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Sample records for catalytic converters suche

  1. Wood stove having catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, A.C.

    1982-12-14

    A wood burning stove is formed with double front and rear side walls of heat conductive metal spaced apart by heat conductive spacer fins and providing air passageways by which room air is heated by conduction from the walls which are heated by the burning of wood deposited on a firebox floor supported in heat conducting relationship with the inner side walls. A catalytic converter is disposed over the fire area in the upper portion of the stove, and is arranged to receive preheated fresh secondary air which mixes with hot, incompletely combusted compounds from the fire and, in the presence of the catalyst, induces a secondary combustion of the substances. This mixture is channeled into a heat extraction chamber where the secondary combustion is completed and the resultant heat is transferred to the metal body of the stove. An exhaust passageway is provided for releasing the products of complete combustion into the atmosphere.

  2. Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

  3. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  4. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  5. Durability of ceramic catalytic converters for motorcycles

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.P.; Scott, P.L.; Hwang, H.S.; Mooney, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Motorcycle exhaust emission standards throughout the world are becoming more stringent. Emission control systems utilizing the catalytic converter are already in production in Taiwan for 2-stroke engine motorcycles. Catalysts designed for 2-stroke engines encounter a more severe exhaust environment than do those designed for 4-stroke engines. The two aspects of increased severity are the higher temperatures and higher stresses due to engine vibrations. Precious metal catalysts have been designed to operate in the thermal environment of 2-stroke engines and such catalysts have been successfully applied to both metal and ceramic substrates. However, until now, only the metal substrate catalysts have been utilized in motorcycle application. Ceramic based catalysts have not been considered because the mounting material that holds the catalyst substrate in place did not have enough durability to withstand the thermal/vibrational forces encountered in 2-stroke engine exhaust. Ceramic substrates have many advantages such as superior high temperature strength, which is especially important for the 2-stroke engine application, flexibility in cell shape and density, and lower cost. To realize these benefits, efforts were made in this study to develop better mounting systems. The results of this effort indicate that the durability requirements of 2-stroke engine can be met with the ceramic catalyst substrates if the improved mounting designs reported in the present study are employed.

  6. Retrofit catalytic converter for wood-burning stoves

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The major purpose of this project was to design, fabricate, test, and evaluate a retrofit catalytic converter for woodburning stoves. In the interim between our date of application March 5, 1981 and the beginning of the grant period December 1, 1981, several such devices became commercially available. Therefore, we decided to modify the purpose and direction of our project. In summary, we designed and constructed a calorimeter room in a building located on the campus of Northern Kentucky University. We equipped this room with a woodburning stove and a metal chimney extending through the roof. We designed and constructed the appropriate instrumentation for monitoring the heat output of the stove. We observed and recorded the operating characteristics of this stove over a period of several days. We then equipped the stove with a barometric damper and repeated the experiment. We are now in the process of equipping the stove with a catalytic converter. Thus the major emphasis of the project currently is to test and evaluate several commercial retrofit devices which are purported to reduce creosote and/or increase the efficiency of a woodburning stove.

  7. Ozone and heavy metals from automobile catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Ballach, H J

    1997-01-01

    The introduction of the 3-way catalytic converter is presently being acclaimed by different sources in Germany as the solution to the ozone problem. This hypothesis is viewed with scepticism: studies conducted in the USA, where the 3-way catalytic converter was introduced as early as 1975, show that the ozone problem has not been resolved by any means in that country. Moreover, the employment of the catalytic converter is associated with the emission of various elements occurring otherwise at extremely low background concentrations, e.g.the elements in the platinum group (Pt, Pd and Rh). A brief review of the literature reveals, for example, that platinum exhibited an unexpectedly high rate of accumulation in upper soil layers near highways in Germany within a few years of the introduction of catalytic converters. The focus of this paper is on impact research. My own studies have shown that water-soluble Pt 4. accumulates at a high rate in poplar roots. A six-week exposure of poplar cuttings to 34.8 ppb Pt 4+ results in disturbances affecting the water balance of the plants and, in conjunction with this, typical symptoms of moderate water stress. Cerium (Ce), another element released by catalytic converters, also displays a high degree of accumulation in plant roots. Water-soluble Pt4+ accumulates to an even greater degree in soil, giving rise to the following series arranged in order of decreasing affinity to platinum: soil > fine roots > coarse roots. In long-term experiments, even the metallic platinum contained in the active layer of catalytic converters accumulated in plant roots; the resulting distribution among soil, fine roots and coarse roots was comparable to that of water-soluble platinum. Possible uptake mechanisms are discussed. The first results of this study indicate that platinum apparently belongs to the elements with a strong affinity to humic matter, a fact which could possibly explain its especially heavy accumulation in upper soil layers.

  8. Converting sugars to sugar alcohols by aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of converting sugars to their corresponding sugar alcohols by catalytic hydrogenation in the aqueous phase. It has been found that surprisingly superior results can be obtained by utilizing a relatively low temperature (less than 120.degree. C.), selected hydrogenation conditions, and a hydrothermally stable catalyst. These results include excellent sugar conversion to the desired sugar alcohol, in combination with long life under hydrothermal conditions.

  9. Reducing cold-start emissions by catalytic converter thermal management

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, S D; Potter, T F; Keyser, M A; Brady, M J; Michaels, K F

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum insulation and phase-change thermal storage have been used to enhance the heat retention of a prototype catalytic converter. Storing heat in the converter between trips allows exhaust gases to be converted more quickly, significantly reducing cold-start emissions. Using a small metal hydride, the thermal conductance of the vacuum insulation can be varied continuously between 0.49 and 27 W/m{sup 2}K (R-12 to R-0.2 insulation) to prevent overheating of the catalyst. A prototype was installed in a Dodge Neon with a 2.0-liter engine. Following a standard preconditioning and a 23-hour cold soak, an FTP (Federal Test Procedure) emissions test was performed. Although exhaust temperatures during the preconditioning were not hot enough to melt the phase-change material, the vacuum insulation performed well, resulting in a converter temperature of 146{degrees}C after the 23-hour cold soak at 27{degrees}C. Compared to the same converter at ambient conditions, overall emissions of CO and HC were reduced by 52 % and 29 %, to 0.27 and 0.037 g/mile, respectively. The maximum converter temperature during the FTP cycle was 720{degrees}C. This limited testing was performed with a nearly-fresh palladium-only catalyst, but demonstrates the potential of this vacuum insulation approach for emissions reduction and thermal control. Further testing is ongoing. An initial assessment of several production issues is made, including high-volume fabrication challenges, durability, and cost.

  10. Thermal analysis and testing of a vacuum insulated catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, S D; Potter, T F; Keyser, M A; Benson, D K

    1994-11-01

    Based on a recent US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) study, about 95% of all trips start after a cold-soak period of 16 hours or less. By preserving the heat in the catalyst between trips, exhaust gases could be processed without warm-up delay and without the usual cold-start emissions. Vacuum insulation and phase-change thermal storage have been incorporated into a catalytic converter design to enhance its heat-retention time. Laboratory testing of a bench-scale prototype showed that a ``light off`` temperature (above 350 C) could be maintained during a 10-hour cold soak. Design improvements currently being tested should increase this heat-retention time to more than 16 hours. The thermal conductance of the vacuum insulation will be made continuously variable to prevent overheating and excessive thermal cycling. This approach to thermal management may be more durable and less costly than quick-heat methods using electric or fuel-fired preheat catalysts.

  11. Numerical and experimental characterizations of automotive catalytic converter internal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, M.-C.; Lee, T.; Kim, J.-Y.; Cheng, C.-Y.; Li, P.; Chui, G.

    1992-07-01

    The three-dimensional non-reacting flow field inside a typical dual-monolith automotive catalytic converter subject to different flow and structural conditions is studied numerically and experimentally. In the numerical analysis, the monolith brick resistance is formulated by using the pressure gradient of a fully developed laminar duct-flow and is corrected for the entrance effect. This correlation is found to agree with experimental pressure drop data and is introduced as an additional source term into the governing nondimensional momentum equation within the monolith brick. Simulation results show that the level of gas flow maldistribution in the monolith depends on the inlet flow Reynolds number, the brick resistance, and the inlet pipe length and its bending angles. The flow distribution is found to be more uniform inside a monolith brick with a lower inlet flow Reynolds number, a larger brick resistance, a shorter inlet pipe, and a straight inlet pipe instead of a bent one. Point-velocity measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry and smoke-flow visualization techniques at selected flow sections are also conducted to verify the simulation results.

  12. Potential for recovery of cerium contained in automotive catalytic converters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic converters (CATCONs) are required by Federal law to be installed in nearly all gasoline- and diesel-fueled onroad vehicles used in the United States. About 85 percent of the light-duty vehicles and trucks manufactured worldwide are equipped with CATCONs. Portions of the CATCONs (called monoliths) are recycled for their platinum-group metal (PGM) content and for the value of the stainless steel they contain. The cerium contained in the monoliths, however, is disposed of along with the slag produced from the recycling process. Although there is some smelter capacity in the United States to treat the monoliths in order to recover the PGMs, a great percentage of monoliths is exported to Europe and South Africa for recycling, and a lesser amount is exported to Japan. There is presently no commercial-scale capacity in place domestically to recover cerium from the monoliths. Recycling of cerium or cerium compounds from the monoliths could help ensure against possible global supply shortages by increasing the amount that is available in the supply chain as well as the number and geographic distribution of the suppliers. It could also reduce the amount of material that goes into landfills. Also, the additional supply could lower the price of the commodity. This report analyzes how much cerium oxide is contained in CATCONs and how much could be recovered from used CATCONs.

  13. Bioaccessibility of platinum group elements in automotive catalytic converter particulates.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Price, Simon

    2008-12-15

    The bioaccessibilities of the platinum group elements (PGE): Rh, Pd, and Pt; and the catalyzator poison, Pb, have been determined in particles derived from milled automotive catalytic converters using a physiologically based extraction test (PBET) that simulates, sequentially, the chemical conditions encountered in the human stomach and intestine. PGE accessibility, relative to total metal concentration, was generally less than a few percent, but increased in the stomach with decreasing pH (from 4 to 1) and/or increasing chloride concentration, and with decreasing particle concentration. In most cases, bioaccessibility increased from the acidic stomach to the neutral, carbonate-rich intestine. Bioaccessibility of Pb displayed similar pH and particle concentration dependencies to PGE in the stomach, but this metal exhibited significantly greater mobilization (up to 80%) overall and a reduction in accessibility from the stomach to intestine. Reaction kinetics of PGE dissolution in the stomach at pH 2.5 were modeled using a combined surface reaction-diffusion controlled mechanism with rate constants of 0.068, 0.031, and 0.015 (microg L(-1))(-1) h(-1) for Rh, Pd, and Pt, respectively. For Pb, however, mobilization proceeded via a different mechanism whose time-dependence was fitted with an empirical, logarithmic equation. Overall, PGE bioaccessibility appeared to be controlled by dissolution rates of metallic nanoparticles in the stomach, and solubility and kinetic constraints on inorganic species (chlorides, hydroxychlorides, and carbanatochlorides) and undefined organic complexes formed in the simulated gastrointestinal tract. Further studies are required to elucidate any effects engendered by the long-term oral exposure of small quantities of these species. PMID:19174929

  14. Converting Light Energy to Chemical Energy: A New Catalytic Approach for Sustainable Environmental Remediation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a synthetic approach to form cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures and demonstrate their use as photocatalytic materials for tandem catalysis. Pd nanoparticles were deposited onto Cu2O cubes, and their tandem catalytic reactivity was studied via the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls. The Pd content of the materials was gradually increased to examine its influence on particle morphology and catalytic performance. Materials were prepared at different Pd amounts and demonstrated a range of tandem catalytic reactivity. H2 was generated via photocatalytic proton reduction initiated by Cu2O, followed by Pd-catalyzed dehalogenation using in situ generated H2. The results indicate that material morphology and composition and substrate steric effects play important roles in controlling the overall reaction rate. Additionally, analysis of the postreacted materials revealed that a small number of the cubes had become hollow during the photodechlorination reaction. Such findings offer important insights regarding photocatalytic active sites and mechanisms, providing a pathway toward converting light-based energy to chemical energy for sustainable catalytic reactions not typically driven via light. PMID:27656687

  15. Converting Light Energy to Chemical Energy: A New Catalytic Approach for Sustainable Environmental Remediation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a synthetic approach to form cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures and demonstrate their use as photocatalytic materials for tandem catalysis. Pd nanoparticles were deposited onto Cu2O cubes, and their tandem catalytic reactivity was studied via the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls. The Pd content of the materials was gradually increased to examine its influence on particle morphology and catalytic performance. Materials were prepared at different Pd amounts and demonstrated a range of tandem catalytic reactivity. H2 was generated via photocatalytic proton reduction initiated by Cu2O, followed by Pd-catalyzed dehalogenation using in situ generated H2. The results indicate that material morphology and composition and substrate steric effects play important roles in controlling the overall reaction rate. Additionally, analysis of the postreacted materials revealed that a small number of the cubes had become hollow during the photodechlorination reaction. Such findings offer important insights regarding photocatalytic active sites and mechanisms, providing a pathway toward converting light-based energy to chemical energy for sustainable catalytic reactions not typically driven via light.

  16. Demonstration of a Catalytic Converter Using a Lawn Mower Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion is an important tool in environmental-remediation strategies and source removal of pollutants. Because a catalyst is regenerated, the chemistry can be extremely effective for conversion of undesirable pollutant species to less harmful products in situations where the pollutants have accumulated or are being continuously…

  17. Pre-converted nitric oxide gas in catalytic reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Mark C.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.

    1999-01-01

    A two-stage catalyst comprises an oxidative first stage and a reductive second stage. The first stage is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2. The second stage serves to convert NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N2, CO2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber. An oxidizing first catalyst converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and includes platinum/alumina, e.g., Pt/Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalyst. A flow of hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from a pipe into a second chamber. For example, propene can be used as a source of hydrocarbons. The NO.sub.2 from the first catalyst mixes with the hydrocarbons in the second chamber. The mixture proceeds to a second reduction catalyst that converts NO.sub.2 to N2, CO2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a gamma-alumina .gamma.-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the second catalyst.

  18. Pre-converted nitric oxide gas in catalytic reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1999-04-06

    A two-stage catalyst comprises an oxidative first stage and a reductive second stage. The first stage is intended to convert NO to NO{sub 2} in the presence of O{sub 2}. The second stage serves to convert NO{sub 2} to environmentally benign gases that include N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O. By preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} in the first stage, the efficiency of the second stage for NO{sub x} reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber. An oxidizing first catalyst converts NO to NO{sub 2} in the presence of O{sub 2} and includes platinum/alumina, e.g., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. A flow of hydrocarbons (C{sub x}H{sub y}) is input from a pipe into a second chamber. For example, propene can be used as a source of hydrocarbons. The NO{sub 2} from the first catalyst mixes with the hydrocarbons in the second chamber. The mixture proceeds to a second reduction catalyst that converts NO{sub 2} to N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O, and includes a {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} are simultaneously reduced while passing through the second catalyst. 9 figs.

  19. Platinum emission rate of automobiles with catalytic converters: Comparison and assessment of results from various approaches.

    PubMed

    Helmers, E

    1997-01-01

    Inconsistent data presently available on the platinum emission rate of cars in Germany equipped with catalytic converters are evaluated. Automobile sources of Pt other than autocatalysts are quantified and found to be 1-6 orders of magnitudes lower than the Pt emissions attributed to catalytic converters. A transfer of emission rates derived from test stand experiments to more realistic street conditions reaches 0.8 microg Pt/km. In this manner, data from test stand experiments and from environmental investigations meet in the range of 0.5-0.8 microg Pt/km.

  20. Study on the thermal deactivation of motorcycle catalytic converters by laboratory aging tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chi; Chen, Lu-Yen; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jeng, Fu-Tien

    2010-03-01

    Catalytic converters are used to curb exhaust pollution from motorcycles in Taiwan. A number of factors, including the length of time the converter is used for and driving conditions, affect the catalysts' properties during periods of use. The goal of this study is to resolve the thermal deactivation mechanism of motorcycle catalytic converters. Fresh catalysts were treated under different aging conditions by laboratory-scale aging tests to simulate the operation conditions of motorcycle catalytic converters. The aged catalysts were characterized by analytical techniques in order to provide information for investigating deactivation phenomena. The time-dependent data of specific surface areas were subsequently used to construct kinetics of sintering at the specific temperature. According to the analytical results of the catalysts' properties, the increase in aging temperature causes an increase in pore size of the catalysts and a decrease in the specific surface area. The aged catalysts all exhibited lower performances than the fresh ones. The reduction in catalytic activity is consistent with the reduction in the loss of specific surface area. The finding of catalytic properties' dependence on temperature is consistent with the thermally activated theory. In contrast, the effect of the aging time on the specific surface area was only significant during the initial few hours. The high correlation between specific surface areas measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and predicted by the constructed model verifies that the prediction models can predict the sintering rate reasonably under the aging conditions discussed in this study. As compared to automobile catalytic converters, the differences of structures and aging conditions are made less obvious by the deactivation phenomena of motorcycles.

  1. QM/MM investigation of the catalytic mechanism of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xia; Zhang, Chunchun; Xu, Dingguo

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II and degrades bradykinin and other vasoactive peptides. ACE inhibitors are used to treat diseases such as hypertension and heart failure. It is thus highly desirable to understand the catalytic mechanism of ACE, as this should facilitate the design of more powerful and selective ACE inhibitors. ACE exhibits two different active domains, the C-domain and the N-domain. In this work, we systematically investigated the inhibitor- and substrate-binding patterns in the N-domain of human ACE using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical approach. The hydrolysis of hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL) as catalyzed by the N-domain of human somatic ACE was explored, and the effects of chloride ion on the overall reaction were also investigated. Two models, one with and one without a chloride ion at the first binding position, were then designed to examine the chloride dependence of inhibitor-substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Our calculations indicate that the hydrolysis reaction follows a stepwise general base/general acid catalysis path. The estimated mean free energy barrier height in the two models is about 15.6 kcal/mol, which agrees very well with the experimentally estimated value of 15.8 kcal/mol. Our simulations thus suggest that the N-domain is in a mixed form during ACE-catalyzed hydrolysis, with the single-chloride-ion and the double-chloride-ion forms existing simultaneously. Graphical Abstract Superposition of ACE C- and N- domains. PMID:27184002

  2. Catalytic converter with fluid injector for catalyst-free enclosure of catalyst bed

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, S.P.S.

    1984-09-25

    A fluid injection lozenge comprises two tubes supporting a perforate member forming a cage enclosing the space between the tubes. Each tube has a series of perforations along its length so that a fluid can be injected, through the tube, into the enclosed space. The lozenges are of use in catalytic converters of either the axial or radial flow design. In the case of a radial flow converter, a plurality of tubes are provided, preferably connected in pairs by the perforate members, to form a squirrel cage structure, disposed in the catalyst bed.

  3. Emission reduction from a diesel engine fueled by pine oil biofuel using SCR and catalytic converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Yang, W. M.; Saravanan, C. G.; Lee, P. S.; Chua, K. J. E.; Chou, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we propose pine oil biofuel, a renewable fuel obtained from the resins of pine tree, as a potential substitute fuel for a diesel engine. Pine oil is endowed with enhanced physical and thermal properties such as lower viscosity and boiling point, which enhances the atomization and fuel/air mixing process. However, the lower cetane number of the pine oil hinders its direct use in diesel engine and hence, it is blended in suitable proportions with diesel so that the ignition assistance could be provided by higher cetane diesel. Since lower cetane fuels are prone to more NOX formation, SCR (selective catalyst reduction), using urea as reducing agent, along with a CC (catalytic converter) has been implemented in the exhaust pipe. From the experimental study, the BTE (brake thermal efficiency) was observed to be increased as the composition of pine oil increases in the blend, with B50 (50% pine oil and 50% diesel) showing 7.5% increase over diesel at full load condition. The major emissions such as smoke, CO, HC and NOX were reduced by 70.1%, 67.5%, 58.6% and 15.2%, respectively, than diesel. Further, the average emissions of B50 with SCR and CC assembly were observed to be reduced, signifying the positive impact of pine oil biofuel on atmospheric environment. In the combustion characteristics front, peak heat release rate and maximum in-cylinder pressure were observed to be higher with longer ignition delay.

  4. Impact of Hong Kong's Voluntary Catalytic Converter Replacement Programme on Roadside Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Guo, H.; Louie, P. K. K.; Luk, C.; Lyu, X.; Meinardi, S.; Yam, Y. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    As part of its ongoing policies to improve roadside air quality, in 2013 the Hong Kong government launched an incentive programme to replace catalytic converters and oxygen sensors in taxis and light buses mainly fueled by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The majority of replacements occurred from October 2013 to April 2014, with 75% of eligible vehicles participating in the programme, or 16,472 vehicles. Based on taxi exhaust measurements at a Hong Kong vehicle testing facility, the concentrations of n-butane, propane and i-butane (the primary components of LPG) decreased by 97% following the replacements. To determine the impact of the programme on roadside air quality, long-term measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed before, during and after the replacement programme, mainly at a busy roadside location in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. A clear decrease in the levels of major pollutants associated with LPG vehicle exhaust was observed at the roadside. For example, average (± 1 standard deviation) n-butane levels from October to April decreased from 13.0 ± 3.6 and 13.9 ± 2.6 ppbv in the two years preceding the programme, to 9.2 ± 2.9 ppbv during the programme, to 6.2 ± 1.7 ppbv the year after the programme. By contrast, compounds such as i-pentane that are not strongly associated with LPG or with LPG exhaust remained steady, averaging 0.90 ± 0.34, 1.01 ± 0.31, 0.93 ± 0.37, and 0.91 ± 0.42 ppbv from October to April of 2011/12, 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15, respectively. Impacts of the programme on roadside levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) will also be discussed. Because many taxis are high mileage vehicles that travel several hundred kilometers daily, their catalytic converters need to be replaced approximately every 18 months. Therefore ongoing vehicle maintenance will be required in order to preserve the gains made from this initial subsidy programme.

  5. Catalytic converters for exhaust emission control of commercial equipment powered by internal combustion engines.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, J G

    1975-01-01

    The development of PTX, monolithic catalytic exhaust purifiers, is outlined, and their first use for exhaust emissions control of commercial equipment is described. The main use of PTX converters is on forklift trucks. The purification achievable with PTX-equipped fork-lift trucks under various operational conditions is discussed, and examples from the field are given. During more than ten years of operation, no adverse health effects have been reported, and PTX-equipped internal combustion engines appear safe for use in confined areas. PMID:50933

  6. Catalytic hydrosolvation process converts coal to low-sulfur liquid fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the catalytic hydrosolvation process for converting coal to low-sulfur fuel oil is described in this paper. Coal impregnated with catalyst was slurried with oil, and the mixture was hydrogenated at a temperature of 475 C, and 30 min residence time under 3600 psi pressure. A ton of coal yielded 3.5 bbl of fuel oil containing 0.2% sulfur, with naphtha and C1-C4 hydrocarbon gases as byproducts. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process indicated potential for further development.

  7. Evaluation of on-board diagnosis methods for three-way catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Tsinoglou, Dimitrios N; Koltsakis, Grigorios C; Samaras, Zissis C

    2002-12-01

    On-board diagnosis (OBD) aims at detecting malfunctions of emission-related components of road vehicles. It is required by legislation in United States and the European Union, as it is considered to be beneficial for the reduction of vehicle-related air pollution. On-board diagnosis of the catalytic converter is a challenging task, as it relies on indirect assessments of catalyst activity. Several methods have been proposed for catalyst diagnosis, presenting a varying degree of correlation between the quantities used as OBD indexes and the actual tailpipe emissions. This paper evaluates two methods, with the support of mathematical modeling; in the first one, which is commonly used by vehicle manufacturers, malfunction detection relies on the oxygen storage properties of the catalyst, while in the second, detection relies on the heat released by the chemical reactions in the catalyst. Both are found to be sufficient for the diagnosis of catalytic converters for current legislation requirements. However, the thermal method presents higher sensitivity to low levels of catalyst deactivation and could therefore be more suitable for diagnosis of future, ultra-low-emitting vehicles.

  8. Occurrence of acid rain in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Summer 1981. The role of the catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.W.; Ghane, H.

    1982-01-01

    Between June and October 1981, acid rain falling in Baton Rouge, LA was studied. The acidity of the rain ranged for pH 3.9 to pH 5.8. Preliminary data showed that rain associated with thermal cumulo nimbus tended to be more acidic, but rain associated with active cold fronts were less acid. This may relate to dispersion and dilution of the acid aerosols by the cold front. It is proposed that exhaust from automobiles fitted with catalytic converters is a substantial contributor to the acid rain problem, and that their net value to the abatement of pollution must be questioned, particularly in regions of the country where smog is not a problem. (JMT)

  9. Folding in solution of the C-catalytic protein fragment of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Sotirios-Spyridon M; Leondiadis, Leondios; Pairas, George; Manessi-Zoupa, Evy; Spyroulias, Georgios A; Cordopatis, Paul

    2009-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key molecule of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system which is responsible for the control of blood pressure. For over 30 years it has become the target for fighting off hypertension. Many inhibitors of the enzyme have been synthesized and used widely in medicine despite the lack of ACE structure. The last 5 years the crystal structure of ACE separate domains has been revealed, but in order to understand how the enzyme works it is necessary to study its structure in solution. We present here the cloning, overexpression in Escherichia coli, purification and structural study of the Ala(959) to Ser(1066) region (ACE_C) that corresponds to the C-catalytic domain of human somatic angiotensin-I-converting enzyme. ACE_C was purified under denatured conditions and the yield was 6 mg/l of culture. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy indicated that 1,1,1-trifluoroethanol (TFE) is necessary for the correct folding of the protein fragment. The described procedure can be used for the production of an isotopically labelled ACE(959-1066) protein fragment in order to study its structure in solution by NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Integrated catalytic process to directly convert furfural to levulinate ester with high selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingfeng; Li, Fengbo; Huang, Zhijun; Lu, Tao; Yuan, Yin; Yuan, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Levulinic acid is an important platform molecule from biomass-based renewable resources. A sustainable manufacturing process for this chemical and its derivatives is the enabling factor to harness the renewable resource. An integrated catalytic process to directly convert furfural to levulinate ester was developed based on a bifunctional catalyst of Pt nanoparticles supported on a ZrNb binary phosphate solid acid. The hydrogenation of furfural and the following alcoholysis of furfuryl alcohol were performed over this catalyst in a one-pot conversion model. Mesoporous ZrNb binary phosphate was synthesized by a sol-gel method and had a high surface area of 170.1 m(2) g(-1) and a large average pore size of around 8.0 nm. Pt nanoparticles remained in a monodisperse state on the support, and the reaction over Pt/ZrNbPO4 (Pt loading: 2.0 wt%; Zr/Nb, 1:1) gave a very high selectivity to levulinate derivatives (91% in total). The sustainability of this conversion was greatly improved by the process intensification based on the new catalyst, mild reaction conditions, cost abatement in separation and purification, and utilization of green reagents and solvents.

  11. Integrated catalytic process to directly convert furfural to levulinate ester with high selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingfeng; Li, Fengbo; Huang, Zhijun; Lu, Tao; Yuan, Yin; Yuan, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Levulinic acid is an important platform molecule from biomass-based renewable resources. A sustainable manufacturing process for this chemical and its derivatives is the enabling factor to harness the renewable resource. An integrated catalytic process to directly convert furfural to levulinate ester was developed based on a bifunctional catalyst of Pt nanoparticles supported on a ZrNb binary phosphate solid acid. The hydrogenation of furfural and the following alcoholysis of furfuryl alcohol were performed over this catalyst in a one-pot conversion model. Mesoporous ZrNb binary phosphate was synthesized by a sol-gel method and had a high surface area of 170.1 m(2) g(-1) and a large average pore size of around 8.0 nm. Pt nanoparticles remained in a monodisperse state on the support, and the reaction over Pt/ZrNbPO4 (Pt loading: 2.0 wt%; Zr/Nb, 1:1) gave a very high selectivity to levulinate derivatives (91% in total). The sustainability of this conversion was greatly improved by the process intensification based on the new catalyst, mild reaction conditions, cost abatement in separation and purification, and utilization of green reagents and solvents. PMID:24194497

  12. Effect of the Sequence of the Thermoelectric Generator and the Three-Way Catalytic Converter on Exhaust Gas Conversion Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chuqi; Tong, Naiqiang; Xu, Yuman; Chen, Shan; Liu, Xun

    2013-07-01

    The potential for thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery in vehicles has increased with recent improvements in the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The problem with using thermoelectric generators for vehicle applications is whether the device is compatible with the original vehicle exhaust system, which determines the quality of the exhaust gas treatment and the realization of energy conservation and emission reduction. Based on ANSYS CFX simulation analysis of the impact of two positional relationships between the TEG and three-way catalytic converter in the exhaust system on the working efficiency of both elements, it is concluded that the layout with the front three-way catalytic converter has an advantage over the other layout mode under current conditions. New ideas for an improvement program are proposed to provide the basis for further research.

  13. Research on Integration of an Automotive Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Generator and a Three-Way Catalytic Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y. D.; Chen, Y. L.; Chen, S.; Xianyu, W. D.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-06-01

    A key research topic related to thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive applications is to improve their compatibility with the original vehicle exhaust system, which determines the quality of the exhaust gas treatment and the realization of energy conservation and emission reduction. A new TEG integrated with a three-way catalytic converter (CTEG) by reshaping the converter as the heat exchanger is proposed. A heat-flux coupling simulation model of the integrated TEG is established at the light-off stage of the original three-way catalytic converter (TWC). Temperature distribution maps of the integrated heat exchanger, thermoelectric modules, and cooling-water tank are obtained to present the process of energy flow among the parts of the CTEG. Based on the simulation results, the output power of the CTEG is calculated by a mathematical model. A minimum output power of 31.93 W can be obtained by conversion when the TWC starts working at steady conditions. Theoretically, this case study demonstrates the great potential for use of CTEGs in vehicles.

  14. Apparatus for controlling the flow of exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger and a catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, K.; Omata, K.

    1984-03-20

    An apparatus for controlling the flow of the exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine including a turbocharger, a catalytic converter in an exhaust duct, and a throttle valve in an intake duct, wherein the apparatus comprises a bypass passage bypassing a turbine of the turbocharger, a waste gate valve which controls the amount of the exhaust gas passing therethrough, an actuator for actuating the waste gate valve which has first and second pressure chambers separated from one another, and a switching valve which selectively connects the second pressure chamber to the atmosphere or to the intake vacuum area, the first pressure chamber being connected to the delivery pressure area of the turbocharger by means of a conduit which is connected to an atmospheric pressure area via a restriction.

  15. New data on the mobility of Pt emitted from catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Fliegel, Daniel; Berner, Zsolt; Eckhardt, Detlef; Stüben, Doris

    2004-05-01

    The mobility and speciation of Pt was investigated in dust deposited in highway tunnels and in gully sediments. For this, a sequential extraction technique was used in combination with a microwave digestion procedure, followed by detection of Pt with high resolution ICP-MS. A digestion procedure using HNO(3)/HCl/H(2)O(2) was developed and its efficiency tested for environmental materials. Total Pt contents ranged from approximately 100 to 300 microg/kg. The high share of chemically mobile Pt in the tunnel dust (up to about 40%) indicates that Pt is predominantly emitted in a mobile form from the converter. The absence of a mobile fraction in the gully sediment is explained by the elution of Pt by run-off. Except for the mobile and easily mobilised fractions none of the other fractions of the sequential extraction contains Pt, neither in the dust samples nor in the gully sediment.

  16. Short communication: Is consumption of a cheese rich in angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibiting peptides, such as the Norwegian cheese Gamalost, associated with reduced blood pressure?

    PubMed

    Nilsen, R; Pripp, A H; Høstmark, A T; Haug, A; Skeie, S

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibiting peptides derived from dairy products may decrease blood pressure. These peptides have been identified in many cheeses, and Gamalost, a traditional Norwegian cheese, is particularly rich in these peptides. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine whether frequency of Gamalost intake was associated with blood pressure in a Norwegian population sample. Blood pressure and other clinical measurements, including the factors of metabolic syndrome, were obtained from 168 participants (56% female, mean age = 51 yr) who completed a questionnaire about dietary habits and other health-related factors. Mean Gamalost intake was 2 servings per week. The prevalence of hypertension was 23.8% in the population, with mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures of 128 and 78 mmHg, respectively. Intake of Gamalost was inversely associated with systolic blood pressure. Each increase in frequency unit of Gamalost intake corresponded to a reduction in systolic blood pressure of 0.72 mmHg, after controlling for sex, age, education, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking status, and dairy food intake. Results from this study indicate that consumption of Gamalost (or other foods rich in ACE-inhibiting peptides) may reduce blood pressure.

  17. Catalytic properties of recombinant dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase from Escherichia coli: a comparative study with angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carlos Eduardo L; Magliarelli, Helena de Fátima; Paschoalin, Thaysa; Nchinda, Aloysius T; Lima, Jackson C; Juliano, Maria A; Paiva, Paulo B; Sturrock, Edward D; Travassos, Luiz R; Carmona, Adriana K

    2009-09-01

    Dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase from Escherichia coli (EcDcp) is a zinc metallopeptidase with catalytic properties closely resembling those of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). However, EcDcp and ACE are classified in different enzyme families (M3 and M2, respectively) due to differences in their primary sequences. We cloned and expressed EcDcp and studied in detail the enzyme's S(3) to S(1)' substrate specificity using positional-scanning synthetic combinatorial (PS-SC) libraries of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides. These peptides contain ortho-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) and 2,4-dinitrophenyl (Dnp) as donor/acceptor pair. In addition, using FRET substrates developed for ACE [Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH, Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH and Abz-LFK(Dnp)-OH] as well as natural ACE substrates (angiotensin I, bradykinin, and Ac-SDKP-OH), we show that EcDcp has catalytic properties very similar to human testis ACE. EcDcp inhibition studies were performed with the ACE inhibitors captopril (K(i)=3 nM) and lisinopril (K(i)=4.4 microM) and with two C-domain-selective ACE inhibitors, 5-S-5-benzamido-4-oxo-6-phenylhexanoyl-L-tryptophan (kAW; K(i)=22.0 microM) and lisinopril-Trp (K(i)=0.8 nM). Molecular modeling was used to provide the basis for the differences found in the inhibitors potency. The phylogenetic relationship of EcDcp and related enzymes belonging to the M3 and M2 families was also investigated and the results corroborate the distinct origins of EcDcp and ACE.

  18. Roadside Accumulation of Pt, Pd, Rh and Other Trace Elements From Automobiles: Catalytic Converter Attrition and Platinum-Group Element Mobility in the Roadside Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, J. C.; Dahlheimer, S. R.; Neal, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Elemental abundances of Pt, Pd and Rh have been documented across the industrialized world in roadside environments due to attrition of automotive catalytic converters (Zereini and Alt, 2000, Anthropogenic PGE Emissions, Springer, 308pp; Ely et al., 2001, EnvSci&Tech, 35:3816-3822; Whiteley and Murray, 2003, SciTotEnv, in press). In our ongoing study, the highest reported roadside Pt abundance 1.8 ppm has been found immediately adjacent to the road at a field site in South Bend, IN, USA. Furthermore, initial studies show positive correlations of Pt, Pd and Rh with some trace elements (Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb), which has been confirmed by further analysis for these and other elements (Ce, Cr). It has been demonstrated that elements such as Ce are present in catalytic converters at concentrations of 100's ppm to 3-wt.%. These elements are also being attrited with Pt, Pd and Rh and aerially transported and deposited. Our field site was established next to US-933 adjacent to the Notre Dame campus. Areas were cleared of the top 2-4 cm of soil (removing surficial Pt, Pd and Rh) at 1, 5, 10 and 50 meters from the roadside. Within 3 months the 1-meter site contained 67% of the initial Rh and Pt concentrations and 100% of the initial Pd concentration. The sites at 5, 10 and 50 meters showed similar results, in some cases exceeding the initial concentrations. After 6 months the concentrations of Pt, Pd and Rh were all within error of the initial concentrations, indicating steady state abundances had probably been reached. Grass samples from each site showed that washed vs. unwashed samples were within error of each other, and there may be a slight enrichment (approx. 1 ppb) in the grasses of Pd and Pt, but this enrichment was independent of distance from the road. The steady-state situation suggests that the PGEs are being removed from the immediate roadside environment, which requires that the metals are being oxidized and/or complexed in such a way to facilitate transport. The

  19. Effect of support on a catalytic converter for removing CO and HC emissions from a two-stroke motorcycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chen, Y.W.

