recombinant ACE2 into clinical trials, we discuss the potential use of ACE2 as a therapeutic and highlight some pertinent questions that still remain unanswered about ACE2. PMID:22121476

  7. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  8. Bidirectional DC/DC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, F.

    2008-09-01

    The presented bidirectional DC/DC converter design concept is a further development of an already existing converter used for low battery voltage operation.For low battery voltage operation a high efficient low parts count DC/DC converter was developed, and used in a satellite for the battery charge and battery discharge function.The converter consists in a bidirectional, non regulating DC/DC converter connected to a discharge regulating Buck converter and a charge regulating Buck converter.The Bidirectional non regulating DC/DC converter performs with relatively high efficiency even at relatively high currents, which here means up to 35Amps.This performance was obtained through the use of power MOSFET's with on- resistances of only a few mille Ohms connected to a special transformer allowing paralleling several transistor stages on the low voltage side of the transformer. The design is patent protected. Synchronous rectification leads to high efficiency at the low battery voltages considered, which was in the range 2,7- 4,3 Volt DC.The converter performs with low switching losses as zero voltage zero current switching is implemented in all switching positions of the converter.Now, the drive power needed, to switch a relatively large number of low Ohm , hence high drive capacitance, power MOSFET's using conventional drive techniques would limit the overall conversion efficiency.Therefore a resonant drive consuming considerable less power than a conventional drive circuit was implemented in the converter.To the originally built and patent protected bidirectional non regulating DC/DC converter, is added the functionality of regulation.Hereby the need for additional converter stages in form of a Charge Buck regulator and a Discharge Buck regulator is eliminated.The bidirectional DC/DC converter can be used in connection with batteries, motors, etc, where the bidirectional feature, simple design and high performance may be useful.

  9. Highly efficient conversion of terpenoid biomass to jet-fuel range cycloalkanes in a biphasic tandem catalytic process

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaokun; Li, Teng; Tang, Kan; ...

    2017-06-12

    The demand for bio-jet fuels to reduce carbon emissions is increasing substantially in the aviation sector, while the scarcity of high-density jet fuel components limits the use of bio-jet fuels in high-performance aircrafts compared with conventional jet fuels. In this paper, we report a novel biphasic tandem catalytic process (biTCP) for synthesizing cycloalkanes from renewable terpenoid biomass, such as 1,8-cineole. Multistep tandem reactions, including C–O ring opening by hydrolysis, dehydration, and hydrogenation, were carried out in the “one-pot” biTCP. 1,8-Cineole was efficiently converted to p-menthane at high yields (>99%) in the biTCP under mild reaction conditions. Finally, the catalytic reactionmore » mechanism is discussed.« less

  10. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  11. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  12. Converting Biomass to Products

    SciTech Connect

    Graybeal, Judith W.

    2006-06-01

    For nearly 30 years, PNNL has been developing and applying novel thermal, chemical and biological processes to convert biomass to industrial and consumer products, fuels and energy. Honors for technologies resulting from this research include the Presidential Green Chemistry Award and several Federal Laboratory Consortium and R&D 100 Awards. PNNL’s research and development activities address the complete processing scheme, from feedstock pretreatment to purified product recovery. The laboratory applies fundamental science and advanced engineering capabilities to biomass conversion and processing to ensure effective recovery of optimal value from biomass; carbohydrate polymer systems to maximize energy efficiencies; and micro-technology systems for separation and conversion processes. For example, bioproducts researchers in the laboratory’s Institute for Interfacial Catalysis develop and demonstrate the utility of new catalyst formulations for production of bio-based chemicals. This article describes a sampling of current and recent catalysis projects for biomass conversion.

  13. Unity power factor converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A unity power factor converter capable of effecting either inversion (dc-to-dc) or rectification (ac-to-dc), and capable of providing bilateral power control from a DC source (or load) through an AC transmission line to a DC load (or source) for power flow in either direction, is comprised of comparators for comparing the AC current i with an AC signal i.sub.ref (or its phase inversion) derived from the AC ports to generate control signals to operate a switch control circuit for high speed switching to shape the AC current waveform to a sine waveform, and synchronize it in phase and frequency with the AC voltage at the AC ports, by selectively switching the connections to a series inductor as required to increase or decrease the current i.

  14. Two new methanol converters

    SciTech Connect

    Westerterp, K.R.; Bodewes, T.N.; Vrijiand, M.S.A.; Kuczynski, M. )

    1988-11-01

    Two novel converter systems were developed for the manufacture of methanol from synthesis gas: the Gas-Solid-Solid Trickle Flow Reactor (GSSTFR) and the Reactor System with Interstage Product Removal (RSIPR). In the GSSTFR version, the product formed at the catalyst surface is directly removed from the reaction zone by means of a solid adsorbent. This adsorbent continuously trickles over the catalyst bed. High reactant conversions up to 100% can be achieved in a single pass so that the usual recycle loop for the unconverted reactants is absent or greatly reduced in size. In the RSIPR version, high conversions per pass are achieved in a series of adiabatic or isothermal fixed bed reactors with selective product removal in absorbers between the reactor stages. The feasibility and economics of the two systems are discussed on the basis of 1,000 tpd methanol plants compared with a low-pressure Lurgi system.

  15. Embryotoxicity of irradiated and nonirradiated catalytic convertertreated automotive exhaust.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D J; Campbell, K I

    1977-11-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the relative embryotoxicity in chick embryos of photochemically reacted and unreacted diluted automotive exhaust emissions from a system equipped with a catalytic converter. Clean air controls and H2SO4 aerosol controls equivalent in concentration to those found in the catalytic exhaust atmosphere were also studied. From day 1 through day 14 of development, continuous exposure to nonirradiated exhause resulted in decreased survival, lowered embryonic weight, a small increase in heart/body weight ratio, and altered hematocrit and serum enzyme activities (LDH and GOT). Irradiated exhaust had little effect on survival or on embryonic weight but resulted in a higher liver/body weight ratio as well as altered hematocrit and serum enzyme activities. Interactions or cumulative effects of different compositions of exhaust atmospheres may play a role in differing biological responses between unreacted and irradiated exhaust. Sulfuric acid aerosol had a minimal effect on survival and resulted in only a slight decrease in embryonic weight and serum LDH activity, with no other apparent effects. In previous studies where the catalytic converter was not used, more pronounced effects on survival, increased heart/body weigh ratio, elevated serum GPT activity, and liver discoloration were observed. Thus, the introduction of an oxidizing catalytic converter appeared to alleviate some but not all of the embryotoxic effects of automotive exhaust.

  16. Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zhang, Yanping

    1995-06-15

    This project investigated a suitable catalyst system for the direct NO decomposition for post-combustion NO{sub x} control. The studied process does not use a reductant, such as ammonia in the case of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) process for catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} to nitrogen. This is a simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter, thus avoiding problems generally associated with the commercial SCR process, namely high operating cost, ammonia slip, and potential N{sub 2}O emissions. The main results from this research project are summarized in the following: Cu-ZSM-5 and M/Cu-ZSM-5 were synthesized by incorporating metal cations into ZSM-5 zeolite supports by optimized ion exchange procedures. It was found that (1) the catalytic activity of Cu-ZSM-5 only increased with copper loading when the Cu-ZSM-5 was prepared in an aqueous copper acetate solution with pH lower than 5.74; (2) high pH of the solution led not only to ion-exchanged Cu{sup 2+}, but also copper deposition on the zeolite surface forming inactive CuO particles as identified by STEM/EDX and XRD; (3) the sequence of metal ion exchange first, followed by copper ion exchange to synthesize M/Cu-ZSM-5, where M represents any metal ion but copper, was important for the cocation to show promotion effects; and (4) air-calcination of M-ZSM was effective in keeping M cations in the zeolite during subsequent copper ion exchange. Positive alkaline and rare earth metal cocation effects on the Cu-ZSM-5 were identified in oxygen-containing gas mixtures in the high temperature region (450--600C). Cerium ion promoted the Cu-ZSM-5 activity in the low temperature range (< 450C) in oxygen-free gas mixture, while alkaline earth and transition metal cocations improved the NO conversion to N{sub 2} in high temperature region.

  17. Hybrid switch for resonant power converters

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Yu, Wensong

    2014-09-09

    A hybrid switch comprising two semiconductor switches connected in parallel but having different voltage drop characteristics as a function of current facilitates attainment of zero voltage switching and reduces conduction losses to complement reduction of switching losses achieved through zero voltage switching in power converters such as high-current inverters.

  18. Noise exposure in convertible automobiles.

    PubMed

    Mikulec, A A; Lukens, S B; Jackson, L E; Deyoung, M N

    2011-02-01

    To quantify the noise exposure received while driving a convertible automobile with the top open, compared with the top closed. Five different convertible automobiles were driven, with the top both closed and open, and noise levels measured. The cars were tested at speeds of 88.5, 104.6 and 120.7 km/h. When driving with the convertible top open, the mean noise exposure ranged from 85.3 dB at 88.5 km/h to 89.9 dB at 120.7 km/h. At the tested speeds, noise exposure increased by an average of 12.4-14.6 dB after opening the convertible top. Driving convertible automobiles at speeds exceeding 88.5 km/h, with the top open, may result in noise exposure levels exceeding recommended limits, especially when driving with the convertible top open for prolonged periods.

  19. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  20. Turbo-Brayton Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breedlove, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Future NASA space missions will require advanced thermal-to-electric power converters that are reliable, efficient, and lightweight. Creare, LLC, is developing a turbo-Brayton power converter that offers high efficiency and specific power. The converter employs gas bearings to provide maintenance free, long-life operation. Discrete components can be packaged to fit optimally with other subsystems, and the converter's continuous gas flow can communicate directly with remote heat sources and heat rejection surfaces without the need for ancillary heat-transfer components and intermediate flow loops. Creare has completed detailed analyses, trade studies, fabrication trials, and preliminary designs for the components and converter assembly. The company is fabricating and testing a breadboard converter.

  1. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  2. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  3. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  4. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  5. Power converters for future LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderighi, M.; Citterio, M.; Riva, M.; Latorre, S.; Costabeber, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Sichirollo, F.; Spiazzi, G.; Stellini, M.; Tenti, P.; Cova, P.; Delmonte, N.; Lanza, A.; Bernardoni, M.; Menozzi, R.; Baccaro, S.; Iannuzzo, F.; Sanseverino, A.; Busatto, G.; De Luca, V.; Velardi, F.

    2012-03-01

    The paper describes power switching converters suitable for possible power supply distribution networks for the upgraded detectors at the High Luminosity LHC collider. The proposed topologies have been selected by considering their tolerance to the highly hostile environment where the converters will operate as well as their limited electromagnetic noise emission. The analysis focuses on the description of the power supplies for noble liquid calorimeters, such as the Atlas LAr calorimeters, though several outcomes of this research can be applied to other detectors of the future LHC experiments. Experimental results carried on demonstrators are provided.

  6. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  7. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  8. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  9. Isolated and soft-switched power converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Adams, Donald Joe

    2002-01-01

    An isolated and soft-switched power converter is used for DC/DC and DC/DC/AC power conversion. The power converter includes two resonant tank circuits coupled back-to-back through an isolation transformer. Each resonant tank circuit includes a pair of resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, a pair of tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and a pair of switching devices with anti-parallel clamping diodes coupled in series as resonant switches and clamping devices for the resonant leg. The power converter is well suited for DC/DC and DC/DC/AC power conversion applications in which high-voltage isolation, DC to DC voltage boost, bidirectional power flow, and a minimal number of conventional switching components are important design objectives. For example, the power converter is especially well suited to electric vehicle applications and load-side electric generation and storage systems, and other applications in which these objectives are important. The power converter may be used for many different applications, including electric vehicles, hybrid combustion/electric vehicles, fuel-cell powered vehicles with low-voltage starting, remote power sources utilizing low-voltage DC power sources, such as photovoltaics and others, electric power backup systems, and load-side electric storage and generation systems.

  10. Pulsed thermionic converter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear electric propulsion concept using a thermionic reactor inductively coupled to a magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator (MPD arc jet) is described, and the results of preliminary analyses are presented. In this system, the MPD thruster operates intermittently at higher voltages and power levels than the thermionic generating unit. A typical thrust pulse from the MPD arc jet is characterized by power levels of 1 to 4 MWe, a duration of 1 msec, and a duty cycle of approximately 20%. The thermionic generating unit operates continuously but with a lower power level of approximately 0.4 MWe. Energy storage between thrust pulses is provided by building up a large current in an inductor using the output of the thermionic converter array. Periodically, the charging current is interrupted, and the energy stored in the magnetic field of the inductor is utilized for a short duration thrust pulse. The results of the preliminary analysis show that a coupling effectiveness of approximately 85 to 90% is feasible for a nominal 400 KWe system with an inductive unit suitable for a flight vehicle.

  11. Mining disease state converters for medical intervention of diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guozhu; Duan, Lei; Tang, Changjie

    2010-02-01

    In applications such as gene therapy and drug design, a key goal is to convert the disease state of diseased objects from an undesirable state into a desirable one. Such conversions may be achieved by changing the values of some attributes of the objects. For example, in gene therapy one may convert cancerous cells to normal ones by changing some genes' expression level from low to high or from high to low. In this paper, we define the disease state conversion problem as the discovery of disease state converters; a disease state converter is a small set of attribute value changes that may change an object's disease state from undesirable into desirable. We consider two variants of this problem: personalized disease state converter mining mines disease state converters for a given individual patient with a given disease, and universal disease state converter mining mines disease state converters for all samples with a given disease. We propose a DSCMiner algorithm to discover small and highly effective disease state converters. Since real-life medical experiments on living diseased instances are expensive and time consuming, we use classifiers trained from the datasets of given diseases to evaluate the quality of discovered converter sets. The effectiveness of a disease state converter is measured by the percentage of objects that are successfully converted from undesirable state into desirable state as deemed by state-of-the-art classifiers. We use experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of our algorithm and to show its effectiveness. We also discuss possible research directions for extensions and improvements. We note that the disease state conversion problem also has applications in customer retention, criminal rehabilitation, and company turn-around, where the goal is to convert class membership of objects whose class is an undesirable class.

  12. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  13. Optimum catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-28

    The objectives of this contract are to discover and evaluate the catalytic properties of novel homogeneous, heterogeneous, or combination catalytic systems for the production of alcohol fuel extenders from syngas, to evaluate analytically and on the bench scale novel reactor concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products, and to develop on the bench scale the best combination of chemistry, reactor, and total process configuration to achieve the minimum product cost for conversion of syngas to liquid fuel products. Methanol production and heterogeneous catalysis utilizing transition elements supported on metal oxides with spinel structure are discussed. 12 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, A. G.; Parkhomchuk, E. V.; Lysikov, A. I.; Parunin, P. D.; Semeikina, V. S.; Parmon, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references.

  15. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  16. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively.

  17. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  18. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  19. Nanocarbons for Catalytic Desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qingqing; Lin, Yangming; Heumann, Saskia; Su, Dangsheng

    2017-08-24

    Nanocarbon catalysts are green and sustainable alternatives to the metal-based catalysts for numerous catalytic transformations. The application of nanocarbons for environmental catalysis is an emerging research discipline and has undergone rapid development in recent years. In this focus review, we provide a critical analysis on the state-of-the-art nanocarbon catalysts for three different catalytic desulfurization processes. And the focus is on the advantage and limitation as well as the reaction mechanism of the nanocarbon catalysts at molecular level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdembrink, B.A.; Degnan, T.F.; Kresge, C.T.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a process for catalytically cracking a petroleum fraction to lighter hydrocarbons. The process comprises providing a feedstock containing a petroleum fraction and then contacting the feedstock with a catalyst under catalytic cracking conditions. The catalyst composition includes a titanometallate layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide material comprising a layered metal oxide and pillars of a chalcogenide of at least one element selected from Groups IB, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVB, VA, VB, VIA, VIIA and VIIIA of the Periodic Table of Elements separating the layers of the metal oxides.

  1. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs.

  2. Proposed electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Device converts wave energy into electric power through array of insulated absorber elements responsive to field of impinging electromagnetic radiation. Device could also serve as solar energy converter that is potentially less expensive and fragile than solar cells, yet substantially more efficient.

  3. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Rongchao

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  4. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-01-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution. PMID:25048695

  5. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  6. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  7. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  8. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Lu

    2008-03-01

    We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called “in vitro selection” to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

  9. Catalytic aromatization of methane.

    PubMed

    Spivey, James J; Hutchings, Graham

    2014-02-07

    Recent developments in natural gas production technology have led to lower prices for methane and renewed interest in converting methane to higher value products. Processes such as those based on syngas from methane reforming are being investigated. Another option is methane aromatization, which produces benzene and hydrogen: 6CH4(g) → C6H6(g) + 9H2(g) ΔG°(r) = +433 kJ mol(-1) ΔH°(r) = +531 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction show that benzene formation is insignificant below ∼600 °C, and that the formation of solid carbon [C(s)] is thermodynamically favored at temperatures above ∼300 °C. Benzene formation is insignificant at all temperatures up to 1000 °C when C(s) is included in the calculation of equilibrium composition. Interestingly, the thermodynamic limitation on benzene formation can be minimized by the addition of alkanes/alkenes to the methane feed. By far the most widely studied catalysts for this reaction are Mo/HZSM-5 and Mo/MCM-22. Benzene selectivities are generally between 60 and 80% at methane conversions of ∼10%, corresponding to net benzene yields of less than 10%. Major byproducts include lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight substituted aromatics. However, carbon formation is inevitable, but the experimental findings show this can be kinetically limited by the use of H2 or oxidants in the feed, including CO2 or steam. A number of reactor configurations involving regeneration of the carbon-containing catalyst have been developed with the goal of minimizing the cost of regeneration of the catalyst once deactivated by carbon deposition. In this tutorial review we discuss the thermodynamics of this process, the catalysts used and the potential reactor configurations that can be applied.

  10. Effect of dry torrefaction on kinetics of catalytic pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniyanto, Sutijan, Deendarlianto, Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Decreasing world reserve of fossil resources (i.e. petroleum oil, coal and natural gas) encourage discovery of renewable resources as subtitute for fossil resources. Biomass is one of the main natural renewable resources which is promising resource as alternate resources to meet the world's energy needs and raw material to produce chemical platform. Conversion of biomass, as source of energy, fuel and biochemical, is conducted using thermochemical process such as pyrolysis-gasification process. Pyrolysis step is an important step in the mechanism of pyrolysis - gasification of biomass. The objective of this study is to obtain the kinetic reaction of catalytic pyrolysis of dry torrified sugarcane bagasse which used Ca and Mg as catalysts. The model of kinetic reaction is interpreted using model n-order of single reaction equation of biomass. Rate of catalytic pyrolysis reaction depends on the weight of converted biomass into char and volatile matters. Based on TG/DTA analysis, rate of pyrolysis reaction is influenced by the composition of biomass (i.e. hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) and inorganic component especially alkali and alkaline earth metallic (AAEM). From this study, it has found two equations rate of reaction of catalytic pyrolysis in sugarcane bagasse using catalysts Ca and Mg. First equation is equation of pyrolysis reaction in rapid zone of decomposition and the second equation is slow zone of decomposition. Value of order reaction for rapid decomposition is n > 1 and for slow decomposition is n<1. Constant and order of reactions for catalytic pyrolysis of dry-torrified sugarcane bagasse with presence of Ca tend to higher than that's of presence of Mg.

  11. Catalytic and thermal cracking processes of waste cooking oil for bio-gasoline synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewanto, Muhammad Andry Rizki; Januartrika, Aulia Azka; Dewajani, Heny; Budiman, Arief

    2017-03-01

    Non-renewable energy resources such as fossil fuels, and coal were depleted as the increase of global energy demand. Moreover, environmental aspect becomes a major concern which recommends people to utilize bio-based resources. Waste cooking oil is one of the economical sources for biofuel production and become the most used raw material for biodiesel production. However, the products formed during frying, can affect the trans-esterification reaction and the biodiesel properties. Therefore, it needs to convert low-quality cooking oil directly into biofuel by both thermal and catalytic cracking processes. Thermal and catalytic cracking sometimes are regarded as prospective bio-energy conversion processes. This research was carried out in the packed bed reactor equipped with 2 stages preheater with temperature of reactor was variated in the range of 450-550°C. At the same temperature, catalytic cracking had been involved in this experiment, using activated ZSM-5 catalyst with 1 cm in length. The organic liquid product was recovered by three stages of double pipe condensers. The composition of cracking products were analyzed using GC-MS instrument and the caloric contents were analyzed using Bomb calorimeter. The results reveal that ZSM-5 was highly selective toward aromatic and long aliphatic compounds formation. The percentage recovery of organic liquid product from the cracking process varies start from 8.31% and the optimal results was 54.08%. The highest heating value of liquid product was resulted from catalytic cracking process at temperature of 450°C with value of 10880.48 cal/gr and the highest product yield with 54.08% recovery was achieved from thermal cracking process with temperature of 450°C.

  12. Catalytic Hydroxylation of Polyethylenes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Polyolefins account for 60% of global plastic consumption, but many potential applications of polyolefins require that their properties, such as compatibility with polar polymers, adhesion, gas permeability, and surface wetting, be improved. A strategy to overcome these deficiencies would involve the introduction of polar functionalities onto the polymer chain. Here, we describe the Ni-catalyzed hydroxylation of polyethylenes (LDPE, HDPE, and LLDPE) in the presence of mCPBA as an oxidant. Studies with cycloalkanes and pure, long-chain alkanes were conducted to assess precisely the selectivity of the reaction and the degree to which potential C–C bond cleavage of a radical intermediate occurs. Among the nickel catalysts we tested, [Ni(Me4Phen)3](BPh4)2 (Me4Phen = 3,4,7,8,-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) reacted with the highest turnover number (TON) for hydroxylation of cyclohexane and the highest selectivity for the formation of cyclohexanol over cyclohexanone (TON, 5560; cyclohexanol/(cyclohexanone + ε-caprolactone) ratio, 10.5). The oxidation of n-octadecane occurred at the secondary C–H bonds with 15.5:1 selectivity for formation of an alcohol over a ketone and 660 TON. Consistent with these data, the hydroxylation of various polyethylene materials by the combination of [Ni(Me4Phen)3](BPh4)2 and mCPBA led to the introduction of 2.0 to 5.5 functional groups (alcohol, ketone, alkyl chloride) per 100 monomer units with up to 88% selectivity for formation of alcohols over ketones or chloride. In contrast to more classical radical functionalizations of polyethylene, this catalytic process occurred without significant modification of the molecular weight of the polymer that would result from chain cleavage or cross-linking. Thus, the resulting materials are new compositions in which hydroxyl groups are located along the main chain of commercial, high molecular weight LDPE, HDPE, and LLDPE materials. These hydroxylated polyethylenes have improved wetting

  13. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  14. Catalytic direct asymmetric Michael reactions: taming naked aldehyde donors.

    PubMed

    Betancort, J M; Barbas, C F

    2001-11-15

    [reaction--see text] Direct catalytic enantio- and diastereoselective Michael addition reactions of unmodified aldehydes to nitro olefins using (S)-2-(morpholinomethyl)pyrrolidine as a catalyst are described. The reactions proceed in good yield (up to 96%) in a highly syn-selective manner (up to 98:2) with enantioselectivities approaching 80%. The resulting gamma-formyl nitro compounds are readily converted to chiral, nonracemic 3,4-disubstituted pyrrolidines.

  15. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  16. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  17. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  18. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol and ethanol for hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Keith L; Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles feature high energy efficiency and minor environmental impact. Liquid fuels are ideal hydrogen carriers, which can catalytically be converted into syngas or hydrogen to power vehicles. Among the potential liquid fuels, alcohols have several advantages. The hydrogen/carbon ratio is higher than that of other liquid hydrocarbons or oxygenates, especially in the case of methanol. In addition, alcohols can be derived from renewable biomass resources. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol or ethanol offers immense potential for onboard hydrogen generation due to its rapid reaction rate and exothermic nature. These benefits stimulate a burgeoning research community in catalyst design, reaction engineering, and mechanistic investigation. The purpose of this Minireview is to provide insight into syngas and hydrogen production from methanol and ethanol partial oxidation, particularly highlighting catalytic chemistry.

  19. Multilevel converters for large electric drives

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, L.M.; Peng, F.Z.

    1997-11-01

    Traditional two-level high frequency pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters for motor drives have several problems associated with their high frequency switching which produces common-mode voltage and high voltage change (dV/dt) rates to the motor windings. Multilevel inverters solve these problems because their devices can switch at a much lower frequency. Two different multilevel topologies are identified for use as a converter for electric drives, a cascade inverter with separate dc sources and a back-to-back diode clamped converter. The cascade inverter is a natural fit for large automotive all electric drives because of the high VA ratings possible and because it uses several levels of dc voltage sources which would be available from batteries or fuel cells. The back to back diode damped converter is ideal where a source of ac voltage is available such as a hybrid electric vehicle. Simulation and experimental results show the superiority of these two converters over PWM based drives.

  20. Hybrid Voltage-Multipliers Based Switching Power Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Caro, Julio C.; Mayo-Maldonado, Jonathan C.; Vazquez-Bautista, Rene Fabian; Valderrabano-Gonzalez, Antonio; Salas-Cabrera, Ruben; Valdez-Resendiz, Jesus Elias

    2011-08-01

    This work presents a derivation of PWM DC-DC hybrid converters by combining traditional converters with the Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier, the voltage multiplier of each converter is driven with the same transistor of the basic topology; this fact makes the structure of the new converters very simple and provides high-voltage gain. The traditional topologies discussed are the boost, buck-boost, Cuk and SEPIC. They main features of the discussed family are: (i) high-voltage gain without using extreme duty cycles or transformers, which allow high switching frequency and (ii) low voltage stress in switching devices, along with modular structures, and more output levels can be added without modifying the main circuit, which is highly desirable in some applications such as renewable energy generation systems. It is shown how a multiplier converter can become a generalized topology and how some of the traditional converters and several state-of-the-art converters can be derived from the generalized topologies and vice-versa. All the discussed converters were simulated, additionally experimental results are provided with an interleaved multiplier converter.

  1. Wind/water energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulkovich, J.

    1979-01-01

    Device will convert wind, water, tidal or wave energy into electrical or mechanical energy. Is comprised of windmill-like paddles or blades synchronously geared to orient themselves to wind direction for optimum energy extraction.

  2. Wind/water energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulkovich, J.

    1979-01-01

    Device will convert wind, water, tidal or wave energy into electrical or mechanical energy. Is comprised of windmill-like paddles or blades synchronously geared to orient themselves to wind direction for optimum energy extraction.

  3. STUDY OF A THERMOPHOTOVOLTAIC CONVERTER.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MEASUREMENT, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, VOLTAGE, ELECTRIC CURRENT, HEAT EXCHANGERS, THERMIONIC CONVERTERS , SILICON COMPOUNDS, CARBIDES, FUELS, HYDROCARBONS, PORTABLE EQUIPMENT....SEMICONDUCTOR), LIGHT TRANSMISSION, INFRARED RADIATION, REFLECTION, OPTICAL COATINGS, MIRRORS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), ELECTRIC POWER PRODUCTION

  4. STUDY OF A THERMOPHOTOVOLTAIC CONVERTER.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THERMOELECTRICITY, *PHOTOELECTRIC CELLS(SEMICONDUCTOR), ELECTRIC POWER PRODUCTION, MATERIALS, THERMIONIC CONVERTERS , THERMIONIC EMISSION, GERMANIUM...ALLOYS, INDIUM ALLOYS, ARSENIC ALLOYS, ARSENIDES, ABSORPTION, REFRACTIVE INDEX, CERAMIC COATINGS, EMISSIVITY, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE.

  5. An Artificial Biomimetic Catalysis Converting CO2 to Green Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Caihong; Wang, Zhiming

    2017-09-01

    Researchers devote to design catalytic systems with higher activity, selectivity, and stability ideally based on cheap and earth-abundant elements to reduce CO2 to value-added hydrocarbon fuels under mild conditions driven by visible light. This may offer profound inspirations on that. A bi-functional molecular iron catalyst designed could not only catalyze two-electron reduction from CO2 to CO but also further convert CO to CH4 with a high selectivity of 82% stably over several days.

  6. Processes for converting lignocellulosics to reduced acid pyrolysis oil

    DOEpatents

    Kocal, Joseph Anthony; Brandvold, Timothy A

    2015-01-06

    Processes for producing reduced acid lignocellulosic-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. In a process, lignocellulosic material is fed to a heating zone. A basic solid catalyst is delivered to the heating zone. The lignocellulosic material is pyrolyzed in the presence of the basic solid catalyst in the heating zone to create pyrolysis gases. The oxygen in the pyrolysis gases is catalytically converted to separable species in the heating zone. The pyrolysis gases are removed from the heating zone and are liquefied to form the reduced acid lignocellulosic-derived pyrolysis oil.

  7. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  8. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  9. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  10. Quenched catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Krambeck, F.J.; Penick, J.E.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes improvement in a fluidized catalytic cracking process wherein a fluidizable catalyst cracking catalyst and a hydrocarbon feed are charged to a reactor riser at catalytic riser cracking conditions to form catalytically cracked vapor product and spent catalyst which are discharged into a reactor vessel having a volume via a riser reactor outlet equipped with a separation means to produce a catalyst lean phase. It comprises: a majority of the cracked product, and a catalyst rich phase comprising a majority of the spend catalyst. The the catalyst rich phase is discharged into a dense bed of catalyst maintained below the riser outlet and the catalyst lean phase is discharged into the vessel for a time, and at a temperature, which cause unselective thermal cracking of the cracked product in the reactor volume before product is withdrawn from the vessel via a vessel outlet. The improvement comprises: addition, after riser cracking is completed, and after separation of cracked products from catalyst, of a quenching stream into the vessel above the dense bed of catalyst, via a quench stream addition point which allows the quench stream to contact at least a majority of the volume of the vessel above the dense bed.

  11. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  12. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  13. Power converter connection configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2008-11-11

    EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  14. A study of Schwarz converters for nuclear powered spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1987-01-01

    High power space systems which use low dc voltage, high current sources such as thermoelectric generators, will most likely require high voltage conversion for transmission purposes. This study considers the use of the Schwarz resonant converter for use as the basic building block to accomplish this low-to-high voltage conversion for either a dc or an ac spacecraft bus. The Schwarz converter has the important assets of both inherent fault tolerance and resonant operation; parallel operation in modular form is possible. A regulated dc spacecraft bus requires only a single stage converter while a constant frequency ac bus requires a cascaded Schwarz converter configuration. If the power system requires constant output power from the dc generator, then a second converter is required to route unneeded power to a ballast load.

  15. A study of Schwarz converters for nuclear powered spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1987-01-01

    High power space systems which use low dc voltage, high current sources such as thermoelectric generators, will most likely require high voltage conversion for transmission purposes. This study considers the use of the Schwarz resonant converter for use as the basic building block to accomplish this low-to-high voltage conversion for either a dc or an ac spacecraft bus. The Schwarz converter has the important assets of both inherent fault tolerance and resonant operation; parallel operation in modular form is possible. A regulated dc spacecraft bus requires only a single stage converter while a constant frequency ac bus requires a cascaded Schwarz converter configuration. If the power system requires constant output power from the dc generator, then a second converter is required to route unneeded power to a ballast load.

  16. Supersymmetric mode converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Matthias; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Stützer, Simon; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the ever-increasing demand for high-capacity transmission systems has driven remarkable advances in technologies that encode information on an optical signal. Mode-division multiplexing makes use of individual modes supported by an optical waveguide as mutually orthogonal channels. The key requirement in this approach is the capability to selectively populate and extract specific modes. Optical supersymmetry (SUSY) has recently been proposed as a particularly elegant way to resolve this design challenge in a manner that is inherently scalable, and at the same time maintains compatibility with existing multiplexing strategies. Supersymmetric partners of multimode waveguides are characterized by the fact that they share all of their effective indices with the original waveguide. The crucial exception is the fundamental mode, which is absent from the spectrum of the partner waveguide. Here, we demonstrate experimentally how this global phase-matching property can be exploited for efficient mode conversion. Multimode structures and their superpartners are experimentally realized in coupled networks of femtosecond laser-written waveguides, and the corresponding light dynamics are directly observed by means of fluorescence microscopy. We show that SUSY transformations can readily facilitate the removal of the fundamental mode from multimode optical structures. In turn, hierarchical sequences of such SUSY partners naturally implement the conversion between modes of adjacent order. Our experiments illustrate just one of the many possibilities of how SUSY may serve as a building block for integrated mode-division multiplexing arrangements. Supersymmetric notions may enrich and expand integrated photonics by versatile optical components and desirable, yet previously unattainable, functionalities.

  17. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  18. Catalytic hydrocracking of heavy oils

    SciTech Connect

    Khulbe, C.P.; Patmore, D.J.; Pruden, B.B.; Ranganathan, R.

    1983-01-25

    An improved process is described for the hydrocracking of heavy hydrocarbon oil, such as oils extracted from tar sands. The charge oil in the presence of an excess of hydrogen is passed through a tubular hydrocracking zone, and the effluent emerging from the top of the zone is separated into a gaseous stream containing a wide boiling range material and a liquid stream containing heavy hydrocarbons. According to the novel feature, the hydrocracking process is carried out in the presence of a catalyst consisting of finely divided coal or other carbonaceous material carrying catalytically active metals from group via and group viii of the periodic table of elements, E.G. Cobalt and molybdenum. The catalyst is slurried with the charge stock and has been found to greatly reduce coke precursors and thereby prevent the formation of carbonaceous deposits in the reaction zone while also being effective in reducing the sulfur concentration of the product.

  19. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  20. MOCCASIN: converting MATLAB ODE models to SBML.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Harold F; Hucka, Michael; Keating, Sarah M; Nudelman, German; Iber, Dagmar; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2016-06-15

    MATLAB is popular in biological research for creating and simulating models that use ordinary differential equations (ODEs). However, sharing or using these models outside of MATLAB is often problematic. A community standard such as Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) can serve as a neutral exchange format, but translating models from MATLAB to SBML can be challenging-especially for legacy models not written with translation in mind. We developed MOCCASIN (Model ODE Converter for Creating Automated SBML INteroperability) to help. MOCCASIN can convert ODE-based MATLAB models of biochemical reaction networks into the SBML format. MOCCASIN is available under the terms of the LGPL 2.1 license (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/lgpl-2.1.html). Source code, binaries and test cases can be freely obtained from https://github.com/sbmlteam/moccasin : mhucka@caltech.edu More information is available at https://github.com/sbmlteam/moccasin. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Carrier frequency noise from HVDC converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, F. A.; Griess, L. D.; Laforest, J. J.; Lindh, C. B.

    1982-08-01

    The development of an ac and dc side carrier frequency noise model for incorporation in the Bonneville Power Administration's ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP) is described. This model of an HVDC Station generates the characteristic wave shapes of voltages and currents in the time plane on which a Fast Fourier Transformer (FFT) is applied. The model representation of HVDC equipment such as converter transformers, smoothing reactors and harmonic filters is compared with de-energized impedance measurements of similar equipment in an HVDC Station. The carrier frequency range for the model covered is 10 kHz - 300 kHz. The measurements were obtained on the valve side and line side of the converter for both ac and dc sides. The calculated and measured noise were compared. The different measuring methods are described. A preferred measurement program is suggested and guidelines are indicated for power line carrier (plc) signal to noise ratios.

  2. Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantaged Jet Fuel – Catalytic Conversion of Corn Stover to Energy Dense, Low Freeze Point Paraffins and Naphthenes

    SciTech Connect

    Cortright, Randy

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of producing liquid fuels, particularly jet fuel, from lignocellulosic materials, such as corn stover. This project was led by Virent, Inc. (Virent) which has developed a novel chemical catalytic process (the BioForming® platform) capable of producing “direct replacement” liquid fuels from biomass-derived feedstocks. Virent has shown it is possible to produce an advantaged jet fuel from biomass that meets or exceeds specifications for commercial and military jet fuel through Fuel Readiness Level (FRL) 5, Process Validation. This project leveraged The National Renewable Energy Lab’s (NREL) expertise in converting corn stover to sugars via dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. NREL had previously developed this deconstruction technology for the conversion of corn stover to ethanol. In this project, Virent and NREL worked together to condition the NREL generated hydrolysate for use in Virent’s catalytic process through solids removal, contaminant reduction, and concentration steps. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was contracted in this project for the procurement, formatting, storage and analysis of corn stover and Northwestern University developed fundamental knowledge of lignin deconstruction that can help improve overall carbon recovery of the combined technologies. Virent conducted fundamental catalytic studies to improve the performance of the catalytic process and NREL provided catalyst characterization support. A technoeconomic analysis (TEA) was conducted at each stage of the project, with results from these analyses used to inform the direction of the project.

  3. Catalytic reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

  4. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  5. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, Harry W; Petkovic, Lucia M; Ginosar, Daniel M

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  6. Stirling Converters For Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1993-01-01

    Two designs expected to meet long-term goals for performance and cost. Proposed for advanced systems to convert solar thermal power to electrical power. Each system, designed to operate with 11-m-diameter paraboloidal reflector, includes solar-energy receiver, liquid-metal heat-transport subsystem, free-piston Stirling engine, cooling subsystem, alternator or generator coupled directly or indirectly to commercial electric-power system, and control and power-conditioning circuitry. System converts approximately 75 kW of input solar thermal power falling on collector to about 25 kW of output electrical power.

  7. High efficiency thermionic converter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Sommer, A. H.; Balestra, C. L.; Briere, T. R.; Lieb, D.; Oettinger, P. E.; Goodale, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Research in thermionic energy conversion technology is reported. The objectives were to produce converters suitable for use in out of core space reactors, radioisotope generators, and solar satellites. The development of emitter electrodes that operate at low cesium pressure, stable low work function collector electrodes, and more efficient means of space charge neutralization were investigated to improve thermionic converter performance. Potential improvements in collector properties were noted with evaporated thin film barium oxide coatings. Experiments with cesium carbonate suggest this substance may provide optimum combinations of cesium and oxygen for thermionic conversion.

  8. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortright, R. D.; Davda, R. R.; Dumesic, J. A.

    2002-08-01

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose-which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals-to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  9. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Cortright, R D; Davda, R R; Dumesic, J A

    2002-08-29

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500 K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose -- which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals -- to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  10. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  11. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  12. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

  13. Converting Work into College Credits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Joseph A.

    1976-01-01

    The Cooperative Education Program conducted by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Industry and Thomas A. Edison College enables State labor department employees to work toward college degrees by attending free classes, taking college-level examinations for college credit, and converting work and life experiences into college credits.…

  14. Converting accounts receivable into cash.

    PubMed

    Folk, M D; Roest, P R

    1995-09-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of healthcare providers have converted their accounts receivable into cash through a process called securitization. This practice has gained popularity because it provides a means to raise capital necessary to healthcare organizations. Although securitization transactions can be complex, they may provide increased financial flexibility to providers as they prepare for continuing change in the healthcare industry.

  15. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  16. Hybrid-mode thermionic converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasor, N. S.; Britt, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Converter's collector electrode has uniform low work-function surface and operates at sufficiently low temperature to produce negligible electron emission. Emitter electrode has main region which has intermediate work-function and auxiliary region which has relatively high work-function surface.

  17. Simplified Digital Down-Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, Elliott H.

    1995-01-01

    Design of digital frequency down-converters simplified by eliminating need for both high-speed number-controlled oscillators (NCOs) and mixer-multipliers, and implementing functions via multiplication coefficients of finite-impulse-response (FIR) filters. Simplification depends on particular choices of operating frequencies. Simplified designs implemented with commercial FIR integrated circuits.

  18. Hybrid-mode thermionic converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasor, N. S.; Britt, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Converter's collector electrode has uniform low work-function surface and operates at sufficiently low temperature to produce negligible electron emission. Emitter electrode has main region which has intermediate work-function and auxiliary region which has relatively high work-function surface.

  19. Converting Work into College Credits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Joseph A.

    1976-01-01

    The Cooperative Education Program conducted by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Industry and Thomas A. Edison College enables State labor department employees to work toward college degrees by attending free classes, taking college-level examinations for college credit, and converting work and life experiences into college credits.…

  20. Advanced Thermionic Converter Technology Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, James R.

    2003-01-01

    A thermionic energy converter (TEC) is a direct energy conversion device, which converts heat to electricity with no moving parts. Thermionic converters are well suited to space nuclear power systems because of their high power density, high heat rejection temperature, and immunity to radiation. Several recent advances in thermionic energy conversion technology have greatly improved the efficiency of these devices. A research program was undertaken to independently confirm these advances, and to extend them to converters with practical geometry. The recent development of a stable cesium/oxygen vapor source has led to a significant improvement in performance. The addition of a small amount of oxygen to the cesium vapor can increase the emission current by a factor of three or more. The beneficial effects of oxygen are stable and reproducible. A TEC with a cold seal has been invented, which greatly simplifies construction, operation, and maintenance of the TEC. Electron reflection from the collector has been shown to reduce the performance of TEC's. Reflection suppressing materials were produced and tested. One sample showed evidence of reflection suppression, increasing the average output voltage by 0.16 V. Another sample did not. Research in this area is ongoing.

  1. IREB Converter to AC Pulses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and the end of the center conductor. the modulated IREB induces a voltage in the coaxial transmission line. This voltage appears across the gap to slow ... down the electrons and to convert the kinetic energy of the IREB into electrical energy that propagates along the coaxial transmission line. (PATENT)

  2. Production of hydrogen from biomass by catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis oil

    SciTech Connect

    Czernik, S.; Wang, D.; Chornet, E.

    1998-08-01

    Hydrogen is the prototype of the environmentally cleanest fuel of interest for power generation using fuel cells and for transportation. The thermochemical conversion of biomass to hydrogen can be carried out through two distinct strategies: (a) gasification followed by water-gas shift conversion, and (b) catalytic steam reforming of specific fractions derived from fast pyrolysis and aqueous/steam processes of biomass. This paper presents the latter route that begins with fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce bio-oil. This oil (as a whole or its selected fractions) can be converted to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming followed by a water-gas shift conversion step. Such a process has been demonstrated at the bench scale using model compounds, poplar oil aqueous fraction, and the whole pyrolysis oil with commercial Ni-based steam reforming catalysts. Hydrogen yields as high as 85% have been obtained. Catalyst initial activity can be recovered through regeneration cycles by steam or CO{sub 2} gasification of carbonaceous deposits.

  3. Catalytic pyrolysis of oil fractions separated from food waste leachate over nanoporous acid catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Soo; Heo, Hyeon Su; Kim, Sang Guk; Ryoo, Ryong; Kim, Jeongnam; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Sung Hoon; Park, Young-Kwon

    2011-07-01

    Oil fractions, separated from food waste leachate, can be used as an energy source. Especially, high quality oil can be obtained by catalytic cracking. In this study, nanoporous catalysts such as Al-MCM-41 and mesoporous MFI type zeolite were applied to the catalytic cracking of oil fractions using the pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Mesoporous MFI type zeolite showed better textural porosity than Al-MCM-41. In addition, mesoporous MFI type zeolite had strong Brönsted acidity while Al-MCM-41 had weak acidity. Significant amount of acid components in the food waste oil fractions were converted to mainly oxygenates and aromatics. As a result of its well-defined nanopores and strong acidity, the use of a mesoporous MFI type zeolite produced large amounts of gaseous and aromatic compounds. High yields of hydrocarbons within the gasoline range were also obtained in the case of mesoporous MFI type zeolite, whereas the use of Al-MCM-41, which exhibits relatively weak acidity, resulted in high yields of oxygenates and diesel range hydrocarbons.

  4. Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zhang, Yanping

    1993-07-01

    This project investigates a suitable catalyst system for the direct NO decomposition in post-combustion gas. streams. The process does not use a reductant, such as the ammonia used in Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to nitrogen. Therefore, it is a greatly simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter. Catalysts are prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports according to ion exchange procedures widely used in preparation of metal/zeolite catalysts. The catalysts of primary interest include copper, palladium, silver, and nickel exchanged ZSM-5 catalysts. Particular emphasis is given in this work on promoted Cu-exchanged zeolites, especially the catalyst system Mg/Cu-ZSM-5 and a few others, which are promising for NO conversion to nitrogen at typical flue gas 0{sub 2} and NO levels and over the temperature range of 723-873K. Effects of zeolite modification, copper exchange level and catalyst preparation conditions on the catalyst activity are studied in a packed-bed microreactor. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reduction (TPR) experiments will be carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a single-particle electrodynamic balance (EDB). Kinetic studies of NO and 0{sub 2} interaction with catalysts over a wide temperature range as well as catalyst structural investigations are planned.

  5. Multilevel converters for power system applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.S.; Stovall, J.P.; Peng, F.Z. |

    1995-09-01

    Multilevel converters are emerging as a new breed of power converter options for power system applications. These converters are most suitable for high voltage high power applications because they connect devices in series without the need for component matching. One of the major limitations of the multilevel converters is the voltage unbalance between different levels. To avoid voltage unbalance between different levels, several techniques have been proposed for different applications. Excluding magnetic-coupled converters, this paper introduces three multilevel voltage source converters: (1) diode-clamp, (2) flying-capacitors, and (3) cascaded inverters with separate dc sources. The operation principle, features, constraints, and potential applications of these converters will be discussed.