    1997-12-01

    The effect of support on the noble metal catalysts for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation was investigated. The reactions were performed under the stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient conditions. Under the stoichiometric point, the activities of the powder catalysts for CO and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} oxidation are in the order Pt/K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}, that is, the same as the order of basicity of these catalysts. Under an oxygen-deficient condition, Pt supported on an acidic support, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}, exhibits the higher C{sub 3}H{sub 6} conversion and the higher activity for the steam re-forming reaction. In contrast, Pt supported on a basic support, K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, exhibits the higher CO conversion and the higher activity for the water-gas shift reaction. The order of activity of the powder catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction is the same as the order of basicity of these catalysts. On the other hand, the testing results of the monolithic PtRh-containing catalysts by the simulative gases and the ECE-40 mode driving cycle also reveal the same trend as that of the Pt powder catalysts. Furthermore, the addition of K{sub 2}O on PtRh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} not only increases the basicity of the catalyst but also significantly reduces the CO emission under the ECE-40 mode driving cycle test. Therefore, K{sub 2}O could be a promising additive to a catalytic converter of a two-stroke motorcycle since it can significantly enhance CO conversion.

  20. N- vs. C-Domain Selectivity of Catalytic Inactivation of Human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates were tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of the M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and orientation factors (double-filter effect). PMID:24228790

  1. Oxidative leaching process with cupric ion in hydrochloric acid media for recovery of Pd and Rh from spent catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C A; Paiva, A P; Oliveira, P C; Costa, M C; da Costa, A M Rosa

    2014-08-15

    The recycling of platinum-group metals from wastes such as autocatalytic converters is getting growing attention due to the scarcity of these precious metals and the market pressure originated by increase of demand in current and emerging applications. Hydrometallurgical treatment of such wastes is an alternative way to the most usual pyrometallurgical processes based on smelter operations. This paper focuses on the development of a leaching process using cupric chloride as oxidising agent, in HCl media, for recovery of palladium and rhodium from a spent catalyst. The chloride media allows the adequate conditions for oxidising and solubilising the metals, as demonstrated by equilibrium calculations based on thermodynamic data. The experimental study of the leaching process revealed that Pd solubilisation is clearly easier than that of Rh. The factors temperature, time, and HCl and Cu(2+) concentrations were significant regarding Pd and Rh leaching, the latter requiring higher factor values to achieve the same results. Leaching yields of 95% Pd and 86% Rh were achieved under optimised conditions (T = 80 °C, t = 4h, [HCl] = 6M, [Cu(2+)] = 0.3M). PMID:24953939

  2. Oxidative leaching process with cupric ion in hydrochloric acid media for recovery of Pd and Rh from spent catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C A; Paiva, A P; Oliveira, P C; Costa, M C; da Costa, A M Rosa

    2014-08-15

    The recycling of platinum-group metals from wastes such as autocatalytic converters is getting growing attention due to the scarcity of these precious metals and the market pressure originated by increase of demand in current and emerging applications. Hydrometallurgical treatment of such wastes is an alternative way to the most usual pyrometallurgical processes based on smelter operations. This paper focuses on the development of a leaching process using cupric chloride as oxidising agent, in HCl media, for recovery of palladium and rhodium from a spent catalyst. The chloride media allows the adequate conditions for oxidising and solubilising the metals, as demonstrated by equilibrium calculations based on thermodynamic data. The experimental study of the leaching process revealed that Pd solubilisation is clearly easier than that of Rh. The factors temperature, time, and HCl and Cu(2+) concentrations were significant regarding Pd and Rh leaching, the latter requiring higher factor values to achieve the same results. Leaching yields of 95% Pd and 86% Rh were achieved under optimised conditions (T = 80 °C, t = 4h, [HCl] = 6M, [Cu(2+)] = 0.3M).

  3. Effects of alloying elements and foil dimensions on the life time of thin Fe-Cr-Al foils in catalytic converters

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.; Kolb-Telieps, A.; Heubner, U.; Brede, M.

    1998-12-31

    Several parameters influencing the life cycle of Fe-20Cr-Al were investigated. For industrially used chemical compositions, the foil thickness of 50 microns is critical for applications in catalytic converters, since exponential scale growth due to surface aluminum depletion has to be considered. Oxidation resistance can also be increased by alloying with yttrium and hafnium as reactive elements. These are superior to those of cerium mischmetal or yttrium alone. Overdoping can cause very high oxidation rates and severe internal oxidation and has to be avoided. Furthermore increasing the aluminum content is helpful as well. Since this may lead to embrittlement of conventionally produced materials, a new production technique was developed, which is based on aluminizing of Fe-Cr at lower thickness. This techniques results in higher aluminium contents in near surface regions which are quite sufficient for increasing oxidation resistance.

  4. Evaluation of an EMITEC resistively heated metal monolith catalytic converter on two M100 neat methanol-fueled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Gregory K.; Schaefer, Ronald M.

    1992-12-01

    The report describes the evaluation of a resistively heated catalyst system on two different methanol fueled vehicles. The EMITEC catalyst consisted of a compact resistively heated metal monolith in front of a larger conventional main converter. The EMITEC catalyst was evaluated on two neat methanol-fueled vehicles, a 1981 Volkswagen Rabbit and a 1988 Toyota Corolla. Emission testing was conducted over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) CVS-75 test cycle. The emissions of primary interest were cold start methanol (unburned fuel), carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde.

  5. Aromatic residues in the catalytic center of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens affect processivity, enzyme activity, and biomass converting efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zakariassen, Henrik; Aam, Berit Bjugan; Horn, Svein J; Vårum, Kjell M; Sørlie, Morten; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2009-04-17

    The processive Serratia marcescens chitinases A (ChiA) and B (ChiB) are thought to degrade chitin in the opposite directions. A recent study of ChiB suggested that processivity is governed by aromatic residues in the +1 and +2 (aglycon) subsites close to the catalytic center. To further investigate the roles of aromatic residues in processivity and to gain insight into the structural basis of directionality, we have mutated Trp(167), Trp(275), and Phe(396) in the -3, +1, and +2 subsites of ChiA, respectively, and characterized the hydrolytic activities of the mutants toward beta-chitin and the soluble chitin-derivative chitosan. Although the W275A and F396A mutants showed only modest reductions in processivity, it was almost abolished by the W167A mutation. Thus, although aglycon subsites seem to steer processivity in ChiB, a glycon (-3) subsite seems to be adapted to do so in ChiA, in line with the notion that the two enzymes have different directionalities. Remarkably, whereas all three single mutants and the W167A/W275A double mutant showed reduced efficiency toward chitin, they showed up to 20-fold higher activities toward chitosan. These results show that the processive mechanism is essential for an efficient conversion of crystalline substrates but comes at a large cost in terms of intrinsic enzyme speed. This needs to be taken into account when devising enzymatic strategies for biomass turnover.

  6. Catalytic oxidation of waste materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Aqueous stream of human waste is mixed with soluble ruthenium salts and is introduced into reactor at temperature where ruthenium black catalyst forms on internal surfaces of reactor. This provides catalytically active surface to convert oxidizable wastes into breakdown products such as water and carbon dioxide.

  7. Effect of K{sub 2}O on a Pd-containing catalytic converter for removing CO and HC emissions from a two-stroke motorcycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chen, Y.W.

    1998-04-01

    Noble metals (Pt, Pd, and Rh) supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}O/CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared and characterized with respect to surface area, pore volume, and temperature-programmed desorption of CO{sub 2}. The effects of K{sub 2}O on the noble-metal catalysts for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation were investigated. The reactions were carried out under the stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient conditions. Under the stoichiometric point, the Pd-containing catalysts exhibit higher activity than the Pt-containing catalysts for both CO and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} oxidation. Moreover, Pd/K{sub 2}O/CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most active catalyst among the powder catalysts in this study. Under the oxygen-deficient conditions and in the presence of water, the CO conversions on Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pd/CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are significantly lower than those on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt/CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, respectively. In contrast, the Pd-containing catalysts exhibit higher C{sub 3}H{sub 6} conversion than the Pt-containing catalysts. However, the CO conversions on the Pd-containing catalysts can be promoted by the addition of K{sub 2}O. On the other hand, the test results of the monolithic catalysts revealed that the CO conversion on PdRh/K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--CeO{sub 2} is quite close to that on PtRh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} under the simulative gases and the ECE-40 mode driving cycle test. PtRh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} is the typical composition of catalytic converters for two-stroke motorcycles. It infers that PdRh/K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} is a promising catalytic converter for a two-stroke motorcycle.

  8. Human Lung Angiotensin Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Friedland, Joan; Silverstein, Emanuel; Drooker, Martin; Setton, Charlotte

    1981-01-01

    To enable its immunohistologic localization, angiotensin converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1) from human lung was solubilized by trypsinization and purified ∼2,660-fold to apparent homogeneity from a washed lung particulate fraction. The specific activity of pure enzyme was estimated to be 117 μmol/min per mg protein with the substrate hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine. Consistent with previously described lung enzyme studies, catalytic activity was strongly inhibited by EDTA, O-phenanthroline, SQ 20,881, and SQ 14,225 and increased by CoCl2. SQ 20,881 was a somewhat more potent inhibitor than SQ 14,225, unlike rabbit lung enzyme. The Michaelis constant (Km) with hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine was 1.6 mM. The molecular weight was estimated at 150,000 from sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single polypeptide chain estimated at 130,000 daltons. Rabbit antibody to human lung enzyme was prepared by parenteral administration of pure angiotensin-converting enzyme in Freund's adjuvant. Rabbit antibody to human lung angiotensin-converting enzyme appeared to crossreact weakly with the rabbit enzyme and strongly inhibited the catalytic activity of the enzymes from human serum, lung, and lymph node. The specificity of the rabbit antibody and purity of the final human lung enzyme preparation was suggested by the single precipitin lines obtained by radial double immunodiffusion, and by the coincidence of enzyme catalytic activity and immunoreactivity on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with both relatively pure and highly impure enzymes. Generally applicable sensitive analysis of acrylamide gels for immunoreactivity (and subsequently for any other activity) by use of intact gel slices in radial double immunodiffusion was devised. Human lung enzyme was very tightly bound to and catalytically active on anti-human enzyme antibody covalently bound to Sepharose 4B, and could not be readily dissociated without

  9. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  10. Converting Transaldolase into Aldolase through Swapping of the Multifunctional Acid-Base Catalyst: Common and Divergent Catalytic Principles in F6P Aldolase and Transaldolase.

    PubMed

    Sautner, Viktor; Friedrich, Mascha Miriam; Lehwess-Litzmann, Anja; Tittmann, Kai

    2015-07-28

    Transaldolase (TAL) and fructose-6-phosphate aldolase (FSA) both belong to the class I aldolase family and share a high degree of structural similarity and sequence identity. The molecular basis of the different reaction specificities (transferase vs aldolase) has remained enigmatic. A notable difference between the active sites is the presence of either a TAL-specific Glu (Gln in FSA) or a FSA-specific Tyr (Phe in TAL). Both residues seem to have analoguous multifunctional catalytic roles but are positioned at different faces of the substrate locale. We have engineered a TAL double variant (Glu to Gln and Phe to Tyr) with an active site resembling that of FSA. This variant indeed exhibits aldolase activity as its main activity with a catalytic efficiency even larger than that of authentic FSA, while TAL activity is greatly impaired. Structural analysis of this variant in complex with the dihydroxyacetone Schiff base formed upon substrate cleavage identifies the introduced Tyr (genuine in FSA) to catalyze protonation of the central carbanion-enamine intermediate as a key determinant of the aldolase reaction. Our studies pinpoint that the Glu in TAL and the Tyr in FSA, although located at different positions at the active site, similarly act as bona fide acid-base catalysts in numerous catalytic steps, including substrate binding, dehydration of the carbinolamine, and substrate cleavage. We propose that the different spatial positions of the multifunctional Glu in TAL and of the corresponding multifunctional Tyr in FSA relative to the substrate locale are critically controlling reaction specificity through either unfavorable (TAL) or favorable (FSA) geometry of proton transfer onto the common carbanion-enamine intermediate. The presence of both potential acid-base residues, Glu and Tyr, in the active site of TAL has deleterious effects on substrate binding and cleavage, most likely resulting from a differently organized H-bonding network. Large-scale motions of the

  11. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  12. Design of Catalytically Amplified Sensors for Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Makhlynets, Olga V.; Korendovych, Ivan V.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytically amplified sensors link an allosteric analyte binding site with a reactive site to catalytically convert substrate into colored or fluorescent product that can be easily measured. Such an arrangement greatly improves a sensor’s detection limit as illustrated by successful application of ELISA-based approaches. The ability to engineer synthetic catalytic sites into non-enzymatic proteins expands the repertoire of analytes as well as readout reactions. Here we review recent examples of small molecule sensors based on allosterically controlled enzymes and organometallic catalysts. The focus of this paper is on biocompatible, switchable enzymes regulated by small molecules to track analytes both in vivo and in the environment. PMID:24970222

  13. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, R.H.; Bartley, B.H.

    1984-05-01

    A fluid catalytic cracking process is disclosed for sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks. Sulfur contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst in the reactor is converted to sulfur oxides in the regenerator and removed from regenerator off-gases by incorporating a composite of alumina and bismuth oxides in a particulate cracking catalyst. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air in the regenerator are captured by the alumina-bismuth oxides composite and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  14. Nano sponge Mn₂O ₃ as a new adsorbent for the preconcentration of Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions in sea water, wastewater, rock, street sediment and catalytic converter samples prior to FAAS determinations.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Emre; Tokalıoğlu, Serife; Sahan, Halil; Patat, Saban

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a nano sponge Mn2O3 adsorbent was synthesized and was used for the first time. Various parameters affecting the recovery values of Pd(II) and Rh(III) were examined. The tolerance limits (≥ 90 %) for both Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions were found to be 75,000 mg L(-1) Na(I), 75,000 mg L(-1) K(I), 50,000 mg L(-1) Mg(II) and 50,000 mg L(-1) Ca(II). A 30s contact time was enough for both adsorption and elution. A preconcentration factor of 100 was obtained by using 100mg of the nano sponge Mn2O3. The reusability of the adsorbent was 120 times. Adsorption capacities for Pd(II) and Rh(III) were found to be 42 and 6.2 mg g(-1), respectively. The detection limits were 1.0 µg L(-1) for Pd(II) and 0.37 µg L(-1) for Rh(III) and the relative standard deviations (RSD, %) were found to be ≤ 2.5%. The method was validated by analyzing the standard reference material, SRM 2556 (Used Auto Catalyst Pellets) and spiked real samples. The optimized method was applied for the preconcentration of Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions in water (sea water and wastewater), rock, street sediment and catalytic converter samples.

  15. Interleaved power converter

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Lizhi

    2007-11-13

    A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

  16. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  17. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  18. XTL Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Spurgeon, Steven R

    2015-10-07

    "XTL Converter" is a short Python script for electron microscopy simulation. The program takes an input crystal file in the VESTA *.XTL format and converts it to a text format readable by the multislice simulation program ìSTEM. The process of converting a crystal *.XTL file to the format used by the ìSTEM simulation program is quite tedious; it generally requires the user to select dozens or hundreds of atoms, rearranging and reformatting their position. Header information must also be reformatted to a specific style to be read by ìSTEM. "XTL Converter" simplifies this process, saving the user time and allowing for easy batch processing of crystals.

  19. XTL Converter

    2015-10-07

    "XTL Converter" is a short Python script for electron microscopy simulation. The program takes an input crystal file in the VESTA *.XTL format and converts it to a text format readable by the multislice simulation program ìSTEM. The process of converting a crystal *.XTL file to the format used by the ìSTEM simulation program is quite tedious; it generally requires the user to select dozens or hundreds of atoms, rearranging and reformatting their position. Headermore » information must also be reformatted to a specific style to be read by ìSTEM. "XTL Converter" simplifies this process, saving the user time and allowing for easy batch processing of crystals.« less

  20. Thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Fitzpatrick, G.O.

    1987-05-19

    A thermionic converter is set forth which includes an envelope having an electron collector structure attached adjacent to a wall. An electron emitter structure is positioned adjacent the collector structure and spaced apart from opposite wall. The emitter and collector structures are in a common chamber. The emitter structure is heated substantially only by thermal radiation. Very small interelectrode gaps can be maintained utilizing the thermionic converter whereby increased efficiency results. 10 figs.

  1. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, B.H.; Petty, R.H.

    1982-08-17

    Gaseous sulfur compounds are removed from a sulfur-containing gas mixture by reacting sulfur oxides in the gas mixture with alumina in association with bismuth. The process is particularly useful in fluid catalytic cracking of sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks wherein sulfur is contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst. By the process of this invention, sulfur oxides may be removed from regenerator off-gases from a fluidized catalytic cracking unit by incorporating particulate alumina impregnated with bismuth in particulate cracking catalyst whereby sulfur oxides generated in the regeneration of the catalyst are reacted with bismuth-impregnated alumina. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air are captured and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  2. Thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Fitzpatrick, Gary O.

    1987-05-19

    A thermionic converter (10) is set forth which includes an envelope (12) having an electron collector structure (22) attached adjacent to a wall (16). An electron emitter structure (24) is positioned adjacent the collector structure (22) and spaced apart from opposite wall (14). The emitter (24) and collector (22) structures are in a common chamber (20). The emitter structure (24) is heated substantially only by thermal radiation. Very small interelectrode gaps (28) can be maintained utilizing the thermionic converter (10) whereby increased efficiency results.

  3. Process for Coating Substrates with Catalytic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klelin, Ric J. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for forming catalysts by coating substrates with two or more catalytic components, which comprises the following sequence of steps. First, the substrate is infused with an adequate amount of solution having a starting material comprising a catalytic component precursor, wherein the thermal decomposition product of the catalytic component precursor is a catalytic component. Second, the excess of the solution is removed from the substrate. thereby leaving a coating of the catalytic component precursor on the surface of the substrate. Third, the coating of the catalytic component precursor is converted to the catalytic component by thermal decomposition. Finally, the coated substance is etched to increase the surface area. The list three steps are then repeated for at least a second catalytic component. This process is ideally suited for application in producing efficient low temperature oxidation catalysts.

  4. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  5. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel-bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating value, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  6. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel-bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating value, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality. PMID:24801125

  7. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  8. Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to light olefins

    DOEpatents

    Rao, V. Udaya S.; Gormley, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalyst and process for making same useful in the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide in which a silicalite support substantially free of aluminum is soaked in an aqueous solution of iron and potassium salts wherein the iron and potassium are present in concentrations such that the dried silicalite has iron present in the range of from about 5 to about 25 percent by weight and has potassium present in an amount not less than about 0.2 percent by weight, and thereafter the silicalite is dried and combined with amorphous silica as a binder for pellets, the catalytic pellets are used to convert synthesis gas to C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 olefins.

  9. Convertible Stadium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Air flotation technology used in NASA's Apollo program has found an interesting application in Hawaii's Aloha Stadium near Honolulu. The stadium's configuration can be changed, by moving entire 7,000-seat sections on a cushion of air, for best accommodation of spectators and participants at different types of events. In most stadiums, only a few hundred seats can be moved, by rolling sections on wheels or rails. At Aloha Stadium, 28,000 of the 50,000 seats can be repositioned for better spectator viewing and, additionally, for improved playing conditions. For example, a stadium designed primarily for football may compromise the baseball diamond by providing only a shallow outfield. Aloha's convertibility allows a full-size baseball field as well as optimum configurations for many other types of sports and special events. The photos show examples. The stadium owes its versatility to air flotation technology developed by General Motors. Its first large-scale application was movement of huge segments of the mammoth Saturn V moonbooster during assembly operations at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Rasor, Ned S.; Britt, Edward J.

    1976-01-01

    A gas-filled thermionic converter is provided with a collector and an emitter having a main emitter region and an auxiliary emitter region in electrical contact with the main emitter region. The main emitter region is so positioned with respect to the collector that a main gap is formed therebetween and the auxiliary emitter region is so positioned with respect to the collector that an auxiliary gap is formed therebetween partially separated from the main gap with access allowed between the gaps to allow ionizable gas in each gap to migrate therebetween. With heat applied to the emitter the work function of the auxiliary emitter region is sufficiently greater than the work function of the collector so that an ignited discharge occurs in the auxiliary gap and the work function of the main emitter region is so related to the work function of the collector that an unignited discharge occurs in the main gap sustained by the ions generated in the auxiliary gap. A current flows through a load coupled across the emitter and collector due to the unignited discharge in the main gap.

  11. Self-powered microthermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; King, Donald B.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-08-10

    A self-powered microthermionic converter having an internal thermal power source integrated into the microthermionic converter. These converters can have high energy-conversion efficiencies over a range of operating temperatures. Microengineering techniques are used to manufacture the converter. The utilization of an internal thermal power source increases potential for mobility and incorporation into small devices. High energy efficiency is obtained by utilization of micron-scale interelectrode gap spacing. Alpha-particle emitting radioisotopes can be used for the internal thermal power source, such as curium and polonium isotopes.

  12. Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, P.J.; Benedek, K.R.; Lunt, R.R.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-12-31

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied to 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. A small fraction of these systems produce a useable byproduct (gypsum): the remainder generate approximately 20 million tons per annum of disposable flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproduct, which are transported and disposed of in landfills. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate this solid waste production, transportation and disposal. All regenerable FGD systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a saleable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid SO{sub 2}. This off-gas has only a fraction of the flue gas volume, and contains no oxygen. Recovery of sulfur from this stream in a single-stage catalytic converter, avoiding a multi-stage Claus plant, could decrease the cost and accelerate the commercialization of many regenerable FGD processes. The paper describes the plan to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is based on a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide such as ceria and zirconia.

  13. Thyristor converter simulation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a simulation on thyristor converters. The simulation features nonlinearity, non-uniform firing, and the commutations. Several applications such as a current regulation, a converter frequency characteristics analysis, and a power line disturbance analysis will be presented. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Conversion of Acetic Acid from the Catalytic Pyrolysis of Xylan Over CeO2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejin; Ko, Jeong Huy; Kwon, Woo Hyun; Park, Young-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    CeO2 was synthesized hydrothermally in supercritical water and applied to the catalytic pyrolysis of xylan. Acetic acid, which is the main component in bio-oil produced from the non-catalytic pyrolysis of xylan, deteriorates the fuel quality of the oil. Catalysis over CeO2 effectively converted the acetic acid to ketone species, such as acetone, thereby reducing the acidity of the oil considerably. The content of aromatics in bio-oil was also increased substantially by catalysis. PMID:27483777

  15. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2002-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  16. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  17. Catalytic coherence transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  18. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  19. Protective circuit for thyristor controlled systems and thyristor converter embodying such protective circuit

    DOEpatents

    Downhower, Jr., Francis H.; Finlayson, Paul T.

    1984-04-10

    A snubber circuit coupled across each thyristor to be gated in a chain of thyristors determines the critical output of a NOR LATCH whenever one snubber circuit could not be charged and discharged under normal gating conditions because of a short failure.

  20. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  1. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  2. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  3. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  4. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  5. Feasibility study for convertible engine torque converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility study has shown that a dump/fill type torque converter has excellent potential for the convertible fan/shaft engine. The torque converter space requirement permits internal housing within the normal flow path of a turbofan engine at acceptable engine weight. The unit permits operating the engine in the turboshaft mode by decoupling the fan. To convert to turbofan mode, the torque converter overdrive capability bring the fan speed up to the power turbine speed to permit engagement of a mechanical lockup device when the shaft speed are synchronized. The conversion to turbofan mode can be made without drop of power turbine speed in less than 10 sec. Total thrust delivered to the aircraft by the proprotor, fan, and engine during tansient can be controlled to prevent loss of air speed or altitude. Heat rejection to the oil is low, and additional oil cooling capacity is not required. The turbofan engine aerodynamic design is basically uncompromised by convertibility and allows proper fan design for quiet and efficient cruise operation. Although the results of the feasibility study are exceedingly encouraging, it must be noted that they are based on extrapolation of limited existing data on torque converters. A component test program with three trial torque converter designs and concurrent computer modeling for fluid flow, stress, and dynamics, updated with test results from each unit, is recommended.

  6. Rotorcraft convertible engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, J. C.; Earle, R. V.; Mar, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Rotorcraft Convertible Engine Study was to define future research and technology effort required for commercial development by 1988 of convertible fan/shaft gas turbine engines for unconventional rotorcraft transports. Two rotorcraft and their respective missions were defined: a Fold Tilt Rotor aircraft and an Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) rotorcraft. Sensitivity studies were conducted with these rotorcraft to determine parametrically the influence of propulsion characteristics on aircraft size, mission fuel requirements, and direct operating costs (DOC). The two rotorcraft were flown with conventional propulsion systems (separate lift/cruise engines) and with convertible propulsion systems to determine the benefits to be derived from convertible engines. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine the optimum engine cycle and staging arrangement for a convertible engine. Advanced technology options applicable to convertible engines were studied. Research and technology programs were identified which would ensure technology readiness for commercial development of convertible engines by 1988.

  7. Minimization of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) operational concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Sandell, M.A.; Hofman, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Several combustion and post-combustion techniques are common for the control of NO{sub x} emissions. These include low NO{sub x} burners, overfire air, reburning, selective catalytic reduction and selective non-catalytic reduction. The use of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) for the post-combustion control of these emissions is rapidly gaining popularity in a variety of applications, including circulating fluidized bed boilers and traveling grate MSW incinerators. Existing coal fired combustors in ozone non-attainment areas may be forced to install RACT for NO{sub x} control, especially in the Northeastern US. These RACT requirements will likely involve the installation of post combustion controls for major sources. The ease of retrofitting today`s SNCR technology can be of significant appeal to these facilities. However, due to the boiler load swings and short residence times of these combustors, some design considerations must be carefully reviewed to ensure optimum operation of the SNCR process. This paper discusses the use of the NOxOUT process to control emissions from existing coal fired combustors. NOxOUT is an in-furnace SNCR technology, using urea based chemicals to convert NO{sub x} to nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water. Special emphasis is placed on minimization of ammonia slip, ammonium sulfate formation, air heater deposition and pressure drop, ammonia in the collected flyash and SNCR effects on downstream pollution control equipment such as electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters and spray dryer/fabric filter combinations.

  8. Design of Catalytic Nanomotors by Dynamic Shadowing Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Zhao, Yiping

    2009-11-01

    Catalytic nanomotors are inorganic replicas of cellular motor proteins that convert chemical energy into work for mobility. These nanostructures achieve self-propelled mobility by carrying an on-board catalyst releasing stored chemical energy. Many researchers use template-directed electroplating (TDEP) which allows simple geometries such as cylindrical rod structures. We use a different method combining physical vapor deposition with dynamic shadowing growth (DSG) to fabricate artificial catalytic nanomotors. DSG allows for the construction of a wide range of structures and the asymmetric deposition of the catalyst layer necessary for nanomotor propulsion. We have constructed a multi-component rotary structure consisting of a silica microbead with a long arm attached, and the motion can be tuned by depositing the catalyst on different locations. We also have studied the propulsion mechanism associated nanomotor movement. The catalytic reaction most often studied is the break-down of hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen gas. We have observed that the structures are propelled away from the catalyst, and we have developed a bubble propulsion model using a spherical microbead half-coated with Pt. Our model suggests propulsion arises by the release and ejection of oxygen. We predict a dependence upon the concentration of hydrogen peroxide as well as surface tension of the solution fitting empirical evidence.

  9. [Bioethics in catastrophe situations such as earthquakes].

    PubMed

    León, C Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    A catastrophe of the magnitude of the earthquake and tsunami that hit Chile not long ago, forces us to raise some questions that we will try to answer from a philosophical, ethical and responsibility viewpoints. An analysis of the basic principles of bioethics is also justified. A natural catastrophe is not, by itself, moral or immoral, fair or unfair. However, its consequences could certainly be regarded as such, depending on whether they could have been prevented or mitigated. We will identify those individuals, who have the ethical responsibility to attend the victims and the ethical principles that must guide the tasks of healthcare and psychological support teams. The minimal indispensable actions to obtain an adequate social and legal protection of vulnerable people, must be defined according to international guidelines. These reflections are intended to improve the responsibility of the State and all the community, to efficiently prevent and repair the material and psychological consequences of such a catastrophe. PMID:22552564

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  11. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  12. ITER convertible blanket evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.P.C.; Cheng, E.

    1995-09-01

    Proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) convertible blankets were reviewed. Key design difficulties were identified. A new particle filter concept is introduced and key performance parameters estimated. Results show that this particle filter concept can satisfy all of the convertible blanket design requirements except the generic issue of Be blanket lifetime. If the convertible blanket is an acceptable approach for ITER operation, this particle filter option should be a strong candidate.

  13. Hypothesis-free? No such thing

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2008-06-01

    Finding meaningful relationships in complex datasets requires starting with the appropriate data. A hypothesis usually takes the form of a mechanistic relationship between a specific cause and a consequent effect, and this will almost always depend on experimental context. There are some circumstances when data must be gathered in the absence of context or hypothesis to characterize a system, but it is unrealistic to expect such preliminary studies to lead to significant biological insights. For this, you need a hypothesis. Systems biology might be the future of biology, but we still need hypotheses to take us where we want to go.

  14. There is no Such Thing as Attention

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Britt

    2011-01-01

    Given that the core issues of attention research have been recognized for millenia, we do not know as much about attention as we should. I argue that the reasons for this failure are (1) we create spurious dichotomies, (2) we reify attention, treating it as a cause, when it is an effect, and (3) we equate a collection of facts with a theory. In order to correct these errors, we need a new technical vocabulary that allows for attentional effects to be continuously distributed, rather than merely present or absent, and that provides a basis for quantitative behavioral predictions that map onto neural substrates. The terminology of the Bayesian decision process has already proved useful for structuring conceptual discussions in other psychological domains, such as perception and decision making under uncertainty, and it had demonstrated early success in the domain of attention. By rejecting a reified, causal conception of attention, in favor of theories that produce attentional effects as consequences, psychologists will be able to conduct more definitive experiments. Such conceptual advances will then enhance the productivity of neuroscientists by allowing them to concentrate their data collection efforts on the richest soil. PMID:21977019

  15. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  16. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  17. Catalytic oxidizers and Title V requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, M.; Rach, S.E.

    1999-07-01

    Catalytic oxidizers have been used to reduce VOC emissions from various industries including printing, chemical, paint, coatings, etc. A catalytic oxidizer uses a catalyst to reduce the operating temperature for combustion to approximately 600 F, which is substantially lower than thermal oxidation unit. Title V requirements have renewed the debate on the best methods to assure compliance of catalytic oxidizers, with some suggesting the need for continuous emission monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the various aspects of catalytic oxidation and consider options such as monitoring inlet/outlet temperatures, delta T across the catalyst, periodic laboratory testing of catalyst samples, and preventive maintenance procedures as means of assuring continuous compliance.

  18. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  19. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  20. Performance of Power Converters at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    Power converters capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated to play an important role in the power system architecture of future NASA deep space missions. Design of such converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance and reduce development and launch costs. Aerospace power systems are mainly a DC distribution network. Therefore, DC/DC and DC/AC converters provide the outputs needed to different loads at various power levels. Recently, research efforts have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to design and evaluate DC/DC converters that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures. This paper presents a summary of the research performed to evaluate the low temperature performance of five DC/DC converters. Various parameters were investigated as a function of temperature in the range of 20 to -196 C. Data pertaining to the output voltage regulation and efficiency of the converters is presented and discussed.

  1. Cascaded resonant bridge converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A converter for converting a low voltage direct current power source to a higher voltage, high frequency alternating current output for use in an electrical system where it is desired to use low weight cables and other circuit elements. The converter has a first stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which converts the direct current power source to an alternating current by means of switching elements that are operated by a variable frequency voltage regulator, a transformer to step up the voltage of the alternating current, and a rectifier bridge to convert the alternating current to a direct current first stage output. The converter further has a second stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which is connected in series to the first stage converter to receive its direct current output and convert it to a second stage high frequency alternating current output by means of switching elements that are operated by a fixed frequency oscillator. The voltage of the second stage output is controlled at a relatively constant value by controlling the first stage output voltage, which is accomplished by controlling the frequency of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller in response to second stage voltage. Fault tolerance in the event of a load short circuit is provided by making the operation of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller responsive to first and second stage current limiting devices. The second stage output is connected to a rectifier bridge whose output is connected to the input of the second stage to provide good regulation of output voltage wave form at low system loads.

  2. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  3. Social Entrepreneurs and Catalytic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddock, Sandra A.; Post, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Social entrepreneurs are private citizens who play critical roles in bringing about catalytic changes in the public sector agenda and the perception of social issues. Factors that make their projects--such as the Partnership for a Drug-Free America and Earth Day--successful include problem complexity, credibility, and a commitment to a collective…

  4. Fundamentals and Catalytic Applications of CeO2-Based Materials.

    PubMed

    Montini, Tiziano; Melchionna, Michele; Monai, Matteo; Fornasiero, Paolo

    2016-05-25

    Cerium dioxide (CeO2, ceria) is becoming an ubiquitous constituent in catalytic systems for a variety of applications. 2016 sees the 40(th) anniversary since ceria was first employed by Ford Motor Company as an oxygen storage component in car converters, to become in the years since its inception an irreplaceable component in three-way catalysts (TWCs). Apart from this well-established use, ceria is looming as a catalyst component for a wide range of catalytic applications. For some of these, such as fuel cells, CeO2-based materials have almost reached the market stage, while for some other catalytic reactions, such as reforming processes, photocatalysis, water-gas shift reaction, thermochemical water splitting, and organic reactions, ceria is emerging as a unique material, holding great promise for future market breakthroughs. While much knowledge about the fundamental characteristics of CeO2-based materials has already been acquired, new characterization techniques and powerful theoretical methods are deepening our understanding of these materials, helping us to predict their behavior and application potential. This review has a wide view on all those aspects related to ceria which promise to produce an important impact on our life, encompassing fundamental knowledge of CeO2 and its properties, characterization toolbox, emerging features, theoretical studies, and all the catalytic applications, organized by their degree of establishment on the market.

  5. Molecular chaperones are nanomachines that catalytically unfold misfolded and alternatively folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Mattoo, Rayees U H; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    By virtue of their general ability to bind (hold) translocating or unfolding polypeptides otherwise doomed to aggregate, molecular chaperones are commonly dubbed "holdases". Yet, chaperones also carry physiological functions that do not necessitate prevention of aggregation, such as altering the native states of proteins, as in the disassembly of SNARE complexes and clathrin coats. To carry such physiological functions, major members of the Hsp70, Hsp110, Hsp100, and Hsp60/CCT chaperone families act as catalytic unfolding enzymes or unfoldases that drive iterative cycles of protein binding, unfolding/pulling, and release. One unfoldase chaperone may thus successively convert many misfolded or alternatively folded polypeptide substrates into transiently unfolded intermediates, which, once released, can spontaneously refold into low-affinity native products. Whereas during stress, a large excess of non-catalytic chaperones in holding mode may optimally prevent protein aggregation, after the stress, catalytic disaggregases and unfoldases may act as nanomachines that use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to repair proteins with compromised conformations. Thus, holding and catalytic unfolding chaperones can act as primary cellular defenses against the formation of early misfolded and aggregated proteotoxic conformers in order to avert or retard the onset of degenerative protein conformational diseases.