  6. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme N-Terminal Inactivation Alleviates Bleomycin-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Xiao, Hong D.; Xu, Jianguo; Ong, Frank S.; Kwon, Mike; Roman, Jesse; Gal, Anthony; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    Bleomycin has potent anti-oncogenic properties for several neoplasms, but drug administration is limited by bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system has been suggested to decrease bleomycin toxicity, but the efficacy of such strategies remains uncertain and somewhat contradictory. Our hypothesis is that, besides angiotensin II, other substrates of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), such as the tetrapeptide N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (AcSDKP), play a significant role in controlling fibrosis. We studied bleomycin-induced lung injury in normotensive mice, termed N-KO and C-KO, which have point mutations inactivating either the N- or C-terminal catalytic sites of ACE, respectively. N-KO, but not C-KO mice, have a marked resistance to bleomycin lung injury as assessed by lung histology and hydroxyproline content. To determine the importance of the ACE N-terminal peptide substrate AcSDKP in the resistance to bleomycin injury, N-KO mice were treated with S-17092, a prolyl-oligopeptidase inhibitor that inhibits the formation of AcSDKP. In response to bleomycin injection, S-17092-treated N-KO mice developed lung fibrosis similar to wild-type mice. In contrast, the administration of AcSDKP to wild-type mice reduced lung fibrosis due to bleomycin administration. This study shows that the inactivation of the N-terminal catalytic site of ACE significantly reduced bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and implicates AcSDKP in the mechanism of protection. These data suggest a possible means to increase tolerance to bleomycin and to treat fibrosing lung diseases. PMID:20651228

  7. Rediscovering ACE: Novel insights into the many roles of the angiotensin-converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Janjulia, Tea; Taylor, Brian; Giani, Jorge F.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Shi, Peng D.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Bernstein, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is best known for the catalytic conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. However, the use of gene-targeting techniques has led to mouse models highlighting many other biochemical properties and actions of this enzyme. This review discusses recent studies examining the functional significance of ACE tissue-specific expression and the presence in ACE of two independent catalytic sites with distinct substrates and biological effects. It is these features which explain why ACE makes important contributions to many different physiological processes including renal development, blood pressure control, inflammation and immunity. PMID:23686164

  8. Study of switching transients in high frequency converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, Donald S.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Lee, Tony

    1993-06-01

    As the semiconductor technologies progress rapidly, the power densities and switching frequencies of many power devices are improved. With the existing technology, high frequency power systems become possible. Use of such a system is advantageous in many aspects. A high frequency ac source is used as the direct input to an ac/ac pulse-density-modulation (PDM) converter. This converter is a new concept which employs zero voltage switching techniques. However, the development of this converter is still in its infancy stage. There are problems associated with this converter such as a high on-voltage drop, switching transients, and zero-crossing detecting. Considering these problems, the switching speed and power handling capabilities of the MOS-Controlled Thyristor (MCT) makes the device the most promising candidate for this application. A complete insight of component considerations for building an ac/ac PDM converter for a high frequency power system is addressed. A power device review is first presented. The ac/ac PDM converter requires switches that can conduct bi-directional current and block bi-directional voltage. These bi-directional switches can be constructed using existing power devices. Different bi-directional switches for the converter are investigated. Detailed experimental studies of the characteristics of the MCT under hard switching and zero-voltage switching are also presented. One disadvantage of an ac/ac converter is that turn-on and turn-off of the switches has to be completed instantaneously when the ac source is at zero voltage. Otherwise shoot-through current or voltage spikes can occur which can be hazardous to the devices. In order for the devices to switch softly in the safe operating area even under non-ideal cases, a unique snubber circuit is used in each bi-directional switch. Detailed theory and experimental results for circuits using these snubbers are presented. converter built using MCT's and IGBT's is

  9. Study of switching transients in high frequency converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinger, Donald S.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Lee, Tony

    1993-01-01

    As the semiconductor technologies progress rapidly, the power densities and switching frequencies of many power devices are improved. With the existing technology, high frequency power systems become possible. Use of such a system is advantageous in many aspects. A high frequency ac source is used as the direct input to an ac/ac pulse-density-modulation (PDM) converter. This converter is a new concept which employs zero voltage switching techniques. However, the development of this converter is still in its infancy stage. There are problems associated with this converter such as a high on-voltage drop, switching transients, and zero-crossing detecting. Considering these problems, the switching speed and power handling capabilities of the MOS-Controlled Thyristor (MCT) makes the device the most promising candidate for this application. A complete insight of component considerations for building an ac/ac PDM converter for a high frequency power system is addressed. A power device review is first presented. The ac/ac PDM converter requires switches that can conduct bi-directional current and block bi-directional voltage. These bi-directional switches can be constructed using existing power devices. Different bi-directional switches for the converter are investigated. Detailed experimental studies of the characteristics of the MCT under hard switching and zero-voltage switching are also presented. One disadvantage of an ac/ac converter is that turn-on and turn-off of the switches has to be completed instantaneously when the ac source is at zero voltage. Otherwise shoot-through current or voltage spikes can occur which can be hazardous to the devices. In order for the devices to switch softly in the safe operating area even under non-ideal cases, a unique snubber circuit is used in each bi-directional switch. Detailed theory and experimental results for circuits using these snubbers are presented. A current regulated ac/ac PDM converter built using MCT's and IGBT's is

  10. Parametric study of laser photovoltaic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Photovoltaic converters are of interest for converting laser power to electrical power in a space-based laser power system. This paper describes a model for photovoltaic laser converters and the application of this model to a neodymium laser silicon photovoltaic converter system. A parametric study which defines the sensitivity of the photovoltaic parameters is described. An optimized silicon photovoltaic converter has an efficiency greater than 50 percent for 1000 W/sq cm of neodymium laser radiation.

  11. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  12. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  13. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  14. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, S.M.; Reidys, C.M. |

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  15. Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

  16. Single-Pass Catalytic Conversion of Syngas into Olefins via Methanol.

    PubMed

    Olsbye, Unni

    2016-06-20

    All together now: Combination in a single reactor of the catalysts for converting syngas into methanol and methanol into olefins was recently reported by Cheng et al. This approach considerably simplifies the catalytic conversion of natural gas. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  18. Why Am I in Such a Bad Mood?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breakfasts Shyness Why Am I in Such a Bad Mood? KidsHealth > For Teens > Why Am I in Such a Bad Mood? A A A What's in this article? ... like hurting yourself, that's more than just a bad mood and you need to tell someone. continue ...

  19. Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, T.

    1994-06-01

    This project investigates a suitable catalyst system for the direct nitric oxide decomposition in post-combustion gas streams. This process does not use a reductant, such as the ammonia used in the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to nitrogen. Therefore, it is a greatly simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter. Catalysts are prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports according to ion exchange procedures widely used in preparation of metal/zeolite catalysts. Particular emphasis is given in this work on promoted Cu-exchanged zeolites, especially the catalyst systems Mg/Cu-ZSM-5 and Ce/Cu-ZSM-5, which are promising for NO conversion to nitrogen at typical flue gas O{sub 2} and NO levels and over the temperature range of 673--873{degrees}C. The effect of zeolite modification, copper exchange level and catalyst preparation conditions on the catalytic activity are studied in O{sub 2}-free, O{sub 2}-rich gases, as well as wet (2--20% H{sub 2}O) gas streams in a packed-bed microreactor. Characterization of catalysts is performed by XRD, STEM, TEM and ESR. During this quarter it was found that severe steaming (20% H{sub 2}O) of Na-ZSM-5 at temperatures above 600{degrees}C caused partial vitreous glass formation and dealumination. Unpromoted Cu-ZSM-5 catalysts suffer drastic loss of NO decomposition activity in wet gas streams at 500{degrees}C. Activity is partially recovered in dry gas. Copper migration out of the zeolite channels leading to CuO formation has been identified by STEM/EDX. In Ce/Cu-ZSM-5 catalysts the wet gas activity i`s greatly improved. CuO particle formation is less extensive and the dry gas activity is largely recovered upon removal of the water vapor.

  20. Converting VSAM in COBOL to embedded SQL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Wang, Yamin; Tsai, Wei-Tek

    1996-12-31

    VSAM databases we widely used on IBM mainframe systems. As new technology, such as relational database and client-server computing, becomes popular, there is a need to reengineer the VSAM databases to relational databases. This paper addresses the issues on converting COBOL programs that access VSAM database to COBOL programs that access relational databases with embedded SQL. It proposed a semi-automatic approach to the conversion of VSAM data sets to SQL tables and VSAM operations in COBOL program to embedded SQL queries. The proposed approach has been experimented on several industrial COBOL programs and a tool implementing the approach is under development.

  1. Expression, purification, and characterization of a biologically active bovine enterokinase catalytic subunit in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liu-Di; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2002-07-01

    Enterokinase (EC 3.4.21.9) is a serine proteinase in the duodenum that exhibits specificity for the sequence (Asp)(4)-Lys. It converts trypsinogen to trypsin. Its high specificity for the recognition site makes enterokinase (EK) a useful tool for in vitro cleavage of fusion proteins. cDNA encoding the catalytic chain of Chinese bovine enterokinase was cloned and its encoding amino acid sequence is identical to the previously reported sequence although there are two one-base mutations which do not change the encoded amino acid. The EK catalytic subunit cDNA was cloned into plasmid pET32a, and fused downstream to the fusion partner thioredoxin (Trx) and the following DDDDK enterokinase recognition sequence. The recombinant bovine enterokinase catalytic subunit was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), and most products existed in soluble form. After an in vivo autocatalytic cleavage of the recombinant Trx-EK catalytic domain fusion protein, intact, biologically active EK catalytic subunit was released from the fusion protein. The recombinant intact EK catalytic subunit was purified to homogeneity with a specific activity of 720 AUs/mg protein through ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified intact EK catalytic subunit has a K(m) of 0.17 mM, and K(cat) is 20.8s(-1). From 100 ml flask culture, 4.3 mg pure active EK catalytic subunits were obtained.

  2. Trash to Gas: Converting Space Trash into Useful Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, Mononita

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Logistical Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project is a collaborative effort in which NASA is determined to reduce total logistical mass through reduction, reuse and recycling of various wastes and components of long duration space missions and habitats. LRR is focusing on four distinct advanced areas of study: Advanced Clothing System, Logistics-to-Living, Heat Melt Compactor and Trash to Supply Gas (TtSG). The objective of TtSG is to develop technologies that convert material waste, human waste and food waste into high-value products. High-value products include life support oxygen and water, rocket fuels, raw material production feedstocks, and other energy sources. There are multiple pathways for converting waste to products involving single or multi-step processes. This paper discusses thermal oxidation methods of converting waste to methane. Different wastes, including food, food packaging, Maximum Absorbent Garments (MAGs), human waste simulants, and cotton washcloths have been evaluated in a thermal degradation reactor under conditions promoting pyrolysis, gasification or incineration. The goal was to evaluate the degradation processes at varying temperatures and ramp cycles and to maximize production of desirable products and minimize high molecular weight hydrocarbon (tar) production. Catalytic cracking was also evaluated to minimize tar production. The quantities of C02, CO, CH4, and H20 were measured under the different thermal degradation conditions. The conversion efficiencies of these products were used to determine the best methods for producing desired products.

  3. Trash-to-Gas: Converting Space Trash into Useful Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne J.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Logistical Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project is a collaborative effort in which NASA is determined to reduce total logistical mass through reduction, reuse and recycling of various wastes and components of long duration space missions and habitats. LRR is focusing on four distinct advanced areas of study: Advanced Clothing System, Logistics-to-Living, Heat Melt Compactor and Trash to Supply Gas (TtSG). The objective of TtSG is to develop technologies that convert material waste, human waste and food waste into high-value products. High-value products include life support oxygen and water, rocket fuels, raw material production feedstocks, and other energy sources. There are multiple pathways for converting waste to products involving single or multi-step processes. This paper discusses thermal oxidation methods of converting waste to methane. Different wastes, including food, food packaging, Maximum Absorbent Garments (MAGs), human waste simulants, and cotton washcloths have been evaluated in a thermal degradation reactor under conditions promoting pyrolysis, gasification or incineration. The goal was to evaluate the degradation processes at varying temperatures and ramp cycles and to maximize production of desirable products and minimize high molecular weight hydrocarbon (tar) production. Catalytic cracking was also evaluated to minimize tar production. The quantities of CO2, CO, CH4, and H2O were measured under the different thermal degradation conditions. The conversion efficiencies of these products were used to determine the best methods for producing desired products.

  4. Photoelectric converters with quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shan-He; Sun, Chang-Pu; Li, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Jin-Can

    2016-05-01

    Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in electronic devices and driving the electron flux from the lower chemical potential to higher chemical potential. Previous studies hinted that the thermodynamic efficiency of a nanosized photoelectric converter at maximum power is bounded by the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency ηCA. In this study, we apply quantum effects to design a photoelectric converter based on a three-level quantum dot (QD) interacting with fermionic baths and photons. We show that, by adopting a pair of suitable degenerate states, quantum coherences induced by the couplings of QDs to sunlight and fermion baths can coexist steadily in nanoelectronic systems. Our analysis indicates that the efficiency at maximum power is no longer limited to ηCA through manipulation of carefully controlled quantum coherences.

  5. Photoelectric converters with quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan-He; Sun, Chang-Pu; Li, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Jin-Can

    2016-05-01

    Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in electronic devices and driving the electron flux from the lower chemical potential to higher chemical potential. Previous studies hinted that the thermodynamic efficiency of a nanosized photoelectric converter at maximum power is bounded by the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency η_{CA}. In this study, we apply quantum effects to design a photoelectric converter based on a three-level quantum dot (QD) interacting with fermionic baths and photons. We show that, by adopting a pair of suitable degenerate states, quantum coherences induced by the couplings of QDs to sunlight and fermion baths can coexist steadily in nanoelectronic systems. Our analysis indicates that the efficiency at maximum power is no longer limited to η_{CA} through manipulation of carefully controlled quantum coherences.

  6. Detail view to show richness of materials such as the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view to show richness of materials such as the Fourteenth Street vestibule with its gilded groin-vaulted ceiling - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Perspective view of the front elevation (note: decorative details such ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the front elevation (note: decorative details such as the brackets underpinning the deep cornice on the porch and house) - Philip T. Berry House, 1402 Thirty-first Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. Is There Such a Thing as Adrenal Fatigue?

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal insufficiency caused by chronic stress. The unproven theory behind adrenal fatigue is that your adrenal glands ... feel good. Existing blood tests, according to this theory, aren't sensitive enough to detect such a ...

  9. Converting factors for stacked wood

    Treesearch

    C. A. Bickford

    1957-01-01

    Though the "cord" is used as a standard unit of measure for stacked wood, there is much confusion as to what a cord is and how it can be properly converted to other units of measure. The amount of solid wood in a pile varies greatly depending on the size, straightness, and evenness of the material in the pile, and also on the closeness of stacking.

  10. High efficiency thermionic converter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Sommer, A. H.; Balestra, C. L.; Briere, D. P.; Oettinger, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    The objective is to improve thermionic converter performance by means of reduced interelectrode losses, greater emitter capabilities, and lower collector work functions until the converter performance level is suitable for out-of-core space reactors and radioisotope generators. Electrode screening experiments have identified several promising collector materials. Back emission work function measurements of a ZnO collector in a thermionic diode have given values less than 1.3 eV. Diode tests were conducted over the range of temperatures of interest for space power applications. Enhanced mode converter experiments have included triodes operated in both the surface ionization and plasmatron modes. Pulsed triodes were studied as a function of pulse length, pulse potential, inert gas fill pressure, cesium pressure, spacing, emitter temperature and collector temperature. Current amplifications (i.e., mean output current/mean grid current) of several hundred were observed up to output current densities of one amp/sq cm. These data correspond to an equivalent arc drop less than 0.1 eV.

  11. Molecular characterization of human and bovine endothelin converting enzyme (ECE-1).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Kröger, B; Jacob, E; Seulberger, H; Subkowski, T; Otter, R; Meyer, T; Schmalzing, G; Hillen, H

    1994-12-19

    A membrane-bound protease activity that specifically converts Big endothelin-1 has been purified from bovine endothelial cells (FBHE). The enzyme was cleaved with trypsin and the peptide sequencing analysis confirmed it to be a zinc chelating metalloprotease containing the typical HEXXH (HELTH) motif. RT-PCR and cDNA screens were employed to isolate the complete cDNAs of the bovine and human enzymes. This human metalloprotease was expressed heterologously in cell culture and oocytes. The catalytic activity of the recombinant enzyme is the same as that determined for the natural enzyme. The data suggest that the characterized enzyme represents the functional human endothelin converting enzyme ECE-1.

  12. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  13. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  14. Catalytically Active Regenerative Sorbent beds (CARS) for airborne contaminants.

    PubMed

    Akse, J R; Thompson, J O

    1995-01-01

    The Pd on Al2O3 catalyst used in the projected Space Station's Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) catalytic oxidizer can be poisoned by volatile halogen-, sulfur-, and nitrogen-containing organic species. Catalytically Active Regenerable Sorbents (CARS) eliminate these problematic contaminants and the large carbon bed used for their elimination in a three-step process. Contaminants are conventionally adsorbed by the CARS bed. After saturation, the bed is connected to an off-line recirculation loop, filled with hydrogen, and then heated. At temperature, contaminants are hydrogenated on catalytic sites within the bed, forming simple alkanes and acid gases that are efficiently converted to innocuous salts in an in-line alkaline bed. The CARS bed is regenerated by this cycle and alkane gases are released to be safely oxidized in the catalytic oxidizer. A challenge mixture containing Freon-113, thiophene, trichloroethylene, Halon-1301, and dichloromethane at 1670, 75, 81, 68, and 83 mg/m3 was successfully treated using this technology, demonstrating the CARS feasibility.

  15. Non-synchronous control of self-oscillating resonant converters

    DOEpatents

    Glaser, John Stanley; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A self-oscillating switching power converter has a controllable reactance including an active device connected to a reactive element, wherein the effective reactance of the reactance and the active device is controlled such that the control waveform for the active device is binary digital and is not synchronized with the switching converter output frequency. The active device is turned completely on and off at a frequency that is substantially greater than the maximum frequency imposed on the output terminals of the active device. The effect is to vary the average resistance across the active device output terminals, and thus the effective output reactance, thereby providing converter output control, while maintaining the response speed of the converter.

  16. Converting baker's waste into alcohol. Revised final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, R.; Wilson, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    All types of baker's waste (including waste from candy manufacturers) can be converted into alcohol to be used as a fuel. All types of waste at any stage in process can be converted, such as: basic ingredients (including floor sweepings); dry mixes (including floor sweepings); dough at any stage; partially or fully cooked products; and day old returned products. The basic steps are the same, only the initial preparation will vary slightly. The variation will be: amount of water to be added and amount and type of nutrients (if any) to be added. The basic steps are: slurrying, liquefying to put starch into liquid state, saccharifying to convert starch into fermentable sugars, fermentation to convert sugars into alcohol, and distillation to separate the alcohol from the mash. Each step is discussed in detail along with problems that may arise. Directions are given and materials (enzymes, yeast, etc.) and equipment are descibed briefly.

  17. Automatic control in multidrive electrotechnical complexes with semiconductor converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilev, B. U.; Mardashov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    The frequency convertor and the automatic control system, which can be used in the multi-drive electromechanical system with a few induction motions, are considered. The paper presents the structure of existing modern multi-drive electric drives inverters, namely, electric drives with a total frequency converter and few electric motions, and an electric drive, in which the converter is used for power supply and control of the independent frequency. It was shown that such technical solutions of frequency converters possess a number of drawbacks. The drawbacks are given. It was shown that the control of technological processes using the electric drive of this structure may be provided under very limited conditions, as the energy efficiency and the level of electromagnetic compatibility of electric drives is low. The authors proposed using a multi-inverter structure with an active rectifier in multidrive electric drives with induction motors frequency converters. The application of such frequency converter may solve the problem of electromagnetic compatibility, namely, consumption of sinusoidal currents from the network and the maintenance of a sinusoidal voltage and energy compatibility, namely, consumption of practically active energy from the network. Also, the paper proposes the use of the automatic control system, which by means of a multi-inverter frequency converter provides separate control of drive machines and flexible regulation of technological processes. The authors present oscillograms, which confirm the described characteristics of the developed electrical drive. The possible subsequent ways to improve the multi-motor drives are also described.

  18. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the

  19. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  20. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  1. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  2. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents.

  3. No Such Thing as "Good Vibrations" in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Franklin D.

    2011-01-01

    A facilities manager must ensure that a building runs as smoothly and successfully as possible. For college, university, and school managers dealing with laboratories and other spaces for scientific study and research, this means making sure that nothing disrupts experiments and other scientific endeavors. Such disruptions can wreak havoc,…

  4. 6. VIEW SHOWING WOODEN FLUMES ACROSS MARICOPA CANAL. SUCH FLUMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING WOODEN FLUMES ACROSS MARICOPA CANAL. SUCH FLUMES WERE USED TO CARRY WATER FROM ONE CANAL TO ANOTHER, BEFORE THE CANAL COMPANIES WERE BOUGHT BY THE GOVERNMENT, AND THE SYSTEM UNIFIED. Photographer unknown, no date - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. There's No Such Thing as Value-Free Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makosky, Vivian Parker

    This paper is based on the view that, although scientists rely on research values such as predictive accuracy and testability, scientific research is still subject to the unscientific values, attitudes, and emotions of the scientists. It is noted that undergraduate students are likely not to think critically about the science they encounter. A…

  6. There's No Such Thing as Value-Free Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makosky, Vivian Parker

    This paper is based on the view that, although scientists rely on research values such as predictive accuracy and testability, scientific research is still subject to the unscientific values, attitudes, and emotions of the scientists. It is noted that undergraduate students are likely not to think critically about the science they encounter. A…

  7. 26. SOME CORES, SUCH AS THESE IN THE BRASS FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. SOME CORES, SUCH AS THESE IN THE BRASS FOUNDRY CA.1950, ARE DIPPED INTO A SOLUTION PRIOR TO BEING BAKED IN THE CORE OVEN BEHIND, TO SET THE RESIN AND CREATE A STRUCTURE STRONG ENOUGH TO HOLD UP AGAINST MOLTEN METAL. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents. 9 figs.

  9. Catalytic properties of the eukaryotic exosome.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, Aleksander; Tomecki, Rafał; López, María Eugenia Gas; Séraphin, Bertrand; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The eukaryotic exosome complex is built around the backbone of a 9-subunit ring similar to phosporolytic ribonucleases such as RNase PH and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Unlike those enzymes, the ring is devoid of any detectable catalytic activities, with the possible exception of the plant version of the complex. Instead, the essential RNA decay capability is supplied by associated hydrolytic ribonucleases belonging to the Dis3 and Rrp6 families. Dis3 proteins are endowed with two different activities: the long known processive 3'-5' exonucleolytic one and the recently discovered endonucleolytic one. Rrp6 proteins are distributive exonucleases. This chapter will review the current knowledge about the catalytic properties of theses nucleases and their interplay within the exosome holocomplex.

  10. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. First quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-02-01

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation will be conducting Phase I of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. this catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria or zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an ongoing DOE-sponsored University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicates that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. the performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  11. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Second quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    In the more than 170 wet scrubber systems in 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers, the SO{sub 2} removed from the boiler flue gas is sorbed, and the sulfated sorbent must be disposed of. The use of regenerable sorbents has the potential to reduce this disposal problem. The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts Univ., and Engelhard Corp. are conducting Phase I of a 4.5-year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting SO{sub 2} to S. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide such as ceria and zirconia; the catalytic activity can be promoted by active transition metals such as Cu. The Phase I program includes the following work elements: market/process/cost/evaluation; lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization, lab-scale bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies, bench-scale catalyst/process studies, and utility review.

  12. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  13. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R.L.; Perigard, R.G.; Rabo, J.A.

    1989-08-08

    This patent describes a process for catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks. It comprises contacting the hydrocarbon feedstock under conditions effective to crack the feedstock with a catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by a process comprising the following step: contacting a fluid mixture of a large pore zeolite having a SiO/sub 2/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ratio of about 3.5 to less than about 20 and an inorganic oxide matrix, with a fluoro salt of the formula A/sub (n-m)/(MF/sub n/)/sub z/. Wherein A is an organic or inorganic ionic moiety; (MF/sub n/)/sub z/ is a fluoroanion moiety comprising the element M; M is an element selected from the group of elements for Groups VB, VIB, VII, IIIA, IVA and VA of the Periodic Table of Elements; n is the coordination number of M; m is the valence of M and z is the valence or charge associated with A, at an effective pH value greater than about 3, at effective conditions of temperature and time to produce a catalyst product, whereby the cracking activity of the zeolite is enhanced.

  14. Sulfur dioxide converter and pollution arrester system

    SciTech Connect

    Montalvo, V.H.

    1983-12-06

    A sulphur dioxide converter and pollution arrester system are disclosed which involves the treatment of smoke and/or contaminated air emanating from a combustion area by passage through a zone achieving turbulence into a water spray contained first treating chamber. The turbulence zone, into which an atomized catalyst is introduced, serves to create a longer path for cooling as well as increased centrifugal motion to the solid particles in the contaminated air and also the formation of sulphur trioxide. In other words, the arrangement is such that pollution arresting action is provided in the form of ''slinging'' resulting from tangential directional movement and, when combining with the water spray in the first treating chamber, the ultimate formation of sulphuric acid. Subsequently, the contaminated air, containing amounts of sulphurous and sulphuric acids, passes through a second treating chamber, where airflow throughout the system is occasioned by action at the outlet end, such as the vacuum created by a flue and not by independent mechanical means. The arrangement serves to a twofold purpose, i.e. to minimize or arrest pollution and to convert sulphur dioxide, a component of high sulphur coal, into commercially valuable sulphuric acid.

  15. Catalytic conversion of nonfood woody biomass solids to organic liquids.

    PubMed

    Barta, Katalin; Ford, Peter C

    2014-05-20

    This Account outlines recent efforts in our laboratories addressing a fundamental challenge of sustainability chemistry, the effective utilization of biomass for production of chemicals and fuels. Efficient methods for converting renewable biomass solids to chemicals and liquid fuels would reduce society's dependence on nonrenewable petroleum resources while easing the atmospheric carbon dioxide burden. The major nonfood component of biomass is lignocellulose, a matrix of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. New approaches are needed to effect facile conversion of lignocellulose solids to liquid fuels and to other chemical precursors without the formation of intractable side products and with sufficient specificity to give economically sustainable product streams. We have devised a novel catalytic system whereby the renewable feedstocks cellulose, organosolv lignin, and even lignocellulose composites such as sawdust are transformed into organic liquids. The reaction medium is supercritical methanol (sc-MeOH), while the catalyst is a copper-doped porous metal oxide (PMO) prepared from inexpensive, Earth-abundant starting materials. This transformation occurs in a single stage reactor operating at 300-320 °C and 160-220 bar. The reducing equivalents for these transformations are derived by the reforming of MeOH (to H2 and CO), which thereby serves as a "liquid syngas" in the present case. Water generated by deoxygenation processes is quickly removed by the water-gas shift reaction. The Cu-doped PMO serves multiple purposes, catalyzing substrate hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation as well as the methanol reforming and shift reactions. This one-pot "UCSB process" is quantitative, giving little or no biochar residual. Provided is an overview of these catalysis studies beginning with reactions of the model compound dihydrobenzofuran that help define the key processes occurring. The initial step is phenyl-ether bond hydrogenolysis, and this is followed by

  16. Catalytic asymmetric allylation reactions using BITIP catalysis and 2-substituted allylstannanes as surrogates for beta-keto ester dianions.

    PubMed

    Keck, G E; Yu, T

    1999-07-29

    [formula: see text] Catalytic asymmetric allylation (CAA) reactions using the indicated allylstannane and the BITIP catalysts previously described by us give high yields and enantioselectivities in additions to aldehydes. The products are convertible to beta-keto esters by oxidative cleavage of the olefin. These reactions thus provide a useful catalytic enantioselective method for chain extension with introduction of a versatile four-carbon unit.

  17. Accessory navicular bone: not such a normal variant.

    PubMed

    Bernaerts, A; Vanhoenacker, F M; Van de Perre, S; De Schepper, A M; Parizel, P M

    2004-01-01

    The accessory navicular is often erroneously considered as a normal anatomic and roentgenographic variant. Three distinct types of accessory navicular bones have been described. The type 2 and 3 variants have been associated with pathologic conditions such as posterior tibial tendon tear and painful navicular syndrome and therefore should not be arbitrarily dismissed as a roentgenologic variant in a symptomatic patient. The pathogenesis and radiologic findings are discussed and illustrated.

  18. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-06-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes.

  19. Understanding the mechanism of catalytic fast pyrolysis by unveiling reactive intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hemberger, Patrick; Custodis, Victoria B. F.; Bodi, Andras; Gerber, Thomas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising way to convert lignin into fine chemicals and fuels, but current approaches lack selectivity and yield unsatisfactory conversion. Understanding the pyrolysis reaction mechanism at the molecular level may help to make this sustainable process more economic. Reactive intermediates are responsible for product branching and hold the key to unveiling these mechanisms, but are notoriously difficult to detect isomer-selectively. Here, we investigate the catalytic pyrolysis of guaiacol, a lignin model compound, using photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, which allows for isomer-selective detection of reactive intermediates. In combination with ambient pressure pyrolysis, we identify fulvenone as the central reactive intermediate, generated by catalytic demethylation to catechol and subsequent dehydration. The fulvenone ketene is responsible for the phenol formation. This technique may open unique opportunities for isomer-resolved probing in catalysis, and holds the potential for achieving a mechanistic understanding of complex, real-life catalytic processes. PMID:28660882

  20. Large wind energy converter: Growian 3 MW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, F.; Thiele, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The main features of the Growian wind energy converter are presented. Energy yield, environmental impact, and construction of the energy converter are discussed. Reliability of the windpowered system is assessed.

  1. Catalytic reforming of naphtha fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, K.C.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1980-09-16

    Production of motor gasoline and a btx-enriched reformate by fractionating a naphtha feedstock into a mid-boiling btxprecursor fraction, a relatively high-boiling fraction and a relatively low-boiling fraction; catalytically reforming the btxprecursor fraction in a first reforming zone; combining the relatively high-boiling and low-boiling fractions and catalytically reforming the combined fractions in a second reforming zone.

  2. Radiation/Catalytic Augmented Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    VUV wavelengths 157 nm (F2) and 193 nm (ArF). Radiative ignitions were achieved with the fluorine laser and not with the argon fluoride laser, even...enhanced combustion processes, utilizing pulsed and continuous VUV light-serces. Similarly, the catalytic technique has provided efficient combustion...ignited fuel-air mixtures, and has enhanced combustion processes, utilizing pulsed and continuous VUV light sources. Similarly, the catalytic technique has

  3. Interleaved DC-DC Converter with Discrete Duty Cycle and Open Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroics, K.; Sokolovs, A.

    2016-08-01

    The authors present the control principle of the multiphase interleaved DC-DC converter that can be used to vastly reduce output current ripple of the converter. The control algorithm can be easily implemented by using microcontroller without current loop in each phase. The converter works in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) but close to boundary conduction mode (BCM). The DC-DC converter with such a control algorithm is useful in applications that do not require precise current adjustment. The prototype of the converter has been built. The experimental results of the current ripple are presented in the paper.

  4. Analysis of high voltage step-up nonisolated DC-DC boost converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alisson Alencar Freitas, Antônio; Lessa Tofoli, Fernando; Junior, Edilson Mineiro Sá; Daher, Sergio; Antunes, Fernando Luiz Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    A high voltage step-up nonisolated DC-DC converter based on coupled inductors suitable to photovoltaic (PV) systems applications is proposed in this paper. Considering that numerous approaches exist to extend the voltage conversion ratio of DC-DC converters that do not use transformers, a detailed comparison is also presented among the proposed converter and other popular topologies such as the conventional boost converter and the quadratic boost converter. The qualitative analysis of the coupled-inductor-based topology is developed so that a design procedure can be obtained, from which an experimental prototype is implemented to validate the theoretical assumptions.

  5. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  6. Catalytic Asymmetric Hydroamination of Unactivated Internal Olefins to Aliphatic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Shi, Shi-Liang; Niu, Dawen; Liu, Peng; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic assembly of enantiopure aliphatic amines from abundant and readily available precursors has long been recognized as a paramount challenge in synthetic chemistry. Herein, we describe a mild and general copper-catalyzed hydroamination that effectively converts unactivated internal olefins, an important yet unexploited class of abundant feedstock chemicals, into highly enantioenriched α-branched amines (≥ 96% enantiomeric excess) featuring two minimally differentiated aliphatic substituents. This method provides a powerful means to access a broad range of advanced, highly functionalized enantioenriched amines of interest in pharmaceutical research and other areas. PMID:26138973

  7. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling.

  8. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  9. Voltage balanced multilevel voltage source converter system

    DOEpatents

    Peng, F.Z.; Lai, J.S.

    1997-07-01

    Disclosed is a voltage balanced multilevel converter for high power AC applications such as adjustable speed motor drives and back-to-back DC intertie of adjacent power systems. This converter provides a multilevel rectifier, a multilevel inverter, and a DC link between the rectifier and the inverter allowing voltage balancing between each of the voltage levels within the multilevel converter. The rectifier is equipped with at least one phase leg and a source input node for each of the phases. The rectifier is further equipped with a plurality of rectifier DC output nodes. The inverter is equipped with at least one phase leg and a load output node for each of the phases. The inverter is further equipped with a plurality of inverter DC input nodes. The DC link is equipped with a plurality of rectifier charging means and a plurality of inverter discharging means. The plurality of rectifier charging means are connected in series with one of the rectifier charging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of rectifier DC output nodes. The plurality of inverter discharging means are connected in series with one of the inverter discharging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of inverter DC input nodes. Each of said rectifier DC output nodes are individually electrically connected to the respective inverter DC input nodes. By this means, each of the rectifier DC output nodes and each of the inverter DC input nodes are voltage balanced by the respective charging and discharging of the rectifier charging means and the inverter discharging means. 15 figs.

  10. Voltage balanced multilevel voltage source converter system

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1997-01-01

    A voltage balanced multilevel converter for high power AC applications such as adjustable speed motor drives and back-to-back DC intertie of adjacent power systems. This converter provides a multilevel rectifier, a multilevel inverter, and a DC link between the rectifier and the inverter allowing voltage balancing between each of the voltage levels within the multilevel converter. The rectifier is equipped with at least one phase leg and a source input node for each of the phases. The rectifier is further equipped with a plurality of rectifier DC output nodes. The inverter is equipped with at least one phase leg and a load output node for each of the phases. The inverter is further equipped with a plurality of inverter DC input nodes. The DC link is equipped with a plurality of rectifier charging means and a plurality of inverter discharging means. The plurality of rectifier charging means are connected in series with one of the rectifier charging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of rectifier DC output nodes. The plurality of inverter discharging means are connected in series with one of the inverter discharging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of inverter DC input nodes. Each of said rectifier DC output nodes are individually electrically connected to the respective inverter DC input nodes. By this means, each of the rectifier DC output nodes and each of the inverter DC input nodes are voltage balanced by the respective charging and discharging of the rectifier charging means and the inverter discharging means.

  11. Space power converter selection methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, William E.; Thibodeaux, Rene

    During baseload power system conceptual design phases, common, flexible power conversion equipment must be identified, characterized, compared and selected to meet all pertinent requirements between various spacecraft sources, distribution networks, and loads. The process used to perform the conceptual analyses must be structured to evaluate all known requirements and integrate them properly into the preliminary study format. An evaluation process is presented, as implemented in a 5-100-kW baseload space power system study, that provides an approach to matching and conceptually designing power converters to power system applications.

  12. Catalytic enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocentres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quasdorf, Kyle W.; Overman, Larry E.

    2014-12-01

    Quaternary carbon stereocentres--carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached--are common features of molecules found in nature. However, before recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods of constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for the synthesis of single stereoisomers of such organic molecules. This progress now makes it possible to incorporate quaternary stereocentres selectively in many organic molecules that are useful in medicine, agriculture and potentially other areas such as flavouring, fragrances and materials.

  13. Catalytic enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocentres.

    PubMed

    Quasdorf, Kyle W; Overman, Larry E

    2014-12-11

    Quaternary carbon stereocentres-carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached-are common features of molecules found in nature. However, before recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods of constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for the synthesis of single stereoisomers of such organic molecules. This progress now makes it possible to incorporate quaternary stereocentres selectively in many organic molecules that are useful in medicine, agriculture and potentially other areas such as flavouring, fragrances and materials.

  14. Nickel affects xylem Sap RNase a and converts RNase A to a urease.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cheng; Liu, Liping; Wood, Bruce W

    2013-12-09

    Nickel (Ni) is an essential micronutrient; however, its metabolic or physiological functions in plants and animals are largely uncharacterized. The ribonucleases (RNase, e.g., RNase A) are a large family of hydrolases found in one form or many forms facilitating nitrogen (N) cycling. It is currently unknown how either a deficiency or excess of Ni influences the functionality of ribonucleases, like RNase A. This is especially true for perennial crops possessing relatively high Ni requirements. We report that the 'rising' xylem sap of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch, a long-lived tree] at bud break contains a 14 kDa RNase A (aka, RNase 1), which amount has a 33% greater in Ni-deficient as in Ni-sufficient trees when exposed to Ni ions exhibits ureolytic activity. The homologous 13.4 kDa bovine pancreatic RNase A likewise exhibits ureolytic activity upon exposure to Ni ions. Ni therefore affects enzymatic function of a typically non-metalloenzyme, such as it transforms to an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing a linear amide; thus, converting an endonuclease esterase into a urease. We conclude that Ni potentially affects the level and activity of RNase A present in the spring xylem sap of pecan trees, and probably in other crops, it has the same influence. The catalytic property of RNase A appears to shift from a nuclease to a urease relying on Ni exposure. This is suggestive that RNase A might possess novel metabolic functionality regarding N-metabolism in perennial plants. The ability of Ni to convert the activity of plant and animal RNase A from that of a ribonuclease to a urease indicates a possible unrecognized beneficial metabolic function of Ni in organisms, while also identifying a potential detrimental effect of excessive Ni on N related metabolic activity if there is sufficient disruption of Ni homeostasis.

  15. Nickel affects xylem Sap RNase a and converts RNase A to a urease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nickel (Ni) is an essential micronutrient; however, its metabolic or physiological functions in plants and animals are largely uncharacterized. The ribonucleases (RNase, e.g., RNase A) are a large family of hydrolases found in one form or many forms facilitating nitrogen (N) cycling. It is currently unknown how either a deficiency or excess of Ni influences the functionality of ribonucleases, like RNase A. This is especially true for perennial crops possessing relatively high Ni requirements. Results We report that the 'rising’ xylem sap of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch, a long-lived tree] at bud break contains a 14 kDa RNase A (aka, RNase 1), which amount has a 33% greater in Ni-deficient as in Ni-sufficient trees when exposed to Ni ions exhibits ureolytic activity. The homologous 13.4 kDa bovine pancreatic RNase A likewise exhibits ureolytic activity upon exposure to Ni ions. Ni therefore affects enzymatic function of a typically non-metalloenzyme, such as it transforms to an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing a linear amide; thus, converting an endonuclease esterase into a urease. Conclusions We conclude that Ni potentially affects the level and activity of RNase A present in the spring xylem sap of pecan trees, and probably in other crops, it has the same influence. The catalytic property of RNase A appears to shift from a nuclease to a urease relying on Ni exposure. This is suggestive that RNase A might possess novel metabolic functionality regarding N-metabolism in perennial plants. The ability of Ni to convert the activity of plant and animal RNase A from that of a ribonuclease to a urease indicates a possible unrecognized beneficial metabolic function of Ni in organisms, while also identifying a potential detrimental effect of excessive Ni on N related metabolic activity if there is sufficient disruption of Ni homeostasis. PMID:24320827

  16. The elaborate plumage in peacocks is not such a drag.

    PubMed

    Askew, Graham N

    2014-09-15

    One of the classic examples of an exaggerated sexually selected trait is the elaborate plumage that forms the train in male peafowl Pavo cristatus (peacock). Such ornaments are thought to reduce locomotor performance as a result of their weight and aerodynamic drag, but this cost is unknown. Here, the effect that the train has on take-off flight in peacocks was quantified as the sum of the rates of change of the potential and kinetic energies of the body (P(CoM)) in birds with trains and following the train's removal. There was no significant difference between P(CoM) in birds with and without a train. The train incurs drag during take-off; however, while this produces a twofold increase in parasite drag, parasite power only accounts for 0.1% of the total aerodynamic power. The train represented 6.9% of body weight and is expected to increase induced power. The absence of a detectable effect on take-off performance does not necessarily mean that there is no cost associated with possessing such ornate plumage; rather, it suggests that given the variation in take-off performance per se, the magnitude of any effect of the train has little meaningful functional relevance. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  18. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  19. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  20. Early Oscillation Detection for DC/DC Converter Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2011-01-01

    The electrical power system of a spacecraft plays a very critical role for space mission success. Such a modern power system may contain numerous hybrid DC/DC converters both inside the power system electronics (PSE) units and onboard most of the flight electronics modules. One of the faulty conditions for DC/DC converter that poses serious threats to mission safety is the random occurrence of oscillation related to inherent instability characteristics of the DC/DC converters and design deficiency of the power systems. To ensure the highest reliability of the power system, oscillations in any form shall be promptly detected during part level testing, system integration tests, flight health monitoring, and on-board fault diagnosis. The popular gain/phase margin analysis method is capable of predicting stability levels of DC/DC converters, but it is limited only to verification of designs and to part-level testing on some of the models. This method has to inject noise signals into the control loop circuitry as required, thus, interrupts the DC/DC converter's normal operation and increases risks of degrading and damaging the flight unit. A novel technique to detect oscillations at early stage for flight hybrid DC/DC converters was developed.

  1. Thermal heat-balance mode flow-to-frequency converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Eligiusz

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents new type of thermal flow converter with the pulse frequency output. The integrating properties of the temperature sensor have been used, which allowed for realization of pulse frequency modulator with thermal feedback loop, stabilizing temperature of sensor placed in the flowing medium. The system assures balancing of heat amount supplied in impulses to the sensor and heat given up by the sensor in a continuous way to the flowing medium. Therefore the frequency of output impulses is proportional to the heat transfer coefficient from sensor to environment. According to the King's law, the frequency of those impulses is a function of medium flow velocity around the sensor. The special feature of presented solution is total integration of thermal sensor with the measurement signal conditioning system. Sensor and conditioning system are not the separate elements of the measurement circuit, but constitute a whole in form of thermal heat-balance mode flow-to-frequency converter. The advantage of such system is easiness of converting the frequency signal to the digital form, without using any additional analogue-to-digital converters. The frequency signal from the converter may be directly connected to the microprocessor input, which with use of standard built-in counters may convert the frequency into numerical value of high precision. Moreover, the frequency signal has higher resistance to interference than the voltage signal and may be transmitted to remote locations without the information loss.

  2. The Honeycomb illusion: Uniform textures not perceived as such

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michael H.; Bruno, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of patterns, in which texture is perceived differently at fixation in comparison to the periphery, such that a physically uniform stimulus yields a nonuniform percept. We call this the Honeycomb illusion, and we discuss it in relation to the similar Extinction illusion (Ninio & Stevens, 2000). The effect remains strong despite multiple fixations, dynamic changes, and manipulations of the size of texture elements. We discuss the phenomenon in relation to how vision achieves a detailed and stable representation of the environment despite changes in retinal spatial resolution and dramatic changes across saccades. The Honeycomb illusion complements previous related observations in suggesting that this representation is not necessarily based on multiple fixations (i.e., memory) or on extrapolation from information available to central vision. PMID:27698980

  3. Thermo-Catalytic Reforming of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Ouadi, Miloud; Jaeger, Nils; Greenhalf, Charles; Santos, Joao; Conti, Roberto; Hornung, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) refers to a heterogeneous mixture composed of plastics, paper, metal, food and other miscellaneous items. Local authorities commonly dispose of this waste by either landfill or incineration which are both unsustainable practices. Disposing of organic wastes via these routes is also becoming increasingly expensive due to rising landfill taxes and transport costs. The Thermo-Catalytic Reforming (TCR®) process, is a proposed valorisation route to transform organic wastes and residues, such as MSW, into sustainable energy vectors including (H2 rich synthesis gas, liquid bio-oil and solid char). The aim herein, was to investigate the conversion of the organic fraction of MSW into fuels and chemicals utilising the TCR technology in a 2kg/h continuous pilot scale reactor. Findings show that MSW was successfully processed with the TCR after carrying out a feedstock pre-treatment step. Approximately, 25wt.% of the feedstock was converted into phase separated liquids, composed of 19wt.% aqueous phase and 6wt.% organic phase bio-oil. The analysis of the bio-oil fraction revealed physical and chemical fuel properties, higher heating value (HHV) of 38MJ/kg, oxygen content <7wt.% and water content <4wt.%. Due to the bio-oil's chemical and physical properties, the bio-oil was found to be directly miscible with fossil diesel when blended at a volume ratio of 50:50. The mass balance closure was 44wt.% synthesis gas, with a H2 content of 36vol% and HHV of 17.23MJ/Nm(3), and 31 wt.% char with a HHV of 17MJ/kg. The production of high quantities of H2 gas and highly de-oxygenated organic liquids makes downstream hydrogen separation and subsequent hydro-deoxygenation of the produced bio-oil a promising upgrading step to achieve drop-in transportation fuels from MSW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Converting from CVF to AAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy E.; Khanampompan, Teerapat; Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    A computer program called dsn config converter automates what had been a manual process for updating the multimission adaptation file (multi.aaf) used by a multiple-mission-command-sequence-generating process comprised of a combination of the AUTOGEN and APGEN programs mentioned in the immediately preceding article. The program converts the dsn_config.cvf file that provides DSN (Deep Space Network) antenna configuration code mappings from a context variable file (CVF) format used in another part of the command generation process to an APGEN activity file (AAF) format used by AUTOGEN and APGEN. Whereas previously, the information in the dsn_config.cvf file was manually encoded into the multi.aaf file, now the program automatically generates a dsn_config.aaf file from the dsn_config.cvf file. As part of this development effort the multi.aaf file was adapted to use the new dsn_config.aaf representations. Through this automation a tedious error-prone step has now been replaced by a quick and robust step.