  6. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes. PMID:25642796

  7. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  8. Microminiature thermionic converters

    DOEpatents

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2001-09-25

    Microminiature thermionic converts (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures. Methods of manufacturing those converters using semiconductor integrated circuit fabrication and micromachine manufacturing techniques are also disclosed. The MTCs of the invention incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. Existing prior art thermionic converter technology has energy conversion efficiencies ranging from 5-15%. The MTCs of the present invention have maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices can be fabricated at modest costs.

  9. Catalytic stove

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.G.

    1986-04-08

    This patent describes a stove including a stove housing having a burning chamber, a bottom wall, side walls, a top wall and an effluent outlet flue. The improvement described here consists of: a domed wall interposed between the burning chamber and the top wall and including a catalyst substantially at the peak of the domed wall, the catalyst being in effluent communication with the flue; the domed wall and side walls comprising a substantially smooth path for an effluent emitted from a burning fuel such that the effluent emitted remains in a substantially combustible gaseous state in the burning chamber as it reaches the top of the domed wall; an air inlet into the burning chamber having a selectively controllable opening at one terminal end exposed to the environment of the stove; and wherein the amount of air entering the burning chamber is selectively controlled by an apparatus comprising: a thermostat attached to the stove; means for defining a thermostat aperture; moveable means for adjusting the effective size of the thermostat aperture; thermal control unit means for detecting changes in the temperature of the stove to which the thermostat is attached and for moving the moveable means for adjusting the effective size of the thermostat aperture as a function of the change in temperature; and, the moveable means, the means for defining a thermostat aperture and the thermal control unit means cooperating to cause the effective area of the thermostat aperture to change by an amount approximately proportional to the square of the change in temperature of the stove, the effective area being increased responsive to a fall in the stove temperature and being decreased responsive to a rise in the stove temperature.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  11. Converting Nonclassicality into Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Killoran, N; Steinhoff, F E S; Plenio, M B

    2016-02-26

    Quantum mechanics exhibits a wide range of nonclassical features, of which entanglement in multipartite systems takes a central place. In several specific settings, it is well known that nonclassicality (e.g., squeezing, spin squeezing, coherence) can be converted into entanglement. In this work, we present a general framework, based on superposition, for structurally connecting and converting nonclassicality to entanglement. In addition to capturing the previously known results, this framework also allows us to uncover new entanglement convertibility theorems in two broad scenarios, one which is discrete and one which is continuous. In the discrete setting, the classical states can be any finite linearly independent set. For the continuous setting, the pertinent classical states are "symmetric coherent states," connected with symmetric representations of the group SU(K). These results generalize and link convertibility properties from the resource theory of coherence, spin coherent states, and optical coherent states, while also revealing important connections between local and nonlocal pictures of nonclassicality.

  12. Converting Nonclassicality into Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Killoran, N; Steinhoff, F E S; Plenio, M B

    2016-02-26

    Quantum mechanics exhibits a wide range of nonclassical features, of which entanglement in multipartite systems takes a central place. In several specific settings, it is well known that nonclassicality (e.g., squeezing, spin squeezing, coherence) can be converted into entanglement. In this work, we present a general framework, based on superposition, for structurally connecting and converting nonclassicality to entanglement. In addition to capturing the previously known results, this framework also allows us to uncover new entanglement convertibility theorems in two broad scenarios, one which is discrete and one which is continuous. In the discrete setting, the classical states can be any finite linearly independent set. For the continuous setting, the pertinent classical states are "symmetric coherent states," connected with symmetric representations of the group SU(K). These results generalize and link convertibility properties from the resource theory of coherence, spin coherent states, and optical coherent states, while also revealing important connections between local and nonlocal pictures of nonclassicality. PMID:26967398

  13. Digital scale converter

    DOEpatents

    Upton, Richard G.

    1978-01-01

    A digital scale converter is provided for binary coded decimal (BCD) conversion. The converter may be programmed to convert a BCD value of a first scale to the equivalent value of a second scale according to a known ratio. The value to be converted is loaded into a first BCD counter and counted down to zero while a second BCD counter registers counts from zero or an offset value depending upon the conversion. Programmable rate multipliers are used to generate pulses at selected rates to the counters for the proper conversion ratio. The value present in the second counter at the time the first counter is counted to the zero count is the equivalent value of the second scale. This value may be read out and displayed on a conventional seven-segment digital display.

  14. Catalytic oxidation for treatment of ECLSS and PMMS waste streams. [Process Material Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Thompson, John; Scott, Bryan; Jolly, Clifford; Carter, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation was added to the baseline multifiltration technology for use on the Space Station Freedom in order to convert low-molecular weight organic waste components such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, and thiocarbamides to CO2 at low temperature (121 C), thereby reducing the total organic carbon (TOC) to below 500 ppb. The rate of reaction for the catalytic oxidation of aqueous organics to CO2 and water depends primarily upon the catalyst, temperature, and concentration of reactants. This paper describes a kinetic study conducted to determine the impact of each of these parameters upon the reaction rate. The results indicate that a classic kinetic model, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation for heterogeneous catalysis, can accurately represent the functional dependencies of this rate.

  15. Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail; Heinz, Robert

    2012-06-26

    A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

  16. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  17. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  18. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  19. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  20. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  1. Rotorcraft convertible engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, D. N.; Hirschkron, R.; Smith, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Convertible propulsion systems for advanced rotorcraft are evaluated in terms of their impact on aircraft operating economics and fuel consumption. A variety of propulsion system concepts, including separate thrust and power producing engines, convertible fan/shaft engines, and auxiliary propeller configurations are presented. The merits of each are evaluated in two different rotorcraft missions: an intercity, commercial transport of the ABC(TM) type, and an offshore oil ring supply ship of the X-wing type. The variable inlet guide vane fan/shaft converting engine and auxiliary propeller configurations are shown to offer significant advantages over all the other systems evaluated, in terms of both direct operating cost and fuel consumption.

  2. Vector generator scan converter

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1990-04-17

    This patent describes high printing speeds for graphics data that are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  3. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  4. Catalytic Products from a Bench-Scale, Simulated Fluidized-Bed Pyrolyzer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass (e.g. lignocellulosics and lipids) were catalytically converted under thermochemical conditions to bio-based, fungible industrial chemicals and products. The focus was on high temperature catalytic conversions of feedstocks in a bench-scale reactor designed to replicate a packed- or fluidiz...

  5. Catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fine chemicals and fuels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hui; Xia, Xi; Lin, Chun-Xiang; Tong, Dong-Shen; Beltramini, Jorge

    2011-11-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant and bio-renewable resource with great potential for sustainable production of chemicals and fuels. This critical review provides insights into the state-of the-art accomplishments in the chemocatalytic technologies to generate fuels and value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, with an emphasis on its major component, cellulose. Catalytic hydrolysis, solvolysis, liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation are the major processes presently studied. Regarding catalytic hydrolysis, the acid catalysts cover inorganic or organic acids and various solid acids such as sulfonated carbon, zeolites, heteropolyacids and oxides. Liquefaction and fast pyrolysis of cellulose are primarily conducted over catalysts with proper acidity/basicity. Gasification is typically conducted over supported noble metal catalysts. Reaction conditions, solvents and catalysts are the prime factors that affect the yield and composition of the target products. Most of processes yield a complex mixture, leading to problematic upgrading and separation. An emerging technique is to integrate hydrolysis, liquefaction or pyrolysis with hydrogenation over multifunctional solid catalysts to convert lignocellulosic biomass to value-added fine chemicals and bio-hydrocarbon fuels. And the promising catalysts might be supported transition metal catalysts and zeolite-related materials. There still exist technological barriers that need to be overcome (229 references). PMID:21863197

  6. Catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fine chemicals and fuels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hui; Xia, Xi; Lin, Chun-Xiang; Tong, Dong-Shen; Beltramini, Jorge

    2011-11-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant and bio-renewable resource with great potential for sustainable production of chemicals and fuels. This critical review provides insights into the state-of the-art accomplishments in the chemocatalytic technologies to generate fuels and value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, with an emphasis on its major component, cellulose. Catalytic hydrolysis, solvolysis, liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation are the major processes presently studied. Regarding catalytic hydrolysis, the acid catalysts cover inorganic or organic acids and various solid acids such as sulfonated carbon, zeolites, heteropolyacids and oxides. Liquefaction and fast pyrolysis of cellulose are primarily conducted over catalysts with proper acidity/basicity. Gasification is typically conducted over supported noble metal catalysts. Reaction conditions, solvents and catalysts are the prime factors that affect the yield and composition of the target products. Most of processes yield a complex mixture, leading to problematic upgrading and separation. An emerging technique is to integrate hydrolysis, liquefaction or pyrolysis with hydrogenation over multifunctional solid catalysts to convert lignocellulosic biomass to value-added fine chemicals and bio-hydrocarbon fuels. And the promising catalysts might be supported transition metal catalysts and zeolite-related materials. There still exist technological barriers that need to be overcome (229 references).

  7. Operation of high power converters in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1993-01-01

    High power converters that are used in space power subsystems are limited in power handling capability due to component and thermal limitations. For applications, such as Space Station Freedom, where multi-kilowatts of power must be delivered to user loads, parallel operation of converters becomes an attractive option when considering overall power subsystem topologies. TRW developed three different unequal power sharing approaches for parallel operation of converters. These approaches, known as droop, master-slave, and proportional adjustment, are discussed and test results are presented.

  8. Catalytic systems used for polymerization, biomass conversion, and enhancing diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pong, Frances

    revealed that these angstrom sized catalysts nearly double the speed of diffusion of passive molecular tracers in their immediate surroundings. This result is particularly intriguing because in this size regime, the viscosity of the surroundings is expected to completely overcome the inertial forces of these catalysts. This study has prompted further diffusion-NMR studies of molecular catalysts and enzymes as molecular motors. Catalytic systems play a crucial role in the conversion of renewable biomasses into energy and useful materials. This field of research has become increasingly important and lucrative as fossil fuel sources continue to decline/destabilize in the face of increased worldwide demand for more resources. In this work (iii), the efficacy of a hydrogen-pressurized, biphasic catalytic system to convert linear sugar polyols to iodoalkanes was examined. These iodoalkanes can easily be converted to 1-alkenes which can then be used for the synthesis of low density polyethylene. The results indicated that the system products were relatively pure and that the catalytic layer had a degree of recyclability, hinting that such a system may be viable for industrial use.

  9. Fractional Watt AMTEC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, T. K.; Rasmussen, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    We report here the long term performance of a small, multi-tube AMTEC converter. This converter was designed to operate and produce approximately 12 watt of electrical output from a small, 4 to 6 watt radioisotope heat source for remote power applications. It was built and put on test in 1999 using electrical heaters as stand-ins for the radioisotope capsule. Since that time it has accumulated more than 5 years of run time at an input heater temperature of 700 °C, with numerous thermal cycles to ambient that were generally related to grid power failures or physical moves of the test apparatus. The power output has remained, with variations due to orientation changes and minor variations due to small temperature changes, essentially constant at 0.40 W to 0.60 W over the test period and operation is ongoing. The converter casing and mechanical structure was fabricated from 316 SS and the electrodes are sputtered titanium nitride films. Separate static tests of a multilayer insulation package suitable for use with the converter showed the capability to reach 700 °C with a thermal input of < 4 watts.

  10. Thermionic energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, Jr., James E.

    1977-08-09

    A thermionic device for converting nuclear energy into electrical energy comprising a tubular anode spaced from and surrounding a cylindrical cathode, the cathode having an outer emitting surface of ruthenium, and nuclear fuel on the inner cylindrical surface. The nuclear fuel is a ceramic composition of fissionable material in a metal matrix. An axial void is provided to collect and contain fission product gases.

  11. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  12. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  13. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  14. Method for remotely powering a device such as a lunar rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, Russell J. (Inventor); Williams, Michael D. (Inventor); Walker, Gilbert H. (Inventor); Schuster, Gregory L. (Inventor); Lee, Ja H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method of supplying power to a device such as a lunar rover located on a planetary surface is provided. At least one, and preferably three, laser satellites are set in orbit around the planet. Each satellite contains a nuclear reactor for generating electrical power. This electrical power is converted into a laser beam which is passed through an amplifying array and directed toward the device such as a lunar rover. The received laser beam is then converted into electrical power for use by the device.

  15. Digital to synchro converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predina, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A digital-to-synchro converter is provided where a binary input code specifies a desired shaft angle and where an resolver type position transducer is employed with additional circuitry to generate a shaft position error signal indicative of the angular difference between the desired shaft angle and the actual shaft angle. The additional circuitry corrects for known and calculated errors in the shaft position detection process and equipment.

  16. Multilevel converters -- A new breed of power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z. |

    1995-09-01

    Multilevel voltage source converters are emerging as a new breed of power converter options for high-power applications. The multilevel voltage source converters typically synthesize the staircase voltage wave from several levels of dc capacitor voltages. One of the major limitations of the multilevel converters is the voltage unbalance between different levels. The techniques to balance the voltage between different levels normally involve voltage clamping or capacitor charge control. There are several ways of implementing voltage balance in multilevel converters. Without considering the traditional magnetic coupled converters, this paper presents three recently developed multilevel voltage source converters: (1) diode-clamp, (2) flying-capacitors, and (3) cascaded-inverters with separate dc sources. The operating principle, features, constraints, and potential applications of these converters will be discussed.

  17. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  18. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  19. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  20. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  1. Transistorized converter provides nondissipative regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    A transistorized regulator converter efficiently converts fluctuating input voltages to a constant output voltage, avoiding the use of saturable reactors. It is nondissipative in operation and functions in an open loop through variable duty cycles.

  2. Catalytic reduction of dioxygen to water with a monomeric manganese complex at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Shook, Ryan L; Peterson, Sonja M; Greaves, John; Moore, Curtis; Rheingold, Arnold L; Borovik, A S

    2011-04-20

    There have been numerous efforts to incorporate dioxygen into chemical processes because of its economic and environmental benefits. The conversion of dioxygen to water is one such example, having importance in both biology and fuel cell technology. Metals or metal complexes are usually necessary to promote this type of reaction and several systems have been reported. However, mechanistic insights into this conversion are still lacking, especially the detection of intermediates. Reported herein is the first example of a monomeric manganese(II) complex that can catalytically convert dioxygen to water. The complex contains a tripodal ligand with two urea groups and one carboxyamidopyridyl unit; this ligand creates an intramolecular hydrogen-bonding network within the secondary coordination sphere that aids in the observed chemistry. The manganese(II) complex is five-coordinate with an N(4)O primary coordination sphere; the oxygen donor comes from the deprotonated carboxyamido moiety. Two key intermediates were detected and characterized: a peroxo-manganese(III) species and a hybrid oxo/hydroxo-manganese(III) species (1). The formulation of 1 was based on spectroscopic and analytical data, including an X-ray diffraction analysis. Reactivity studies showed dioxygen was catalytically converted to water in the presence of reductants, such as diphenylhydrazine and hydrazine. Water was confirmed as a product in greater than 90% yield. A mechanism was proposed that is consistent with the spectroscopy and product distribution, in which the carboxyamido group switches between a coordinated ligand and a basic site to scavenge protons produced during the catalytic cycle. These results highlight the importance of incorporating intramolecular functional groups within the secondary coordination sphere of metal-containing catalysts.

  3. Converting amine concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Aqueous solutions of alkanolamines are commonly used solvents and remove acid gas components from natural and synthesis gas. The literature is full of experimental data for these systems and examples of their application. One problem with comparing data from different sources is that different concentration units are used. A BASIC program was written to simplify the conversion process between these common concentration units: weight fraction or mass fraction, X, kg solute/kg solution; mole fraction, x, mol solute/mol solution; molarity, M, mol solute/l solution; and molarity, m, mol solute/kg solvent. A table lists the formulas for converting between these four units. The source code is included.

  4. The microminiature thermionic converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donald Bryan

    The design, fabrication, testing, and analysis of the microminiature thermionic converter (MTC) is discussed. MTCs are two electrode devices that convert heat energy into electrical energy. The electrodes are spaced opposite each other in a vacuum environment with one electrode heated and the second cooled. Electrons are emitted from the hot electrode to the cool electrode creating electrical power. The fabrication of the MTC uses micromachining and semiconductor integrated circuit fabrication methods. These fabrication techniques allow the MTC to have an inter-electrode spacing of 20 microns or less with electrode materials having work functions ranging from 0.75 to 3 eV. The small gap size and low work function features of the MTC give it the potential to produce electricity at relatively high conversion efficiencies (20--25%). MTC designs may be tailored to function for different heat sources (combustion, solar, advanced nuclear reactors, radioisotopes, waste heat) over broad temperature regimes. The MTC diode prototype has been successfully fabricated, operated, and analyzed over a wide range of emitter and collector temperatures in the power production mode as well as power consumption mode. The emitter temperatures of interest ranged from 770 through 1220K. Maximum power output densities of 2mW/cm2 have been produced, and maximum output voltages approaching 1 Volt have also been produced. The MTC has been used to power an external load consisting of a Motorola 1N4004 diode. Models have been developed to characterize thermionic surface emission and electron transport across the gap. The MTC diode current-voltage characteristics and features have been successfully modeled over all five operational modes that characterize a thermionic converter. Power production has not been as high as expected. The shortcomings are due to the low work function material, (Ba,Sr,Ca)O, used in the diode. The tests and models indicate that the irregularities in work function across

  5. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  6. On lossless switched-capacitor power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, C.K.; Wong, S.C.; Chow, M.H.L.

    1995-05-01

    This paper addresses the design of efficient switched-capacitor power converters. The discussion starts with a review of the fundamental limitation of switched-capacitor circuits which shows that the topology of such circuits and the ``forced`` step changes of capacitor voltages are the inherent attributes of power loss. Although the argument follows from a rather trivial result from basic circuit theory, it addresses an important issue on the maximum efficiency achievable in a switched-capacitor converter circuit. Based on the observed topological constraint of switched-capacitor converter circuits, the simplest lossless topology for AC/DC conversion is deduced. Also discussed is a simple version of lossless topology that achieves isolation between the source and the load. Finally, an experimental AC/DC switched-capacitor converter, based on the proposed idea, is presented which demonstrates an improved efficiency over other existing switched-capacitor converters. The proposed AC/DC converter contains no inductors and thus is suitable for custom IC implementation for very low power applications.

  7. Catalytic hydrofining of oil

    SciTech Connect

    Kukes, S.G.; Parrott, S.L.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for hydrotreating a hydrocarbon containing feed stream comprising the step of intimately contacting a substantially liquid hydrocarbon containing feed stream. It also contains compounds of nickel, vanadium and sulfur, with a free hydrogen containing gas and a catalyst composition consisting essentially of (a) alumina and (b) at least one compound selected from the group consisting of yttrium oxide and zirconium oxide, under such hydrotreating conditions as to produce a hydrocarbon containing feed stream having a reduced level of nickel, vanadium and sulfur. The catalyst composition has been prepared by a method comprising the steps of: (A) impregnating alumina with a solution containing at least one compound of at least one metal selected from the group consisting of yttrium and zirconium and at least one compound of aluminum; (B) heating the material obtained in step (A) under such conditions as to dry the material from step (A) and to at least partially convert the one compound of at least one metal to at least one of yttrium oxide and zirconium oxide and at least one compound of aluminum to aluminum oxide.

  8. Potential converter for laser-power beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Williams, Michael D.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Iles, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    Future space missions, such as those associated with the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), will require large amounts of power for operation of bases, rovers, and orbit transfer vehicles. One method for supplying this power is to beam power from a spaced based or Earth based laser power station to a receiver where laser photons can be converted to electricity. Previous research has described such laser power stations orbiting the Moon and beaming power to a receiver on the surface of the Moon by using arrays of diode lasers. Photovoltaic converters that can be efficiently used with these diode lasers are described.

  9. Catalytic combustion over hexaaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.; Kingsley, J.J.; Hubler, T.L.; McCready, D.E.; Cox, J.L.

    1997-12-31

    Combustion is the oldest and most extensively used process for the production of light, heat, and energy utilization. Mankind has sought to control combustion since prehistoric times to more effectively utilize the combustible material, control the products of combustion, and harness the energy released during combustion. Catalysts provide the means to control the reactions of combustion beyond what can be achieved in the homogeneous gas phase (1). Catalysts also enable operation outside the range of flammability limits and control atmospheric pollutants of combustion, mainly NO{sub x}, carbon monoxide, and particles of incomplete combustion (soot). The major technical difficulty that has hindered widespread application of catalytic combustion devices is their poor performance, particularly durability of their ceramic substrates and catalytically active phases in the high temperature environment. Catalytic combustion of hydrocarbons over metals and metal oxide catalysts has been explored extensively. Recent reviews of materials for high temperature catalytic combustion have been provided by Marcus et al. (2) and Trim (3). Hexaaluminates which show good thermal stability above 1200{degrees}C are one class of metal oxides receiving consideration for application in high temperature combustion devices. Matsuda et al. (4) have developed thermally stable La-hexaaluminates with the same layer structure as Ba-hexaaluminate and have investigated their catalytic application. Machida et al. (5-7) have investigated the catalytic properties of a number of hexaaluminates of BaMAl{sub 11}O{sub 19-{alpha}}(M=Cr, Mn,Fe,Co,Ni). Here we report the synthesis, properties and catalytic combustion of some new hexaaluminates.

  10. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; Dinetta, L. C.; Goetz, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) energy converters may be successfully deployed to provide new mission capabilities for spacecraft. Betavoltaic power supplies based on the conversion of tritium beta decay to electricity using GaP energy converters can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. High temperature solar cells, also based on GaP, can be used in inward-bound missions greatly reducing the need for thermal dissipation. Results are presented for GaP direct conversion devices powered by Ni-63 and compared to the conversion of light emitted by tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/sq cm have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. Temperature dependent IV, QE, R(sub sh), and V(sub oc) results are also presented. These data are used to predict the high-temperature solar cell and betacell performance of GaP devices and suggest appropriate applications for the deployment of this technology.

  11. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, Albert Andreas Maria

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero.

  12. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, A.A.M.

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero. 20 figs.

  13. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  14. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  15. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively. PMID:10539210

  16. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively.

  17. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  18. Unity power factor converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A unity power factor converter capable of effecting either inversion (dc-to-dc) or rectification (ac-to-dc), and capable of providing bilateral power control from a DC source (or load) through an AC transmission line to a DC load (or source) for power flow in either direction, is comprised of comparators for comparing the AC current i with an AC signal i.sub.ref (or its phase inversion) derived from the AC ports to generate control signals to operate a switch control circuit for high speed switching to shape the AC current waveform to a sine waveform, and synchronize it in phase and frequency with the AC voltage at the AC ports, by selectively switching the connections to a series inductor as required to increase or decrease the current i.

  19. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  20. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  1. Catalytic molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, M N; de Prada, P; Landry, D W

    2001-06-01

    We have constructed catalytic molecular beacons from a hammerhead-type deoxyribozyme by a modular design. The deoxyribozyme was engineered to contain a molecular beacon stem-loop module that, when closed, inhibits the deoxyribozyme module and is complementary to a target oligonucleotide. Binding of target oligonucleotides opens the beacon stem-loop and allosterically activates the deoxyribozyme module, which amplifies the recognition event through cleavage of a doubly labeled fluorescent substrate. The customized modular design of catalytic molecular beacons allows for any two single-stranded oligonucleotide sequences to be distinguished in homogenous solution in a single step. Our constructs demonstrate that antisense conformational triggers based on molecular beacons can be used to initiate catalytic events. The selectivity of the system is sufficient for analytical applications and has potential for the construction of deoxyribozyme-based drug delivery tools specifically activated in cells containing somatic mutations.

  2. Catalytic enantioselective peroxidation of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaojie; Liu, Yan; Sun, Bingfeng; Cindric, Brittany; Deng, Li

    2008-07-01

    Despite the potential of chiral peroxides as biologically interesting or even clinically important compounds, no catalytic enantioselective peroxidation has been reported. With a chiral catalyst not only to induce enantioselectivity but also to convert a well established epoxidation pathway into a peroxidation pathway, the first efficient catalytic peroxidation has been successfully developed. Employing readily available alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones and hydroperoxides and an easily accessible cinchona alkaloid catalyst, this novel reaction will open new possibilities in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral peroxides. Under different conditions a highly enantioselective epoxidation with the same starting materials, reagents, and catalyst has was also established.

  3. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO[sub 2]-containing gas streams is highly attractive as it produces a saleable. Product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO[sub 2] with coke) and Claus plants(reaction of SO[sub 2] with H[sub 2]S over catalyst). This project win investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single-stage selective reduction SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified as a superior catalyst for SO[sub 2] reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because of its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650C). Kinetic and parametric studies of SO[sub 2] reduction planned over various CeO[sub 2]-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a simplified process, a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. A first apparent application is treatment of regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought Claus-alternative'' for coal-fired power plant applications.

  4. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, A. G.; Parkhomchuk, E. V.; Lysikov, A. I.; Parunin, P. D.; Semeikina, V. S.; Parmon, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references.

  5. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  6. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  7. Hybrid switch for resonant power converters

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Yu, Wensong

    2014-09-09

    A hybrid switch comprising two semiconductor switches connected in parallel but having different voltage drop characteristics as a function of current facilitates attainment of zero voltage switching and reduces conduction losses to complement reduction of switching losses achieved through zero voltage switching in power converters such as high-current inverters.

  8. Fuel densifier converts biomass into fuel cubes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    A new cost-effective means to produce clean-burning and low cost commercial and industrial fuel is being introduced by Columbia Fuel Densification Corp., Phoenix. The Columbia Commercial Hydraulic Fuel Densifier converts raw biomass materials such as wood chips, paper, peat moss and rice hulls into densified fuel cubes. The densifier is mobile and its operation is briefly outlined.

  9. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  10. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  11. Turbo-Brayton Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breedlove, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Future NASA space missions will require advanced thermal-to-electric power converters that are reliable, efficient, and lightweight. Creare, LLC, is developing a turbo-Brayton power converter that offers high efficiency and specific power. The converter employs gas bearings to provide maintenance free, long-life operation. Discrete components can be packaged to fit optimally with other subsystems, and the converter's continuous gas flow can communicate directly with remote heat sources and heat rejection surfaces without the need for ancillary heat-transfer components and intermediate flow loops. Creare has completed detailed analyses, trade studies, fabrication trials, and preliminary designs for the components and converter assembly. The company is fabricating and testing a breadboard converter.

  12. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  13. Isolated and soft-switched power converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Adams, Donald Joe

    2002-01-01

    An isolated and soft-switched power converter is used for DC/DC and DC/DC/AC power conversion. The power converter includes two resonant tank circuits coupled back-to-back through an isolation transformer. Each resonant tank circuit includes a pair of resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, a pair of tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and a pair of switching devices with anti-parallel clamping diodes coupled in series as resonant switches and clamping devices for the resonant leg. The power converter is well suited for DC/DC and DC/DC/AC power conversion applications in which high-voltage isolation, DC to DC voltage boost, bidirectional power flow, and a minimal number of conventional switching components are important design objectives. For example, the power converter is especially well suited to electric vehicle applications and load-side electric generation and storage systems, and other applications in which these objectives are important. The power converter may be used for many different applications, including electric vehicles, hybrid combustion/electric vehicles, fuel-cell powered vehicles with low-voltage starting, remote power sources utilizing low-voltage DC power sources, such as photovoltaics and others, electric power backup systems, and load-side electric storage and generation systems.

  14. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  15. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  16. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-01-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution. PMID:25048695

  17. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins.

    PubMed

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-08-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution.

  18. Mining disease state converters for medical intervention of diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guozhu; Duan, Lei; Tang, Changjie

    2010-02-01

    In applications such as gene therapy and drug design, a key goal is to convert the disease state of diseased objects from an undesirable state into a desirable one. Such conversions may be achieved by changing the values of some attributes of the objects. For example, in gene therapy one may convert cancerous cells to normal ones by changing some genes' expression level from low to high or from high to low. In this paper, we define the disease state conversion problem as the discovery of disease state converters; a disease state converter is a small set of attribute value changes that may change an object's disease state from undesirable into desirable. We consider two variants of this problem: personalized disease state converter mining mines disease state converters for a given individual patient with a given disease, and universal disease state converter mining mines disease state converters for all samples with a given disease. We propose a DSCMiner algorithm to discover small and highly effective disease state converters. Since real-life medical experiments on living diseased instances are expensive and time consuming, we use classifiers trained from the datasets of given diseases to evaluate the quality of discovered converter sets. The effectiveness of a disease state converter is measured by the percentage of objects that are successfully converted from undesirable state into desirable state as deemed by state-of-the-art classifiers. We use experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of our algorithm and to show its effectiveness. We also discuss possible research directions for extensions and improvements. We note that the disease state conversion problem also has applications in customer retention, criminal rehabilitation, and company turn-around, where the goal is to convert class membership of objects whose class is an undesirable class.

  19. Effect of dry torrefaction on kinetics of catalytic pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniyanto, Sutijan, Deendarlianto, Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Decreasing world reserve of fossil resources (i.e. petroleum oil, coal and natural gas) encourage discovery of renewable resources as subtitute for fossil resources. Biomass is one of the main natural renewable resources which is promising resource as alternate resources to meet the world's energy needs and raw material to produce chemical platform. Conversion of biomass, as source of energy, fuel and biochemical, is conducted using thermochemical process such as pyrolysis-gasification process. Pyrolysis step is an important step in the mechanism of pyrolysis - gasification of biomass. The objective of this study is to obtain the kinetic reaction of catalytic pyrolysis of dry torrified sugarcane bagasse which used Ca and Mg as catalysts. The model of kinetic reaction is interpreted using model n-order of single reaction equation of biomass. Rate of catalytic pyrolysis reaction depends on the weight of converted biomass into char and volatile matters. Based on TG/DTA analysis, rate of pyrolysis reaction is influenced by the composition of biomass (i.e. hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) and inorganic component especially alkali and alkaline earth metallic (AAEM). From this study, it has found two equations rate of reaction of catalytic pyrolysis in sugarcane bagasse using catalysts Ca and Mg. First equation is equation of pyrolysis reaction in rapid zone of decomposition and the second equation is slow zone of decomposition. Value of order reaction for rapid decomposition is n > 1 and for slow decomposition is n<1. Constant and order of reactions for catalytic pyrolysis of dry-torrified sugarcane bagasse with presence of Ca tend to higher than that's of presence of Mg.

  20. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Lu

    2008-03-01

    We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called “in vitro selection” to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

  1. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  2. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  3. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  4. Catalytic desulfurization of industrial waste gases

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, Th.

    1985-07-30

    Industrial waste gases containing objectionable/polluting compounds of sulfur, e.g., H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/ and such organosulfur derivatives as COS, CS/sub 2/ and mercaptans, are catalytically desulfurized, e.g., by Claus process, employing an improved catalyst comprising titanium dioxide and calcium, barium, strontium or magnesium sulfate.

  5. A graphene-based smart catalytic system with superior catalytic performances and temperature responsive catalytic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junjie; Lv, Weipeng; Zhang, Guanghui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao; Fan, Xiaobin

    2013-07-21

    We have successfully developed a unique graphene-based smart catalytic system which consists of the graphene supported Au-Pt bimetallic nanocatalyst with a well-defined core-shell structure and a dextran-based temperature-responsive polymer. The unique catalytic system possesses excellent catalytic performances and the catalytic activities could be readily switched on or off at different temperature windows. PMID:23740038

  6. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  7. Proposed electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Device converts wave energy into electric power through array of insulated absorber elements responsive to field of impinging electromagnetic radiation. Device could also serve as solar energy converter that is potentially less expensive and fragile than solar cells, yet substantially more efficient.

  8. A critical view on catalytic pyrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Venderbosch, R H

    2015-04-24

    The rapid heating of biomass in an oxygen-free environment optimizes the yield of fast-pyrolysis liquids. This liquid comprises a mix of acids, (dehydrated) carbohydrates, aldehydes, ketones, lignin fragments, aromatics, and alcohols, limiting its use. Deoxygenation of these liquids to replace hydrocarbons represents significant challenges. Catalytic pyrolysis is seen as a promising route to yield liquids with a higher quality. In this paper, literature data on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass are reviewed and deoxygenation results correlated with the overall carbon yield. Evidence is given that in an initial stage of the catalytic process reactive components are converted to coke, gas, and water, and only to a limited extent to a liquid product. Catalysts are not yet good enough, and an appropriate combination of pyrolysis conditions, reactive products formed, and different reactions to take place to yield improved quality liquids may be practically impossible.

  9. Dual Nanoparticle/Substrate Control of Catalytic Dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, Albina Y; Wang, Sanwu; Rashkeev, Sergey; Glazoff, Michael V; Pennycook, Stephen J; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2007-01-01

    Saturated hydrocarbons, or alkanes (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2}), are abundant in petroleum and can be converted to alkenes (C{sub n}H{sub 2n}) by dehydrogenation. Alkenes, also known as unsaturated hydrocarbons, are easy to polymerize and are the primary feedstock of the petrochemical industry, especially ethene (n=2) and propene (n = 3). Efficient catalytic dehydrogenation is therefore a major industrial objective. It has been found that oxidative catalytic dehydrogenation, that is, a process assisted by both a solid catalyst and a flow of oxygen gas, is most practical because of higher system longevity. Chromia/alumina catalytic systems have been widely adopted by industry. They have also been the subject of scientific studies seeking understanding that may help optimization of the process.

  10. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol and ethanol for hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Keith L; Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles feature high energy efficiency and minor environmental impact. Liquid fuels are ideal hydrogen carriers, which can catalytically be converted into syngas or hydrogen to power vehicles. Among the potential liquid fuels, alcohols have several advantages. The hydrogen/carbon ratio is higher than that of other liquid hydrocarbons or oxygenates, especially in the case of methanol. In addition, alcohols can be derived from renewable biomass resources. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol or ethanol offers immense potential for onboard hydrogen generation due to its rapid reaction rate and exothermic nature. These benefits stimulate a burgeoning research community in catalyst design, reaction engineering, and mechanistic investigation. The purpose of this Minireview is to provide insight into syngas and hydrogen production from methanol and ethanol partial oxidation, particularly highlighting catalytic chemistry.

  11. 26 CFR 1.544-5 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Convertible securities. 1.544-5 Section 1.544-5...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Personal Holding Companies § 1.544-5 Convertible securities. Under section 544(b) outstanding securities of a corporation such as bonds, debentures, or other corporate obligations,...

  12. 26 CFR 1.544-5 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Convertible securities. 1.544-5 Section 1.544-5...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Personal Holding Companies § 1.544-5 Convertible securities. Under section 544(b) outstanding securities of a corporation such as bonds, debentures, or other corporate obligations,...

  13. 26 CFR 1.544-5 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Convertible securities. 1.544-5 Section 1.544-5...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Personal Holding Companies § 1.544-5 Convertible securities. Under section 544(b) outstanding securities of a corporation such as bonds, debentures, or other corporate obligations,...

  14. 26 CFR 1.544-5 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Convertible securities. 1.544-5 Section 1.544-5...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Personal Holding Companies § 1.544-5 Convertible securities. Under section 544(b) outstanding securities of a corporation such as bonds, debentures, or other corporate obligations,...