  5. A dc to dc converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, A. E.; Gould, J. M.; Matheney, J. L.; Garrett, H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide an improved converter for converting one direct current voltage to another. A plurality of phased square wave voltages are provided from a ring counter through amplifiers to a like plurality of output transformers. Each of these transformers has two windings, and S(1) winding and an S(2) winding. The S(1) windings are connected in series, then the S(2) windings are connected in series, and finally, the two sets of windings are connected in series. One of six SCRs is connected between each two series connected windings to a positive output terminal and one of diodes is connected between each set of two windings of a zero output terminal. By virtue of this configuration, a quite high average direct current voltage is obtained, which varies between full voltage and two-thirds full voltage rather than from full voltage to zero. Further, its variation, ripple frequency, is reduced to one-sixth of that present in a single phase system. Application to raising battery voltage for an ion propulsion system is mentioned.

  6. Hybrid thermionic-photovoltaic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Datas, A.

    2016-04-04

    A conceptual device for the direct conversion of heat into electricity is presented. This concept hybridizes thermionic (TI) and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion in a single thermionic-photovoltaic (TIPV) solid-state device. This device transforms into electricity both the electron and photon fluxes emitted by an incandescent surface. This letter presents an idealized analysis of this device in order to determine its theoretical potential. According to this analysis, the key advantage of this converter, with respect to either TPV or TI, is the higher power density in an extended temperature range. For low temperatures, TIPV performs like TPV due to the negligible electron flux. On the contrary, for high temperatures, TIPV performs like TI due to the great enhancement of the electron flux, which overshadows the photon flux contribution. At the intermediate temperatures, ∼1650 K in the case of this particular study, I show that the power density potential of TIPV converter is twice as great as that of TPV and TI. The greatest impact concerns applications in which the temperature varies in a relatively wide range, for which averaged power density enhancement above 500% is attainable.

  7. Catalytically induced electrokinetics for motors and micropumps.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Walter F; Baker, Paul T; Kline, Timothy R; Wang, Yang; Mallouk, Thomas E; Sen, Ayusman

    2006-11-22

    We have explored the role of electrokinetics in the spontaneous motion of platinum-gold nanorods suspended in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solutions that may arise from the bimetallic electrochemical decomposition of H2O2. The electrochemical decomposition pathway was confirmed by measuring the steady-state short-circuit current between platinum and gold interdigitated microelectrodes (IMEs) in the presence of H2O2. The resulting ion flux from platinum to gold implies an electric field in the surrounding solution that can be estimated from Ohm's Law. This catalytically generated electric field could in principle bring about electrokinetic effects that scale with the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation. Accordingly, we observed a linear relationship between bimetallic rod speed and the resistivity of the bulk solution. Previous observations relating a decrease in speed to an increase in ethanol concentration can be explained in terms of a decrease in current density caused by the presence of ethanol. Furthermore, we found that the catalytically generated electric field in the solution near a Pt/Au IME in the presence of H2O2 is capable of inducing electroosmotic fluid flow that can be switched on and off externally. We demonstrate that the velocity of the fluid flow in the plane of the IME is a function of the electric field, whether catalytically generated or applied from an external current source. Our findings indicate that the motion of PtAu nanorods in H2O2 is primarily due to a catalytically induced electrokinetic phenomenon and that other mechanisms, such as those related to interfacial tension gradients, play at best a minor role.

  8. Green technology for conversion of renewable hydrocarbon based on plasma-catalytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedirchyk, Igor; Nedybaliuk, Oleg; Chernyak, Valeriy; Demchina, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    The ability to convert renewable biomass into fuels and chemicals is one of the most important steps on our path to green technology and sustainable development. However, the complex composition of biomass poses a major problem for established conversion technologies. The high temperature of thermochemical biomass conversion often leads to the appearance of undesirable byproducts and waste. The catalytic conversion has reduced yield and feedstock range. Plasma-catalytic reforming technology opens a new path for biomass conversion by replacing feedstock-specific catalysts with free radicals generated in the plasma. We studied the plasma-catalytic conversion of several renewable hydrocarbons using the air plasma created by rotating gliding discharge. We found that plasma-catalytic hydrocarbon conversion can be conducted at significantly lower temperatures (500 K) than during the thermochemical ( 1000 K) and catalytic (800 K) conversion. By using gas chromatography, we determined conversion products and found that conversion efficiency of plasma-catalytic conversion reaches over 85%. We used obtained data to determine the energy yield of hydrogen in case of plasma-catalytic reforming of ethanol and compared it with other plasma-based hydrogen-generating systems.

  9. Data Converters Performance at Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rejeshuni, Rarnesham; Kumar, Nikil; Mao, James; Keymeulen, Didier; Zebulum, Ricardo S.; Stoica, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Space missions often require radiation and extreme-temperature hardened electronics to survive the harsh environments beyond earth's atmosphere. Traditional approaches to preserve electronics incorporate shielding, insulation and redundancy at the expense of power and weight. However, a novel way of bypassing these problems is the concept of evolutionary hardware. A reconfgurable device, consisting of several switches interconnected with analog/digital parts, is controlled by an evolutionary processor (EP). When the EP detects degradation in the circuit it sends signals to reconfgure the switches, thus forming a new circuit with the desired output. This concept has been developed since the mid-90s, but one problem remains - the EP cannot degrade substantially. For this reason, extensive testing at extreme temperatures (-180' to 120(deg)C) has been done on devices found on FPGA boards (taking the role of the EP) such as the Analog to Digital and the Digital to Analog Converter. Analysis of the results has shown that FPGA boards implementing EP with some compensation may be a practical solution to evolving circuits. This paper describes results on the tests of data converters at extreme temperatures.

  10. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukemire, Alan T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  11. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukemire, Alan T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  12. Attraction of undulatory swimmers, such as nematodes, to surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David; Bau, Haim

    2014-11-01

    Nematodes play a significant role in the ecosystem; agriculture; human, animal, and plant disease; and medical research. The interactions between nematodes and surfaces may play an important role in nematodes' life cycle and ability to invade a host. We studied the effect of a surface on the dynamics of low-Reynolds number, undulating swimmers such as Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans -both wild type and touch-insensitive. The experiments demonstrated that swimmers located far from a surface selected randomly their direction of motion. In contrast, surface-proximate swimmers rotated towards, collided with, and swam along the surface for considerable time intervals, periodically contacting the surface with their anterior. Likewise, swimmers in a swarm were present at higher concentrations close to the surface. Both resistive force theory-based calculations and symmetry arguments predict that short range hydrodynamic torque, resulting from the interaction between the swimmer-induced flow field and the surface, rotate the swimmer towards the surface. We conclude that the surface attraction and following results from the interplay between short-range hydrodynamic and steric forces and is genotype-independent. The work was supported, in part, by NIH NIA 5R03AG042690-02 and NBIC NSF NSEC DMR08-32802.

  13. There is no such thing as a biocompatible material.

    PubMed

    Williams, David F

    2014-12-01

    This Leading Opinion Paper discusses a very important matter concerning the use of a single word in biomaterials science. This might be considered as being solely concerned with semantics, but it has implications for the scientific rationale for biomaterials selection and the understanding of their performance. That word is the adjective 'biocompatible', which is often used to characterize a material property. It is argued here that biocompatibility is a perfectly acceptable term, but that it subsumes a variety of mechanisms of interaction between biomaterials and tissues or tissue components and can only be considered in the context of the characteristics of both the material and the biological host within which it placed. De facto it is a property of a system and not of a material. It follows that there can be no such thing as a biocompatible material. It is further argued that in those situations where it is considered important, or necessary, to use a descriptor of biocompatibility, as in a scientific paper, a regulatory submission or in a legal argument, the phrase 'intrinsically biocompatible system' would be the most appropriate. The rationale for this linguistic restraint is that far too often it has been assumed that some materials are 'universally biocompatible' on the basis of acceptable clinical performance in one situation, only for entirely unacceptable performance to ensue in quite different clinical circumstances.

  14. Thermoelectric converters for alternating current standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Taschuk, D. D.

    2012-06-01

    Thermoelectric converters of alternating current remain priority instruments when creating standard equipment. This work presents the results of design and manufacture of alternating current converter for a military standard of alternating current in Ukraine. Results of simulation of temperature distribution in converter elements, ways of optimization to improve the accuracy of alternating current signal reproduction are presented. Results of metrological trials are given. The quality of thermoelectric material specially created for alternating current metrology is verified. The converter was used in alternating current standard for the frequency range from 10 Hz to 30 MHz. The efficiency of using thermoelectric signal converters in measuring instruments is confirmed.

  15. Catalytic and non-catalytic pyrolysis of biomass in non-inert environments for production of deoxygenated bio-oil and chemicals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fast pyrolysis processes are among the most effective methods for liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass. Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) over HZSM-5 or other zeolites and/or utilization of reactive atmospheres such as in the non-catalytic Tail Gas Reactive Pyrolysis (TRGP) process, a recent patent...

  16. Complementary structure sensitive and insensitive catalytic relationships.

    PubMed

    Van Santen, Rutger A

    2009-01-20

    The burgeoning field of nanoscience has stimulated an intense interest in properties that depend on particle size. For transition metal particles, one important property that depends on size is catalytic reactivity, in which bonds are broken or formed on the surface of the particles. Decreased particle size may increase, decrease, or have no effect on the reaction rates of a given catalytic system. This Account formulates a molecular theory of the structure sensitivity of catalytic reactions based on the computed activation energies of corresponding elementary reaction steps on transition metal surfaces. Recent progress in computational catalysis, surface science, and nanochemistry has significantly improved our theoretical understanding of particle-dependent reactivity changes in heterogeneous catalytic systems. Reactions that involve the cleavage or formation of molecular pi-bonds, as in CO or N(2), must be distinguished from reactions that involve the activation of sigma-bonds, such as CH bonds in methane. The activation of molecular pi-bonds requires a reaction center with a unique configuration of several metal atoms and step-edge sites, which can physically not be present on transition metal particles less than 2 nm. This is called class I surface sensitivity, and the rate of reaction will sharply decrease when particle size decreases below a critical size. The activation of sigma chemical bonds, in which the activation proceeds at a single metal atom, displays a markedly different size relationship. In this case, the dependence of reaction rate on coordinative unsaturation of reactive surface atoms is large in the forward direction of the reaction, but the activation energy of the reverse recombination reaction will not change. Dissociative adsorption with cleavage of a CH bond is strongly affected by the presence of surface atoms at the particle edges. This is class II surface sensitivity, and the rate will increase with decreasing particle size. Reverse

  17. The critical role of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme as revealed by gene targeting in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Esther, C R; Marino, E M; Howard, T E; Machaud, A; Corvol, P; Capecchi, M R; Bernstein, K E

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) generates the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II, which plays a critical role in maintenance of blood pressure in mammals. Although significant ACE activity is found in plasma, the majority of the enzyme is bound to tissues such as the vascular endothelium. We used targeted homologous recombination to create mice expressing a form of ACE that lacks the COOH-terminal half of the molecule. This modified ACE protein is catalytically active but entirely secreted from cells. Mice that express only this modified ACE have significant plasma ACE activity but no tissue-bound enzyme. These animals have low blood pressure, renal vascular thickening, and a urine concentrating defect. The phenotype is very similar to that of completely ACE-deficient mice previously reported, except that the renal pathology is less severe. These studies strongly support the concept that the tissue-bound ACE is essential to the control of blood pressure and the structure and function of the kidney. PMID:9153279

  18. Heterodimerization of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 isoforms regulates the subcellular distribution of this metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laurent; Barret, Alain; Etienne, Eric; Meidan, Rina; Valdenaire, Olivier; Corvol, Pierre; Tougard, Claude

    2003-01-03

    Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) is a membrane metalloprotease that generates endothelin from its direct precursor big endothelin. Four isoforms of ECE-1 are produced from a single gene through the use of alternate promoters. These isoforms share the same extracellular catalytic domain and contain unique cytosolic tails, which results in their specific subcellular targeting. We investigated the distribution of ECE-1 isoforms in transfected AtT-20 neuroendocrine cells. Whereas ECE-1a and 1c were present at the plasma membrane, ECE-1b and ECE-1d were retained inside the cells. We found that both intracellular isoforms were concentrated in the endosomal system: ECE-1d in recycling endosomes, and ECE-1b in late endosomes/multivesicular bodies. Leucine-based motifs were involved in the intracellular retention of these isoforms, and the targeting of ECE-1b to the degradation pathway required an additional signal in the N terminus. The concentration of ECE-1 isoforms in the endosomal system suggested new functions for these enzymes. Potential novel functions include redistribution of other isoforms through direct interaction. We have showed that ECE-1 isoforms could heterodimerize, and that in such heterodimers the ECE-1b targeting signal was dominant. Interaction of a plasma membrane isoform with ECE-1b resulted in its intracellular localization and decreased its extracellular activity. These data demonstrated that the targeting signals specific for ECE-1b constitute a regulatory domain per se that could modulate the localization and the activity of other isoforms.

  19. Converting conformational changes to electrostatic energy in molecular motors: The energetics of ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Strajbl, Marek; Shurki, Avital; Warshel, Arieh

    2003-12-09

    F1-ATPase is the catalytic component of the ATP synthase molecular machine responsible for most of the uphill synthesis of ATP in living systems. The enormous advances in biochemical and structural studies of this machine provide an opportunity for detailed understanding of the nature of its rotary mechanism. However, further quantitative progress in this direction requires development of reliable ways of translating the observed structural changes to the corresponding energies. This requirement is particularly challenging because we are dealing with a large system that couples major structural changes with a chemical process. The present work provides such a structure-function correlation by using the linear response approximation to describe the rotary mechanism. This approach allows one to evaluate the energy of transitions between different conformational states by considering only the changes in the corresponding electrostatic energies of the ligands. The relevant energetics are also obtained by calculating the linear response approximation-based free energies of transferring the ligands from water to the different sites of F1-ATPase in their different conformational states. We also use the empirical valence bond approach to evaluate the actual free-energy profile for the ATP synthesis in the different conformational states of the system. Integrating the information from the different approaches provides a semiquantitative structure-function correlation for F1-ATPase. It is found that the conformational changes are converted to changes in the electrostatic interaction between the protein and its ligands, which drives the ATP synthesis.

  20. Novel natural peptide substrates for endopeptidase 24.15, neurolysin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Rioli, Vanessa; Gozzo, Fabio C; Heimann, Andrea S; Linardi, Alessandra; Krieger, José E; Shida, Cláudio S; Almeida, Paulo C; Hyslop, Stephen; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ferro, Emer S

    2003-03-07

    Endopeptidase 24.15 (EC; ep24.15), neurolysin (EC; ep24.16), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC; ACE) are metallopeptidases involved in neuropeptide metabolism in vertebrates. Using catalytically inactive forms of ep24.15 and ep24.16, we have identified new peptide substrates for these enzymes. The enzymatic activity of ep24.15 and ep24.16 was inactivated by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues within their conserved HEXXH motifs, without disturbing their secondary structure or peptide binding ability, as shown by circular dichroism and binding assays. Fifteen of the peptides isolated were sequenced by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and shared homology with fragments of intracellular proteins such as hemoglobin. Three of these peptides (PVNFKFLSH, VVYPWTQRY, and LVVYPWTQRY) were synthesized and shown to interact with ep24.15, ep24.16, and ACE, with K(i) values ranging from 1.86 to 27.76 microm. The hemoglobin alpha-chain fragment PVNFKFLSH, which we have named hemopressin, produced dose-dependent hypotension in anesthetized rats, starting at 0.001 microg/kg. The hypotensive effect of the peptide was potentiated by enalapril only at the lowest peptide dose. These results suggest a role for hemopressin as a vasoactive substance in vivo. The identification of these putative intracellular substrates for ep24.15 and ep24.16 is an important step toward the elucidation of the role of these enzymes within cells.

  1. Design of Compact Multi-Megawatt Mode Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; /SLAC

    2006-03-21

    Experience gained during recent operation of high power 11.424 GHz rf sources for accelerators led to new, more strict requirements on system components. One of the basic components of such a system is a mode converter that transforms the rectangular waveguide mode into the TE{sub 01} mode in circular waveguide. With such a converter, it is possible to minimize the use of WR90 rectangular waveguide which was shown to be a weak part of the previous system at power levels higher than 100 MW and pulse lengths on the order of a microsecond. We used several methods to design a mode converter with extremely low parasitic mode conversion and compact size. These methods employ HFSS[4] and include multi-parameter searches, concurrent optimization with a mode-matching code Cascade[2], cascading of resulting S-matrices, and tolerance analysis using perturbation techniques. This report describes the design methods and presents results.

  2. Boosting the value of biodiesel byproduct by the non-catalytic transesterification of dimethyl carbonate via a continuous flow system under ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Jeon, Young Jae

    2014-10-01

    Transformation of coconut oil into biodiesel by using dimethyl carbonate (DMC) via a non-catalytic transesterification reaction under ambient pressure was investigated in this study. The non-catalytic transformation to biodiesel was achieved by means of a heterogeneous reaction between liquid triglycerides and gas phase DMC. The reaction was enhanced in the presence of porous material due to its intrinsic physical properties such as tortuosity and absorption/adsorption. The numerous pores in the material served as micro reaction chambers and ensured that there was enough contact time between the liquid triglycerides and the gaseous DMC, which enabled the completion of the transesterification. The highest fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) yield achieved was 98±0.5% within 1-2min at a temperature of 360-450°C under ambient pressure. The fast reaction rates made it possible to convert the lipid feedstock into biodiesel via a continuous flow system without the application of increased pressure. This suggested that the commonly used supercritical conditions could be avoided, resulting in huge cost benefits for biodiesel production. In addition, the high value of the byproduct from the transesterification of the lipid feedstock with DMC suggested that the production biodiesel using this method could be more economically competitive. Finally, the basic properties of biodiesel derived from the non-catalytic conversion of rapeseed oil with DMC were summarised.

  3. Catalytic pyrolysis of car tire waste using expanded perlite.

    PubMed

    Kar, Y

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the non-catalytic and catalytic pyrolysis experiments were conducted on the sample of tire waste using expanded perlite as an additive material to determine especially the effect of temperature and catalyst-to-tire ratio on the products yields and the compositions and qualities of pyrolytic oils (NCPO and CPO). Non-catalytic studies, which were carried out under the certain conditions (a nitrogen flow of 100mL/min and a heating rate of 10°C/min), showed that the highest yield of pyrolytic oil (NCPO) was 60.02wt.% at 425°C. Then, the catalytic pyrolysis studies were carried out at catalyst-to-tire ratio range of 0.05-0.25 and the highest catalytic pyrolytic oil (CPO) yield was 65.11wt.% at the ratio of 0.10 with the yield increase of 8.48wt.% compared with the non-catalytic pyrolysis. Lastly, the pyrolytic oils were characterized with applying a various techniques such as elemental analyses and various chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques (GC-MS, (1)H NMR, FT-IR, etc.). The characterization results revealed that the pyrolytic oils which were complex mixtures of C(5)-C(15) organic compounds (predominantly aromatic compounds) and also the CPO compared to the NCPO was more similar to conventional fuels in view of the certain fuel properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  5. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  6. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  7. New tests for characterizing the durability of a ceramic catalytic converter package

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.P.; Helfinstine, J.D.; Gulati, S.T.

    1996-09-01

    New test methods were developed to characterize the high temperature durability of intumescent mats that are used to mount ceramic catalyst supports in stainless steel cans. The key attribute of these tests is the use of an electric resistance heating method to maintain a temperature gradient through the thickness of the mat when a cyclic or constant shear stress is applied to the mat interface. These tests are simple to perform and do not require expensive equipment or highly skilled operators. Using these new test methods, the durability of ceramic preconverters mounted with 4,070 gm/m{sup 2} intumescent mat was studied. The results of these tests indicate that a preconverter package with 4070 gm/m{sup 2} intumescent mat can perform satisfactorily in the close-coupled application where temperatures exceed 900 C. The mat performance can be quantified in terms of applied stress and test temperature by utilizing the experimental methods described in the present study.

  8. Thermal Catalytic Syngas Cleanup for High-Efficiency Waste-to-Energy Converters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    to typical gasification- and 1 pyrolysis -based processes, including many commercial downdraft gasifiers. In a countercurrent gasifier, complete...recalcitrant chars are simply burned to provide the thermal energy needed to power the preceding gasification, pyrolysis , and drying zones. The high...system. Pressure in the gasifier was monitored with a gauge and ranged from 0.25 to 0.75 psig during normal operations. A picture of the gasifier is

  9. Effectiveness of replacing catalytic converters in LPG-fueled vehicles in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Xiaopu; Guo, Hai; Simpson, Isobel J.; Meinardi, Simone; Louie, Peter K. K.; Ling, Zhenhao; Wang, Yu; Liu, Ming; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Wang, Nan; Blake, Donald R.

    2016-05-01

    Many taxis and public buses are powered by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in Hong Kong. With more vehicles using LPG, they have become the major contributor to ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Hong Kong. An intervention program which aimed to reduce the emissions of VOCs and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from LPG-fueled vehicles was implemented by the Hong Kong government in September 2013. Long-term real-time measurements indicated that the program was remarkably effective in reducing LPG-related VOCs, NOx and nitric oxide (NO) in the atmosphere. Receptor modeling results further revealed that propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane and NO in LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust emissions decreased by 40.8 ± 0.1, 45.7 ± 0.2, 35.7 ± 0.1, 47.8 ± 0.1 and 88.6 ± 0.7 %, respectively, during the implementation of the program. In contrast, despite the reduction of VOCs and NOx, O3 following the program increased by 0.40 ± 0.03 ppbv (˜ 5.6 %). The LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust was generally destructive to OH and HO2. However, the destruction effect weakened for OH and it even turned to positive contribution to HO2 during the program. These changes led to the increases of OH, HO2 and HO2 / OH ratio, which might explain the positive O3 increment. Analysis of O3-VOCs-NOx sensitivity in ambient air indicated VOC-limited regimes in the O3 formation before and during the program. Moreover, a maximum reduction percentage of NOx (i.e., 69 %) and the lowest reduction ratio of VOCs / NOx (i.e., 1.1) in LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust were determined to give a zero O3 increment. The findings are of great help to future formulation and implementation of control strategies on vehicle emissions in Hong Kong, and could be extended to other regions in China and around the world.