  15. Inactivation of human angiotensin converting enzyme by copper peptide complexes containing ATCUN motifs.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Nikhil H; Cowan, J A

    2005-12-21

    The copper complex [KGHK-Cu]+ demonstrates catalytic inactivation of human angiotensin converting enzyme at sub-saturating concentrations, under oxidative conditions, with an observed rate constant k approximately 2.9 +/- 0.5 x 10(-2) min(-1). PMID:16317474

  16. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  17. Thermoionic converter for space Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shengquan; Yang, Jicai

    1990-05-01

    Thermionic converters offer many advantages for use as space reactors. Over the last several years, six experiments were performed, of which four were in-pile experiments and two out-pile experiments. Of the four in-pile experiments, three involved the use of three converters linked in series. The use of nuclear reactors as the power source for an electrical system in space is one of the important developmental projects under consideration today. For a time extending relatively long into the future, according to most opinions on potential power requirements, the choice of a thermionic converter to implement thermoelectric conversion has many advantages.

  18. Hybrid Voltage-Multipliers Based Switching Power Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Caro, Julio C.; Mayo-Maldonado, Jonathan C.; Vazquez-Bautista, Rene Fabian; Valderrabano-Gonzalez, Antonio; Salas-Cabrera, Ruben; Valdez-Resendiz, Jesus Elias

    2011-08-01

    This work presents a derivation of PWM DC-DC hybrid converters by combining traditional converters with the Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier, the voltage multiplier of each converter is driven with the same transistor of the basic topology; this fact makes the structure of the new converters very simple and provides high-voltage gain. The traditional topologies discussed are the boost, buck-boost, Cuk and SEPIC. They main features of the discussed family are: (i) high-voltage gain without using extreme duty cycles or transformers, which allow high switching frequency and (ii) low voltage stress in switching devices, along with modular structures, and more output levels can be added without modifying the main circuit, which is highly desirable in some applications such as renewable energy generation systems. It is shown how a multiplier converter can become a generalized topology and how some of the traditional converters and several state-of-the-art converters can be derived from the generalized topologies and vice-versa. All the discussed converters were simulated, additionally experimental results are provided with an interleaved multiplier converter.

  19. Processes for converting lignocellulosics to reduced acid pyrolysis oil

    DOEpatents

    Kocal, Joseph Anthony; Brandvold, Timothy A

    2015-01-06

    Processes for producing reduced acid lignocellulosic-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. In a process, lignocellulosic material is fed to a heating zone. A basic solid catalyst is delivered to the heating zone. The lignocellulosic material is pyrolyzed in the presence of the basic solid catalyst in the heating zone to create pyrolysis gases. The oxygen in the pyrolysis gases is catalytically converted to separable species in the heating zone. The pyrolysis gases are removed from the heating zone and are liquefied to form the reduced acid lignocellulosic-derived pyrolysis oil.

  20. Multilevel converters for large electric drives

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, L.M.; Peng, F.Z.

    1997-11-01

    Traditional two-level high frequency pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters for motor drives have several problems associated with their high frequency switching which produces common-mode voltage and high voltage change (dV/dt) rates to the motor windings. Multilevel inverters solve these problems because their devices can switch at a much lower frequency. Two different multilevel topologies are identified for use as a converter for electric drives, a cascade inverter with separate dc sources and a back-to-back diode clamped converter. The cascade inverter is a natural fit for large automotive all electric drives because of the high VA ratings possible and because it uses several levels of dc voltage sources which would be available from batteries or fuel cells. The back to back diode damped converter is ideal where a source of ac voltage is available such as a hybrid electric vehicle. Simulation and experimental results show the superiority of these two converters over PWM based drives.

  1. STIFF: Converting Scientific FITS Images to TIFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Emmanuel

    2011-10-01

    STIFF is a program that converts scientific FITS1 images to the more popular TIFF2 format for illustration purposes. Most FITS readers and converters do not do a proper job at converting FITS image data to 8 bits. 8-bit images stored in JPEG, PNG or TIFF files have the intensities implicitely stored in a non-linear way. Most current FITS image viewers and converters provide the user an incorrect translation of the FITS image content by simply rescaling linearly input pixel values. A first consequence is that the people working on astronomical images usually have to apply narrow intensity cuts or square-root or logarithmic intensity transformations to actually see something on their deep-sky images. A less obvious consequence is that colors obtained by combining images processed this way are not consistent across such a large range of surface brightnesses. Though with other software the user is generally afforded a choice of nonlinear transformations to apply in order to make the faint stuff stand out more clearly in the images, with the limited selection of choices provides, colors will not be accurately rendered, and some manual tweaking will be necessary. The purpose of STIFF is to produce beautiful pictures in an automatic and consistent way.

  2. Wind/water energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulkovich, J.

    1979-01-01

    Device will convert wind, water, tidal or wave energy into electrical or mechanical energy. Is comprised of windmill-like paddles or blades synchronously geared to orient themselves to wind direction for optimum energy extraction.

  3. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  4. Transformerless dc-Isolated Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficient voltage converter employs capacitive instead of transformer coupling to provide dc isolation. Offers buck/boost operation, minimal filtering, and low parts count, with possible application in photovoltaic power inverters, power supplies and battery charges. In photovoltaic inverter circuit with transformerless converter, Q2, Q3, Q4, and Q5 form line-commutated inverter. Switching losses and stresses nil because switching performed when current is zero.

  5. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  6. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  7. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  8. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  9. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  10. Radiation effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dexin; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    DC-DC switching converters are circuits that can be used to convert a DC voltage of one value to another by switching action. They are increasing being used in space systems. Most of the popular DC-DC switching converters utilize power MOSFETs. However power MOSFETs, when subjected to radiation, are susceptible to degradation of device characteristics or catastrophic failure. This work focuses on the effects of total ionizing dose on converter performance. Four fundamental switching converters (buck converter, buck-boost converter, cuk converter, and flyback converter) were built using Harris IRF250 power MOSFETs. These converters were designed for converting an input of 60 volts to an output of about 12 volts with a switching frequency of 100 kHz. The four converters were irradiated with a Co-60 gamma source at dose rate of 217 rad/min. The performances of the four converters were examined during the exposure to the radiation. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the converters increases as total dose increases. However, the increases of the output voltage were different for the four different converters, with the buck converter and cuk converter the highest and the flyback converter the lowest. We observed significant increases in output voltage for cuk converter at a total dose of 24 krad (si).

  11. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Cortright, R D; Davda, R R; Dumesic, J A

    2002-08-29

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500 K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose -- which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals -- to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  12. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortright, R. D.; Davda, R. R.; Dumesic, J. A.

    2002-08-01

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose-which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals-to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  13. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Cortright, R D; Davda, R R; Dumesic, J A

    2002-08-29

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500 K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose -- which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals -- to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams. PMID:12198544

  14. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  15. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  16. Power converter connection configuration

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2008-11-11

    EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  17. Superconducting active impedance converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10--80 K temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  18. A study of Schwarz converters for nuclear powered spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1987-01-01

    High power space systems which use low dc voltage, high current sources such as thermoelectric generators, will most likely require high voltage conversion for transmission purposes. This study considers the use of the Schwarz resonant converter for use as the basic building block to accomplish this low-to-high voltage conversion for either a dc or an ac spacecraft bus. The Schwarz converter has the important assets of both inherent fault tolerance and resonant operation; parallel operation in modular form is possible. A regulated dc spacecraft bus requires only a single stage converter while a constant frequency ac bus requires a cascaded Schwarz converter configuration. If the power system requires constant output power from the dc generator, then a second converter is required to route unneeded power to a ballast load.

  19. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  20. MOCCASIN: converting MATLAB ODE models to SBML

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Harold F.; Hucka, Michael; Keating, Sarah M.; Nudelman, German; Iber, Dagmar; Sealfon, Stuart C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: MATLAB is popular in biological research for creating and simulating models that use ordinary differential equations (ODEs). However, sharing or using these models outside of MATLAB is often problematic. A community standard such as Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) can serve as a neutral exchange format, but translating models from MATLAB to SBML can be challenging—especially for legacy models not written with translation in mind. We developed MOCCASIN (Model ODE Converter for Creating Automated SBML INteroperability) to help. MOCCASIN can convert ODE-based MATLAB models of biochemical reaction networks into the SBML format. Availability and implementation: MOCCASIN is available under the terms of the LGPL 2.1 license (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/lgpl-2.1.html). Source code, binaries and test cases can be freely obtained from https://github.com/sbmlteam/moccasin. Contact: mhucka@caltech.edu Supplementary information: More information is available at https://github.com/sbmlteam/moccasin. PMID:26861819

  1. Series resonant converter using flyback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. T.; Josephs, L. C.

    Series resonant converters are widely used in applications requiring high power density. They offer several advantages over other topologies such as simplicity of design, switching at zero current levels, and high efficiency due to low switching losses. A new converter will be proposed that delivers pulses of equal energy to the load with comparatively small pulse-to-pulse delay and draws sinusoidal input current pulses. Also, the conventional charge and discharge cycle of the commutation capacitor is eliminated. The capacitor voltage is bidirectional and energy is transferred from the capacitor to the load during each switching cycle. This topology does not generate any abruptly discontinuous current waveforms, therefore, the EMI produced is minimal.

  2. Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1993-09-01

    This project investigates a suitable catalyst system for direct NO decomposition in post-combustion gas streams. This process does not use a reductant, such as the ammonia used in Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to nitrogen. Therefore, it is greatly simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter. Catalysts are prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports according to ion exchange procedures widely used in preparation of metal/zeolite catalysts. The catalysts of primary interest include copper, palladium, silver and nickel exchanged ZSM-5 catalysts. Particular emphasis is given in this work on promoted Cu-exchanged zeolites, especially the catalyst system Mg/Cu-ZSM-5 and a few others, which are promising for NO conversion to nitrogen at typical flue gas O{sub 2} and NO levels and over the temperature range of 723--873K. The effect of zeolite modification, copper exchange level and catalyst preparation conditions on the catalyst activity are studied in a packed-bed microreactor. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reduction (TPR) experiments will be carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Kinetic studies of NO and O{sub 2} interaction with catalysts over a wide temperature range as well as catalyst structural investigations are planned.

  3. Production of hydrogen from biomass by catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis oil

    SciTech Connect

    Czernik, S.; Wang, D.; Chornet, E.

    1998-08-01

    Hydrogen is the prototype of the environmentally cleanest fuel of interest for power generation using fuel cells and for transportation. The thermochemical conversion of biomass to hydrogen can be carried out through two distinct strategies: (a) gasification followed by water-gas shift conversion, and (b) catalytic steam reforming of specific fractions derived from fast pyrolysis and aqueous/steam processes of biomass. This paper presents the latter route that begins with fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce bio-oil. This oil (as a whole or its selected fractions) can be converted to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming followed by a water-gas shift conversion step. Such a process has been demonstrated at the bench scale using model compounds, poplar oil aqueous fraction, and the whole pyrolysis oil with commercial Ni-based steam reforming catalysts. Hydrogen yields as high as 85% have been obtained. Catalyst initial activity can be recovered through regeneration cycles by steam or CO{sub 2} gasification of carbonaceous deposits.

  4. Supersymmetric mode converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Matthias; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Stützer, Simon; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the ever-increasing demand for high-capacity transmission systems has driven remarkable advances in technologies that encode information on an optical signal. Mode-division multiplexing makes use of individual modes supported by an optical waveguide as mutually orthogonal channels. The key requirement in this approach is the capability to selectively populate and extract specific modes. Optical supersymmetry (SUSY) has recently been proposed as a particularly elegant way to resolve this design challenge in a manner that is inherently scalable, and at the same time maintains compatibility with existing multiplexing strategies. Supersymmetric partners of multimode waveguides are characterized by the fact that they share all of their effective indices with the original waveguide. The crucial exception is the fundamental mode, which is absent from the spectrum of the partner waveguide. Here, we demonstrate experimentally how this global phase-matching property can be exploited for efficient mode conversion. Multimode structures and their superpartners are experimentally realized in coupled networks of femtosecond laser-written waveguides, and the corresponding light dynamics are directly observed by means of fluorescence microscopy. We show that SUSY transformations can readily facilitate the removal of the fundamental mode from multimode optical structures. In turn, hierarchical sequences of such SUSY partners naturally implement the conversion between modes of adjacent order. Our experiments illustrate just one of the many possibilities of how SUSY may serve as a building block for integrated mode-division multiplexing arrangements. Supersymmetric notions may enrich and expand integrated photonics by versatile optical components and desirable, yet previously unattainable, functionalities.

  5. Detail view to show richness of materials such as the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view to show richness of materials such as the Fourteenth Street vestibule with its gilded groin-vaulted ceiling - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Perspective view of the front elevation (note: decorative details such ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the front elevation (note: decorative details such as the brackets underpinning the deep cornice on the porch and house) - Philip T. Berry House, 1402 Thirty-first Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  8. Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

  9. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  10. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  11. Acrylamide catalytically inhibits topoisomerase II in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Sciandrello, Giulia; Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Catanzaro, Irene; Saverini, Marghereth; Barbata, Giusi

    2010-04-01

    The vinyl monomer acrylamide is characterized by the presence of an alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group that makes it reactive towards thiol, hydroxyl or amino groups and towards the nucleophilic centers in DNA. The ability of acrylamide to chemically modify protein thiols has prompted us to consider topoisomerase II as one possible target of acrylamide, since agents targeting protein sulfhydryl groups act as either catalytic inhibitors or poisons of topoisomerase II. Nuclear extracts from V79 Chinese hamster cells incubated with acrylamide reduced topoisomerase II activity as inferred by an inability to convert kinetoplast DNA to the decatenated form. Nuclear extracts incubated with acrylamide pre-incubated with DTT converted kinetoplast DNA to the decatenated form, suggesting that acrylamide influences topoisomerase II activity through reaction with sulfhydryl groups on the enzyme. Furthermore, acrylamide did not induce the pBR322 DNA cleavage, as assessed by cleavage assay; thus, it cannot be regarded as a poison of topoisomerase II. As a catalytic inhibitor, acrylamide antagonizes the effect of etoposide, a topoisomerase II poison, as determined by clonogenic assay in V79 cells. This antagonism is confirmed by band depletion assay, from which it can be inferred that acrylamide reduces the level of catalytically active cellular topoisomerase II available for the action of etoposide. PMID:20006698

  12. High efficiency thermionic converter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Sommer, A. H.; Balestra, C. L.; Briere, T. R.; Lieb, D.; Oettinger, P. E.; Goodale, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Research in thermionic energy conversion technology is reported. The objectives were to produce converters suitable for use in out of core space reactors, radioisotope generators, and solar satellites. The development of emitter electrodes that operate at low cesium pressure, stable low work function collector electrodes, and more efficient means of space charge neutralization were investigated to improve thermionic converter performance. Potential improvements in collector properties were noted with evaporated thin film barium oxide coatings. Experiments with cesium carbonate suggest this substance may provide optimum combinations of cesium and oxygen for thermionic conversion.

  13. Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, T.

    1994-06-01

    This project investigates a suitable catalyst system for the direct nitric oxide decomposition in post-combustion gas streams. This process does not use a reductant, such as the ammonia used in the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to nitrogen. Therefore, it is a greatly simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter. Catalysts are prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports according to ion exchange procedures widely used in preparation of metal/zeolite catalysts. Particular emphasis is given in this work on promoted Cu-exchanged zeolites, especially the catalyst systems Mg/Cu-ZSM-5 and Ce/Cu-ZSM-5, which are promising for NO conversion to nitrogen at typical flue gas O{sub 2} and NO levels and over the temperature range of 673--873{degrees}C. The effect of zeolite modification, copper exchange level and catalyst preparation conditions on the catalytic activity are studied in O{sub 2}-free, O{sub 2}-rich gases, as well as wet (2--20% H{sub 2}O) gas streams in a packed-bed microreactor. Characterization of catalysts is performed by XRD, STEM, TEM and ESR. During this quarter it was found that severe steaming (20% H{sub 2}O) of Na-ZSM-5 at temperatures above 600{degrees}C caused partial vitreous glass formation and dealumination. Unpromoted Cu-ZSM-5 catalysts suffer drastic loss of NO decomposition activity in wet gas streams at 500{degrees}C. Activity is partially recovered in dry gas. Copper migration out of the zeolite channels leading to CuO formation has been identified by STEM/EDX. In Ce/Cu-ZSM-5 catalysts the wet gas activity i`s greatly improved. CuO particle formation is less extensive and the dry gas activity is largely recovered upon removal of the water vapor.

  14. Rediscovering ACE: Novel insights into the many roles of the angiotensin-converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Janjulia, Tea; Taylor, Brian; Giani, Jorge F.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Shi, Peng D.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Bernstein, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is best known for the catalytic conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. However, the use of gene-targeting techniques has led to mouse models highlighting many other biochemical properties and actions of this enzyme. This review discusses recent studies examining the functional significance of ACE tissue-specific expression and the presence in ACE of two independent catalytic sites with distinct substrates and biological effects. It is these features which explain why ACE makes important contributions to many different physiological processes including renal development, blood pressure control, inflammation and immunity. PMID:23686164

  15. TOP OF STRAND ANNEALING TOWER, ONE OF FIVE SUCH STRUCTURES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP OF STRAND ANNEALING TOWER, ONE OF FIVE SUCH STRUCTURES THE BUFFALO PLANT OF AMERICAN BRASS. HEAVIER-GAUGE STRIP IS CONTINUOUSLY ANNEALED TO GIVE THE PRODUCT A MORE UNIFORM GRAIN SIZE AND RENDER IT MORE DUCTILE. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  16. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  17. 26. SOME CORES, SUCH AS THESE IN THE BRASS FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. SOME CORES, SUCH AS THESE IN THE BRASS FOUNDRY CA.1950, ARE DIPPED INTO A SOLUTION PRIOR TO BEING BAKED IN THE CORE OVEN BEHIND, TO SET THE RESIN AND CREATE A STRUCTURE STRONG ENOUGH TO HOLD UP AGAINST MOLTEN METAL. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. No Such Thing as "Good Vibrations" in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Franklin D.

    2011-01-01

    A facilities manager must ensure that a building runs as smoothly and successfully as possible. For college, university, and school managers dealing with laboratories and other spaces for scientific study and research, this means making sure that nothing disrupts experiments and other scientific endeavors. Such disruptions can wreak havoc,…

  19. 6. VIEW SHOWING WOODEN FLUMES ACROSS MARICOPA CANAL. SUCH FLUMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING WOODEN FLUMES ACROSS MARICOPA CANAL. SUCH FLUMES WERE USED TO CARRY WATER FROM ONE CANAL TO ANOTHER, BEFORE THE CANAL COMPANIES WERE BOUGHT BY THE GOVERNMENT, AND THE SYSTEM UNIFIED. Photographer unknown, no date - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents.

  1. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents. 9 figs.

  2. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagoruiko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  3. Non-catalytic surfaces for metallic heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swann, R. T.; Wood, G. M.; Brown, R. D.; Upchurch, B. T.; Allen, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    The magnitude of the atom recombination coefficients needed for metal heat shield surfaces on Shuttle-type vehicles is analyzed and discussed. Prior work which identifies surfaces having low catalytic activity is reviewed. Arc tunnel tests to evaluate catalytic activity are described and the difficulties of such tests are discussed. Results are presented which show major differences between atom recombination and atom exchange from molecules. Results of surface analysis show that bulk and surface composition of a coating are different.

  4. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  5. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  6. Converting Work into College Credits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Joseph A.

    1976-01-01

    The Cooperative Education Program conducted by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Industry and Thomas A. Edison College enables State labor department employees to work toward college degrees by attending free classes, taking college-level examinations for college credit, and converting work and life experiences into college credits.…

  7. FM-to-Digital Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniuszko, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Circuit includes array of low-cost multivibrators. Inexpensive circuit converts frequency-modulated (FM) signal into digital signal. Consists of zero-crossing detector and series of monostable multivibrators and D-type flip-flops. Used to control filter.

  8. Fundamental studies of catalytic gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1990-06-01

    Previous work has shown that chars and coal can be gasified with steam in the presence of alkali-transition metal oxide catalysts or alkali-earth alkali catalysts at relatively low temperatures. These studies are to be extended to the investigation of the amounts of catalysts required and whether a throw away catalyst can be used. Fresh versus stored char will be gasified to determine the role of oxidation of the char on gasification rates. Less expensive catalyst materials such as sodium instead of potassium and iron instead of nickel will be explored. Reaction rates will be determined in the presence of nitrogen, Co and CO{sub 2}. Reactions of methane and carbon solids in the presence of an oxidizing agent such as water, oxygen, and/or carbon dioxide will be explored in the presence of similar catalyst. This quarter, additional experiments on catalytic gasification of coal were carried out. Major emphasis, however, was on the production of C{sub 2} and higher hydrocarbons from methane at very high selectivities. Catalysts studied include KCaNiO. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Multilevel converters for power system applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.S.; Stovall, J.P.; Peng, F.Z. |

    1995-09-01

    Multilevel converters are emerging as a new breed of power converter options for power system applications. These converters are most suitable for high voltage high power applications because they connect devices in series without the need for component matching. One of the major limitations of the multilevel converters is the voltage unbalance between different levels. To avoid voltage unbalance between different levels, several techniques have been proposed for different applications. Excluding magnetic-coupled converters, this paper introduces three multilevel voltage source converters: (1) diode-clamp, (2) flying-capacitors, and (3) cascaded inverters with separate dc sources. The operation principle, features, constraints, and potential applications of these converters will be discussed.

  10. Study of switching transients in high frequency converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinger, Donald S.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Lee, Tony

    1993-01-01

    As the semiconductor technologies progress rapidly, the power densities and switching frequencies of many power devices are improved. With the existing technology, high frequency power systems become possible. Use of such a system is advantageous in many aspects. A high frequency ac source is used as the direct input to an ac/ac pulse-density-modulation (PDM) converter. This converter is a new concept which employs zero voltage switching techniques. However, the development of this converter is still in its infancy stage. There are problems associated with this converter such as a high on-voltage drop, switching transients, and zero-crossing detecting. Considering these problems, the switching speed and power handling capabilities of the MOS-Controlled Thyristor (MCT) makes the device the most promising candidate for this application. A complete insight of component considerations for building an ac/ac PDM converter for a high frequency power system is addressed. A power device review is first presented. The ac/ac PDM converter requires switches that can conduct bi-directional current and block bi-directional voltage. These bi-directional switches can be constructed using existing power devices. Different bi-directional switches for the converter are investigated. Detailed experimental studies of the characteristics of the MCT under hard switching and zero-voltage switching are also presented. One disadvantage of an ac/ac converter is that turn-on and turn-off of the switches has to be completed instantaneously when the ac source is at zero voltage. Otherwise shoot-through current or voltage spikes can occur which can be hazardous to the devices. In order for the devices to switch softly in the safe operating area even under non-ideal cases, a unique snubber circuit is used in each bi-directional switch. Detailed theory and experimental results for circuits using these snubbers are presented. A current regulated ac/ac PDM converter built using MCT's and IGBT's is

  11. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  12. Controlling structure and porosity in catalytic nanoparticle superlattices with DNA.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Evelyn; Morris, William; Mondloch, Joseph E; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we describe a strategy for converting catalytically inactive, highly crystalline nanoparticle superlattices embedded in silica into catalytically active, porous structures through superlattice assembly and calcination. First, a body-centered cubic (bcc) superlattice is synthesized through the assembly of two sets of 5 nm gold nanoparticles chemically modified with DNA bearing complementary sticky end sequences. These superlattices are embedded in silica and calcined at 350 °C to provide access to the catalytic nanoparticle surface sites. The calcined superlattice maintains its bcc ordering and has a surface area of 210 m(2)/g. The loading of catalytically active nanoparticles within the superlattice was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, which revealed that the calcined superlattice contained approximately 10% Au by weight. We subsequently investigate the ability of supported Au nanoparticle superlattices to catalyze alcohol oxidation. In addition to demonstrating that calcined superlattices are effective catalysts for alcohol oxidation, electron microscopy reveals preservation of the crystalline structure of the bcc superlattice following calcination and catalysis. Unlike many bulk nanoparticle catalysts, which are difficult to characterize and susceptible to aggregation, nanoparticle superlattices synthesized using DNA interactions offer an attractive bottom-up route to structurally defined heterogeneous catalysts, where one has the potential to independently control nanoparticle size, nanoparticle compositions, and interparticle spacings.

  13. Parametric study of laser photovoltaic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Photovoltaic converters are of interest for converting laser power to electrical power in a space-based laser power system. This paper describes a model for photovoltaic laser converters and the application of this model to a neodymium laser silicon photovoltaic converter system. A parametric study which defines the sensitivity of the photovoltaic parameters is described. An optimized silicon photovoltaic converter has an efficiency greater than 50 percent for 1000 W/sq cm of neodymium laser radiation.

  14. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-18

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  15. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  16. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the

  17. The elaborate plumage in peacocks is not such a drag.

    PubMed

    Askew, Graham N

    2014-09-15

    One of the classic examples of an exaggerated sexually selected trait is the elaborate plumage that forms the train in male peafowl Pavo cristatus (peacock). Such ornaments are thought to reduce locomotor performance as a result of their weight and aerodynamic drag, but this cost is unknown. Here, the effect that the train has on take-off flight in peacocks was quantified as the sum of the rates of change of the potential and kinetic energies of the body (P(CoM)) in birds with trains and following the train's removal. There was no significant difference between P(CoM) in birds with and without a train. The train incurs drag during take-off; however, while this produces a twofold increase in parasite drag, parasite power only accounts for 0.1% of the total aerodynamic power. The train represented 6.9% of body weight and is expected to increase induced power. The absence of a detectable effect on take-off performance does not necessarily mean that there is no cost associated with possessing such ornate plumage; rather, it suggests that given the variation in take-off performance per se, the magnitude of any effect of the train has little meaningful functional relevance.

  18. The elaborate plumage in peacocks is not such a drag.

    PubMed

    Askew, Graham N

    2014-09-15

    One of the classic examples of an exaggerated sexually selected trait is the elaborate plumage that forms the train in male peafowl Pavo cristatus (peacock). Such ornaments are thought to reduce locomotor performance as a result of their weight and aerodynamic drag, but this cost is unknown. Here, the effect that the train has on take-off flight in peacocks was quantified as the sum of the rates of change of the potential and kinetic energies of the body (P(CoM)) in birds with trains and following the train's removal. There was no significant difference between P(CoM) in birds with and without a train. The train incurs drag during take-off; however, while this produces a twofold increase in parasite drag, parasite power only accounts for 0.1% of the total aerodynamic power. The train represented 6.9% of body weight and is expected to increase induced power. The absence of a detectable effect on take-off performance does not necessarily mean that there is no cost associated with possessing such ornate plumage; rather, it suggests that given the variation in take-off performance per se, the magnitude of any effect of the train has little meaningful functional relevance. PMID:25232196

  19. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. First quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Benedek, K.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-02-01

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation will be conducting Phase I of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. this catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria or zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an ongoing DOE-sponsored University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicates that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. the performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  20. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Second quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    In the more than 170 wet scrubber systems in 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers, the SO{sub 2} removed from the boiler flue gas is sorbed, and the sulfated sorbent must be disposed of. The use of regenerable sorbents has the potential to reduce this disposal problem. The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts Univ., and Engelhard Corp. are conducting Phase I of a 4.5-year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting SO{sub 2} to S. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide such as ceria and zirconia; the catalytic activity can be promoted by active transition metals such as Cu. The Phase I program includes the following work elements: market/process/cost/evaluation; lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization, lab-scale bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies, bench-scale catalyst/process studies, and utility review.

  1. Transplantation: To convert or not to convert: lessons from the CONVERT trial.

    PubMed

    Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Vincenti, Flavio

    2009-07-01

    In participants of the CONVERT trial, which enrolled recipients of kidney transplants, conversion of immunosuppressive therapy from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus did not improve renal function. More importantly, the intervention was detrimental among patients with impaired kidney function and/or proteinuria. Sirolimus conversion resulted, however, in lower rates of malignancy.

  2. Trash to Gas: Converting Space Trash into Useful Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, Mononita

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Logistical Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project is a collaborative effort in which NASA is determined to reduce total logistical mass through reduction, reuse and recycling of various wastes and components of long duration space missions and habitats. LRR is focusing on four distinct advanced areas of study: Advanced Clothing System, Logistics-to-Living, Heat Melt Compactor and Trash to Supply Gas (TtSG). The objective of TtSG is to develop technologies that convert material waste, human waste and food waste into high-value products. High-value products include life support oxygen and water, rocket fuels, raw material production feedstocks, and other energy sources. There are multiple pathways for converting waste to products involving single or multi-step processes. This paper discusses thermal oxidation methods of converting waste to methane. Different wastes, including food, food packaging, Maximum Absorbent Garments (MAGs), human waste simulants, and cotton washcloths have been evaluated in a thermal degradation reactor under conditions promoting pyrolysis, gasification or incineration. The goal was to evaluate the degradation processes at varying temperatures and ramp cycles and to maximize production of desirable products and minimize high molecular weight hydrocarbon (tar) production. Catalytic cracking was also evaluated to minimize tar production. The quantities of C02, CO, CH4, and H20 were measured under the different thermal degradation conditions. The conversion efficiencies of these products were used to determine the best methods for producing desired products.

  3. Trash-to-Gas: Converting Space Trash into Useful Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne J.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Logistical Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project is a collaborative effort in which NASA is determined to reduce total logistical mass through reduction, reuse and recycling of various wastes and components of long duration space missions and habitats. LRR is focusing on four distinct advanced areas of study: Advanced Clothing System, Logistics-to-Living, Heat Melt Compactor and Trash to Supply Gas (TtSG). The objective of TtSG is to develop technologies that convert material waste, human waste and food waste into high-value products. High-value products include life support oxygen and water, rocket fuels, raw material production feedstocks, and other energy sources. There are multiple pathways for converting waste to products involving single or multi-step processes. This paper discusses thermal oxidation methods of converting waste to methane. Different wastes, including food, food packaging, Maximum Absorbent Garments (MAGs), human waste simulants, and cotton washcloths have been evaluated in a thermal degradation reactor under conditions promoting pyrolysis, gasification or incineration. The goal was to evaluate the degradation processes at varying temperatures and ramp cycles and to maximize production of desirable products and minimize high molecular weight hydrocarbon (tar) production. Catalytic cracking was also evaluated to minimize tar production. The quantities of CO2, CO, CH4, and H2O were measured under the different thermal degradation conditions. The conversion efficiencies of these products were used to determine the best methods for producing desired products.

  4. Converting VSAM in COBOL to embedded SQL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Wang, Yamin; Tsai, Wei-Tek

    1996-12-31

    VSAM databases we widely used on IBM mainframe systems. As new technology, such as relational database and client-server computing, becomes popular, there is a need to reengineer the VSAM databases to relational databases. This paper addresses the issues on converting COBOL programs that access VSAM database to COBOL programs that access relational databases with embedded SQL. It proposed a semi-automatic approach to the conversion of VSAM data sets to SQL tables and VSAM operations in COBOL program to embedded SQL queries. The proposed approach has been experimented on several industrial COBOL programs and a tool implementing the approach is under development.

  5. The Honeycomb illusion: Uniform textures not perceived as such

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michael H.; Bruno, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of patterns, in which texture is perceived differently at fixation in comparison to the periphery, such that a physically uniform stimulus yields a nonuniform percept. We call this the Honeycomb illusion, and we discuss it in relation to the similar Extinction illusion (Ninio & Stevens, 2000). The effect remains strong despite multiple fixations, dynamic changes, and manipulations of the size of texture elements. We discuss the phenomenon in relation to how vision achieves a detailed and stable representation of the environment despite changes in retinal spatial resolution and dramatic changes across saccades. The Honeycomb illusion complements previous related observations in suggesting that this representation is not necessarily based on multiple fixations (i.e., memory) or on extrapolation from information available to central vision. PMID:27698980

  6. The Honeycomb illusion: Uniform textures not perceived as such

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michael H.; Bruno, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of patterns, in which texture is perceived differently at fixation in comparison to the periphery, such that a physically uniform stimulus yields a nonuniform percept. We call this the Honeycomb illusion, and we discuss it in relation to the similar Extinction illusion (Ninio & Stevens, 2000). The effect remains strong despite multiple fixations, dynamic changes, and manipulations of the size of texture elements. We discuss the phenomenon in relation to how vision achieves a detailed and stable representation of the environment despite changes in retinal spatial resolution and dramatic changes across saccades. The Honeycomb illusion complements previous related observations in suggesting that this representation is not necessarily based on multiple fixations (i.e., memory) or on extrapolation from information available to central vision.

  7. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  8. Catalytic conversion of nonfood woody biomass solids to organic liquids.

    PubMed

    Barta, Katalin; Ford, Peter C

    2014-05-20

    This Account outlines recent efforts in our laboratories addressing a fundamental challenge of sustainability chemistry, the effective utilization of biomass for production of chemicals and fuels. Efficient methods for converting renewable biomass solids to chemicals and liquid fuels would reduce society's dependence on nonrenewable petroleum resources while easing the atmospheric carbon dioxide burden. The major nonfood component of biomass is lignocellulose, a matrix of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. New approaches are needed to effect facile conversion of lignocellulose solids to liquid fuels and to other chemical precursors without the formation of intractable side products and with sufficient specificity to give economically sustainable product streams. We have devised a novel catalytic system whereby the renewable feedstocks cellulose, organosolv lignin, and even lignocellulose composites such as sawdust are transformed into organic liquids. The reaction medium is supercritical methanol (sc-MeOH), while the catalyst is a copper-doped porous metal oxide (PMO) prepared from inexpensive, Earth-abundant starting materials. This transformation occurs in a single stage reactor operating at 300-320 °C and 160-220 bar. The reducing equivalents for these transformations are derived by the reforming of MeOH (to H2 and CO), which thereby serves as a "liquid syngas" in the present case. Water generated by deoxygenation processes is quickly removed by the water-gas shift reaction. The Cu-doped PMO serves multiple purposes, catalyzing substrate hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation as well as the methanol reforming and shift reactions. This one-pot "UCSB process" is quantitative, giving little or no biochar residual. Provided is an overview of these catalysis studies beginning with reactions of the model compound dihydrobenzofuran that help define the key processes occurring. The initial step is phenyl-ether bond hydrogenolysis, and this is followed by

  9. Catalytic conversion of nonfood woody biomass solids to organic liquids.

    PubMed

    Barta, Katalin; Ford, Peter C

    2014-05-20

    This Account outlines recent efforts in our laboratories addressing a fundamental challenge of sustainability chemistry, the effective utilization of biomass for production of chemicals and fuels. Efficient methods for converting renewable biomass solids to chemicals and liquid fuels would reduce society's dependence on nonrenewable petroleum resources while easing the atmospheric carbon dioxide burden. The major nonfood component of biomass is lignocellulose, a matrix of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. New approaches are needed to effect facile conversion of lignocellulose solids to liquid fuels and to other chemical precursors without the formation of intractable side products and with sufficient specificity to give economically sustainable product streams. We have devised a novel catalytic system whereby the renewable feedstocks cellulose, organosolv lignin, and even lignocellulose composites such as sawdust are transformed into organic liquids. The reaction medium is supercritical methanol (sc-MeOH), while the catalyst is a copper-doped porous metal oxide (PMO) prepared from inexpensive, Earth-abundant starting materials. This transformation occurs in a single stage reactor operating at 300-320 °C and 160-220 bar. The reducing equivalents for these transformations are derived by the reforming of MeOH (to H2 and CO), which thereby serves as a "liquid syngas" in the present case. Water generated by deoxygenation processes is quickly removed by the water-gas shift reaction. The Cu-doped PMO serves multiple purposes, catalyzing substrate hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation as well as the methanol reforming and shift reactions. This one-pot "UCSB process" is quantitative, giving little or no biochar residual. Provided is an overview of these catalysis studies beginning with reactions of the model compound dihydrobenzofuran that help define the key processes occurring. The initial step is phenyl-ether bond hydrogenolysis, and this is followed by

  10. There is no such thing as a biocompatible material.

    PubMed

    Williams, David F

    2014-12-01

    This Leading Opinion Paper discusses a very important matter concerning the use of a single word in biomaterials science. This might be considered as being solely concerned with semantics, but it has implications for the scientific rationale for biomaterials selection and the understanding of their performance. That word is the adjective 'biocompatible', which is often used to characterize a material property. It is argued here that biocompatibility is a perfectly acceptable term, but that it subsumes a variety of mechanisms of interaction between biomaterials and tissues or tissue components and can only be considered in the context of the characteristics of both the material and the biological host within which it placed. De facto it is a property of a system and not of a material. It follows that there can be no such thing as a biocompatible material. It is further argued that in those situations where it is considered important, or necessary, to use a descriptor of biocompatibility, as in a scientific paper, a regulatory submission or in a legal argument, the phrase 'intrinsically biocompatible system' would be the most appropriate. The rationale for this linguistic restraint is that far too often it has been assumed that some materials are 'universally biocompatible' on the basis of acceptable clinical performance in one situation, only for entirely unacceptable performance to ensue in quite different clinical circumstances.

  11. Acid deposition: No such thing as a free launch

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1990-07-01

    This paper reviews the acid deposition process and outlines the issues of atmospheric science that have made it such a difficult issue on which to achieve consensus. The geographical focus of this review is eastern North America, but the considerations presented here are applicable also to other regions. Acid deposition consists of delivery of acidic substances from the atmosphere to the earth's surface, principally sulfur and nitrogen oxides, acids, and salts. These compounds (mainly the oxides) are introduced into the atmosphere principally as by-products of fossil fuel combustion. Research on atmospheric processes examines the relations between the rates and spatial distributions of emissions of acidifying substances, the atmospheric concentrations and spatial distributions of these substances and of their atmospheric transformation products, and the rates and spatial distributions of deposition of these materials. The goal of this research is to determine how atmospheric concentrations and deposition fluxes would change in response to specified changes in emissions. Effects research is the study of the consequences of atmospheric concentrations and deposition rates of acidic and related substances on human health, on artificial structural and ornamental materials, on cultivated crops, and on natural terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The goal of this research is to determine standards for concentrations and deposition that are suitable for protecting human health and the general welfare from adverse effects of acid deposition. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Attraction of undulatory swimmers, such as nematodes, to surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David; Bau, Haim

    2014-11-01

    Nematodes play a significant role in the ecosystem; agriculture; human, animal, and plant disease; and medical research. The interactions between nematodes and surfaces may play an important role in nematodes' life cycle and ability to invade a host. We studied the effect of a surface on the dynamics of low-Reynolds number, undulating swimmers such as Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans -both wild type and touch-insensitive. The experiments demonstrated that swimmers located far from a surface selected randomly their direction of motion. In contrast, surface-proximate swimmers rotated towards, collided with, and swam along the surface for considerable time intervals, periodically contacting the surface with their anterior. Likewise, swimmers in a swarm were present at higher concentrations close to the surface. Both resistive force theory-based calculations and symmetry arguments predict that short range hydrodynamic torque, resulting from the interaction between the swimmer-induced flow field and the surface, rotate the swimmer towards the surface. We conclude that the surface attraction and following results from the interplay between short-range hydrodynamic and steric forces and is genotype-independent. The work was supported, in part, by NIH NIA 5R03AG042690-02 and NBIC NSF NSEC DMR08-32802.

  13. Fuel-Rich Catalytic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Olson, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    Two-stage combustion system reduces particulate emissions. Program on catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrates feasibility of two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With fuel-rich (fuel/air equivalence ratios of 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic-combustion preburner as first stage, combustion process free of soot at reactor-outlet temperatures of 1,200 K or less.

  14. Photoelectric converters with quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan-He; Sun, Chang-Pu; Li, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Jin-Can

    2016-05-01

    Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in electronic devices and driving the electron flux from the lower chemical potential to higher chemical potential. Previous studies hinted that the thermodynamic efficiency of a nanosized photoelectric converter at maximum power is bounded by the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency η_{CA}. In this study, we apply quantum effects to design a photoelectric converter based on a three-level quantum dot (QD) interacting with fermionic baths and photons. We show that, by adopting a pair of suitable degenerate states, quantum coherences induced by the couplings of QDs to sunlight and fermion baths can coexist steadily in nanoelectronic systems. Our analysis indicates that the efficiency at maximum power is no longer limited to η_{CA} through manipulation of carefully controlled quantum coherences. PMID:27300826

  15. Photoelectric converters with quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shan-He; Sun, Chang-Pu; Li, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Jin-Can

    2016-05-01

    Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in electronic devices and driving the electron flux from the lower chemical potential to higher chemical potential. Previous studies hinted that the thermodynamic efficiency of a nanosized photoelectric converter at maximum power is bounded by the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency ηCA. In this study, we apply quantum effects to design a photoelectric converter based on a three-level quantum dot (QD) interacting with fermionic baths and photons. We show that, by adopting a pair of suitable degenerate states, quantum coherences induced by the couplings of QDs to sunlight and fermion baths can coexist steadily in nanoelectronic systems. Our analysis indicates that the efficiency at maximum power is no longer limited to ηCA through manipulation of carefully controlled quantum coherences.

  16. Photoelectric converters with quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan-He; Sun, Chang-Pu; Li, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Jin-Can

    2016-05-01

    Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in electronic devices and driving the electron flux from the lower chemical potential to higher chemical potential. Previous studies hinted that the thermodynamic efficiency of a nanosized photoelectric converter at maximum power is bounded by the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency η_{CA}. In this study, we apply quantum effects to design a photoelectric converter based on a three-level quantum dot (QD) interacting with fermionic baths and photons. We show that, by adopting a pair of suitable degenerate states, quantum coherences induced by the couplings of QDs to sunlight and fermion baths can coexist steadily in nanoelectronic systems. Our analysis indicates that the efficiency at maximum power is no longer limited to η_{CA} through manipulation of carefully controlled quantum coherences.

  17. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  18. Status of advanced bremsstrahlung converters

    SciTech Connect

    Halbleib, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to review the somewhat ill-defined area of advanced converter research in a more or less chronological fashion. Section 2 reviews the early B/sub z/ work that was motivated by the CASINO project. More recent work makes liberal use of technology from ICF research using REBs is discussed in Sec. 3. Section 4 discusses possible directions for future research, some of which are being actively pursued at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and elsewhere.

  19. Catalytic Asymmetric Hydroamination of Unactivated Internal Olefins to Aliphatic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Shi, Shi-Liang; Niu, Dawen; Liu, Peng; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic assembly of enantiopure aliphatic amines from abundant and readily available precursors has long been recognized as a paramount challenge in synthetic chemistry. Herein, we describe a mild and general copper-catalyzed hydroamination that effectively converts unactivated internal olefins, an important yet unexploited class of abundant feedstock chemicals, into highly enantioenriched α-branched amines (≥ 96% enantiomeric excess) featuring two minimally differentiated aliphatic substituents. This method provides a powerful means to access a broad range of advanced, highly functionalized enantioenriched amines of interest in pharmaceutical research and other areas. PMID:26138973

  20. High efficiency thermionic converter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Sommer, A. H.; Balestra, C. L.; Briere, D. P.; Oettinger, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    The objective is to improve thermionic converter performance by means of reduced interelectrode losses, greater emitter capabilities, and lower collector work functions until the converter performance level is suitable for out-of-core space reactors and radioisotope generators. Electrode screening experiments have identified several promising collector materials. Back emission work function measurements of a ZnO collector in a thermionic diode have given values less than 1.3 eV. Diode tests were conducted over the range of temperatures of interest for space power applications. Enhanced mode converter experiments have included triodes operated in both the surface ionization and plasmatron modes. Pulsed triodes were studied as a function of pulse length, pulse potential, inert gas fill pressure, cesium pressure, spacing, emitter temperature and collector temperature. Current amplifications (i.e., mean output current/mean grid current) of several hundred were observed up to output current densities of one amp/sq cm. These data correspond to an equivalent arc drop less than 0.1 eV.

  1. Non-synchronous control of self-oscillating resonant converters

    DOEpatents

    Glaser, John Stanley; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A self-oscillating switching power converter has a controllable reactance including an active device connected to a reactive element, wherein the effective reactance of the reactance and the active device is controlled such that the control waveform for the active device is binary digital and is not synchronized with the switching converter output frequency. The active device is turned completely on and off at a frequency that is substantially greater than the maximum frequency imposed on the output terminals of the active device. The effect is to vary the average resistance across the active device output terminals, and thus the effective output reactance, thereby providing converter output control, while maintaining the response speed of the converter.

  2. Converting baker's waste into alcohol. Revised final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, R.; Wilson, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    All types of baker's waste (including waste from candy manufacturers) can be converted into alcohol to be used as a fuel. All types of waste at any stage in process can be converted, such as: basic ingredients (including floor sweepings); dry mixes (including floor sweepings); dough at any stage; partially or fully cooked products; and day old returned products. The basic steps are the same, only the initial preparation will vary slightly. The variation will be: amount of water to be added and amount and type of nutrients (if any) to be added. The basic steps are: slurrying, liquefying to put starch into liquid state, saccharifying to convert starch into fermentable sugars, fermentation to convert sugars into alcohol, and distillation to separate the alcohol from the mash. Each step is discussed in detail along with problems that may arise. Directions are given and materials (enzymes, yeast, etc.) and equipment are descibed briefly.

  3. Catalytic and non-catalytic pyrolysis of biomass in non-inert environments for production of deoxygenated bio-oil and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast pyrolysis processes are among the most effective methods for liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass. Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) over HZSM-5 or other zeolites and/or utilization of reactive atmospheres such as in the non-catalytic Tail Gas Reactive Pyrolysis (TRGP) process, a recent patent...

  4. Analysis of a class of pulse modulated dc-to-dc power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, P.

    1975-01-01

    The basic operational characteristics of dc-to-dc converters are analyzed. The basic physical characteristics of power converters are identified. A simple class of dc-to-dc power converters is chosen which could satisfy any set of operating requirements. Three different controlling methods in this class are described in detail. Necessary conditions for the stability of these converters are measured through analog computer simulation. These curves are related to other operational characteristics, such as ripple and regulation. Finally, further research is suggested for the solution of the physical design of absolutely stable, reliable, and efficient power converters of this class.

  5. Analysis of high voltage step-up nonisolated DC-DC boost converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alisson Alencar Freitas, Antônio; Lessa Tofoli, Fernando; Junior, Edilson Mineiro Sá; Daher, Sergio; Antunes, Fernando Luiz Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    A high voltage step-up nonisolated DC-DC converter based on coupled inductors suitable to photovoltaic (PV) systems applications is proposed in this paper. Considering that numerous approaches exist to extend the voltage conversion ratio of DC-DC converters that do not use transformers, a detailed comparison is also presented among the proposed converter and other popular topologies such as the conventional boost converter and the quadratic boost converter. The qualitative analysis of the coupled-inductor-based topology is developed so that a design procedure can be obtained, from which an experimental prototype is implemented to validate the theoretical assumptions.

  6. Orthogonal-core type three-phase dc-ac converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ichinokura, O.; Saito, H.; Jinzenji, T. ); Tajima, K. )

    1993-03-01

    In a previous paper, the authors proposed an orthogonal-core type dc-ac converter for use in photovoltaic power systems. The dc-ac converter has such desirable features as a simple construction, high degree of safety, and ease of maintenance. The operating characteristics of a single-phase converter for residential photovoltaic power systems have also been reported. In this paper, the authors discuss the basic operation of an orthogonal-core type dc-ac converter for a three-phase power system based on simulations and experiments. An optimal construction of the orthogonal-core type three-phase dc-ac converter has been developed.

  7. Interleaved DC-DC Converter with Discrete Duty Cycle and Open Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroics, K.; Sokolovs, A.

    2016-08-01

    The authors present the control principle of the multiphase interleaved DC-DC converter that can be used to vastly reduce output current ripple of the converter. The control algorithm can be easily implemented by using microcontroller without current loop in each phase. The converter works in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) but close to boundary conduction mode (BCM). The DC-DC converter with such a control algorithm is useful in applications that do not require precise current adjustment. The prototype of the converter has been built. The experimental results of the current ripple are presented in the paper.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of car tire waste using expanded perlite.

    PubMed

    Kar, Y

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the non-catalytic and catalytic pyrolysis experiments were conducted on the sample of tire waste using expanded perlite as an additive material to determine especially the effect of temperature and catalyst-to-tire ratio on the products yields and the compositions and qualities of pyrolytic oils (NCPO and CPO). Non-catalytic studies, which were carried out under the certain conditions (a nitrogen flow of 100mL/min and a heating rate of 10°C/min), showed that the highest yield of pyrolytic oil (NCPO) was 60.02wt.% at 425°C. Then, the catalytic pyrolysis studies were carried out at catalyst-to-tire ratio range of 0.05-0.25 and the highest catalytic pyrolytic oil (CPO) yield was 65.11wt.% at the ratio of 0.10 with the yield increase of 8.48wt.% compared with the non-catalytic pyrolysis. Lastly, the pyrolytic oils were characterized with applying a various techniques such as elemental analyses and various chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques (GC-MS, (1)H NMR, FT-IR, etc.). The characterization results revealed that the pyrolytic oils which were complex mixtures of C(5)-C(15) organic compounds (predominantly aromatic compounds) and also the CPO compared to the NCPO was more similar to conventional fuels in view of the certain fuel properties.

  9. Large wind energy converter: Growian 3 MW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, F.; Thiele, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The main features of the Growian wind energy converter are presented. Energy yield, environmental impact, and construction of the energy converter are discussed. Reliability of the windpowered system is assessed.

  10. Boosting the value of biodiesel byproduct by the non-catalytic transesterification of dimethyl carbonate via a continuous flow system under ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Jeon, Young Jae

    2014-10-01

    Transformation of coconut oil into biodiesel by using dimethyl carbonate (DMC) via a non-catalytic transesterification reaction under ambient pressure was investigated in this study. The non-catalytic transformation to biodiesel was achieved by means of a heterogeneous reaction between liquid triglycerides and gas phase DMC. The reaction was enhanced in the presence of porous material due to its intrinsic physical properties such as tortuosity and absorption/adsorption. The numerous pores in the material served as micro reaction chambers and ensured that there was enough contact time between the liquid triglycerides and the gaseous DMC, which enabled the completion of the transesterification. The highest fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) yield achieved was 98±0.5% within 1-2min at a temperature of 360-450°C under ambient pressure. The fast reaction rates made it possible to convert the lipid feedstock into biodiesel via a continuous flow system without the application of increased pressure. This suggested that the commonly used supercritical conditions could be avoided, resulting in huge cost benefits for biodiesel production. In addition, the high value of the byproduct from the transesterification of the lipid feedstock with DMC suggested that the production biodiesel using this method could be more economically competitive. Finally, the basic properties of biodiesel derived from the non-catalytic conversion of rapeseed oil with DMC were summarised.

  11. Boosting the value of biodiesel byproduct by the non-catalytic transesterification of dimethyl carbonate via a continuous flow system under ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Jeon, Young Jae

    2014-10-01

    Transformation of coconut oil into biodiesel by using dimethyl carbonate (DMC) via a non-catalytic transesterification reaction under ambient pressure was investigated in this study. The non-catalytic transformation to biodiesel was achieved by means of a heterogeneous reaction between liquid triglycerides and gas phase DMC. The reaction was enhanced in the presence of porous material due to its intrinsic physical properties such as tortuosity and absorption/adsorption. The numerous pores in the material served as micro reaction chambers and ensured that there was enough contact time between the liquid triglycerides and the gaseous DMC, which enabled the completion of the transesterification. The highest fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) yield achieved was 98±0.5% within 1-2min at a temperature of 360-450°C under ambient pressure. The fast reaction rates made it possible to convert the lipid feedstock into biodiesel via a continuous flow system without the application of increased pressure. This suggested that the commonly used supercritical conditions could be avoided, resulting in huge cost benefits for biodiesel production. In addition, the high value of the byproduct from the transesterification of the lipid feedstock with DMC suggested that the production biodiesel using this method could be more economically competitive. Finally, the basic properties of biodiesel derived from the non-catalytic conversion of rapeseed oil with DMC were summarised. PMID:25065794

  12. Voltage balanced multilevel voltage source converter system

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1997-01-01

    A voltage balanced multilevel converter for high power AC applications such as adjustable speed motor drives and back-to-back DC intertie of adjacent power systems. This converter provides a multilevel rectifier, a multilevel inverter, and a DC link between the rectifier and the inverter allowing voltage balancing between each of the voltage levels within the multilevel converter. The rectifier is equipped with at least one phase leg and a source input node for each of the phases. The rectifier is further equipped with a plurality of rectifier DC output nodes. The inverter is equipped with at least one phase leg and a load output node for each of the phases. The inverter is further equipped with a plurality of inverter DC input nodes. The DC link is equipped with a plurality of rectifier charging means and a plurality of inverter discharging means. The plurality of rectifier charging means are connected in series with one of the rectifier charging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of rectifier DC output nodes. The plurality of inverter discharging means are connected in series with one of the inverter discharging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of inverter DC input nodes. Each of said rectifier DC output nodes are individually electrically connected to the respective inverter DC input nodes. By this means, each of the rectifier DC output nodes and each of the inverter DC input nodes are voltage balanced by the respective charging and discharging of the rectifier charging means and the inverter discharging means.

  13. Voltage balanced multilevel voltage source converter system

    DOEpatents

    Peng, F.Z.; Lai, J.S.

    1997-07-01

    Disclosed is a voltage balanced multilevel converter for high power AC applications such as adjustable speed motor drives and back-to-back DC intertie of adjacent power systems. This converter provides a multilevel rectifier, a multilevel inverter, and a DC link between the rectifier and the inverter allowing voltage balancing between each of the voltage levels within the multilevel converter. The rectifier is equipped with at least one phase leg and a source input node for each of the phases. The rectifier is further equipped with a plurality of rectifier DC output nodes. The inverter is equipped with at least one phase leg and a load output node for each of the phases. The inverter is further equipped with a plurality of inverter DC input nodes. The DC link is equipped with a plurality of rectifier charging means and a plurality of inverter discharging means. The plurality of rectifier charging means are connected in series with one of the rectifier charging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of rectifier DC output nodes. The plurality of inverter discharging means are connected in series with one of the inverter discharging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of inverter DC input nodes. Each of said rectifier DC output nodes are individually electrically connected to the respective inverter DC input nodes. By this means, each of the rectifier DC output nodes and each of the inverter DC input nodes are voltage balanced by the respective charging and discharging of the rectifier charging means and the inverter discharging means. 15 figs.

  14. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  15. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  16. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  17. Early Oscillation Detection for DC/DC Converter Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2011-01-01

    The electrical power system of a spacecraft plays a very critical role for space mission success. Such a modern power system may contain numerous hybrid DC/DC converters both inside the power system electronics (PSE) units and onboard most of the flight electronics modules. One of the faulty conditions for DC/DC converter that poses serious threats to mission safety is the random occurrence of oscillation related to inherent instability characteristics of the DC/DC converters and design deficiency of the power systems. To ensure the highest reliability of the power system, oscillations in any form shall be promptly detected during part level testing, system integration tests, flight health monitoring, and on-board fault diagnosis. The popular gain/phase margin analysis method is capable of predicting stability levels of DC/DC converters, but it is limited only to verification of designs and to part-level testing on some of the models. This method has to inject noise signals into the control loop circuitry as required, thus, interrupts the DC/DC converter's normal operation and increases risks of degrading and damaging the flight unit. A novel technique to detect oscillations at early stage for flight hybrid DC/DC converters was developed.

  18. Investigations on a hybrid positron source with a granular converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, X.; Chaikovska, I.; Chehab, R.; Chevallier, M.; Dadoun, O.; Furukawa, K.; Guler, H.; Kamitani, T.; Miyahara, F.; Satoh, M.; Sievers, P.; Suwada, T.; Umemori, K.; Variola, A.

    2015-07-01

    Promising results obtained with crystal targets for positron production led to the elaboration of a hybrid source made of an axially oriented tungsten crystal, as a radiator, and an amorphous tungsten converter. If the converter is granular, made of small spheres, the heat dissipation is greatly enhanced and the thermal shocks reduced, allowing the consideration of such device for the future linear colliders. A positron source of this kind is investigated. Previous simulations have shown very promising results for the yield as for the energy deposition and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). Here, we present detailed simulations made in this granular converter with emphasis on the energy deposition density, which is a critical parameter as learned from the breakdown of the SLC target. A test on the KEKB linac is foreseen; it will allow a determination of the energy deposited and the PEDD in the converter through temperature measurements. Four granular converters, made of W spheres of mm radius have been built at LAL-Orsay; they will be installed at KEK and compared to compact converters. A description of the experimental layout at KEK is provided. Applications to future linear colliders as CLIC and ILC are considered.

  19. MatrixConverter: Facilitating construction of phenomic character matrices1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Endara, Lorena; Burleigh, J. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: While numerous software packages enable scientists to evaluate molecular data and transform them for phylogenetic analyses, few such tools exist for phenomic data. We introduce MatrixConverter, a program that helps expedite and facilitate the transformation of raw phenomic character data into discrete character matrices that can be used in most evolutionary inference programs. • Methods and Results: MatrixConverter is an open source program written in Java; a platform-independent binary executable, as well as sample data sets and a user’s manual, are available at https://github.com/gburleigh/MatrixConverter/tree/master/distribution. MatrixConverter has a simple, intuitive user interface that enables the user to immediately begin scoring phenomic characters. We demonstrate the performance of MatrixConverter on a phenomic data set from cycads. • Conclusions: New technologies and software make it possible to obtain phenomic data from species across the tree of life, and MatrixConverter helps to transform these new data for evolutionary or ecological inference. PMID:25699217

  20. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  1. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  2. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  3. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Pumera, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered. PMID:23450281

  4. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Pumera, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  5. Microlith-Based Catalytic Reactor for Air Quality and Trace Contaminant Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilekar, Saurabh; Hawley, Kyle; Junaedi, Christian; Crowder, Bruce; Prada, Julian; Mastanduno, Richard; Perry, Jay L.; Kayatin, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, gaseous compounds such as methane, carbon monoxide, and trace contaminants have posed challenges for maintaining clean air in enclosed spaces such as crewed spacecraft cabins as they are hazardous to humans and are often difficult to remove by conventional adsorption technology. Catalytic oxidizers have provided a reliable and robust means of disposing of even trace levels of these compounds by converting them into carbon dioxide and water. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) and NASA - Marshall (MSFC) have been developing, characterizing, and optimizing high temperature catalytic oxidizers (HTCO) based on PCI's patented Microlith® technology to meet the requirements of future extended human spaceflight explorations. Current efforts have focused on integrating the HTCO unit with a compact, simple recuperative heat exchanger to reduce the overall system size and weight while also reducing its energy requirements. Previous efforts relied on external heat exchangers to recover the waste heat and recycle it to the oxidizer to minimize the system's power requirements; however, these units contribute weight and volume burdens to the overall system. They also result in excess heat loss due to the separation of the HTCO and the heat recuperator, resulting in lower overall efficiency. Improvements in the recuperative efficiency and close coupling of HTCO and heat recuperator lead to reductions in system energy requirements and startup time. Results from testing HTCO units integrated with heat recuperators at a variety of scales for cabin air quality control and heat melt compactor applications are reported and their benefits over previous iterations of the HTCO and heat recuperator assembly are quantified in this paper.

  6. Converting conformational changes to electrostatic energy in molecular motors: The energetics of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajbl, Marek; Shurki, Avital; Warshel, Arieh

    2003-12-01

    F1-ATPase is the catalytic component of the ATP synthase molecular machine responsible for most of the uphill synthesis of ATP in living systems. The enormous advances in biochemical and structural studies of this machine provide an opportunity for detailed understanding of the nature of its rotary mechanism. However, further quantitative progress in this direction requires development of reliable ways of translating the observed structural changes to the corresponding energies. This requirement is particularly challenging because we are dealing with a large system that couples major structural changes with a chemical process. The present work provides such a structure-function correlation by using the linear response approximation to describe the rotary mechanism. This approach allows one to evaluate the energy of transitions between different conformational states by considering only the changes in the corresponding electrostatic energies of the ligands. The relevant energetics are also obtained by calculating the linear response approximation-based free energies of transferring the ligands from water to the different sites of F1-ATPase in their different conformational states. We also use the empirical valence bond approach to evaluate the actual free-energy profile for the ATP synthesis in the different conformational states of the system. Integrating the information from the different approaches provides a semiquantitative structure-function correlation for F1-ATPase. It is found that the conformational changes are converted to changes in the electrostatic interaction between the protein and its ligands, which drives the ATP synthesis.

  7. A dc to dc converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, A. E.; Gould, J. M.; Matheney, J. L.; Garrett, H.

    1984-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide an improved converter for converting one direct current voltage to another. A plurality of phased square wave voltages are provided from a ring counter through amplifiers to a like plurality of output transformers. Each of these transformers has two windings, and S(1) winding and an S(2) winding. The S(1) windings are connected in series, then the S(2) windings are connected in series, and finally, the two sets of windings are connected in series. One of six SCRs is connected between each two series connected windings to a positive output terminal and one of diodes is connected between each set of two windings of a zero output terminal. By virtue of this configuration, a quite high average direct current voltage is obtained, which varies between full voltage and two-thirds full voltage rather than from full voltage to zero. Further, its variation, ripple frequency, is reduced to one-sixth of that present in a single phase system. Application to raising battery voltage for an ion propulsion system is mentioned.

  8. Thin film porous membranes for catalytic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Boyle, T.J.; Gardner, T.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reports on new and surprising experimental data for catalytic film gas sensing resistors coated with nanoporous sol-gel films to impart selectivity and durability to the sensor structure. This work is the result of attempts to build selectivity and reactivity to the surface of a sensor by modifying it with a series of sol-gel layers. The initial sol-gel SiO{sub 2} layer applied to the sensor surprisingly showed enhanced O{sub 2} interaction with H{sub 2} and reduced susceptibility to poisons such as H{sub 2}S.

  9. Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters

    PubMed Central

    Quasdorf, Kyle W.; Overman, Larry E.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Quaternary carbon stereocenters–carbon atoms to which four distinct carbon substituents are attached–are common features of molecules found in nature. However, prior to recent advances in chemical catalysis, there were few methods available for constructing single stereoisomers of this important structural motif. Here we discuss the many catalytic enantioselective reactions developed during the past decade for synthesizing organic molecules containing such carbon atoms. This progress now makes it possible to selectively incorporate quaternary stereocenters in many high-value organic molecules for use in medicine, agriculture, and other areas. PMID:25503231

  10. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  11. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukemire, Alan T.

    1993-03-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  12. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukemire, Alan T.

    1995-05-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  13. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukemire, Alan T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  14. Electrochemical fabrication of Cu(OH) 2 and CuO nanostructures and their catalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Hai; Pan, Keming; Liu, Yang; Li, Haitao; He, Xiaodie; Ming, Jun; Ma, Zheng; Kang, Zhenhui

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we reported an anodization method for the fabrication of novel uniform Cu(OH) 2 nanowires, CuO nanoparticles, and CuO shuttle-like nanoparticles with advanced structures. The possible formation mechanism of Cu(OH) 2 nanowires, CuO nanoparticles, and CuO shuttle-like nanoparticles was proposed. The good catalytic properties of CuO nanoparticles converted from Cu(OH) 2 nanowires and the CuO shuttle-like nanoparticles were confirmed by evaluating their catalytic ability on the C-N cross coupling of amines with iodobenzene.

  15. Catalytic Preparation of Pyrrolidones from Renewable Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, John G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong

    2005-12-01

    Use of renewable resources for production of valuable chemical commodities is becoming a topic of great national interest and importance. This objective fits well with the USDOE’s objective of promoting the industrial bio-refinery concept in which a wide array of valuable chemical, fuel, food, nutraceuticals and animal feed products all result from the integrated processing of grains, oil seeds and other bio-mass materials. The bio-refinery thus serves to enhance the overall utility and profitability of the agriculture industry as well as helping to reduce the dependence on petroleum. Pyrrolidones fit well with the bio-refinery concept since they may be produced in a scheme beginning with the fermentation of a portion of the bio-refinery’s sugar product into succinate. Pyrrolidones are a class of industrially important chemicals with a variety of uses including as polymer intermediates, cleaners, and “green solvents” which can replace hazardous chlorinated compounds. Battelle has developed an efficient process for the thermo – catalytic conversion of succinate into pyrrolidones, especially n-methylpyrrolidone. The process uses both novel Rh based catalysts and novel aqueous process conditions and results in high selectivities and yields of pyrrolidone compounds. The process also includes novel methodology for enhancing yields by recycling and converting non-useful side products of the catalysis into additional pyrrolidone. The process has been demonstrated in both batch and continuous reactors. Additionally, stability of the unique Rh-based catalyst has been demonstrated.

  16. Thermoelectric converters for alternating current standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Taschuk, D. D.

    2012-06-01

    Thermoelectric converters of alternating current remain priority instruments when creating standard equipment. This work presents the results of design and manufacture of alternating current converter for a military standard of alternating current in Ukraine. Results of simulation of temperature distribution in converter elements, ways of optimization to improve the accuracy of alternating current signal reproduction are presented. Results of metrological trials are given. The quality of thermoelectric material specially created for alternating current metrology is verified. The converter was used in alternating current standard for the frequency range from 10 Hz to 30 MHz. The efficiency of using thermoelectric signal converters in measuring instruments is confirmed.

  17. Catalytic Enantioselective Carboannulation with Allylsilanes

    PubMed Central

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R.; Badillo, Joseph J.; Tran, Ngon T.; Franz, Annaliese K.

    2015-01-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a Sc(III)-indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (via trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  18. Catalytic enantioselective carboannulation with allylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R; Badillo, Joseph J; Tran, Ngon T; Franz, Annaliese K

    2014-09-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a scandium(III)/indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon center are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (by trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  19. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  20. Design of Compact Multi-Megawatt Mode Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; /SLAC

    2006-03-21

    Experience gained during recent operation of high power 11.424 GHz rf sources for accelerators led to new, more strict requirements on system components. One of the basic components of such a system is a mode converter that transforms the rectangular waveguide mode into the TE{sub 01} mode in circular waveguide. With such a converter, it is possible to minimize the use of WR90 rectangular waveguide which was shown to be a weak part of the previous system at power levels higher than 100 MW and pulse lengths on the order of a microsecond. We used several methods to design a mode converter with extremely low parasitic mode conversion and compact size. These methods employ HFSS[4] and include multi-parameter searches, concurrent optimization with a mode-matching code Cascade[2], cascading of resulting S-matrices, and tolerance analysis using perturbation techniques. This report describes the design methods and presents results.

  1. Effectiveness of replacing catalytic converters in LPG-fueled vehicles in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Xiaopu; Guo, Hai; Simpson, Isobel J.; Meinardi, Simone; Louie, Peter K. K.; Ling, Zhenhao; Wang, Yu; Liu, Ming; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Wang, Nan; Blake, Donald R.

    2016-05-01

    Many taxis and public buses are powered by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in Hong Kong. With more vehicles using LPG, they have become the major contributor to ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Hong Kong. An intervention program which aimed to reduce the emissions of VOCs and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from LPG-fueled vehicles was implemented by the Hong Kong government in September 2013. Long-term real-time measurements indicated that the program was remarkably effective in reducing LPG-related VOCs, NOx and nitric oxide (NO) in the atmosphere. Receptor modeling results further revealed that propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane and NO in LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust emissions decreased by 40.8 ± 0.1, 45.7 ± 0.2, 35.7 ± 0.1, 47.8 ± 0.1 and 88.6 ± 0.7 %, respectively, during the implementation of the program. In contrast, despite the reduction of VOCs and NOx, O3 following the program increased by 0.40 ± 0.03 ppbv (˜ 5.6 %). The LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust was generally destructive to OH and HO2. However, the destruction effect weakened for OH and it even turned to positive contribution to HO2 during the program. These changes led to the increases of OH, HO2 and HO2 / OH ratio, which might explain the positive O3 increment. Analysis of O3-VOCs-NOx sensitivity in ambient air indicated VOC-limited regimes in the O3 formation before and during the program. Moreover, a maximum reduction percentage of NOx (i.e., 69 %) and the lowest reduction ratio of VOCs / NOx (i.e., 1.1) in LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust were determined to give a zero O3 increment. The findings are of great help to future formulation and implementation of control strategies on vehicle emissions in Hong Kong, and could be extended to other regions in China and around the world.

  2. Preliminary Characterization of a Coaxial DBD Plasma-Catalytic Converter for Methane Partial Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulombe, Sylvain; Diaz Gomez Maqueo, Pablo; Evans, Mathew; Sainct, Florent; Bergthorson, Jeff

    2015-09-01

    This contribution discusses the development and characteristics of a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) using a methane-oxygen mixture at atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure. A sinusoidal voltage waveform of 12 kVp-p at 20 kHz produces discharges in a 1.15 mm gap. Power is estimated using a Lissajous figure method while optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to estimate the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the gas. Obtained OES spectra are similar, differing mainly on the intensity of their CH and OH bands, tending towards a more intense OH band as oxygen availability increased. CH bands show the strongest emission intensities of which, CH(C-X) seems to be the most intense of all, followed by CH(A-X) and lastly by CH(B-X). The spectra of CH(A-X) and CH(C-X) were uploaded into a simulation software to estimate the plasma temperatures. For the CH(A-X) bands, a simulation with a Trot = 600 K and a Tvib = 6000 K matched the experimental spectra. In the case of the CH(C-X) band, a Trot = 800 K and a Tvib = 4000 K were determined. The vibrational temperatures are especially high, a result which is particularly important for the development of a plasma-catalysis reactor. The authors acknowledge the financial support provided by NSERC, FRQNT as well as McGill University through the McGill Engineering Doctoral Award program.

  3. Exhaust pipe arrangement for a turbocharged multi-cylinder internal combustion engine having catalytic converters

    SciTech Connect

    Gauffres, U.J.

    1984-04-24

    An exhaust pipe arrangement for internal combustion engines is disclosed which includes an exhaust gas turbocharger, a bypass conduit for circumventing the turbocharger, a blow off valve, a starter catalyst disposed in an exhaust pipe, an oxygen sensor, and a main catalyst connected downstream of the turbocharger, starter catalyst, and oxygen sensor. To reduce the exhaust gas counterpressure and relieve the load on the starter catalyst at the same time, the starter catalyst is arranged upstream of a junction of the bypass conduit entering into the exhaust pipe.