  10. Simultaneous leaching of Pt, Pd and Rh from automotive catalytic converters in chloride-containing solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasani, M.; Khodadadi, A.; Koleini, S. M. J.; Saeedi, A. H.; Meléndez, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Dissolution of platinum group metals (PGM; herein Pt, Pd and Rh) in different chloride-based leaching systems from spent auto catalysts was performed. Response surface methodology and a five-level-five-factor central composite design were used to evaluate the effects of 1) temperature, 2) liquid-to-solid ratio, 3) stirring speed, 4) acid concentration and 5) particle size on extraction yield of PGM by aqua regia. Analysis of variance was used to determine the optimum conditions and most significant factors affecting the overall metal extraction. In the optimum conditions, leaching of Pt, Pd and Rh was 91.58%, 93.49% and 60.15%, respectively. The effect of different oxidizing agents on the PGM dissolution in chloride medium was studied comparatively in the following leaching systems: a) aqua regia/sulfuric acid mixture, b) hydrogen peroxide in sulfuric acid (piranha solution), c) sodium hypochlorite and d) copper(II). Dissolution of Rh is increased in both aqua regia and hydrogen peroxide/hydrochloric acid solutions by adding sulfuric acid.

  11. DNA replication: polymerase epsilon as a non-catalytic converter of the helicase.

    PubMed

    Zegerman, Philip

    2013-04-08

    In eukaryotes DNA polymerase epsilon (ε) synthesises the leading DNA strand during replication. A new study provides insight into how this polymerase also functions independently of its enzyme activity to assemble and activate the replicative helicase.

  12. Preliminary Characterization of a Coaxial DBD Plasma-Catalytic Converter for Methane Partial Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulombe, Sylvain; Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Pablo; Evans, Mathew; Sainct, Florent; Bergthorson, Jeff

    2015-09-01

    This contribution discusses the development and characteristics of a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) using a methane-oxygen mixture at atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure. A sinusoidal voltage waveform of 12 kVp-p at 20 kHz produces discharges in a 1.15 mm gap. Power is estimated using a Lissajous figure method while optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to estimate the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the gas. Obtained OES spectra are similar, differing mainly on the intensity of their CH and OH bands, tending towards a more intense OH band as oxygen availability increased. CH bands show the strongest emission intensities of which, CH(C-X) seems to be the most intense of all, followed by CH(A-X) and lastly by CH(B-X). The spectra of CH(A-X) and CH(C-X) were uploaded into a simulation software to estimate the plasma temperatures. For the CH(A-X) bands, a simulation with a Trot = 600 K and a Tvib = 6000 K matched the experimental spectra. In the case of the CH(C-X) band, a Trot = 800 K and a Tvib = 4000 K were determined. The vibrational temperatures are especially high, a result which is particularly important for the development of a plasma-catalysis reactor. The authors acknowledge the financial support provided by NSERC, FRQNT as well as McGill University through the McGill Engineering Doctoral Award program.

  13. Effectiveness of replacing catalytic converters in LPG-fueled vehicles in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, X. P.; Guo, H.; Simpson, I. J.; Meinardi, S.; Louie, P. K. K.; Ling, Z. H.; Wang, Y.; Liu, M.; Luk, C. W. Y.; Wang, N.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Many taxis and public buses are powered by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in Hong Kong. With more vehicles using LPG, they have become the major contributor to ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Hong Kong. An intervention program aimed to reduce the emissions of VOCs and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from LPG-fueled vehicles was implemented by the Hong Kong Government in September 2013. Long-term real-time measurements indicated that the program was remarkably effective in reducing LPG-related VOCs, NOx and nitric oxide (NO) in the atmosphere. Receptor modeling results further revealed that propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane and NO in LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust emissions decreased by 37.3 ± 0.4, 50.2 ± 0.3, 32.9 ± 0.4, 41.1 ± 0.4 and 75.9 ± 0.3 %, respectively, during the implementation of the program. In contrast, despite the reduction of VOCs and NOx, the O3 production following the program increased by 0.25 ± 0.04 ppbv h-1 (4.8 %). Moreover, the production rate of HOx decreased due to the reduction of VOCs, whereas NO reduction resulted in a more significant decrease of the HOx in destruction compared to the decrease in production, and an increase of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2). Analysis of O3-VOCs-NOx sensitivity in ambient air indicated VOC-limited regimes in the O3 formation before and during the program. Moreover, a maximum reduction percentage of NOx (i.e., 29.4 %) and the lowest reduction ratio of VOCs / NOx (i.e., ~ 3 : 1) in LPG-fueled vehicle emissions were determined to give a zero O3 increment. The findings are of great help to future formulation and implementation of control strategies on vehicle emissions in Hong Kong.

  14. Simplifying the circuit of Josephson parametric converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Baleegh; Brink, Markus; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Keefe, George

    Josephson parametric converters (JPCs) are quantum-limited three-wave mixing devices that can play various important roles in quantum information processing in the microwave domain, including amplification of quantum signals, transduction of quantum information, remote entanglement of qubits, nonreciprocal amplification, and circulation of signals. However, the input-output and biasing circuit of a state-of-the-art JPC consists of bulky components, i.e. two commercial off-chip broadband 180-degree hybrids, four phase-matched short coax cables, and one superconducting magnetic coil. Such bulky hardware significantly hinders the integration of JPCs in scalable quantum computing architectures. In my talk, I will present ideas on how to simplify the JPC circuit and show preliminary experimental results

  15. Clustering of cycloidal wave energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Stefan G.

    2016-03-29

    A wave energy conversion system uses a pair of wave energy converters (WECs) on respective active mountings on a floating platform, so that the separation of the WECs from each other or from a central WEC can be actively adjusted according to the wavelength of incident waves. The adjustable separation facilitates operation of the system to cancel reactive forces, which may be generated during wave energy conversion. Modules on which such pairs of WECs are mounted can be assembled with one or more central WECs to form large clusters in which reactive forces and torques can be made to cancel. WECs of different sizes can be employed to facilitate cancelation of reactive forces and torques.

  16. Microlith-Based Catalytic Reactor for Air Quality and Trace Contaminant Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilekar, Saurabh; Hawley, Kyle; Junaedi, Christian; Crowder, Bruce; Prada, Julian; Mastanduno, Richard; Perry, Jay L.; Kayatin, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, gaseous compounds such as methane, carbon monoxide, and trace contaminants have posed challenges for maintaining clean air in enclosed spaces such as crewed spacecraft cabins as they are hazardous to humans and are often difficult to remove by conventional adsorption technology. Catalytic oxidizers have provided a reliable and robust means of disposing of even trace levels of these compounds by converting them into carbon dioxide and water. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) and NASA - Marshall (MSFC) have been developing, characterizing, and optimizing high temperature catalytic oxidizers (HTCO) based on PCI's patented Microlith® technology to meet the requirements of future extended human spaceflight explorations. Current efforts have focused on integrating the HTCO unit with a compact, simple recuperative heat exchanger to reduce the overall system size and weight while also reducing its energy requirements. Previous efforts relied on external heat exchangers to recover the waste heat and recycle it to the oxidizer to minimize the system's power requirements; however, these units contribute weight and volume burdens to the overall system. They also result in excess heat loss due to the separation of the HTCO and the heat recuperator, resulting in lower overall efficiency. Improvements in the recuperative efficiency and close coupling of HTCO and heat recuperator lead to reductions in system energy requirements and startup time. Results from testing HTCO units integrated with heat recuperators at a variety of scales for cabin air quality control and heat melt compactor applications are reported and their benefits over previous iterations of the HTCO and heat recuperator assembly are quantified in this paper.

  17. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Pumera, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  18. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Pumera, Martin

    2013-04-07

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  19. Expression studies of catalytic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, H.D.; Patten, P.A.; Yang, P.L.

    1995-12-05

    We have examined the positive influence of human constant regions on the folding and bacterial expression of active soluble mouse immunoglobulin variable domains derived form a number of catalytic antibodies. Expression yields of eight hybridoma-and myeloma-derived chimeric Fab fragments are compared in both shake flasks and high-density fermentation. In addition the usefulness of this system for the generation of in vivo expression libraries is examined by constructing and expressing combinations of heavy and light chain variable regions that were not selected as a pair during an immune response. A mutagenesis study of one of the recombinant catalytic Fab fragments reveals that single amino acid substitutions can have dramatic effects on the expression yield. This system should be generally applicable to the production of Fab fragments of catalytic and other hybridoma-derived antibodies for crystallographic and structure-function studies. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  1. Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

  2. Compact Relativistic Magnetron with Output Mode Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Andrey; Fuks, Mikhail; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2003-10-01

    We consider a relativistic magnetron in which all of the resonators of the anode block are smoothly continued onto a conical antenna up to the radius corresponding to the cutoff frequency of the radiated wave in a cylindrical waveguide. Such a magnetron is capable of high output power, is compact, has a high resistance to microwave breakdown, is able to work with extremely high currents, and has the possibility of forming desirable output radiation patterns. The magnetic field can be provided by a small solenoid over the resonant system, which is a much smaller volume than is required for the Helmholtz coils used in traditional relativistic magnetrons. The maximum size of this magnetron is the aperture of the horn antenna. The unique aspect of such a design is the possibility of using the horn antenna for conversion of the operating mode to lower order modes, including the TE_11 mode, which is radiated as a narrow wave beam. For a magnetron operating in π-mode, the mode converter comprises a continuation of the resonantor blocks onto the horn for those resonators that correspond to the symmetry of the output mode. For example, in order to provide Gaussian mode output only two diametrically opposite resonators of even-numbered resonators must be continued onto the horn. In this case the aperture of the horn antenna can be close to the cut-off diameter for the TE_11 mode, and the output power is limited only by breakdown of the output window. In this presentation results of preliminary calculations of the magnetron with output mode converters are presented.

  3. Catalytic hydrothermal conversion of dissolved carbon dioxide into methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Jin, Fangming; Cao, Jianglin; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Guangyi

    2010-11-01

    This paper aims to convert NaHCO3 (dissolved carbon dioxide in NaOH solution) into methane via hydrothermal catalytic reaction. The effects of various experimental parameters on the conversion efficiency of NaHCO3, e.g., amount of reactant (Zn) and catalyst (Ni), temperature, reaction time etc, were investigated. The results showed that a maximal 43.6% yield of methane was obtained at the optimal conditions: Zn 0.1 mol, Ni 0.06 mol, temperature of 300° C, reaction time of 120 min, filling rate of 35% and NaHCO3 0.01 mol. In the absence of Ni catalyst, CO2 was mostly converted into formic acid (formic acid yield of 87%) and the corresponding methane yield was zero, while in the presence of Ni, the yield of methane increased to 43.6% and the yield of formic acid was only 3%. Based on these results, it was supposed that Ni played a catalytic role in hydrothermal conversion of CO2 into methane and formic acid was the intermediate product during the formation of methane from CO2 in the hydrothermal processes.

  4. Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters

    PubMed Central

    Quasdorf, Kyle W.; Overman, Larry E.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Quaternary carbon stereocenters–carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached–are common features of molecules found in nature. However, prior to recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods available for constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for synthesizing organic molecules containing such carbon atoms. This progress now makes it possible to selectively incorporate quaternary stereocenters in many high-value organic molecules for use in medicine, agriculture, and other areas. PMID:25503231

  5. Thin film porous membranes for catalytic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Boyle, T.J.; Gardner, T.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reports on new and surprising experimental data for catalytic film gas sensing resistors coated with nanoporous sol-gel films to impart selectivity and durability to the sensor structure. This work is the result of attempts to build selectivity and reactivity to the surface of a sensor by modifying it with a series of sol-gel layers. The initial sol-gel SiO{sub 2} layer applied to the sensor surprisingly showed enhanced O{sub 2} interaction with H{sub 2} and reduced susceptibility to poisons such as H{sub 2}S.

  6. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  7. Inverter converters. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, R.

    1980-05-01

    Cited works cover the field of electrical devices which convert direct to alternating current. Some of the applications discussed are motor and furnace drives, solar and wind generated electrical power conversion, variable frequency devices for motor speed control drives, and power frequency conversion devices. The components used in these devices, such as thyristors, SCRs, MOS devices, etc., and the associated circuitries, are described.

  8. Comparing Approaches to Converting Large High Schools into Smaller Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    Scholars and reformers in the United States have called for converting large high schools into smaller units to provide a more effective, personal, and culturally responsive education for all students. Current literature argues that such "conversion high schools" should break into fully autonomous small schools rather than more…

  9. Radiation-Tolerant DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skutt, Glenn; Sable, Dan; Leslie, Leonard; Graham, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses power converters suitable for space use that meet the DSCC MIL-PRF-38534 Appendix G radiation hardness level P classification. A method for qualifying commercially produced electronic parts for DC-DC converters per the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC) radiation hardened assurance requirements was developed. Development and compliance testing of standard hybrid converters suitable for space use were completed for missions with total dose radiation requirements of up to 30 kRad. This innovation provides the same overall performance as standard hybrid converters, but includes assurance of radiation- tolerant design through components and design compliance testing. This availability of design-certified radiation-tolerant converters can significantly reduce total cost and delivery time for power converters for space applications that fit the appropriate DSCC classification (30 kRad).

  10. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Faison, Brendlyn D.; Davison, Brian H.; Woodward, Jonathan

    1994-01-01

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system.

  11. To provide additional coupons for the digital-to-analog converter box program and to expedite delivery of coupons under such program.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Barton, Joe [R-TX-6

    2009-01-23

    House - 01/26/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Josephson A/D Converter Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    LITERATURE ..... ............ 2 2.1 Multiple- Quantum Interference Superconducting A/D Converter ......... ........................... 2 2.2 Analysis of...within the first three years. Demonstration of a superconducting A/D converter operating well into the gigasample per second region within five years...Appendix and are described briefly below: 2.1 Multiple- Quantum Interference Superconducting A/D Converter R. E. Harris, C. A. Hamilton, and F. L. Lloyd Appl

  13. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  14. Static dc voltage stabilizer-converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osadchiy, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    The advantages are outlined of a static dc voltage converter combining the functions of the feed voltage stabilizer simultaneously. A comparison is made between the circuits for the known static stabilizer converter and that developed by the author. A characteristic feature of the improved system is the increased stabilization coefficient, low output impedance and the possibility of smooth regulation of the output voltage. A practical diagram is presented for the improved high voltage stabilizer converter and its parameters.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF PHOTOEMISSION SOLAR ENERGY CONVERTERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The feasibility of making a photoemissive solar energy converter was investigated theoretically and in practical devices. Theoretical...practical device was only one-tenth of one percent. In support of the work done directly in fabrication of photoemissive solar energy converters, numerous...measurements were made of the properties of photoemitters under the high light and high current conditions typical of photoemissives solar energy converter

  16. Development of a Modular Power Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Biesenieks, L.; Sokolovs, A.; Galkin, I.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the most important details of elaboration of a versatile power module that can be utilized as a part of various converters. Two or more modules connected together can form a frequency converter or multilevel converter or 3-phase inverter/rectifier etc. Initially the module was developed for fast prototyping of uninterruptible power supplies and energy systems with alternative energy sources. The module can be used also as a basis for laboratory equipment of the power electronics course.

  17. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-03

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  18. Catalytic Conversion of Renewable Resources into Bulk and Fine Chemicals.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Johannes G

    2016-12-01

    Several strategies can be chosen to convert renewable resources into chemicals. In this account, I exemplify the route that starts with so-called platform chemicals; these are relatively simple chemicals that can be produced in high yield, directly from renewable resources, either via fermentation or via chemical routes. They can be converted into the existing bulk chemicals in a very efficient manner using multistep catalytic conversions. Two examples are given of the conversion of sugars into nylon intermediates. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) can be prepared in good yield from fructose. Two hydrogenation steps convert HMF into 1,6-hexanediol. Oppenauer oxidation converts this product into caprolactone, which in the past, has been converted into caprolactam in a large-scale industrial process by reaction with ammonia. An even more interesting platform chemical is levulinic acid (LA), which can be obtained directly from lignocellulose in good yield by treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 200°C. Hydrogenation converts LA into gamma-valerolactone, which is ring-opened and esterified in a gas-phase process to a mixture of isomeric methyl pentenoates in excellent selectivity. In a remarkable selective palladium-catalysed isomerising methoxycarbonylation, this mixture is converted in to dimethyl adipate, which is finally hydrolysed to adipic acid. Overall selectivities of both processes are extremely high. The conversion of lignin into chemicals is a much more complicated task in view of the complex nature of lignin. It was discovered that breakage of the most prevalent β-O-4 bond in lignin occurs not only via the well-documented C3 pathway, but also via a C2 pathway, leading to the formation of highly reactive phenylacetaldehydes. These compounds went largely unnoticed as they immediately recondense on lignin. We have now found that it is possible to prevent this by converting these aldehydes in a tandem reaction, as they are formed. For this purpose, we have used

  19. Evaluation of High Performance Converters Under Low Dose Rate Total Ionizing Dose (TID) Testing for NASA Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Sahu, Kusum

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of low dose rate (0.01-0.18 rads(Si)/sec) total ionizing dose (TID) tests performed on several types of high performance converters. The parts used in this evaluation represented devices such as a high speed flash converter, a 16-bit ADC and a voltage-to-frequency converter.

  20. A complete dc characterization of a constant-frequency, clamped-mode, series-resonant converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Fu-Sheng; Lee, Fred C.

    1988-01-01

    The dc behavior of a clamped-mode series-resonant converter is characterized systematically. Given a circuit operating condition, the converter's mode of operation is determined and various circuit parameters are calculated, such as average inductor current (load current), rms inductor current, peak capacitor voltage, rms switch currents, average diode currents, switch turn-on currents, and switch turn-off currents. Regions of operation are defined, and various circuit characteristics are derived to facilitate the converter design.

  1. Nonlinear program based optimization of boost and buck-boost converter designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, S.; Lee, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The facility of an Augmented Lagrangian (ALAG) multiplier based nonlinear programming technique is demonstrated for minimum-weight design optimizations of boost and buck-boost power converters. Certain important features of ALAG are presented in the framework of a comprehensive design example for buck-boost power converter design optimization. The study provides refreshing design insight of power converters and presents such information as weight and loss profiles of various semiconductor components and magnetics as a function of the switching frequency.

  2. Nonlinear program based optimization of boost and buck-boost converter designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, S.; Lee, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The facility of an Augmented Lagrangian (ALAG) multiplier based nonlinear programming technique is demonstrated for minimum-weight design optimizations of boost and buck-boost power converters. Certain important features of ALAG are presented in the framework of a comprehensive design example for buck-boost power converter design optimization. The study provides refreshing design insight of power converters and presents such information as weight and loss profiles of various semiconductor components and magnetics as a function of the switching frequency.

  3. Combustor design tool for a gas fired thermophotovoltaic energy converter

    SciTech Connect

    Lindler, K.W.; Harper, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. A TPV device converts radiant energy from a high temperature incandescent emitter directly into electricity by photovoltaic cells. The current Department of Energy sponsored research involves the design, construction and demonstration of a prototype TPV converter that uses a hydrocarbon fuel (such as natural gas) as the energy source. As the photovoltaic cells are designed to efficiently convert radiant energy at a prescribed wavelength, it is important that the temperature of the emitter be nearly constant over its entire surface. The US Naval Academy has been tasked with the development of a small emitter (with a high emissivity) that can be maintained at 1,756 K (2,700 F). This paper describes the computer spreadsheet model that was developed as a tool to be used for the design of the high temperature emitter.

  4. Power line carrier interference from HVDC converter terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Tatro, P.J.; Adamson, K.A. ); Eitzmann, M.A.; Smead, M. . Power Systems Engineering Dept.)

    1993-07-01

    Power line carrier (PLC) equipment typically operates in the frequency range from 25 kHz to 300 kHz. Interference studies for HVDC converters usually concentrate on interference from noise sources within this frequency range. However, operating experience at the Sandy Pond converter terminal has indicated that PLC equipment is also susceptible to interference from sources of power system harmonics below the PLC frequency range. Extensive field testing and analytical studies have shown that each PLC circuit has a resonant frequency below the operating frequency. If excited at this resonant frequency, high voltages may exist within the PLC circuit. The resulting saturation of PLC components leads to local generation of radio frequency (RF) noise that interferes with proper operation of PLC circuits. Sources of power system harmonics in the 3-10 kHz range, such as line commutated dc converters, are potential sources of this type of interference.

  5. Novel Smart Microreactors Equipped with Responsive Catalytic Nanoparticles on Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Zhuang; Liu, Lu-Yue; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Wei; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2017-09-27

    Nowadays efficient and reliable control of highly exothermic reactions to effectively prevent overheating or even explosions still remains a challenging task, although newly developed microreactor technology has shown promise. Here, we report a novel smart microreactor system equipped with responsive catalytic nanoparticles on microchannels for self-regulated control over highly exothermic reactions by responding to the reaction-generated heat. On the basis of shrinking/swelling behaviors of polymeric networks in the responsive catalytic nanoparticles, the smart microreactor could respond to the change of reaction temperature to tune the catalysis activity of catalytic particles in a thermo-feedback process. As a breakthrough result, highly exothermic reactions carried out in such a microreactor can be well-controlled in a self-regulation process without any manual assistance, efficiently ensuring the safety of the reaction. Such smart responsive catalytic systems have high potential and are attractive as a new generation of efficient tools that feature a self-regulation property for highly exothermic catalytic reactions.

  6. DC/DC Converter Stability Testing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents study results on hybrid DC/DC converter stability testing methods. An input impedance measurement method and a gain/phase margin measurement method were evaluated to be effective to determine front-end oscillation and feedback loop oscillation. In particular, certain channel power levels of converter input noises have been found to have high degree correlation with the gain/phase margins. It becomes a potential new method to evaluate stability levels of all type of DC/DC converters by utilizing the spectral analysis on converter input noises.

  7. A theoretical study of photovoltaic converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical models for the photovoltaic conversion of laser power were developed. These models simulate the operation of planar and vertical junction photovoltaic converters and are described in detail.

  8. Modular Power Converters for PV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2012-05-01

    This report describes technical opportunities to serve as parts of a technological roadmap for Shoals Technologies Group in power electronics for PV applications. There are many different power converter circuits that can be used for solar inverter applications. The present applications do not take advantage of the potential for using common modules. We envision that the development of a power electronics module could enable higher reliability by being durable and flexible. Modules would have fault current limiting features and detection circuits such that they can limit the current through the module from external faults and can identify and isolate internal faults such that the remaining modules can continue to operate with only minimal disturbance to the utility or customer. Development of a reliable, efficient, low-cost, power electronics module will be a key enabling technology for harnessing more power from solar panels and enable plug and play operation. Power electronics for computer power supplies, communication equipment, and transportation have all targeted reliability and modularity as key requirements and have begun concerted efforts to replace monolithic components with collections of common smart modules. This is happening on several levels including (1) device level with intelligent control, (2) functional module level, and (3) system module. This same effort is needed in power electronics for solar applications. Development of modular units will result in standard power electronic converters that will have a lower installed and operating cost for the overall system. These units will lead to increased adaptability and flexibility of solar inverters. Incorporating autonomous fault current limiting and reconfiguration capabilities into the modules and having redundant modules will lead to a durable converter that can withstand the rigors of solar power generation for more than 30 years. Our vision for the technology roadmap is that there is no need

  9. In situ catalytic hydrogenation of model compounds and biomass-derived phenolic compounds for bio-oil upgrading

    Treesearch

    Junfeng Feng; Zhongzhi Yang; Chung-yun Hse; Qiuli Su; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    The renewable phenolic compounds produced by directional liquefaction of biomass are a mixture of complete fragments decomposed from native lignin. These compounds are unstable and difficult to use directly as biofuel. Here, we report an efficient in situ catalytic hydrogenation method that can convert phenolic compounds into saturated cyclohexanes. The process has...