  4. Effectiveness of replacing catalytic converters in LPG-fueled vehicles in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, X. P.; Guo, H.; Simpson, I. J.; Meinardi, S.; Louie, P. K. K.; Ling, Z. H.; Wang, Y.; Liu, M.; Luk, C. W. Y.; Wang, N.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Many taxis and public buses are powered by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in Hong Kong. With more vehicles using LPG, they have become the major contributor to ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Hong Kong. An intervention program aimed to reduce the emissions of VOCs and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from LPG-fueled vehicles was implemented by the Hong Kong Government in September 2013. Long-term real-time measurements indicated that the program was remarkably effective in reducing LPG-related VOCs, NOx and nitric oxide (NO) in the atmosphere. Receptor modeling results further revealed that propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane and NO in LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust emissions decreased by 37.3 ± 0.4, 50.2 ± 0.3, 32.9 ± 0.4, 41.1 ± 0.4 and 75.9 ± 0.3 %, respectively, during the implementation of the program. In contrast, despite the reduction of VOCs and NOx, the O3 production following the program increased by 0.25 ± 0.04 ppbv h-1 (4.8 %). Moreover, the production rate of HOx decreased due to the reduction of VOCs, whereas NO reduction resulted in a more significant decrease of the HOx in destruction compared to the decrease in production, and an increase of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2). Analysis of O3-VOCs-NOx sensitivity in ambient air indicated VOC-limited regimes in the O3 formation before and during the program. Moreover, a maximum reduction percentage of NOx (i.e., 29.4 %) and the lowest reduction ratio of VOCs / NOx (i.e., ~ 3 : 1) in LPG-fueled vehicle emissions were determined to give a zero O3 increment. The findings are of great help to future formulation and implementation of control strategies on vehicle emissions in Hong Kong.

  5. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  6. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF AIR POLLUTANTS FROM PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY USING OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Major pollutants from pulp and paper mills include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as methanol and total reduced sulfur compounds (TRS) such as dimethyl sulfide. The conventional treatment technologies including incineration or catalytic thermal oxidation are energy intens...

  7. Microcomputer control of power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Alegria, C.M.; Freris, L.L.; Paiva, J.P.

    1984-08-01

    Thyristor power converters are charac terized by an inherent discrete control action and are, therefore, particularly well suited to on - line control by microcomputers. The paper presents a new design of digital controllers based upon powerful 16-bit or bit -slice microprocessors, which provide high firing time resolution and enough computing power to implement sophis ticated control strategies. Both hardware and software are discussed, with special emphasis on the firing con trol algorithms. The properties of Pulse Frequency Con trol (PFC) and Pulse Phase Control (PPC) are examined and small-signal discrete models are presented. These models are used in the analysis of constant current and constant extinction angle control through the z-transform method.

  8. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  9. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  10. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1989-07-01

    A support is discussed which was provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  11. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a support provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  12. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1989-07-06

    This document discusses a support provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs. 7 figs.

  13. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1990-10-16

    A support is presented for use in a thermionic converted to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a large metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  14. Sea water battery power converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Russell E.; Henry, John L.

    1991-04-01

    The invention converts the voltage output of a DC source to a higher voltage. A germanium transistor start-up circuit receives a DC supply voltage input and includes an astable multivibrator which produces a square wave voltage output that is transformed to a substantially DC steady-state voltage output by a transformer and a capacitor. This elevated voltage is provided to an oscillator circuit which provides two square wave outputs. Each output is provided to an array of invertors operably coupled to an array of field effect transistors. The transistors are operably coupled to a power transformer. The square wave outputs of the power transformer are full wave rectified to provide a DC output having a higher voltage than the system input voltage. The power transformer also provides another full wave rectified voltage which disables the start-up circuit to eliminate parasitic energy losses attributable to its continued oscillation.

  15. Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

  16. Converting simple vegetation surveys in functional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Claúdia; Cabral, João Alexandre; Crespí, António Luís; Hughes, Samantha Jane; Santos, Mário

    2013-04-01

    This study assessed an integrated method for estimating the structural and functional trends of Mediterranean vegetation based on simple field characterizations. Despite considerable effort made by scientists to estimate vegetation dynamics, most methods are too complex to be applied and quantification achieved by non-specialists. We propose an alternative approach that converts simple measures such as generic vegetation cover into life forms or life traits. We used the Stochastic Dynamic Methodology, a dynamic approach based on a sequential process, to calculate the functional response to succession and anthropogenic disturbances using Raunkiaer's life form spectra. Using derived scenarios, the model was able to successfully translate functional and structural trends from simple field descriptions. The simulations demonstrate that this methodology can be used in environmental studies, particularly when specialised field botanists are not available.

  17. Clustering of cycloidal wave energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Stefan G.

    2016-03-29

    A wave energy conversion system uses a pair of wave energy converters (WECs) on respective active mountings on a floating platform, so that the separation of the WECs from each other or from a central WEC can be actively adjusted according to the wavelength of incident waves. The adjustable separation facilitates operation of the system to cancel reactive forces, which may be generated during wave energy conversion. Modules on which such pairs of WECs are mounted can be assembled with one or more central WECs to form large clusters in which reactive forces and torques can be made to cancel. WECs of different sizes can be employed to facilitate cancelation of reactive forces and torques.

  18. Simplifying the circuit of Josephson parametric converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Baleegh; Brink, Markus; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Keefe, George

    Josephson parametric converters (JPCs) are quantum-limited three-wave mixing devices that can play various important roles in quantum information processing in the microwave domain, including amplification of quantum signals, transduction of quantum information, remote entanglement of qubits, nonreciprocal amplification, and circulation of signals. However, the input-output and biasing circuit of a state-of-the-art JPC consists of bulky components, i.e. two commercial off-chip broadband 180-degree hybrids, four phase-matched short coax cables, and one superconducting magnetic coil. Such bulky hardware significantly hinders the integration of JPCs in scalable quantum computing architectures. In my talk, I will present ideas on how to simplify the JPC circuit and show preliminary experimental results

  19. Heterogeneous catalytic alcoholysis of benzonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Kagarlitskii, A.D.; Dmumakaev, K.Kh.; Bekova, N.S.

    1986-04-01

    The authors investigate the possibility of the direct heterogeneous catalytic synthesis of ethylbenzoate from benzonitrile. The catalysts tested were oxides of aluminium, titanium, and vanadium. The main conversion product detected chromatographically was ethylbenzoate; benzaldehyde, benzamide, and benzanilide were also identified. Aluminium oxide was found to be the most effective catalyst.

  20. Simple, chemoselective, catalytic olefin isomerization.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Steven W M; Barabé, Francis; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2014-12-01

    Catalytic amounts of Co(Sal(tBu,tBu))Cl and organosilane irreversibly isomerize terminal alkenes by one position. The same catalysts effect cycloisomerization of dienes and retrocycloisomerization of strained rings. Strong Lewis bases like amines and imidazoles, and labile functionalities like epoxides, are tolerated.

  1. MEMS-based fuel cells with integrated catalytic fuel processor and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Havstad, Mark A.

    2011-08-09

    Described herein is a means to incorporate catalytic materials into the fuel flow field structures of MEMS-based fuel cells, which enable catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbon based fuel, such as methane, methanol, or butane. Methods of fabrication are also disclosed.

  2. Converting a fuel to combustible gas

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, G.

    1985-04-02

    A sulfur-containing fuel is passed into a first fluidized bed containing CaSO/sub 4/ and CaO and an oxygen-transfer mediator (e.g. H/sub 2/) whereby the fuel is converted to combustible gas, some CaSO/sub 4/ being reduced to CaS and sulfur being fixed as CaS by reaction with CaO. Bed particles pass from the bottom layer of the first bed into the bottom layer of the second bed which is fluidized by air at conditions such that some, but not all of the CaS is selectively oxidized to CaSO/sub 4/ with no liberation of sulfur moieties. Bed particles pass from the bottom layer of second bed to the bottom layer of a third bed optionally after passage via a fourth bed between the second and third beds. In the third bed particles are fluidized with air to convert CaS selectively to CaSO/sub 4/ with no liberation of sulfur moiety whereby to raise the particles' temperature sufficiently above that of the first bed that particles passing from the bottom layer of the third bed into the bottom layer of the first bed provide sufficient sensible heat to maintain the fuel conversion temperature of the first bed. In the fourth bed particles are fluidized with air under such conditions that sulfur moiety is liberated, preferably at a rate which approximately equals the rate of sulfur-capture in the first bed whereby to maintain approximately a constant amount of reactive CaO in the beds for sulfur-capture in the first bed.

  3. Hollow mesoporous aluminosilica spheres with perpendicular pore channels as catalytic nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Zhaohui; Hsieh, Ming-Feng; Chen, Mei; Liu, Pengxin; Chen, Cheng; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2012-05-22

    The design and synthesis of hollow/yolk-shell mesoporous structures with catalytically active ordered mesoporous shells can infuse new vitality into the applications of these attractive structures. In this study, we report that hollow/yolk-shell structures with catalytically active ordered mesoporous aluminosilica shells can be easily prepared by using silica spheres as the silica precursors. By simply treating with a hot alkaline solution in the presence of sodium aluminate (NaAlO(2)) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), solid silica spheres can be directly converted into high-quality hollow mesoporous aluminosilica spheres with perpendicular pore channels. On the basis of the proposed formation mechanism of etching followed by co-assembly, the synthesis strategy developed in this work can be extended as a general strategy to prepare ordered mesoporous yolk-shell structures with diverse compositions and morphologies simply by replacing solid silica spheres with silica-coated nanocomposites. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol with yolk-shell structured Au@ordered mesoporous aluminosilica as the catalyst has clearly demonstrated that the highly permeable perpendicular pore channels of mesoporous aluminosilica can effectively prevent the catalytically active yolk from aggregating. Furthermore, with accessible acidity, the yolk-shell structured ordered mesoporous aluminosilica spheres containing Pd yolk exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in a one-pot two-step synthesis involving an acid catalysis and subsequent catalytic hydrogenation for desired benzimidazole derivative, which makes the proposed hollow ordered aluminosilica spheres a versatile and practicable scaffold for advanced catalytic nanoreactor systems.

  4. Catalytic gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Robertus, R.J.

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of catalytic gasification of bagasse to produce methanol. In previous studies, a catalytic steam gasification process was developed which converted wood to methanol synthesis gas in one step using nickel based catalysts in a fluid-bed gasifier. Tests in a nominal 1 ton/day process development unit (PDU) gasifier with these same catalysts showed bagasse to be a good feedstock for fluid-bed gasifiers, but the catalysts deactivated quite rapidly in the presence of bagasse. Laboratory catalyst screening tests showed K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on the bagasse to be a promising catalyst for converting bagasse to methanol synthesis gas. PDU tests with 10 wt % K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on bagasse showed the technical feasibility of this type of catalyst on a larger scale. A high quality synthesis gas was produced and carbon conversion to gas was high. The gasifier was successfully operated without forming agglomerates of catalyst, ash, and char in the gasifier. There was no loss of activity throughout the runs because catalysts is continually added with the bagasse. Laboratory tests showed about 80% of the potassium carbonate could be recovered and recycled with a simple water wash. An economic evaluation of the process for converting bagasse to methanol showed the required selling price of methanol to be significantly higher than the current market price of methanol. Several factors make this current evaluaton using bagasse as a feedstock less favorable: (1) capital costs are higher due to inflation and some extra costs required to use bagasse, (2) smaller plant sizes were considered so economies of scale are lost, and (3) the market price of methanol in the US has fallen 44% in the last six months. 24 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Computational and Physical Analysis of Catalytic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Richard; Sohn, Jung Jae; Kyung, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit unique physical and chemical properties depending on their geometrical properties. For this reason, synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled shape and size is important to use their unique properties. Catalyst supports are usually made of high-surface-area porous oxides or carbon nanomaterials. These support materials stabilize metal catalysts against sintering at high reaction temperatures. Many studies have demonstrated large enhancements of catalytic behavior due to the role of the oxide-metal interface. In this paper, the catalyzing ability of supported nano metal oxides, such as silicon oxide and titanium oxide compounds as catalysts have been analyzed using computational chemistry method. Computational programs such as Gamess and Chemcraft has been used in an effort to compute the efficiencies of catalytic compounds, and bonding energy changes during the optimization convergence. The result illustrates how the metal oxides stabilize and the steps that it takes. The graph of the energy computation step(N) versus energy(kcal/mol) curve shows that the energy of the titania converges faster at the 7th iteration calculation, whereas the silica converges at the 9th iteration calculation.

  6. Catalytic pyrolysis of automobile shredder residue

    SciTech Connect

    Arzoumanidis, G.G.; McIntosh, M.J.; Steffensen, E.J.

    1995-07-01

    In the United States, approximately 10 million automobiles are scrapped and shredded each year. The mixture of plastics and other materials remaining after recovery of the metals is known as Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR). In 1994, about 3.5 million tons of ASR was produced and disposed of in landfills. However, environmental, legislative, and economic considerations are forcing the industry to search for recycling or other alternatives to disposal. Numerous studies have been done relating the ASR disposal problem to possible recycling treatments such as pyrolysis, gasification, co-liquefaction of ASR with coal, chemical recovery of plastics from ASR, catalytic pyrolysis, reclamation in molten salts, and vacuum pyrolysis. These and other possibilities have been studied intensively, and entire symposia have been devoted to the problem. Product mix, yields, toxicology issues, and projected economics of conceptual plant designs based on experimental results are among the key elements of past studies. Because the kinds of recycling methods that may be developed, along with their ultimate economic value, depend on a very large number of variables, these studies have been open-ended. It is hoped that it may be useful to explore some of these previously studied areas from fresh perspectives. One such approach, currently under development at Argonne National Laboratory, is the catalytic pyrolysis of ASR.

  7. Comparing Approaches to Converting Large High Schools into Smaller Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    Scholars and reformers in the United States have called for converting large high schools into smaller units to provide a more effective, personal, and culturally responsive education for all students. Current literature argues that such "conversion high schools" should break into fully autonomous small schools rather than more interdependent…

  8. Inverter converters. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, R.

    1980-05-01

    Cited works cover the field of electrical devices which convert direct to alternating current. Some of the applications discussed are motor and furnace drives, solar and wind generated electrical power conversion, variable frequency devices for motor speed control drives, and power frequency conversion devices. The components used in these devices, such as thyristors, SCRs, MOS devices, etc., and the associated circuitries, are described.

  9. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  10. Catalytic function of the mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase in acetone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Nakao, Tomomi; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523 are able to grow on acetone and use it as a source of carbon and energy. We previously demonstrated by gene deletion analysis that the mimABCD gene cluster, which encodes a binuclear iron monooxygenase, plays an essential role in acetone metabolism in these mycobacteria. In the present study, we determined the catalytic function of MimABCD in acetone metabolism. Whole-cell assays were performed using Escherichia coli cells expressing the MimABCD complex. When the recombinant E. coli cells were incubated with acetone, a product was detected by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Based on the retention time and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) spectrum, the reaction product was identified as acetol (hydroxyacetone). The recombinant E. coli cells produced 1.02 mM of acetol from acetone within 24 h. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MimABCD also was able to convert methylethylketone (2-butanone) to 1-hydroxy-2-butanone. Although it has long been known that microorganisms such as mycobacteria metabolize acetone via acetol, this study provides the first biochemical evidence for the existence of a microbial enzyme that catalyses the conversion of acetone to acetol.

  11. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Faison, Brendlyn D.; Davison, Brian H.; Woodward, Jonathan

    1994-01-01

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system.

  12. A 25-kW Series-Resonant Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, R. J.; Robson, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    Prototype exhibited efficiency of 93.9 percent. 25-kW resonant dc/dc power converter designed, developed, fabricated, and tested, using Westinghouse D7ST transistors as high-power switches. D7ST transistor characterized for use as switch in series-resonant converters, and refined base-drive circuit developed. Technical base includes advanced switching magnetic, and filter components, mathematical circuit models, control philosophies, and switch-drive strategies. Power-system benefits such as lower losses when used for high-voltage distribution, and reduced magnetics and filter mass realized.

  13. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.

    2012-11-13

    A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

  14. Catalytic Activities Of [GADV]-Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Takae; Fukushima, Jun; Maruyama, Masako; Iwamoto, Ryoko; Ikehara, Kenji

    2005-10-01

    We have previously postulated a novel hypothesis for the origin of life, assuming that life on the earth originated from “[GADV]-protein world”, not from the “RNA world” (see Ikehara's review, 2002). The [GADV]-protein world is constituted from peptides and proteins with random sequences of four amino acids (glycine [G], alanine [A], aspartic acid [D] and valine [V]), which accumulated by pseudo-replication of the [GADV]-proteins. To obtain evidence for the hypothesis, we produced [GADV]-peptides by repeated heat-drying of the amino acids for 30 cycles ([GADV]-P30) and examined whether the peptides have some catalytic activities or not. From the results, it was found that the [GADV]-P30 can hydrolyze several kinds of chemical bonds in molecules, such as umbelliferyl-β-D-galactoside, glycine-p-nitroanilide and bovine serum albumin. This suggests that [GADV]-P30 could play an important role in the accumulation of [GADV]-proteins through pseudo-replication, leading to the emergence of life. We further show that [GADV]-octapaptides with random sequences, but containing no cyclic compounds as diketepiperazines, have catalytic activity, hydrolyzing peptide bonds in a natural protein, bovine serum albumin. The catalytic activity of the octapeptides was much higher than the [GADV]-P30 produced through repeated heat-drying treatments. These results also support the [GADV]-protein-world hypothesis of the origin of life (see Ikehara's review, 2002). Possible steps for the emergence of life on the primitive earth are presented.

  15. Evaluation of High Performance Converters Under Low Dose Rate Total Ionizing Dose (TID) Testing for NASA Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Sahu, Kusum

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of low dose rate (0.01-0.18 rads(Si)/sec) total ionizing dose (TID) tests performed on several types of high performance converters. The parts used in this evaluation represented devices such as a high speed flash converter, a 16-bit ADC and a voltage-to-frequency converter.

  16. Radiation-Tolerant DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skutt, Glenn; Sable, Dan; Leslie, Leonard; Graham, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses power converters suitable for space use that meet the DSCC MIL-PRF-38534 Appendix G radiation hardness level P classification. A method for qualifying commercially produced electronic parts for DC-DC converters per the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC) radiation hardened assurance requirements was developed. Development and compliance testing of standard hybrid converters suitable for space use were completed for missions with total dose radiation requirements of up to 30 kRad. This innovation provides the same overall performance as standard hybrid converters, but includes assurance of radiation- tolerant design through components and design compliance testing. This availability of design-certified radiation-tolerant converters can significantly reduce total cost and delivery time for power converters for space applications that fit the appropriate DSCC classification (30 kRad).

  17. Bubble driven quasioscillatory translational motion of catalytic micromotors.

    PubMed

    Manjare, Manoj; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Y-P

    2012-09-21

    A new quasioscillatory translational motion has been observed for big Janus catalytic micromotors with a fast CCD camera. Such motional behavior is found to coincide with both the bubble growth and burst processes resulting from the catalytic reaction, and the competition of the two processes generates a net forward motion. Detailed physical models have been proposed to describe the above processes. It is suggested that the bubble growth process imposes a growth force moving the micromotor forward, while the burst process induces an instantaneous local pressure depression pulling the micromotor backward. The theoretic predictions are consistent with the experimental data.

  18. Secure ultrafast communication with spatial-temporal converters.

    PubMed

    Matoba, O; Javidi, B

    2000-06-10

    An encrypted database interfaced with an ultrafast secure data communication system using spatial-temporal converters is proposed. The original spatial signal is optically encrypted, and the encrypted signal is holographically stored in a storage medium such as photorefractive materials. The spatially encrypted signal is sampled to avoid the overlap of each datum at the receiver. The sampled data are converted into a temporal signal to transmit the information through an optical fiber. At the receiver the temporal signal is converted back into the spatially encrypted signal. Retrieval of the original data can be achieved when the correct phase key is used in the decryption system. We developed an expression for encrypted output and decrypted data. We numerically evaluate the effect of sampling the spatially encrypted signal on the quality of the decrypted data.

  19. Power line carrier interference from HVDC converter terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Tatro, P.J.; Adamson, K.A. ); Eitzmann, M.A.; Smead, M. . Power Systems Engineering Dept.)

    1993-07-01

    Power line carrier (PLC) equipment typically operates in the frequency range from 25 kHz to 300 kHz. Interference studies for HVDC converters usually concentrate on interference from noise sources within this frequency range. However, operating experience at the Sandy Pond converter terminal has indicated that PLC equipment is also susceptible to interference from sources of power system harmonics below the PLC frequency range. Extensive field testing and analytical studies have shown that each PLC circuit has a resonant frequency below the operating frequency. If excited at this resonant frequency, high voltages may exist within the PLC circuit. The resulting saturation of PLC components leads to local generation of radio frequency (RF) noise that interferes with proper operation of PLC circuits. Sources of power system harmonics in the 3-10 kHz range, such as line commutated dc converters, are potential sources of this type of interference.

  20. Simplified Heat-Source/Thermionic Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation coupling of heat from heat-source cylinder to converter cylinder through vacuum gap eliminates need for high-temperature electrical insulators between reactor heat pipes and thermionic converters. In addition no radiatior heat pipe is necessary because collectors of thermionic converters from which excess heat must be removed radiate directly to space. New design concept is also applicable to terrestrial and non-nuclear thermionic power supplies.

  1. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  2. Catalytic ammonia decomposition over industrial-waste-supported Ru catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pei Fang Ng; Li Li; Shaobin Wang; Zhonghua Zhu; Gaoqing Lu; Zifeng Yan

    2007-05-15

    Industrial solid wastes (fly ash and red mud, a by-product of the aluminium industry) have been employed as supports for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Physical and chemical treatments on red mud were conducted and these modified supports were also used for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Those Ru catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as N2 adsorption, H{sub 2} adsorption, XRD, XPS, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and were then tested for catalytic ammonia decomposition to hydrogen. It was found that red-mud-supported Ru catalyst exhibits higher ammonia conversion and hydrogen production than fly-ash-supported catalyst. Heat and chemical treatments of the red mud greatly improve the catalytic activity. Moreover, a combination of acid and heat treatments produces the highest catalytic conversion of ammonia. 35 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. DC/DC Converter Stability Testing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents study results on hybrid DC/DC converter stability testing methods. An input impedance measurement method and a gain/phase margin measurement method were evaluated to be effective to determine front-end oscillation and feedback loop oscillation. In particular, certain channel power levels of converter input noises have been found to have high degree correlation with the gain/phase margins. It becomes a potential new method to evaluate stability levels of all type of DC/DC converters by utilizing the spectral analysis on converter input noises.

  4. Modular Power Converters for PV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2012-05-01

    This report describes technical opportunities to serve as parts of a technological roadmap for Shoals Technologies Group in power electronics for PV applications. There are many different power converter circuits that can be used for solar inverter applications. The present applications do not take advantage of the potential for using common modules. We envision that the development of a power electronics module could enable higher reliability by being durable and flexible. Modules would have fault current limiting features and detection circuits such that they can limit the current through the module from external faults and can identify and isolate internal faults such that the remaining modules can continue to operate with only minimal disturbance to the utility or customer. Development of a reliable, efficient, low-cost, power electronics module will be a key enabling technology for harnessing more power from solar panels and enable plug and play operation. Power electronics for computer power supplies, communication equipment, and transportation have all targeted reliability and modularity as key requirements and have begun concerted efforts to replace monolithic components with collections of common smart modules. This is happening on several levels including (1) device level with intelligent control, (2) functional module level, and (3) system module. This same effort is needed in power electronics for solar applications. Development of modular units will result in standard power electronic converters that will have a lower installed and operating cost for the overall system. These units will lead to increased adaptability and flexibility of solar inverters. Incorporating autonomous fault current limiting and reconfiguration capabilities into the modules and having redundant modules will lead to a durable converter that can withstand the rigors of solar power generation for more than 30 years. Our vision for the technology roadmap is that there is no need

  5. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Marritt, Sophie J.; Kemp, Gemma L.; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes. PMID:24634538

  6. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Duncan G G; Marritt, Sophie J; Kemp, Gemma L; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2013-11-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes.

  7. Transient Numerical Modeling of Catalytic Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a transient model of catalytic combustion suitable for isolated channels and monolith reactors. The model is a lumped two-phase (gas and solid) model where the gas phase is quasi-steady relative to the transient solid. Axial diffusion is neglected in the gas phase; lateral diffusion, however, is accounted for using transfer coefficients. The solid phase includes axial heat conduction and external heat loss due to convection and radiation. The combustion process utilizes detailed gas and surface reaction models. The gas-phase model becomes a system of stiff ordinary differential equations while the solid phase reduces, after discretization, into a system of stiff ordinary differential-algebraic equations. The time evolution of the system came from alternating integrations of the quasi-steady gas and transient solid. This work outlines the numerical model and presents some sensitivity studies on important parameters including internal transfer coefficients, catalytic surface site density, and external heat-loss (if applicable). The model is compared to two experiments using CO fuel: (1) steady-state conversion through an isothermal platinum (Pt) tube and (2) transient propagation of a catalytic reaction inside a small Pt tube. The model requires internal mass-transfer resistance to match the experiments at lower residence times. Under mass-transport limited conditions, the model reasonably predicted exit conversion using global mass-transfer coefficients. Near light-off, the model results did not match the experiment precisely even after adjustment of mass-transfer coefficients. Agreement improved for the first case after adjusting the surface kinetics such that the net rate of CO adsorption increased compared to O2. The CO / O2 surface mechanism came from a sub-set of reactions in a popular CH4 / O2 mechanism. For the second case, predictions improved for lean conditions with increased external heat loss or adjustment of the kinetics as in the

  8. A Modern Understanding of the Traditional and Nontraditional Biological Functions of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Giani, Jorge F.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent peptidase responsible for converting angiotensin I into the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. However, ACE is a relatively nonspecific peptidase that is capable of cleaving a wide range of substrates. Because of this, ACE and its peptide substrates and products affect many physiologic processes, including blood pressure control, hematopoiesis, reproduction, renal development, renal function, and the immune response. The defining feature of ACE is that it is composed of two homologous and independently catalytic domains, the result of an ancient gene duplication, and ACE-like genes are widely distributed in nature. The two ACE catalytic domains contribute to the wide substrate diversity of ACE and, by extension, the physiologic impact of the enzyme. Several studies suggest that the two catalytic domains have different biologic functions. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure of ACE has elucidated some of the structural differences between the two ACE domains. This is important now that ACE domain-specific inhibitors have been synthesized and characterized. Once widely available, these reagents will undoubtedly be powerful tools for probing the physiologic actions of each ACE domain. In turn, this knowledge should allow clinicians to envision new therapies for diseases not currently treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:23257181

  9. Catalytic Domain Architecture of Metzincin Metalloproteases*

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteases cleave proteins and peptides, and deregulation of their function leads to pathology. An understanding of their structure and mechanisms of action is necessary to the development of strategies for their regulation. Among metallopeptidases are the metzincins, which are mostly multidomain proteins with ∼130–260-residue globular catalytic domains showing a common core architecture characterized by a long zinc-binding consensus motif, HEXXHXXGXX(H/D), and a methionine-containing Met-turn. Metzincins participate in unspecific protein degradation such as digestion of intake proteins and tissue development, maintenance, and remodeling, but they are also involved in highly specific cleavage events to activate or inactivate themselves or other (pro)enzymes and bioactive peptides. Metzincins are subdivided into families, and seven such families have been analyzed at the structural level: the astacins, ADAMs/adamalysins/reprolysins, serralysins, matrix metalloproteinases, snapalysins, leishmanolysins, and pappalysins. These families are reviewed from a structural point of view. PMID:19201757

  10. Make the most of catalytic hydrogenations

    SciTech Connect

    Landert, J.P.; Scubla, T.

    1995-03-01

    Liquid-phase catalytic hydrogenation is one of the most useful and versatile reactions available for organic synthesis. Because it is environmentally clean, it has replaced other reduction processes, such as the Bechamp reaction, and zinc and sulfide reductions. Moreover, the economics are favorable, provided that raw materials free of catalyst poisons are used. The hydrogenation reaction is very selective with appropriate catalysts and can often be carried out without a solvent. Applications include reduction of unsaturated carbon compounds to saturated derivatives (for example, in vegetable-oil processing), carbonyl compounds to alcohols (such as sorbitol), and nitrocompounds to amines. the reactions are usually run in batch reactors to rapidly reach complete conversion and allow quick change-over of products. The paper describes the basics of hydrogenation; steering clear of process hazards; scale-up and optimization; and system design in practice.

  11. Exploration of the Chaotic Behaviour in a Buck-Boost Converter Depending on the Converter and Load Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirbaş, Şevki; Fidanboy, Hikmet; Kurt, Erol

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, detailed analyses of the chaotic behavior observed in a buck-boost converter are presented. Although this basic converter system is already known world-wide for the purpose of dc-dc conversion of the output of renewable energy systems, it indicates certain chaotic regimes where both the output amplitude and frequency change randomly. This chaotic regime can yield an unstable output over the resistive or resistive/inductive electrical loads. This study presents a detailed map for the regular and chaotic regions in terms of material parameters, such as converter capacitance C, resistive load R, and inductive load L. Thus, the stable area of operation for efficient and renewable electricity production will be ascertained for the studied converter system. We emphasize that the material parameters C, R, and L play important roles in generating energy from the solar cell; indeed, the stability increases with higher values of the converter capacitor and load inductance, whereas it decreases according to the resistive load. A number of periodic windows have been observed and the output frequency gives a broad-band spectrum of up to 50 kHz.

  12. Catalytically active nanomaterials: a promising candidate for artificial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Youhui; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-04-15

    Natural enzymes, exquisite biocatalysts mediating every biological process in living organisms, are able to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions up to 10(19) times for specific substrates and reactions. However, the practical application of enzymes is often hampered by their intrinsic drawbacks, such as low operational stability, sensitivity of catalytic activity to environmental conditions, and high costs in preparation and purification. Therefore, the discovery and development of artificial enzymes is highly desired. Recently, the merging of nanotechnology with biology has ignited extensive research efforts for designing functional nanomaterials that exhibit various properties intrinsic to enzymes. As a promising candidate for artificial enzymes, catalytically active nanomaterials (nanozymes) show several advantages over natural enzymes, such as controlled synthesis in low cost, tunability in catalytic activities, as well as high stability against stringent conditions. In this Account, we focus on our recent progress in exploring and constructing such nanoparticulate artificial enzymes, including graphene oxide, graphene-hemin nanocomposites, carbon nanotubes, carbon nanodots, mesoporous silica-encapsulated gold nanoparticles, gold nanoclusters, and nanoceria. According to their structural characteristics, these enzyme mimics are categorized into three classes: carbon-, metal-, and metal-oxide-based nanomaterials. We aim to highlight the important role of catalytic nanomaterials in the fields of biomimetics. First, we provide a practical introduction to the identification of these nanozymes, the source of the enzyme-like activities, and the enhancement of activities via rational design and engineering. Then we briefly describe new or enhanced applications of certain nanozymes in biomedical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and therapeutics. For instance, we have successfully used these biomimetic catalysts as colorimetric probes for the detection of

  13. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Vaidyanathan, Sam

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher

  14. A Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor with Cylindrical Thermoelectric Converter Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Vaidyanathan, Sam

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear space power system that consists of a solid metal nuclear reactor core with heat pipes carrying energy to a cylindrical thermoelectric converter surrounding each of the heat pipes with a heat pipe radiator surrounding the thermoelectric converter is the most simple and reliable space power system. This means no single point of failure since each heat pipe and cylindrical converter is a separate power system and if one fails it will not affect the others. The heat pipe array in the solid core is designed so that if an isolated heat pipe or even two adjacent heat pipes fail, the remaining heat pipes will still transport the core heat without undue overheating of the uranium nitride fuel. The primary emphasis in this paper is on simplicity, reliability and fabricability of such a space nuclear power source. The core and heat pipes are made of Niobium 1% Zirconium alloy (Nb1Zr), with rhenium lined fuel tubes, bonded together by hot isostatic pressure, (HIPing) and with sodium as the heat pipe working fluid, can be operated up to 1250K. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is made by depositing the constituents of the converter around a Nb1%Zr tube and encasing it in a Nb 1% Zr alloy tube and HIPing the structure to get final bonding and to produce residual compressive stresses in all brittle materials in the converter. A radiator heat pipe filled with potassium that operates at 850K is bonded to the outside of the cylindrical converter for cooling. The solid core heat pipe and cylindrical converter are mated by welding during the final assembly. A solid core reactor with 150 heat pipes with a 0.650-inch (1.65 cm) ID and a 30-inch (76.2 cm) length with an output of 8 Watts per square inch as demonstrated by the SP100 PD2 cell tests will produce about 80 KW of electrical power. An advanced solid core reactor made with molybdenum 47% rhenium alloy, with lithium heat pipes and the PD2 theoretical output of 11 watts per square inch or advanced higher

  15. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  16. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  17. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  18. Cutoff lensing: predicting catalytic sites in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubailly, Simon; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Predicting function-related amino acids in proteins with unknown function or unknown allosteric binding sites in drug-targeted proteins is a task of paramount importance in molecular biomedicine. In this paper we introduce a simple, light and computationally inexpensive structure-based method to identify catalytic sites in enzymes. Our method, termed cutoff lensing, is a general procedure consisting in letting the cutoff used to build an elastic network model increase to large values. A validation of our method against a large database of annotated enzymes shows that optimal values of the cutoff exist such that three different structure-based indicators allow one to recover a maximum of the known catalytic sites. Interestingly, we find that the larger the structures the greater the predictive power afforded by our method. Possible ways to combine the three indicators into a single figure of merit and into a specific sequential analysis are suggested and discussed with reference to the classic case of HIV-protease. Our method could be used as a complement to other sequence- and/or structure-based methods to narrow the results of large-scale screenings.

  19. Catalytic asymmetric alkylation of acylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Jiawei; Oost, Rik; Desmarchelier, Alaric; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R

    2015-03-01

    The highly enantioselective addition of Grignard reagents to acylsilanes is catalyzed by copper diphosphine complexes. This transformation affords α-silylated tertiary alcohols in up to 97% yield and 98:2 enantiomeric ratio. The competing Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reduction is suppressed by the use of a mixture of Lewis acid additives. The chiral catalyst can be recovered as a copper complex and used repeatedly without any loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25403641

  20. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  1. An experimental TE sub 12 - TE sub 11 circular waveguide mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, D.

    1985-08-01

    Theoretical and experimental results for a prototype TE sub 12 to TE sub 11 circular waveguide mode converter are discussed. The system which requires such device, the high power Ka-Band transmitter is described briefly. A short review of coupled mode theory is given, and the theoretical performance of the final converter design is given. Experimental results for the fabricated converter are presented and compared with theory. A method of identifying the various circular waveguide modes in a multimode device is described. Given the close agreement between the theoretical predictions and experimental results, the computer code may be used with confidence in the design of future multimode tapers and mode converters.

  2. Practical Design Guidelines of qZSI Based Step-Up DC/DC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakis, Janis; Vinnikov, Dmitri; Roasto, Indrek; Jalakas, Tanel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents some design guidelines for a new voltage fed step-up DC/DC isolated converter. The most significant advantage of proposed converter is voltage buck-boost operation on single stage. The most promising application for proposed converter is in the field of distributed power generation e.g. fuel cells or photovoltaic. The most sensitive issues - such as power losses caused by high currents in the input side of converter and high transient overvoltages across the inverter bridge caused by stray inductances were discussed and solved. The proposals and recommendations to overcome these issues are given in the paper. The Selection and design guidelines of converter elements are proposed and explained. The prototype of proposed converter was built and experimentally tested. Some results are presented and evaluated.

  3. Series Connected Converter for Control of Multi-Bus Spacecraft Power Utility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Raymond F. (Inventor); Brush, Andy (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides a power system using series connected regulators. Power from a source, such as a solar array, is processed through the regulators and provided to corresponding buses used to charge a battery and supply loads. The regulators employ a bypass loop around a DC-DC converter. The bypass loop connects a hot input of the converter to a return output, preferably though an inductor. Part of the current from the source passes through the bypass loop to the power bus. The converter bucks or boosts the voltage from the source to maintain the desired voltage at the bus. Thus, only part of the power is processed through the converter. The converter can also be used without the bypass loop to provide isolation. All of the converters can be substantially identical.

  4. Three powerful dinuclear metal-organic catalysts for converting CO2 into organic carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Shi, Zhuang-Zhi; Zhu, Chen-Dan; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Peng; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2016-09-28

    Developing efficient catalysts for converting carbon dioxide (CO2) into varied organic carbonates is an important scientific goal. By using the NH2-functionalized tripodal ligand 2-((bis(2-aminoethyl)amino)methyl)phenol (HL), three dinuclear metal-organic complexes [Zn(L)]2·2ClO4 (1), [Cu(L)]2·2ClO4·2H2O (2) and [Cd(L)]2·2ClO4 (3) have been successfully isolated and structurally characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Considering the dinuclear metal centers and the NH2-functional groups in the structures, 1-3 were investigated as catalysts for converting CO2 into organic carbonates, and the results show that 1-3 exhibit an outstanding ability for converting CO2 into varied organic carbonates at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa). The catalytic system also displays a wide substrate scope and high catalytic activity, and the reaction mechanism has been proposed herein. PMID:27530724

  5. Power Converters Secure Electronics in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In order to harden power converters for the rigors of space, NASA awarded multiple SBIR contracts to Blacksburg, Virginia-based VPT Inc. The resulting hybrid DC-DC converters have proven valuable in aerospace applications, and as a result the company has generated millions in revenue from the product line and created four high-tech jobs to handle production.

  6. Operation of high power converters in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Three different unequal power sharing approaches for parallel operation of converters - droop, master-slave, and proportional adjustment - are discussed. The approaches have been incorporated in the breadboard dc-dc converter units used in the space station power management and distribution dc test bed at the Lewis Research Center, where the system operation has been verified.

  7. High-Efficiency dc/dc Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency dc/dc converter has been developed that provides commonly used voltages of plus or minus 12 Volts from an unregulated dc source of from 14 to 40 Volts. Unique features of converter are its high efficiency at low power level and ability to provide output either larger or smaller than input voltage.

  8. Distributed electrical leads for thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Fitzpatrick, Gary O.; Britt, Edward J.

    1979-01-01

    In a thermionic converter, means are provided for coupling an electrical lead to at least one of the electrodes thereof. The means include a bus bar and a plurality of distributed leads coupled to the bus bar each of which penetrates through one electrode and are then coupled to the other electrode of the converter in spaced apart relation.

  9. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  10. Controller for a wave energy converter

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, David G.; Bull, Diana L.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2015-09-22

    A wave energy converter (WEC) is described, the WEC including a power take off (PTO) that converts relative motion of bodies of the WEC into electrical energy. A controller controls operation of the PTO, causing the PTO to act as a motor to widen a wave frequency spectrum that is usable to generate electrical energy.

  11. Passive Resonant Bidirectional Converter with Galvanic Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblad, Nathan S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A passive resonant bidirectional converter system that transports energy across a galvanic barrier includes a converter using at least first and second converter sections, each section including a pair of transfer terminals, a center tapped winding; a chopper circuit interconnected between the center tapped winding and one of the transfer terminals; an inductance feed winding interconnected between the other of the transfer terminals and the center tap and a resonant tank circuit including at least the inductance of the center tap winding and the parasitic capacitance of the chopper circuit for operating the converter section at resonance; the center tapped windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a first common winding core and the inductance feed windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a second common winding core for automatically synchronizing the resonant oscillation of the first and second converter sections and transferring energy between the converter sections until the voltage across the pairs of transfer terminals achieves the turns ratio of the center tapped windings.

  12. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Patrick H.; Yu, David U. L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  13. Catalytic Preparation of Pyrrolidones from Renewable Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, John G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong

    2005-06-01

    Abstract Use of renewable resources for production of valuable chemical commodities is becoming a topic of great national interest and importance. This objective fits well with the U.S. DOE’s objective of promoting the industrial bio-refinery concept in which a wide array of valuable chemical, fuel, food, nutraceuticals, and animal feed products all result from the integrated processing of grains, oil seeds, and other bio-mass materials. The bio-refinery thus serves to enhance the overall utility and profitability of the agriculture industry as well as helping to reduce the USA’s dependence on petroleum. Pyrrolidones fit well into the bio-refinery concept since they may be produced in a scheme beginning with the fermentation of a portion of the bio-refinery’s sugar product into succinate. Pyrrolidones are a class of industrially important chemicals with a variety of uses including polymer intermediates, cleaners, and “green solvents” which can replace hazardous chlorinated compounds. Battelle has developed an efficient process for the thermo-catalytic conversion of succinate into pyrrolidones, especially n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. The process uses both novel Rh based catalysts and novel aqueous process conditions and results in high selectivities and yields of pyrrolidone compounds. The process also includes novel methodology for enhancing yields by recycling and converting non-useful side products of the catalysis into additional pyrrolidone. The process has been demonstrated in both batch and continuous reactors. Additionally, stability of the unique Rh-based catalyst has been demonstrated.

  14. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  15. Radiation Effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, De-Xin; AbdulMazid, M. D.; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, several DC-DC converters were designed and built. The converters are Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, Flyback, and full-bridge zero-voltage switched. The total ionizing dose radiation and single event effects on the converters were investigated. The experimental results for the TID effects tests show that the voltages of the Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, and Flyback converters increase as total dose increased when using power MOSFET IRF250 as a switching transistor. The change in output voltage with total dose is highest for the Buck converter and the lowest for Flyback converter. The trend of increase in output voltages with total dose in the present work agrees with those of the literature. The trends of the experimental results also agree with those obtained from PSPICE simulation. For the full-bridge zero-voltage switch converter, it was observed that the dc-dc converter with IRF250 power MOSFET did not show a significant change of output voltage with total dose. In addition, for the dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation-hardened power MOSFET, the output voltage did not change significantly with total dose. The experimental results were confirmed by PSPICE simulation that showed that FB-ZVS converter with IRF250 power MOSFET's was not affected with the increase in total ionizing dose. Single Event Effects (SEE) radiation tests were performed on FB-ZVS converters. It was observed that the FB-ZVS converter with the IRF250 power MOSFET, when the device was irradiated with Krypton ion with ion-energy of 150 MeV and LET of 41.3 MeV-square cm/mg, the output voltage increased with the increase in fluence. However, for Krypton with ion-energy of 600 MeV and LET of 33.65 MeV-square cm/mg, and two out of four transistors of the converter were permanently damaged. The dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation hardened power MOSFET's did not show significant change at the output voltage with fluence while being irradiated by Krypton with ion energy of 1.20 GeV and LET of 25

  16. Experimental studies and computer simulation of the control of energy transfer using inductor-converter bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1984-03-01

    An inductor-converter bridge (ICB) is a solid state DC-AC-DC power converter system for bidirectional, controllable, energy transfer between two coils. The ICB is suitable for supplying large pulsed power to such magnets as the superconducting equilibrium field coil of the proposed tokamak power reactors from another superconducting energy storage coil.

  17. A Methodology to Teach Advanced A/D Converters, Combining Digital Signal Processing and Microelectronics Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintans, C.; Colmenar, A.; Castro, M.; Moure, M. J.; Mandado, E.

    2010-01-01

    ADCs (analog-to-digital converters), especially Pipeline and Sigma-Delta converters, are designed using complex architectures in order to increase their sampling rate and/or resolution. Consequently, the learning of ADC devices also encompasses complex concepts such as multistage synchronization, latency, oversampling, modulation, noise shaping,…

  18. Modelling, analyses and design of switching converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, S. M.; Middlebrook, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A state-space averaging method for modelling switching dc-to-dc converters for both continuous and discontinuous conduction mode is developed. In each case the starting point is the unified state-space representation, and the end result is a complete linear circuit model, for each conduction mode, which correctly represents all essential features, namely, the input, output, and transfer properties (static dc as well as dynamic ac small-signal). While the method is generally applicable to any switching converter, it is extensively illustrated for the three common power stages (buck, boost, and buck-boost). The results for these converters are then easily tabulated owing to the fixed equivalent circuit topology of their canonical circuit model. The insights that emerge from the general state-space modelling approach lead to the design of new converter topologies through the study of generic properties of the cascade connection of basic buck and boost converters.

  19. Power Management and Distribution System Developed for Thermionic Power Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft solar, bimodal system combines propulsion and power generation into a single integrated system. An Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) provides orbital transfer capabilities, power generation for payloads, and onboard propulsion to the spacecraft. A key benefit of a bimodal system is a greater payload-to-spacecraft mass ratio resulting in lower launch vehicle requirements. Scaling down to smaller launch vehicles increases space access by reducing overall mission cost. NASA has joined efforts with the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to develop enabling technologies for such a system. The NASA/Air Force bimodal concept uses solar concentrators to focus energy into an integrated power plant. This power plant consists of a graphite core that stores thermal energy within a cavity. An array of thermionic converters encircles the graphite cavity and provides electrical energy conversion functions. During the power generation phase of the bimodal system, the thermionic converters are exposed to the heated cavity and convert the thermal energy to electricity. Near-term efforts of the ISUS bimodal program are focused on a ground demonstration of key technologies in order to proceed to a full space flight test. Thermionic power generation is one key technology of the bimodal concept. Thermionic power converters impose unique operating requirements upon a power management and distribution (PMAD) system design. Single thermionic converters supply large currents at very low voltages. Operating voltages can vary over a range of up to 3 to 1 as a function of operating temperature. Most spacecraft loads require regulated 28-volts direct-current (Vdc) power. A combination of series-connected converters and powerprocessing boosters is required to deliver power to the spacecraft's payloads at this level.

  20. Boost matrix converters in clean energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Ekrem

    This dissertation describes an investigation of novel power electronic converters, based on the ultra-sparse matrix topology and characterized by the minimum number of semiconductor switches. The Z-source, Quasi Z-source, Series Z-source and Switched-inductor Z-source networks were originally proposed for boosting the output voltage of power electronic inverters. These ideas were extended here on three-phase to three-phase and three-phase to single-phase indirect matrix converters. For the three-phase to three-phase matrix converters, the Z-source networks are placed between the three-switch input rectifier stage and the output six-switch inverter stage. A brief shoot-through state produces the voltage boost. An optimal pulse width modulation technique was developed to achieve high boosting capability and minimum switching losses in the converter. For the three-phase to single-phase matrix converters, those networks are placed similarly. For control purposes, a new modulation technique has been developed. As an example application, the proposed converters constitute a viable alternative to the existing solutions in residential wind-energy systems, where a low-voltage variable-speed generator feeds power to the higher-voltage fixed-frequency grid. Comprehensive analytical derivations and simulation results were carried out to investigate the operation of the proposed converters. Performance of the proposed converters was then compared between each other as well as with conventional converters. The operation of the converters was experimentally validated using a laboratory prototype.

  1. Catalytic and mechanical cycles in F-ATP synthases: Fourth in the Cycles Review Series

    PubMed Central

    Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Meier, T

    2006-01-01

    Cycles have a profound role in cellular life at all levels of organization. Well-known cycles in cell metabolism include the tricarboxylic acid and the urea cycle, in which a specific carrier substrate undergoes a sequence of chemical transformations and is regenerated at the end. Other examples include the interconversions of cofactors, such as NADH or ATP, which are present in the cell in limiting amounts and have to be recycled effectively for metabolism to continue. Every living cell performs a rapid turnover of ATP to ADP to fulfil various energetic demands and effectively regenerates the ATP from ADP in an energy-consuming process. The turnover of the ATP cycle is impressive; a human uses about its body weight in ATP per day. Enzymes perform catalytic reaction cycles in which they undergo several chemical and physical transformations before they are converted back to their original states. The ubiquitous F1Fo ATP synthase is of particular interest not only because of its biological importance, but also owing to its unique rotational mechanism. Here, we give an overview of the membrane-embedded Fo sector, particularly with respect to the recent crystal structure of the c ring from Ilyobacter tartaricus, and summarize current hypotheses for the mechanism by which rotation of the c ring is generated. PMID:16607397

  2. Catalytic conversion of carbohydrates into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural over cellulose-derived carbonaceous catalyst in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Zhao, Geng; Tang, Xing; Wu, Zhen; Xu, Jiaxing; Lin, Lu; Liu, Shijie

    2013-11-01

    Three environmental-benign and low-cost carbon-based solid acid catalysts containing -SO3H, -COOH and phenolic -OH groups were prepared and used for the conversion of glucose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl). The results demonstrated that cellulose-derived carbonaceous catalyst (CCC) possessed the highest catalytic activity, which resulted in 46.4% HMF yield at 160°C for only 15 min. In addition, the reaction kinetics for the conversion of glucose into HMF over CCC was fitted with the first-order rate equation. The slightly-deactivated CCC after four successive reaction runs could be easily regenerated by a simple carbonization and sulfonation process. More gratifyingly, the combination of CCC and [BMIM]Cl were confirmed to be suitable for converting other carbohydrates such as fructose, sucrose, maltose, cellobiose, starch and cellulose into HMF. Particularly, a plausible mechanism involving hydrolysis, isomerization and dehydration for the conversion of carbohydrates into HMF was also proposed. PMID:24090810

  3. Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil from Pine Sawdust

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Solantausta, Yrjo

    2012-06-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing has been applied to the fast pyrolysis liquid product (bio-oil) from softwood biomass in a bench-scale continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor system. The intent of the research was to develop process technology to convert the bio-oil into a petroleum refinery feedstock to supplement fossil energy resources and to displace imported feedstock. This paper is focused on the process experimentation and product analysis. The paper describes the experimental methods used and relates the results of the product analyses. A range of operating parameters including temperature, and flow-rate were tested with bio-oil derived from pine wood as recovered and pyrolyzed in the pilot pyrolyzer of Metso Power in Tampere, Finland. Effects of time on stream and catalyst activity were assessed. Details of the process results were presented included product yields and hydrogen consumption. Detailed analysis of the products were provided including elemental composition and product descriptors such as density, viscosity and Total Acid Number (TAN). In summation, the paper provides an initial understanding of the efficacy of hydroprocessing as applied to the Finnish pine bio-oil.

  4. Catalytic Cracking of Gaseous Heavy Hydrocarbons by Ceramic Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, S.; Nacken, M.; Walch, A.; Chudzinski, S.

    2002-09-19

    The use of syngas from waste or biomass gasification to generate electricity is a way which is attracting increasing attention especially with regard to the demands of regenerable energy consumption and to the reduction of waste disposal. In order to feed the syngas to a gas motor or a gas turbine the gas has to be cleaned. In future also the coupling of biomass gasification with a fuel cell will be applied, which needs a very efficient gas cleaning. The decomposition of tars and the removal of particles from the gas are the key issues of gas cleaning. Up to now these two steps are performed in two separate units. Normally, the tars are decomposed in catalytic beds or honeycomb structures. The catalytic decomposition is achieved at temperatures between 750 C and 900 C depending on the catalyst used. Particles are removed by filtration of the hot gas. Filtration at high temperatures and with high efficiencies is possible when using ceramic filter elements. Ceramic hot gas filters are well established in advanced coal gasification, such as the integrated gasification combined cycle process, as well as in waste and biomass gasification and pyrolysis processes. Since the catalytic reaction requires high temperatures the gas has to be reheated after the particles are removed in the filter or the hot unfiltered gas has to flow through the catalytic unit. If the gas is filtered first, reheating of the gas stream is an additional cost factor. Furthermore, pipes downstream of the filter can be plugged, if the temperature of the gas falls below the condensation temperature of the heavy hydrocarbons. Using the second way of hot unfiltered gas flows through the catalytic unit, there is the problem of deactivation of the catalyst by deposition of dust at higher dust concentrations. At worst the catalytic unit can be plugged by dust deposition.

  5. Heterogeneous kinetic modeling of the catalytic conversion of cycloparaffins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sabawi, Mustafa N.

    The limited availability of high value light hydrocarbon feedstocks along with the rise in crude prices has resulted in the international recognition of the vast potential of Canada's oil sands. With the recent expansion of Canadian bitumen production come, however, many technical challenges, one of which is the significant presence of aromatics and cycloparaffins in bitumen-derived feedstocks. In addition to their negative environmental impact, aromatics limit fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock conversion, decrease the yield and quality of valuable products such as gasoline and middle distillates, increase levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons prone to form coke on the catalyst, and ultimately compromise the FCC unit performance. Although cycloparaffins do not have such negative impacts, they are precursors of aromatics as they frequently undergo hydrogen transfer reactions. However, cycloparaffin cracking chemistry involves other competing reactions that are complex and need much investigation. This dissertation provides insights and understanding of the fundamentals of the catalytic cracking of cycloparaffins using carefully selected model compounds such as methylcyclohexane (MCH) and decalin. Thermal and catalytic cracking of these cycloparaffins on FCC-type catalysts are carried out using the CREC Riser Simulator under operating conditions similar to those of the industrial FCC units in terms of temperature, reaction time, reactant partial pressure and catalyst-to-hydrocarbon ratio. The crystallite size of the supported zeolites is varied between 0.4 and 0.9 microns, with both activity and selectivity being monitored. Catalytic conversions ranged between 4 to 16 wt% for MCH and between 8 to 27 wt% for decalin. Reaction pathways of cycloparaffins are determined, and these include ring-opening, protolytic cracking, isomerization, hydrogen transfer and transalkylation. The yields and selectivities of over 60 and 140 products, formed during MCH and decalin

  6. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme-cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes.

  7. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-11-05

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme-cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes.

  8. Maximizing the catalytic function of hydrogen spillover in platinum-encapsulated aluminosilicates with controlled nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Im, Juhwan; Shin, Hyeyoung; Jang, Haeyoun; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2014-02-25

    Hydrogen spillover has been studied for several decades, but its nature, catalytic functions and even its existence remain topics of vigorous debate. This is a consequence of the lack of model catalysts that can provide direct evidences of the existence of hydrogen spillover and simplify the catalytic interpretation. Here we use platinum encapsulated in a dense aluminosilicate matrix with controlled diffusional properties and surface hydroxyl concentrations to elucidate the catalytic functions of hydrogen spillover. The catalytic investigation and theoretical modelling show that surface hydroxyls, presumably Brønsted acids, are crucial for utilizing the catalytic functions of hydrogen spillover on the aluminosilicate surface. The catalysts with optimized nanostructure show remarkable activities in hydro-/dehydrogenation, but virtually no activity for hydrogenolysis. This distinct chemoselectivity may be beneficial in industrially important hydroconversions such as propane dehydrogenation to propylene because the undesired hydrogenolysis pathway producing light hydrocarbons of low value (methane and ethane) is greatly suppressed.

  9. Basicity, Catalytic and Adsorptive Properties of Hydrotalcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Francois

    Solid bases have numerous potential applications, not only as catalyst for the manufacture of fine chemicals, in refining and petrochemistry, but also for adsorption and anion exchange. The present processes use liquid bases, typically alcoholic potash, and require neutralisation of the reaction medium at the end of the reaction, with production of salts. The substitution of these liquid bases by solids would provide cleaner and safer processes, due to the reduction of salts, and facilitate separation of the products and recycling of the catalyst. This chapter reviews the recent ideas on the modification of the basic properties of hydrotalcites by anion exchange and on the catalytic properties of solid bases as catalysts. Many examples of successful applications are given, with emphasis to industrial processes recently presented such as isomerisation of olefins. The basic properties of hydrotalcites can also be used to carry the exchange of toxic anions, humic acids or dyes, and have driven recent developments proposing HDT as drug carriers.

  10. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties. PMID:27308672

  11. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and

  12. Polarization-controllable TE21 mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Yu, C. F.; Fan, C. T.

    2005-07-01

    We report the concept and development of a Ka-band mode and polarization converter that efficiently converts a TE10 rectangular waveguide mode into either a linearly or a circularly polarized TE21 cylindrical waveguide mode. The converter is composed of a power-dividing section, a mode-converting section, and a polarization-transitioning section. The converting process in each section is displayed and the working principles are discussed. A prototype has been built and tested. The measured results agree well with the numerical calculations for both linear and circular polarizations. The measured optimum back-to-back transmission is 94% with a 1-dB bandwidth of 4.1 GHz for the linear polarization. As for the circular polarization, the measured optimum transmission is 97%, but the corresponding bandwidth is indistinct due to some resonant dips. The reasons and impact for the dips are discussed. A bandwidth of 3.9 GHz is obtained for a single circular converter; meanwhile, an approach to eliminating these unwanted dips is presented in theory. For further diagnostics, the field pattern of either polarization is directly displayed on a temperature-sensitive liquid crystal display sheet, where the electric field strength can be discerned from the color spectrum. In addition to high conversion efficiency and broad bandwidth, this converter features easy construction, high mode purity, and polarization controllability.

  13. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report concerns our research on base-catalyzed coal solubilization and a new approach for hydrogen addition. The work on base-catalyzed, chemical solubilization is continuing. this report is focused on the hydrogenation research. Specifically it deals with the use of arene chromium carbonyl complexes as reagents for the addition of dideuterium to coal molecules. In one phase of the work, he has established that the aromatic hydrocarbons in a representative coal liquid can be converted in very good yield to arene chromium carbonyl compounds. In a second phase of the work directly related to our objective of improved methods for catalytic hydrogenation, he has established that the aromatic constituents of the same coal liquid add dideuterium in the presence of added napththalene chromium carbonyl.

  14. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  15. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  16. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Chatterjee, K.; Cheng, C.; Ettinger, M.; Flores, F.; Jiralerspong, S.; Miyake, M.; Muntean, J.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this research was to convert coal into a soluble substance under mild conditions. The strategy involved two steps, first to breakdown the macromolecular network of coal, and second to add hydrogen catalytically. We investigated different basic reagents that could, in priciple, break down coal`s structure and alkylation strategies that might enhance its solubility. We examined O- and C-alkylation, the importance of the strength of the base, the character of the added alkyl groups and other reaction parameters. This work provided new information concerning the way in which hydrogen bonding, polarization interactions between aromatic structures and covalent bonding could be disrupted and solubility enhanced. The objective of our research was to explore new organochromium chemistry that might be feasible for the hydrogenation of coal under mild conditions.

  17. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Chatterjee, K.; Cheng, C.; Ettinger, M.; Flores, F.; Jiralerspong, S.; Miyake, M.; Muntean, J.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this research was to convert coal into a soluble substance under mild conditions. The strategy involved two steps, first to breakdown the macromolecular network of coal, and second to add hydrogen catalytically. We investigated different basic reagents that could, in priciple, break down coal's structure and alkylation strategies that might enhance its solubility. We examined O- and C-alkylation, the importance of the strength of the base, the character of the added alkyl groups and other reaction parameters. This work provided new information concerning the way in which hydrogen bonding, polarization interactions between aromatic structures and covalent bonding could be disrupted and solubility enhanced. The objective of our research was to explore new organochromium chemistry that might be feasible for the hydrogenation of coal under mild conditions.

  18. Catalytic removal of carbon monoxide over carbon supported palladium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Avanish Kumar; Saxena, Amit; Shah, Dilip; Mahato, T H; Singh, Beer; Shrivastava, A R; Gutch, P K; Shinde, C P

    2012-11-30

    Carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) catalyst was prepared by impregnation of palladium chloride using incipient wetness technique, which was followed by liquid phase reduction with formaldehyde. Thereafter, Pd/C catalyst was characterized using X-ray diffractometery, scanning electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermo gravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and surface characterization techniques. Catalytic removal of carbon monoxide (CO) over Pd/C catalyst was studied under dynamic conditions. Pd/C catalyst was found to be continuously converting CO to CO(2) through the catalyzed reaction, i.e., CO+1/2O(2)→CO(2). Pd/C catalyst provided excellent protection against CO. Effects of palladium wt%, CO concentration, humidity, space velocity and reaction environment were also studied on the breakthrough behavior of CO. PMID:23083941

  19. Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    Precision Combustion, Inc. will develop a unique, fuel-flexible Rich Catalytic Lean-Burn (RCL®) injector with catalytic combustor capable of enabling ultralow-emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels. This will broaden the range of opportunity fuels that can be utilized to include low- and ultralow-Btu gases, such as digester and blast furnace gases, and fuels containing reactive species, such as refinery, wellhead, and industrial byproduct gases.

  20. Modeling a Transient Catalytic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Transient model of monolith catalytic combustor presented in report done under NASA/DOE contract. Model assumes quasi-steady gas phase and thermally "thin" solid. In gas-phase treatment, several quasi-global chemical reactions assumed capable of describing CO and unburnt hydrocarbon emissions in fuel-lean operations. In steady-state computation presented, influence of selected operating and design parameters on minimum combustor length studied. When fast transient responses required, both steady and unsteady studies made to achieve meaningful compromise in design.

  1. Catalytic membranes for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2011-04-19

    A fuel cell of the present invention comprises a cathode and an anode, one or both of the anode and the cathode including a catalyst comprising a bundle of longitudinally aligned graphitic carbon nanotubes including a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally and atomically distributed throughout the graphitic carbon walls of said nanotubes. The nanotubes also include nitrogen atoms and/or ions chemically bonded to the graphitic carbon and to the transition metal. Preferably, the transition metal comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and Cr.

  2. Programmable Analog-To-Digital Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, Edward H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    High-speed analog-to-digital converter with programmable voltage steps that can be changed during operation. Allows concentration of converter resolution over specific portion of waveform. Particularly useful in digitizing wind-shear radar and lidar return signals, in digital oscilloscopes, and other applications in which desirable to increase digital resolution over specific area of waveform while accepting lower resolution over rest of waveform. Effective increase in dynamic range achieved without increase in number of analog-to-digital converter bits. Enabling faster analog-to-digital conversion.

  3. Computational Introduction of Catalytic Activity into Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bertolani, Steve J; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Siegel, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there have been several successful cases of introducing catalytic activity into proteins. One method that has been used successfully to achieve this is the theozyme placement and enzyme design algorithms implemented in Rosetta Molecular Modeling Suite. Here, we illustrate how to use this software to recapitulate the placement of catalytic residues and ligand into a protein using a theozyme, protein scaffold, and catalytic constraints as input. PMID:27094294

  4. Microbial fuel cell energy harvesting using synchronous flyback converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaraj, Muhannad; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Park, Jae-Do

    2014-02-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) use biodegradable substrates, such as wastewater and marine sediments to generate electrical energy. To harvest more energy from an MFC, power electronic converters have recently been used to replace resistors or charge pumps, because they have superior controllability on MFC's operating point and higher efficiency in energy storage for different applications. Conventional diode-based energy harvesters suffer from low efficiency because of the energy losses through the diode. Replacing the diode with a MOSFET can reduce the conduction loss, but it requires an isolated gate signal to control the floating secondary MOSFET, which makes the control circuitry complex. This study presents a new MFC energy harvesting regime using a synchronous flyback converter, which implements a transformer-based harvester with much simpler configuration and improves harvesting efficiency by 37.6% compared to a diode based boost converter, from 33.5% to 46.1%. The proposed harvester was able to store 2.27 J in the output capacitor out of 4.91 J generated energy from the MFC, while the boost converter can capture 1.67 J from 4.95 J.

  5. Electrical power converter method and system employing multiple output converters

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2007-05-01

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  6. Intercell ohmic contacts for high efficiency multijunction solar converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehr, S. W.; Miller, D. L.; Harris, J. S., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The monolithic multijunction converter is an attractive approach to achieving solar/electric conversion with greater than 30% efficiency. A major technical challenge in the development of such devices is the requirement for low resistance, optically transparent intercell contacts between adjacent junctions. These contacts should transmit, without significant loss, the spectral fraction of the incident sunlight which is not absorbed and converted in the overlying junction materials. Their contact resistances must be low enough to prevent significant I to the 2d power R loss at the designed current density levels. They should also exhibit adequate thermal conductivity to prevent device overheating when subjected to the designed illumination level. Recent encouraging results for the development of such contacts are presented.

  7. From waste to energy -- Catalytic steam gasification of broiler litter

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.A.; Sheth, A.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1996, the production of broiler chickens in the US was approximately 7.60 billion head. The quantity of litter generated is enormous. In 1992, the Southeast region alone produced over five million tons of broiler litter. The litter removed from the broiler houses is rich in nutrients and often spread over land as a fertilizer. Without careful management, the associated agricultural runoff can cause severe environmental damage. With increasing broiler litter production, the implementation of alternative disposal technologies is essential to the sustainable development of the poultry industry. A process originally developed for the conversion of coals to clean gaseous fuel may provide an answer. Catalytic steam gasification utilities an alkali salt catalyst and steam to convert a carbonaceous feedstock to a gas mixture composed primarily of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane. The low to medium energy content gas produced may be utilized as an energy source or chemical feedstock. Broiler litter is an attractive candidate for catalytic steam gasification due to its high potassium content. Experiments conducted in UTSI's bench-scale high-pressure fixed bed gasifier have provided data for technical and economic feasibility studies of the process. Experiments have also been performed to examine the effects of temperature, pressure, and additional catalysts on the gasification rate.

  8. Electrochemical synthesis of elongated noble metal nanoparticles, such as nanowires and nanorods, on high-surface area carbon supports

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Blyznakov, Stoyan; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-08-04

    Elongated noble-metal nanoparticles and methods for their manufacture are disclosed. The method involves the formation of a plurality of elongated noble-metal nanoparticles by electrochemical deposition of the noble metal on a high surface area carbon support, such as carbon nanoparticles. Prior to electrochemical deposition, the carbon support may be functionalized by oxidation, thus making the manufacturing process simple and cost-effective. The generated elongated nanoparticles are covalently bound to the carbon support and can be used directly in electrocatalysis. The process provides elongated noble-metal nanoparticles with high catalytic activities and improved durability in combination with high catalyst utilization since the nanoparticles are deposited and covalently bound to the carbon support in their final position and will not change in forming an electrode assembly.

  9. Molecular characterization of human and bovine endothelin converting enzyme (ECE-1).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Kröger, B; Jacob, E; Seulberger, H; Subkowski, T; Otter, R; Meyer, T; Schmalzing, G; Hillen, H

    1994-12-19

    A membrane-bound protease activity that specifically converts Big endothelin-1 has been purified from bovine endothelial cells (FBHE). The enzyme was cleaved with trypsin and the peptide sequencing analysis confirmed it to be a zinc chelating metalloprotease containing the typical HEXXH (HELTH) motif. RT-PCR and cDNA screens were employed to isolate the complete cDNAs of the bovine and human enzymes. This human metalloprotease was expressed heterologously in cell culture and oocytes. The catalytic activity of the recombinant enzyme is the same as that determined for the natural enzyme. The data suggest that the characterized enzyme represents the functional human endothelin converting enzyme ECE-1. PMID:7805846

  10. Metal Chlorides in Ionic Liquid Solvents Convert Sugars to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Holladay, John E.; Brown, Heather M.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2007-06-15

    Sugars were converted to hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) at high yield in ionic liquids without the addition of Bronsted acids. Very small amount of certain metal halides significantly reduced the fructose dehydration barrier in ionic liquids producing HMF at high yields. Most remarkably, glucose, a common sugar molecule, was selectively converted to HMF in good yield in ionic liquids containing a small amount of CrCl2. Thus CrCl2 is unique among metal chlorides tested for its effectiveness in both isomerizing glucose as well as dehydrating fructose. Only negligble amount of levulinic acid was formed in the reactions. The catalytic activity of metal chlorides for sugar conversion in ionic liquids is perhaps related to hydroxyl group of the sugar forming metal complexes with the unsaturated metal center.

  11. Phase substitution of spare converter for a failed one of parallel phase staggered converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.; Wester, G. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Failure detection and substitution of a spare module is provided in a system having a plurality of phase staggered modules connected in parallel to deliver regulated voltage from an unregulated source. Phase control signals applied to the active converter modules are applied to the spare module through NOR gates associated with and disabled by the power output of respective modules such that failure of any one enables its phase control signal to be applied to the spare module, thus controlling the spare module to operate in the phase position of the failed module. A NAND gate detects when any one active module fails and enables a gate in the spare module, thus activating the spare module.

  12. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  13. Semiconductor Thermoelectric Converters of Alternating Current Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Bodnaruk, V. I.; Taschuk, D. D.

    2011-05-01

    Measuring converters have been developed based on Bi2Te3 solid solutions optimized for temperature and temporal stability of the basic thermoelectric parameters (thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and the Seebeck coefficient). Semiconductor material was grown by the vertical zone melting method. High efficiency of the optimized semiconductor materials made it possible to reduce the operating temperature considerably, as well as facilitating selection of structural materials and the converter fabrication technique. The influence of the Peltier and Thomson effects on the accuracy of direct current conversion has been reduced, and the operating frequency range of measurements has been expanded. Thermoelectric converters with sensitivity up to 30 V W-1 have been created without evacuation of the working space, which is filled with an inert gas mixture. The engineered converters offer the advantages of high sensitivity and a wide operating frequency range (up to 30 MHz).

  14. Photonic-to-plasmonic mode converter.

    PubMed

    Melikyan, Argishti; Kohl, Manfred; Sommer, Martin; Koos, Christian; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg

    2014-06-15

    A novel photonic-to-plasmonic mode converter for efficiently converting a silicon strip waveguide mode to a gap surface plasmon polariton (SPP) of a metallic slot structure is proposed. A conversion efficiency of more than 85% is found for metallic slots with a slot size of 30-50 nm. Calculations show that high conversion efficiencies can be achieved for various cladding materials with refractive indices of 1.44, 1.6, and 1.7. The optical 1 dB bandwidth of the converter is around 200 nm. The proposed mode converter shows a good tolerance with respect to fabrication errors, and it requires a simple fabrication procedure only.

  15. Waveguide mode converter and method using same

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1990-01-01

    A waveguide mode converter converts electromagnetic power being transmitted in a TE.sub.0n or a TM.sub.0n mode, where n is an integer, to an HE.sub.11 mode. The conversion process occurs in a single stage without requiring the power to pass through any intermediate modes. The converter comprises a length of circular corrugated waveguide formed in a multiperiod periodic curve. The period of the curve is selected to couple the desired modes and decouple undesired modes. The corrugation depth is selected to control the phase propagation constant, or wavenumbers, of the input and output modes, thereby preventing coherent coupling to competing modes. In one embodiment, both the period and amplitude of the curve may be selectively adjusted, thereby allowing the converter to be tuned to maximize the conversion efficiency.

  16. Rotorcraft convertible engines for the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Two rotorcraft studies were executed. The goal was to identify attractive techniques for implementing convertible powerplants for the ABC, Folded Tilt Rotor, and X-wing type high speed, high-L/D rotorcraft; to determine the DOC and fuel savings benefits achieved thereby; and to define research required to bring these powerplants into existence by the 1990's. These studies are reviewed herein and the different methods of approach are pointed out as well as the key findings. Fan shaft engines using variable inlet guide vanes or torque converters, and turboprop powerplants appear attractive. Savings in DOC and fuel consumption of over 15 percent are predicted in some cases as a result of convertible engine use rather than using separate engines for the thrust and the shaft functions. Areas of required research are fan performance (including noise), integrated engine/rotorcraft control, torque converters, turbine design, airflow for rotorcraft torque control, bleed for lift flow, and transmissions and clutches.