  10. Automotive parts/accessories/supplies-automotive service equipment set (Chile). Catalytic convertors, July 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The market survey covers the catalytic converter market in Chile. The analysis contains statistical and narrative information on projected market demand, end-users; receptivity of Chilean consumers to U.S. products; the competitive situation, and market access (tariffs, non-tariff barriers, standards, taxes, distribution channels). It also contains key contact information.

  11. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Simple, Chemoselective, Catalytic Olefin Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic amounts of Co(SaltBu,tBu)Cl and organosilane irreversibly isomerize terminal alkenes by one position. The same catalysts effect cycloisomerization of dienes and retrocycloisomerization of strained rings. Strong Lewis bases like amines and imidazoles, and labile functionalities like epoxides, are tolerated. PMID:25398144

  13. Catalytic Asymmetric Bromocyclization of Polyenes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Ramesh C; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2017-02-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric bromonium ion-induced polyene cyclization has been achieved by using a chiral BINOL-derived thiophosphoramide catalyst and 1,3-dibromo-5,5-dimethylhydantoin as an electrophilic bromine source. Bromocyclization products are obtained in high yields, with good enantiomeric ratios and high diastereoselectivity, and are abundantly found as scaffolds in natural products.

  14. Heterogeneous catalytic alcoholysis of benzonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Kagarlitskii, A.D.; Dmumakaev, K.Kh.; Bekova, N.S.

    1986-04-01

    The authors investigate the possibility of the direct heterogeneous catalytic synthesis of ethylbenzoate from benzonitrile. The catalysts tested were oxides of aluminium, titanium, and vanadium. The main conversion product detected chromatographically was ethylbenzoate; benzaldehyde, benzamide, and benzanilide were also identified. Aluminium oxide was found to be the most effective catalyst.

  15. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF AIR POLLUTANTS FROM PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY USING OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Major pollutants from pulp and paper mills include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as methanol and total reduced sulfur compounds (TRS) such as dimethyl sulfide. The conventional treatment technologies including incineration or catalytic thermal oxidation are energy intens...

  16. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF AIR POLLUTANTS FROM PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY USING OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Major pollutants from pulp and paper mills include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as methanol and total reduced sulfur compounds (TRS) such as dimethyl sulfide. The conventional treatment technologies including incineration or catalytic thermal oxidation are energy intens...

  17. Catalytic gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Robertus, R.J.

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of catalytic gasification of bagasse to produce methanol. In previous studies, a catalytic steam gasification process was developed which converted wood to methanol synthesis gas in one step using nickel based catalysts in a fluid-bed gasifier. Tests in a nominal 1 ton/day process development unit (PDU) gasifier with these same catalysts showed bagasse to be a good feedstock for fluid-bed gasifiers, but the catalysts deactivated quite rapidly in the presence of bagasse. Laboratory catalyst screening tests showed K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on the bagasse to be a promising catalyst for converting bagasse to methanol synthesis gas. PDU tests with 10 wt % K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on bagasse showed the technical feasibility of this type of catalyst on a larger scale. A high quality synthesis gas was produced and carbon conversion to gas was high. The gasifier was successfully operated without forming agglomerates of catalyst, ash, and char in the gasifier. There was no loss of activity throughout the runs because catalysts is continually added with the bagasse. Laboratory tests showed about 80% of the potassium carbonate could be recovered and recycled with a simple water wash. An economic evaluation of the process for converting bagasse to methanol showed the required selling price of methanol to be significantly higher than the current market price of methanol. Several factors make this current evaluaton using bagasse as a feedstock less favorable: (1) capital costs are higher due to inflation and some extra costs required to use bagasse, (2) smaller plant sizes were considered so economies of scale are lost, and (3) the market price of methanol in the US has fallen 44% in the last six months. 24 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  18. Exploration of the Chaotic Behaviour in a Buck-Boost Converter Depending on the Converter and Load Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirbaş, Şevki; Fidanboy, Hikmet; Kurt, Erol

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, detailed analyses of the chaotic behavior observed in a buck-boost converter are presented. Although this basic converter system is already known world-wide for the purpose of dc-dc conversion of the output of renewable energy systems, it indicates certain chaotic regimes where both the output amplitude and frequency change randomly. This chaotic regime can yield an unstable output over the resistive or resistive/inductive electrical loads. This study presents a detailed map for the regular and chaotic regions in terms of material parameters, such as converter capacitance C, resistive load R, and inductive load L. Thus, the stable area of operation for efficient and renewable electricity production will be ascertained for the studied converter system. We emphasize that the material parameters C, R, and L play important roles in generating energy from the solar cell; indeed, the stability increases with higher values of the converter capacitor and load inductance, whereas it decreases according to the resistive load. A number of periodic windows have been observed and the output frequency gives a broad-band spectrum of up to 50 kHz.

  19. Catalytic pyrolysis of automobile shredder residue

    SciTech Connect

    Arzoumanidis, G.G.; McIntosh, M.J.; Steffensen, E.J.

    1995-07-01

    In the United States, approximately 10 million automobiles are scrapped and shredded each year. The mixture of plastics and other materials remaining after recovery of the metals is known as Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR). In 1994, about 3.5 million tons of ASR was produced and disposed of in landfills. However, environmental, legislative, and economic considerations are forcing the industry to search for recycling or other alternatives to disposal. Numerous studies have been done relating the ASR disposal problem to possible recycling treatments such as pyrolysis, gasification, co-liquefaction of ASR with coal, chemical recovery of plastics from ASR, catalytic pyrolysis, reclamation in molten salts, and vacuum pyrolysis. These and other possibilities have been studied intensively, and entire symposia have been devoted to the problem. Product mix, yields, toxicology issues, and projected economics of conceptual plant designs based on experimental results are among the key elements of past studies. Because the kinds of recycling methods that may be developed, along with their ultimate economic value, depend on a very large number of variables, these studies have been open-ended. It is hoped that it may be useful to explore some of these previously studied areas from fresh perspectives. One such approach, currently under development at Argonne National Laboratory, is the catalytic pyrolysis of ASR.

  20. MEMS-based fuel cells with integrated catalytic fuel processor and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Havstad, Mark A [Davis, CA

    2011-08-09

    Described herein is a means to incorporate catalytic materials into the fuel flow field structures of MEMS-based fuel cells, which enable catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbon based fuel, such as methane, methanol, or butane. Methods of fabrication are also disclosed.

  1. Integrated process for the catalytic conversion of biomass-derived syngas into transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Vanessa Lebarbier; Smith, Colin; Flake, Matthew; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gray, Michel J.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of renewable fuels that will enable cost competitiveness with petroleum-derived fuels remains a grand challenge for U.S. scientists. In this paper, we report on an integrated catalytic approach for producing transportation fuels from biomass-derived syngas. The composition of the resulting hydrocarbon fuel can be modulated to meet specified requirements. Biomass-derived syngas is first converted over an Rh-based catalyst into a complex aqueous mixture of condensable C2+ oxygenated compounds (predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate). This multi-component aqueous mixture then is fed to a second reactor loaded with a ZnxZryOz mixed oxide catalyst, which has tailored acid-base sites, to produce an olefin mixture rich in isobutene. The olefins then are oligomerized using a solid acid catalyst (e.g., Amberlyst-36) to form condensable olefins with molecular weights that can be targeted for gasoline, jet, and/or diesel fuel applications. The product rich in long-chain olefins (C7+) is finally sent to a fourth reactor that is needed for hydrogenation of the olefins into paraffin fuels. Simulated distillation of the hydrotreated oligomerized liquid product indicates that ~75% of the hydrocarbons present are in the jet-fuel range. Process optimization for the oligomerization step could further improve yield to the jet-fuel range. All of these catalytic steps have been demonstrated in sequence, thus providing proof-of-concept for a new integrated process for the production of drop-in biofuels. This unique and flexible process does not require external hydrogen and also could be applied to non-syngas derived feedstock, such as fermentation products (e.g., ethanol, acetic acid, etc.), other oxygenates, and mixtures thereof containing alcohols, acids, aldehydes and/or esters.

  2. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.

    2012-11-13

    A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

  3. Target-directed catalytic metallodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, J.C.; Cowan, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Most drugs function by binding reversibly to specific biological targets, and therapeutic effects generally require saturation of these targets. One means of decreasing required drug concentrations is incorporation of reactive metal centers that elicit irreversible modification of targets. A common approach has been the design of artificial proteases/nucleases containing metal centers capable of hydrolyzing targeted proteins or nucleic acids. However, these hydrolytic catalysts typically provide relatively low rate constants for target inactivation. Recently, various catalysts were synthesized that use oxidative mechanisms to selectively cleave/inactivate therapeutic targets, including HIV RRE RNA or angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). These oxidative mechanisms, which typically involve reactive oxygen species (ROS), provide access to comparatively high rate constants for target inactivation. Target-binding affinity, co-reactant selectivity, reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, ROS products (metal-associated vs metal-dissociated; hydroxyl vs superoxide), and multiple-turnover redox chemistry were studied for each catalyst, and these parameters were related to the efficiency, selectivity, and mechanism(s) of inactivation/cleavage of the corresponding target for each catalyst. Important factors for future oxidative catalyst development are 1) positioning of catalyst reduction potential and redox reactivity to match the physiological environment of use, 2) maintenance of catalyst stability by use of chelates with either high denticity or other means of stabilization, such as the square planar geometric stabilization of Ni- and Cu-ATCUN complexes, 3) optimal rate of inactivation of targets relative to the rate of generation of diffusible ROS, 4) targeting and linker domains that afford better control of catalyst orientation, and 5) general bio-availability and drug delivery requirements. PMID:23828584

  4. A Modern Understanding of the Traditional and Nontraditional Biological Functions of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Giani, Jorge F.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent peptidase responsible for converting angiotensin I into the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. However, ACE is a relatively nonspecific peptidase that is capable of cleaving a wide range of substrates. Because of this, ACE and its peptide substrates and products affect many physiologic processes, including blood pressure control, hematopoiesis, reproduction, renal development, renal function, and the immune response. The defining feature of ACE is that it is composed of two homologous and independently catalytic domains, the result of an ancient gene duplication, and ACE-like genes are widely distributed in nature. The two ACE catalytic domains contribute to the wide substrate diversity of ACE and, by extension, the physiologic impact of the enzyme. Several studies suggest that the two catalytic domains have different biologic functions. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure of ACE has elucidated some of the structural differences between the two ACE domains. This is important now that ACE domain-specific inhibitors have been synthesized and characterized. Once widely available, these reagents will undoubtedly be powerful tools for probing the physiologic actions of each ACE domain. In turn, this knowledge should allow clinicians to envision new therapies for diseases not currently treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:23257181

  5. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  6. Laser energy converted into electric power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1973-01-01

    Apparatus verifies concepts of converting laser energy directly into electric energy. Mirror, placed in beam and inclined at angle to it, directs small amount of incident radiation to monitor which establishes precise power levels and other beam characteristics. Second mirror and condensing lens direct bulk of laser energy into laser plasmadynamic converter.

  7. Distributed electrical leads for thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Fitzpatrick, Gary O.; Britt, Edward J.

    1979-01-01

    In a thermionic converter, means are provided for coupling an electrical lead to at least one of the electrodes thereof. The means include a bus bar and a plurality of distributed leads coupled to the bus bar each of which penetrates through one electrode and are then coupled to the other electrode of the converter in spaced apart relation.

  8. Power Converters Secure Electronics in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In order to harden power converters for the rigors of space, NASA awarded multiple SBIR contracts to Blacksburg, Virginia-based VPT Inc. The resulting hybrid DC-DC converters have proven valuable in aerospace applications, and as a result the company has generated millions in revenue from the product line and created four high-tech jobs to handle production.

  9. Passive Resonant Bidirectional Converter with Galvanic Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblad, Nathan S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A passive resonant bidirectional converter system that transports energy across a galvanic barrier includes a converter using at least first and second converter sections, each section including a pair of transfer terminals, a center tapped winding; a chopper circuit interconnected between the center tapped winding and one of the transfer terminals; an inductance feed winding interconnected between the other of the transfer terminals and the center tap and a resonant tank circuit including at least the inductance of the center tap winding and the parasitic capacitance of the chopper circuit for operating the converter section at resonance; the center tapped windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a first common winding core and the inductance feed windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a second common winding core for automatically synchronizing the resonant oscillation of the first and second converter sections and transferring energy between the converter sections until the voltage across the pairs of transfer terminals achieves the turns ratio of the center tapped windings.

  10. Pump noise cancellation in parametric wavelength converters.

    PubMed

    Ataie, Vahid; Myslivets, Evgeny; Wiberg, Andereas O J; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-12-10

    A novel technique for pump noise effect mitigation in parametric wavelength converters is introduced. The method relies on digital signal processing and effectively takes advantage of the correlation property between the pump and idler, imposed by the parametric interaction. A 4 dB improvement in receiver performance is demonstrated experimentally for the conventional 10 Gbps OOK signal converted over 20 nm.

  11. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  12. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Patrick H.; Yu, David U. L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  13. Controller for a wave energy converter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Bull, Diana L.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2015-09-22

    A wave energy converter (WEC) is described, the WEC including a power take off (PTO) that converts relative motion of bodies of the WEC into electrical energy. A controller controls operation of the PTO, causing the PTO to act as a motor to widen a wave frequency spectrum that is usable to generate electrical energy.

  14. Implementation of 40Gb/s converter for very short reach optical transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Hu, Qingsheng; Miao, Peng; Ren, Bin; Xu, Duo

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, a practical 40Gb/s 12:16 converter is implemented for VSR parallel optical transmission. The converter realizes the functions of mapping OC-768 frame to/from parallel optics. Using two chips of Altera FPGA and Agilent81250, a complete simplex communication experiment system is built. Detailed design such as frame synchronization, deskew algorithm and converter are presented. In addition, we design a SFI-5 interface verifying board to verify the deskew function. Testing results are also given illustrating that the converter works well.

  15. State space analysis of boost DC/DC converter with voltage mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, K. Latha; Nayak, C. Gurudas; Mandi, Rajashekar P.

    2017-07-01

    The boost converter belongs to the family of indirect energy transfer converters. The inductor stores energy during switch on and the output capacitor deliver power to the load. During switch off condition, the stored inductive energy appears in series with the input source and supply the output. The paper deals with the small signal analysis of dc-dc boost converter. It is used in modeling the closed loop converter parameters. The boost converter produces an undesirable Right-Half Plane Zero (RHPZ) in the small signal analysis due to which the implementation of voltage mode control needs attention. This requires compensating the regulator such that the crossover frequency occurs well below the frequency of the RHP zero. The paper describes modeling of voltage mode control boost converter operating in continuous conduction mode.

  16. Series Connected Converter for Control of Multi-Bus Spacecraft Power Utility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Raymond F. (Inventor); Brush, Andy (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides a power system using series connected regulators. Power from a source, such as a solar array, is processed through the regulators and provided to corresponding buses used to charge a battery and supply loads. The regulators employ a bypass loop around a DC-DC converter. The bypass loop connects a hot input of the converter to a return output, preferably though an inductor. Part of the current from the source passes through the bypass loop to the power bus. The converter bucks or boosts the voltage from the source to maintain the desired voltage at the bus. Thus, only part of the power is processed through the converter. The converter can also be used without the bypass loop to provide isolation. All of the converters can be substantially identical.

  17. Optimum Design of CMOS DC-DC Converter for Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yasushi; Edo, Masaharu; Denta, Toshio; Kawashima, Tetsuya; Ninomiya, Tamotsu

    In recent years, low output power CMOS DC-DC converters which integrate power stage MOSFETs and a PWM controller using CMOS process have been used in many mobile applications. In this paper, we propose the calculation method of CMOS DC-DC converter efficiency and report optimum design of CMOS DC-DC converter based on this method. By this method, converter efficiencies are directly calculated from converter specifications, dimensions of power stage MOSFET and device parameters. Therefore, this method can be used for optimization of CMOS DC-DC converter design, such as dimensions of power stage MOSFET and switching frequency. The efficiency calculated by the proposed method agrees well with the experimental results.

  18. Practical Design Guidelines of qZSI Based Step-Up DC/DC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakis, Janis; Vinnikov, Dmitri; Roasto, Indrek; Jalakas, Tanel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents some design guidelines for a new voltage fed step-up DC/DC isolated converter. The most significant advantage of proposed converter is voltage buck-boost operation on single stage. The most promising application for proposed converter is in the field of distributed power generation e.g. fuel cells or photovoltaic. The most sensitive issues - such as power losses caused by high currents in the input side of converter and high transient overvoltages across the inverter bridge caused by stray inductances were discussed and solved. The proposals and recommendations to overcome these issues are given in the paper. The Selection and design guidelines of converter elements are proposed and explained. The prototype of proposed converter was built and experimentally tested. Some results are presented and evaluated.

  19. Evaluations of uranium-nitride fueled converters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.; Cassell, P. L.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation of two uranium-nitride (UN) fueled converters was initiated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to investigate the effect of fuel on the converter performance while being operated out-of-core. The initial tests were performed with the dynamic data acquisition system that was developed at the Laboratory. Parametric tests of these converters were to obtain: (1) static volt-ampere curves, (2) dynamic volt-ampere curves, and (3) the electrode work functions. The power outputs were 9.3 W/sq cm for the rhenium converter and 3.8 W/sq cm for the tungsten converter at 0.6 V when the emitter surface temperature was 2000 K, according to the static volt-ampere curves.

  20. Qualitative model of a plasma photoelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, N. A.; Flamant, G.

    2009-01-01

    A converter of focused optical radiation into electric current is considered on the basis of the photovoltaic effect in plasmas. The converter model is based on analysis of asymmetric spatial distributions of charge particle number density and ambipolar potential in the photoplasma produced by external optical radiation focused in a heat pipe filled with a mixture of alkali vapor and a heavy inert gas. Energy balance in the plasma photoelectric converter is analyzed. The conditions in which the external radiation energy is effectively absorbed in the converter are indicated. The plasma parameters for which the energy of absorbed optical radiation is mainly spent on sustaining the ambipolar field in the plasma are determined. It is shown that the plasma photoelectric converter makes it possible to attain a high conversion efficiency for focused solar radiation.

  1. A novel power converter for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuvarajan, S.; Yu, Dachuan; Xu, Shanguang

    A simple and economical power conditioner to convert the power available from solar panels into 60 Hz ac voltage is described. The raw dc voltage from the solar panels is converted to a regulated dc voltage using a boost converter and a large capacitor and the dc output is then converted to 60 Hz ac using a bridge inverter. The ratio between the load current and the short-circuit current of a PV panel at maximum power point is nearly constant for different insolation (light) levels and this property is utilized in designing a simple maximum power point tracking (MPPT) controller. The controller includes a novel arrangement for sensing the short-circuit current without disturbing the operation of the PV panel and implementing MPPT. The switching losses in the inverter are reduced by using snubbers. The results obtained on an experimental converter are presented.

  2. Modelling, analyses and design of switching converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, S. M.; Middlebrook, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A state-space averaging method for modelling switching dc-to-dc converters for both continuous and discontinuous conduction mode is developed. In each case the starting point is the unified state-space representation, and the end result is a complete linear circuit model, for each conduction mode, which correctly represents all essential features, namely, the input, output, and transfer properties (static dc as well as dynamic ac small-signal). While the method is generally applicable to any switching converter, it is extensively illustrated for the three common power stages (buck, boost, and buck-boost). The results for these converters are then easily tabulated owing to the fixed equivalent circuit topology of their canonical circuit model. The insights that emerge from the general state-space modelling approach lead to the design of new converter topologies through the study of generic properties of the cascade connection of basic buck and boost converters.

  3. Boost matrix converters in clean energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Ekrem

    This dissertation describes an investigation of novel power electronic converters, based on the ultra-sparse matrix topology and characterized by the minimum number of semiconductor switches. The Z-source, Quasi Z-source, Series Z-source and Switched-inductor Z-source networks were originally proposed for boosting the output voltage of power electronic inverters. These ideas were extended here on three-phase to three-phase and three-phase to single-phase indirect matrix converters. For the three-phase to three-phase matrix converters, the Z-source networks are placed between the three-switch input rectifier stage and the output six-switch inverter stage. A brief shoot-through state produces the voltage boost. An optimal pulse width modulation technique was developed to achieve high boosting capability and minimum switching losses in the converter. For the three-phase to single-phase matrix converters, those networks are placed similarly. For control purposes, a new modulation technique has been developed. As an example application, the proposed converters constitute a viable alternative to the existing solutions in residential wind-energy systems, where a low-voltage variable-speed generator feeds power to the higher-voltage fixed-frequency grid. Comprehensive analytical derivations and simulation results were carried out to investigate the operation of the proposed converters. Performance of the proposed converters was then compared between each other as well as with conventional converters. The operation of the converters was experimentally validated using a laboratory prototype.

  4. Power Management and Distribution System Developed for Thermionic Power Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft solar, bimodal system combines propulsion and power generation into a single integrated system. An Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) provides orbital transfer capabilities, power generation for payloads, and onboard propulsion to the spacecraft. A key benefit of a bimodal system is a greater payload-to-spacecraft mass ratio resulting in lower launch vehicle requirements. Scaling down to smaller launch vehicles increases space access by reducing overall mission cost. NASA has joined efforts with the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to develop enabling technologies for such a system. The NASA/Air Force bimodal concept uses solar concentrators to focus energy into an integrated power plant. This power plant consists of a graphite core that stores thermal energy within a cavity. An array of thermionic converters encircles the graphite cavity and provides electrical energy conversion functions. During the power generation phase of the bimodal system, the thermionic converters are exposed to the heated cavity and convert the thermal energy to electricity. Near-term efforts of the ISUS bimodal program are focused on a ground demonstration of key technologies in order to proceed to a full space flight test. Thermionic power generation is one key technology of the bimodal concept. Thermionic power converters impose unique operating requirements upon a power management and distribution (PMAD) system design. Single thermionic converters supply large currents at very low voltages. Operating voltages can vary over a range of up to 3 to 1 as a function of operating temperature. Most spacecraft loads require regulated 28-volts direct-current (Vdc) power. A combination of series-connected converters and powerprocessing boosters is required to deliver power to the spacecraft's payloads at this level.

  5. Not just angiotensinases: new roles for the angiotensin-converting enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel W; Clarke, Nicola E; Turner, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis. Angiotensin II, the primary bioactive peptide of the RAS, is generated from angiotensin I by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). A homologue of ACE, ACE2, is able to convert angiotensin II to a peptide with opposing effects, angiotensin-(1-7). It is proposed that disturbance of the balance of ACE and ACE2 expression and/or function is important in pathologies in which angiotensin II plays a role. These include cardiovascular and renal disease, lung injury and liver fibrosis. The critical roles of ACE and ACE2 in regulating angiotensin II levels have traditionally focussed attention on their activities as angiotensinases. Recent discoveries, however, have illuminated the roles of these enzymes and of the ACE2 homologue, collectrin, in intracellular trafficking and signalling. This paper reviews the key literature regarding both the catalytic and non-catalytic roles of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene family.