  17. Converting Garbage to Gold: Recycling Our Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, William U.

    1984-01-01

    Recycling conserves energy, fights pollution and inflation, creates jobs, and improves the outlook for the future of materials. But converting a throwaway society to recycling will depend on finding good markets for waste paper and scrap metals. (RM)

  18. Prokaryotic squalene-hopene cyclases can be converted to citronellal cyclases by single amino acid exchange.

    PubMed

    Siedenburg, Gabriele; Breuer, Michael; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Squalene-hopene cyclases (SHCs) are prokaryotic enzymes that catalyse the cyclisation of the linear precursor squalene to pentacyclic hopene. Recently, we discovered that a SHC cloned from Zymomonas mobilis (ZMO-1548 gene product) has the unique property to cyclise the monoterpenoid citronellal to isopulegol. In this study, we performed saturation mutagenesis of three amino acids of the catalytic centre of ZMO-1548 (F428, F486 and W555), which had been previously identified to interact with enzyme-bound substrate. Replacement of F428 by tyrosine increased hopene formation from squalene, but isopulegol-forming activity was strongly reduced or abolished in all muteins of position 428. W555 was essential for hopene formation; however, three muteins (W555Y, W428F or W555T) revealed enhanced cyclisation efficiency with citronellal. The residue at position 486 turned out to be the most important for isopulegol-forming activity. While the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine favoured cyclisation activity with squalene, several small and/or hydrophobic residues such as cysteine, alanine or isoleucine and others reduced activity with squalene but greatly enhanced isopulegol formation from citronellal. Replacement of the conserved aromatic residue corresponding to F486 to cysteine in other SHCs cloned from Z. mobilis (ZMO-0872), Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (SHC(Aac)), Acetobacter pasteurianus (SHC(Apa)), Streptomyces coelicolor (SHC(Sco)) and Bradyrhizobium japonicum (SHC(Bja)) resulted in more or less strong isopulegol-forming activities from citronellal. In conclusion, many SHCs can be converted to citronellal cyclases by mutagenesis of the active centre thus broadening the applicability of this interesting class of biocatalyst. PMID:22526778

  19. Prokaryotic squalene-hopene cyclases can be converted to citronellal cyclases by single amino acid exchange.

    PubMed

    Siedenburg, Gabriele; Breuer, Michael; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Squalene-hopene cyclases (SHCs) are prokaryotic enzymes that catalyse the cyclisation of the linear precursor squalene to pentacyclic hopene. Recently, we discovered that a SHC cloned from Zymomonas mobilis (ZMO-1548 gene product) has the unique property to cyclise the monoterpenoid citronellal to isopulegol. In this study, we performed saturation mutagenesis of three amino acids of the catalytic centre of ZMO-1548 (F428, F486 and W555), which had been previously identified to interact with enzyme-bound substrate. Replacement of F428 by tyrosine increased hopene formation from squalene, but isopulegol-forming activity was strongly reduced or abolished in all muteins of position 428. W555 was essential for hopene formation; however, three muteins (W555Y, W428F or W555T) revealed enhanced cyclisation efficiency with citronellal. The residue at position 486 turned out to be the most important for isopulegol-forming activity. While the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine favoured cyclisation activity with squalene, several small and/or hydrophobic residues such as cysteine, alanine or isoleucine and others reduced activity with squalene but greatly enhanced isopulegol formation from citronellal. Replacement of the conserved aromatic residue corresponding to F486 to cysteine in other SHCs cloned from Z. mobilis (ZMO-0872), Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (SHC(Aac)), Acetobacter pasteurianus (SHC(Apa)), Streptomyces coelicolor (SHC(Sco)) and Bradyrhizobium japonicum (SHC(Bja)) resulted in more or less strong isopulegol-forming activities from citronellal. In conclusion, many SHCs can be converted to citronellal cyclases by mutagenesis of the active centre thus broadening the applicability of this interesting class of biocatalyst.

  20. High voltage photovoltaic power converter

    DOEpatents

    Haigh, Ronald E.; Wojtczuk, Steve; Jacobson, Gerard F.; Hagans, Karla G.

    2001-01-01

    An array of independently connected photovoltaic cells on a semi-insulating substrate contains reflective coatings between the cells to enhance efficiency. A uniform, flat top laser beam profile is illuminated upon the array to produce electrical current having high voltage. An essentially wireless system includes a laser energy source being fed through optic fiber and cast upon the photovoltaic cell array to prevent stray electrical signals prior to use of the current from the array. Direct bandgap, single crystal semiconductor materials, such as GaAs, are commonly used in the array. Useful applications of the system include locations where high voltages are provided to confined spaces such as in explosive detonation, accelerators, photo cathodes and medical appliances.

  1. Notes on Converting to Microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Antonio; Almy, John

    1998-01-01

    As a substitute for commercial microscale glassware kits, common glassware items have been utilized to carry out techniques such as refluxing, recrystallization, elution chromatography, extractions and boiling point determinations. In addition four microscale experiments are described which do not require kits: synthesis of 4,6,8-trimethylazulene, isolation of cholesterol by continuous extraction, synthesis of benzoic acid via a Grignard reaction and synthesis of meso-tetraphenylporphyrin.

  2. Purification of prosomatostatin-converting enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mackin, R B; Noe, B D; Spiess, J

    1990-09-01

    The enzymes responsible for performing cleavage of propeptides at basic amino acids have proven difficult to characterize. Using the processing of anglerfish islet prosomatostatin (PSS) as a model system, we are pursuing the characterization of both a single basic amino acid-specific and a dibasic amino acid-specific converting enzyme. We describe here the model system and protein isolation methods that have allowed significant progress toward complete characterization of the somatostatin-generating propeptide converting enzymes (PCEs). PMID:1976216

  3. ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL DATA CONVERTER

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, G.W.; Althouse, J.E.; Anderson, D.P.; Bussey, G.R.; Minnear, L.H.

    1960-09-01

    Electrical apparatus is described, particularly useful in telemetry work, for converting analog signals into electrical pulses and recording them. An electronic editor commands the taking of signal readings at a frequency which varies according to linearity of the analog signal being converted. Readings of information signals are recorded, along with time base readings and serial numbering, if desired, on magnetic tape and the latter may be used to operate a computer or the like. Magnetic tape data may be transferred to punched cards.

  4. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Williams, R.S.

    1993-12-31

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant(reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650{degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams, The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

  5. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1993-12-31

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range (400--650{degree}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2} formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

  6. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1992-12-31

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas streams is highly attractive as it produces a saleable. Product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plants(reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project win investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single-stage selective reduction SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because of its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650C). Kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a simplified process, a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. A first apparent application is treatment of regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

  7. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1994-12-31

    Elemental sulfur recovery from S0{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multistage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of S0{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of S0{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of S0{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for S0{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range (400--650{degree}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of S0{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

  8. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1993-06-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant(reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650{degree}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams, The potential cost and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

  9. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1995-03-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range (400-650{degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach cannot be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought {open_quotes}Claus-alternative{close_quotes} for coal-fired power plant applications.

  10. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor peptides derived from the endostatin-containing NC1 fragment of human collagen XVIII.

    PubMed

    Farias, Shirley L; Sabatini, Regiane A; Sampaio, Tatiana C; Hirata, Izaura Y; Cezari, Maria Helena S; Juliano, Maria A; Sturrock, Edward D; Carmona, Adriana K; Juliano, Luiz

    2006-05-01

    Extracellular matrix and soluble plasma proteins generate peptides that regulate biological activities such as cell growth, differentiation and migration. Bradykinin, a peptide released from kininogen by kallikreins, stimulates vasodilatation and endothelial cell proliferation. Various classes of substances can potentiate these biological actions of bradykinin. Among them, the best studied are bradykinin potentiating peptides (BPPs) derived from snake venom, which can also strongly inhibit angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. We identified and synthesized sequences resembling BPPs in the vicinity of potential proteolytic cleavage sites in the collagen XVIII molecule, close to endostatin. These peptides were screened as inhibitors of human recombinant wild-type ACE containing two intact functional domains; two full-length ACE mutants containing only a functional C- or N-domain catalytic site; and human testicular ACE, a natural form of the enzyme that only contains the C-domain. The BPP-like peptides inhibited ACE in the micromolar range and interacted preferentially with the C-domain. The proteolytic activity involved in the release of BPP-like peptides was studied in human serum and human umbilical-vein endothelial cells. The presence of enzymes able to release these peptides in blood led us to speculate on a physiological mechanism for the control of ACE activities.

  11. 47 CFR 15.121 - Scanning receivers and frequency converters used with scanning receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...; replacing a plug-in semiconductor chip; or programming a semiconductor chip using special access codes or an external device, such as a personal computer. Scanning receivers, and frequency converters designed for...

  12. 47 CFR 15.121 - Scanning receivers and frequency converters used with scanning receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; replacing a plug-in semiconductor chip; or programming a semiconductor chip using special access codes or an external device, such as a personal computer. Scanning receivers, and frequency converters designed for...

  13. 47 CFR 15.121 - Scanning receivers and frequency converters used with scanning receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; replacing a plug-in semiconductor chip; or programming a semiconductor chip using special access codes or an external device, such as a personal computer. Scanning receivers, and frequency converters designed for...

  14. 47 CFR 15.121 - Scanning receivers and frequency converters used with scanning receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; replacing a plug-in semiconductor chip; or programming a semiconductor chip using special access codes or an external device, such as a personal computer. Scanning receivers, and frequency converters designed for...

  15. 47 CFR 15.121 - Scanning receivers and frequency converters used with scanning receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; replacing a plug-in semiconductor chip; or programming a semiconductor chip using special access codes or an external device, such as a personal computer. Scanning receivers, and frequency converters designed for...

  16. Caspase-1 Protein Induces Apoptosis-associated Speck-like Protein Containing a Caspase Recruitment Domain (ASC)-mediated Necrosis Independently of Its Catalytic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Motani, Kou; Kushiyama, Hiroko; Imamura, Ryu; Kinoshita, Takeshi; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Suda, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The adaptor protein, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), connects pathogen/danger sensors such as NLRP3 and NLRC4 with caspases and is involved in inflammation and cell death. We have found that ASC activation induced caspase-8-dependent apoptosis or CA-074Me (cathepsin B inhibitor)-inhibitable necrosis depending on the cell type. Unlike necroptosis, another necrotic cell death, ASC-mediated necrosis, was neither RIP3-dependent nor necrostatin-1-inhibitable. Although acetyl–YVAD–chloromethylketone (Ac-YVAD-CMK) (caspase-1 inhibitor) did not inhibit ASC-mediated necrosis, comprehensive gene expression analyses indicated that caspase-1 expression coincided with the necrosis type. Furthermore, caspase-1 knockdown converted necrosis-type cells to apoptosis-type cells, whereas exogenous expression of either wild-type or catalytically inactive caspase-1 did the opposite. Knockdown of caspase-1, but not Ac-YVAD-CMK, suppressed the monocyte necrosis induced by Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas infection. Thus, the catalytic activity of caspase-1 is dispensable for necrosis induction. Intriguingly, a short period of caspase-1 knockdown inhibited IL-1β production but not necrosis, although longer knockdown suppressed both responses. Possible explanations of this phenomenon are discussed. PMID:21832064

  17. Design and evaluation of cellular power converter architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, David John

    Power electronic technology plays an important role in many energy conversion and storage applications, including machine drives, power supplies, frequency changers and UPS systems. Increases in performance and reductions in cost have been achieved through the development of higher performance power semiconductor devices and integrated control devices with increased functionality. Manufacturing techniques, however, have changed little. High power is typically achieved by paralleling multiple die in a sing!e package, producing the physical equivalent of a single large device. Consequently, both the device package and the converter in which the device is used continue to require large, complex mechanical structures, and relatively sophisticated heat transfer systems. An alternative to this approach is the use of a cellular power converter architecture, which is based upon the parallel connection of a large number of quasi-autonomous converters, called cells, each of which is designed for a fraction of the system rating. The cell rating is chosen such that single-die devices in inexpensive packages can be used, and the cell fabricated with an automated assembly process. The use of quasi-autonomous cells means that system performance is not compromised by the failure of a cell. This thesis explores the design of cellular converter architectures with the objective of achieving improvements in performance, reliability, and cost over conventional converter designs. New approaches are developed and experimentally verified for highly distributed control of cellular converters, including methods for ripple cancellation and current-sharing control. The performance of these techniques are quantified, and their dynamics are analyzed. Cell topologies suitable to the cellular architecture are investigated, and their use for systems in the 5-500 kVA range is explored. The design, construction, and experimental evaluation of a 6 kW cellular switched-mode rectifier is also addressed

  18. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical

  19. 31 CFR 363.164 - Is a converted savings bond eligible to be converted back into a definitive bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to be converted back into a definitive bond? 363.164 Section 363.164 Money and Finance: Treasury... Bond § 363.164 Is a converted savings bond eligible to be converted back into a definitive bond? Once a definitive savings bond has been converted to a book-entry bond, it may not be converted back into...

  20. The effect of online catalytic pyrolysis on the yield of light liquid products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gangwei

    2014-06-01

    Hydro-catalytic pyrolysis on Yunnan lignite were studied in a fixed bed to determine their effects on high-value raw materials, such as BTX, PCX and lower naphthalene, in liquid products. Ni and Mo were chosen as active pyrolysis centers through thermogravimetry, after which their catalytic effects were analyzed in a fixed bed. The results showed that different concentrations of impregnated Ni and Mo solution can significantly increase the yield of high-value products and enable catalyst separating and recycling with this method of online catalytic pyrolysis.

  1. ZVS Full-Bridge Based DC-DC Converter with Linear Voltage Gain According to Duty Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Hyun-Lark

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) full-bridge based DC-DC converter with linear voltage gain according to duty cycle. The proposed converter is based on an asymmetrical pulse-width-modulation (APWM) full-bridge converter which has various advantages over other converters. However, it has some drawbacks such as limited maximum duty cycle to 0.5 and narrow input range. The proposed converter overcomes these problems. The duty cycle is not limited and input voltage range is wide. Also, the ZVS operation of all power switches is achieved. Therefore, switching losses are significantly reduced and high-efficiency is obtained. Steady-state analysis and experimental results for the proposed converter are presented to validate the feasibility and the performance of the proposed converter.

  2. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  3. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  4. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  5. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalyst are presented.

  6. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen/oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a unique monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant inlet temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of a catalytic igniter. The test results showed that the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using both the granular and monolithic catalysts are presented. The capabilities of a facility constructed to conduct the igniter testing and the advantages of a catalytic igniter over other ignition systems for gaseous hydrogen and oxygen are also discussed.

  7. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  8. Switching coordination of distributed dc-dc converters for highly efficient photovoltaic power plants

    DOEpatents

    Agamy, Mohammed; Elasser, Ahmed; Sabate, Juan Antonio; Galbraith, Anthony William; Harfman Todorovic, Maja

    2014-09-09

    A distributed photovoltaic (PV) power plant includes a plurality of distributed dc-dc converters. The dc-dc converters are configured to switch in coordination with one another such that at least one dc-dc converter transfers power to a common dc-bus based upon the total system power available from one or more corresponding strings of PV modules. Due to the coordinated switching of the dc-dc converters, each dc-dc converter transferring power to the common dc-bus continues to operate within its optimal efficiency range as well as to optimize the maximum power point tracking in order to increase the energy yield of the PV power plant.

  9. Current Fed Step-up DC/DC Converter for Fuel Cell Inverter Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreičiks, Aleksandrs; Vitols, Kristaps; Krievs, Oskars; Steiks, Ingars

    2009-01-01

    In order to use hydrogen fuel cells in domestic applications either as main power supply or backup source, their low DC output voltage has to be matched to the level and frequency of the utility grid AC voltage. Such power converter systems usually consist of a DC-DC converter and a DC-AC inverter. Comparison of different current fed step-up DC/DC converters is done in this paper and a double inductor step-up push-pull converter investigated, presenting simulation and experimental results. The converter is elaborated for 1200 W power to match the rated power of the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell located in hydrogen fuel cell research laboratory of Riga Technical University.

  10. A multilevel voltage-source converter system with balanced dc voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng; McKeever, J.; VanCoevering, J.

    1995-04-01

    A multilevel voltage-source converter system is proposed for high-voltage, high-power applications such as large induction motor drives, back-to-back interconnected power systems, and electrical traction drives. Multilevel voltage-source converters have a voltage unbalance problem in the dc capacitors. The problem may be solved by use of additional voltage regulators or separate dc sources. However, these solutions are found not to be practicable for most applications. The proposed converter system can solve the voltage unbalance problem of the conventional multilevel voltage-source converters, without using any additional voltage balance circuits or separate voltage sources. Mechanism of the voltage unbalance problem is analyzed theoretically in this paper. The validity of the new converter system is demonstrated by simulation and experiment.

  11. Catalytic decarbonylation of biosourced substrates.

    PubMed

    Ternel, Jérémy; Lebarbé, Thomas; Monflier, Eric; Hapiot, Frédéric

    2015-05-11

    Linear α-olefins (LAO) are one of the main targets in the field of surfactants, lubricants, and polymers. With the depletion of petroleum resources, the production of LAO from renewable feedstocks has gained increasing interest in recent years. In the present study, we demonstrated that Ir catalysts were suitable to decarbonylate a wide range of biosourced substrates under rather mild conditions (160 °C, 5 h reaction time) in the presence of potassium iodide and acetic anhydride. The resulting LAO were obtained with good conversion and selectivity provided that the purity of the substrate, the nature of the ligand, and the amounts of the additives were controlled accurately. The catalytic system could be recovered efficiently by using a Kugelrohr distillation apparatus and recycled.

  12. Catalytic Carbonylative Spirolactonization of Hydroxycyclopropanols.

    PubMed

    Davis, Dexter C; Walker, Katherine L; Hu, Chunhua; Zare, Richard N; Waymouth, Robert M; Dai, Mingji

    2016-08-24

    A palladium-catalyzed cascade carbonylative spirolactonization of hydroxycyclopropanols has been developed to efficiently synthesize oxaspirolactones common to many complex natural products of important therapeutic value. The mild reaction conditions, high atom economy, broad substrate scope, and scalability of this new method were highlighted in expedient total syntheses of the Turkish tobacco natural products α-levantanolide and α-levantenolide in two and four steps, respectively. The hydroxycyclopropanol substrates are readily available in one step via a Kulinkovich reaction of the corresponding lactones. Mechanistic studies utilizing high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) identified several key intermediates in the catalytic cycle, as well as those related to catalyst decomposition and competitive pathways. PMID:27459274

  13. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  14. Catalytic reactor with improved burner

    DOEpatents

    Faitani, Joseph J.; Austin, George W.; Chase, Terry J.; Suljak, George T.; Misage, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

  15. The evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  16. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-11

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD{sup +} in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD{sup +} homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD{sup +}-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  17. High Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes∥,‡

    PubMed Central

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD+ in most prokaryotes, most single cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD+ homeostasis has increased interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD+ consuming enzymes, such as the NAD+-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding while a trapped nicotinoyl-thioester complexed with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule, and an oxyanion hole which both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence for several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:20853856

  18. Efficient conversion of vicinal diols to alkenes by treatment of the corresponding dimesylates with a catalytic, minimally fluorous, recoverable diaryl diselenide and sodium borohydride

    PubMed

    Crich; Neelamkavil; Sartillo-Piscil

    2000-12-14

    In conjunction with sodium borohydride as stoichiometric reagent a catalytic quantity of bis(4-perfluorohexylphenyl) diselenide converts vicinal dimesylates to the corresponding alkenes in good yield on warming in ethanol. The diselenide is recovered in high yield by continuous fluorous extraction.

  19. Fuel elements of thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.L.; Gontar, A.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.; Schulepov, L.N.

    1997-01-01

    Work on thermionic nuclear power systems has been performed in Russia within the framework of the TOPAZ reactor program since the early 1960s. In the TOPAZ in-core thermionic convertor reactor design, the fuel element`s cladding is also the thermionic convertor`s emitter. Deformation of the emitter can lead to short-circuiting and is the primary cause of premature TRC failure. Such deformation can be the result of fuel swelling, thermocycling, or increased unilateral pressure on the emitter due to the release of gaseous fission products. Much of the work on TRCs has concentrated on preventing or mitigating emitter deformation by improving the following materials and structures: nuclear fuel; emitter materials; electrical insulators; moderator and reflector materials; and gas-exhaust device. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques that accurately mimic operational conditions and toward the creation of analytical and numerical models that allow operational conditions and behavior to be predicted without the expense and time demands of in-pile tests. New and modified materials and structures for the cores of thermionic NPSs and new fabrication processes for the materials have ensured the possibility of creating thermionic NPSs for a wide range of powers, from tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, with life spans of 5 to 10 years.

  20. Converting Bangladesh's influential religious leaders.

    PubMed

    Neaz, A

    1996-01-01

    While the Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB) introduced family planning to Bangladesh in 1953, very little progress was achieved before the 1980s. It was noticed during the 1980s that despite solid service delivery efforts with interpersonal communication at the community level and expanding choices of contraceptive methods, program success was impeded by religious leader opposition. Religious leader claims that family planning was against Islam reinforce male opposition to contraception. In an effort to win the support of religious leaders, the FPAB established an Islamic Research Cell (IRC) in 1984 and launched targeted advocacy and orientation programs. An expert with religious education and background ran the IRC. The leaders were taught that Islam directly or indirectly promotes family welfare from the viewpoint of the health and economic needs of the family, and that the Qur'an nowhere argues that family planning is forbidden. The Qur'an actually encourages prolonged breastfeeding and the avoidance of unwanted births. Orientation courses, seminars, a national conference, and the distribution of educational printed media eventually convinced the religious leaders to support family planning. Male involvement in family planning is essential in such a male-dominated society.

  1. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1994-09-20

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attrition mill and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system. 1 fig.

  2. Converting color images to grayscale images by reducing dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Kim, Byoung-Kwang; Song, Woo-Jin

    2010-05-01

    A novel color-to-grayscale method is presented for converting color images to grayscale images by reducing dimensions. The proposed method converts three-dimensional (3-D) RGB color vectors into one-dimensional (1-D) grayscale values by projecting the 3-D vector into a two-dimensional (2-D) intermediate one followed by compressing the 2-D vector into the 1-D value. Characteristics of color are introduced to facilitate the final determination of the 1-D values in the reducing dimensions. The proposed method has the advantages of preserving chromatic contrasts, maintaining luminance consistency, and having a low computational cost. Furthermore, the proposed method has high resistance to artifacts, such as halos, which can occur when using local contents.

  3. CONVERTING PYROLYSIS OILS TO RENEWABLE TRANSPORT FUELS: PROCESSING CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, Jennifer; Nair, Prabhakar N.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Bain, Richard; Marinangelli, Richard

    2008-03-11

    To enable a sustained supply of biomass-based transportation fuels, the capability to process feedstocks outside the food chain must be developed. Significant industry efforts are underway to develop these new technologies, such as converting cellulosic wastes to ethanol. UOP, in partnership with U.S. Government labs, NREL and PNNL, is developing an alternate route using cellulosic feedstocks. The waste biomass is first subjected to a fast pyrolysis operation to generate pyrolysis oil (pyoil for short). Current efforts are focused on developing a thermochemical platform to convert pyoils to renewable gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. The fuels produced will be indistinguishable from their fossil fuel counterparts and, therefore, will be compatible with existing transport and distribution infrastructure.

  4. Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, Daryl; Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George; Abel, David

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

  5. Efficiency of Thermionic and Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstenmaier, York Christian; Wachutka, Gerhard

    2007-02-01

    Thermoelectric and thermionic converters — also in micro- and nano-meter design — are considered for power generation and cooling applications. The potential of thermionic vacuum gap converters is investigated precisely by a new advanced theory with inclusion of backward currents from the 2nd electrode, losses due to thermal radiation and ohmic resistance in the electrodes, tunneling through the gap, image forces, and space charge effects. The efficiency of nano-meter gap thermionic converters is by far higher than for thermoelectric devices (including nano-structured superlattices) for operating temperatures above 800°K, however, there is no chance of realization with today's technology. For a vacuum gap width of about 1 μm the performance is higher than for hypothetical bulk- thermoelectric generators (TEGs) with ZT = 1 for T > 1000°K and also higher than for hypothetical nano-structured superlattices (ZT = 2.4) for T > 1200°K. A thermionic converter with gap width of 5μm has lower performance than a TEG with ZT = 1, however, also operates at T > 1200°K. Reasonable performance of thermionic converters at T ⩽ 500°K necessitates materials with workfunctions ⩽ 0.5 eV.

  6. Fabrication and life testing of thermionic converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L.; Bruce, R.

    1973-01-01

    An unfueled converter containing a chloride-fluoride duplex tungsten emitter of 4.78 eV vacuum work function was tested for 46,647 hours at an emitter temperature of 1973 K and an electrode power output of about 8 watts/sq cm. The test demonstrated the superior and stable performance of the (110) oriented tungsten emitter at high temperatures. Three 90 UC-10 ZrC(C/U = 1.04, tungsten additive = 4 wt %) fueled converters were fabricated and tested at an emitter temperature of 1873 K. Converter containing chloride-arc-cast duplex tungsten cladding showed temperature thermionic performance and slower rate of performance drop than converter containing chloride-fluoride duplex tungsten cladding. This is believed to be due to the superior fuel component diffusion resistance of the arc-cast tungsten substrate used in the fuel cladding. It was shown that a converter containing a carbide fueled chloride-arc-cast duplex tungsten emitter with an initial electrode power output of 6.80 watts/sq cm could still deliver an electrode power output of 6.16 watts/sq cm after 18,632 hours of operation at an emitter temperature of 1873 K.

  7. Ac-dc converter firing error detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, O.L.

    1996-07-15

    Each of the twelve Booster Main Magnet Power Supply modules consist of two three-phase, full-wave rectifier bridges in series to provide a 560 VDC maximum output. The harmonic contents of the twelve-pulse ac-dc converter output are multiples of the 60 Hz ac power input, with a predominant 720 Hz signal greater than 14 dB in magnitude above the closest harmonic components at maximum output. The 720 Hz harmonic is typically greater than 20 dB below the 500 VDC output signal under normal operation. Extracting specific harmonics from the rectifier output signal of a 6, 12, or 24 pulse ac-dc converter allows the detection of SCR firing angle errors or complete misfires. A bandpass filter provides the input signal to a frequency-to-voltage converter. Comparing the output of the frequency-to-voltage converter to a reference voltage level provides an indication of the magnitude of the harmonics in the ac-dc converter output signal.

  8. Materials technology for Stirling space power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggenstoss, William; Mittendorf, Donald

    1992-01-01

    This program was conducted in support of the NASA LeRC development of the Stirling power converter (SPC) for space power applications. The objectives of this contract were: (1) to perform a technology review and analyses to support the evaluation of materials issues for the SPC; (2) to evaluate liquid metal compatibility issues of the SPC; (3) to evaluate and define a transient liquid phase diffusion bonding (TLPDB) process for the SPC joints to the Udimet 720 heater head; and (4) to evaluate alternative (to the TLPDB) joining techniques. In the technology review, several aspects of the current Stirling design were examined including the power converter assembly process, materials joining, gas bearings, and heat exchangers. The supporting analyses included GLIMPS power converter simulation in support of the materials studies, and system level analysis in support of the technology review. The liquid metal compatibility study evaluated process parameters for use in the Stirling power converter. The alternative joining techniques study looked at the applicability of various joining techniques to the Stirling power converter requirements.

  9. TRANC - a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, O.; Brümmer, C.; Ammann, C.; Wolff, V.; Freibauer, A.

    2011-12-01

    The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (N) from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for the measurement of total reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter), which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen (Nr) compounds in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of total Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO) within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced N compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised N compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate N is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher N oxides or those originated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD) for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3-, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal and catalytic conversions to NO

  10. TRANC - a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, O.; Brümmer, C.; Ammann, C.; Wolff, V.; Freibauer, A.

    2012-05-01

    The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (reactive nitrogen: Nr) from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter), which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen compounds (∑Nr) in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of all Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO) within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced Nr compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised Nr compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate Nr is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher nitrogen oxides or those generated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD) for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3-, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in ∑Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all individual Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal and catalytic

  11. Catalytic, stereospecific syn-dichlorination of alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Alexander J.; Eey, Stanley T.-C.; Denmark, Scott E.

    2015-02-01

    As some of the oldest organic chemical reactions known, the ionic additions of elemental halogens such as bromine and chlorine to alkenes are prototypical examples of stereospecific reactions, typically delivering vicinal dihalides resulting from anti-addition. Although the invention of enantioselective variants is an ongoing challenge, the ability to overturn the intrinsic anti-diastereospecificity of these transformations is also a largely unsolved problem. Here, we describe the first catalytic, syn-stereospecific dichlorination of alkenes, employing a group transfer catalyst based on a redox-active main group element (selenium). With diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh) (5 mol%) as the pre-catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BnEt3NCl) as the chloride source and an N-fluoropyridinium salt as the oxidant, a wide variety of functionalized cyclic and acyclic 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, including simple allylic alcohols, deliver syn-dichlorides with exquisite stereocontrol. This methodology is expected to find applications in streamlining the synthesis of polychlorinated natural products such as the chlorosulfolipids.

  12. Catalytic, Stereospecific Syn-Dichlorination of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Alexander J.; Eey, Stanley T.-C.; Denmark, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    As some of the oldest organic chemical reactions known, the ionic additions of elemental halogens such as bromine and chlorine to alkenes are prototypical examples of stereospecific reactions, typically delivering vicinal dihalides resulting from anti-addition. Whilst the invention of enantioselective variants is an ongoing challenge, the ability to overturn the intrinsic anti-diastereospecificity of these transformations is also a largely unsolved problem. In this Article, we describe the first catalytic, syn-stereospecific dichlorination of alkenes, employing a group transfer catalyst based on a redox-active main group element (i.e., selenium). Thus, with diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh) (5 mol %) as the pre-catalyst, benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BnEt3NCl) as the chloride source, and an N-fluoropyridinium salt as the oxidant, a wide variety of functionalized cyclic and acyclic 1,2-disubstituted alkenes, including simple allylic alcohols, deliver syn-dichlorides with exquisite stereocontrol. This methodology is expected to find applications in streamlining the synthesis of polychlorinated natural products such as the chlorosulfolipids. PMID:25615668

  13. Topological entropy of catalytic sets: Hypercycles revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of catalytic networks have been widely studied over the last decades because of their implications in several fields like prebiotic evolution, virology, neural networks, immunology or ecology. One of the most studied mathematical bodies for catalytic networks was initially formulated in the context of prebiotic evolution, by means of the hypercycle theory. The hypercycle is a set of self-replicating species able to catalyze other replicator species within a cyclic architecture. Hypercyclic organization might arise from a quasispecies as a way to increase the informational containt surpassing the so-called error threshold. The catalytic coupling between replicators makes all the species to behave like a single and coherent evolutionary multimolecular unit. The inherent nonlinearities of catalytic interactions are responsible for the emergence of several types of dynamics, among them, chaos. In this article we begin with a brief review of the hypercycle theory focusing on its evolutionary implications as well as on different dynamics associated to different types of small catalytic networks. Then we study the properties of chaotic hypercycles with error-prone replication with symbolic dynamics theory, characterizing, by means of the theory of topological Markov chains, the topological entropy and the periods of the orbits of unimodal-like iterated maps obtained from the strange attractor. We will focus our study on some key parameters responsible for the structure of the catalytic network: mutation rates, autocatalytic and cross-catalytic interactions.

  14. Green Catalytic Process for Cyclic Carbonate Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xian-Dong; He, Liang-Nian

    2016-06-01

    As a renewable and abundant C1 resource possessing multiple attractive characteristics, such as low cost, nontoxicity, non-flammability, and easy accessibility, CO2 conversion into value-added chemicals and fuels can contribute to green chemistry and sustainable development. Since CO2 is a thermodynamically inert molecule, the activation of CO2 is pivotal for its effective conversion. In this regard, the formation of a transition-metal CO2 complex through direct coordination is one of the most powerful ways to induce the inert CO2 molecule to undergo chemical reactions. To date, numerous processes have been developed for efficient synthesis of cyclic carbonates from CO2 . On the basis of mechanistic understanding, we have developed efficient metal catalysts and green processes, including heterogeneous catalysis, and metal-free systems, such as ionic liquids, for cyclic carbonate synthesis. The big challenge is to develop catalysts that promote the reaction under low pressure (preferably at 1 bar). In this context, bifunctional catalysis is capable of synergistic activation of both the substrate and CO2 molecule, and thus, could render CO2 conversion smoothly under mild conditions. Alternatively, converting CO2 derivatives, that is, the captured CO2 as an activated species, would more easily take place at low pressure in comparison with gaseous CO2 . The aim of this Personal Account is to summarize versatile catalytic processes for cyclic carbonate synthesis from CO2 , including epoxide/CO2 coupling reaction, carboxylation of 1,2-diol with CO2 , oxidative cyclization of olefins with CO2 , condensation of vicinal halohydrin with CO2 , carboxylative cyclization of propargyl alcohols with CO2 , and conversion of the CO2 derivatives. PMID:27121768

  15. Metal hybrid nanoparticles for catalytic organic and photochemical transformations.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-17

    In order to understand heterogeneous catalytic reactions, model catalysts such as a single crystalline surface have been widely studied for many decades. However, catalytic systems that actually advance the reactions are three-dimensional and commonly have multiple components including active metal nanoparticles and metal oxide supports. On the other hand, as nanochemistry has rapidly been developed and been applied to various fields, many researchers have begun to discuss the impact of nanochemistry on heterogeneous catalysis. Metal hybrid nanoparticles bearing multiple components are structurally very close to the actual catalysts, and their uniform and controllable morphology is suitable for investigating the relationship between the structure and the catalytic properties in detail. In this Account, we introduce four typical structures of metal hybrid nanoparticles that can be used to conduct catalytic organic and photochemical reactions. Metal@silica (or metal oxide) yolk-shell nanoparticles, in which metal cores exist in internal voids surrounded by thin silica (or metal oxide) shells, exhibited extremely high thermal and chemical stability due to the geometrical protection of the silica layers against the metal cores. The morphology of the metal cores and the pore density of the hollow shells were precisely adjusted to optimize the reaction activity and diffusion rates of the reactants. Metal@metal oxide core-shell nanoparticles and inverted structures, where the cores supported the shells serving an active surface, exhibited high activity with no diffusion barriers for the reactants and products. These nanostructures were used as effective catalysts for various organic and gas-phase reactions, including hydrogen transfer, Suzuki coupling, and steam methane reforming. In contrast to the yolk- and core-shell structures, an asymmetric arrangement of distinct domains generated acentric dumbbells and tipped rods. A large domain of each component added multiple

  16. Hydrodynamic Performance of a Wave Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yingchen

    2010-11-01

    To harvest energy from ocean waves, a new wave energy converter (WEC) was proposed and tested in a wave tank. The WEC freely floats on the water surface and rides waves. It utilizes its wave-driven angular oscillation to convert the mechanical energy of waves into electricity. To gain the maximum possible angular oscillation of the WEC under specified wave conditions, both floatation of the WEC and wave interaction with the WEC play critical roles in a joint fashion. During the experiments, the submersion condition of the WEC and wave condition were varied. The results were analyzed in terms of the oscillation amplitude, stability, auto-orientation capability, and wave frequency dependency.

  17. WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter - SIMulator)

    2014-11-26

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) is a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model wave energy converters (WECs) when they are subject to operational waves. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/Simulink using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. In WEC-Sim, WECs are modeled by connecting rigid bodies to one another with joint or constraint blocks from the WEC-Sim library. WEC-Sim is a publicly available, open-sourcemore » code to model WECs.« less

  18. WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter - SIMulator)

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-26

    WEC-Sim (Wave Energy Converter SIMulator) is a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to model wave energy converters (WECs) when they are subject to operational waves. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/Simulink using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. In WEC-Sim, WECs are modeled by connecting rigid bodies to one another with joint or constraint blocks from the WEC-Sim library. WEC-Sim is a publicly available, open-source code to model WECs.

  19. Converting virtual community members into online buyers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumeet; Kim, Hee-Woong; Shin, Seon-Jin

    2010-10-01

    Although many online vendors have sponsored virtual communities (VCs) in the hope of reaping commercial benefits from it, not many have been successful in reaping commercial benefits from their VC. Online vendors can benefit greatly from having a VC, if the VC members can be converted into online buyers. This study examines the conversion of a VC member into an online buyer. Using a classical-conditioning approach, this study finds that members' committed participation in the VC is the springboard for online vendors to convert VC members into online buyers.

  20. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.