  6. Catalytic ammonia decomposition over industrial-waste-supported Ru catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pei Fang Ng; Li Li; Shaobin Wang; Zhonghua Zhu; Gaoqing Lu; Zifeng Yan

    2007-05-15

    Industrial solid wastes (fly ash and red mud, a by-product of the aluminium industry) have been employed as supports for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Physical and chemical treatments on red mud were conducted and these modified supports were also used for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Those Ru catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as N2 adsorption, H{sub 2} adsorption, XRD, XPS, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and were then tested for catalytic ammonia decomposition to hydrogen. It was found that red-mud-supported Ru catalyst exhibits higher ammonia conversion and hydrogen production than fly-ash-supported catalyst. Heat and chemical treatments of the red mud greatly improve the catalytic activity. Moreover, a combination of acid and heat treatments produces the highest catalytic conversion of ammonia. 35 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Experimental studies and computer simulation of the control of energy transfer using inductor-converter bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1984-03-01

    An inductor-converter bridge (ICB) is a solid state DC-AC-DC power converter system for bidirectional, controllable, energy transfer between two coils. The ICB is suitable for supplying large pulsed power to such magnets as the superconducting equilibrium field coil of the proposed tokamak power reactors from another superconducting energy storage coil.

  8. A Methodology to Teach Advanced A/D Converters, Combining Digital Signal Processing and Microelectronics Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintans, C.; Colmenar, A.; Castro, M.; Moure, M. J.; Mandado, E.

    2010-01-01

    ADCs (analog-to-digital converters), especially Pipeline and Sigma-Delta converters, are designed using complex architectures in order to increase their sampling rate and/or resolution. Consequently, the learning of ADC devices also encompasses complex concepts such as multistage synchronization, latency, oversampling, modulation, noise shaping,…

  9. A Methodology to Teach Advanced A/D Converters, Combining Digital Signal Processing and Microelectronics Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintans, C.; Colmenar, A.; Castro, M.; Moure, M. J.; Mandado, E.

    2010-01-01

    ADCs (analog-to-digital converters), especially Pipeline and Sigma-Delta converters, are designed using complex architectures in order to increase their sampling rate and/or resolution. Consequently, the learning of ADC devices also encompasses complex concepts such as multistage synchronization, latency, oversampling, modulation, noise shaping,…

  10. Transient Numerical Modeling of Catalytic Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a transient model of catalytic combustion suitable for isolated channels and monolith reactors. The model is a lumped two-phase (gas and solid) model where the gas phase is quasi-steady relative to the transient solid. Axial diffusion is neglected in the gas phase; lateral diffusion, however, is accounted for using transfer coefficients. The solid phase includes axial heat conduction and external heat loss due to convection and radiation. The combustion process utilizes detailed gas and surface reaction models. The gas-phase model becomes a system of stiff ordinary differential equations while the solid phase reduces, after discretization, into a system of stiff ordinary differential-algebraic equations. The time evolution of the system came from alternating integrations of the quasi-steady gas and transient solid. This work outlines the numerical model and presents some sensitivity studies on important parameters including internal transfer coefficients, catalytic surface site density, and external heat-loss (if applicable). The model is compared to two experiments using CO fuel: (1) steady-state conversion through an isothermal platinum (Pt) tube and (2) transient propagation of a catalytic reaction inside a small Pt tube. The model requires internal mass-transfer resistance to match the experiments at lower residence times. Under mass-transport limited conditions, the model reasonably predicted exit conversion using global mass-transfer coefficients. Near light-off, the model results did not match the experiment precisely even after adjustment of mass-transfer coefficients. Agreement improved for the first case after adjusting the surface kinetics such that the net rate of CO adsorption increased compared to O2. The CO / O2 surface mechanism came from a sub-set of reactions in a popular CH4 / O2 mechanism. For the second case, predictions improved for lean conditions with increased external heat loss or adjustment of the kinetics as in the

  11. Catalytic Domain Architecture of Metzincin Metalloproteases*

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteases cleave proteins and peptides, and deregulation of their function leads to pathology. An understanding of their structure and mechanisms of action is necessary to the development of strategies for their regulation. Among metallopeptidases are the metzincins, which are mostly multidomain proteins with ∼130–260-residue globular catalytic domains showing a common core architecture characterized by a long zinc-binding consensus motif, HEXXHXXGXX(H/D), and a methionine-containing Met-turn. Metzincins participate in unspecific protein degradation such as digestion of intake proteins and tissue development, maintenance, and remodeling, but they are also involved in highly specific cleavage events to activate or inactivate themselves or other (pro)enzymes and bioactive peptides. Metzincins are subdivided into families, and seven such families have been analyzed at the structural level: the astacins, ADAMs/adamalysins/reprolysins, serralysins, matrix metalloproteinases, snapalysins, leishmanolysins, and pappalysins. These families are reviewed from a structural point of view. PMID:19201757

  12. Make the most of catalytic hydrogenations

    SciTech Connect

    Landert, J.P.; Scubla, T.

    1995-03-01

    Liquid-phase catalytic hydrogenation is one of the most useful and versatile reactions available for organic synthesis. Because it is environmentally clean, it has replaced other reduction processes, such as the Bechamp reaction, and zinc and sulfide reductions. Moreover, the economics are favorable, provided that raw materials free of catalyst poisons are used. The hydrogenation reaction is very selective with appropriate catalysts and can often be carried out without a solvent. Applications include reduction of unsaturated carbon compounds to saturated derivatives (for example, in vegetable-oil processing), carbonyl compounds to alcohols (such as sorbitol), and nitrocompounds to amines. the reactions are usually run in batch reactors to rapidly reach complete conversion and allow quick change-over of products. The paper describes the basics of hydrogenation; steering clear of process hazards; scale-up and optimization; and system design in practice.

  13. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  14. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  15. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  16. Catalytic σ-Bond Metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznichenko, Alexander L.; Hultzsch, Kai C.

    This account summarizes information on recently reported applications of organo-rare-earth metal complexes in various catalytic transformations of small molecules. The σ-bond metathesis at d0rare-earth metal centers plays a pivotal role in carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond forming processes. Relevant mechanistic details are discussed and the focus of the review lies in practical applications of organo-rare-earth metal complexes.

  17. Catalytically active nanomaterials: a promising candidate for artificial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Youhui; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-04-15

    Natural enzymes, exquisite biocatalysts mediating every biological process in living organisms, are able to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions up to 10(19) times for specific substrates and reactions. However, the practical application of enzymes is often hampered by their intrinsic drawbacks, such as low operational stability, sensitivity of catalytic activity to environmental conditions, and high costs in preparation and purification. Therefore, the discovery and development of artificial enzymes is highly desired. Recently, the merging of nanotechnology with biology has ignited extensive research efforts for designing functional nanomaterials that exhibit various properties intrinsic to enzymes. As a promising candidate for artificial enzymes, catalytically active nanomaterials (nanozymes) show several advantages over natural enzymes, such as controlled synthesis in low cost, tunability in catalytic activities, as well as high stability against stringent conditions. In this Account, we focus on our recent progress in exploring and constructing such nanoparticulate artificial enzymes, including graphene oxide, graphene-hemin nanocomposites, carbon nanotubes, carbon nanodots, mesoporous silica-encapsulated gold nanoparticles, gold nanoclusters, and nanoceria. According to their structural characteristics, these enzyme mimics are categorized into three classes: carbon-, metal-, and metal-oxide-based nanomaterials. We aim to highlight the important role of catalytic nanomaterials in the fields of biomimetics. First, we provide a practical introduction to the identification of these nanozymes, the source of the enzyme-like activities, and the enhancement of activities via rational design and engineering. Then we briefly describe new or enhanced applications of certain nanozymes in biomedical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and therapeutics. For instance, we have successfully used these biomimetic catalysts as colorimetric probes for the detection of

  18. Cutoff lensing: predicting catalytic sites in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Aubailly, Simon; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-10-08

    Predicting function-related amino acids in proteins with unknown function or unknown allosteric binding sites in drug-targeted proteins is a task of paramount importance in molecular biomedicine. In this paper we introduce a simple, light and computationally inexpensive structure-based method to identify catalytic sites in enzymes. Our method, termed cutoff lensing, is a general procedure consisting in letting the cutoff used to build an elastic network model increase to large values. A validation of our method against a large database of annotated enzymes shows that optimal values of the cutoff exist such that three different structure-based indicators allow one to recover a maximum of the known catalytic sites. Interestingly, we find that the larger the structures the greater the predictive power afforded by our method. Possible ways to combine the three indicators into a single figure of merit and into a specific sequential analysis are suggested and discussed with reference to the classic case of HIV-protease. Our method could be used as a complement to other sequence- and/or structure-based methods to narrow the results of large-scale screenings.

  19. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  20. Cutoff lensing: predicting catalytic sites in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubailly, Simon; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Predicting function-related amino acids in proteins with unknown function or unknown allosteric binding sites in drug-targeted proteins is a task of paramount importance in molecular biomedicine. In this paper we introduce a simple, light and computationally inexpensive structure-based method to identify catalytic sites in enzymes. Our method, termed cutoff lensing, is a general procedure consisting in letting the cutoff used to build an elastic network model increase to large values. A validation of our method against a large database of annotated enzymes shows that optimal values of the cutoff exist such that three different structure-based indicators allow one to recover a maximum of the known catalytic sites. Interestingly, we find that the larger the structures the greater the predictive power afforded by our method. Possible ways to combine the three indicators into a single figure of merit and into a specific sequential analysis are suggested and discussed with reference to the classic case of HIV-protease. Our method could be used as a complement to other sequence- and/or structure-based methods to narrow the results of large-scale screenings.

  1. Catalytic bromine recovery from HBr waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, P.F.; Beatty, R.D.; Mahajan, S.

    1993-12-31

    Waste HBr is formed during the bromination of many organic molecules, such as flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural chemicals. For over 50 years attempts to recover the bromine from waste HBr by catalytic oxidation have been unsuccessful due to low catalyst activity and stability. The discovery of a new high-activity catalysts with excellent long-term stability and life capable of high HBr conversion below 300{degrees}C has made catalytic oxidation of waste HBr commercially feasible. The oxidation of anhydrous HBr using oxygen is highly exothermic, giving an adiabatic temperature rise of 2000{degrees}C. Use of 48 wt% HBr in the oxidation reduces the adiabatic temperature rise to only 300{degrees}C. A multitubular heat exchanger type of reactor can then be used to manage the heat. A 5,000 kg/yr pilot plant was built to verify the performance of the catalyst, the suitability of the reactor materials of construction, and the multibular reactor concept. The pilot unit has a single full-scale reactor tube 4 m long and 2.54 cm in diameter with a hot oil jacket for heat management. Excellent catalyst stability was observed during a 600 h catalyst-life test. HBr conversion of 99% was maintained throughout the run, and over 360 kg of bromine was produced. The temperature at a localized hot spot near the reactor inlet was only 15-20{degrees}C above the reactor inlet temperature, indicating efficient heat management.

  2. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  3. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of heterogeneous catalytic ozonation and biological process.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Jia, Shengyong; Hou, Baolin; Zhao, Qian

    2014-08-01

    Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater (CGW) was investigated employing heterogeneous catalytic ozonation integrated with anoxic moving bed biofilm reactor (ANMBBR) and biological aerated filter (BAF) process. The results indicated that catalytic ozonation with the prepared catalyst (i.e. MnOx/SBAC, sewage sludge was converted into sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) which loaded manganese oxides) significantly enhanced performance of pollutants removal by generated hydroxyl radicals. The effluent of catalytic ozonation process was more biodegradable and less toxic than that in ozonation alone. Meanwhile, ANMBBR-BAF showed efficient capacity of pollutants removal in treatment of the effluent of catalytic ozonation at a shorter reaction time, allowing the discharge limits to be met. Therefore, the integrated process with efficient, economical and sustainable advantages was suitable for advanced treatment of real biologically pretreated CGW. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Converter design techniques and applications. [transistorized voltage converters for aerospace systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.

    1974-01-01

    The design of transistorized voltage converters of the series, shunt, and switching types is developed and explained. The shunt converter has the smallest size, lowest weight, and lowest parts count. Regulation and stability are very good but efficiency is poor. The series converter is somewhat larger in size, heavier, uses more parts, and has an order of magnitude (10 to 1) decrease in regulation performance in comparison with the shunt converter. The switching converter tends to be a compromise with increased size, weight, and circuit complexity to gain in efficiency and regulation over a series converter. A switching converter will usually exhibit ringing in the output filter for some types of loads so it has only fair stability performance.-

  5. Programmable Analog-To-Digital Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, Edward H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    High-speed analog-to-digital converter with programmable voltage steps that can be changed during operation. Allows concentration of converter resolution over specific portion of waveform. Particularly useful in digitizing wind-shear radar and lidar return signals, in digital oscilloscopes, and other applications in which desirable to increase digital resolution over specific area of waveform while accepting lower resolution over rest of waveform. Effective increase in dynamic range achieved without increase in number of analog-to-digital converter bits. Enabling faster analog-to-digital conversion.

  6. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  7. Electrical power converter method and system employing multiple output converters

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2007-05-01

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  8. Converting mixed waste into durable glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ruller, J.A.; Greenman, W.G.

    1994-12-31

    Radioactive, hazardous and mixed contamination of soils and sediments within the Weapons Complex is widespread and estimated to total billions of cubic meters. The cost to remediate this contamination, as well as the contaminated surface and groundwaters, buildings and facilities has been estimated to be up to $300 billion over the next 30 years and up to $30 billion over the next five years. Progress towards cleaning the Weapons Complex depends upon the development of new remediation technologies. The remediation of contaminated soils and sludges ultimately rests on the immobilization of radioactive and hazardous contaminants into a solid wasteform that is leach resistant to aqueous corrosion and other forms of degradation (such as thermal cycling and biological attack) and is highly durable. In addition, the process to immobilize the contaminants should concentrate the contaminants into the smallest volume to reduce disposal/storage and transportation costs. GTS Duratek and the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America have successfully demonstrated that several different waste streams can be converted into a durable, leach-resistant glass that will also lower waste volumes. In this paper, the authors discuss these successes for soils and sludges from three separate US Department of Energy sites. The sites are: the K-25 facility; the Weldon Spring site; and Fernald, Ohio.

  9. Microbial fuel cell energy harvesting using synchronous flyback converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaraj, Muhannad; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Park, Jae-Do

    2014-02-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) use biodegradable substrates, such as wastewater and marine sediments to generate electrical energy. To harvest more energy from an MFC, power electronic converters have recently been used to replace resistors or charge pumps, because they have superior controllability on MFC's operating point and higher efficiency in energy storage for different applications. Conventional diode-based energy harvesters suffer from low efficiency because of the energy losses through the diode. Replacing the diode with a MOSFET can reduce the conduction loss, but it requires an isolated gate signal to control the floating secondary MOSFET, which makes the control circuitry complex. This study presents a new MFC energy harvesting regime using a synchronous flyback converter, which implements a transformer-based harvester with much simpler configuration and improves harvesting efficiency by 37.6% compared to a diode based boost converter, from 33.5% to 46.1%. The proposed harvester was able to store 2.27 J in the output capacitor out of 4.91 J generated energy from the MFC, while the boost converter can capture 1.67 J from 4.95 J.

  10. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Products

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2009-10-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to biomass fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. The project was a cooperative research and development agreement among UOP LLC, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis undertaken at PNNL. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of catalyst formulations were tested over a range of operating parameters including temperature, pressure, and flow-rate with bio-oil derived from several different biomass feedstocks. Effects of liquid hourly space velocity and catalyst bed temperature were assessed. Details of the process results were presented including mass and elemental balances. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition, chemical functional type determined by mass spectrometry, and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to bio-oil.

  11. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil from Pine Sawdust

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Solantausta, Yrjo

    2012-06-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to the fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) from softwood biomass in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of operating parameters including temperature, and flow-rate were tested with bio-oil derived from pine wood as recovered and pyrolyzed in the pilot pyrolyzer of Metso Power in Tampere, Finland. Effects of time on stream and catalyst activity were assessed. Details of the process results were presented included product yields and hydrogen consumption. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an initial understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to the Finnish pine bio-oil.

  12. A Markovian engine for a biological energy transducer: the catalytic wheel.

    PubMed

    Tsong, Tian Yow; Chang, Cheng-Hung

    2007-04-01

    The molecular machines in biological cells are made of proteins, DNAs and other classes of molecules. The structures of these molecules are characteristically "soft", highly flexible, and yet their interactions with other molecules or ions are specific and selective. This chapter discusses a prevalent form, the catalytic wheel, or the energy transducer of cells, examines its mechanism of action, and extracts from it a set of simple but general rules for understanding the energetics of the biomolecular devices. These rules should also benefit design of manmade nanometer scale machines such as rotary motors or track-guided linear transporters. We will focus on an electric work that, by matching system dynamics and then enhancing the conformational fluctuation of one or several driver proteins, converts stochastic input of energy into rotation or locomotion of a receptor protein. The spatial (or barrier) and temporal symmetry breakings required for selected driver/receptor combinations are examined. This electric ratchet consists of a core engine that follows the Markovian dynamic, alleviates difficulties encountered in rigid mechanical model, and tailors to the soft-matter characteristics of the biomolecules.

  13. Catalytic and mechanical cycles in F-ATP synthases: Fourth in the Cycles Review Series

    PubMed Central

    Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Meier, T

    2006-01-01

    Cycles have a profound role in cellular life at all levels of organization. Well-known cycles in cell metabolism include the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycle, in which a specific carrier substrate undergoes a sequence of chemical transformations and is regenerated at the end. Other examples include the interconversions of cofactors, such as NADH or ATP, which are present in the cell in limiting amounts and have to be recycled effectively for metabolism to continue. Every living cell performs a rapid turnover of ATP to ADP to fulfil various energetic demands and effectively regenerates the ATP from ADP in an energy-consuming process. The turnover of the ATP cycle is impressive; a human uses about its body weight in ATP per day. Enzymes perform catalytic reaction cycles in which they undergo several chemical and physical transformations before they are converted back to their original states. The ubiquitous F1Fo ATP synthase is of particular interest not only because of its biological importance, but also owing to its unique rotational mechanism. Here, we give an overview of the membrane-embedded Fo sector, particularly with respect to the recent crystal structure of the c ring from Ilyobacter tartaricus, and summarize current hypotheses for the mechanism by which rotation of the c ring is generated. PMID:16607397

  14. Waveguide mode converter and method using same

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1990-01-01

    A waveguide mode converter converts electromagnetic power being transmitted in a TE.sub.0n or a TM.sub.0n mode, where n is an integer, to an HE.sub.11 mode. The conversion process occurs in a single stage without requiring the power to pass through any intermediate modes. The converter comprises a length of circular corrugated waveguide formed in a multiperiod periodic curve. The period of the curve is selected to couple the desired modes and decouple undesired modes. The corrugation depth is selected to control the phase propagation constant, or wavenumbers, of the input and output modes, thereby preventing coherent coupling to competing modes. In one embodiment, both the period and amplitude of the curve may be selectively adjusted, thereby allowing the converter to be tuned to maximize the conversion efficiency.

  15. Damping assembly for a torque converter clutch

    SciTech Connect

    Dull, D.C.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes a turbine damped torque converter and clutch. It comprises: a pressure plate; a torque converter turbine; a torque converter impeller; means including a control chamber for the pressure plate means for controlling the apply and release of the clutch for engaging the clutch with the impeller; a torque converter output shaft; a planetary gear arrangement including an input gear drivingly connected with the pressure plate, a reaction gear drivingly connected with the turbine, an output member drivingly connected with the output shaft and pinion gear means meshing with the input gear and the reaction gear for drivingly interconnecting the turbine and the pressure plate at a drive ratio of the turbine to the pressure plate of less than 1:1; and one-way drive means disposed between the turbine and the output shaft for preventing the turbine from overrunning the output shaft.

  16. Thermionic Converters Based on Nanostructured Carbon Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeck, Franz A. M.; Wang, Yunyu; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Thermionic energy converters are based on electron emission through thermal excitation and collection where the thermal energy is directly converted into electrical power. Conventional thermionic energy converters based on emission from planar metal emitters have been limited due to space charge. This paper presents a novel approach to thermionic energy conversion by focusing on nanostructured carbon materials, sulfur doped nanocrystalline diamond and carbon nanotube films as emitters. These materials exhibit intrinsic field enhancement which can be exploited in lowering the emission barrier, i.e. the effective work function. Moreover, emission from these materials is described in terms of emission sites as a result of a non-uniform spatial distribution of the field enhancement factor. This phenomenon can prove advantageous in a converter configuration to mitigate space charge effects by reducing the transit time of electrons in the gap due to an accelerated charge carrier transport.

  17. Rotorcraft convertible engines for the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Two rotorcraft studies were executed. The goal was to identify attractive techniques for implementing convertible powerplants for the ABC, Folded Tilt Rotor, and X-wing type high speed, high-L/D rotorcraft; to determine the DOC and fuel savings benefits achieved thereby; and to define research required to bring these powerplants into existence by the 1990's. These studies are reviewed herein and the different methods of approach are pointed out as well as the key findings. Fan shaft engines using variable inlet guide vanes or torque converters, and turboprop powerplants appear attractive. Savings in DOC and fuel consumption of over 15 percent are predicted in some cases as a result of convertible engine use rather than using separate engines for the thrust and the shaft functions. Areas of required research are fan performance (including noise), integrated engine/rotorcraft control, torque converters, turbine design, airflow for rotorcraft torque control, bleed for lift flow, and transmissions and clutches.

  18. Converting Garbage to Gold: Recycling Our Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, William U.

    1984-01-01

    Recycling conserves energy, fights pollution and inflation, creates jobs, and improves the outlook for the future of materials. But converting a throwaway society to recycling will depend on finding good markets for waste paper and scrap metals. (RM)

  19. Third order digital-to-analog converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, W. P.

    1972-01-01

    System, consisting of sample and hold digital-to-analog converter, clock circuit, sample delay circuit, initial condition circuit and interpolator circuit, improves accuracy of reconstructed analog signal without increasing sample rates.

  20. Intercell ohmic contacts for high efficiency multijunction solar converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehr, S. W.; Miller, D. L.; Harris, J. S., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The monolithic multijunction converter is an attractive approach to achieving solar/electric conversion with greater than 30% efficiency. A major technical challenge in the development of such devices is the requirement for low resistance, optically transparent intercell contacts between adjacent junctions. These contacts should transmit, without significant loss, the spectral fraction of the incident sunlight which is not absorbed and converted in the overlying junction materials. Their contact resistances must be low enough to prevent significant I to the 2d power R loss at the designed current density levels. They should also exhibit adequate thermal conductivity to prevent device overheating when subjected to the designed illumination level. Recent encouraging results for the development of such contacts are presented.